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  1. The use of contrast media in deceased kidney donors does not affect initial graft function or graft survival.

    PubMed

    Vigneau, C; Fulgencio, J-P; Godier, A; Chalem, Y; El Metaoua, S; Rondeau, E; Tuppin, P; Bonnet, F

    2006-09-01

    Patients receiving cadaveric kidney transplants often experience delayed graft function. As iodinated contrast media injection (ICMI), necessary for cerebral angiography, which is often used to diagnose brain death, can be nephrotoxic, we compared renal function recovery (RFR) and 1-year and long-term graft survival according to the method used to diagnose brain death. Data from 9921 cadaveric kidneys, transplanted between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2003, were retrieved from the French National Registry for organ donation. We defined RFR as the number of days for the recipient to reach a plasma creatinine less than 250 mumol/l, and/or a 24-h urine output greater than 1000 ml. RFR and 1-year and long-term graft survival were compared between four different donor groups (according to ICMI and diabetes mellitus). A total of 41.5% of deceased donors received ICMI before organ procurement and 1.95% of them were diabetic. History of ICMI or diabetes in the donor did not influence RFR or 1-year graft survival. Long-term graft survival was decreased in the group of patients transplanted with a diabetic graft as compared to patients transplanted with a non-diabetic graft (P=0.001). History of ICMI in the donor did not affect long-term graft survival in the non-diabetic donor group (P=0.2); however, in the diabetic group, ICMI tended to decrease long-term graft survival (P=0.056). ICMI did not affect RFR or graft survival in non-diabetic deceased donors. However, its use in diabetic deceased donors requires further study.

  2. The blind kidney: disorders affecting kidneys and eyes.

    PubMed

    Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Bockenhauer, Detlef

    2013-12-01

    There are many disorders that can affect both the kidneys and the eyes. Awareness of the ocular manifestations of kidney disorders is important as it can guide the diagnosis and facilitate the choice of a specific treatment. Conversely, ophthalmologists need to be aware of potential renal manifestations in disorders presenting initially with visual failure. We review disorders affecting both of these organ systems, based upon cases from our clinical practice to highlight the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration.

  3. Nocturnal Hypoxia and Loss of Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sofia B.; Ronksley, Paul E.; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Tsai, Willis H.; Manns, Braden J.; Tonelli, Marcello; Klarenbach, Scott W.; Chin, Rick; Clement, Fiona M.; Hanly, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is more common in patients with kidney disease, whether nocturnal hypoxia affects kidney function is unknown. Methods We studied all adult subjects referred for diagnostic testing of sleep apnea between July 2005 and December 31 2007 who had serial measurement of their kidney function. Nocturnal hypoxia was defined as oxygen saturation (SaO2) below 90% for ≥12% of the nocturnal monitoring time. The primary outcome, accelerated loss of kidney function, was defined as a decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥4 ml/min/1.73 m2 per year. Results 858 participants were included and followed for a mean study period of 2.1 years. Overall 374 (44%) had nocturnal hypoxia, and 49 (5.7%) had accelerated loss of kidney function. Compared to controls without hypoxia, patients with nocturnal hypoxia had a significant increase in the adjusted risk of accelerated kidney function loss (odds ratio (OR) 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25, 6.67). Conclusion Nocturnal hypoxia was independently associated with an increased risk of accelerated kidney function loss. Further studies are required to determine whether treatment and correction of nocturnal hypoxia reduces loss of kidney function. PMID:21559506

  4. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:23802624

  5. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  6. Ear length and kidney function decline after kidney donation.

    PubMed

    Katavetin, Pisut; Watanatorn, Salin; Townamchai, Natavudh; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Praditpornsilpa, Kearkiat

    2016-11-01

    The preservation of kidney function after kidney donation depends on the kidney reserve - the potential of the remaining kidney to boost their function after loss of the other kidney. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, size and shape of the external ears are examined to evaluate the person's kidney health. We hypothesized that ear size might be a practical yet overlooked marker of kidney reserve. Fifty kidney transplantation donors were participated in this study. The length and width of both ears of all participants were measured during one of the post-donation visits. Pre-donation serum creatinine and post-donation serum creatinine as well as other relevant parameters (age, sex, weight, height, etc.) of the participants were extracted from medical records. The estimated GFR was calculated from serum creatinine, age and sex using the CKD-EPI equation. Ear length negatively associated with %GFR decline after kidney donation. For every 1 cm increase in ear length, it was associated with 5.7% less GFR decline after kidney donation (95% Confidence Interval 0.2 to 11.3, P = 0.04). Ear width, as well as age, sex, body weight, height, body mass index, and pre-donation eGFR did not significantly associate with the GFR decline. Our findings support the notion of Traditional Chinese Medicine that ear morphology may be associated with kidney health and suggest that ear length might be a useful predictor of kidney function decline after kidney donation.

  7. [Kidney function and renal cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Izzedine, Hassan; Méjean, Arnaud; Escudier, Bernard

    2014-02-01

    Although radical nephrectomy is still practiced in many patients with large renal tumors, oncology and nephrology arguments for kidney-sparing approach for small renal masses has taken over this first. Indeed, partial nephrectomy provides equivalent oncologic results while preserving renal function and thereby limit morbidity and cardiovascular mortality related to chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients who develop kidney cancer often have medical comorbidities that may affect renal function, such as diabetes and hypertension. Histological examination of renal tissue adjacent to the tumor showed significant pathological changes in the majority of patients. For elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, active surveillance allows kidney-sparing approach with extremely low rates of progression and metastasis of cancer disease. Despite these significant advances in understanding for the treatment of small renal masses, partial nephrectomy remains underused. Better management must take into account the preservation of renal function in order to increase overall survival. A strategy for the systematic evaluation of renal function in patients with CR, with multidisciplinary staff (nephrologist urologist and oncologist), is therefore highly desirable.

  8. Mixed compared with single-source proteins in high-protein diets affect kidney structure and function differentially in obese fa/fa Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Devassy, Jessay G; Wojcik, Jennifer L; Ibrahim, Naser H M; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-02-01

    Questions remain regarding the potential negative effects of dietary high protein (HP) on kidney health, particularly in the context of obesity in which the risk for renal disease is already increased. To examine whether some of the variability in HP effects on kidney health may be due to source of protein, obese fa/fa Zucker rats were given HP (35% of energy from protein) diets containing either casein, soy protein, or a mixed source of animal and plant proteins for 12 weeks. Control lean and obese rats were given diets containing casein at normal protein (15% of energy from protein) levels. Body weight and blood pressure were measured, and markers of renal structural changes, damage, and function were assessed. Obesity alone resulted in mild renal changes, as evidenced by higher kidney weights, proteinuria, and glomerular volumes. In obese rats, increasing the protein level using the single, but not mixed, protein sources resulted in higher renal fibrosis compared with the lean rats. The mixed-protein HP group also had lower levels of serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, even though this diet further increased kidney and glomerular size. Soy and mixed-protein HP diets also resulted in a small number of damaged glomeruli, while soy compared with mixed-protein HP diet delayed the increase in blood pressure over time. Since obesity itself confers added risk of renal disease, an HP diet from mixed-protein sources that enables weight loss but has fewer risks to renal health may be advantageous.

  9. SIRT1 and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yi; Hao, Chuan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background SIRT1 is a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent deacetylase belonging to the class III histone deacetylases. Abundantly expressed in the kidney, especially in the renal medulla, SIRT1 is closely involved in renal physiology and pathology. Summary SIRT1 targets both histone and nonhistone proteins, participates in many important signaling pathways and mediates the regulation of longevity, metabolic homeostasis, acute stress response and DNA integrity. With regard to the kidney, SIRT1 attenuates diabetic albuminuria, reduces blood pressure and related cardiovascular diseases, resists acute kidney injury, delays kidney fibrogenesis, promotes cyst formation and benefits renal ageing. Key Messages This review summarizes the biology of SIRT1 and focuses on the latest studies concerning SIRT1 as a potential therapeutic target for kidney diseases. PMID:27536685

  10. Superparamagnetic iron oxide polyacrylic acid coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles do not affect kidney function but cause acute effect on the cardiovascular function in healthy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Nina K.; Frische, Sebastian; Thomsen, Karen; Laustsen, Christoffer; Pedersen, Michael; Hansen, Pernille B.L.; Bie, Peter; Fresnais, Jérome; Berret, Jean-Francois; Baatrup, Erik; Wang, Tobias

    2013-01-15

    This study describes the distribution of intravenously injected polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (10 mg kg{sup −1}) at the organ, cellular and subcellular levels in healthy BALB/cJ mice and in parallel addresses the effects of NP injection on kidney function, blood pressure and vascular contractility. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed accumulation of NPs in the liver within 1 h after intravenous infusion, accommodated by intracellular uptake in endothelial and Kupffer cells with subsequent intracellular uptake in renal cells, particularly the cytoplasm of the proximal tubule, in podocytes and mesangial cells. The renofunctional effects of NPs were evaluated by arterial acid–base status and measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after instrumentation with chronically indwelling catheters. Arterial pH was 7.46 ± 0.02 and 7.41 ± 0.02 in mice 0.5 h after injections of saline or NP, and did not change over the next 12 h. In addition, the injections of NP did not affect arterial PCO{sub 2} or [HCO{sub 3}{sup −}] either. Twenty-four and 96 h after NP injections, the GFR averaged 0.35 ± 0.04 and 0.35 ± 0.01 ml min{sup −1} g{sup −1}, respectively, values which were statistically comparable with controls (0.29 ± 0.02 and 0.33 ± 0.1 ml{sup –1} min{sup –1} 25 g{sup –1}). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased 12–24 h after NP injections (111.1 ± 11.5 vs 123.0 ± 6.1 min{sup −1}) associated with a decreased contractility of small mesenteric arteries revealed by myography to characterize endothelial function. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that accumulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles does not affect kidney function in healthy mice but temporarily decreases blood pressure. -- Highlights: ► PAA coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were injected intravenously into healthy mice. ► We examine the distribution and physiological effects of

  11. Allopurinol and kidney function: An update.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa K; Chapman, Peter T; Palmer, Suetonia C

    2016-01-01

    Allopurinol is the most commonly used urate lowering therapy in the management of gout. Despite the fact that it has been available for over 40 years there is ongoing debate about optimal allopurinol dosing in gout patients with chronic kidney disease. Given that gout is common in patients with renal impairment, clinicians need to be aware of the relationships between serum urate and kidney function as well as the effects of allopurinol on kidney function and vice versa. The use of allopurinol in patients on dialysis is an understudied area. Dialysis reduces plasma oxypurinol concentrations, therefore the dose and time of administration in relationship to dialysis need to be carefully considered. Recently, it has been suggested that there may be a role for allopurinol in patients with chronic kidney disease without gout. Observational studies have reported an association between serum urate and chronic kidney disease and end stage renal failure. The effect of urate lowering therapy with allopurinol on progression of kidney disease has been examined in small studies with varying results. Larger clinical trials are currently underway. This review will examine the relationships between allopurinol and kidney function in adults with and without renal disease and address allopurinol dosing in gout patients with impaired kidney function.

  12. Biomarkers in chronic kidney disease, from kidney function to kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Giacoman, Salvador; Madero, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) typically evolves over many years, with a long latent period when the disease is clinically silent and therefore diagnosis, evaluation and treatment is based mainly on biomarkers that assess kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) remains the ideal marker of kidney function. Unfortunately measuring GFR is time consuming and therefore GFR is usually estimated from equations that take into account endogenous filtration markers like serum creatinine (SCr) and cystatin C (CysC). Other biomarkers such as albuminuria may precede kidney function decline and have demonstrated to have strong associations with disease progression and outcomes. New potential biomarkers have arisen with the promise of detecting kidney damage prior to the currently used markers. The aim of this review is to discuss the utility of the GFR estimating equations and biomarkers in CKD and the different clinical settings where these should be applied. The CKD-Epidemiology Collaboration equation performs better than the modification of diet in renal disease equation, especially at GFR above 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2. Equations combining CysC and SCr perform better than the equations using either CysC or SCr alone and are recommended in situations where CKD needs to be confirmed. Combining creatinine, CysC and urine albumin to creatinine ratio improves risk stratification for kidney disease progression and mortality. Kidney injury molecule and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin are considered reasonable biomarkers in urine and plasma to determine severity and prognosis of CKD. PMID:25664247

  13. Biologically active extracts with kidney affections applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu (Neagu), Mihaela; Pascu, Daniela-Elena; Cozea, Andreea; Bunaciu, Andrei A.; Miron, Alexandra Raluca; Nechifor, Cristina Aurelia

    2015-12-01

    This paper is aimed to select plant materials rich in bioflavonoid compounds, made from herbs known for their application performances in the prevention and therapy of renal diseases, namely kidney stones and urinary infections (renal lithiasis, nephritis, urethritis, cystitis, etc.). This paper presents a comparative study of the medicinal plant extracts composition belonging to Ericaceae-Cranberry (fruit and leaves) - Vaccinium vitis-idaea L. and Bilberry (fruit) - Vaccinium myrtillus L. Concentrated extracts obtained from medicinal plants used in this work were analyzed from structural, morphological and compositional points of view using different techniques: chromatographic methods (HPLC), scanning electronic microscopy, infrared, and UV spectrophotometry, also by using kinetic model. Liquid chromatography was able to identify the specific compounds of the Ericaceae family, present in all three extracts, arbutosid, as well as specific components of each species, mostly from the class of polyphenols. The identification and quantitative determination of the active ingredients from these extracts can give information related to their therapeutic effects.

  14. Sexual function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Anantharaman, Priya; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2007-04-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and lead to sexual dysfunction, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and altered mineral metabolism. Common clinical problems include disturbances in menstruation in women, erectile dysfunction in men, and decreased libido and infertility in both sexes. Organic factors tend to be prominent and are related to uremia and other comorbid illnesses. Psychological factors and depression may exacerbate the primary problem. Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are seen early in CKD and tend to worsen after patients start dialysis. Hypogonadism plays a dominant role in male sexual function, whereas changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function predominate in female sexual dysfunction. In patients on dialysis, treatment strategies include optimizing dose of dialysis, correction of anemia with erythropoietin, and correction of hyperparathyroidism. Successful kidney transplantation may restore normal sexual function, especially in younger patients.

  15. Chromatin dynamics in kidney development and function.

    PubMed

    Bechtel-Walz, Wibke; Huber, Tobias B

    2014-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are fundamental key features of developing cells connecting developmental regulatory factors to chromatin modification. Changes in the environment during renal development can have long-lasting effects on the permanent tissue structure and the level of expression of important functional genes. These changes are believed to contribute to kidney disease occurrence and progression. Although the mechanisms of early patterning and cell fate have been well described for renal development, little is known about associated epigenetic modifications and their impact on how genes interact to specify the renal epithelial cells of nephrons and how this specification is relevant to maintaining normal renal function. A better understanding of the renal cell-specific epigenetic modifications and the interaction of different cell types to form this highly complex organ will not only help to better understand developmental defects and early loss of kidney function in children, but also help to understand and improve chronic disease progression, cell regeneration and renal aging.

  16. Aquaporins in avian kidneys: function and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Hiroko; Yang, Yimu

    2013-12-01

    For terrestrial vertebrates, water economy is a prerequisite for survival, and the kidney is their major osmoregulatory organ. Birds are the only vertebrates other than mammals that can concentrate urine in adaptation to terrestrial environments. Aquaporin (AQP) and glyceroporin (GLP) are phylogenetically old molecules and have been found in plants, microbial organisms, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Currently, 13 AQPs/aquaGLPs and isoforms are known to be present in mammals. AQPs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11 are expressed in the kidney; of these, AQPs 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7 are shown to be involved in fluid homeostasis. In avian kidneys, AQPs 1, 2, 3, and 4 have been identified and characterized. Also, gene and/or amino acid sequences of AQP5, AQP7, AQP8, AQP9, AQP11, and AQP12 have been reported in birds. AQPs 2 and 3 are expressed along cortical and medullary collecting ducts (CDs) and are responsible, respectively, for the water inflow and outflow of CD epithelial cells. While AQP4 plays an important role in water exit in the CD of mammalian kidneys, it is unlikely to participate in water outflow in avian CDs. This review summarizes current knowledge on structure and function of avian AQPs and compares them to those in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Also, we aim to provide input into, and perspectives on, the role of renal AQPs in body water homeostasis during ontogenic and phylogenetic advancement.

  17. Delayed Graft Function 5 Months After Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Tim; Pries, Alexandra; Kapischke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Delayed kidney graft function Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Living donor kidney transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Delayed graft function is a clinical term to describe the failure of the transplanted kidney to function immediately after transplantation. Case Report: A 59-year-old woman suffered from a rare case of delayed graft function lasting 148 days after unrelated living donor kidney transplantation. Until now, 15 years after transplantation, organ function is still good, with serum creatinine levels about 1.4 to 2.0 mg/dl. Conclusions: Even after prolonged graft dysfunction, good graft function can be achieved. PMID:26915643

  18. Effects of Reduced Kidney Function Because of Living Kidney Donation on Left Ventricular Mass.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Ursula; Böger, Carsten A; Farkas, Stefan; Mack, Matthias; Luchner, Andreas; Hamer, Okka W; Zeman, Florian; Debl, Kurt; Fellner, Claudia; Jungbauer, Carsten; Banas, Bernhard; Buchner, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Living kidney donation is associated with a small but significant increase in cardiovascular mortality. In addition, mildly decreased kidney function is associated with an increase of left ventricular mass and with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. To investigate this association, we evaluated the impact of mildly decreased kidney function after living kidney donation on subclinical cardiac structural and functional changes. In this prospective cohort study, cardiac and renal magnetic resonance imaging and laboratory analyses were performed in 23 living kidney donors (mean age 54±10 years, 52% male) before donation and at 4 and 12 months after nephrectomy. Mean estimated glomerular filtration rate was 102±15 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2) before donation and 70±13 mL min(-1) 1.73 m(-2) at 12 months (P<0.001). Left ventricular mass increased from 112±22 to 115±23 g (P<0.001). In addition, heart rate was significantly increased (65±7 to 74±14; P=0.04). Concurrently, kidney and adrenal gland volume increased from 163±33 to 195±34 mL (P<0.001) and from 7.6±2.2 to 8.4±2.4 mL (P=0.032), respectively, as did procollagen type III (Δ0.11 ng/mL, P<0.001) and not N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (Δ14 pg/mL, P=0.25). The mild decrease in kidney function after living kidney donation leads to a significant but clinically negligible increase in left ventricular mass 12 months after living kidney donation. This study of a longitudinal analysis of living kidney donors provides direct evidence of a kidney-heart link.

  19. Effects of feline hyperthyroidism on kidney function: a review.

    PubMed

    Vaske, Heather H; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Grauer, Gregory F

    2016-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease and hyperthyroidism are two commonly diagnosed conditions in the geriatric feline population, and are often seen concurrently. Management of both diseases is recommended; however, the physiologic implications of both diseases must be understood to ensure the most favorable outcome for each patient. This report reviews the complex interplay between hyperthyroidism and kidney function, as well as the effects of hyperthyroid therapy on kidney function.

  20. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease in man

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk JG; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Smith, George Davey; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; van der Heide, Jaap J Homan; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc AJ; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael JE; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner., Jaspal S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the result of permanent loss of kidney function, is a major global problem. We identify common genetic variants at chr2p12-p13, chr6q26, chr17q23 and chr19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P=10−10 to 10−15). SNPs rs10206899 (near NAT8, chr2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, chr19q13) were also associated with CKD. Our findings provide new insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to CKD. PMID:20383145

  1. Influence of low-level laser radiation on kidney functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.

    1998-12-01

    Most of all renal diseases are accompanied by lowering of kidney functions. That makes the quality of the treatment worse. On an example 69 patients receiving Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT), the influence of the laser radiation on a contracting system of blood, on current of an active and inactive tubercular inflammation and on partial functions of kidneys were investigated. Is established, that LLLT does not render influence to a contracting system; promotes stopping of unspecific and moderate peaking of a specific inflammation of kidneys. Is proved, that after a rate of laserotherapy the improving of a blood micricirculation in kidney occurs in 57.9% of patients; a secretion - in 63.1% of the patients; a stimulation of urodynamic is fixed in 79% of cases. Magnification of diuresis, improving filtration and concentration functions of kidneys also is marked.

  2. Biosignals analysis for kidney function effect analysis of fennel aromatherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong-Hyun; Cho, Dong-Uk; Seo, Ssang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Human effort in order to enjoy a healthy life is diverse. IT technology to these analyzes, the results of development efforts, it has been applied. Therefore, I use the care and maintenance diagnostic health management and prevention than treatment. In particular, the aromatherapy treatment easy to use without the side effects there is no irritation, are widely used in modern society. In this paper, we measured the aroma effect by applying a biosignal analysis techniques; an experiment was performed to analyze. In particular, we design methods and processes of research based on the theory aroma that affect renal function. Therefore, in this paper, measuring the biosignals and after fennel aromatherapy treatment prior to the enforcement of the mutual comparison, through the analysis, studies were carried out to analyze the effect of fennel aromatherapy therapy on kidney function.

  3. Assessment of kidney function in preterm infants: lifelong implications.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Carolyn L; DeFreitas, Marissa J; Strauss, José

    2016-12-01

    This educational review will highlight the historical and contemporary references that establish a basic understanding of measurements of kidney function in the neonate and its relevance for the life of an individual. Importantly, the differential renal function of preterm infants relative to term infants has become paramount with the increased viability of preterm infants and the realization that kidney function is associated with gestational age. Moreover, neonatal kidney function is primarily associated with absolute renal mass and hemodynamic stability. Neonatal kidney function and its early developmental progression predict lifelong cardiovascular and renal disease risks. Validation of estimation equations of kidney function in this population has provided important reference data for other investigations and a clinical basis for prospective and longitudinal follow-up. Future research should be directed towards a better understanding of surrogate markers of kidney function from infancy through adulthood. Pediatric nephrologists should be aware of the developmental aspects of kidney function including the importance of the congenital nephron endowment and the preservation of kidney function throughout a lifetime. • Nephrogenesis occurs in utero in concert with other organ systems by branching morphogenesis, including the lungs, pancreas, and vascular tree, with over 60 % of nephrons being formed during the last trimester. • Infants born preterm before 36 weeks' gestation are in active nephrogenesis and are at increased risk of having a decreased nephron endowment from prenatal and postnatal genetic and epigenetic hazards that will impact the patient for a lifetime. • Post-natal adaptation of kidney function is directly proportional to the number of perfused nephrons, estimated by total kidney volume (TKV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and gestational age. • Accurate measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in infants is problematic due to the

  4. Adaptive functional change of the contralateral kidney after partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Se Young; Yoo, Sangjun; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Song, Cheryn; Hong, Bumsik; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Ahn, Hanjong; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-04-12

    Partial nephrectomy aims to maintain renal function by nephron sparing; however, functional changes in the contralateral kidney remain unknown. We evaluate the functional change in the contralateral kidney using a diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) renal scan and determine factors predicting contralateral kidney function after partial nephrectomy. A total of 699 patients underwent partial nephrectomy, with a DTPA scan before and after surgery to assess the separate function of each kidney. Patients were divided into three groups according to initial contralateral glomerular filtration rate (GFR; group 1: <30 ml/min/1.73 m2, group 2: 30-45 ml/min/1.73 m2, and group 3: ≧45 ml/min/1.73 m2). Multiple regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with increased GFR of the contralateral kidney over a 4 year postoperative period. Patients in group 1 had a higher mean age and hypertension history, worse American Society of Anesthesiologists score, and larger tumor size than in the other two groups. The ipsilateral GFR changes at 4 years after partial nephrectomy were -18.9%, -3.6%, and 3.9% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, while the contralateral GFR changes were 10.8%, 25.7%, and 38.8%. Age (Beta: -0.105, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.213; -0.011 p<0.05) and preoperative contralateral GFR (Beta: -0.256, 95% CI: -0.332; -0.050 p<0.01) were significant predictive factors for increased GFR of the contralateral kidney after 4 years. The contralateral kidney compensated for the functional loss of the ipsilateral kidney. The increase of GFR in contralateral kidney is more prominent in younger patients with decreased contralateral renal function.

  5. Structural and Functional Changes With the Aging Kidney.

    PubMed

    Denic, Aleksandar; Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Senescence or normal physiologic aging portrays the expected age-related changes in the kidney as compared to a disease that occurs in some but not all individuals. The microanatomical structural changes of the kidney with older age include a decreased number of functional glomeruli from an increased prevalence of nephrosclerosis (arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and tubular atrophy with interstitial fibrosis), and to some extent, compensatory hypertrophy of remaining nephrons. Among the macroanatomical structural changes, older age associates with smaller cortical volume, larger medullary volume until middle age, and larger and more numerous kidney cysts. Among carefully screened healthy kidney donors, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) declines at a rate of 6.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) per decade. There is reason to be concerned that the elderly are being misdiagnosed with CKD. Besides this expected kidney function decline, the lowest risk of mortality is at a GFR of ≥75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for age <55 years but at a lower GFR of 45 to 104 mL/min/1.73 m(2) for age ≥65 years. Changes with normal aging are still of clinical significance. The elderly have less kidney functional reserve when they do actually develop CKD, and they are at higher risk for acute kidney injury.

  6. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution, which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped track the fate and function (e.g., cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic, rather than static, nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting-edge area of kidney research.

  7. Challenges for environmental epidemiology research: are biomarker concentrations altered by kidney function or urine concentration adjustment?

    PubMed

    Weaver, Virginia M; Kotchmar, Dennis J; Fadrowski, Jeffrey J; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2016-01-01

    Biomonitoring has become a standard approach for exposure assessment in occupational and environmental epidemiology. The use of biological effect markers to identify early adverse changes in target organs has also become widely adopted. However, the potential for kidney function to affect biomarker levels in the body and the optimal approach to adjustment of biomarker concentrations in spot urine samples for hydration status are two important but underappreciated challenges associated with biomarker use. Several unexpected findings, such as positive associations between urine nephrotoxicant levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), have been reported recently in research using biomarkers. These and other findings, discussed herein, suggest an impact of kidney glomerular filtration or tubule processing on biomarker levels. This is more commonly raised in the context of decreased kidney filtration, traditionally referred to as reverse causality; however, recent data suggest that populations with normal kidney filtration may be affected as well. Misclassification bias would result if biomarkers reflect kidney function as well as either exposures or early biological effect outcomes. Furthermore, urine biomarker associations with eGFR that differ markedly by approach used to adjust for urine concentration have been reported. Associations between urine measures commonly used for this adjustment, such as urine creatinine, and specific research outcomes could alter observed biomarker associations with outcomes. Research recommendations to address the potential impact of kidney function and hydration status adjustment on biomarkers are provided, including a range of approaches to study design, exposure and outcome assessment, and adjustment for urine concentration.

  8. Variation in Cancer Incidence among Patients with ESRD during Kidney Function and Nonfunction Intervals.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Clarke, Christina A; Snyder, Jon J; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Engels, Eric A

    2016-05-01

    Among patients with ESRD, cancer risk is affected by kidney dysfunction and by immunosuppression after transplant. Assessing patterns across periods of dialysis and kidney transplantation may inform cancer etiology. We evaluated 202,195 kidney transplant candidates and recipients from a linkage between the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients and cancer registries, and compared incidence in kidney function intervals (time with a transplant) with incidence in nonfunction intervals (waitlist or time after transplant failure), adjusting for demographic factors. Incidence of infection-related and immune-related cancer was higher during kidney function intervals than during nonfunction intervals. Incidence was most elevated for Kaposi sarcoma (hazard ratio [HR], 9.1; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 4.7 to 18), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.8 to 3.7), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 5.3), lip cancer (HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 6.0), and nonepithelial skin cancers (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.5 to 5.8). Conversely, ESRD-related cancer incidence was lower during kidney function intervals (kidney cancer: HR, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.7 to 0.8 and thyroid cancer: HR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.6 to 0.8). With each successive interval, incidence changed in alternating directions for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and lung, pancreatic, and nonepithelial skin cancers (higher during function intervals), and kidney and thyroid cancers (higher during nonfunction intervals). For many cancers, incidence remained higher than in the general population across all intervals. These data indicate strong short-term effects of kidney dysfunction and immunosuppression on cancer incidence in patients with ESRD, suggesting a need for persistent cancer screening and prevention.

  9. Musculoskeletal Health, Kidney and Liver Function in Retired Jockeys.

    PubMed

    Cullen, S; Donohoe, A; McGoldrick, A; McCaffrey, N; Davenport, C; Byrne, B; Donaghy, C; Tormey, W; Smith, D; Warrington, G

    2015-11-01

    The long-term implications of making-weight daily on musculoskeletal health and functioning of the kidney and liver remain unknown. This study aimed to investigate musculoskeletal health and kidney and liver function in a group of retired jockeys. 28 retired male jockeys (age 50-70 years) provided fasting blood samples for markers of bone metabolism and kidney and liver function. A dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan was performed for the assessment of bone mineral density (BMD). Established reference ranges were used for interpretation of results. Comparisons were made between retired jockeys based on the professional racing licence held: Flat, National Hunt or Dual. Mean whole-body osteopenia was reported, with no differences between groups. Bone markers, micronutrients, electrolytes and associated hormones, and markers for kidney and liver function were within clinical normative ranges. No differences existed between groups. Results indicate the retired jockeys in this study do not demonstrate compromised bone health or kidney and liver function. However, the retired jockeys may not have undergone chronic weight cycling in the extreme manner evident in present-day jockeys, indicating the next generation of jockeys may face more of a problem. Jockeys should be tracked longitudinally throughout their racing career and beyond.

  10. Multiple kidney cysts in thin basement membrane disease with proteinuria and kidney function impairment

    PubMed Central

    Sevillano, Angel M.; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Morales, Enrique; Hernandez, Eduardo; Molina, Maria; Gonzalez, Ester; Praga, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Some patients with thin basement membrane disease (TBMD) develop proteinuria, hypertension and different degrees of CKD, besides the persistent microhaematuria characteristic of the disease. Little is known about factors associated with this unfavourable outcome. Methods We reviewed clinical, pathological and radiological features of 32 patients with biopsy-proven TBMD. Patients were divided in two groups: those with persistent normal kidney function and negative or minimal proteinuria (n = 16) and those with persistent proteinuria >0.5 g/day (n = 16). Results Patients with proteinuria had a worse kidney function at baseline than those with negative proteinuria. Global or segmental glomerulosclerosis, together with interstitial fibrosis, was found in 37% of patients with proteinuria. All proteinuric patients were treated with renin–angiotensin system blockers. At the end of follow-up (198 months in proteinuric patients and 210 months in patients with negative proteinuria) the prevalence of hypertension was 68% in proteinuric patients (12% at baseline), compared with 12 and 6%, respectively, in non-proteinuric patients. A slow decline of renal function was observed in proteinuric patients, although no patient developed end-stage kidney disease. Ultrasound studies showed bilateral kidney cysts in nine patients (56%) with proteinuria. Cysts were bilateral and countless in six patients, and bilateral but with a limited number of cysts in the three remaining patients. No cysts were found in patients with negative proteinuria. Conclusions Some patients with TBMD develop hypertension, proteinuria and CKD. Multiple bilateral kidney cysts were found in a majority (56%) of these patients. Further studies are needed to investigate the pathogenesis and the influence on long-term outcome of this TBMD-associated multiple kidney cysts. PMID:25852885

  11. Renal functional reserve and renal recovery after acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aashish; Mucino, Marìa Jimena; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Renal functional reserve (RFR) represents the capacity of the kidney to increase glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in response to certain physiological or pathological stimuli or conditions. Once baseline GFR is determined, RFR can be assessed clinically after an oral protein load or intravenous amino acid infusion. In clinical practice, baseline GFR displays variable levels due to diet or other factors. RFR is the difference between peak 'stress' GFR induced by the test (p.o. or i.v.) and the baseline GFR. In clinical scenarios where hyperfiltration is present (high baseline GFR due to pregnancy, hypertension or diabetic nephropathy, in solitary kidney or kidney donors), RFR may be fully or partially used to achieve normal or supranormal renal function. Since commonly used renal function markers, such as GFR, may remain within normal ranges until 50% of nephrons are lost or in patients with a single remnant kidney, the RFR test may represent a sensitive and early way to assess the functional decline in the kidney. RFR assessment may become an important tool to evaluate the ability of the kidney to recover completely or partially after a kidney attack. In case of healing with a defect and progressive fibrosis, recovery may appear complete clinically, but a reduced RFR may be a sign of a maladaptive repair or subclinical loss of renal mass. Thus, a reduction in RFR may represent the equivalent of renal frailty or susceptibility to insults. The main aim of this article is to review the concept of RFR, its utility in different clinical scenarios, and future perspective for its use.

  12. Associations of deceased donor kidney injury with kidney discard and function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hall, I E; Schröppel, B; Doshi, M D; Ficek, J; Weng, F L; Hasz, R D; Thiessen-Philbrook, H; Reese, P P; Parikh, C R

    2015-06-01

    Deceased donor kidneys with acute kidney injury (AKI) are often discarded due to fear of poor outcomes. We performed a multicenter study to determine associations of AKI (increasing admission-to-terminal serum creatinine by AKI Network stages) with kidney discard, delayed graft function (DGF) and 6-month estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In 1632 donors, kidney discard risk increased for AKI stages 1, 2 and 3 (compared to no AKI) with adjusted relative risks of 1.28 (1.08-1.52), 1.82 (1.45-2.30) and 2.74 (2.0-3.75), respectively. Adjusted relative risk for DGF also increased by donor AKI stage: 1.27 (1.09-1.49), 1.70 (1.37-2.12) and 2.25 (1.74-2.91), respectively. Six-month eGFR, however, was similar across AKI categories but was lower for recipients with DGF (48 [interquartile range: 31-61] vs. 58 [45-75] ml/min/1.73m(2) for no DGF, p < 0.001). There was significant favorable interaction between donor AKI and DGF such that 6-month eGFR was progressively better for DGF kidneys with increasing donor AKI (46 [29-60], 49 [32-64], 52 [36-59] and 58 [39-71] ml/min/1.73m(2) for no AKI, stage 1, 2 and 3, respectively; interaction p = 0.05). Donor AKI is associated with kidney discard and DGF, but given acceptable 6-month allograft function, clinicians should consider cautious expansion into this donor pool.

  13. Urinary Markers of Kidney Injury and Kidney Function Decline in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Scherzer, Rebecca; Abraham, Alison; Tien, Phyllis C.; Grunfeld, Carl; Peralta, Carmen A.; Devarajan, Prasad; Bennett, Michael; Butch, Anthony W.; Anastos, Kathryn; Cohen, Mardge H.; Nowicki, Marek; Sharma, Anjali; Young, Mary A.; Sarnak, Mark J.; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected persons have substantially higher risk of kidney failure than persons without HIV, but serum creatinine levels are insensitive for detecting declining kidney function. We hypothesized that urine markers of kidney injury would be associated with declining kidney function among HIV-infected women. Methods In the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS), we measured concentrations of albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), interleukin-18 (IL-18), kidney injury marker-1 (KIM-1), and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) from stored urine among 908 HIV-infected and 289 uninfected participants. Primary analyses used cystatin C based estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD-EPI eGFRcys) as the outcome, measured at baseline and two follow-up visits over eight years; secondary analyses used creatinine (CKD-EPI eGFRcr). Each urine biomarker was categorized into tertiles, and kidney decline was modeled with both continuous and dichotomized outcomes. Results Compared with the lowest tertiles, the highest tertiles of ACR (−0.15ml/min/1.73m2, p<0.0001), IL-18 (−0.09ml/min/1.73m2, p<0.0001) and KIM-1 (−0.06ml/min/1.73m2, p<0.001) were independently associated with faster eGFRcys decline after multivariate adjustment including all three biomarkers among HIV-infected women. Among these biomarkers, only IL-18 was associated with each dichotomized eGFRcys outcome: ≥3% (Relative Risk 1.40; 95%CI 1.04-1.89); ≥5% (1.88; 1.30-2.71); and ≥10% (2.16; 1.20-3.88) for the highest versus lowest tertile. In alternative models using eGFRcr, the high tertile of KIM-1 had independent associations with 5% (1.71; 1.25-2.33) and 10% (1.78; 1.07-2.96) decline, and the high IL-18 tertile with 10% decline (1.97; 1.00-3.87). Conclusions Among HIV-infected women in the WIHS cohort, novel urine markers of kidney injury detect risk for subsequent declines in kidney function. PMID:23023103

  14. Berberine improves kidney function in diabetic mice via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Sun, Li-Na; Nie, Hui-Bin; Wang, Xue-Ling; Guan, Guang-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Effective therapies to prevent the development of this disease are required. Berberine (BBR) has several preventive effects on diabetes and its complications. However, the molecular mechanism of BBR on kidney function in diabetes is not well defined. Here, we reported that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is required for BBR-induced improvement of kidney function in vivo. AMPK phosphorylation and activity, productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), kidney function including serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine clearance (Ccr), and urinary protein excretion, morphology of glomerulus were determined in vitro or in vivo. Exposure of cultured human glomerulus mesangial cells (HGMCs) to BBR time- or dose-dependently activates AMPK by increasing the thr172 phosphorylation and its activities. Inhibition of LKB1 by siRNA or mutant abolished BBR-induced AMPK activation. Incubation of cells with high glucose (HG, 30 mM) markedly induced the oxidative stress of HGMCs, which were abolished by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, AMPK gene overexpression or BBR. Importantly, the effects induced by BBR were bypassed by AMPK siRNA transfection in HG-treated HGMCs. In animal studies, streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia dramatically promoted glomerulosclerosis and impaired kidney function by increasing serum BUN, urinary protein excretion, and decreasing Ccr, as well as increased oxidative stress. Administration of BBR remarkably improved kidney function in wildtype mice but not in AMPKα2-deficient mice. We conclude that AMPK activation is required for BBR to improve kidney function in diabetic mice.

  15. Novel in vivo techniques to visualize kidney anatomy and function

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János; Kidokoro, Kengo; Riquier-Brison, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Intravital imaging using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become an increasingly popular and widely used experimental technique in kidney research over the past few years. MPM allows deep optical sectioning of the intact, living kidney tissue with submicron resolution which is unparalleled among intravital imaging approaches. MPM has solved a long-standing critical technical barrier in renal research to study several complex and inaccessible cell types and anatomical structures in vivo in their native environment. Comprehensive and quantitative kidney structure and function MPM studies helped our better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the healthy and diseased kidney. This review summarizes recent in vivo MPM studies with a focus on the glomerulus and the filtration barrier, although select, glomerulus-related renal vascular and tubular functions are also mentioned. The latest applications of serial MPM of the same glomerulus in vivo, in the intact kidney over several days, during the progression of glomerular disease are discussed. This visual approach, in combination with genetically encoded fluorescent markers of cell lineage, has helped to track the fate and function (e.g. cell calcium changes) of single podocytes during the development of glomerular pathologies, and provided visual proof for the highly dynamic rather than static nature of the glomerular environment. Future intravital imaging applications have the promise to further push the limits of optical microscopy, and to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of kidney injury. Also, MPM will help to study new mechanisms of tissue repair and regeneration, a cutting edge area of kidney research. PMID:25738253

  16. Sodium nitrite protects against kidney injury induced by brain death and improves post-transplant function.

    PubMed

    Kelpke, Stacey S; Chen, Bo; Bradley, Kelley M; Teng, Xinjun; Chumley, Phillip; Brandon, Angela; Yancey, Brett; Moore, Brandon; Head, Hughston; Viera, Liliana; Thompson, John A; Crossman, David K; Bray, Molly S; Eckhoff, Devin E; Agarwal, Anupam; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-08-01

    Renal injury induced by brain death is characterized by ischemia and inflammation, and limiting it is a therapeutic goal that could improve outcomes in kidney transplantation. Brain death resulted in decreased circulating nitrite levels and increased infiltrating inflammatory cell infiltration into the kidney. Since nitrite stimulates nitric oxide signaling in ischemic tissues, we tested whether nitrite therapy was beneficial in a rat model of brain death followed by kidney transplantation. Nitrite, administered over 2 h of brain death, blunted the increased inflammation without affecting brain death-induced alterations in hemodynamics. Kidneys were transplanted after 2 h of brain death and renal function followed over 7 days. Allografts collected from nitrite-treated brain-dead rats showed significant improvement in function over the first 2 to 4 days after transplantation compared with untreated brain-dead animals. Gene microarray analysis after 2 h of brain death without or with nitrite therapy showed that the latter significantly altered the expression of about 400 genes. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that multiple signaling pathways were affected by nitrite, including those related to hypoxia, transcription, and genes related to humoral immune responses. Thus, nitrite therapy attenuates brain death-induced renal injury by regulating responses to ischemia and inflammation, ultimately leading to better post-transplant kidney function.

  17. Effect of Kidney Function on Drug Kinetics and Dosing in Neonates, Infants, and Children.

    PubMed

    Rodieux, Frederique; Wilbaux, Melanie; van den Anker, Johannes N; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Neonates, infants, and children differ from adults in many aspects, not just in age, weight, and body composition. Growth, maturation and environmental factors affect drug kinetics, response and dosing in pediatric patients. Almost 80% of drugs have not been studied in children, and dosing of these drugs is derived from adult doses by adjusting for body weight/size. As developmental and maturational changes are complex processes, such simplified methods may result in subtherapeutic effects or adverse events. Kidney function is impaired during the first 2 years of life as a result of normal growth and development. Reduced kidney function during childhood has an impact not only on renal clearance but also on absorption, distribution, metabolism and nonrenal clearance of drugs. 'Omics'-based technologies, such as proteomics and metabolomics, can be leveraged to uncover novel markers for kidney function during normal development, acute kidney injury, and chronic diseases. Pharmacometric modeling and simulation can be applied to simplify the design of pediatric investigations, characterize the effects of kidney function on drug exposure and response, and fine-tune dosing in pediatric patients, especially in those with impaired kidney function. One case study of amikacin dosing in neonates with reduced kidney function is presented. Collaborative efforts between clinicians and scientists in academia, industry, and regulatory agencies are required to evaluate new renal biomarkers, collect and share prospective pharmacokinetic, genetic and clinical data, build integrated pharmacometric models for key drugs, optimize and standardize dosing strategies, develop bedside decision tools, and enhance labels of drugs utilized in neonates, infants, and children.

  18. Effect of Nigella sativa on the kidney function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dollah, Mohammad Aziz; Parhizkar, Saadat; Izwan, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is an amazing herb which is used in traditional medicine for a wide range of illnesses including bronchial asthma, dysentery, gastrointestinal problems, as well as beneficial effect on blood lipids, lowering blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and triglycerides level. This study aimed to determine the toxic effect of N. sativa powder on the kidney function which was evaluated by serum urea and creatinine and through histopathological examination of kidney tissue. Methods and Materials: In this study, 24 male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups (six each). The rats were kept in the separate cage with three rats per cage. The treatment groups were given rat pellet containing N. sativa dose at 0.01, 0.10, and 1.00 g/kg body weight which were considered as low, normal, and high dose for five weeks while control group fed with rat chow pellet without supplementation. At the end of 35 days, the rats were sacrificed to take the blood sample and to remove the kidney organ for toxicity evaluation. Statistical analyses were done through one-way ANOVA using SPSS. Results: The finding revealed that there was no significant difference in serum urea of treatment groups compared with the control group. The results showed a significant decline in serum creatinine of high dose of Nigella sativa treated compared with low dose treated and control groups (p<0.05). Histopathological examination of kidney tissue showed normal kidney architecture with no tissue degeneration, inflammation, necrosis, and tubular dilation in all groups. Conclusion: With the evidence of normal urea and creatinine level in blood and normal kidney tissue in histology examination for all treatment groups, it is suggested that there is no toxic effect on kidney function of Nigella sativa at different doses for five-week period. PMID:25050269

  19. Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium

    PubMed Central

    Köttgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Böger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Glazer, Nicole L.; Parsa, Afshin; Gao, Xiaoyi; Yang, Qiong; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Li, Man; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Isaacs, Aaron; Ketkar, Shamika; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Paré, Guillaume; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Zeller, Tanja; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Tönjes, Anke; Hayward, Caroline; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore; Harris, Tamara B.; Rapmersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Struchalin, Maksim; Cavalieri, Margherita; Singleton, Andrew; Giallauria, Francesco; Metter, Jeffery; de Boer, Ian; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Oostra, Ben A.; Feitosa, Mary; Province, Michael; Levy, Daniel; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Wilde, Sandra; Muenzel, Thomas F.; Leak, Tennille S; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Koenig, Wolfgang; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Minelli, Cosetta; Hu, Frank B.; Johansson, Åsa; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Nitsch, Dorothea; Brandstätter, Anita; Kollerits, Barbara; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Mägi, Reedik; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Boban, Mladen; Campbell, Susan; Endlich, Karlhans; Völzke, Henry; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Badola, Sunita; Parker, Alexander N.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Franke, Andre; Rochat, Thierry; Paulweber, Bernhard; Prokopenko, Inga; Wang, Wei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shlipak, Michael G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Hastie, Nick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H.; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney. PMID:20383146

  20. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  1. Biomarkers of delayed graft function as a form of acute kidney injury in kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malyszko, Jolanta; Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Glowinska, Irena; Durlik, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation ensures distinct advantages for patients with end-stage kidney disease. However, in some cases early complications can lead to allograft dysfunction and consequently graft loss. One of the most common early complications after kidney transplantation is delayed graft function (DGF). Unfortunately there is no effective treatment for DGF, however early diagnosis of DGF and therapeutic intervention (eg modification of immunosuppression) may improve outcome. Therefore, markers of acute kidney injury are required. Creatinine is a poor biomarker for kidney injury due principally to its inability to help diagnose early acute renal failure and complete inability to help differentiate among its various causes. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers in this setting. There are promising candidate biomarkers with the ability to detect DGF. We focused on emerging biomarkers of DGF with NGAL is being the most studied followed by KIM-1, L-FABP, IL-18, and others. However, large randomized studies are needed to establish the value of new, promising biomarkers, in DGF diagnosis, prognosis and its cost-effectiveness. PMID:26175216

  2. [Functional evaluation in patients with kidney calculi].

    PubMed

    Stojimirović, B

    1998-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a common disorder and a significant problem because of incidence, recurrence and severe consequences. Stone disease is a surgical as well as a medical problem. Major progress has been made recently in understanding the pathophysiological disturbances responsible for stone formation as well as in the techniques of stone removal. The introduction of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy has considerably reduced the need for surgery. Improvements in methods of kidney stone removal have not diminished the need for the application of an effective prophylactic program. The internist should take a complete history of stone events (number, composition, location and outcome of stone event), family history of stones, dietary habits (focusing on the consumption of animal protein, salt and dairy products), medications and physical examination. Radiopaque stones should be documented by plane X-ray films. Ultrasonography should be used to image calculi that are nonopaque, and to easily distinguish them from masses such as tumour or blood clot. Computed tomography is also an excellent method for imaging nonopaque renal calculi but higher cost and radiation exposure are disadvantages [2]. Crystallographic analysis is the essential diagnostic procedure. If available, previous stones should also be examined. "In stone disease, everything is measurement. What the laboratory cannot tell you, you will not know; what it tells you in error, you will not correct by using your instincts, your medical experience, or your art [3]". Reliable diagnostic protocols are available for the identification of different causes of stones. The complexity of protocols depend on the severity of nephrolithiasis. Patients with a single stone episode undergo simple protocol, and extensive detailed protocol is used for patients with recurrent stone disease, or patients at increased risk. Simple protocol, besides the already mentioned history of stone events, radiographic investigation and

  3. Low-level cadmium exposure and effects on kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Maria; Sallsten, Gerd; Lundh, Thomas; Barregard, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The nephrotoxicity of cadmium at low levels of exposure, measured by urinary cadmium, has recently been questioned since co-excretion of cadmium and proteins may have causes other than cadmium toxicity. The aim of this study was to explore the relation between kidney function and low or moderate cadmium levels, measured directly in kidney biopsies. Methods We analysed cadmium in kidney biopsies (K-Cd), blood (B-Cd) and urine (U-Cd) from 109 living kidney donors in a cross-sectional study. We measured glomerular filtration rate (GFR), cystatin C in serum, albumin, β-2-microglobulin (B2M), retinol-binding protein (RBP), α-1-microglobulin (A1M), N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase and kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1) in 24 h and overnight urine. Results We found significant positive associations between A1M excretion and K-Cd in multiple regression models including age, sex, weight, smoking and urinary flow rate. This association was also present in never-smokers. A1M was also positively associated with B-Cd and U-Cd. GFR and the other biomarkers of kidney function were not associated with K-Cd. GFR estimated from serum cystatin C showed a very poor correlation with measured GFR. KIM-1, RBP and possibly albumin were positively associated with U-Cd, but only in overnight urine. No associations were found with B2M. Conclusions Our results suggest that A1M in urine is a sensitive biomarker for effects of low-level cadmium exposure. A few associations between other renal biomarkers and U-Cd, but not K-Cd, were probably caused by physiological co-excretion or chance. PMID:25286916

  4. [Ovarian function in women after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, B; Marianowski, L; Gradowska, L

    1994-08-01

    The full recovery of reproductive age patients suffering from chronic renal failure due to a successful transplant should include the restoration of normal reproductive functions. In the study data are presented concerning the resumption of menstruation and the evaluation of the ovarian function of renal transplant recipients. After a successful renal transplant the ovarian function improves considerably but isn't always fully restored which can be attributed to the renal efficiency grade or result from the administered immunosuppressive treatment. Approximately 40% of the patients have ovulatory cycles with a normal length of the luteal phase. 40% have also ovulatory cycles but the luteal phase is shorter and the progesterone values are lower. The remaining patients have anovulatory cycles with low estrogen values and a high FSH and LH concentration.

  5. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in acute kidney injury is affected by administration timing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Cai, Jieru; Jiao, Xiaoyan; Yu, Xiaofang; Ding, Xiaoqiang

    2017-03-10

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising therapy for acute kidney injury; however, the efficacy is limited due to poor survival after transplantation. In this study, we investigated how MSC transplantation timing affected the survival and therapeutic potential of MSCs in the kidney ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury model. After kidney I/R injury, the inflammatory process and tissue damage were characterized over 1 week post-I/R, we found that inflammation peaked at 12-24 h post-I/R (h.p.i.), and urine  neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) measurements correlated highly with measures of inflammation. We cultured MSCs with supernatants from I/R injured kidney tissue homogenates collected at different time points and found that kidney homogenates from 12 and 24 h.p.i. were most toxic to MSCs, whereas homogenates from 1 h.p.i. were not as cytotoxic as those from 12 and 24 h.p.i. Compared with MSCs administered at 12, or 24 h.p.i., cells administered immediately after ischemia or 1 h.p.i. yielded the highest renoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects. Our findings indicate that MSC treatment for acute kidney injury is most effective when applied prior to the development of a potent inflammatory microenvironment, and urine NGAL may be helpful for detecting inflammation and selecting MSC transplantation timing in I/R kidney injury.

  6. Interconnected Network Motifs Control Podocyte Morphology and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Azeloglu, Evren U.; Hardy, Simon V.; Eungdamrong, Narat John; Chen, Yibang; Jayaraman, Gomathi; Chuang, Peter Y.; Fang, Wei; Xiong, Huabao; Neves, Susana R.; Jain, Mohit R.; Li, Hong; Ma’ayan, Avi; Gordon, Ronald E.; He, John Cijiang; Iyengar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are kidney cells with specialized morphology that is required for glomerular filtration. Diseases, such as diabetes, or drug exposure that causes disruption of the podocyte foot process morphology results in kidney pathophysiology. Proteomic analysis of glomeruli isolated from rats with puromycin-induced kidney disease and control rats indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), which is activated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), is a key regulator of podocyte morphology and function. In podocytes, cAMP signaling activates cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) to enhance expression of the gene encoding a differentiation marker, synaptopodin, a protein that associates with actin and promotes its bundling. We constructed and experimentally verified a β-adrenergic receptor–driven network with multiple feedback and feedforward motifs that controls CREB activity. To determine how the motifs interacted to regulate gene expression, we mapped multicompartment dynamical models, including information about protein subcellular localization, onto the network topology using Petri net formalisms. These computational analyses indicated that the juxtaposition of multiple feedback and feedforward motifs enabled the prolonged CREB activation necessary for synaptopodin expression and actin bundling. Drug-induced modulation of these motifs in diseased rats led to recovery of normal morphology and physiological function in vivo. Thus, analysis of regulatory motifs using network dynamics can provide insights into pathophysiology that enable predictions for drug intervention strategies to treat kidney disease. PMID:24497609

  7. Better recovery of kidney function in patients with de novo chronic kidney disease after partial nephrectomy compared with those with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Iizuka, Junpei; Omae, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-06-01

    We compared kidney functional recovery between patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease, those with de novo chronic kidney disease and those with normal kidney function, after partial nephrectomy. A total of 311 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between January 2004 and July 2011 with sufficient kidney functional data participated in the study. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (group1: 78 patients) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) before partial nephrectomy. Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease (group 2: 49) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) before surgery and who developed estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) 3 months after partial nephrectomy. Normal patients (group 3: 184) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) both before and after partial nephrectomy. Group 1 was associated with older age and higher comorbidity, including hypertension and diabetes mellitus, compared with other groups. R.E.N.A.L. score was not significantly different between the groups. Although the percent change of estimated glomerular filtration rate between the preoperative period and 3 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was significantly decreased compared with that in other groups (group 1: -6.8%, group 2: -18%, group 3: -7.3%), the renal functional recovery between 3 and 12 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was better than that in other groups (group 1: -0.5%, group 2: 5.6%, group 3: -0.4%). Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease had better kidney functional recovery than the other two groups, which might suggest that they were surgically assaulted and developed chronic kidney disease in the early postoperative period, and were essentially different from those with pre-existing chronic kidney

  8. Association of Kidney Function and Early Kidney Injury With Incident Hypertension in HIV-Infected Women.

    PubMed

    Ascher, Simon B; Scherzer, Rebecca; Peralta, Carmen A; Tien, Phyllis C; Grunfeld, Carl; Estrella, Michelle M; Abraham, Alison; Gustafson, Deborah R; Nowicki, Marek; Sharma, Anjali; Cohen, Mardge H; Butch, Anthony W; Young, Mary A; Bennett, Michael R; Shlipak, Michael G

    2017-02-01

    Subclinical kidney disease is associated with developing hypertension in the general population, but data are lacking among HIV-infected people. We examined associations of kidney function and injury with incident hypertension in 823 HIV-infected and 267 HIV-uninfected women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study, a multicenter, prospective cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected women in the United States. Baseline kidney biomarkers included estimated glomerular filtration rate using cystatin C, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, and 7 urine biomarkers of tubular injury: α-1-microglobulin, interleukin-18, kidney injury molecule-1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, liver fatty acid-binding protein, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase, and α1-acid-glycoprotein. We used multivariable Poisson regression to evaluate associations of kidney biomarkers with incident hypertension, defined as 2 consecutive visits of antihypertensive medication use. During a median follow-up of 9.6 years, 288 HIV-infected women (35%) developed hypertension. Among the HIV-infected women, higher urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio was independently associated with incident hypertension (relative risk =1.13 per urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio doubling, 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.20), as was lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (relative risk =1.10 per 10 mL/min/1.73 m(2) lower estimated glomerular filtration rate; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.17). No tubular injury and dysfunction biomarkers were independently associated with incident hypertension in HIV-infected women. In contrast, among the HIV-uninfected women, urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio was not associated with incident hypertension, whereas higher urine interleukin-18, α1-acid-glycoprotein, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase levels were significantly associated with incident hypertension. These findings suggest that early glomerular injury and kidney dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension in

  9. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium rescues kidney function in rats with established chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    van Koppen, Arianne; Joles, Jaap A; van Balkom, Bas W M; Lim, Sai Kiang; de Kleijn, Dominique; Giles, Rachel H; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health care problem, affecting more than 35% of the elderly population worldwide. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been described, however it is unclear whether the MSCs themselves or their secretome is required. We hypothesized that MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) reduces progression of CKD and studied functional and structural effects in a rat model of established CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (SNX) combined with L-NNA and 6% NaCl diet in Lewis rats. Six weeks after SNX, CKD rats received either 50 µg CM or 50 µg non-CM (NCM) twice daily intravenously for four consecutive days. Six weeks after treatment CM administration was functionally effective: glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance) and effective renal plasma flow (PAH clearance) were significantly higher in CM vs. NCM-treatment. Systolic blood pressure was lower in CM compared to NCM. Proteinuria tended to be lower after CM. Tubular and glomerular damage were reduced and more glomerular endothelial cells were found after CM. DNA damage repair was increased after CM. MSC-CM derived exosomes, tested in the same experimental setting, showed no protective effect on the kidney. In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that administration of MSC-CM has a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function shown by decreased progression of CKD and reduced hypertension and glomerular injury.

  10. Functional assessment of transplanted kidneys with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ting; Li, Ying-Chun; Yin, Long-Lin; Pu, Hong; Chen, Jia-Yuan

    2015-10-28

    Kidney transplantation has emerged as the treatment of choice for many patients with end-stage renal disease, which is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Given the shortage of clinically available donor kidneys and the significant incidence of allograft dysfunction, a noninvasive and accurate assessment of the allograft renal function is critical for postoperative management. Prompt diagnosis of graft dysfunction facilitates clinical intervention of kidneys with salvageable function. New advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology have enabled the calculation of various renal parameters that were previously not feasible to measure noninvasively. Diffusion-weighted imaging provides information on renal diffusion and perfusion simultaneously, with quantification by the apparent diffusion coefficient, the decrease of which reflects renal function impairment. Diffusion-tensor imaging accounts for the directionality of molecular motion and measures fractional anisotropy of the kidneys. Blood oxygen level-dependent MR evaluates intrarenal oxygen bioavailability, generating the parameter of R2* (reflecting the concentration of deoxyhemoglobin). A decrease in R2* could happen during acute rejection. MR nephro-urography/renography demonstrates structural data depicting urinary tract obstructions and functional data regarding the glomerular filtration and blood flow. MR angiography details the transplant vasculature and is particularly suitable for detecting vascular complications, with good correlation with digital subtraction angiography. Other functional MRI technologies, such as arterial spin labeling and MR spectroscopy, are showing additional promise. This review highlights MRI as a comprehensive modality to diagnose a variety of etiologies of graft dysfunction, including prerenal (e.g., renal vasculature), renal (intrinsic causes) and postrenal (e.g., obstruction of the collecting system) etiologies.

  11. Functional status and survival after kidney transplantation1–12

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Bloom, Roy D.; Shults, Justine; Thomasson, Arwin; Mussell, Adam; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Abt, Peter; Levine, Matthew; Caplan, Arthur; Feldman, Harold I.; Karlawish, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Background Older patients constitute a growing proportion of U.S. kidney transplant recipients and often have a high burden of comorbidities. A summary measure of health such as functional status might enable transplant professionals to better evaluate and counsel these patients about their prognosis after transplant. Methods We linked UNOS registry data about post-transplant survival with pre-transplant functional status data (physical function [PF] scale of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36) among individuals undergoing kidney transplant from 6/1/2000 – 5/31/2006. We examined the relationship between survival and functional status with multivariable Cox regression, adjusted for age. Using logistic regression models for three-year survival, we also estimated the reduction in deaths in the hypothetical scenario that recipients with poor functional status in this cohort experienced modest improvements in function. Results The cohort comprised 10,875 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) with a mean age of 50 years; 14% were ≥65. Differences in three-year mortality between highest and lowest PF groups ranged from 3% among recipients <35 years to 14% among recipients ≥65 years. In multivariable Cox regression, worse PF was associated with higher mortality (HR 1.66 for lowest versus highest PF quartiles; p<0.001). Interactions between PF and age were non-significant. We estimated that 11% fewer deaths would occur if KTRs with the lowest functional status experienced modest improvements in function. Conclusions Across a wide age range, functional status was an independent predictor of post-transplant survival. Functional status assessment may be a useful tool with which to counsel patients about post-transplant outcomes. PMID:24113514

  12. Cystatin C and renal function in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Franco, M C P; Nagasako, S S; Machado, P G; Nogueira, P C K; Pestana, J O M; Sesso, R

    2009-12-01

    In clinical practice, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is often determined with serum creatinine. However, studies have shown cystatin C to be a better parameter for the diagnosis of impaired renal function. We compared GFR estimated by plasma cystatin C with GFR estimated by serum creatinine in a sample of 50 pediatric renal transplant recipients and 24 healthy children. The correlation between GFR estimated by serum creatinine and by cystatin C was significant (r = 0.75; P < 0.001, Person's correlation); however, in pediatric kidney transplant recipients, the GFR was 6.7 mL/min lower when determined using cystatin C rather than serum creatinine. Moreover, using GFR estimated by cystatin C we found that 42% of the pediatric kidney transplant recipients had an estimated GFR <60 mL.min-1.1.73 (m(2))-1, whereas when GFR was estimated by the serum creatinine formula only 16% of the children had values below this cutoff point indicative of chronic kidney disease (P < 0.001). We conclude that, in pediatric kidney transplant recipients, estimation of GFR yields lower values when cystatin C is used rather than serum creatinine.

  13. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages. Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I. Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = −0.76, BUN: r = −0.72, and cystatin C: r = −0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603–0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746–0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P

  14. Reduced kidney function is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Jari A; Zaccardi, Francesco; Karppi, Jouni; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kurl, Sudhir

    2016-08-01

    There is limited knowledge on the relationship between kidney function and incidence of atrial fibrillation. Thus, this prospective study was designed to evaluate whether various biomarkers of kidney function are associated to the risk of atrial fibrillation. The study population consisted of 1840 subjects (615 women and 1225 men) aged 61-82 years. Cystatin C- and creatinine-based estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys and eGRFcreat , respectively) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) were assessed to investigate their relationship with the risk of atrial fibrillation. During a median follow-up of 3.7 years, a total of 159 incident atrial fibrillation cases occurred. After adjustment for potential confounders, the risk of atrial fibrillation was increased (hazard ratio 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56-4.81, P < 0.001) in subjects with reduced kidney function (eGFRcys , 15-59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) compared to subjects with normal kidney function (≥90 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ). Similar results were also found when comparing the respective groups of subjects defined by their eGRFcreat levels (hazard ratio 2.41, CI 1.09-5.30, P = 0.029). Consistently, subjects with ACR ≥300 mg/g had an increased risk of incident atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 2.16, CI 1.35-2.82, P < 0.001) compared to those with ACR <30 mg/g. Reduced eGFR and albuminuria were associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation.

  15. Kidney function outcomes following thermal ablation of small renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Jay D; Jafri, Syed M; Qi, David

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of small renal masses (SRMs) continues to increase likely attributable to widespread use of axial cross-sectional imaging. Many of these SRMs present in elderly patients with abnormal baseline renal function. Such patients are at risk for further decline following therapeutic intervention. Renal thermal ablation presents one approach for management of SRMs whereby tumors are treated in situ without need for global renal ischemia. These treatment characteristics contribute to favorable renal function outcomes following kidney tumor ablation particularly in patients with an anatomic or functional solitary renal unit. PMID:27152264

  16. Effect of pharmacologic agents on the function of the hypothermically preserved dog kidney during normothermic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Ploeg, R J; Vreugdenhil, P; Goossens, D; McAnulty, J F; Southard, J H; Belzer, F O

    1988-06-01

    We examined how a combination of pharmacologic agents ("rescue" agents) affect the function of hypothermically preserved dog kidneys at the time of reperfusion. Dog kidneys were preserved either by simple cold storage in EuroCollins' solution for 24 or 48 hours or by continuous perfusion at 5 degrees C in Belzer's gluconate-hydroxyethyl starch solution for as long as 5 days. After preservation, renal functions were measured with the isolated perfused kidney model. Kidneys were reperfused at normothermia either with or without the addition of a combination of rescue agents to the reperfusion medium. The rescue agents studied were allopurinol (1 mmol/L); superoxide dismutase (32,000 U/L); catalase (137,500 U/L); dimethylthiourea (3 mmol/L); glutathione (3 mmol/L); desferrioxamine (0.2 gm/L), for protection against O2 free radical injury and lipid peroxidation injury; verapamil (25 mg/L), as a Ca channel blocker; and ATP-MgCl2 (0.3 mmol/L), to stimulate energy metabolism. The renal functions we measured were glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (creatinine clearance), urine production, perfusate flow, urinary protein concentration, Na reabsorptive capacity, and tissue concentrations of ATP, K, and total tissue water. GFR was reduced by 75% to 90% after all periods of preservation, and the rescue agents had no effect on GFR. Sodium reabsorption was reduced from 98% to a range of 40% to 50% after 48 hours of cold storage or 5 days of machine perfusion and was not increased by rescue agents. There was a time-dependent increase in the amount of urine protein that was not affected by rescue agents. The addition of rescue agents did not affect total tissue water or concentrations of ATP or K in kidneys after normothermic reperfusion. These results demonstrate that pharmacologic agents previously suggested to suppress reperfusion damage in kidneys are not effective in this model. Therefore it is likely that kidneys damage occurs primarily during preservation, which suggest that

  17. Changes in kidney function among Nicaraguan sugarcane workers

    PubMed Central

    Laws, Rebecca L; Brooks, Daniel R; Amador, Juan José; Weiner, Daniel E; Kaufman, James S; Ramírez-Rubio, Oriana; Riefkohl, Alejandro; Scammell, Madeleine K; López-Pilarte, Damaris; Sánchez, José Marcel; Parikh, Chirag R; McClean, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology in Central American workers. Objectives: To investigate changes and job-specific differences in kidney function over a 6-month sugarcane harvest season, explore the potential role of hydration, and measure proteinuria. Methods: We recruited 284 Nicaraguan sugarcane workers performing seven distinct tasks. We measured urine albumin and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results: eGFR varied by job and decreased during the harvest in seed cutters (−8.6 ml/min/1.73 m2), irrigators (−7.4 ml/min/1.73 m2), and cane cutters (−5.0 ml/min/1.73 m2), as compared to factory workers. The number of years employed at the company was negatively associated with eGFR. Fewer than 5% of workers had albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) >30 mg/g. Conclusions: The decline in kidney function during the harvest and the differences by job category and employment duration provide evidence that one or more risk factors of CKD are occupational. PMID:25631575

  18. Ultrasonic imaging characteristics of transplanted kidneys with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Liang, W X; Cai, M J; Jiang, L; Xie, Y Q; Yuan, W L; Zhang, H

    2014-08-29

    We investigated the ultrasonic imaging characteristics of transplanted kidneys with delayed graft function (DGF). Ultrasonography was performed in 44 patients after kidney transplantation, and a time-intensity analysis was performed to compare the differences between patients with normal graft function (NGF) and those with DGF. Compared with the NGF group, the DGF group had earlier arrival time, shorter time to peak, and higher arrival intensity and peak intensity (P < 0.05). The variation-of-intensity parameters in different renal cortices increased, whereas the variation-of-time parameter decreased, in those with DGF (P < 0.05). In conclusion, compared with the NGF group, the microcirculation perfusion of transplanted kidneys in the DGF group showed higher perfusion with earlier arrival time, shorter time to peak, and higher arrival intensity and peak intensity. In addition, the intensity variations of contrast agent in different renal cortices from patients with DGF were greater, whereas the variations in perfusion time were smaller than those in patients with NGF.

  19. History of fluid balance and kidney function in space.

    PubMed

    Drummer, Christian; Cirillo, Massimo; De Santo, Natale G

    2004-01-01

    During the last four decades, about 400 people have been in Space, since Yuri Gagarin was sent in 1961 as the first human into Earth orbit. From the very beginning, the circulatory system of astronauts (meaning heart, vascular system, body fluid distribution and balance, and the kidney) was central to the medical concerns of Space physiologists and physicians because of its gravity-dependence. The present manuscript puts emphasize on some key scientists who worked in the field of body fluid regulation and kidney function in the USA, in Russia and in Europe during recent decades. The manuscript in particular summarizes the outcome of this research and describes the present understanding of how the body fluid regulatory system adapts to the extreme environment of Space.

  20. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Kimmel, Paul L; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A; Bruce, Marino A; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Lash, James P

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

  1. Kidney function and cognitive health in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Brendan; Shlipak, Michael G; Sarnak, Mark J; Katz, Ronit; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Odden, Michelle C

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the importance of kidney function in healthy aging. We examined the association between kidney function and change in cognitive function in 3,907 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study who were recruited from 4 US communities and studied from 1992 to 1999. Kidney function was measured by cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys). Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, which were administered up to 7 times during annual visits. There was an association between eGFRcys and change in cognitive function after adjustment for confounders; persons with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had a 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.51, 0.77) points/year faster decline in Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score and a 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.56) points/year faster decline in Digit Symbol Substitution Test score compared with persons with an eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2). Additional adjustment for intermediate cardiovascular events modestly affected these associations. Participants with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had fewer cognitive impairment-free life-years on average compared with those with eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2), independent of confounders and mediating cardiovascular events (mean difference = -0.44, 95% confidence interval: -0.62, -0.26). Older adults with lower kidney function are at higher risk of worsening cognitive function.

  2. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  3. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kvetny, J; Wilms, L; Pedersen, P L; Larsen, J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine mitochondrial function in cells from persons with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls. The participating persons were examined clinically and had basal oxygen consumption (VO(2)) determined. The concentrations of thyroid hormones and thyrotropine stimulating hormone were determined, and mitochondrial function in isolated mononuclear blood cells was examined by enzymatic methods [citrate synthase activity (CS)] and by flow cytometry (mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM fluorescence and mitochondrial mass by MTG fluorescence). The ratio of T(4)/T(3) was lowered in subclinical hypothyroidism patients compared to controls (2.5+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.4, p=0.005). VO(2) was increased in persons with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to controls (adolescents: 134+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 119+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.006, adults: 139+/-14 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 121+/-17 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.001). The mitochondrial function, represented by citrate synthase activity, MTG, and TMRM fluorescence were all increased (CS in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 0.074+/-0.044 nmol/mg*min vs. 0.056+/-0.021 nmol/mg*min, p=0.005; MTG fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 7,482+/-1,733 a.u. vs. 6,391+/-2,171 a.u., p=0.027; TMRM fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 13,449+/-3,807 a.u. vs. 11,733+/-4,473 a.u, p=0.04). Our results indicate an increased mitochondrial stimulation, eventually caused by increased deiodination of T(4) to intracellular bioactive iodothyronines in adults and adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism.

  4. Role of glutathione transport processes in kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Lash, Lawrence H. . E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The kidneys are highly dependent on an adequate supply of glutathione (GSH) to maintain normal function. This is due, in part, to high rates of aerobic metabolism, particularly in the proximal tubules. Additionally, the kidneys are potentially exposed to high concentrations of oxidants and reactive electrophiles. Renal cellular concentrations of GSH are maintained by both intracellular synthesis and transport from outside the cell. Although function of specific carriers has not been definitively demonstrated, it is likely that multiple carriers are responsible for plasma membrane transport of GSH. Data suggest that the organic anion transporters OAT1 and OAT3 and the sodium-dicarboxylate 2 exchanger (SDCT2 or NaDC3) mediate uptake across the basolateral plasma membrane (BLM) and that the organic anion transporting polypeptide OATP1 and at least one of the multidrug resistance proteins mediate efflux across the brush-border plasma membrane (BBM). BLM transport may be used pharmacologically to provide renal proximal tubular cells with exogenous GSH to protect against oxidative stress whereas BBM transport functions physiologically in turnover of cellular GSH. The mitochondrial GSH pool is derived from cytoplasmic GSH by transport into the mitochondrial matrix and is mediated by the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate exchangers. Maintenance of the mitochondrial GSH pool is critical for cellular and mitochondrial redox homeostasis and is important in determining susceptibility to chemically induced apoptosis. Hence, membrane transport processes are critical to regulation of renal cellular and subcellular GSH pools and are determinants of susceptibility to cytotoxicity induced by oxidants and electrophiles.

  5. Kidney damage biomarkers detect acute kidney injury but only functional markers predict mortality after paraquat ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Fahim; Buckley, Nicholas A; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Pickering, John W; Peake, Philip; Palangasinghe, Chathura; Wijerathna, Thilini; Ratnayake, Indira; Shihana, Fathima; Endre, Zoltan H

    2015-09-02

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common following paraquat ingestion. The diagnostic performance of injury biomarkers was investigated in serial blood and urine samples from patients from 5 Sri Lankan hospitals. Functional AKI was diagnosed using serum creatinine (sCr) or serum cystatin C (sCysC). The 95th centile in healthy subjects defined the urinary biomarker cutoffs for diagnosing structural AKI. 50 poisoned patients provided 2 or more specimens, 76% developed functional AKI [AKIN stage 1 (n=12), 2 (n=7) or 3 (n=19)]; 19/26 patients with AKIN stage 2/3 also had functional AKI by sCysC criteria (≥50% increase). Urinary cystatin C (uCysC), clusterin (uClu) and NGAL (uNGAL) increased within 24h of ingestion compared with NoAKI patients and healthy controls. Each biomarker demonstrated moderate diagnostic utility [AUC-ROC: uCysC 0.79, uNGAL 0.79, uClu 0.68] for diagnosis of functional AKI at 16h. Death occurred only in subjects with functional AKI. Structural biomarker-based definitions detected more AKI than did sCr or sCysC, but did not independently predict death. Renal injury biomarkers did not add clinical value to patients who died rapidly due to multi-organ failure. Use of injury biomarkers within 16-24h may guide early intervention for reno-protection in less severe paraquat poisoning.

  6. Smell and taste function in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jessica E; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Kainer, Gad

    2010-08-01

    Loss of appetite and poor growth are common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and changes in smell and/or taste function may be responsible, but the hypothesis has not been proven. This aims of this prospective age- and gender-controlled study were to determine whether: (1) changes in smell and taste function occur in children with CKD; (2) smell or taste dysfunction are associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); (3) there is an association between smell or taste loss and body mass index (BMI). The study cohort consisted of 72 children of whom 20 were CKD stage 3-5 patients, 12 were CKD stage 2 patients, 20 were clinical controls (CC) and 20 were healthy children (HC). The CKD patients and clinical controls were recruited from Sydney Children's Hospital and The Children's Hospital, Westmead, and healthy controls were recruited from a local school. Scores for each group from taste and smell chemosensory function tests were compared, and their relationship with renal function and BMI investigated. The CKD stage 3-5 group had a significantly lower taste identification score (85.6%, P < 0.001) than the CC (94.8%) and HC (94.8%) groups, with almost one third of the children in the CKD stage 3-5 group exhibiting taste loss. Decreased taste function was associated with decreased eGFR (r = 0.43, P < 0.01), but no association between BMI and taste function was found (r = 0.001, P > 0.9). Odour identification scores were not different; however, there was a positive relationship with BMI (r = 0.427, P = 0.006). We conclude that a loss of taste can occur in children with CKD and that when it occurs, it worsens as eGFR declines and is found early in kidney disease.

  7. The regulation and function of microRNAs in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qingqing; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Dong, Zheng

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are endogenous short noncoding RNAs, which regulate virtually all major cellular processes by inhibiting target gene expression. In kidneys, miRNAs have been implicated in renal development, homeostasis, and physiological functions. In addition, miRNAs play important roles in the pathogenesis of various renal diseases, including renal carcinoma, diabetic nephropathy, acute kidney injury, hypertensive nephropathy, polycystic kidney disease, and others. Furthermore, miRNAs may have great values as biomarkers in different kidney diseases.

  8. Pretransplant transcriptome profiles identify among kidneys with delayed graft function those with poorer quality and outcome.

    PubMed

    Mas, Valeria R; Scian, Mariano J; Archer, Kellie J; Suh, Jihee L; David, Krystle G; Ren, Qing; Gehr, Todd W B; King, Anne L; Posner, Marc P; Mueller, Thomas F; Maluf, Daniel G

    2011-01-01

    Robust biomarkers are needed to identify donor kidneys with poor quality associated with inferior early and longer-term outcome. The occurrence of delayed graft function (DGF) is most often used as a clinical outcome marker to capture poor kidney quality. Gene expression profiles of 92 preimplantation biopsies were evaluated in relation to DGF and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) to identify preoperative gene transcript changes associated with short-term function. Patients were stratified into those who required dialysis during the first week (DGF group) versus those without (noDGF group) and subclassified according to 1-month eGFR of >45 mL/min (eGFR(hi)) versus eGFR of ≤45 mL/min (eGFR(lo)). The groups and subgroups were compared in relation to clinical donor and recipient variables and transcriptome-associated biological pathways. A validation set was used to confirm target genes. Donor and recipient characteristics were similar between the DGF versus noDGF groups. A total of 206 probe sets were significant between groups (P < 0.01), but the gene functional analyses failed to identify any significantly affected pathways. However, the subclassification of the DGF and noDGF groups identified 283 probe sets to be significant among groups and associated with biological pathways. Kidneys that developed postoperative DGF and sustained an impaired 1-month function (DGF(lo) group) showed a transcriptome profile of significant immune activation already preimplant. In addition, these kidneys maintained a poorer transplant function throughout the first-year posttransplant. In conclusion, DGF is a poor marker for organ quality and transplant outcome. In contrast, preimplant gene expression profiles identify "poor quality" grafts and may eventually improve organ allocation.

  9. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Kidney Disease What is Kidney Disease? What the Kidneys Do Click for more information You have two ... damaged, wastes can build up in the body. Kidney Function and Aging Kidney function may be reduced ...

  10. Native kidney function after renal transplantation combined with other solid organs in preemptive patients.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Panicali, L; Persici, E; Conte, D; Cappuccilli, M L; Cuna, V; Capelli, I; Todeschini, P; D'Arcangelo, G Liviano; Stefoni, S

    2010-05-01

    Kidney transplantations combined with other solid organs are progressively increasing in number. There are no guidelines regarding the nephrologic indications for combined transplantations, namely liver-kidney (LKT), or heart-kidney (HKT), in preemptive patients with chronic kidney failure who are not on regular dialysis therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the functional contribution of the native kidneys after preemptive kidney transplantation combined with other solid organs. From 2004, 9 patients (aged 50.3 +/- 8.5 years) with chronic kidney failure (creatinine 2.5 +/- 1.0 mg/dL) caused by polycystic kidney disease (n = 4), vascular nephropathy (n = 2), interstitial nephropathy (n = 1), glomerulonephritis (n = 1), or end-stage kidney disease (n = 1), underwent combined transplantations (8 LKT, 1 HKT). A scintigraphic functional study (Tc-99DMSA or Tc-99mMAG3), was performed at 4 +/- 3 months after transplantation to evaluate the functional contribution of both the native kidneys and the graft. All patients were given immunosuppressive drugs, including a calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus/or cyclosporine). At the time of scintigraphy, renal function in all patients was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. The functional contribution of the transplanted kidneys was on average 77 +/- 18%. Only in 1 patient was the contribution of the graft <50%. At follow-up after 36 months, patient and kidney survivals were 100%. The study confirmed a high risk of loss of native kidney function in the presence of organic nephropathy. In light of our experience, a creatinine clearance <30 mL/min in an appropriate cutoff for a combined transplantation. Close clinical and instrumental assessment pretransplant is essential before proceeding with a combined transplant program to exclude functional forms and to optimize the use of organs.

  11. Development of Reduced Kidney Function in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hickson, LaTonya J.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Gabriel, Sherine E.; McCarthy, James T.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a variety of kidney disorders. However, it is unclear whether the development of reduced kidney function (RKF) is higher in patients with RA compared to the general population. Study Design Retrospective review. Setting & Participants Incident adult-onset RA cases (813) and a comparison cohort of non-RA subjects (813) in Olmsted County, Minnesota, from 1980-2007. Predictor Baseline demographic and clinical variables. Outcomes RKF: 1) Estimated GFR (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and 2) eGFR <45 on two consecutive occasions at least 90 days apart; cardiovascular disease (CVD);, and death. Measurements The cumulative incidence of RKF was estimated adjusting for the competing risk of death. Results Of 813 RA patients and 813 non-RA subjects, mean age was 56±16 (SD) years, 68% were female, and 9% had RKF at baseline. The 20-year cumulative incidence of RKF was higher in RA patients compared to non-RA participants for eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 (25% vs. 20%; p=0.03) but not eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73m2 (9% vs. 10%; p=0.8). The presence of CVD at baseline (HR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.14-2.73; p=0.01) and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate in RA patients (HR per 10-mm/h greater, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.16; p=0.04) was associated with increased risk of eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2. An eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2 was not associated with an increased risk of CVD development in RA patients (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.63-1.57; p=0.9), however, a greater reduction in GFR (eGFR <45 ml/min/1.73m2) was associated with an increased risk of CVD (HR, 1.93; CI, 1.04-3.58; p=0.04). Limitations RKF was defined by estimating equations for kidney function. We are limited to deriving associations from our findings. Conclusions RA patients were more likely to develop RKF over time. CVD and associated factors appear to play a role. The presence of RA in individuals with RKF may lead to an increase in morbidity from CVD development, for which awareness may provide a means for

  12. Kidney Function and Cerebral Blood Flow: The Rotterdam Study.

    PubMed

    Sedaghat, Sanaz; Vernooij, Meike W; Loehrer, Elizabeth; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Hofman, Albert; van der Lugt, Aad; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-03-01

    CKD is linked with various brain disorders. Whereas brain integrity is dependent on cerebral perfusion, the association between kidney function and cerebral blood flow has yet to be determined. This study was performed in the framework of the population-based Rotterdam Study and included 2645 participants with mean age of 56.6 years (45% men). We used eGFR and albumin-to-creatinine ratio to assess kidney function and performed phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging of basilar and carotid arteries to measure cerebral blood flow. Participants had an average (SD) eGFR of 86.3 (13.4) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and a median (interquartile range) albumin-to-creatinine ratio of 3.4 (2.2-6.1) mg/g. In age- and sex-adjusted models, a higher albumin-to-creatinine ratio was associated with lower cerebral blood flow level (difference in cerebral blood flow [milliliters per minute per 100 ml] per doubling of the albumin-to-creatinine ratio, -0.31; 95% confidence interval, -0.58 to -0.03). The association was not present after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors (P=0.10). Each 1 SD lower eGFR was associated with 0.42 ml/min per 100 ml lower cerebral blood flow (95% confidence interval, 0.01 to 0.83) adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Thus, in this population-based study, we observed that lower eGFR is independently associated with lower cerebral blood flow.

  13. Rate of change in kidney function and the risk of death: the case for incorporating the rate of kidney function decline into the CKD staging system.

    PubMed

    Al-Aly, Ziyad; Cepeda, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased risk of death. A wave of recent studies used longitudinal data to examine the effect of the rate of decline of kidney function on the risk of death. The results from these studies show that there is an independent and graded association between the rate of kidney function decline and the risk of death. There is a need to incorporate the rate of decline in the definition of CKD. This redefinition of CKD will transform a static definition into a dynamic one that more accurately describes the disease state in an individual patient.

  14. Glibenclamide improves kidney and heart structure and function in the adenine-diet model of chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Vishal; Gobe, Glenda; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associated cardiovascular disease involves free radical damage and inflammation. Addition of adenine to the diet induces inflammation followed by CKD and cardiovascular disease. NOD-like receptor protein-3 (NLRP-3) is pro-inflammatory in the kidney; glibenclamide inhibits production of NLRP-3. Male Wistar rats were fed either control rat food or adenine (0.25%) in this food for 16 weeks. Glibenclamide (10 mg/kg/day) was administered to two groups with and without adenine for the final 8 weeks. Kidney function (blood urea nitrogen/BUN, plasma creatinine/PCr, plasma uric acid, proteinuria), kidney structure (fibrosis, inflammation), cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, left ventricular stiffness, vascular responses and echocardiography) and protein expression of markers for oxidative stress (HO-1), and inflammation (TNF-α, NLRP-3) were assessed. In adenine-fed rats, glibenclamide decreased BUN (controls: 6±0.6; adenine: 56.6±5.4; adenine+glibenclamide: 19.4±2.7 mmol/L), PCr (controls: 42±2.8; adenine: 268±23; adenine+glibenclamide: 81±10 μmol/L), proteinuria (controls: 150±7.4; adenine: 303±19; adenine+glibenclamide: 220±13 μmol/L) (all p<0.05). Glibenclamide decreased infiltration of chronic inflammatory cells, fibrosis, tubular damage and expression of HO-1, TNF-α and NLRP-3 in the kidney. Glibenclamide did not alter plasma uric acid concentrations (controls: 38±1; adenine: 63±4; adenine+glibenclamide: 69±14 μmol/L). Cardiovascular changes included decreased systolic blood pressure and improved vascular responses although cardiac fibrosis, left ventricular stiffness and hypertrophy were not reduced. Glibenclamide improved kidney structure and function in CKD and decreased some cardiovascular parameters. Inflammatory markers and cell populations were attenuated by glibenclamide in kidneys.

  15. Successful Pregnancy Outcome in a Patient with Solitary Kidney Affected by Angiomyolipoma: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Kavita; Nanda, Sakshi; Choudhary, Sumesh; Gandhi, Khushali

    2016-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumour and its occurrence during pregnancy is even rare. It is usually diagnosed incidentally. It can increase in size during pregnancy and can present acutely as rupture with retroperitoneal haemorrhage, mechanism of which is still unclear. We present a case of successful pregnancy outcome in a patient with congenital solitary kidney affected by angiomyolipoma, diagnosed incidentally at 19 years of age. The patient had conceived twice. Her antenatal and post partum period was uneventful both the times. PMID:27891407

  16. A Lifetime of Allograft Function with Kidneys from Older Donors.

    PubMed

    Rose, Caren; Schaeffner, Elke; Frei, Ulrich; Gill, Jagbir; Gill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to increase expanded criteria donor (ECD) transplantation are needed. We quantified the extent to which ECD kidneys provide recipients with a lifetime of allograft function by determining the difference between patient survival and death-censored allograft survival (graft survival). Initial analyses compared 5-year outcomes in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (European) and the United States Renal Data System. Among European recipients ≥65 years, patient survival exceeded graft survival, and ECD recipients returned to dialysis for an average of 5.2 months after transplant failure. Among United States recipients ≥60 years, graft survival exceeded patient survival. Although patient survival in elderly recipients in the United States was low (49% at 5 years), the average difference in patient survival at 10 years in elderly recipients in the United States with an ECD versus non-ECD transplant was only 7 months. The probability of patient survival with a functioning allograft at 5 years was higher with ECD transplantation within 1 year after activation to the waiting list than with delayed non-ECD transplantation ≥3 years after activation to the waiting list. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that ECD transplants do not provide a lifetime of allograft function in recipients <50 years in the United States. These findings should encourage ECD transplantation in patients ≥60 years, demonstrate that rapid ECD transplantation is superior to delayed non-ECD transplantation, and challenge the policy in the United States of allowing patients <50 years to receive an ECD transplant.

  17. The anomalies associated with congenital solitary functioning kidney in children.

    PubMed

    Akl, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of associated urological and non-urological anomalies as well as the renal outcome in patients with a congenital solitary func-tioning kidney (CSFK). A retrospective review of 30 consecutive cases of CSFK seen at the pediatric renal service at the Jordan University Hospital between 2004 and 2008 was performed. There were 20 males and 10 females, whose ages ranged from five days to 14 years. In 20 patients (67%), the left kidney was absent. Associated anomalies were detected in 23 (77%) of the 30 patients; urological anomalies accounted for 47% (14/30) and non-urological anomalies were found in 19/30 (53%) patients. The latter included anomalies of the ear, nose and throat (ENT) in 9/30 (30%), musculoskeletal system (one with hypermobile joints) in 8/30 (27%), gastrointestinal (GI) in 7/30 (23%), cardiovascular (CV) in 4/30 (13%) and dermatological with epidermolysis bullosa, endocrine (euthyroid goiter) and gynecological (cervical cyst) in one patient each (3%). Proteinuria was seen in 6/30 (20%) and hypertension in 2/30 (7%) patients. Chronic renal failure (CRF) was seen in 6/30 (20%) patients, of whom three had end-stage renal failure (ESRF). CRF was seen mainly in patients with more than two associated urological anomalies. Idiopathic hyperuricosuria was found in five of the six tested patients (83%). In our study, the most common associated anomalies with CSFK were urological. The presence of more than two associated urological anomalies increased the risk of CRF.

  18. Cystatin-C is associated with partial recovery of kidney function and progression to chronic kidney disease in living kidney donors

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sae-Gyul; Song, Jun-Gol; Hwang, Gyu Sam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Donor nephrectomy in living-donor kidney transplantation may result in hyperfiltration injury in remnant kidney; however, its clinical implication in partial recovery of kidney function (PRKF) in remnant kidney and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of PRKF on CKD development in the residual kidney and the utility of cystatin-C (Cys-C) in evaluating renal function in living-donor kidney transplantation donors. The electronic medical records and laboratory results of 1648 kidney transplant (KT) donors and 13,834 healthy nondonors between January 2006 and November 2014 were reviewed. The predictors of PRKF and CKD diagnosed by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria were evaluated by multivariate analysis. CKD risk was compared between KT donors and healthy nondonors using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis following propensity score matching (PSM). The incidence of PRKF for KT donors was 49.3% (813). CKD incidence was 24.8% (408) in KT donors and 2.0% (277) in healthy nondonors. The predictors of PRKF were, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 17.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.16–32.77), age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00–1.04; P < 0.001), Cys-C concentration (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00–1.04; P = 0.02), and preoperative albumin level (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.27–0.89; P = 0.02). The predictors of CKD were age (hazards ratio [HR], 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02–1.05; P < 0.001), Cys-C concentration (HR, 1.024; 95% CI, 1.012–1.037; P < 0.001), and PRKF (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.04–1.92; P = 0.03). After PSM, the risk of progression to CKD was higher in KT donors than in healthy nondonors (HR, 58.4; 95% CI, 34.2–99.8; P < 0.001). Donor nephrectomy is associated with PRKF and progression to CKD. Cys-C is a useful early marker for detecting PRKF and CKD. PMID:28151912

  19. Cystatin-C is associated with partial recovery of kidney function and progression to chronic kidney disease in living kidney donors: Observational study.

    PubMed

    Bang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sae-Gyul; Song, Jun-Gol; Hwang, Gyu Sam

    2017-02-01

    Donor nephrectomy in living-donor kidney transplantation may result in hyperfiltration injury in remnant kidney; however, its clinical implication in partial recovery of kidney function (PRKF) in remnant kidney and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of PRKF on CKD development in the residual kidney and the utility of cystatin-C (Cys-C) in evaluating renal function in living-donor kidney transplantation donors.The electronic medical records and laboratory results of 1648 kidney transplant (KT) donors and 13,834 healthy nondonors between January 2006 and November 2014 were reviewed. The predictors of PRKF and CKD diagnosed by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria were evaluated by multivariate analysis. CKD risk was compared between KT donors and healthy nondonors using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis following propensity score matching (PSM).The incidence of PRKF for KT donors was 49.3% (813). CKD incidence was 24.8% (408) in KT donors and 2.0% (277) in healthy nondonors. The predictors of PRKF were, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 17.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.16-32.77), age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.04; P < 0.001), Cys-C concentration (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.04; P = 0.02), and preoperative albumin level (OR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.27-0.89; P = 0.02). The predictors of CKD were age (hazards ratio [HR], 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.05; P < 0.001), Cys-C concentration (HR, 1.024; 95% CI, 1.012-1.037; P < 0.001), and PRKF (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.04-1.92; P = 0.03). After PSM, the risk of progression to CKD was higher in KT donors than in healthy nondonors (HR, 58.4; 95% CI, 34.2-99.8; P < 0.001).Donor nephrectomy is associated with PRKF and progression to CKD. Cys-C is a useful early marker for detecting PRKF and CKD.

  20. Acute kidney function and morphology following topload administration of recombinant hemoglobin solution.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Alexandre Fabricio; Abreu Martucci, Ana Carolina Carvalho Ferreira; Cabrales, Pedro; Nascimento, Paulo do; Intaglietta, Marcos; Tsai, Amy G; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado

    2017-02-01

    There is a 0.138% incidence of adverse reactions related to blood transfusion. Transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, fever, pathogen transmission, and hemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common ones. Synthetic oxygen carriers have been developed to deal with blood shortages and for use in the field where stored blood was not available. They were also designed to be pathogen free, including unknown viruses. In this study, we used Male Golden Syrian Hamsters implemented with a dorsal window chamber to determine how infusion of three different, genetically crosslinked recombinant acellular hemoglobin (rHb) solutions with different oxygen affinities and nitric oxide kinetics affect mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), kidney function, and kidney structure. We found that the administration of all three rHb solutions caused mild hypertension and bradycardia 30 minutes after infusion. However, acute changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were not detected, even though histological analysis was performed 72 hours after treatment revealed some structural changes. All the rHb solutions resulted in hypertension 30 minutes after a 10% topload administration. Regardless of their properties, the presence of acellular Hb causes significant alterations to kidney tissue.

  1. Angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor blockade different affects postishemic kidney injury in normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Miloradović, Zoran; Ivanov, Milan; Jovović, Đurđica; Karanović, Danijela; Vajić, Una Jovana; Marković-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Mihailović-Stanojević, Nevena; Milanović, Jelica Grujić

    2016-12-01

    Many studies demonstrated that angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor (AT1R) blockade accelerates renal recovery in post-ischaemic kidney but there are many controversies related to its net effect on kidney structure and function. During the past years, our research group was trying to define the pathophysiological significance of the renin-angiotensin system on post-ischemic acute renal failure (ARF) development in normotensive Wistar as well as hypertensive rats (SHR). This review mostly summarizes our experience in that field. Our previous studies in normotensive rats revealed that AT1R blockade, except slightly renal vascular resistance improvement, had no other obvious beneficial effects, and therefore implies angiotensin 2 (Ang-2) overexpression as non-dominant on kidney reperfusion injuries development. Similarly it was observed in Wistar rats with induced mild (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg b.w.) nitric oxide (NO) deficiency. Expectably, in strong induced (L-NAME, 10 mg/kg b.w.) NO deficiency associated with ARF, massive tubular injuries indicate harmful effects of AT1R blockade, implying strongly disturbed glomerular filtration and suggesting special precaution related to AT1R blockers usage. Opposite to previous, by our opinion, AT1R antagonism promises new advance in treatment of essentially hypertensive subjects who develop ARF. Increased glomerular filtration, diminished oxidative stress, and most importantly improved tubular structure in postishemic SHR treated with AT1R blocker losartan, implicate Ang-2 over production as potently agent in the kidney ischemic injury, partly trough generation of reactive oxygen species. These data contribute understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating illness in hypertensive surroundings.

  2. Estimating residual kidney function in dialysis patients without urine collection.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Tariq; Michels, Wieneke M; Levey, Andrew S; Inker, Lesley A; Dekker, Friedo W; Krediet, Raymond T; Hoekstra, Tiny; Schwartz, George J; Eckfeldt, John H; Coresh, Josef

    2016-05-01

    Residual kidney function contributes substantially to solute clearance in dialysis patients but cannot be assessed without urine collection. We used serum filtration markers to develop dialysis-specific equations to estimate urinary urea clearance without the need for urine collection. In our development cohort, we measured 24-hour urine clearances under close supervision in 44 patients and validated these equations in 826 patients from the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis. For the development and validation cohorts, median urinary urea clearance was 2.6 and 2.4 ml/min, respectively. During the 24-hour visit in the development cohort, serum β-trace protein concentrations remained in steady state but concentrations of all other markers increased. In the validation cohort, bias (median measured minus estimated clearance) was low for all equations. Precision was significantly better for β-trace protein and β2-microglobulin equations and the accuracy was significantly greater for β-trace protein, β2-microglobulin, and cystatin C equations, compared with the urea plus creatinine equation. Area under the receiver operator characteristic curve for detecting measured urinary urea clearance by equation-estimated urinary urea clearance (both 2 ml/min or more) were 0.821, 0.850, and 0.796 for β-trace protein, β2-microglobulin, and cystatin C equations, respectively; significantly greater than the 0.663 for the urea plus creatinine equation. Thus, residual renal function can be estimated in dialysis patients without urine collections.

  3. Functional and morphologic damage in the neonatally irradiated canine kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Peneyra, R.S.; Jaenke, R.S.

    1985-11-01

    Perinatal irradiation of the developing kidney results in progressive glomerulosclerosis (PGS) and renal failure. This syndrome may result from direct radiation damage to mature deep cortical nephrons and/or nephron functional adaptations resulting from outer cortical nephron ablation. Beagle dogs received single, whole-body exposures (330 R) to /sup 60/Co gamma radiation at 4 days of age (IR4) to study the combined effects of direct radiation damage and nephron loss, or at 30 days of age (IR30) to study the effects of renal irradiation alone. To study the effects of nephron loss alone, dogs underwent unilateral nephrectomy (UN4) or superficial hyperthermic renal ablation (HY4) at 4 days of age. Nephron loss due to irradiation (IR4) and partial renal ablation (UN4 and HY4) was associated with compensatory nephron hypertrophy and increased single nephron glomerular filtration rate (SNGFR), while irradiation at 30 days resulted in transitory decreased SNGFR. Similar degrees of PGS occurred in IR4 dogs which experienced both irradiation and loss of nephrons and UN4 and HY4 dogs which experienced only loss of nephrons. PGS of lesser severity also occurred in IR30 dogs. These findings indicate that PGS associated with perinatal renal irradiation results from direct radiation damage to deep cortical nephrons and compensatory functional changes occurring in response to loss of renal mass.

  4. Measuring dynamic kidney function in an undergraduate physiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-12-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on a "dipstick" approach of urinalysis. Although this technique can provide some basic insights into the functioning of the kidneys, it overlooks the dynamic processes of filtration, reabsorption, and secretion. In the present article, we provide a straightforward approach of using renal clearance measurements to estimate glomerular filtration rate, fractional water reabsorption, glucose clearance, and other physiologically relevant parameters. The estimated values from our measurements in laboratory are in close agreement with those anticipated based on textbook parameters. For example, we found glomerular filtration rate to average 124 ± 45 ml/min, serum creatinine to be 1.23 ± 0.4 mg/dl, and fractional water reabsorption to be ∼96.8%. Furthermore, analyses for the class data revealed significant correlations between parameters like fractional water reabsorption and urine concentration, providing opportunities to discuss urine concentrating mechanisms and other physiological processes. The procedures outlined here are general enough that most undergraduate physiology laboratory courses should be able to implement them without difficulty.

  5. Spontaneous Rupture of the Kidney Affected by Multifocal Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Atti, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Papillary renal cell carcinoma (pRCC) represents the second most common type of malignant renal epithelial tumor (represents the 10% of the kidney’s carcinoma) and can be subclassified in the basophile type I and eosinophile type II. We report a clinical case of spontaneous rupture of the kidney affected by multifocal (42 tumors foci) pRCC in a young man 53 years old, without showing earlier specific cancer signs and symptoms. Prognosis for type I pRCC is better than type II pRCC, but it is anyway related to the tumoral grade, to the tumoral stage and to the diagnostic precocity. Signs and symptoms are very similar to those characterizing the more frequent clear cell carcinoma. Nevertheless in the 40% of the cases the lesion is asymptomatic. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous rupture of the kidney affected by multifocal pRCC in literature without showing earlier specific cancer signs and symptoms. PMID:25568749

  6. Unilateral nephrectomy 24 hours after bilateral kidney irradiation reduces damage to the function and structure of the remaining kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Z.X.; Travis, E.L.

    1994-09-01

    The effect of unilateral nephrectomy 24 h after irradiation on renal function and death with renal insufficiency as well as histopathological changes in the kidney was assessed. Single doses totaling 8-18 Gy were given bilaterally to unanesthetized female and male C3Hf/Kam mice. Renal function damage was assayed by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and hematocrit (Hct). Histological damage was quantified by two parameters: kidney area and number of surviving tubule cells along the renal capsule. The number of glomeruli was scored as an indication of the number of nephrons. Changes in the two functional parameters did not appear sooner after irradiation in the nephrectomized mice than in the non-nephrectomized mice. Rather, less impairment of function was measured by both parameters in the nephrectomized mice but only after radiation doses greater than 12 Gy. The LD{sub 50} at 424 days after irradiation was also higher in the nephrectomized mice than in the mice receiving only irradiation, 13.98 Gy (95% confidence limits = 12.03, 15.93) and 11.71 Gy (95% confidence limits = 10.4, 13.1), respectively, in agreement with the data on function. Unilateral nephrectomy alone induced a 10% increase in size of the contralateral kidney. The dose-response curve for the kidney area from nephrectomized mice was parallel to and displaced above that for non-nephrectomized mice, indicating that the increase in renal mass occurred independent of and was not compromised by radiation. Unilateral nephrectomy alone induced no increase in the number of proximal tubules in the contralateral kidney. 30 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Intraoperative administration of inhaled carbon monoxide reduces delayed graft function in kidney allografts in Swine.

    PubMed

    Hanto, D W; Maki, T; Yoon, M H; Csizmadia, E; Chin, B Y; Gallo, D; Konduru, B; Kuramitsu, K; Smith, N R; Berssenbrugge, A; Attanasio, C; Thomas, M; Wegiel, B; Otterbein, L E

    2010-11-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion injury and delayed graft function (DGF) following organ transplantation adversely affect graft function and survival. A large animal model has not been characterized. We developed a pig kidney allograft model of DGF and evaluated the cytoprotective effects of inhaled carbon monoxide (CO). We demonstrate that donor warm ischemia time is a critical determinant of DGF as evidenced by a transient (4-6 days) increase in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen following transplantation before returning to baseline. CO administered to recipients intraoperatively for 1 h restored kidney function more rapidly versus air-treated controls. CO reduced acute tubular necrosis, apoptosis, tissue factor expression and P-selectin expression and enhanced proliferative repair as measured by phosphorylation of retinol binding protein and histone H3. Gene microarray analyses with confirmatory PCR of biopsy specimens showed that CO blocked proinflammatory gene expression of MCP-1 and heat shock proteins. In vitro in pig renal epithelial cells, CO blocks anoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death while promoting proliferation. This large animal model of DGF can be utilized for testing therapeutic strategies to reduce or prevent DGF in humans. The efficacy of CO on improving graft function posttransplant validates the model and offers a potentially important therapeutic strategy to improve transplant outcomes.

  8. Recovery of Native Renal Function in Patients with Hepatorenal Syndrome Following Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant with Mercaptoacetyltriglycine-3 Renogram: Developing a Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Bains, Sukhkarn N.; Carlson, David; Qian, Jesse; Liou, Douglas; Wojciechowski, David; Werner, Jacob; Khan, Sana; Kroll, Cameron; Sandhu, Manreet; Nguyen, Nhan; Hawkins, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) end up receiving a combined liver and kidney transplant (CKLT) with preservation of native kidneys, specially type 1 HRS since is characterizes by a very rapid deterioration of renal function. Eventually, most of the patients regain renal function, but it is unknown if this is due to the transplanted kidney, the recovery of native renal function, or both. The aim of this study is to evaluate if there is recovery of native renal function in patients with HRS following CKLT. 22 patients (16 men; 6 women) with history of HRS and status post CKLT were studied. Mercapto-acetyltriglycine-3 renograms in the anterior and posterior views with the three kidneys in the field of view were simultaneously acquired. The renograms were analyzed by creating regions of interest around the transplanted and native kidneys. Relative contribution to the renal function, clearance, and effective renal plasma flow for the transplanted and native kidneys were obtained. 1/22 (4.5%) patients presented with a very poor functioning transplanted kidney, in 15/22 (68%) cases the combined native renal function was markedly poorer than the transplanted renal function and in 6/22 (27%) native kidneys showed a contribution to the renal function similar to the transplanted kidney. In conclusion, our series show that around 32% of the HRS patients recovered their native renal function after CKLT. Identification of common factors that affect recovery of native renal function may help to avoid unnecessary renal transplants, significantly reducing morbidity and cost, while facilitating a reallocation of scarce donor resources. PMID:26912978

  9. Recovery of Native Renal Function in Patients with Hepatorenal Syndrome Following Combined Liver and Kidney Transplant with Mercaptoacetyltriglycine-3 Renogram: Developing a Methodology.

    PubMed

    Aparici, Carina Mari; Bains, Sukhkarn N; Carlson, David; Qian, Jesse; Liou, Douglas; Wojciechowski, David; Werner, Jacob; Khan, Sana; Kroll, Cameron; Sandhu, Manreet; Nguyen, Nhan; Hawkins, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) end up receiving a combined liver and kidney transplant (CKLT) with preservation of native kidneys, specially type 1 HRS since is characterizes by a very rapid deterioration of renal function. Eventually, most of the patients regain renal function, but it is unknown if this is due to the transplanted kidney, the recovery of native renal function, or both. The aim of this study is to evaluate if there is recovery of native renal function in patients with HRS following CKLT. 22 patients (16 men; 6 women) with history of HRS and status post CKLT were studied. Mercapto-acetyltriglycine-3 renograms in the anterior and posterior views with the three kidneys in the field of view were simultaneously acquired. The renograms were analyzed by creating regions of interest around the transplanted and native kidneys. Relative contribution to the renal function, clearance, and effective renal plasma flow for the transplanted and native kidneys were obtained. 1/22 (4.5%) patients presented with a very poor functioning transplanted kidney, in 15/22 (68%) cases the combined native renal function was markedly poorer than the transplanted renal function and in 6/22 (27%) native kidneys showed a contribution to the renal function similar to the transplanted kidney. In conclusion, our series show that around 32% of the HRS patients recovered their native renal function after CKLT. Identification of common factors that affect recovery of native renal function may help to avoid unnecessary renal transplants, significantly reducing morbidity and cost, while facilitating a reallocation of scarce donor resources.

  10. Modeling transport in the kidney: investigating function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical models of water and solute transport in the kidney have significantly expanded our understanding of renal function in both health and disease. This review describes recent theoretical developments and emphasizes the relevance of model findings to major unresolved questions and controversies. These include the fundamental processes by which urine is concentrated in the inner medulla, the ultrastructural basis of proteinuria, irregular flow oscillation patterns in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and the mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of thiazides. Macroscopic models of water, NaCl, and urea transport in populations of nephrons have served to test, confirm, or refute a number of hypotheses related to the urine concentrating mechanism. Other macroscopic models focus on the mechanisms, role, and irregularities of renal hemodynamic control and on the regulation of renal oxygenation. At the mesoscale, models of glomerular filtration have yielded significant insight into the ultrastructural basis underlying a number of disorders. At the cellular scale, models of epithelial solute transport and pericyte Ca2+ signaling are being used to elucidate transport pathways and the effects of hormones and drugs. Areas where further theoretical progress is conditional on experimental advances are also identified. PMID:19889951

  11. Rapamycin reduces kidney volume and delays the loss of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2009-04-01

    This is the first report of a case of a reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) receiving rapamycin. A 42-year-old man with ADPKD and a severe persistent bleeding from his solitary left kidney was successfully treated with tranexamic acid (TXA). He also received low-dose rapamycin for 8 months, and this was associated with a 23.5% reduction in kidney volume, improvement and stabilization of renal function, and normalization of haemoglobin levels. When treatment with rapamycin was interrupted, renal function deteriorated within an 8-month period and haemodialysis (HD) became necessary. Kidney volume increased at once, and life-threatening bleeding prompted a nephrectomy 4 months after the onset of HD. These data suggest that the reduction in kidney volume and preservation of renal function with rapamycin could be the result of the antiangiogenic, antiproliferative effects of rapamycin.

  12. Renal function in congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kemper, M J; Müller-Wiefel, D E

    2001-11-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract are a major cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in children. The molecular mechanisms having been elaborated, there is now growing evidence that kidney function is to a large extent determined genetically at an early stage. Assessment of kidney function is an important tool in clinical medicine and is feasible in utero. Postnatally, determination of absolute glomerular filtration rate and also of split and excretory renal function play an important role in the determination of treatment and prognosis. This is supplemented by other biochemical, molecular and interventional prognostic factors, which are of help in preservation of kidney survival by minimizing modulating factors. If chronic or terminal renal failure ensues in childhood or even in early infancy, however, improved medical care has led to encouraging results, ultimately influencing the motivation in the care of children with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

  13. [The effect of long-term lithium treatment on kidney function].

    PubMed

    Rybakowski, Janusz; Drogowska, Joanna; Abramowicz, Maria; Chłopocka-Woźniak, Maria; Czekalski, Stanisław

    2012-01-01

    In 1963 it was first demonstrated that long-term lithium administration exerts a "mood-stabilising" effect, preventing recurrences of mania and depression in bipolar affective disorder. Despite the introduction of many other drugs having mood-stabilising effect, lithium still remains the first choice drug for the prophylaxis of affective episodes in mood disorder. Lithium is eliminated nearly exclusively by the kidneys: lithium clearance is proportional to creatinine clearance and is influenced by natriuretic and antinatriuretic factors. Nowadays, nearly 40-year experience with long-term lithium treatment point to a possibility of nephrotoxic effects of this ion. Impaired urinary concentrating ability, which, in a few patients can reach an intensity of diabetes insipidus, can occur after several weeks of lithium administration. Favourable results in the treatment of diabetes insipidus have been obtained with amiloride, the drug which block epithelial sodium channel. However, after 10-20 years of treatment, lithium-induced interstitial nephropathy may be demonstrated in some patients, which, in small proportion of the latter may lead to end-stage renal disease. Lithium-induced hipercalcemia and nephrotic syndrome are rare complications of lithium therapy. In patients on long-term lithium therapy periodic monitoring of kidney function by measuring serum creatinine concentration and glomerular filtration rate is necessary. In case of detecting nephropathy, a discontinuation of lithium sho uld be considered. The patient in whom lithium was discontinued due to nephropathy should remain in nephrological treatment.

  14. Effects of dietary thia fatty acids on lipid composition, morphology and macrophage function of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) kidney.

    PubMed

    Gjøen, Tor; Kleveland, Ellen Johanne; Moya-Falcón, Corina; Frøystad, Marianne K; Vegusdal, Anne; Hvattum, Erlend; Berge, Rolf K; Ruyter, Bente

    2007-09-01

    High lipid levels are being used in modern salmonid diets to promote rapid growth; however there is a limiting supply of the traditional fish oils as the fish farming industry expands. One way to utilize the lipid sources better, could be to find ways to stimulate fatty acid (FA) oxidation so that Atlantic salmon use more energy for muscle growth and less for storage in perivisceral adipose tissue. We have previously shown that dietary inclusion of the thia FA tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) promoted hepatic beta-oxidation and reduced total body lipid levels. However, dietary TTA also had some negative effects, leading to accumulation of sulfone and sulfoxide metabolites of TTA in the kidney and increasing mortality rates, particularly at low water temperatures. Therefore we also wish to investigate the effects of TTA on kidney function at high and low temperatures, including some immune system parameters. The production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) immunoreactive material from exogenously added arachidonic acid in isolated head kidney macrophages was affected by both diet and temperature. The phagocytic activity in these cells was reduced by DTA in the 12 degrees C group and there was significantly higher protein degradation in head kidney macrophages at 12 degrees C compared to 5 degrees C in all dietary groups. Interestingly, the incorporation of thia FAs in the kidney was higher at 5 degrees C (0.3% TTA and 0.6% DTA) than at 12 degrees C (0.1% TTA and 0.5% DTA). Additionally, there were lower levels of saturated FAs, while higher levels of polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) in the kidney of TTA fed fish at 5 degrees C. We also observed temperature-independent tubular dilatation and a reduction in the density of melanomacrophages of the kidney in salmon fed TTA. Nevertheless, the mRNA expression of some immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue was not affected by TTA-inclusion in salmon diets. In conclusion, it is clear that 0.6% TTA

  15. Renal effects of nabumetone, a COX-2 antagonist: impairment of function in isolated perfused rat kidneys contrasts with preserved renal function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Reichman, J; Cohen, S; Goldfarb, M; Shina, A; Rosen, S; Brezis, M; Karmeli, F; Heyman, S N

    2001-01-01

    The constitutive cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 enzyme has been considered the physiologically important isoform for prostaglandin synthesis in the normal kidney. It has, therefore, been suggested that selective inhibitors of the 'inducible' isoform (COX-2) may be free from renal adverse effects. We studied the renal effects of the predominantly COX-2 antagonist nabumetone in isolated perfused kidneys. As compared with controls, kidneys removed after in vivo administration of oral nabumetone (15 mg/kg) disclosed altered renal function with reduced glomerular filtration rate, filtration fraction, and urine volume and enhanced hypoxic outer medullary tubular damage. By contrast, renal function and morphology were not affected in vivo by nabumetone or its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid. The latter agent (10-20 mg/kg i.v.) did not significantly alter renal microcirculation, as opposed to a selective substantial reduction in medullary blood flow noted with the nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.v.). In a rat model of acute renal failure, induced by concomitant administration of radiocontrast, nitric oxide synthase, and COX inhibitors, the decline in kidney function and the extent of hypoxic medullary damage with oral nabumetone (80 mg/kg) were comparable to a control group, and significantly less than those induced by indomethacin. In rats subjected to daily oral nabumetone for 3 consecutive weeks, renal function and morphology were preserved as well. Both nabumetone and 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid reduced renal parenchymal prostaglandin E2 to the same extent as indomethacin. It is concluded that while nabumetone adversely affects renal function and may intensify hypoxic medullary damage ex vivo, rat kidneys are not affected by this agent in vivo, both in acute and chronic studies. COX selectivity may not explain the renal safety of nabumetone.

  16. Awareness level of kidney functions and diseases among adults in a Nigerian population

    PubMed Central

    Okwuonu, C. G.; Chukwuonye, I. I.; Ogah, S. O.; Abali, C.; Adejumo, O. A.; Oviasu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of kidney diseases is on the increase in Nigeria. The cost of its management is far beyond the reach of an average patient. Prevention is thus of paramount importance and awareness of kidney diseases will help in its prevention. The aim of this study is to assess the level of awareness of kidney functions and diseases among adults in a Nigerian population. A semi-structured, researcher – administered questionnaire was the tool for data collection. Four hundred and thirty-five questionnaires were analyzed. There were 160 males (36.8%) and 275 females (63.2%). The mean age was 42.8 ± 14 years with a range of 18–78 years. Among these, 82.1% were aware of the kidneys' involvement in waste removal from the body through urine while 36% and 29% were aware of kidneys' role in blood pressure regulation and blood production, respectively. Only 26.6% correctly identified at least two basic functions of the kidneys. Also, 32.6% of the respondents were aware of at least three common causes of kidney diseases in our environment. Majority of the respondents (70.7%) did not know that kidney diseases could be inherited. Furthermore, belief in alternative therapy for kidney disease was documented in 83.2%, while unawareness of dialysis as a treatment modality was recorded in 68% of the respondents. The awareness of kidney functions and diseases among the population is poor. Measures are needed to improve this to stem the rising prevalence of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria. PMID:26060365

  17. Understanding Trends in Kidney Function 1 Year after Kidney Transplant in the United States.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihung; Tilea, Anca; Gillespie, Brenda; Shahinian, Vahakn; Banerjee, Tanushree; Grubbs, Vanessa; Powe, Neil; Rios-Burrows, Nilka; Pavkov, Meda; Saran, Rajiv

    2017-03-07

    Lower eGFR 1 year after kidney transplant is associated with shorter allograft and patient survival. We examined how practice changes in the past decade correlated with time trends in average eGFR at 1 year after kidney transplant in the United States in a cohort of 189,944 patients who received a kidney transplant between 2001 and 2013. We calculated the average eGFR at 1 year after transplant for the recipient cohort of each year using the appropriate Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation depending on the prevailing methodology of creatinine measurement, and used linear regression to model the effects of practice changes on the national post-transplant eGFR trend. Between the 2001-2005 period and the 2011-2013 period, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained essentially unchanged, with differences of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 1.65) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.32 to 1.01) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) among deceased and living donor kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Over time, the mean age of recipients increased and more marginal organs were used; adjusting for these trends unmasked a larger temporal improvement in post-transplant eGFR. However, changes in immunosuppression practice had a positive effect on average post-transplant eGFR and balanced out the negative effect of recipient/donor characteristics. In conclusion, average 1-year post-transplant eGFR remained stable, despite increasingly unfavorable attributes in recipients and donors. With an aging ESRD population and continued organ shortage, preservation of average post-transplant eGFR will require sustained improvement in immunosuppression and other aspects of post-transplant care.

  18. Functional cardiovascular reserve predicts survival pre-kidney and post-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Stephen M S; Iqbal, Hasan; Kanji, Hemali; Hamborg, Thomas; Aldridge, Nicolas; Krishnan, Nithya; Imray, Chris H E; Banerjee, Prithwish; Bland, Rosemary; Higgins, Robert; Zehnder, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance is an important comorbidity in patients with CKD. Anaerobic threshold (AT) determines the upper limits of aerobic exercise and is a measure of cardiovascular reserve. This study investigated the prognostic capacity of AT on survival in patients with advanced CKD and the effect of kidney transplantation on survival in those with reduced cardiovascular reserve. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, cardiovascular reserve was evaluated in 240 patients who were waitlisted for kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2010, and patients were followed for ≤5 years. Survival time was the primary endpoint. Cumulative survival for the entire cohort was 72.6% (24 deaths), with cardiovascular events being the most common cause of death (54.2%). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, patients with AT <40% of predicted peak VO2 had a significantly reduced 5-year cumulative overall survival rate compared with those with AT ≥40% (P<0.001). Regarding the cohort with AT <40%, patients who underwent kidney transplantation (6 deaths) had significantly better survival compared with nontransplanted patients (17 deaths) (hazard ratio, 4.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.78 to 11.38; P=0.002). Survival did not differ significantly among patients with AT ≥40%, with one death in the nontransplanted group and no deaths in the transplanted group. In summary, this is the first prospective study to demonstrate a significant association of AT, as the objective index of cardiovascular reserve, with survival in patients with advanced CKD. High-risk patients with reduced cardiovascular reserve had a better survival rate after receiving a kidney transplant.

  19. Evaluation of factors associated with cadmium exposure and kidney function in the general population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingai; Choi, Seong-Jin; Kim, Dong-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Bae, Hye-Sun; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon; Kim, Heon; Choi, Byung-Sun; Yu, Il-Je; Park, Jung-Duck

    2013-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential toxic metal which is widely distributed in the environment. The general population is exposed to low levels of Cd and the kidney is the organ most sensitive to Cd toxicity. This study was performed to simultaneously evaluate Cd exposure, kidney function, and oxidative stress biomarkers in the general population. A total of 643 adults were interviewed to document demographic characteristics, lifestyles, past-medical history, and diet during the last 24 h. We estimated daily Cd intake based on the diet of study subjects who had not been exposed to Cd occupationally. Whole blood and urine samples were collected and analyzed to determine Cd concentrations and kidney function indices (β₂ -microglobulin [β₂-MG], N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase [NAG], metallothionein [MT]). The oxidative stress index (malondialdehyde [MDA]) was determined from the urine. The daily Cd intake from diet was established as 7.07 μg/day. The mean concentration of Cd measured in the blood was 1.22 μg/L and urine was 0.95 μg/g creatinine. The concentrations of Cd in blood and urine were higher in females than in males. The blood levels of Cd were affected by sex, age, and smoking, and urine Cd was influenced by sex, age, and blood Cd. The urine Cd was positively correlated with MT, NAG activity, and MDA in females, but with NAG only in males. The blood Cd was associated with MT in males. Increased NAG activity was observed when Cd in urine reached 1.0 μg Cd/g creatinine and was also affected by age, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Urinary MT only responded to Cd in urine or blood. In summary, exposure to Cd in the general population was influenced by various factors including sex, age, and smoking habits. Such exposure might eventually cause tubular damage in the kidneys through the oxidative stress mechanism, and females might be more susceptible than males to Cd exposure under the environment.

  20. Basic fibroblast growth factor reduces functional and structural damage in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Sandra; Contreras, Felipe; Tapia, Andrés; Carreño, Juan E; Vergara, Cesar; Ewertz, Ernesto; Cespedes, Carlos; Irarrazabal, Carlos; Sandoval, Mauricio; Velarde, Victoria; Vio, Carlos P

    2014-02-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by loss of renal function. The pathological processes involved in the progression of this condition are already known, but the molecular mechanisms have not been completely explained. Recent reports have shown the intrinsic capacity of the kidney to undergo repair after acute injury through the reexpression of repairing proteins (Villanueva S, Cespedes C, Vio CP. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 290: R861-R870, 2006). Stimulation with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) could accelerate this process. However, it is not known whether bFGF can induce this phenomenon in kidney cells affected by CKD. Our aim was to study the evolution of renal damage in animals with CKD treated with bFGF and to relate the amount of repairing proteins with renal damage progression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy (NPX) and treated with bFGF (30 μg/kg, NPX+bFGF); a control NPX group was treated with saline (NPX+S). Animals were euthanized 35 days after bFGF administration. Functional effects were assessed based on serum creatinine levels; morphological damage was assessed by the presence of macrophages (ED-1), interstitial α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and interstitial collagen through Sirius red staining. The angiogenic factors VEGF and Tie-2 and the epithelial/tubular factors Ncam, bFGF, Pax-2, bone morphogenic protein-7, Noggin, Lim-1, Wnt-4, and Smads were analyzed. Renal stem cells were evaluated by Oct-4. We observed a significant reduction in serum creatinine levels, ED-1, α-SMA, and Sirius red as well as an important induction of Oct-4, angiogenic factors, and repairing proteins in NPX+bFGF animals compared with NPX+S animals. These results open new perspectives toward reducing damage progression in CKD.

  1. Compromised Diet Quality is Associated with Decreased Renal Function in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyerang; Lim, Hyunjung; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-07-01

    Nutritional status of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is important since it affects growth and development. This study was to investigate overall diet quality measured by nutrient intake adequacy, nutrient density, and several dietary habits in children with CKD and its relationship with clinical parameters according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Assessment of nutritional status and diet quality was conducted in nineteen children with CKD. Average Z-scores of height, weight and body mass index (BMI) in the participants were less than standard growth rate. Nutritional status, such as Z-scores of height (p < 0.05) and serum total protein (p < 0.05), were significantly lower in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2) compared to those with GFR ≥ 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Nutrition adequacy ratio of energy, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, iron, and zinc and overall diet quality were significantly poorer in the children with GFR < 75 mL/min/1.73 m(2). Poorer appetite and avoidance of food were observed in the children with higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Intakes of iron, zinc, thiamin, niacin, and vitamin B6 were positively correlated with GFR. Intakes of calcium, potassium and folate were positively correlated with BUN, while protein intakes were negatively correlated. Overall nutrient intakes were inadequate and diet quality was decreased as kidney function was decreased. Dietary habit and appetite were also related with kidney function in this study subjects. Systemic efforts of nutritional intervention are imperative to prevent deteriorating growth and development and improve the nutritional status in children with CKD.

  2. Effect of radiation processing on nutritional, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties of red kidney beans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marathe, S. A.; Deshpande, R.; Khamesra, Arohi; Ibrahim, Geeta; Jamdar, Sahayog N.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study dry red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), irradiated in the dose range of 0.25-10.0 kGy were evaluated for proximate composition, functional, sensory and antioxidant properties. Radiation processing up to 10 kGy did not affect proximate composition, hydration capacity and free fatty acid value. All the sensory attributes were unaffected at 1.0 kGy dose. The dose of 10 kGy, showed lower values for odor and taste, however, they were in acceptable range. Significant improvement in textural quality and reduction in cooking time was observed at dose of 10 kGy. Antioxidant activity of radiation processed samples was also assessed after normal processing such as soaking and pressure cooking. Both phenolic content and antioxidant activity evaluated in terms of DPPH free radical scavenging assay and inhibition in lipid peroxidation using rabbit erythrocyte ghost system, were marginally improved (5-10%) at the dose of 10 kGy in dry and cooked samples. During storage of samples for six months, no significant change was observed in sensory, cooking and antioxidant properties. Thus, radiation treatment of 1 kGy can be applied to get extended shelf life of kidney beans with improved functional properties without impairing bioactivity; nutritional quality and sensory property.

  3. Nephrin Preserves Podocyte Viability and Glomerular Structure and Function in Adult Kidneys.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuezhu; Chuang, Peter Y; D'Agati, Vivette D; Dai, Yan; Yacoub, Rabi; Fu, Jia; Xu, Jin; Taku, Oltjon; Premsrirut, Prem K; Holzman, Lawrence B; He, John Cijiang

    2015-10-01

    Nephrin is required during kidney development for the maturation of podocytes and formation of the slit diaphragm junctional complex. Because nephrin expression is downregulated in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin deficiency is considered a pathologic feature of glomerular injury. However, whether nephrin deficiency exacerbates glomerular injury in glomerular diseases has not been experimentally confirmed. Here, we generated mice with inducible RNA interference-mediated nephrin knockdown. Short-term nephrin knockdown (6 weeks), starting after the completion of kidney development at 5 weeks of age, did not affect glomerular structure or function. In contrast, mice with long-term nephrin knockdown (20 weeks) developed mild proteinuria, foot process effacement, filtration slit narrowing, mesangial hypercellularity and sclerosis, glomerular basement membrane thickening, subendothelial zone widening, and podocyte apoptosis. When subjected to an acquired glomerular insult induced by unilateral nephrectomy or doxorubicin, mice with short-term nephrin knockdown developed more severe glomerular injury compared with mice without nephrin knockdown. Additionally, nephrin-knockdown mice developed more exaggerated glomerular enlargement when subjected to unilateral nephrectomy and more podocyte apoptosis and depletion after doxorubicin challenge. AKT phosphorylation, which is a slit diaphragm-mediated and nephrin-dependent pathway in the podocyte, was markedly reduced in mice with long-term or short-term nephrin knockdown challenged with uninephrectomy or doxorubicin. Taken together, our data establish that under the basal condition and in acquired glomerular diseases, nephrin is required to maintain slit diaphragm integrity and slit diaphragm-mediated signaling to preserve glomerular function and podocyte viability in adult mice.

  4. Age-related changes in the function of autophagy in rat kidneys.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Shi, Suozhu; Cui, Shaoyuan; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guangyan; Chen, Xiangmei

    2012-04-01

    Autophagy is a highly regulated intracellular process for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, especially protein aggregates and damaged organelles. It is essential for maintaining healthy cells. Impaired or deficient autophagy is believed to cause or contribute to aging and age-related disease. In this study, we investigated the effects of age on autophagy in the kidneys of 3-, 12-, and 24-month-old Fischer 344 rats. The results revealed that autophagy-related gene (Atg)7 was significantly downregulated in kidneys of increasing age. The protein expression level of the autophagy marker light chain 3/Atg8 exhibited a marked decline in aged kidneys. The levels of p62/SQSTM1 and polyubiquitin aggregates, representing the function of autophagy and proteasomal degradation, increased in older kidneys. The level of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of mitochondrial DNA oxidative damage, was also increased in older kidneys. Analysis by transmission electron microscope demonstrated swelling and disintegration of cristae in the mitochondria of aged kidneys. These results suggest that autophagic function decreases with age in the kidneys of Fischer 344 rats, and autophagy may mediate the process of kidney aging, leading to the accumulation of damaged mitochondria.

  5. Acute presentations of renal artery stenosis in three patients with a solitary functioning kidney.

    PubMed

    Pun, E; Dowling, R J; Mitchell, P J

    2004-12-01

    Renal artery stenosis can present uncommonly in the acute state as flash pulmonary oedema and hypertensive encephalopathy. We present three such cases in patients with a solitary functioning kidney, with successful management via renal artery angioplasty and stent insertion.

  6. Kidney function assessment and its role in drug development, review and utilization.

    PubMed

    Tortorici, Michael A; Nolin, Thomas D

    2014-07-01

    A key regulatory requirement pertaining to drug development is characterization of the role of kidney function in drug disposition and response, along with provision of corresponding renal dose adjustment recommendations. Traditionally, this information has been derived from Phase I pharmacokinetic studies in which regulatory guidance exists for pharmaceutical manufacturers on the design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation of data. Categorization and stratification of subjects into kidney function groups and dosing recommendations have historically been based on creatinine clearance estimates using the Cockcroft-Gault equation. As new estimating equations have emerged, the choice of equation for assessment of kidney function has become an area of debate. This review highlights these equations and provides recent examples of the use of quantitative models, incorporating efficacy and safety to make rational dose recommendations in subjects with impaired kidney function.

  7. Kidney Function as a Determinant of HDL and Triglyceride Concentrations in the Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Michael; Ray, Udayan; Yu, Richard; Hudspeth, Andrew; Smillie, Michael; Jordan, Neville; Bartle, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a potent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD risk increases in a stepwise manner with increasing kidney impairment and is significantly reduced by kidney transplantation, suggesting a causal relationship. Dyslipidemia, a well recognised CVD risk factor, is highly prevalent in CKD. While dyslipidemia is a risk factor for CKD, kidney impairment can also induce a dyslipidemic state that may contribute to the excess burden of CVD in CKD. We utilised a multipronged approach to determine whether a causal relationship exists. Materials and Methods: Retrospective case-control analysis of 816 patients admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital in 2008–2009 with different degrees of kidney impairment and retrospective before-after cohort analysis of 60 patients who received a transplanted kidney between 1999 and 2009. Results: Decreased estimated GFR (eGFR) was independently associated with decreased high density lipoprotein (HDL, p < 0.0001) and increased triglyceride concentrations (p < 0.01) in multivariate analysis. There was no significant relationship between eGFR and low density lipoprotein (LDL) or total cholesterol in multivariate analysis. Kidney transplantation increased HDL (p < 0.0001) and decreased triglyceride (p = 0.007) concentration, whereas there was no significant change in LDL and total cholesterol. These effects were dependent on maintenance of graft function, statin therapy (those who were on) if graft failure occurred then HDL again decreased and triglycerides increased. Conclusions: Kidney transplantation ameliorated alterations in plasma lipoprotein profile associated with kidney impairment, an effect that was dependent on the maintenance of graft function. These data suggest that kidney function is a determinant of HDL and triglyceride concentrations in patients with CKD. PMID:27005668

  8. A Teaching Aid for Physiologists--Simulation of Kidney Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packer, J. S.; Packer, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Presented is the development of a simulation model of the facultative water transfer mechanism of the mammalian kidney. Discussion topics include simulation philosophy, simulation facilities, the model, and programming the model as a teaching aid. Graphs illustrate typical program displays. A listing of references concludes the article. (MA)

  9. Apelin and copeptin: two opposite biomarkers associated with kidney function decline and cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Antonio; Chirico, Valeria; Lupica, Rosaria; Buemi, Antoine; Loddo, Saverio; Caccamo, Chiara; Salis, Paola; Bertani, Tullio; Buemi, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) plays a detrimental role in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Copeptin represents a measurable substitute for circulating AVP whereas apelin counteracts AVP signaling. The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of apelin and copeptin for the progression of ADPKD disease. 52 ADPKD patients were enrolled and followed until the end of the observation period or the primary study endpoint was reached, defined by the combined outcome of decrease of glomerular filtration rate associated with a total renal volume increase. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was employed for identifying the progression of renal disease and Kaplan-Meier curves assessed the renal survival. Adjusted risk estimates for progression endpoint and incident renal replacement therapy (RRT) were calculated using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. ADPKD patients were characterized by lower apelin levels and higher copeptin levels when compared with healthy subjects. These biomarkers were strictly correlated with osmolality and markers of renal function. At ROC analysis, apelin and copeptin showed a very good diagnostic profile in identifying ADPKD progression. After the follow up of 24 months, 33 patients reached the endpoint. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis showed that apelin predicted renal disease progression and incident RRT independently of other potential confounders. Apelin is associated with kidney function decline in ADPKD, suggesting that it may be a new marker to predict kidney outcome.

  10. Failure to visualize acutely injured kidneys with technetium-99m DMSA does not preclude recoverable function

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A. Jr.; Akiya, F.; Gregory, M.C.

    1986-03-01

    A 35-yr-old patient developed severe acute tubular necrosis requiring hemodialysis. A (99mTc)dimercaptosuccinic acid scan of the kidneys showed no renal uptake at 4 or 24 hr, but the patient subsequently recovered normal renal function as judged by a normal serum creatinine. Based on this case report and a review of the literature, one cannot assume irreversible loss of function in patients with acute renal failure, based on the absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake by the kidneys.

  11. Microvascular resistance in response to iodinated contrast media in normal and functionally impaired kidneys.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Osamu; Takano, Masamichi; Uchiyama, Saori; Fukuizumi, Isamu; Shimura, Tetsuro; Matsushita, Masato; Komiyama, Hidenori; Inami, Toru; Murakami, Daisuke; Munakata, Ryo; Ohba, Takayoshi; Hata, Noritake; Seino, Yoshihiko; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-12-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is considered to result from intrarenal vasoconstriction, and occurs more frequently in impaired than in normal kidneys. It was hypothesized that iodinated contrast media would markedly change renal blood flow and vascular resistance in functionally impaired kidneys. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (32 men; mean age, 75.3 ± 7.6 years) undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography and were divided into two groups based on the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (CKD and non-CKD groups, n = 18 in both). Average peak velocity (APV) and renal artery resistance index (RI) were measured by Doppler flow wire before and after administration of the iodinated contrast media. The APV and the RI were positively and inversely correlated with the eGFR at baseline, respectively (APV, R = 0.545, P = 0.001; RI, R = -0.627, P < 0.001). Mean RI was significantly higher (P = 0.015) and APV was significantly lower (P = 0.026) in the CKD than in the non-CKD group. Both APV (P < 0.001) and RI (P = 0.002) were significantly changed following contrast media administration in the non-CKD group, but not in the CKD group (APV, P = 0.258; RI, P = 0.707). Although renal arterial resistance was higher in patients with CKD, it was not affected by contrast media administration, suggesting that patients with CKD could have an attenuated response to contrast media.

  12. Effect of telmisartan on kidney function in patients with chronic kidney disease: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Ashish; Kamila, Shibnath; Reddy, Swetha; Lilly, Joyal; Mariyala, MS Sadhguna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Globally the burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is rising, an important cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is involved in its pathogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of telmisartan (40 mg/day), an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) in Indian patients with CKD in real-life setting. Method: This was a prospective observational study. Fifty-six patients (>18 years) diagnosed with CKD were enrolled into the study. Serum creatinine, 24-h urinary protein, spot urine protein-to-creatinine ratio, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and blood pressure (BP) were assessed along with safety. Results: A total of 55 patients (96.36% hypertensive; 63.61% diabetic) with mean age of 48.23 years completed the study. At the end of 3 months treatment with telmisartan, 24-h urinary protein, spot urine protein-to-creatinine, serum creatinine and BP significantly reduced (p < .05) by 806.78 mg, 0.95, 0.44 mg/dl and 8.9/4.7 mmHg in the overall population. GFR increased from the baseline value of 52.13 to 65.01 ml/min. Telmisartan was well tolerated and treatment was discontinued in one patient because of hyperkalemia. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that telmisartan effectively and safely reduces proteinuria in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:27994942

  13. Antioxidant effects of maslinic acid in livers, hearts and kidneys of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: effects on kidney function.

    PubMed

    Mkhwanazi, Blessing N; Serumula, Metse R; Myburg, Rene B; Van Heerden, Fanie R; Musabayane, Cephas T

    2014-04-01

    Studies indicate that hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress triggers the development of microvascular and macrovascular complications in diabetes. Accordingly, we hypothesized that maslinic acid (MA) prevents these complications due to its antioxidant properties. We, therefore, investigated the effects of 5-week MA treatment of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats on anti-oxidative status of cardiac, hepatic and renal tissues as well as on kidney function. Proximal tubular effects of MA were studied in anesthetized rats challenged with hypotonic saline after a 3.5 h equilibration for 4 h of 1 h control, 1.5 h treatment and 1.5 h recovery periods using lithium clearance. MA was added to the infusate during the treatment period. Oral glucose tolerance responses to MA were monitored in rats given a glucose load after an 18 h fast. Compared with untreated diabetic rats, MA-treated diabetic animals exhibited significantly low malondialdehyde (MDA, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in hepatic, cardiac and renal tissues. The expressions of gastrocnemius muscle GLUT4 and kidney GLUT1 and GLUT2 were assessed to elucidate the mechanism of the hypoglycemic effects of MA. MA-treatment diminished the expression of GLUT1 and GLUT2 in diabetic kidney and reduced glycemia values of diabetic rats. MA administration increased urinary Na+ outputs and additionally the FENa indicating that at least part of the overall reduction in Na+ reabsorption occurred in the proximal tubules. These results suggest antioxidant effects of MA can ameliorate oxidative stress and improve kidney function in diabetes mellitus.

  14. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  15. Ethanolic extract of Clerodendrum violaceum Gürke leaves enhances kidney function in mouse model of malaria.

    PubMed

    Zailani, Ahmed H; Balogun, Elizabeth A; Adebayo, Joseph O

    2009-05-01

    Evaluation of the effects of daily oral administration of ethanolic extract of C. violaceum leaves (13 mg/kg body weight) for 5 days on some kidney function indices of uninfected and Plasmodium berghei-infected mice was done on days 3, 8 and 14 post-infection. The indices studied include serum urea and creatinine concentrations with the specific activities of alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase in the kidney. Treatment of P. berghei-infected mice with ethanolic extract of C. violaceum leaves (13 mg/kg body weight) for 5 days was able to ameliorate significantly the alterations in the various parameters observed in infected untreated mice, comparing favourably with chloroquine treatment in most cases. Administration of extract to uninfected mice had no significant effect on both serum and kidney parameters compared to the uninfected control. The results suggest that the ethanolic extract of C. violaceum leaves does not adversely affect kidney function at the dose used in traditional medicine for the treatment of malaria but rather enhances it.

  16. Improved Structure and Function in Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Rat Kidneys with Renal Tubular Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K J; Zhang, Jizhong; Han, Ling; Kamocka, Malgorzata; Miller, Caroline; Gattone, Vincent H; Dominguez, Jesus H

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease is a truly catastrophic monogenetic disease, causing death and end stage renal disease in neonates and children. Using PCK female rats, an orthologous model of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease harboring mutant Pkhd1, we tested the hypothesis that intravenous renal cell transplantation with normal Sprague Dawley male kidney cells would improve the polycystic kidney disease phenotype. Cytotherapy with renal cells expressing wild type Pkhd1 and tubulogenic serum amyloid A1 had powerful and sustained beneficial effects on renal function and structure in the polycystic kidney disease model. Donor cell engraftment and both mutant and wild type Pkhd1 were found in treated but not control PCK kidneys 15 weeks after the final cell infusion. To examine the mechanisms of global protection with a small number of transplanted cells, we tested the hypothesis that exosomes derived from normal Sprague Dawley cells can limit the cystic phenotype of PCK recipient cells. We found that renal exosomes originating from normal Sprague Dawley cells carried and transferred wild type Pkhd1 mRNA to PCK cells in vivo and in vitro and restricted cyst formation by cultured PCK cells. The results indicate that transplantation with renal cells containing wild type Pkhd1 improves renal structure and function in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease and may provide an intra-renal supply of normal Pkhd1 mRNA.

  17. Kidney function and blood pressure in preschool-aged children exposed to cadmium and arsenic - potential alleviation by selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Skröder, Helena; Hawkesworth, Sophie; Kippler, Maria; El Arifeen, Shams; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Moore, Sophie E.; Vahter, Marie

    2015-07-15

    Background: Early-life exposure to toxic compounds may cause long-lasting health effects, but few studies have investigated effects of childhood exposure to nephrotoxic metals on kidney and cardiovascular function. Objectives: To assess effects of exposure to arsenic and cadmium on kidney function and blood pressure in pre-school-aged children, and potential protection by selenium. Methods: This cross-sectional study was part of the 4.5 years of age (range: 4.4–5.4 years) follow-up of the children from a supplementation trial in pregnancy (MINIMat) in rural Bangladesh, and nested studies on early-life metal exposures. Exposure to arsenic, cadmium and selenium from food and drinking water was assessed by concentrations in children's urine, measured by ICP-MS. Kidney function was assessed by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, n=1106), calculated from serum cystatin C, and by kidney volume, measured by ultrasound (n=375). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was measured (n=1356) after five minutes rest. Results: Multivariable-adjusted regression analyzes showed that exposure to cadmium, but not arsenic, was inversely associated with eGFR, particularly in girls. A 0.5 µg/L increase in urinary cadmium among the girls (above spline knot at 0.12) was associated with a decrease in eGFR of 2.6 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2}, corresponding to 0.2SD (p=0.022). A slightly weaker inverse association with cadmium was also indicated for kidney volume, but no significant associations were found with blood pressure. Stratifying on children's urinary selenium (below or above median of 12.6 µg/L) showed a three times stronger inverse association of U-Cd with eGFR (all children) in the lower selenium stratum (B=−2.8; 95% CI: −5.5, −0.20; p=0.035), compared to those with higher selenium (B=−0.79; 95% CI: −3.0, 1.4; p=0.49). Conclusions: Childhood cadmium exposure seems to adversely affect kidney function, but not blood pressure, in this population of young children

  18. Hematuria and decreased kidney function as initial signs of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Kenney, Barton; McNamara, Joseph; Stein, Jeffrey; Moeckel, Gilbert W

    2010-11-01

    We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who presented with hematuria and decreased kidney function as initial manifestations of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Computed tomography of the abdomen showed extensive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and bilateral nephromegaly. The patient's kidney biopsy specimen showed a dense monomorphous interstitial infiltrate of small round blue cells with significant nuclear atypia. Immunohistochemical workup showed positive staining for CD20, CD10, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT), consistent with ALL. The patient underwent induction chemotherapy, attained remission 4 weeks after induction, and presently is stable in the consolidation phase of chemotherapy. This is an unusual case of ALL involving both kidneys with initial presenting signs of hematuria and decreased kidney function.

  19. Vicarious liver visualization in solitary functioning kidney with technetium-99m ethylenedicysteine renal scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Tarun Kumar; Phulsunga, Rohit Kumar; Gupta, Nitin; Sood, Ashwani; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of 3-year-old boy who was incidentally diagnosed to have single left kidney on ultrasonography. Dynamic technetium-99m ethylenedicysteine renal scintigraphy was acquired for assessing the existing kidney function showed the tracer localization in bilateral renal fossae during the entire study. The single-photon emission computerized tomography/computerized tomography study revealed activity in the right renal fossa to be in the enlarged right lobe of the liver, which was mimicking as impaired functioning right kidney in planar images. The hybrid imaging helped in accurate delineation of tracer uptake by confirming it to be the false appearance of the right kidney in planar imaging. This case report also highlights the possible mechanism of renal tracer uptake in the liver parenchyma. PMID:26170576

  20. Associations of Perfusate Biomarkers and Pump Parameters With Delayed Graft Function and Deceased Donor Kidney Allograft Function.

    PubMed

    Parikh, C R; Hall, I E; Bhangoo, R S; Ficek, J; Abt, P L; Thiessen-Philbrook, H; Lin, H; Bimali, M; Murray, P T; Rao, V; Schröppel, B; Doshi, M D; Weng, F L; Reese, P P

    2016-05-01

    Hypothermic machine perfusion (HMP) is increasingly used in deceased donor kidney transplantation, but controversy exists regarding the value of perfusion biomarkers and pump parameters for assessing organ quality. We prospectively determined associations between perfusate biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], kidney injury molecule 1, IL-18 and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP]) and pump parameters (resistance and flow) with outcomes of delayed graft function (DGF) and 6-mo estimated GFR (eGFR). DGF occurred in 230 of 671 (34%) recipients. Only 1-h flow was inversely associated with DGF. Higher NGAL or L-FABP concentrations and increased resistance were inversely associated with 6-mo eGFR, whereas higher flow was associated with higher adjusted 6-mo eGFR. Discarded kidneys had consistently higher median resistance and lower median flow than transplanted kidneys, but median perfusate biomarker concentrations were either lower or not significantly different in discarded compared with transplanted kidneys. Notably, most recipients of transplanted kidneys with isolated "undesirable" biomarker levels or HMP parameters experienced acceptable 6-mo allograft function, suggesting these characteristics should not be used in isolation for discard decisions. Additional studies must confirm the utility of combining HMP measurements with other characteristics to assess kidney quality.

  1. Monitoring the Intracellular Tacrolimus Concentration in Kidney Transplant Recipients with Stable Graft Function.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung Seok; Yang, Seung Hee; Kim, Min Chang; Cho, Joo-Youn; Min, Sang-Il; Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Dong Ki; Ha, Jongwon; Kim, Yon Su

    2016-01-01

    Although monitoring the intracellular concentration of immunosuppressive agents may be a promising approach to individualizing the therapy after organ transplantation, additional studies on this issue are needed prior to its clinical approval. We investigated the relationship between intracellular and whole blood concentrations of tacrolimus (IC-TAC and WB-TAC, respectively), the factors affecting this relationship, and the risk of rejection based upon IC-TAC in stable kidney recipients. Both IC-TAC and WB-TAC were measured simultaneously in 213 kidney recipients with stable graft function using LC-MS/MS. The tacrolimus ratio was defined as IC-TAC per WB-TAC. The genetic polymorphism of ABCB1 gene and flow cytometric analyses were conducted to probe the correlation between tacrolimus concentrations and the immunoreactivity status as a potential risk of rejection, respectively. The correlation between IC-TAC and WB-TAC was relatively linear (r = 0.67; P<0.001). The factors affecting the tacrolimus ratio were sex, hematocrit, and the transplant duration, as follows: a high tacrolimus ratio was noted in female patients, patients with a low hematocrit, and patients with a short transplant period. However, the tacrolimus ratio did not reflect the prior clinical outcomes (e.g., rejection) or the genetic polymorphism of ABCB1. After stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin, the proportion of T cells producing interferon-gamma or interleukin-2 was higher in the low-IC-TAC group than in the high-IC-TAC group. Further studies are required to evaluate the value of the intracellular tacrolimus concentrations in several clinical settings, such as rejection, infection, and drug toxicity.

  2. The transcriptome of the implant biopsy identifies donor kidneys at increased risk of delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Mueller, T F; Reeve, J; Jhangri, G S; Mengel, M; Jacaj, Z; Cairo, L; Obeidat, M; Todd, G; Moore, R; Famulski, K S; Cruz, J; Wishart, D; Meng, C; Sis, B; Solez, K; Kaplan, B; Halloran, P F

    2008-01-01

    Improved assessment of donor organ quality at time of transplantation would help in management of potentially usable organs. The transcriptome might correlate with risk of delayed graft function (DGF) better than conventional risk factors. Microarray results of 87 consecutive implantation biopsies taken postreperfusion in 42 deceased (DD) and 45 living (LD) donor kidneys were compared to clinical and histopathology-based scores. Unsupervised analysis separated the 87 kidneys into three groups: LD, DD1 and DD2. Kidneys in DD2 had a greater incidence of DGF (38.1 vs. 9.5%, p < 0.05) than those in DD1. Clinical and histopathological risk scores did not discriminate DD1 from DD2. A total of 1051 transcripts were differentially expressed between DD1 and DD2, but no transcripts separated DGF from immediate graft function (adjusted p < 0.01). Principal components analysis revealed a continuum from LD to DD1 to DD2, i.e. from best to poorest functioning kidneys. Within DD kidneys, the odds ratio for DGF was significantly increased with a transcriptome-based score and recipient age (p < 0.03) but not with clinical or histopathologic scores. The transcriptome reflects kidney quality and susceptibility to DGF better than available clinical and histopathological scoring systems.

  3. Maintenance of vascular integrity by pericytes is essential for normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    Lemos, Dario R; Marsh, Graham; Huang, Angela; Campanholle, Gabriela; Aburatani, Takahide; Dang, Lan; Gomez, Ivan; Fisher, Ken; Ligresti, Giovanni; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Duffield, Jeremy S

    2016-12-01

    Pericytes are tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitor cells anatomically associated with the vasculature that have been shown to participate in tissue regeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that kidney pericytes, derived from FoxD1(+) mesodermal progenitors during embryogenesis, are necessary for postnatal kidney homeostasis. Diphtheria toxin delivery to FoxD1Cre::RsDTR transgenic mice resulted in selective ablation of >90% of kidney pericytes but not other cell lineages. Abrupt increases in plasma creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, and albuminuria within 96 h indicated acute kidney injury in pericyte-ablated mice. Loss of pericytes led to a rapid accumulation of neutral lipid vacuoles, swollen mitochondria, and apoptosis in tubular epithelial cells. Pericyte ablation led to endothelial cell swelling, reduced expression of vascular homeostasis markers, and peritubular capillary loss. Despite the observed injury, no signs of the acute inflammatory response were observed. Pathway enrichment analysis of genes expressed in kidney pericytes in vivo identified basement membrane proteins, angiogenic factors, and factors regulating vascular tone as major regulators of vascular function. Using novel microphysiological devices, we recapitulated human kidney peritubular capillaries coated with pericytes and showed that pericytes regulate permeability, basement membrane deposition, and microvascular tone. These findings suggest that through the active support of the microvasculature, pericytes are essential to adult kidney homeostasis.

  4. Genome-Wide Association and Functional Follow-Up Reveals New Loci for Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Chouraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank B.; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Kolcic, Ivana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Endlich, Karlhans; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Giulianini, Franco; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Metzger, Marie; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem with a genetic component. We performed genome-wide association studies in up to 130,600 European ancestry participants overall, and stratified for key CKD risk factors. We uncovered 6 new loci in association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the primary clinical measure of CKD, in or near MPPED2, DDX1, SLC47A1, CDK12, CASP9, and INO80. Morpholino knockdown of mpped2 and casp9 in zebrafish embryos revealed podocyte and tubular abnormalities with altered dextran clearance, suggesting a role for these genes in renal function. By providing new insights into genes that regulate renal function, these results could further our understanding of the pathogenesis of CKD. PMID:22479191

  5. Does Swimming Exercise Affect Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease in Rats Treated with Gum Acacia?

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H.; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Al Balushi, Khalid A.; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Waly, Mostafa I.; Yasin, Javid; Adham, Sirin A.; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2014-01-01

    Different modes of exercise are reported to be beneficial in subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Similar benefits have also been ascribed to the dietary supplement gum acacia (GA). Using several physiological, biochemical, immunological, and histopathological measurements, we assessed the effect of swimming exercise (SE) on adenine –induced CKD, and tested whether SE would influence the salutary action of GA in rats with CKD. Eight groups of rats were used, the first four of which were fed normal chow for 5 weeks, feed mixed with adenine (0.25% w/w) to induce CKD, GA in the drinking water (15% w/v), or were given adenine plus GA, as above. Another four groups were similarly treated, but were subjected to SE during the experimental period, while the first four groups remained sedentary. The pre-SE program lasted for four days (before the start of the experimental treatments), during which the rats were made to swim for 5 to 10 min, and then gradually extended to 20 min per day. Thereafter, the rats in the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th groups started to receive their respective treatments, and were subjected to SE three days a week for 45 min each. Adenine induced the typical signs of CKD as confirmed by histopathology, and the other measurements, and GA significantly ameliorated all these signs. SE did not affect the salutary action of GA on renal histology, but it partially improved some of the above biochemical and physiological analytes, suggesting that addition of this mode of exercise to GA supplementation may improve further the benefits of GA supplementation. PMID:25048380

  6. Iron-restricted pair-feeding affects renal damage in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yoshiro; Senchi, Aya; Sawada, Hisashi; Oboshi, Makiko; Horimatsu, Tetsuo; Okuno, Keisuke; Yasumura, Seiki; Ishihara, Masaharu; Masuyama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Background We have previously shown that dietary iron restriction prevents the development of renal damage in a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, iron deficiency is associated with appetite loss. In addition, calorie restriction is reported to prevent the development of end-stage renal pathology in CKD rats. Thus, the beneficial effect of iron restriction on renal damage may depend on calorie restriction. Here, we investigate the effect of pair-feeding iron restriction on renal damage in a rat model of CKD. Methods First, to determine the amount of food intake, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly given an ad libitum normal diet or an iron-restricted diet, and the food intake was measured. Second, CKD was induced by a 5/6 nephrectomy in SD rats, and CKD rats were given either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet. Results Food intake was reduced in the iron-restricted diet group compared to the normal diet group of SD rats for 16 weeks (mean food intake; normal diet group and iron-restricted diet group: 25 and 20 g/day, respectively). Based on the initial experiments, CKD rats received either a pair-feeding normal or iron-restricted diet (20 g/day) for 16 weeks. Importantly, pair-feeding iron restriction prevented the development of proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and tubulointerstitial damage in CKD rats. Interestingly, pair-feeding iron restriction attenuated renal expression of nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor in CKD rats. Conclusions Pair-feeding iron restriction affected renal damage in a rat model of CKD. PMID:28196143

  7. Arteriolar hyalinization in implantation kidney biopsies as a predictor of graft function.

    PubMed

    Wazna, E; Pazik, J; Perkowska-Ptasińska, A; Lewandowski, Z; Nazarewski, S; Chmura, A; Durlik, M

    2009-10-01

    The shortage of organs suitable for transplantation has caused a constant evolution of donor acceptance criteria, making an implantation biopsy a valuable tool to predict kidney allograft survival. Preimplantation vascular changes may be divided into sclerosis or intimal fibrous thickening or arteriolar hyalinization. Increasing evidence has indicated their impact on graft function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of preimplantation arteriolar hyalinization for the stability of kidney allograft function. Among a prospective cohort study of 53 kidney recipients (implantation: 2006-2007) who showed serum creatinine values between 1 and 2 mg/dL at 3 months after engraftment, the mean observation time was 24 +/- 8.7 months. At the end of the observation, kidney function as defined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate by the Cockcroft-Gault formula (eGFR C-G) was significantly diminished in individuals with preimplantation evidences of arteriolar hyalinization (mean values: 51.2 +/- 14.8 and 62.0 +/- 16.7, respectively; P < .03) or serum creatinine concentrations (1.76 +/- 0.36 vs 1.51 +/- 0.48 mg/dL; P < .09). The negative influence of arteriolar hyalinosis on allograft function was time-dependent; an early satisfactory filtration rate did not preclude progressive kidney dysfunction.

  8. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis in a patient with normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    van Sloten, T T; Pijpers, E; Stehouwer, C D A; Brouwers, M C G J

    2012-06-01

    The existence of metformin-induced lactic acidosis has been questioned, in particular in the absence of specific risk factors such as impaired renal function. This report describes the presence of lactic acidosis in a patient with normal kidney function and normal doses of metformin. Subsequent positive rechallenge with metformin confirms causality.

  9. Copeptin Is Associated with Kidney Length, Renal Function, and Prevalence of Simple Cysts in a Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ackermann, Daniel; Vuistiner, Philippe; Guessous, Idris; Ehret, Georg; Alwan, Heba; Youhanna, Sonia; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Vogt, Bruno; Burnier, Michel; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Devuyst, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has a key role in osmoregulation by facilitating water transport in the collecting duct. Recent evidence suggests that AVP may have additional effects on renal function and favor cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Whether AVP also affects kidney structure in the general population is unknown. We analyzed the association of copeptin, an established surrogate for AVP, with parameters of renal function and morphology in a multicentric population-based cohort. Participants from families of European ancestry were randomly selected in three Swiss cities. We used linear multilevel regression analysis to explore the association of copeptin with renal function parameters as well as kidney length and the presence of simple renal cysts assessed by ultrasound examination. Copeptin levels were log-transformed. The 529 women and 481 men had median copeptin levels of 3.0 and 5.2 pmol/L, respectively (P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, the copeptin level was associated inversely with eGFR (β=−2.1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], −3.3 to −0.8; P=0.002) and kidney length (β=−1.2; 95% CI, −1.9 to −0.4; P=0.003) but positively with 24-hour urinary albumin excretion (β=0.11; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.20; P=0.03) and urine osmolality (β=0.08; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.10; P<0.001). A positive association was found between the copeptin level and the presence of renal cysts (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.4; P=0.02). These results suggest that AVP has a pleiotropic role in renal function and may favor the development of simple renal cysts. PMID:25270071

  10. Copeptin is associated with kidney length, renal function, and prevalence of simple cysts in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Belen; Pruijm, Menno; Ackermann, Daniel; Vuistiner, Philippe; Guessous, Idris; Ehret, Georg; Alwan, Heba; Youhanna, Sonia; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Péchère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Vogt, Bruno; Burnier, Michel; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Devuyst, Olivier; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-06-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has a key role in osmoregulation by facilitating water transport in the collecting duct. Recent evidence suggests that AVP may have additional effects on renal function and favor cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Whether AVP also affects kidney structure in the general population is unknown. We analyzed the association of copeptin, an established surrogate for AVP, with parameters of renal function and morphology in a multicentric population-based cohort. Participants from families of European ancestry were randomly selected in three Swiss cities. We used linear multilevel regression analysis to explore the association of copeptin with renal function parameters as well as kidney length and the presence of simple renal cysts assessed by ultrasound examination. Copeptin levels were log-transformed. The 529 women and 481 men had median copeptin levels of 3.0 and 5.2 pmol/L, respectively (P<0.001). In multivariable analyses, the copeptin level was associated inversely with eGFR (β=-2.1; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -3.3 to -0.8; P=0.002) and kidney length (β=-1.2; 95% CI, -1.9 to -0.4; P=0.003) but positively with 24-hour urinary albumin excretion (β=0.11; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.20; P=0.03) and urine osmolality (β=0.08; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.10; P<0.001). A positive association was found between the copeptin level and the presence of renal cysts (odds ratio, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.4; P=0.02). These results suggest that AVP has a pleiotropic role in renal function and may favor the development of simple renal cysts.

  11. Functional Status, Time to Transplantation, and Survival Benefit of Kidney Transplantation Among Wait-Listed Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Peter P.; Shults, Justine; Bloom, Roy D.; Mussell, Adam; Harhay, Meera N.; Abt, Peter; Levine, Matthew; Johansen, Kirsten L.; Karlawish, Jason T.; Feldman, Harold I.

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of an aging end-stage renal disease population with multiple comorbidities, transplantation professionals face challenges in evaluating the global health of patients awaiting kidney transplantation. Functional status might be useful for identifying which patients will derive a survival benefit from transplantation versus dialysis. Study Design Retrospective cohort study of wait-listed patients using data on functional status from a national dialysis provider linked to United Network for Organ Sharing registry data. Setting & Participants Adult kidney transplant candidates added to the waiting list between the years 2000 and 2006. Predictor Physical function scale of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Healthy Survey, analyzed as a time-varying covariate. Outcomes Kidney transplantation; Survival benefit of transplantation versus remaining wait-listed. Measurements We used multivariable Cox regression to assess the association between physical function with study outcomes. In survival benefit analyses, transplant status was modeled as a time-varying covariate. Results The cohort comprised 19,242 kidney transplant candidates (median age, 51 years; 36% black race) receiving maintenance dialysis. Candidates in the lowest baseline physical function quartile were more likely to be inactivated (adjusted HR vs. highest quartile, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.21-1.39) and less likely to undergo transplantation (adjusted HR vs. highest quartile, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.61-0.68). After transplantation, worse physical function was associated with shorter 3-year survival (84% vs. 92% for the lowest vs. highest function quartiles). However, compared to dialysis, transplantation was associated with a statistically significant survival benefit by 9 months for patients in every function quartile. Limitations Functional status is self-reported. Conclusions Even patients with low function appear to live longer with kidney transplantation versus dialysis. For waitlisted

  12. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  13. Evaluation of Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil effects on glycemic index, liver functions and kidney functions of New Zealand rabbits.

    PubMed

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Hamdi-Pacha, Y; Belkhiri, A M; Djaalab, H; Riachi, F; Serakta, M; Boukeloua, A; Maameri, Z

    2011-01-01

    Pistacia lentiscus fatty oil (PLFO) is a well known natural remedy in eastern Algeria folk medicine. It is widely used in the treatment of respiratory disorders and dermal burns. The present study has been carried out to investigate effects of this oil on fasting glucose and some functional parameters of the liver and kidney in white male New Zealand rabbits (Initial mean weight 1.95 Kg). PLFO was applied to tested rabbits (PLFO group) via rectal route, once daily 5-day per week, for six consecutive weeks at the dose of 1 ml/Kg body weight. The same number of animals (n=6) was not treated and served as control (CRL group). The results showed that PLFO was tolerated by rectal route. No significant differences were observed in body weights of the two groups. Biochemical analysis showed that aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were significantly decreased in blood plasma at (P< 0.05) and (P< 0.01) respectively in PLFO group (Mann-Whitney test). On the other hand, the fasting glucose level (GLU) was significantly increased (Mann-Whitney test, P< 0.05), while the rest of the tested parameters (Albumin, total proteins, creatinine, urea) was not significantly affected. However, these variations have not biologic signification toxicity. The study concludes that PLFO is tolerable via rectal route; it is safe with no adverse effect on liver functions and renal functions with possible anti-glycogenesis activity.

  14. Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities and Kidney Function Decline: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shlipak, Michael G.; Katz, Ronit; Agarwal, Subhashish; Ix, Joachim H.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Peralta, Carmen A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Clinical heart failure (HF) is associated with CKD and faster rates of kidney function decline. Whether subclinical abnormalities of cardiac structure are associated with faster kidney function decline is not known. The association between cardiac concentricity and kidney function decline was evaluated. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This is a longitudinal study of 3866 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (2000–2007) who were free of clinical cardiovascular disease, with an estimated GFR (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 at baseline and 5 years of follow-up. Concentricity, a measurement of abnormal cardiac size, was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and evaluated as a continuous measurement and in quartiles. GFR was estimated by creatinine (eGFRcr) and cystatin C (eGFRcys). The association of concentricity with annual eGFR decline, incident CKD, and rapid kidney function decline (>5% per year) was investigated using linear mixed models as well as Poisson and logistic regression, respectively. Analyses adjusted for demographics, BP, diabetes, and inflammatory markers. Results Median decline was −0.8 (interquartile range, −3.1, −0.5) by eGFRcr. Compared with the lowest quartile of concentricity, persons in the highest quartile had an additional 21% (9%–32%) decline in mean eGFRcr in fully adjusted models. Concentricity was also associated with incident CKD and with rapid kidney function decline after adjustment. Conclusions Subclinical abnormalities in cardiac structure are associated with longitudinal kidney function decline independent of diabetes and hypertension. Future studies should examine mechanisms to explain these associations. PMID:22580783

  15. Analysis of Nephron Composition and Function in the Adult Zebrafish Kidney

    PubMed Central

    McCampbell, Kristen K.; Springer, Kristin N.; Wingert, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish model has emerged as a relevant system to study kidney development, regeneration and disease. Both the embryonic and adult zebrafish kidneys are composed of functional units known as nephrons, which are highly conserved with other vertebrates, including mammals. Research in zebrafish has recently demonstrated that two distinctive phenomena transpire after adult nephrons incur damage: first, there is robust regeneration within existing nephrons that replaces the destroyed tubule epithelial cells; second, entirely new nephrons are produced from renal progenitors in a process known as neonephrogenesis. In contrast, humans and other mammals seem to have only a limited ability for nephron epithelial regeneration. To date, the mechanisms responsible for these kidney regeneration phenomena remain poorly understood. Since adult zebrafish kidneys undergo both nephron epithelial regeneration and neonephrogenesis, they provide an outstanding experimental paradigm to study these events. Further, there is a wide range of genetic and pharmacological tools available in the zebrafish model that can be used to delineate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate renal regeneration. One essential aspect of such research is the evaluation of nephron structure and function. This protocol describes a set of labeling techniques that can be used to gauge renal composition and test nephron functionality in the adult zebrafish kidney. Thus, these methods are widely applicable to the future phenotypic characterization of adult zebrafish kidney injury paradigms, which include but are not limited to, nephrotoxicant exposure regimes or genetic methods of targeted cell death such as the nitroreductase mediated cell ablation technique. Further, these methods could be used to study genetic perturbations in adult kidney formation and could also be applied to assess renal status during chronic disease modeling. PMID:25145398

  16. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  17. Grape Powder Improves Age-Related Decline in Mitochondrial and Kidney Functions in Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Quaisar

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects and mechanism of grape powder- (GP-) mediated improvement, if any, on aging kidney function. Adult (3-month) and aged (21-month) Fischer 344 rats were treated without (controls) and with GP (1.5% in drinking water) and kidney parameters were measured. Control aged rats showed higher levels of proteinuria and urinary kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), which decreased with GP treatment in these rats. Renal protein carbonyls (protein oxidation) and gp91phox-NADPH oxidase levels were high in control aged rats, suggesting oxidative stress burden in these rats. GP treatment in aged rats restored these parameters to the levels of adult rats. Moreover, glomerular filtration rate and sodium excretion were low in control aged rats suggesting compromised kidney function, which improved with GP treatment in aged rats. Interestingly, low renal mitochondrial respiration and ATP levels in control aged rats were associated with reduced levels of mitochondrial biogenesis marker MtTFA. Also, Nrf2 proteins levels were reduced in control aged rats. GP treatment increased levels of MtTFA and Nrf2 in aged rats. These results suggest that GP by potentially regulating Nrf2 improves aging mitochondrial and kidney functions. PMID:27528887

  18. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Fassett, Robert G; Bulmer, Andrew C

    2015-10-26

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin's antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations.

  19. Endogenously elevated bilirubin modulates kidney function and protects from circulating oxidative stress in a rat model of adenine-induced kidney failure

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Ai-Ching; Lam, Alfred K.; Gopalan, Vinod; Benzie, Iris F.; Briskey, David; Coombes, Jeff S.; Fassett, Robert G.; Bulmer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Mildly elevated bilirubin is associated with a reduction in the presence and progression of chronic kidney disease and related mortality, which may be attributed to bilirubin’s antioxidant properties. This study investigated whether endogenously elevated bilirubin would protect against adenine-induced kidney damage in male hyperbilirubinaemic Gunn rats and littermate controls. Animals were orally administered adenine or methylcellulose solvent (vehicle) daily for 10 days and were then monitored for 28 days. Serum and urine were assessed throughout the protocol for parameters of kidney function and antioxidant/oxidative stress status and kidneys were harvested for histological examination upon completion of the study. Adenine-treated animals experienced weight-loss, polyuria and polydipsia; however, these effects were significantly attenuated in adenine-treated Gunn rats. No difference in the presence of dihydroadenine crystals, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were noted in Gunn rat kidneys versus controls. However, plasma protein carbonyl and F2-isoprostane concentrations were significantly decreased in Gunn rats versus controls, with no change in urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine or kidney tissue F2-isoprostane concentrations. These data indicated that endogenously elevated bilirubin specifically protects from systemic oxidative stress in the vascular compartment. These data may help to clarify the protective relationship between bilirubin, kidney function and cardiovascular mortality in clinical investigations. PMID:26498893

  20. Generation of Functional Kidney Organoids In Vivo Starting from a Single-Cell Suspension.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Valentina; Brizi, Valerio; Xinaris, Christodoulos

    2016-08-19

    Novel methods in developmental biology and stem cell research have made it possible to generate complex kidney tissues in vitro that resemble whole organs and are termed organoids. In this chapter we describe a technique using suspensions of fully dissociated mouse kidney cells to yield organoids that can become vascularized in vivo and mature and display physiological functions. This system can be used to produce fine-grained human-mouse chimeric organoids in which the renal differentiation potential of human cells can be assessed. It can also be an excellent method for growing chimeric organoids in vivo using human stem cells, which can differentiate into specialized kidney cells and exert nephron-specific functions. We provide detailed methods, a brief discussion of critical points, and describe some successfully implemented examples of the system.

  1. Study Protocol - Accurate assessment of kidney function in Indigenous Australians: aims and methods of the eGFR Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an overwhelming burden of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease among Indigenous Australians. In this high risk population, it is vital that we are able to measure accurately kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate is the best overall marker of kidney function. However, differences in body build and body composition between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians suggest that creatinine-based estimates of glomerular filtration rate derived for European populations may not be appropriate for Indigenous Australians. The burden of kidney disease is borne disproportionately by Indigenous Australians in central and northern Australia, and there is significant heterogeneity in body build and composition within and amongst these groups. This heterogeneity might differentially affect the accuracy of estimation of glomerular filtration rate between different Indigenous groups. By assessing kidney function in Indigenous Australians from Northern Queensland, Northern Territory and Western Australia, we aim to determine a validated and practical measure of glomerular filtration rate suitable for use in all Indigenous Australians. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study of Indigenous Australian adults (target n = 600, 50% male) across 4 sites: Top End, Northern Territory; Central Australia; Far North Queensland and Western Australia. The reference measure of glomerular filtration rate was the plasma disappearance rate of iohexol over 4 hours. We will compare the accuracy of the following glomerular filtration rate measures with the reference measure: Modification of Diet in Renal Disease 4-variable formula, Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation, Cockcroft-Gault formula and cystatin C- derived estimates. Detailed assessment of body build and composition was performed using anthropometric measurements, skinfold thicknesses, bioelectrical impedance and a sub-study used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. A

  2. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.

  3. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  4. Genetic polymorphisms of Interleukin-18 are not associated with allograft function in kidney transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Wenna Gleyce Araújo; Cilião, Daiani Alves; Genre, Julieta; Gondim, Dikson Dibe; Alves, Renata Gomes; Hassan, Neife Deghaide; Lima, Francisco Pignataro; Pereira, Maurício Galvão; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; de Oliveira Crispim, Janaina Cristiana

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 18 (IL-18) is a proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in host defense by upregulating both innate and acquired immune responses. Analysis of IL18 polymorphisms may be clinically important since their roles have been recognized in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, the role of this cytokine polymorphisms in kidney transplant still remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the associations between IL18 polymorphisms and graft function assessed by creatinine clearance in kidney transplant recipients. A total of 82 kidney transplant recipients and 183 healthy controls were enrolled, and frequencies of alleles, genotypes and haplotypes for IL18 polymorphisms were determined and compared with creatinine clearance. The -607C/A (rs1946518) and -137C/G (rs187238) variant alleles in the IL18 gene were determined by polymerase chain reaction. In our study, no significant association was found between the IL18 variants and creatinine clearance (p > 0.05). Nonetheless, polymorphism analysis revealed an increase in the frequency of the IL18 major haplotype -607C/-137G in kidney transplant patients (odds ratio 2.57, 95% confidence interval 1.45–4.55, p = 0.0014). Finally, we found that IL18 polymorphisms did not influence the renal function and that IL18 haplotype -607C/-137G seems to be associated with kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25071398

  5. α-Melanocyte stimulating hormone treatment in pigs does not improve early graft function in kidney transplants from brain dead donors.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Willem G; Secher, Niels; Keller, Anna K; Møldrup, Ulla; Chynau, Yahor; Ploeg, Rutger J; van Goor, Harry; Nørregaard, Rikke; Birn, Henrik; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Nielsen, Søren; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Jespersen, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Delayed graft function and primary non-function are serious complications following transplantation of kidneys derived from deceased brain dead (DBD) donors. α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide and its renoprotective effects have been demonstrated in models of acute kidney injury. We hypothesized that α-MSH treatment of the recipient improves early graft function and reduces inflammation following DBD kidney transplantation. Eight Danish landrace pigs served as DBD donors. After four hours of brain death both kidneys were removed and stored for 18 hours at 4°C in Custodiol preservation solution. Sixteen recipients were randomized in a paired design into two treatment groups, transplanted simultaneously. α-MSH or a vehicle was administered at start of surgery, during reperfusion and two hours post-reperfusion. The recipients were observed for ten hours following reperfusion. Blood, urine and kidney tissue samples were collected during and at the end of follow-up. α-MSH treatment reduced urine flow and impaired recovery of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) compared to controls. After each dose of α-MSH, a trend towards reduced mean arterial blood pressure and increased heart rate was observed. α-MSH did not affect expression of inflammatory markers. Surprisingly, α-MSH impaired recovery of renal function in the first ten hours following DBD kidney transplantation possibly due to hemodynamic changes. Thus, in a porcine experimental model α-MSH did not reduce renal inflammation and did not improve short-term graft function following DBD kidney transplantation.

  6. Kidney Dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Dysplasia What is kidney dysplasia? Kidney dysplasia is a condition in which ... Kidney dysplasia in one kidney What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  7. Functional genetic targeting of embryonic kidney progenitor cells ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M Rita; Brändli, André W; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya; Vainio, Seppo J

    2015-05-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor-treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting.

  8. The kidney disease quality of life cognitive function subscale and cognitive performance maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Cognitive impairment is common but often undiagnosed in patients with end-stage renal disease, in part reflecting limited validated and easily administered tools to assess cognitive function in dialysis patients. Accordingly, we assessed the utility of the Kidney Disease Quality of Life ...

  9. Donor kidney adapts to body dimensions of recipient: no influence of donor gender on renal function after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tent, H; Lely, A T; Toering, T J; San Giorgi, M R M; Rook, M; Lems, S P M; Hepkema, B G; Hofker, H S; Ploeg, R J; Homan van der Heide, J J; Navis, G J

    2011-10-01

    Female kidneys and kidneys from small donors have been suggested to perform worse after kidney transplantation. Here, we evaluate the impact of gender and body dimensions on posttransplantation GFR in living donor transplantation. Two hundred and ninety-three donor-recipient pairs, who were transplanted at our center were evaluated. All pairs had detailed renal function measurement ((125) I-iothalamate and (131) I-hippuran) 4 months predonation in the donor and 2.5 months posttransplantation in donor and recipient. For 88 pairs, 5 years of recipient follow-up was available. Delta GFR was calculated as (recipient GFR-donor single kidney GFR). Recipients of both male and female kidneys had similar renal function at early and long term after transplantation. Male recipients had higher ERPF, ΔGFR and ΔERPF at both time points. Kidneys of donors smaller than their recipient had higher ΔGFR and ΔERPF than kidneys of larger donors at both time points (p < 0.05). In multivariate analysis, ΔGFR was predicted by donor/recipient BSA-ratio together with transplantation related factors (R(2) 0.19), irrespective of donor and recipient gender. In conclusion, in living donor transplantation, female kidneys perform as well as male donor kidneys. Kidneys adapt to the recipient's body size and demands, independent of gender, without detrimental effects in renal function and outcome up to mid-long term.

  10. Antigravity suit inflation - Kidney function and cardiovascular and hormonal responses in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, Ghislaine; Kravik, Stein E.; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Leftheriotis, Georges; Vincent, Madeleine

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on kidney function in normal men was investigated in experiments in which the subjects underwent 30 min of sitting and then were subjected to 4.5 h of 70-deg head-up tilt. During the last 3 h of the tilt period, an antigravity suit (60 T legs, 30 T abdomen) was applied. The results showed that LBPP induces a significant increase in effective renal plasma flow and significant changes in the kidney excretory patterns, which were similar to those observed during a water immersion or the early phase of bed rest.

  11. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Belis, J A; Belis, T E; Lai, J C; Goodwin, C A; Gabriele, O F

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and 131iodine orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on 99mtechnetium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the 131iodine orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  12. Radionuclide determination of individual kidney function in the treatment of chronic renal obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Belis, J.A.; Belis, T.E.; Lai, J.C.; Goodwin, C.A.; Gabriele, O.F.

    1982-04-01

    Differential radionuclide renal scans can be useful in the management of patients with chronic partial obstruction of 1 kidney. The /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid perfusion scan can be used to assess glomerular blood flow. The /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scan provides qualitative functional information from scintigrams and quantitative evaluation of effective renal plasma flow to each kidney, as well as a total excretory index. Sequential /sup 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate renal scans were used to assess individual renal function before and after surgical correction of unilateral chronic renal obstruction in 31 patients. The preservation of cortical perfusion on /supb 99m/Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid scans indicated that potential existed for partial recovery of renal function. Effective renal plasma flow and excretory index determined in conjunction with the /sup 131/I orthoiodohippurate scans provided a quantitative assessment of preoperative renal function, an evaluation of the effect of surgery and a sensitive method for long-term evaluation of differential renal function. Correction of ureteropelvic junction obstruction usually resulted in improvement in unilateral renal function. Neither nephrolithotomy nor extended pyelolithotomy diminished renal function in the kidney subjected to an operation and often improved it. Patients with long-standing distal ureteral obstruction had the least improvement in renal function postoperatively.

  13. Shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) induces significant structural and functional changes in the kidney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, Andrew P.; Willis, Lynn R.; Lingeman, James E.

    2003-10-01

    The foundation for understanding SWL-injury has been well-controlled renal structural and functional studies in pigs, a model that closely mimics the human kidney. A clinical dose (2000 shocks at 24 kV) of SWL administered by the Dornier HM3 induces a predictable, unique vascular injury at F2 that is associated with transient renal vasoconstriction, seen as a reduction in renal plasma flow, in both treated and untreated kidneys. Unilateral renal denervation studies links the fall in blood flow in untreated kidneys to autonomic nerve activity in the treated kidney. SWL-induced trauma is associated with an acute inflammatory process, termed Lithotripsy Nephritis and tubular damage at the site of damage that leads to a focal region of scar. Lesion size increases with shock number and kV level. In addition, risk factors like kidney size and pre-existing renal disease (e.g., pyelonephritis), can exaggerate the predicted level of renal impairment. Our new protection data show that lesion size can be greatly reduced by a pretreatment session with low kV and shock number. The mechanisms of soft tissue injury probably involves shear stress followed by acoustic cavitation. Because of the perceived enhanced level of bioeffects from 3rd generation lithotripters, these observations are more relevant than ever.

  14. Impact of acute kidney injury on distant organ function: recent findings and potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kent; Rabb, Hamid

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in critically ill patients and subsequently worsens outcomes. Although many drugs to prevent and treat AKI have shown benefits in preclinical models, no specific agent has been shown to benefit AKI in humans. Moreover, despite remarkable advances in dialysis techniques that enable management of AKI in hemodynamically unstable patients with shock, dialysis-requiring severe AKI is still associated with an unacceptably high mortality rate. Thus, focusing only on kidney damage and loss of renal function has not been sufficient to improve outcomes of patients with AKI. Recent data from basic and clinical research have begun to elucidate complex organ interactions in AKI between kidney and distant organs, including heart, lung, spleen, brain, liver, and gut. This review serves to update the topic of organ cross talk in AKI and focuses on potential therapeutic targets to improve patient outcomes during AKI-associated multiple organ failure.

  15. Molecular pathways involved in loss of kidney graft function with tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Daniel G; Mas, Valeria R; Archer, Kellie J; Yanek, Kenneth; Gibney, Eric M; King, Anne L; Cotterell, Adrian; Fisher, Robert A; Posner, Marc P

    2008-01-01

    Loss of kidney graft function with tubular atrophy (TA) and interstitial fibrosis (IF) causes most kidney allograft losses. We aimed to identify the molecular pathways involved in IF/TA progression. Kidney biopsies from normal kidneys (n = 24), normal allografts (n = 6), and allografts with IF/TA (n = 17) were analyzed using high-density oligonucleotide microarray. Probe set level tests of hypotheses tests were conducted to identify genes with a significant trend in gene expression across the three groups using Jonckheere-Terpstra test for trend. Interaction networks and functional analysis were used. An unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis showed that all the IF/TA samples were associated with high correlation. Gene ontology classified the differentially expressed genes as related to immune response, inflammation, and matrix deposition. Chemokines (CX), CX receptor (for example, CCL5 and CXCR4), interleukin, and interleukin receptor (for example, IL-8 and IL10RA) genes were overexpressed in IF/TA samples compared with normal allografts and normal kidneys. Genes involved in apoptosis (for example, CASP4 and CASP5) were importantly overexpressed in IF/TA. Genes related to angiogenesis (for example, ANGPTL3, ANGPT2, and VEGF) were downregulated in IF/TA. Genes related to matrix production-deposition were upregulated in IF/TA. A distinctive gene expression pattern was observed in IF/TA samples compared with normal allografts and normal kidneys. We were able to establish a trend in gene expression for genes involved in different pathways among the studied groups. The top-scored networks were related to immune response, inflammation, and cell-to-cell interaction, showing the importance of chronic inflammation in progressive graft deterioration.

  16. [The use of dynamic renal scintigraphy for studying kidney functional disorders in patients with different forms of hypercorticism].

    PubMed

    Komissarenko, I V; Slavnov, V N; Markov, V V; Demchenko, N P; Kvacheniuk, A N; Kovalenko, A E

    1996-01-01

    Results are submitted of studying the function of the kidneys in 34 patients with Itsenko [correction of Icenko]-Cushing disease and syndrome, who were evaluated by dynamic renoscintigraphy besides routine clinical procedures. Dynamic renoscintigraphy was found to be an important diagnostic acid enabling one to disclose function disorders of the kidneys in the preclinical stage under normal routine investigations. In this setting, there have been revealed disturbances both in secretory-filtrational and excretory and aggregate functions of the kidneys practically in all the patients irrespective of the type of hypercorticoidism. Surgical treatment of hypercorticoidism does not lead to normalization of the function of the kidneys. And what is more, function disorders of the kidney on the side of the surgical intervention appear to be even more serious.

  17. Assessment of allograft function using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Anupma; Sharma, Raj Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Lal, Hira; Yadav, Abhishek; Bhadhuria, Dharmendra; Prasad, Narayan; Gupta, Amit

    2014-11-01

    Developing a non-invasive method such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) could be used as a feasible and reproducible modality in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction. We assessed the functional status of the renal allograft by DWMRI and its applicability in assessment of graft dysfunction on all end-stage renal transplant patients who attained normal renal function on the 7th day post-transplantation. Follow-up imaging of the recipient allograft was performed at the end of 90 and 180 days and in case of graft dysfunction. Kidney biopsies were performed to correlate with the corresponding MRI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps of the cortex and medulla were obtained by studying the DWMRI. The ADC values were significantly lower in the medulla compared with the cortex in normal donor kidneys and normally functioning transplanted kidneys, while they decreased significantly when rejection occurred. The reduction in ADC values occurred both in the cortex and in the medulla, and correlated with the degree of rejection on the kidney biopsies. The ADC values increased significantly during the recovery from rejection. We conclude that DWMRI can be beneficial in the diagnosis and follow-up of transplant patients during acute rejection.

  18. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  19. Measuring Dynamic Kidney Function in an Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on…

  20. Morphometric and functional abnormalities of kidneys in the progeny of mice fed chocolate during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Patera, Janusz; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Słodkowska, Janina; Borowska, Adamina; Skopiński, Piotr; Sommer, Ewa; Wasiutyński, Aleksander; Skopińska-Rózewska, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Even most commonly consumed beverages like tea, coffee, chocolate and cocoa contain methylxanthines, biogenic amines and polyphenols, among them catechins, that exhibit significant biological activity and might profoundly affect the organism homeostasis. We have previously shown that 400 mg of bitter chocolate or 6 mg of theobromine added to the daily diet of pregnant and afterwards lactating mice affected embryonic angiogenesis and caused bone mineralization disturbances as well as limb shortening in 4-weeks old offspring. The aim of the present study was the morphometric and functional evaluation of kidneys in the 4-weeks old progeny mice fed according to the protocol mentioned above. Progeny from the mice fed chocolate presented considerable morphometric abnormalities in the kidney structure, with the lower number of glomeruli per mm2 and their increased diameter. Moreover, higher serum creatinine concentration was observed in that group of offspring. No morphometric or functional irregularities were found in the progeny of mice fed theobromine. Abnormalities demonstrated in the offspring of mice fed chocolate are not related to its theobromine content. Consequently, identification of active compound(s) responsible for the observed effects is of vital importance.

  1. Heterozygous Loss-of-Function SEC61A1 Mutations Cause Autosomal-Dominant Tubulo-Interstitial and Glomerulocystic Kidney Disease with Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bolar, Nikhita Ajit; Golzio, Christelle; Živná, Martina; Hayot, Gaëlle; Van Hemelrijk, Christine; Schepers, Dorien; Vandeweyer, Geert; Hoischen, Alexander; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Raes, Ann; Matthys, Erve; Sys, Emiel; Azou, Myriam; Gubler, Marie-Claire; Praet, Marleen; Van Camp, Guy; McFadden, Kelsey; Pediaditakis, Igor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vyleťal, Petr; Hartmannová, Hana; Stránecký, Viktor; Hůlková, Helena; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Sovová, Jana; Hnízda, Aleš; Kidd, Kendrah; Bleyer, Anthony J; Spong, Richard S; Vande Walle, Johan; Mortier, Geert; Brunner, Han; Van Laer, Lut; Kmoch, Stanislav; Katsanis, Nicholas; Loeys, Bart L

    2016-07-07

    Autosomal-dominant tubulo-interstitial kidney disease (ADTKD) encompasses a group of disorders characterized by renal tubular and interstitial abnormalities, leading to slow progressive loss of kidney function requiring dialysis and kidney transplantation. Mutations in UMOD, MUC1, and REN are responsible for many, but not all, cases of ADTKD. We report on two families with ADTKD and congenital anemia accompanied by either intrauterine growth retardation or neutropenia. Ultrasound and kidney biopsy revealed small dysplastic kidneys with cysts and tubular atrophy with secondary glomerular sclerosis, respectively. Exclusion of known ADTKD genes coupled with linkage analysis, whole-exome sequencing, and targeted re-sequencing identified heterozygous missense variants in SEC61A1-c.553A>G (p.Thr185Ala) and c.200T>G (p.Val67Gly)-both affecting functionally important and conserved residues in SEC61. Both transiently expressed SEC6A1A variants are delocalized to the Golgi, a finding confirmed in a renal biopsy from an affected individual. Suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletions of sec61al2 in zebrafish embryos induced convolution defects of the pronephric tubules but not the pronephric ducts, consistent with the tubular atrophy observed in the affected individuals. Human mRNA encoding either of the two pathogenic alleles failed to rescue this phenotype as opposed to a complete rescue by human wild-type mRNA. Taken together, these findings provide a mechanism by which mutations in SEC61A1 lead to an autosomal-dominant syndromic form of progressive chronic kidney disease. We highlight protein translocation defects across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, the principal role of the SEC61 complex, as a contributory pathogenic mechanism for ADTKD.

  2. Higher tenofovir exposure is associated with longitudinal declines in kidney function in women living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Sanjiv M.; Scherzer, Rebecca; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Minkoff, Howard; Sharma, Anjali; Cohen, Mardge; Young, Mary A.; Abraham, Alison G.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate is a commonly used antiretroviral drug, but risk factors for tenofovir (TFV)-associated kidney disease are not fully understood. We used intensive pharmacokinetic studies in a cohort of HIV-infected women on TFV-based therapy to study the relationship between TFV exposure and subsequent kidney function. Design This is a nested study within the Women's Interagency HIV Study, a multicenter, prospective cohort of HIV-infected women. Participants on TFV-based therapy underwent 24-h intensive pharmacokinetic sampling after witnessed dose. Kidney function was measured over the succeeding 7 years by serum creatinine [estimated glomerular filtration rate calculated by serum creatinine (eGFRcr)]. Methods Multivariable linear mixed models evaluated the relationship of baseline TFV area under the-time concentration curves (AUCs) with subsequent changes in kidney function. Covariates included age, diabetes, hypertension, race, BMI, ritonavir use, duration of TFV exposure, current CD4+ cell count, and HIV viral load. Results Of the 105 participants, persons within the highest baseline TFV AUC tertile had significantly lower eGFRcr compared with those in the lowest tertile (mean±stan-standard error: 80±4.3 vs. 104±2.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P<0.0001). By year 7, this difference widened (72±4.9 vs. 105±2.9, P<0.0001). After multivariable adjustment, TFV AUC in the highest tertile remained associated with lower eGFRcr relative to values in the lowest tertile at both baseline (−15 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P=0.0047) and year 7 (−23 ml/min per 1.73 m2, P=0.0002). Conclusion Through intensive TFV pharmacokinetic sampling, we found a strong association between greater TFV exposure and subsequent decline in kidney function. Variations in TFV drug exposure may partially account for subsequent nephrotoxicity in persons infected with HIV. PMID:26558723

  3. Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Sim, Xueling; Go, Min Jin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S-J Cathy; Mei, Hao; Rao, Dabeeru C; Hixson, James E; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Ogihara, Toshio; Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Kooner, Jaspal S; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Cho, Yoon Shin; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2012-07-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), impairment of kidney function, is a serious public health problem, and the assessment of genetic factors influencing kidney function has substantial clinical relevance. Here, we report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for kidney function-related traits, including 71,149 east Asian individuals from 18 studies in 11 population-, hospital- or family-based cohorts, conducted as part of the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN). Our meta-analysis identified 17 loci newly associated with kidney function-related traits, including the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, uric acid and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on serum creatinine levels (eGFRcrea) (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)). We further examined these loci with in silico replication in individuals of European ancestry from the KidneyGen, CKDGen and GUGC consortia, including a combined total of ∼110,347 individuals. We identify pleiotropic associations among these loci with kidney function-related traits and risk of CKD. These findings provide new insights into the genetics of kidney function.

  4. [Sexuality after kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Steiner, T; Wunderlich, H; Ott, U

    2009-12-01

    The quality of life of patients after kidney transplantation is of increasing interest. In this connection, issues of sexuality are meaningful too. Many patients with end-stage kidney disease suffer from sexual disorders. More than 50% of the male patients on dialysis and even more females are affected by disturbances such as erectile dysfunction and loss of libido or abnormal menstrual cycles. After successful kidney transplantation most symptoms in women are improved, whereas in men disturbances in erectile function often persist or even deteriorate. In these patients treatment with inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 is a valid option with an effective response. In women with stable graft function pregnancy can be achieved successfully. Nevertheless, pregnant kidney allograft recipients should be considered as high-risk patients needing special care under the supervision of a team of obstetricians and nephrologists.

  5. Unconventional Functions of Mitotic Kinases in Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hascoet, Pauline; Chesnel, Franck; Le Goff, Cathy; Le Goff, Xavier; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Human tumors exhibit a variety of genetic alterations, including point mutations, translocations, gene amplifications and deletions, as well as aneuploid chromosome numbers. For carcinomas, aneuploidy is associated with poor patient outcome for a large variety of tumor types, including breast, colon, and renal cell carcinoma. The Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a heterogeneous carcinoma consisting of different histologic types. The clear renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype and represents 85% of the RCC. Central to the biology of the ccRCC is the loss of function of the Von Hippel–Lindau gene, but is also associated with genetic instability that could be caused by abrogation of the cell cycle mitotic spindle checkpoint and may involve the Aurora kinases, which regulate centrosome maturation. Aneuploidy can also result from the loss of cell–cell adhesion and apical–basal cell polarity that also may be regulated by the mitotic kinases (polo-like kinase 1, casein kinase 2, doublecortin-like kinase 1, and Aurora kinases). In this review, we describe the “non-mitotic” unconventional functions of these kinases in renal tumorigenesis. PMID:26579493

  6. [Hypothermic storage under aerobic conditions--the effect of different flushing solutions on kidney functional recovery].

    PubMed

    Fischer, J H; Miyata, M; Isselhard, W; Casser, H R

    1979-01-01

    Canine kidneys (n = 17) were flushed with COLLINS (C2), SACKS II, LAMBOTTE (KMgS), ROSS (hypertonic citrate), or RINGER glucose-mannitol solution following a 30-min period of normothermic ischemia. After 24 h hypothermic preservation with retrograde oxygen persufflation (ROP) and autotransplantation, the immediate functional recovery was determined using inulin and PAH clearance methods and compared with the normal contralateral kidney. While a good functional recovery was found in the COLLINS group, significantly exceeding results from hypothermic ischemic storage preservation, in experiments using other flush solutions ROP preservation resulted in only a small immediate function. Thus the experiments indicate that COLLINS solution C2 is the optimal flush solution for ROP preservation.

  7. Does long-term creatine supplementation impair kidney function in resistance-trained individuals consuming a high-protein diet?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on kidney function in resistance-trained individuals ingesting a high-protein diet. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. The participants were randomly allocated to receive either creatine (20 g/d for 5 d followed by 5 g/d throughout the trial) or placebo for 12 weeks. All of the participants were engaged in resistance training and consumed a high-protein diet (i.e., ≥ 1.2 g/Kg/d). Subjects were assessed at baseline (Pre) and after 12 weeks (Post). Glomerular filtration rate was measured by 51Cr-EDTA clearance. Additionally, blood samples and a 24-h urine collection were obtained for other kidney function assessments. Results No significant differences were observed for 51Cr-EDTA clearance throughout the trial (Creatine: Pre 101.42 ± 13.11, Post 108.78 ± 14.41 mL/min/1.73m2; Placebo: Pre 103.29 ± 17.64, Post 106.68 ± 16.05 mL/min/1.73m2; group x time interaction: F = 0.21, p = 0.64). Creatinine clearance, serum and urinary urea, electrolytes, proteinuria, and albuminuria remained virtually unchanged. Conclusions A 12-week creatine supplementation protocol did not affect kidney function in resistance-trained healthy individuals consuming a high-protein diet; thus reinforcing the safety of this dietary supplement. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01817673 PMID:23680457

  8. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance and Kidney Function Research in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsk, P.; Juel, N.; Kramer, H. J.; de Santo, N. G.; Regnard, J.; Heer, M.

    2005-06-01

    Fluid and electrolyte regulation in humans is modulated by gravitational stress through a complex interaction of cardiovascular reflexes, neuroendocrine variables, physical factors and renal function.Weightlessness is a unique tool to obtain more information on integrated fluid volume control. Results from space, however, have been unexpected and unpredictable from the results of ground- based simulations.The concept of how weightlesness and gravity modulate the regulation of body fluids and associated blood components must therefore be revised and a new simulation model developed. There are several main questions to be asked. Does weightlessness induce diuresis and natriuresis during the initial hours of spaceflight, leading to an extracellular and intravascular fluid volume deficit? Why are fluid- and sodium-retaining systems activated by spaceflight, and why are the renal responses to saline and water stimuli attenuated? Can excess sodium be stored in an hitherto unknown way, in particular during spaceflight? How can the effects of weightlessness on fluid and electrolyte regulation be correctly simulated on the ground? The information obtained from space might help us to understand how gravity degrades the fluid and electrolyte balance in sodium-retaining and oedema- forming states, such as in heart failure.

  9. Visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kei; Fukuda, Masamichi; Matsui, Yoshio; Kario, Kazuomi; Kimura, Kenjiro

    2014-05-01

    The authors previously reported that the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure is correlated with renal function decline in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease. Little is known about the association between visit-to-visit variability and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease. The authors retrospectively studied 69 patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease stage 3a, 3b, or 4. The standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure in 12 consecutive visits were defined as visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure. The median observation period was 32 months. In univariate correlation, the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of blood pressure were not significantly associated with the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant association between the visit-to-visit variability of blood pressure and renal function decline in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease, in contrast with our previous study of nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease.

  10. The Pharmacokinetics of Beraprost Sodium Following Single Oral Administration to Subjects With Impaired Kidney Function.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Masahiro; Miyakawa, Jun; Doi, Masaaki; Okada, Kiyonobu; Kurumatani, Hajimu; Mori, Yoshitaka; Oshida, Keiyu; Nakajo, Ikumi; Oikawa, Keishi; Ushigome, Fumihiko; Miyashita, Aiji; Isono, Masanao; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of beraprost sodium (BPS) and its active enantiomer, BPS-314d, in Japanese subjects with impaired kidney function. The plasma and urine concentrations of BPS and BPS-314d were measured following the single oral administration of 120 μg of BPS as the sustained-release tablet, TRK-100STP, under fasting conditions to 18 subjects with impaired kidney function (stage 2, 3, and 4 chronic kidney disease [CKD] as categorized by the estimated glomerular filtration rate) and to 6 age-, body weight-, and gender-matched subjects with normal kidney function (stage 1 CKD). The Cmax values (mean ± SD) of BPS in stage 1, 2, 3, and 4 CKD, respectively, were 84.9 ± 22.9, 119.8 ± 36.4, 190.6 ± 137.3, and 240.2 ± 110.5 pg/mL; its AUC0-48h were 978 ± 226, 1252 ± 427, 1862 ± 964, and 1766 ± 806 pg·h/mL, respectively, and its cumulative urinary excretion rates were 0.704 ± 0.351%, 0.638 ± 0.292%, 0.485 ± 0.294%, and 0.159 ± 0.136%. The Cmax values of BPS-314d were 22.4 ± 6.4, 30.8 ± 8.5, 46.7 ± 30.6, and 54.4 ± 25.2 pg/mL, its AUC0-48h were 155 ± 56, 226 ± 67, 341 ± 176, and 329 ± 143 pg·h/mL, and its cumulative urinary excretion rates were 0.428 ± 0.242%, 0.349 ± 0.179%, 0.356 ± 0.270%, and 0.096 ± 0.099%, respectively. Adverse events were reported in 2 subjects with stage 2 CKD and 1 subject with stage 4 CKD. The Cmax and AUC0-48h of BPS and BPS-314d were higher based on the severity of impaired kidney function. No relationship was observed between the incidence of adverse events and the severity, and tolerability was confirmed. We consider that dose adjustment is not necessary, but BPS is more carefully treated in patients with impaired kidney function.

  11. Stone orientation affects the mechanism of failure in artificial kidney stones subject to shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Cauwelaert, Javier; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    Micro computed tomography (CT) imaging was used to follow the progressive development of cracks in artificial kidney stones. The artificial stones were made from U30 cement with a cylindrical shape (6.5 mm diameter and 8.5 mm long). The stones were held within a polypropylene vial in one of three orientations: vertical, horizontal, and angled at 45 deg. The stones were treated with an electromagnetic lithotripter and the initiation and growth of cracks was observed using microCT. The images show that the orientation of the stones with respect to the shock changes the dominant mechanism for fragmentation. Vertical stones developed a spall-like crack near the distal surface, which propagated from the surface to the interior of the stone. Initiation of a secondary spall-like crack was observed proximal to the first crack. Little surface damage was observed. Horizontal stones presented pitting in the proximal surface and erosion in lateral faces, indicating the action of cavitation. Angled stones presented both spall-like fracture in either the leading or the distal corners and surface damage (pitting) in the proximal surface. Experiments are being performed to follow the development of cracks in human kidney stones. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation.

  12. Evolutionary diversification in stickleback affects ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Luke J; Matthews, Blake; Des Roches, Simone; Chase, Jonathan M; Shurin, Jonathan B; Schluter, Dolph

    2009-04-30

    Explaining the ecological causes of evolutionary diversification is a major focus of biology, but surprisingly little has been said about the effects of evolutionary diversification on ecosystems. The number of species in an ecosystem and their traits are key predictors of many ecosystem-level processes, such as rates of productivity, biomass sequestration and decomposition. Here we demonstrate short-term ecosystem-level effects of adaptive radiation in the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) over the past 10,000 years. These fish have undergone recent parallel diversification in several lakes in coastal British Columbia, resulting in the formation of two specialized species (benthic and limnetic) from a generalist ancestor. Using a mesocosm experiment, we demonstrate that this diversification has strong effects on ecosystems, affecting prey community structure, total primary production, and the nature of dissolved organic materials that regulate the spectral properties of light transmission in the system. However, these ecosystem effects do not simply increase in their relative strength with increasing specialization and species richness; instead, they reflect the complex and indirect consequences of ecosystem engineering by sticklebacks. It is well known that ecological factors influence adaptive radiation. We demonstrate that adaptive radiation, even over short timescales, can have profound effects on ecosystems.

  13. An Intact Kidney Slice Model to Investigate Vasa Recta Properties and Function in situ

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, C.; Kennedy-Lydon, T.; Sprott, C.; Desai, T.; Sawbridge, L.; Munday, J.; Unwin, R.J.; Wildman, S.S.P.; Peppiatt-Wildman, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Medullary blood flow is via vasa recta capillaries, which possess contractile pericytes. In vitro studies using isolated descending vasa recta show that pericytes can constrict/dilate descending vasa recta when vasoactive substances are present. We describe a live kidney slice model in which pericyte-mediated vasa recta constriction/dilation can be visualized in situ. Methods Confocal microscopy was used to image calcein, propidium iodide and Hoechst labelling in ‘live’ kidney slices, to determine tubular and vascular cell viability and morphology. DIC video-imaging of live kidney slices was employed to investigate pericyte-mediated real-time changes in vasa recta diameter. Results Pericytes were identified on vasa recta and their morphology and density were characterized in the medulla. Pericyte-mediated changes in vasa recta diameter (10–30%) were evoked in response to bath application of vasoactive agents (norepinephrine, endothelin-1, angiotensin-II and prostaglandin E2) or by manipulating endogenous vasoactive signalling pathways (using tyramine, L-NAME, a cyclo-oxygenase (COX-1) inhibitor indomethacin, and ATP release). Conclusions The live kidney slice model is a valid complementary technique for investigating vasa recta function in situ and the role of pericytes as regulators of vasa recta diameter. This technique may also be useful in exploring the role of tubulovascular crosstalk in regulation of medullary blood flow. PMID:22833057

  14. Changes in renal function in early pregnancy in women with one kidney.

    PubMed

    Davison, J M

    1978-01-01

    In healthy women the 24-hour endogenous creatinine clearance is elevated by some 50 percent within 6 weeks of conception and an analogous increase of the 24-hour glucose excretion occurs. 24-hour glucose excretion later reverts to normal, reflecting a delayed onset of increased tubular reabsorption.Following unilateral nephrectomy there are marked increases in RPF and GFR in the contralateral kidney. Single hypertrophied kidneys apparently can adapt still further as in normal pregnancy. We have studied 5 women, in satisfactory general health prior to the pregnancy, each with only one kidney, before conception and during early pregnancy. Three had had unilateral nephrectomy for renal trauma 6-9 years earlier. two had received renal allografts 3 years earlier. In all cases the endogenous creatinine clearance began to rise in the second half of the menstrual cycle and when pregnancy supervened it rose rapidly to a peak value of 30-40 percent above the midcycle level within 7-10 weeks of the last menstrual period. That early peak was not always sustained and GFR subsequently fell to a level of 25-30 percent above the midcycle level. These changes in renal function were slower and smaller than in healthy women with 2 kidneys but were compatible with a successful outcome of pregnancy in these five cases.

  15. Renal Nitric Oxide Deficiency and Chronic Kidney Disease in Young Sheep Born with a Solitary Functioning Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Reetu R.; Easton, Lawrence K.; Booth, Lindsea C.; Schlaich, Markus P.; Head, Geoffrey A.; Moritz, Karen M.; Denton, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that renal hemodynamic responses to nitric oxide (NO) inhibition were attenuated in aged, hypertensive sheep born with a solitary functioning kidney (SFK). NO is an important regulator of renal function, particularly, in the postnatal period. We hypothesized that the onset of renal dysfunction and hypertension in individuals with a SFK is associated with NO deficiency early in life. In this study, renal and cardiovascular responses to L-NAME infusion (Nw-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) were examined in 6-month old lambs born with a SFK, induced by fetal unilateral nephrectomy (uni-x). Renal responses to L-NAME were attenuated in uni-x sheep with the fall in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) being less in the uni-x compared to sham lambs (%ΔGFR; −41 ± 3 vs −54 ± 4: P = 0.03, %ΔUNaV; −48 ± 5 vs −76 ± 3, P = 0.0008). 24 hour-basal urinary nitrate and nitrite (NOx) excretion was less in the uni-x animals compared to the sham (NOx excretion μM/min/kg; sham: 57 ± 7; uni-x: 38 ± 4, P = 0.02). L-NAME treatment reduced urinary NOx to undetectable levels in both groups. A reduction in NO bioavailability in early life may contribute to the initiation of glomerular and tubular dysfunction that promotes development and progression of hypertension in offspring with a congenital nephron deficit, including those with a SFK. PMID:27226113

  16. Is High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Causally Related to Kidney Function?

    PubMed Central

    Coassin, Stefan; Friedel, Salome; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Objective— A recent observational study with almost 2 million men reported an association between low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and worse kidney function. The causality of this association would be strongly supported if genetic variants associated with HDL cholesterol were also associated with kidney function. Approach and Results— We used 68 genetic variants (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) associated with HDL cholesterol in genome-wide association studies including >188 000 subjects and tested their association with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using summary statistics from another genome-wide association studies meta-analysis of kidney function including ≤133 413 subjects. Fourteen of the 68 SNPs (21%) had a P value <0.05 compared with the 5% expected by chance (Binomial test P=5.8×10−6). After Bonferroni correction, 6 SNPs were still significantly associated with eGFR. The genetic variants with the strongest associations with HDL cholesterol concentrations were not the same as those with the strongest association with kidney function and vice versa. An evaluation of pleiotropy indicated that the effects of the HDL-associated SNPs on eGFR were not mediated by HDL cholesterol. In addition, we performed a Mendelian randomization analysis. This analysis revealed a positive but nonsignificant causal effect of HDL cholesterol–increasing variants on eGFR. Conclusions— In summary, our findings indicate that HDL cholesterol does not causally influence eGFR and propose pleiotropic effects on eGFR for some HDL cholesterol–associated SNPs. This may cause the observed association by mechanisms other than the mere HDL cholesterol concentration. PMID:27687604

  17. Genome-wide association study of kidney function decline in individuals of European descent

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Mathias; Tin, Adrienne; Garnaas, Maija; McMahon, Gearoid M.; Chu, Audrey Y.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; Woodward, Marc; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tammara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Smith, Albert V.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Li, Man; Freudenberger, Paul; Hofer, Edith; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; de Boer, Ian H.; Li, Guo; Siscovick, David S.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Corre, Tanguy; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Olden, Matthias; Yang, Qiong; de Andrade, Mariza; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Turner, Stephen T.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Ding, Jingzhong; Liu, Yongmei; Barlassina, Cristina; Cusi, Daniele; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A; Ridker, Paul M; Grallert, Harald; Meisinger, Christa; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Kramer, Holly; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Snieder, Harold; Del Greco, Fabiola; Franke, Andre; Nöthlings, Ute; Lieb, Wolfgang; Bakker, Stephan J.L.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Dehghan, Abbas; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Uitterlinden, André G.; Coassin, Stefan; Haun, Margot; Kollerits, Barbara; Kronenberg, Florian; Paulweber, Bernhard; Aumann, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Pietzner, Mike; Völker, Uwe; Rettig, Rainer; Chouraki, Vincent; Helmer, Catherine; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Metzger, Marie; Stengel, Benedicte; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Raitakari, Olli; Johnson, Andrew; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Goessling, Wolfram; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Böger, Carsten A.

    2014-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple loci associated with cross-sectional eGFR, but a systematic genetic analysis of kidney function decline over time is missing. Here we conducted a GWAS meta-analysis among 63,558 participants of European descent, initially from 16 cohorts with serial kidney function measurements within the CKDGen Consortium, followed by independent replication among additional participants from 13 cohorts. In stage 1 GWAS meta-analysis, SNPs at MEOX2, GALNT11, IL1RAP, NPPA, HPCAL1 and CDH23 showed the strongest associations for at least one trait, in addition to the known UMOD locus which showed genome-wide significance with an annual change in eGFR. In stage 2 meta-analysis, the significant association at UMOD was replicated. Associations at GALNT11 with Rapid Decline (annual eGFRdecline of 3ml/min/1.73m2 or more), and CDH23 with eGFR change among those with CKD showed significant suggestive evidence of replication. Combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analyses showed significance for UMOD, GALNT11 and CDH23. Morpholino knockdowns of galnt11 and cdh23 in zebrafish embryos each had signs of severe edema 72 hours after gentamicin treatment compared to controls, but no gross morphological renal abnormalities before gentamicin administration. Thus, our results suggest a role in the deterioration of kidney function for the loci GALNT11 and CDH23, and show that the UMOD locus is significantly associated with kidney function decline. PMID:25493955

  18. Cold preservation with hyperbranched polyglycerol-based solution improves kidney functional recovery with less injury at reperfusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shadan; Liu, Bin; Guan, Qiunong; Chafeeva, Irina; Brooks, Donald E; Nguan, Christopher YC; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Du, Caigan

    2017-01-01

    Minimizing donor organ injury during cold preservation (including cold perfusion and storage) is the first step to prevent transplant failure. We recently reported the advantages of hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) as a novel substitute for hydroxyethyl starch in UW solution for both cold heart preservation and cold kidney perfusion. This study evaluated the functional recovery of the kidney at reperfusion after cold preservation with HPG solution. The impact of HPG solution compared to conventional UW and HTK solutions on tissue weight and cell survival at 4°C was examined using rat kidney tissues and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), respectively. The kidney protection by HPG solution was tested in a rat model of cold kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury, and was evaluated by histology and kidney function. Here, we showed that preservation with HPG solution prevented cell death in cultured HUVECs and edema formation in kidney tissues at 4°C similar to UW solution, whereas HTK solution was less effective. In rat model of cold ischemia-reperfusion injury, the kidneys perfused and subsequently stored 1-hour with cold HPG solution showed less leukocyte infiltration, less tubular damage and better kidney function (lower levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen) at 48 h of reperfusion than those treated with UW or HTK solution. In conclusion, our data show the superiority of HPG solution to UW or HTK solution in the cold perfusion and storage of rat kidneys, suggesting that the HPG solution may be a promising candidate for improved donor kidney preservation prior to transplantation. PMID:28337272

  19. Environmental Exposure to Cadmium: Health Risk Assessment and its Associations with Hypertension and Impaired Kidney Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haiyun; Liao, Qilin; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yang, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Bi, Jun; Yan, Beizhan

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal. This study was aimed to estimate the potential health risks in a Cd-polluted district in China, and examine the relationship between urinary cadmium(UCd) and hypertension and impaired kidney function at low exposure levels (UCd: GM 1.3 μg/g creatinine). Blood pressure measurement, questionnaires, and collection of urinary samples were conducted from 217 residents. Environmental samples, food, and cigarette samples were collected and detected to estimate the risks posed by Cd and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact pathways to these risks. A logistic regression model was used in examining associations between exposure and hypertension and impaired kidney function. Results show that this population is at high risk. For non-smokers, incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) and hazard quotient (HQ) are 1.74E-04 and 2.96, and for smokers, they are 1.07E-03 and 52.5, respectively. Among all exposure pathways, smoking and foods cause the major increases in ILCR and HQ. UCd is significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) = 1.468 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.104, 1.953; P = 0.008) and impaired kidney function (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.054, 3.432; P = 0.033). The results demonstrate that Cd can potentially lead to adverse health effects.

  20. Environmental Exposure to Cadmium: Health Risk Assessment and its Associations with Hypertension and Impaired Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haiyun; Liao, Qilin; Chillrud, Steven N.; Yang, Qiang; Huang, Lei; Bi, Jun; Yan, Beizhan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal. This study was aimed to estimate the potential health risks in a Cd-polluted district in China, and examine the relationship between urinary cadmium(UCd) and hypertension and impaired kidney function at low exposure levels (UCd: GM 1.3 μg/g creatinine). Blood pressure measurement, questionnaires, and collection of urinary samples were conducted from 217 residents. Environmental samples, food, and cigarette samples were collected and detected to estimate the risks posed by Cd and the contribution of inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact pathways to these risks. A logistic regression model was used in examining associations between exposure and hypertension and impaired kidney function. Results show that this population is at high risk. For non-smokers, incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) and hazard quotient (HQ) are 1.74E-04 and 2.96, and for smokers, they are 1.07E-03 and 52.5, respectively. Among all exposure pathways, smoking and foods cause the major increases in ILCR and HQ. UCd is significantly associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) = 1.468; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.104, 1.953; P = 0.008) and impaired kidney function (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.054, 3.432; P = 0.033). The results demonstrate that Cd can potentially lead to adverse health effects. PMID:27411493

  1. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    PubMed

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD.

  2. The distribution and function of aquaporins in the kidney: resolved and unresolved questions.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Yaguchi, Tomoyuki; Shimizu, Kinue; Kita, Aoi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Takata, Kuniaki

    2017-03-01

    The membrane water channel aquaporin (AQP) family is composed of 13 isoforms in mammals, eight of which are reportedly expressed in the kidney: AQP1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 11. These isoforms are differentially expressed along the renal tubules and collecting ducts. AQP1 and 7 are distributed in the proximal tubules, whereas AQP2, 3, and 4 occur in the collecting duct system. They play important roles in the reabsorption of water and some solutes across the plasma membrane. In contrast to other aquaporins found in the kidney, AQP6, 8, and 11 are localized to the cytoplasm rather than to the apical or basolateral membranes. It is therefore doubtful that these isoforms are directly involved in water or solute reabsorption. AQP6 is localized in acid-secreting type A intercalated cells of the collecting duct. AQP8 has been found in the proximal tubule but its cellular location has not yet been defined by immunohistochemistry. AQP11 seems to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of proximal tubule cells. Interestingly, polycystic kidneys develop in AQP11-null mice. Many vacuole-like structures are seen in proximal tubule cells in kidneys of newborn AQP11-null mice. Subsequently, cysts are generated, and most of the mice die within a month due to severe renal failure. Although ER stress and impairment of polycystin-1, the product of the gene mutated in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease, are possible causes of cystogenesis in AQP11-null mice, the exact mechanism of pathogenesis and the physiological function of AQP11 are yet to be resolved.

  3. Ectopic lipid accumulation: A potential cause for metabolic disturbances and a contributor to the alteration of kidney function.

    PubMed

    Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Alix, Pascaline M; Koppe, Laetitia; Pelletier, Caroline C; Kalbacher, Emilie; Fouque, Denis; Soulage, Christophe O

    2013-11-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation is now known to be a mechanism that contributes to organ injury in the context of metabolic diseases. In muscle and liver, accumulation of lipids impairs insulin signaling. This hypothesis accounts for the mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes, aging and lipodystrophy. Increasing data suggest that lipid accumulation in the kidneys could also contribute to the alteration of kidney function in the context of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Furthermore and more unexpectedly, animal models of kidney disease exhibit a decreased adiposity and ectopic lipid redistribution suggesting that kidney disease may be a state of lipodystrophy. However, whether this abnormal lipid partitioning during chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have any functional impact in these tissues needs to be investigated. Here, we provide a perspective by defining the problem and analyzing the possible causes and consequences. Further human studies are required to strengthen these observations, and provide novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. Enhancing kidney function with thrombolytic therapy following donation after cardiac death: a multicenter quasi-blinded prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Woodside, Kenneth J; Goldfarb, David A; Rabets, John C; Sanchez, Edmund Q; Lebovitz, Daniel J; Schulak, James A; Fung, John J; Eghtesad, Bijan

    2015-12-01

    Kidneys from donors after cardiac death (DCD) are at risk for inferior outcomes, possibly due to microthrombi and additional warm ischemia. We describe an organ procurement organization-wide trial utilizing thrombolytic tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) during machine pulsatile perfusion (MPP). A kidney from each recovered kidney pair was prospectively randomized to receive tPA (50 mg Alteplase) or no tPA (control) in the MPP perfusate. From 2011 to 2013, 24 kidneys were placed with enrolled recipients from 19 DCD kidney donors. There were no significant differences for absolute values of flow or resistance while undergoing MPP between the groups, nor rates of achieving discrete flow and resistance targets. While there was a trend toward lower creatinine and higher glomerular filtration rates in the tPA group at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, these differences were not significant. Delayed graft function (DGF) rates were 41.7% in the tPA group vs. 58.4% in the control group (OR 0.51, 95%CI 0.10-2.59, p = 0.68). Death-censored graft survival was similar between the groups. In this pilot study, encouraging trends are seen in kidney allograft function independent of MPP parameters following DCD kidney transplantation for those kidneys receiving thrombolytic tPA and MPP, compared with standard MPP.

  5. Bovine serum albumin nanoparticles for delivery of tacrolimus to reduce its kidney uptake and functional nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Yanxia; Gao, Yajie; Ma, Shujin; Zhang, Chao; Li, Jinwen; Wang, Dishi; Li, Xueping; Li, Chengwei; Liu, Yan; Li, Xinru

    2015-04-10

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a new nanoparticulate formulation for delivery of tacrolimus to reduce its kidney distribution and functional nephrotoxicity. Tacrolimus (TAC)-loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles (TAC-BSA-NPs) were prepared by emulsification-dispersion technique. The obtained TAC-BSA-NPs, with 189.50±7.15 nm of diameter and -20.86±0.45 mV of Zeta potential determined by DLS, were spherical in shape observed by TEM. The drug loading content and encapsulation efficiency were (1.7±0.13)% and (85±3.0)%, respectively. The in vitro release of TAC-BSA-NPs exhibited biphasic drug release pattern with an initial burst release and subsequently sustained release. Pharmacokinetic analysis displayed that TAC-BSA-NPs could enhance the drug blood level and prolong the circulation time in comparison to Prograf(®). Meanwhile, compared with Prograf(®), TAC-BSA-NPs could deliver less TAC to kidney and simultaneously reduce the functional nephrotoxicity of TAC to kidney. In conclusion, BSA nanoparticles might be a more safe carrier for delivery of hydrophobic drug TAC.

  6. Loss of executive function after dialysis initiation in adults with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kurella Tamura, Manjula; Vittinghoff, Eric; Hsu, Chi-Yuan; Tam, Karman; Seliger, Stephen L; Sozio, Stephen; Fischer, Michael; Chen, Jing; Lustigova, Eva; Strauss, Louise; Deo, Rajat; Go, Alan S; Yaffe, Kristine

    2017-04-01

    The association of dialysis initiation with changes in cognitive function among patients with advanced chronic kidney disease is poorly described. To better define this, we enrolled participants with advanced chronic kidney disease from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort in a prospective study of cognitive function. Eligible participants had a glomerular filtration rate of 20 ml/min/1.73m(2) or less, or dialysis initiation within the past two years. We evaluated cognitive function by a validated telephone battery at regular intervals over two years and analyzed test scores as z scores. Of 212 participants, 123 did not transition to dialysis during follow-up, 37 transitioned to dialysis after baseline, and 52 transitioned to dialysis prior to baseline. In adjusted analyses, the transition to dialysis was associated with a significant loss of executive function, but no significant changes in global cognition or memory. The estimated net difference in cognitive z scores at two years for participants who transitioned to dialysis during follow-up compared to participants who did not transition to dialysis was -0.01 (95% confidence interval -0.13, 0.11) for global cognition, -0.24 (-0.51, 0.03) for memory, and -0.33 (-0.60, -0.07) for executive function. Thus, among adults with advanced chronic kidney disease, dialysis initiation was associated with loss of executive function with no change in other aspects of cognition. Larger studies are needed to evaluate cognition during dialysis initiation.

  7. A Point Mutation in p190A RhoGAP Affects Ciliogenesis and Leads to Glomerulocystic Kidney Defects

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Maxwell E. R.; Aoudjit, Lamine; Hu, Di; Sharma, Richa; Tremblay, Mathieu; Ishii, Hidetaka; Marcotte, Michael; Stanga, Daniela; Tang, You Chi; Boualia, Sami Kamel; Nguyen, Alana H. T.; Takano, Tomoko; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Vidal, Silvia; Bouchard, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Rho family GTPases act as molecular switches regulating actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Attenuation of their signaling capacity is provided by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), including p190A, that promote the intrinsic GTPase activity of Rho proteins. In the current study we have performed a small-scale ENU mutagenesis screen and identified a novel loss of function allele of the p190A gene Arhgap35, which introduces a Leu1396 to Gln substitution in the GAP domain. This results in decreased GAP activity for the prototypical Rho-family members, RhoA and Rac1, likely due to disrupted ordering of the Rho binding surface. Consequently, Arhgap35-deficient animals exhibit hypoplastic and glomerulocystic kidneys. Investigation into the cystic phenotype shows that p190A is required for appropriate primary cilium formation in renal nephrons. P190A specifically localizes to the base of the cilia to permit axoneme elongation, which requires a functional GAP domain. Pharmacological manipulations further reveal that inhibition of either Rho kinase (ROCK) or F-actin polymerization is able to rescue the ciliogenesis defects observed upon loss of p190A activity. We propose a model in which p190A acts as a modulator of Rho GTPases in a localized area around the cilia to permit the dynamic actin rearrangement required for cilia elongation. Together, our results establish an unexpected link between Rho GTPase regulation, ciliogenesis and glomerulocystic kidney disease. PMID:26859289

  8. Excretory Function of Intestinal Tract Enhanced in Kidney Impaired Rats Caused by Adenine

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yu; Gao, Tao; Li, Yue; Gao, Zhiyi; Duan, Jinlian; Yin, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to prove the compensative effect of intestine for renal function. Rat kidney was impaired by intragastrically administrating adenine (400 mg per day for 5 days). Intestinal tract was harvested and equally divided into 20 segments except cecum. Kidneys were harvested and histologically examined with hematoxylin-eosin staining kits. Uric acid, urea (BUN), and creatinine in serum were determined with assay kits, and BUN and creatinine in every intestinal segment were also determined. The results showed that adenine was able to increase uric acid level in serum from 20.98 ± 6.98 μg/mL to 40.77 ± 7.52 μg/mL and cause renal function damage with BUN (from 3.87 ± 0.62 mM to 12.33 ± 3.27 mM) and creatinine (from 51.48 ± 6.98 μM to 118.25 ± 28.63 μM) increasing in serum and with abnormally micromorphological changes in kidney. The amount of BUN and creatinine distributed in intestinal tract was positively correlated with those in blood. In impaired renal function rats, the amount of BUN (from 4.26 ± 0.21 μMole to 10.72 ± 0.55 μMole) and creatinine (from 681.4 ± 23.3 nMole to 928.7 ± 21.3 nMole) distributed in intestinal tract significantly increased. All the results proved that intestinal tract had excretory function compensative for renal function. PMID:27975080

  9. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  10. [Function and morphology of isolated rat kidney following cellfree perfusion with various plasmaexpanders (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Franke, H; Sobotta, E E; Witzki, G; Unsicker, K

    1975-05-01

    Isolated arteficially perfused rat kidneys prepared as described by Franke et al. (1971) were perfused for 60 min with solutions of Haemaccel, Dextran 40, Pluronic-F-108, or hydroxy-aethyl starch in a single pass system. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of the Haemaccel or Dextran 40 perfused organs amounted during the first 30 min to 0.58 ml X g-1 X min-1 and 0.47 ml X g-1 X min-1 respectively. Using Pluronic-F-108 or hydroxy-aethyl starch GFR rose to 0.94 ml X g-1 X min-1 and to 0.85 ml X G-1 X min-1. With Haemaccel or Dextran 40 solutions a mean tubular Na-reabsorption of 75.4 mumol X g-1 X min-1 and of 59 mumol X g-1 X min-1 respectively was determined. Employing Pluronic-F-108 or hydroxy-aethyl starch a mean sodium net transport of 92.6 mumol X g-1 X min-1 in both experimental groups was obtained. The differences described in the functional capabilities of Haemaccel or Dextran 40 and of Pluronic-F-108 or Hydroxyethyl starch perfused kidneys are in good accordance with morphological changes in the ultrastructure. The most striking morphological deviations were found in proximal tubules of those kidneys perfused with Haemaccel solutions. On the other hand after perfusion with hydroxyethyl starch only very few morphological alterations could be detected.

  11. Mannitol has no impact on renal function after open partial nephrectomy in solitary kidneys.

    PubMed

    Omae, Kenji; Kondo, Tsunenori; Takagi, Toshio; Iizuka, Junpei; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-02-01

    Mannitol has been administered during partial nephrectomy as a renal protective agent for ischemic damage. However, we do not have any high-level clinical evidence of its effectiveness. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of mannitol during open partial nephrectomy by comparing the postoperative renal function of patients who received it and those who did not. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 55 patients who underwent open partial nephrectomy for renal cancer in a solitary kidney from January 1990 to December 2012, and who were followed up postoperatively for at least 6 months. Of the 55 patients, mannitol was given to 20 patients (group M+) and not to the other 35 patients (group M-). We compared not only the postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate, but also its decrease rate and the incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis in the two groups. There were no significant differences in perioperative patient characteristics between the two groups. Mannitol made no significant difference in both the postoperative estimated glomerular filtration rate and its decrease rate at any point within 6 months of the postoperative period. The incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis was one (5.0%) in group M+ and two (5.7%) in group M-. These findings suggest that there might be no advantage from the administration of mannitol during open partial nephrectomy.

  12. Carbondioxide-Aided Angiography Decreases Contrast Volume and Preserves Kidney Function in Peripheral Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, Emilia; Tegtmeier, Catharina; Bimpong-Buta, Nana Yaw; Sansone, Roberto; Uhlenbruch, Mark; Richter, Andreas; Stegemann, Berthold; Roden, Michael; Westenfeld, Ralf; Kelm, Malte; Heiss, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a common comorbidity in patients with peripheral artery disease. We investigated the safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide (CO2) as supplemental contrast agent to decrease contrast volume during fluoroscopy-guided peripheral vascular procedures in routine angiological practice. We analyzed 191 consecutive interventions of the lower extremity in claudicants and critical limb ischemia (CLI) that were performed with iodinated contrast media (ICM) alone (n = 154) or with the aided or exclusive use of CO2 (n = 37). The technical success rate, total irradiation, and intervention time were not significantly different between ICM and CO2 No severe procedure-related complications occurred. The contrast volume was lower in CO2 than in ICM. Although kidney function, creatinine, and estimated glomerular filtration rate was lower in CO2 at baseline, the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy was lower in CO2 compared to ICM. These data support CO2 as an alternative supplemental contrast agent that can be applied safely and efficiently to lower contrast volume during peripheral vascular interventions preventing kidney dysfunction even in patients with disease of the popliteal artery and below the knee and CLI.

  13. Selenium Deficiency Affects the mRNA Expression of Inflammatory Factors and Selenoprotein Genes in the Kidneys of Broiler Chicks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiu-Li; Xu, Bo; Huang, Xiao-Dan; Gao, Yu-Hong; Chen, Yu; Shan, An-Shan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Se deficiency on the transcription of inflammatory factors and selenoprotein genes in the kidneys of broiler chicks. One hundred fifty 1-day-old broiler chicks were randomly assigned to two groups fed with either a low-Se diet (L group, 0.033 mg/kg Se) or an adequate Se diet (C group, 0.2 mg/kg Se). The levels of uric acid (UA) and creatinine (Cr) in the serum and the mRNA levels of 6 inflammatory factors and 25 selenoprotein genes in the kidneys were measured as the clinical signs of Se deficiency occurred at 20 days old. The results indicated that the contents of UA and Cr in the serum increased in L group (p < 0.05), and the mRNA levels of the inflammatory factors (NF-κB, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α) increased in L group (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the mRNA levels of PTGEs and HO-1 were not changed. In addition, 25 selenoprotein transcripts displayed ubiquitous expression in the kidneys of the chicks. The mRNA levels of 14 selenoprotein genes (Dio1, Dio2, GPx3, Sepp1, SelH, SelI, SelK, Sepn1, SelO, SelW, Sep15, SelT, SelU, and SelS) decreased, and 9 selenoprotein genes (GPx1, GPx2, GPx4, SelPb, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, SPS2, and SelM) increased in L group (p < 0.05), but the Dio3 and Sepx1 mRNA levels did not change. The results indicated that Se deficiency resulted in kidney dysfunction, activation of the NF-κB pathway, and a change in selenoprotein gene expression. The changes of inflammatory factor and selenoprotein gene expression levels were directly related to the abnormal renal functions induced by Se deficiency.

  14. [Pharmacodynamics of vecuronium in the kidney transplant recipient and the patient with normal renal function].

    PubMed

    Takita, K; Goda, Y; Kawahigashi, H; Okuyama, A; Kubota, M; Kemmotsu, O

    1993-02-01

    Pharmacodynamics of vecuronium were evaluated in seven kidney transplant recipients and compared with seven patients with normal renal function. Vecuronium 0.12 mg.kg-1 was used for the initial dose and 0.03 mg.kg-1 for the second dose for each patient under general anesthesia with either isoflurane, sevoflurane or halothane plus nitrous oxide after induction by thiamylal. The effect of vecuronium was evaluated by a muscle relaxation monitor. The time to the maximum blockade (onset time) and the time of 25% recovery of the first twitch height (duration time) were measured after each administration of vecuronium in patients of both groups. The onset times after the initial and second doses were similar in both groups (180.0 +/- 15.5 sec for recipients versus 185.7 +/- 14.9 sec for patients of normal renal function). However, duration was significantly longer in recipients than in patients of normal renal function. Durations after the initial and second doses were 130 +/- 19 min for the initial dose and 86 +/- 12 min for the second dose in recipients, whereas they were 51 +/- 5 min and 37 +/- 5 min in patients of normal renal function. The prolonged durations of vecuronium in the kidney transplant recipient were speculated to be mainly due to delayed elimination of the drug and effect of cyclosporin, an immunosuppressive agent in the recipients. These results suggest that the titrated administration of vecuronium by keen monitoring of muscle relaxation is needed in the kidney transplant recipient to avoid unnecessary prolongation in duration of action.

  15. SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling preserves microvascular integrity and renal function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hao; Advani, Suzanne L; Thai, Kerri; Kabir, M Golam; Sood, Manish M; Gibson, Ian W; Yuen, Darren A; Connelly, Kim A; Marsden, Philip A; Kelly, Darren J; Gilbert, Richard E; Advani, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The progressive decline of renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by both disruption of the microvascular architecture and the accumulation of fibrotic matrix. One angiogenic pathway recently identified as playing an essential role in renal vascular development is the stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1)/CXCR4 pathway. Because similar developmental processes may be recapitulated in the disease setting, we hypothesized that the SDF-1/CXCR4 system would regulate microvascular health in CKD. Expression of CXCR4 was observed to be increased in the kidneys of subtotally nephrectomized (SNx) rats and in biopsies from patients with secondary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), a rodent model and human correlate both characterized by aberration of the renal microvessels. A reno-protective role for local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling was indicated by i) CXCR4-dependent glomerular eNOS activation following acute SDF-1 administration; and ii) acceleration of renal function decline, capillary loss and fibrosis in SNx rats treated with chronic CXCR4 blockade. In contrast to the upregulation of CXCR4, SDF-1 transcript levels were decreased in SNx rat kidneys as well as in renal fibroblasts exposed to the pro-fibrotic cytokine transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), the latter effect being attenuated by histone deacetylase inhibition. Increased renal SDF-1 expression was, however, observed following the treatment of SNx rats with the ACE inhibitor, perindopril. Collectively, these observations indicate that local SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling functions to preserve microvascular integrity and prevent renal fibrosis. Augmentation of this pathway, either purposefully or serendipitously with either novel or existing therapies, may attenuate renal decline in CKD.

  16. Associations of Sugar and Artificially Sweetened Soda with Albuminuria and Kidney Function Decline in Women

    PubMed Central

    Curhan, Gary C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Sugar-sweetened soda is reported to be associated with increased risk for diabetes and albuminuria, but there are currently limited data on how sugar or artificially sweetened soda may be related to kidney function decline. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study identified 3318 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study with data on soda intake and albuminuria; of these, 3256 also had data on estimated GFR (eGFR) change between 1989 and 2000. Cumulative average beverage intake was derived from the 1984, 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998 food frequency questionnaires. Serving categories included <1/mo (referent), 1 to 4/mo, 2 to 6/wk, 1 to 1.9/d, and ≥2/d. Microalbuminuria (MA) was considered a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio of 25 to 355 μg/mg. For kidney function change, the primary outcome was a ≥30% decline in eGFR over 11 years; rapid eGFR decline defined as ≥3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year was also examined. Results Consumption of ≥2 servings per day of artificially sweetened (diet) soda was independently associated with eGFR decline ≥30% (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.01) and ≥3 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year (OR 2.20, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.55). No increased risk for eGFR decline was observed for <2 servings per day of diet soda. No associations were noted between diet soda and MA or sugar soda and MA or eGFR decline. Conclusions Consumption of ≥2 servings per day of artificially sweetened soda is associated with a 2-fold increased odds for kidney function decline in women. PMID:20884773

  17. Impact of therapeutic and high doses of florfenicol on kidney and liver functional indicators in goat

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jan Muhammad; Qureshi, Toufique Ahmed; Shah, Tahmina; Shah, Qurban Ali; Arain, Muhammad Asif; Bhutto, Zohaib Ahmed; Saeed, Muhammad; Siyal, Farman Ali

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of therapeutic and high doses of florfenicol on kidney and liver functional indicators in goat species. Materials and Methods: Six mature, healthy goats (combine breed and sex) with average weight 25 kg were selected for this study. The therapeutic (20 mg/kg b.w.) and high doses (40 and 60 mg) of florfenicol were administered for 3 days with 24 h interval. Blood samples were collected at 0, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h following the each administered dose. Results: The results showed that the therapeutic dose of florfenicol produced nonsignificant effect on serum urea, creatinine, total protein (TP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and bilirubin on all timings, and increased (p<0.05) the serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) levels for 48 h. Whereas the high doses of florfenicol (40 and 60 mg) significantly altered the kidney and liver functional indicators in the blood. In contrast with control, the serum urea level was (p<0.01) increased at all timing points. Creatinine values were altered (p<0.01, <0.05) in increasing manner from 24 to 96 h. The high dose of 40 mg decreased the TP (p<0.05) for 72 h and 60 mg persisted same effect (p<0.01) up to 120 h. The indices of ALP, GGT, SGOT, and SGPT were raised (p<0.01, <0.05) at all timings. The bilirubin indexes also (p<0.05) elevated from 48 to 72. Conclusion: It was concluded that the high doses of florfenicol produced reversible dose-dependent effects on functional indicators of kidney and liver such as urea, creatinine, TP, ALP, SGOT, SGPT, GGT, and bilirubin. PMID:27847425

  18. How does your kidney smell? Emerging roles for olfactory receptors in renal function.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Blythe D; Pluznick, Jennifer L

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) are chemosensors that are responsible for one's sense of smell. In addition to this specialized role in the nose, recent evidence suggests that ORs are also found in a variety of additional tissues including the kidney. As this list of renal ORs continues to expand, it is becoming clear that they play important roles in renal and whole-body physiology, including a novel role in blood pressure regulation. In this review, we highlight important considerations that are crucial when studying ORs and present the current literature on renal ORs and their emerging relevance in maintaining renal function.

  19. Urine biomarkers of kidney injury among adolescents in Nicaragua, a region affected by an epidemic of chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Rubio, Oriana; Amador, Juan José; Kaufman, James S.; Weiner, Daniel E.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Khan, Usman; McClean, Michael D.; Laws, Rebecca L.; López-Pilarte, Damaris; Friedman, David J.; Kupferman, Joseph; Brooks, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Background An epidemic of chronic kidney disease (CKD) of non-traditional aetiology has been recently recognized by health authorities as a public health priority in Central America. Previous studies have identified strenuous manual work, agricultural activities and residence at low altitude as potential risk factors; however, the aetiology remains unknown. Because individuals are frequently diagnosed with CKD in early adulthood, we measured biomarkers of kidney injury among adolescents in different regions of Nicaragua to assess whether kidney damage might be initiated during childhood. Methods Participants include 200 adolescents aged 12–18 years with no prior work history from four different schools in Nicaragua. The location of the school served as a proxy for environmental exposures and geographic locations were selected to represent a range of factors that have been associated with CKD in adults (e.g. altitude, primary industry and CKD mortality rates). Questionnaires, urine dipsticks and kidney injury biomarkers [interleukin-18, N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and albumin–creatinine ratio] were assessed. Biomarker concentrations were compared by school using linear regression models. Results Protein (3.5%) and glucose (1%) in urine measured by dipstick were rare and did not differ by school. Urine biomarkers of tubular kidney damage, particularly NGAL and NAG, showed higher concentrations in those schools and regions within Nicaragua that were defined a priori as having increased CKD risk. Painful urination was a frequent self-reported symptom. Conclusions Although interpretation of these urine biomarkers is limited because of the lack of population reference values, results suggest the possibility of early kidney damage prior to occupational exposures in these adolescents. PMID:26311057

  20. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber-Walter, Robert; Scholz, Sebastian; Haller, Herrmann; Kielstein, Jan T; Hafer, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Background Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT) may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT) study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL). The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital). Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d). One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]). Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™) index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health). Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion Mortality after severe AKI is higher than short-term prospective studies show, and morbidity is significant. Kidney recovery as well as general health remains incomplete. Reduction of QoL is minor, and social rehabilitation is very good. Affectivity is heterogeneous, but most patients experience emotional well-being. In summary, AKI in critically ill patients leads to incomplete rehabilitation but acceptable QoL after 5 years. PMID:27284261

  1. Kidney: polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Paul, Binu M; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a life-threatening genetic disorder characterized by the presence of fluid-filled cysts primarily in the kidneys. PKD can be inherited as autosomal recessive (ARPKD) or autosomal dominant (ADPKD) traits. Mutations in either the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, which encode polycystin 1 and polycystin 2, are the underlying cause of ADPKD. Progressive cyst formation and renal enlargement lead to renal insufficiency in these patients, which need to be managed by lifelong dialysis or renal transplantation. While characteristic features of PKD are abnormalities in epithelial cell proliferation, fluid secretion, extracellular matrix and differentiation, the molecular mechanisms underlying these events are not understood. Here we review the progress that has been made in defining the function of the polycystins, and how disruption of these functions may be involved in cystogenesis.

  2. Effects of 10 to 30 years of lithium treatment on kidney function.

    PubMed

    Aiff, Harald; Attman, Per-Ola; Aurell, Mattias; Bendz, Hans; Ramsauer, Bernd; Schön, Staffan; Svedlund, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Long-term lithium treatment is associated with end-stage renal disease, but there is little evidence of a clinically significant reduction in renal function in most patients. We previously found that 1.5% of people who took lithium from the 1960s and 1970s developed end-stage renal disease; however, none of the patients who started after 1980 had end-stage renal disease. Here we aimed to study the prevalence and extent of kidney damage during the course of long-term lithium treatment since 1980. We retrieved serum lithium and creatinine levels from 4879 patients examined between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2010. Only patients who started their lithium treatment during the study period and had at least 10 years of cumulative treatment were included. The study group comprised 630 adult patients (402 women and 228 men) with normal creatinine levels at the start of lithium treatment. There was a yearly increase in median serum creatinine levels already from the first year of treatment. About one-third of the patients who had taken lithium for 10-29 years had evidence of chronic renal failure but only 5% were in the severe or very severe category. The results indicate that a substantial proportion of adult patients who are treated with lithium for more than a decade develop signs of renal functional impairment, also when treated according to modern therapeutic principles. Our results emphasise that lithium treatment requires continuous monitoring of kidney function.

  3. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  4. Isoforms of Spectrin and Ankyrin Reflect the Functional Topography of the Mouse Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Stankewich, Michael C.; Moeckel, Gilbert W.; Ji, Lan; Ardito, Thomas; Morrow, Jon S.

    2016-01-01

    The kidney displays specialized regions devoted to filtration, selective reabsorption, and electrolyte and metabolite trafficking. The polarized membrane pumps, channels, and transporters responsible for these functions have been exhaustively studied. Less examined are the contributions of spectrin and its adapter ankyrin to this exquisite functional topography, despite their established contributions in other tissues to cellular organization. We have examined in the rodent kidney the expression and distribution of all spectrins and ankyrins by qPCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescent and immuno electron microscopy. Four of the seven spectrins (αΙΙ, βΙ, βΙΙ, and βΙΙΙ) are expressed in the kidney, as are two of the three ankyrins (G and B). The levels and distribution of these proteins vary widely over the nephron. αΙΙ/βΙΙ is the most abundant spectrin, found in glomerular endothelial cells; on the basolateral membrane and cytoplasmic vesicles in proximal tubule cells and in the thick ascending loop of Henle; and less so in the distal nephron. βΙΙΙ spectrin largely replaces βΙΙ spectrin in podocytes, Bowman’s capsule, and throughout the distal tubule and collecting ducts. βΙ spectrin is only marginally expressed; its low abundance hinders a reliable determination of its distribution. Ankyrin G is the most abundant ankyrin, found in capillary endothelial cells and all tubular segments. Ankyrin B populates Bowman’s capsule, podocytes, the ascending thick loop of Henle, and the distal convoluted tubule. Comparison to the distribution of renal protein 4.1 isoforms and various membrane proteins indicates a complex relationship between the spectrin scaffold, its adapters, and various membrane proteins. While some proteins (e.g. ankyrin B, βΙΙΙ spectrin, and aquaporin 2) tend to share a similar distribution, there is no simple mapping of different spectrins or ankyrins to most membrane proteins. The implications of this data are

  5. Impact of Momordica charantia extract on kidney function and structure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mardani, Saeed; Nasri, Hamid; Hajian, Shabnam; Ahmadi, Ali; Kazemi, Reyhane; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Bitter Melon (BM) is known for its hypoglycemic effect and is commonly used in populations. Objectives: This study examined the effects and safety of bitter melon fruit in laboratory mice. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 70 male mice (25-30 gr) were randomly divided into 7 groups. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with single doses of 0, 100, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg and multiple doses 500 mg/kg daily for 7 days. The mice were then observed for 72 hours before sacrificing. Immediately kidneys were taken out for histological examinations. Tubular cell vacuolization and flattening as well as hyaline casts, debris and dilatation of tubular lumen were the morphologic lesions which were assessed with scores from 0 to 4, while zero score addressed normal renal tissue. Serum samples were assayed for kidney function (creatinine; Cr and Blood Urea Nitrogen; BUN). Blood and bitter melon antioxidant activities were measured, too. Data were analyzed with Stata software (Stata Corp. 2011. Stata Statistical Software: Release 12. College Station, TX: Stata Corp LP)using ANOVA and Bonferroni tests. Results: All single dose groups showed normal behavior after the dosing and no statistical changes were observed in blood parameters (p>0.05). Histological examinations revealed normal organ structures, however, the group treated for 7 days showed statistically a significant change in BUN (p=0.002) and a borderline significance in Cr (p=0.051). Conclusions: Administration of up to 4000 mg/kg did not have any effect on the mice kidney function and histology, however chronic administration were nephrotoxic. More studies with different dosage regimens are suggested. PMID:24644542

  6. Selective Activation of AMPK b1-containing Isoforms Improves Kidney Function in a Rat Model of Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Salatto, Christopher T; Miller, Russell A; Cameron, Kimberly O; Cokorinos, Emily; Reyes, Allan; Ward, Jessica; Calabrese, Matt; Kurumbail, Ravi; Rajamohan, Francis; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Tess, David A; Shavnya, Andre; Genung, Nathan E; Edmonds, David J; Jatkar, Aditi; Maciejewski, Benjamin S; Amaro, Marina; Gandhok, Harmeet; Monetti, Mara; Cialdea, Katherine; Bollinger, Eliza; Kreeger, John M; Coskran, Timothy M; Opsahl, Alan C; Boucher, Germaine G; Birnbaum, Morris J; DaSilva-Jardine, Paul; Rolph, Tim

    2017-03-13

    Diabetic nephropathy remains an area of high unmet medical need, with current therapies slowing, but not preventing the progression of disease. A reduced phosphorylation state of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been correlated with diminished kidney function in both human subjects and animal models of kidney disease. Here, we describe the identification of novel, potent, small molecule activators of AMPK that selectively activate AMPK heterotrimers containing the β1 subunit. After confirming that human and rodent kidney predominately express AMPK β1, we explore the effects of pharmacologic activation of AMPK in the ZSF-1 rat model of diabetic nephropathy. Chronic administration of these direct activators elevate the phosphorylation of AMPK in the kidney, without impacting blood glucose levels, and reduce the progression of proteinuria to a greater degree than the ACE-inhibitor ramipril. Further analysis of urine biomarkers and kidney tissue gene expression reveal AMPK activation leads to the modulation of multiple pathways implicated in kidney injury, including cellular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and oxidative stress. These results support the need for further investigation into the potential beneficial effects of AMPK activation in kidney disease.

  7. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Najafabadi, Mojgan Mortazavi; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Feizi, Awat

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g) was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr), and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P = 0.01). Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression. PMID:27819022

  8. Kidney transplant artery stenosis. Interrelationship between blood pressure, kidney function, renin-aldosterone system and body sodium content.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, H J; Pedersen, E B; Fjeldborg, O

    1977-01-01

    Among 9 hypertensive recipients with kidney transplant artery stenosis (KTAS) evidence of increased activity of the renin system was present in 3. Surgical repair of KTAS in 4 recipients resulted in an increase in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate associated with a decrease in exchangeable sodium and blood pressure. Peripheral plasma renin and aldosterone values were normal before and after operation in all. It is suggested that sodium retention may counterbalance increased activity of the renin system in KTAS. Preoperative determinations of plasma renin do not predict the effect of surgical repair of KTAS on hypertension.

  9. Association of Serum Erythropoietin with Cardiovascular Events, Kidney Function Decline and Mortality: The Health ABC Study

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Katz, Ronit; Patel, Kushang V.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Ix, Joachim H.; Fried, Linda F.; Newman, Anne B.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Harris, Tamara B.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that in patients with heart failure (HF), high serum erythropoietin is associated with risk of recurrent HF and mortality. Trials of erythropoietin stimulating agents in persons with kidney disease have also suggested an increased incidence of adverse clinical events. No studies have evaluated the association of endogenous erythropoietin levels with clinical outcomes in the community living older adults. Methods and Results Erythropoietin concentration was measured in 2,488 participants aged 70–79 years in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Associations of erythropoietin with incident HF, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, mortality, and ≥30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were examined using Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression over 10.7 years of follow up. Mean (SD) age was 75 (3) years and median (quartile 1, quartile 3) erythropoietin was 12.3 (9.0, 17.2) mIU/mL. There were 503 incident HF events and each doubling of serum erythropoietin was associated with a 25% increased risk of incident HF 1.25 (95% CI 1.13, 1.48) after adjusting for demographics, prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD risk factors, kidney function and serum hemoglobin. There was no interaction of serum erythropoietin with chronic kidney disease or anemia (p>0.50). There were 330 incident CHD events, 161 strokes, 1,112 deaths and 698 outcomes of ≥ 30% decline in eGFR. Serum erythropoietin was not significantly associated with these outcomes. Conclusions Higher levels of endogenous erythropoietin are associated with incident HF in older adults. Studies need to elucidate the mechanisms through which endogenous erythropoietin levels associate with specific outcomes. PMID:26721912

  10. Serum Resistin and Kidney Function: A Family-Based Study in Non-Diabetic, Untreated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Menzaghi, Claudia; Salvemini, Lucia; Fini, Grazia; Thompson, Ryan; Mangiacotti, Davide; Di Paola, Rosa; Morini, Eleonora; Giorelli, Maddalena; De Bonis, Concetta; De Cosmo, Salvatore; Doria, Alessandro; Trischitta, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background High serum resistin levels have been associated with kidney dysfunction. Most of these studies have been carried out in individuals with severe kidney impairment, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related treatments. Thus, the observed association might have been influenced by these confounders. Our aim was to study the relationship between serum resistin, urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in a family-based sample, the Gargano Family Study (GFS) of 635 non diabetic, untreated Whites. Methods A linear mixed effects model and bivariate analyses were used to evaluate the phenotypic and genetic relations between serum resistin and both ACR and eGFR. All analyses were adjusted for sex, age, age squared, BMI, systolic blood pressure, smoking habits and physical exercise. Results After adjustments, resistin levels were slightly positively associated with ACR (β±SE = 0.049±0.023, p = 0.035) and inversely related to eGFR (β±SE = −1.43±0.61, p = 0.018) levels. These associations remained significant when either eGFR or ACR were, reciprocally, added as covariates. A genetic correlation (ρg = −0.31±0.12; adjusted p = 0.013) was observed between resistin and eGFR (but not ACR) levels. Conclusion Serum resistin levels are independently associated with ACR and eGFR in untreated non-diabetic individuals. Serum resistin and eGFR share also some common genetic background. Our data strongly suggest that resistin plays a role in modulating kidney function. PMID:22701635

  11. Exome Sequencing and Prediction of Long-Term Kidney Allograft Function

    PubMed Central

    Mesnard, Laurent; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Burbach, Maren; Li, Carol; Shang, Huimin; Dadhania, Darshana; Lee, John R.; Xiang, Jenny; Suberbielle, Caroline; Carmagnat, Maryvonnick; Ouali, Nacera; Rondeau, Eric; Abecassis, Michael M.; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-01-01

    Current strategies to improve graft outcome following kidney transplantation consider information at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci. Cell surface antigens, in addition to HLA, may serve as the stimuli as well as the targets for the anti-allograft immune response and influence long-term graft outcomes. We therefore performed exome sequencing of DNA from kidney graft recipients and their living donors and estimated all possible cell surface antigens mismatches for a given donor/recipient pair by computing the number of amino acid mismatches in trans-membrane proteins. We designated this tally as the allogenomics mismatch score (AMS). We examined the association between the AMS and post-transplant estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) using mixed models, considering transplants from three independent cohorts (a total of 53 donor-recipient pairs, 106 exomes, and 239 eGFR measurements). We found that the AMS has a significant effect on eGFR (mixed model, effect size across the entire range of the score: -19.4 [-37.7, -1.1], P = 0.0042, χ2 = 8.1919, d.f. = 1) that is independent of the HLA-A, B, DR matching, donor age, and time post-transplantation. The AMS effect is consistent across the three independent cohorts studied and similar to the strong effect size of donor age. Taken together, these results show that the AMS, a novel tool to quantify amino acid mismatches in trans-membrane proteins in individual donor/recipient pair, is a strong, robust predictor of long-term graft function in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:27684477

  12. The Western-style diet: a major risk factor for impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Odermatt, Alex

    2011-11-01

    The Western-style diet is characterized by its highly processed and refined foods and high contents of sugars, salt, and fat and protein from red meat. It has been recognized as the major contributor to metabolic disturbances and the development of obesity-related diseases including type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Also, the Western-style diet has been associated with an increased incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). A combination of dietary factors contributes to the impairment of renal vascularization, steatosis and inflammation, hypertension, and impaired renal hormonal regulation. This review addresses recent progress in the understanding of the association of the Western-style diet with the induction of dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and disturbances of corticosteroid regulation in the development of CKD. Future research needs to distinguish between acute and chronic effects of diets with high contents of sugars, salt, and fat and protein from red meat, and to uncover the contribution of each component. Improved therapeutic interventions should consider potentially altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics and be combined with lifestyle changes. A clinical assessment of the long-term risks of whole-body disturbances is strongly recommended to reduce metabolic complications and cardiovascular risk in kidney donors and patients with CKD.

  13. The Association of Long-Functioning Hemodialysis Vascular Access with Prevalence of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kujawa-Szewieczek, Agata; Szotowska, Magdalena; Więcek, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is frequently observed in chronic dialysis patients and is also highly prevalent in kidney transplant recipients. This study evaluates the impact of long-functioning hemodialysis vascular access on LVH in single center cohort of kidney transplant recipients. 162 patients at 8.7 ± 1.8 years after kidney transplantation were enrolled. Echocardiography, carotid ultrasound, and assessment of pulse wave velocity were performed. LVH was defined based on left ventricular mass (LVM) indexed for body surface area (BSA) and height2.7. There were 67 patients with and 95 without patent vascular access. Both study groups were comparable with respect to gender, age, duration of dialysis therapy, and time after transplantation, kidney graft function, and cardiovascular comorbidities. Patients with patent vascular access were characterized by significantly elevated LVM and significantly greater percentage of LVH, based on LVMI/BSA (66.7 versus 48.4%, P = 0.02). OR for LVH in patients with patent vascular access was 2.39 (1.19–4.76), P = 0.01. Regression analyses confirmed an independent contribution of patent vascular access to higher LVM and increased prevalence of LVH. We concluded that long-lasting patent hemodialysis vascular access after kidney transplantation is associated with the increased prevalence of LVH in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24616896

  14. The impact of ICAM1 and VCAM1 gene polymorphisms on chronic allograft nephropathy and transplanted kidney function.

    PubMed

    Kłoda, K; Domański, L; Pawlik, A; Wiśniewska, M; Safranow, K; Ciechanowski, K

    2013-01-01

    ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 adhesion molecules play important roles in the immune response and emergence of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The several polymorphisms of ICAM1 and VCAM1 genes are associated with changes in molecular expression therefore affecting allograft function and immune responses after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of polymorphisms in ICAM1 and VCAM1 genes on biopsy-proven CAN and renal allograft function. The 270 Caucasian renal transplant recipients (166 men and 104 women) were genotyped for the rs5498 ICAM1 and rs1041163 and rs3170794 VCAM1 gene polymorphisms using real-time polymerase chain reaction. There was no correlation between polymorphisms and CAN. Creatinine concentrations in the first month after transplantation differed between the rs5498 ICAM1 genotypes (P = .095), being higher for GG carriers (AA + AG vs GG, P =.07) albeit not with statistical significance. Creatinine concentrations at 12, 24, and 36 months after transplantation differed significantly among rs5498 ICAM1 genotypes (P = .0046, P =.016, and P = .02) and were higher among GG carriers (AA + AG vs GG, P = .001, P = .004, and P = .006). Rs5498 ICAM1 GG genotype and receipient male gender were independent factors associated with higher creatinine concentrations. These results suggest that the rs5498 ICAM1 GG genotype may be associated with long-term allograft function.

  15. Solitary Kidney

    MedlinePlus

    ... How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Solitary Kidney What is a solitary kidney? When a person has only one kidney or ... ureter are removed (bottom right). What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are ...

  16. Cognitive and Kidney Function: Results from a British Birth Cohort Reaching Retirement Age

    PubMed Central

    Silverwood, Richard J.; Richards, Marcus; Pierce, Mary; Hardy, Rebecca; Sattar, Naveed; Ferro, Charles; Savage, Caroline; Kuh, Diana; Nitsch, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found associations between cognitive function and chronic kidney disease. We aimed to explore possible explanations for this association in the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development, a prospective birth cohort representative of the general British population. Methods Cognitive function at age 60–64 years was quantified using five measures (verbal memory, letter search speed and accuracy, simple and choice reaction times) and glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the same age was estimated using cystatin C. The cross-sectional association between cognitive function and eGFR was adjusted for background confounding factors (socioeconomic position, educational attainment), prior cognition, and potential explanations for any remaining association (smoking, diabetes, hypertension, inflammation, obesity). Results Data on all the analysis variables were available for 1306–1320 study members (depending on cognitive measure). Verbal memory and simple and choice reaction times were strongly associated with eGFR. For example, the lowest quartile of verbal memory corresponded to a 4.1 (95% confidence interval 2.0, 6.2) ml/min/1.73 m2 lower eGFR relative to the highest quartile. Some of this association was explained by confounding due to socioeconomic factors, but very little of it by prior cognition. Smoking, diabetes, hypertension, inflammation and obesity explained some but not all of the remaining association. Conclusions These analyses support the notion of a shared pathophysiology of impaired cognitive and kidney function at older age, which precedes clinical disease. The implications of these findings for clinical care and research are important and under-recognised, though further confirmatory studies are required. PMID:24482683

  17. Assessment of salivary gland function in patients after successful kidney transplantation using (99m)Tc-pertechnetate salivary gland scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Orsal, Ebru; Seven, Bedri; Keles, Mustafa; Ayan, Arif Kursad; Cankaya, Erdem; Ozkan, Ozalkan

    2013-01-01

    Chronic renal failure and its treatment can induce oral health problems and salivary glands dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess salivary glands function in patients with kidney transplantation using technetium-99m pertechnetate ((99m)Tc-P) salivary glands scintigraphy. We prospectively studied 34 patients with kidney transplantation (30 males and 4 females,mean age 39.76±11.6 years) and 28 healthy controls (12 males and 16 females, mean age 36.1±9.5 years). Salivary gland scintigraphy was performed nearly 4.4±2.9 years after successful kidney transplantation. Dynamic salivary glands scintigraphy was performed during 25min after the intravenous administration of 185MBq of (99m)Tc-P. Time-activity curves and glands functional parameters were calculated for the parotid and submandibular salivary glands: uptake ratio, maximum accumulation of the radionuclide, and excretion fraction. Statistical analysis of the functional parameters showed no significant differences between patients with kidney transplantation and healthy controls (P>0.05). In conclusion, this study showed that using (99m)Tc-P salivary gland scintigraphy, salivary glands function of patients with successful kidney transplantation do not differ statistically from those in healthy controls.

  18. Nutrition in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Veroux, Massimiliano; Corona, Daniela; Sinagra, Nunziata; Tallarita, Tiziano; Ekser, Burcin; Giaquinta, Alessia; Zerbo, Domenico; Veroux, Pierfrancesco

    2013-10-01

    Organ transplantation has progressively established itself as the preferred therapy for many end-stage organ failures. However, many of these chronic diseases and their treatments can negatively affect nutritional status, leading to malnutrition and mineral deficiencies.Nutritional status is an important determinant of the clinical outcome of kidney transplant recipients.Malnutrition and obesity may represent a contraindication to transplantation in many cases and may increase the risk of postoperative complications after the transplantation. Nutritional support in kidney transplant recipients is challenging, since it must take into account the pre-transplant nutritional status, the side effects of immunosuppression, the function of the transplanted graft, the presence of infection, and the general status of the patient at the time of the transplantation.With these considerations in mind, we reviewed current literature on the impact of nutritional status on the outcome of kidney transplantation.

  19. Antigravity suit inflation: kidney function and cardiovascular and hormonal responses in men.

    PubMed

    Geelen, G; Kravik, S E; Hadj-Aissa, A; Leftheriotis, G; Vincent, M; Bizollon, C A; Sem-Jacobsen, C W; Greenleaf, J E; Gharib, C

    1989-02-01

    To investigate the effects of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on kidney function while controlling certain cardiovascular and endocrine responses, seven men [35 +/- 2 (SE) yr] underwent 30 min of sitting and then 4.5 h of 70 degrees head-up tilt. An antigravity suit was applied (60 Torr legs, 30 Torr abdomen) during the last 3 h of tilt. A similar noninflation experiment was conducted where the suited subjects were tilted for 3.5 h. To provide adequate urine flow, the subjects were hydrated during the course of both experiments. Immediately after inflation, mean arterial pressure increased by 8 +/- 3 Torr and pulse rate decreased by 16 +/- 3 beats/min. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone were maximally suppressed (P less than 0.05) after 2.5 h of inflation. Plasma vasopressin decreased by 40-50% (P less than 0.05) and plasma sodium and potassium remained unchanged during both experiments. Glomerular filtration rate was not increased significantly by inflation, whereas inflation induced marked increases (P less than 0.05) in effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), urine flow, osmolar and free water clearances, and total and fractional sodium excretion. No such changes occurred during control. Thus, LBPP induces 1) a significant increase in ERPF and 2) significant changes in kidney excretory patterns similar to those observed during water immersion or the early phase of bed rest, situations that also result in central vascular volume expansion.

  20. Optical spectroscopy approach for the predictive assessment of kidney functional recovery following ischemic injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, Rajesh N.; Pivetti, Christopher D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Troppmann, Christoph; Demos, Stavros G.

    2010-02-01

    Tissue that has undergone significant yet unknown amount of ischemic injury is frequently encountered in organ transplantation and trauma clinics. With no reliable real-time method of assessing the degree of injury incurred in tissue, surgeons generally rely on visual observation which is subjective. In this work, we investigate the use of optical spectroscopy methods as a potentially more reliable approach. Previous work by various groups was strongly suggestive that tissue autofluorescence from NADH obtained under UV excitation is sensitive to metabolic response changes. To test and expand upon this concept, we monitored autofluorescence and light scattering intensities of injured vs. uninjured rat kidneys via multimodal imaging under 355 nm, 325 nm, and 266 nm excitation as well as scattering under 500 nm illumination. 355 nm excitation was used to probe mainly NADH, a metabolite, while 266 nm excitation was used to probe mainly tryptophan to correct for non-metabolic signal artifacts. The ratio of autofluorescence intensities derived under these two excitation wavelengths was calculated and its temporal profile was fit to a relaxation model. Time constants were extracted, and longer time constants were associated with kidney dysfunction. Analysis of both the autofluorescence and light scattering images suggests that changes in microstructure tissue morphology, blood absorption spectral characteristics, and pH contribute to the behavior of the observed signal which may be used to obtain tissue functional information and offer predictive capability.

  1. Optical Spectroscopy Approach for the Predictive Assessment of Kidney Functional Recovery Following Ischemic Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R N; Pivetti, C D; Rubenchik, A M; Matthews, D L; Troppmann, C; Demos, S G

    2010-02-11

    Tissue that has undergone significant yet unknown amount of ischemic injury is frequently encountered in organ transplantation and trauma clinics. With no reliable real-time method of assessing the degree of injury incurred in tissue, surgeons generally rely on visual observation which is subjective. In this work, we investigate the use of optical spectroscopy methods as a potentially more reliable approach. Previous work by various groups was strongly suggestive that tissue autofluorescence from NADH obtained under UV excitation is sensitive to metabolic response changes. To test and expand upon this concept, we monitored autofluorescence and light scattering intensities of injured vs. uninjured rat kidneys via multimodal imaging under 355 nm, 325 nm, and 266 nm excitation as well as scattering under 500 nm illumination. 355 nm excitation was used to probe mainly NADH, a metabolite, while 266 nm excitation was used to probe mainly tryptophan to correct for non-metabolic signal artifacts. The ratio of autofluorescence intensities derived under these two excitation wavelengths was calculated and its temporal profile was fit to a relaxation model. Time constants were extracted, and longer time constants were associated with kidney dysfunction. Analysis of both the autofluorescence and light scattering images suggests that changes in microstructure tissue morphology, blood absorption spectral characteristics, and pH contribute to the behavior of the observed signal which may be used to obtain tissue functional information and offer predictive capability.

  2. Mitochondrial function in heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats: influence of captopril treatment.

    PubMed

    Mujkosová, Jana; Ulicná, Olga; Waczulíková, Iveta; Vlkovicová, Jana; Vancová, Ol'ga; Ferko, Miroslav; Polák, Stefan; Ziegelhöffer, Attila

    2010-06-01

    Effect of captopril treatment on capability of heart and kidney mitochondria to produce ATP was investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Heart mitochondria from SHR responded to hypertension with tendency to compensate the elevated energy demands of cardiac cells by moderate increase in mitochondrial Mg2+-ATPase activity, membrane fluidity (MF) and in majority of functional parameters of the mitochondria (p>0.05). Significant increase exhibited only the oxygen consumption (QO2; p<0.01-0.001) and oxidative phosphorylation rate (OPR; p<0.003) with glutamate+malate (GLUT+MAL) as substrates. Lowering the blood pressure (p<0.02) captopril also eliminated the above compensatory response and impaired the oxidative ATP production by decreasing OPR (p<0.001). Kidney mitochondria of SHR experienced serious disarrangement in parameters of oxidative ATP production: increase in Mg2+-ATPase activity (p<0.05) but, also scattered QO2 values (p<0.03-0.01) leading to decrease in OPR and the ADP:O (p<0.05-0.01) values with both GLUT+MAL and succinate as substrates. Captopril treatment does not alleviated but even worsened the above alterations. Mg2+-ATPase became also decreased and the depression of ADP:O became aggravated (p<0.0001).

  3. Technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake in long-term catheterized kidney. Comparison with renal function

    SciTech Connect

    Higashihara, E.; Tokuda, H.; Kishi, H.; Niijima, T.; Okada, Y.; Nishikawa, J.; Iio, M.

    1988-04-01

    We studied 23 long-term catheterized kidneys in 14 patients. The uptake of /sup 99m/Tc acid (/sup 99m/Tc-DMSA) was measured at one- and two-hour intervals after injection, and the uptake was corrected for variations in renal depth. These values were compared with inulin, creatinine, and para-amino hippurate (PAH) clearances which were measured in each kidney by collecting urine through long-term catheterization. Correlation coefficient was obtained between PAH clearance corrected for the body surface area and the two-hour uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA. The correlation coefficients between the two-hour uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA and the clearance values are not significantly different from those between the one-hour uptake and the clearance values. Corrections of the uptake for variations in renal depth did not improve the correlation coefficients. The results show that /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA is an excellent method to estimate the renal plasma flow and the one-hour uptake without correction for renal depth is clinically sufficient to evaluate the split renal function.

  4. Structure and Activity Changes of Phytohemagglutinin from Red Kidney Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) Affected by Ultrahigh-Pressure Treatments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjun; Liu, Cencen; Zhao, Mouming; Cui, Chun; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2015-11-04

    Phytohemagglutin (PHA), purified from red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) by Affi-Gel blue affinity chromatography, was subjected to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) treatment (150, 250, 350, and 450 MPa). The purified PHA lost its hemagglutination activity after 450 MPa treatment and showed less pressure tolerance than crude PHA. However, the saccharide specificity and α-glucosidase inhibition activity of the purified PHA did not change much after UHP treatment. Electrophoresis staining by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) manifested that the glycone structure of purified PHA remained stable even after 450 MPa pressure treatment. However, electrophoresis staining by Coomassie Blue as well as circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) assay proved that the protein unit structure of purified PHA unfolded when treated at 0-250 MPa but reaggregates at 250-450 MPa. Therefore, the hemagglutination activity tends to be affected by the protein unit structure, while the stability of the glycone structure contributed to the remaining α-glucosidase inhibition activity.

  5. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  6. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  7. Preoperative and postoperative cortical function of the kidney with staghorn calculi assessed by 99mtechnetium-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, J; Itoh, H; Okada, Y; Higashi, Y; Yoshida, O; Fujita, T; Torizuka, K

    1983-09-01

    99mTechnetium dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy, consisting of the cortical image and dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake rate, was used to assess preoperative and postoperative renal function in 55 patients with staghorn calculi. In 14 of 20 patients who had undergone extended pyelolithotomy and in 4 of 22 who had undergone nephrolithotomy there was an increase or no change in the postoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake in the surgically treated kidney. However, there was no increase in the postoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake in the patients who had undergone pyelolithotomy combined with nephrotomy or partial nephrectomy. Eight per cent of the preoperative dimercaptosuccinic acid renal uptake rate in the diseased kidney seems to be the absolute level for predicting the postoperative recovery of renal function. Dimercaptosuccinic acid renal images provide evidence of morphological changes in the cortex of the kidney with stones and the dimercaptosuccinic acid uptake rate is a useful adjunct for quantitative assessments of preoperative and postoperative residual cortical function.

  8. Kidney Function Alters the Relationship between Postoperative Troponin T Level and Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chew-Yin; Ong, Gracie S.Y.; Tan, Alvin S.B.; Mansor, Marzida; Shariffuddin, Ina I.; Hashim, Noorjahan H.M.; Lai, Hou Yee; Undok, A. Wahab; Kolandaivel, Ushananthini N.; Vajiravelu, Vasanthan; Garg, Amit X.; Cuerden, Meaghan; Guyatt, Gordon; Thabane, Lehana; Mooney, John; Lee, Vincent; Chow, Clara; Devereaux, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac troponin T (cTnT), even at low concentrations, is a risk factor for 30-day mortality in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, but it is uncertain whether that risk is generalizable to patients with poor kidney function. We, therefore, evaluated the relationship between cTnT concentration and kidney function on the outcome of 30-day mortality in a post hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery. cTnT was measured for 3 days after surgery and considered abnormal if the peak was ≥0.02 ng/ml. Of the included 14,037 patients, 267 (1.9%) patients died within 30 days of surgery. The adjusted hazard ratios for death with an abnormal cTnT concentration were 4.37 (95% confidence intervals [95% CI], 3.21 to 6.22), 6.15 (95% CI, 2.95 to 140.9), 6.30 (95% CI, 3.12 to 21.23), 1.33 (95% CI, 0.56 to 4.85), and 1.46 (95% CI, 0.46 to 9.21) for eGFR≥60, 45 to <60, 30 to <45, 15 to <30, and <15 ml/min per 1.73 m2 or on dialysis, respectively. Compared with patients with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2, the adjusted hazard ratio was significantly lower for patients with eGFR=15 to <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (interaction P value=0.02). Redefining abnormal cTnT concentration as ≥0.03 ng/ml or a change of ≥0.02 ng/ml did not alter results. Because the risk associated with postoperative cTnT levels may be different for patients with eGFR<30 ml/min per 1.73 m2, additional research is required to determine how to interpret perioperative cTnT values for patients with low kidney function. PMID:25711126

  9. Improved kidney function in patients who switch their protease inhibitor from atazanavir or lopinavir to darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Nelson, Mark; Phillips, Andrew; Chadwick, David; Trevelion, Roy; Jones, Rachael; Williams, Deborah I.; Hamzah, Lisa; Sabin, Caroline A.; Post, Frank A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Atazanavir (ATV) and lopinavir (LPV) have been associated with kidney disease progression in HIV positive patients, with no data reported for darunavir (DRV). We examined kidney function in patients who switched their protease inhibitor from ATV or LPV to DRV. Design: Cohort study. Methods: Data were from the UK CHIC study. We compared pre and post switch estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) slopes (expressed in ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year) in all switchers and those with rapid eGFR decline (>5 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year) on ATV or LPV. Mixed-effects models were adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, eGFR at switch and time updated CD4+ cell count, HIV RNA and cumulative tenofovir (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) exposure. Results: Data from 1430 patients were included. At the time of switching to DRV, median age was 45 years, 79% were men, 76% had an undetectable viral load, and median eGFR was 93 ml/min per 1.73 m2. Adjusted mean (95% confidence interval) pre and post switch eGFR slopes were −0.84 (−1.31, −0.36) and 1.23 (0.80, 1.66) for ATV (P < 0.001), and −0.57 (−1.09, −0.05) and 0.62 (0.28, 0.96) for LPV (P < 0.001). Stable or improved renal function was observed in patients with rapid eGFR decline on ATV or LPV who switched to DRV [−15.27 (−19.35, −11.19) and 3.72 (1.78, 5.66), P < 0.001 for ATV, −11.93 (−14.60, −9.26) and 0.87 (−0.54, 2.27), P < 0.001 for LPV]. Similar results were obtained if participants who discontinued tenofovir disoproxil fumarate at the time of switch were excluded. Conclusions: We report improved kidney function in patients who switched from ATV or LPV to DRV, suggesting that DRV may have a more favourable renal safety profile. PMID:28121667

  10. Kidney function and clinical recommendations of drug dose adjustment in geriatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In elderly patients chronic kidney disease often limits drug prescription. As several equations for quick assessment of kidney function by estimating glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and several different clinical recommendations for drug dose adjustment in renal failure are published, choosing the correct approach for drug dosage is difficult for the practitioner. The aims of our study were to quantify the agreement between eGFR-equations grouped by creatinine-based or cystatin C-based and within the groups of creatinine and cystatin C-based equations and to investigate whether use of various literature and online references results in different recommendations for drug dose adjustment in renal disease in very elderly primary care patients. Methods We included 108 primary care patients aged 80 years and older from 11 family practices into a cross-sectional study. GFR was estimated using two serum creatinine-based equations (Cockroft-Gault, MDRD) and three serum cystatin C-based equations (Grubb, Hoek, Perkins). Concordance between different equations was quantified using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Essential changes in drug doses or discontinuation of medication were documented and compared in terms of estimated renal function as a consequence of the different eGFR-equations using five references commonly used in the US, Great Britain and Germany. Results In general, creatinine-based equations resulted in lower eGFR-estimation and in higher necessity of drug dose adjustment than cystatin C-based equations. Concordance was high between creatinine-based equations alone (ICCs 0.87) and between cystatin C-based equations alone (ICCs 0.90 to 0.96), and moderate between creatinine-based equations and cystatin C-based equations (ICCs 0.54 to 0.76). When comparing the five different references consulted to identify necessary drug dose adjustments we found that the numbers of drugs that necessitate dose adjustment in the case of renal

  11. Effects of benidipine and candesartan on kidney and vascular function in hypertensive Dahl rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kozo; Sato, Hitoshi; Sonoda, Rie; Ina, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Tetsuji

    2003-07-01

    We examined the effect of the dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB) benidipine, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) candesartan, and the combination of these drugs on blood pressure and kidney and vascular function in rats with salt-induced hypertension. Dahl salt-sensitive (DS) rats were fed with a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet from 7 weeks of age. Benidipine (1, 3 mg/kg), candesartan (1, 3 mg/kg), benidipine (3 mg/kg) combined with candesartan (3 mg/kg), or vehicle was administered orally after the start of the feeding. Relaxant responses to acetylcholine (an endothelium-dependent vasodilator) and sodium nitroprusside (an endothelium-independent vasodilator) were measured to examine the vascular function. DS rats fed the high-salt diet showed an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP), which was accompanied by glomerular sclerosis and an increase in urinary albumin excretion. Relaxant responses to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were impaired in superior mesenteric arterial rings from the hypertensive DS rats. SBP was significantly lower in all of the drug-treated groups than in the vehicle-treated group. The antihypertensive effect of benidipine at 3 mg/kg was more potent than that of candesartan at 3 mg/kg. The albuminuria was significantly decreased in the benidipine and benidipine plus candesartan groups, but not in the candesartan group. The level of SBP in the benidipine plus candesartan group was lower than that by either drug alone. In addition, benidipine alone and benidipine plus candesartan inhibited the glomerular sclerosis and the impairment of relaxant responses in the arteries. These results demonstrate that benidipine is more effective than candesartan in lowering blood pressure and preventing the impairment of kidney and vascular function in salt-sensitive hypertensive rats. In addition, the results suggest that combination therapy with benidipine and an ARB decreases blood pressure more effectively than either drug alone

  12. Renal functional reserve is impaired in patients with systemic sclerosis without clinical signs of kidney involvement

    PubMed Central

    Livi, R; Teghini, L; Pignone, A; Generini, S; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Cagnoni, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional response of the kidney to an amino acid challenge (the so called renal functional reserve (RFR)) in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) with no clinical sign of renal involvement. Methods: Before and after an intravenous amino acid load (Freamine III Baxter, 8.5% solution, 4.16 ml/min for two hours), glomerular filtration rate (GFR, as creatinine clearance), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF, as para-aminohyppurate clearance), and calculated total renal vascular resistance (TRVR) were measured in 21 patients with SSc with apparently normal renal function and 10 normal controls. Results: In basal conditions, patients had lower ERPF (403.5 (SD 43.8) v 496.4 (SD 71.3) ml/min, p<0.0002) and higher TRVR (10 822 (SD 2044) v 8874 (SD 1639) dyne/sxcm-5, p<0.014) than controls. The RFR, evaluated as the percentage increase of GFR after the amino acid load, was significantly reduced in patients with SSc (SSc +1.9 (SD18.6)%, controls +34.8 (SD 13.9)%; p<0.0002). However, the response of patients was not uniform. Multiple regression analysis showed that the RFR was inversely dependent on the patients' mean arterial pressure at admission and basal GFR (R2=65%, p<0.0001). Conclusions: Most patients with SSc cannot increase renal filtration under the challenge of a protein overload. This defective renal response to the amino acid load test sustains the concept of the prevalence of vasoconstrictor over vasodilating factors in the kidney of these patients. PMID:12117672

  13. Socioeconomic Status and Reduced Kidney Function in the Whitehall II Study: Role of Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qaoud, Talal M.; Nitsch, Dorothea; Wells, Jonathan; Witte, Daniel R.; Brunner, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous US-based studies have found that chronic kidney disease (CKD) disproportionately affects those of more adverse social circumstances. Our aim was to show the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and decreased kidney function in a European context and explore the role of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We consider the potential confounding effect of lean muscle mass. Study Design Cross-sectional. Setting & Participants White participants in the follow-up of the Whitehall II cohort: UK-based European population (age, 55-79 years; n = 5,533), of whom 4,066 men (73%) and 1,467 women (27%) with complete data were analyzed. Predictors Self-reported occupational grade/salary range. Outcomes Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using the CKD-EPI (CKD Epidemiology Collaboration) equation. Measurements Body mass index (BMI), serum lipid levels, blood pressure, Tanita TBF-300 body composition analyzer, impedance-derived lean mass index (LMI). Results Participants in a lower compared with higher occupational grade were at increased odds of having decreased GFR (age- and sex-adjusted OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.12-1.53; P = 0.001). Socioeconomic disparity in LMI was evident in women, but not men. After further adjustment for BMI and components of metabolic syndrome, the odds of decreased GFR in whites with a lower compared with higher occupational grade was attenuated by 23.3% (OR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.45; P = 0.008). Adjustment for LMI explained 15% of the association between SES and estimated GFR. Limitations Cross-sectional design, missing data for subset of participants, no urinary data. Conclusions BMI and components of metabolic syndrome may explain up to a quarter of the association between low SES and decreased GFR, suggesting potential modifiable factors. PMID:21719176

  14. The Friend leukaemia virus integration 1 (Fli-1) transcription factor affects lupus nephritis development by regulating inflammatory cell infiltration into the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Sato, S; Zhang, X K

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Friend leukaemia virus integration 1 (Fli-1) is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in both human patients and murine models of lupus. Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lpr mice and New Zealand mixed (NZM)2410 mice, murine models of lupus, with decreased expression of Fli-1 had significantly prolonged survival and reduced nephritis. Lupus nephritis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients, and inflammatory cell infiltration plays a key role in the development of the disease. To study how the expression of Fli-1 affects the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the kidneys, we generated congenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic MRL/lpr mice. A significantly increased number of GFP-expressing inflammatory cells infiltrated the kidneys of wild-type MRL/lpr mice compared to Fli-1 heterozygous (Fli-1+/−) MRL/lpr mice after injection of GFP+ cells. Expression of inflammatory chemokine mRNA, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, was significantly lower in the kidneys from Fli-1+/− MRL/lpr mice compared to wild-type littermates. Numbers of infiltrated cells into the kidneys correlate with expression levels of CCL2, CCL4 and CCL5, but not the titres of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies in these mice. Significantly increased inflammatory cells from wild-type MRL/lpr mice infiltrated into kidneys compared to the cells from Fli-1+/− MRL/lpr mice. The chemotaxis of inflammatory cells from Fli-1+/− MRL/lpr mice towards each chemokine was decreased significantly compared to inflammatory cells from wild-type MRL/lpr mice in the transwell migration assay in vitro. Our results indicate that Fli-1 affects lupus nephritis development by regulating the expression of chemokines in the kidney and the migration of inflammatory cells. PMID:24580413

  15. The Friend leukaemia virus integration 1 (Fli-1) transcription factor affects lupus nephritis development by regulating inflammatory cell infiltration into the kidney.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Zhang, X K

    2014-07-01

    The transcription factor Friend leukaemia virus integration 1 (Fli-1) is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus in both human patients and murine models of lupus. Murphy Roths large (MRL)/lpr mice and New Zealand mixed (NZM)2410 mice, murine models of lupus, with decreased expression of Fli-1 had significantly prolonged survival and reduced nephritis. Lupus nephritis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in patients, and inflammatory cell infiltration plays a key role in the development of the disease. To study how the expression of Fli-1 affects the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the kidneys, we generated congenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic MRL/lpr mice. A significantly increased number of GFP-expressing inflammatory cells infiltrated the kidneys of wild-type MRL/lpr mice compared to Fli-1 heterozygous (Fli-1(+/-)) MRL/lpr mice after injection of GFP(+) cells. Expression of inflammatory chemokine mRNA, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, was significantly lower in the kidneys from Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice compared to wild-type littermates. Numbers of infiltrated cells into the kidneys correlate with expression levels of CCL2, CCL4 and CCL5, but not the titres of anti-dsDNA autoantibodies in these mice. Significantly increased inflammatory cells from wild-type MRL/lpr mice infiltrated into kidneys compared to the cells from Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice. The chemotaxis of inflammatory cells from Fli-1(+/-) MRL/lpr mice towards each chemokine was decreased significantly compared to inflammatory cells from wild-type MRL/lpr mice in the transwell migration assay in vitro. Our results indicate that Fli-1 affects lupus nephritis development by regulating the expression of chemokines in the kidney and the migration of inflammatory cells.

  16. Identification of human nephron progenitors capable of generation of kidney structures and functional repair of chronic renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Metsuyanim, Sally; Omer, Dorit; Gnatek, Yehudit; Gershon, Rotem; Pri-Chen, Sara; Ozdemir, Derya D; Lerenthal, Yaniv; Noiman, Tzahi; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Vaknin, Zvi; Schneider, David F; Aronow, Bruce J; Goldstein, Ronald S; Hohenstein, Peter; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Identification of tissue-specific renal stem/progenitor cells with nephrogenic potential is a critical step in developing cell-based therapies for renal disease. In the human kidney, stem/progenitor cells are induced into the nephrogenic pathway to form nephrons until the 34 week of gestation, and no equivalent cell types can be traced in the adult kidney. Human nephron progenitor cells (hNPCs) have yet to be isolated. Here we show that growth of human foetal kidneys in serum-free defined conditions and prospective isolation of NCAM1+ cells selects for nephron lineage that includes the SIX2-positive cap mesenchyme cells identifying a mitotically active population with in vitro clonogenic and stem/progenitor properties. After transplantation in the chick embryo, these cells—but not differentiated counterparts—efficiently formed various nephron tubule types. hNPCs engrafted and integrated in diseased murine kidneys and treatment of renal failure in the 5/6 nephrectomy kidney injury model had beneficial effects on renal function halting disease progression. These findings constitute the first definition of an intrinsic nephron precursor population, with major potential for cell-based therapeutic strategies and modelling of kidney disease. PMID:23996934

  17. Glutathione S-transferase iso-enzymes in perfusate from pumped kidneys are associated with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Hall, I E; Bhangoo, R S; Reese, P P; Doshi, M D; Weng, F L; Hong, K; Lin, H; Han, G; Hasz, R D; Goldstein, M J; Schröppel, B; Parikh, C R

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment tools are needed in transplantation. The objective of this prospective, multi-center study was to determine the associations of the alpha and pi iso-enzymes of glutathione S-transferase (GST), measured from perfusate solution at the start and end (base and post) of kidney allograft machine perfusion, with subsequent delayed graft function (DGF). We also compared GST iso-enzyme perfusate levels from discarded versus transplanted kidneys. A total of 428 kidneys were linked to outcomes as recorded by the United Network of Organ Sharing. DGF, defined as any dialysis in the first week of transplant, occurred in 141 recipients (32%). Alpha- and pi-GST levels significantly increased during machine perfusion. The adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) of DGF with each log-unit increase in base and post pi-GST were 1.14 (1.0-1.3) and 1.36 (1.1-1.8), respectively. Alpha-GST was not independently associated with DGF. There were no significant differences in GST values between discarded and transplanted kidneys, though renal resistance was significantly higher in discarded kidneys. We found pi-GST at the end of machine perfusion to be independently associated with DGF. Further studies should elucidate the utility of GST for identifying injured kidneys with regard to organ allocation, discard and recipient management decisions.

  18. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1 superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium.

    PubMed

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin, Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physio-pathology.

  19. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  20. In vitro interactions between Neoparamoeba spp. and salmonid leucocytes; The effect of parasite sonicate on anterior kidney leucocyte function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, K.; Alcorn, S.; Murray, A.; Morrison, R.; Nowak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Sonicated Neoparamoeba spp. (Nspp) did not affect the in vitro respiratory burst response of leucocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha anterior kidneys (P > 0.05). Atlantic salmon and chinook salmon leucocytes pre-incubated with the parasites, however, responded to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation with a greater response compared to cells incubated with PMA on its own (P < 0.05). Sonicated Nspp was not chemo-attractive for anterior kidney leucocytes isolated from all three fish species. ?? 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  1. [MicroRNAs and kidneys].

    PubMed

    Stříteská, Jana; Nekvindová, Jana; Cerný, Vladimír; Palička, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short non-coding ribonucleic acid molecules that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level thus affecting important physiological as well as pathophysiological processes in the organism, for example cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and metabolism. They are involved in pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Many microRNAs are tissue or organ-specific which implies their possible potential as biomarkers or maybe even therapeutical agents as documented by microRNA research interest rising exponentially during last years. Among all, microRNAs are important also for physiological function of the kidney and they are involved in various renal disorders. Today research is focused mainly on renal and urinary tract carcinogenesis, acute kidney injury, chronic renal diseases (polycystic kidney disease) or renal complications of systemic diseases such as diabetic or hypertension nephropathy and autoimmune kidney injury including acute allograft rejection after kidney transplantation. The review summarizes current information about microRNA effect on kidney development and function and also on the most common kidney diseases.

  2. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin Reflects Both Inflammation and Kidney Function in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan S.; Hoffmann, Søren; Iversen, Allan Z.; Pedersen, Sune H.; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Galatius, Søren; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Magnusson, Nils E.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has emerged as a marker for acute kidney injury and cardiovascular outcome. However, the relative importance of inflammation versus kidney function on plasma NGAL levels is uncertain, making the interpretation of plasma NGAL unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between plasma NGAL, inflammation and kidney function in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods We prospectively included 584 patients with acute ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from 2006 to 2008. Blood samples were drawn immediately before PCI. Additionally, we included 42 patients who had 4 blood samples drawn before and after PCI. Plasma NGAL was measured using a time-resolved immunofluorometric assay. Cross-sectional analyses were performed in these two single-center, prospective study cohorts. Results Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was associated significantly more strongly with plasma NGAL when eGFR was abnormal compared to normal eGFR: a decrease in eGFR of 10 ml/min was associated with an increase in NGAL of 27% (18-36%) versus 4% (1-7%), respectively (p < 0.001). Leukocyte count and C-reactive protein were the main determinants of plasma NGAL in patients with normal eGFR, whereas eGFR was the main determinant at reduced kidney function. Conclusions eGFR determines the association of NGAL with either inflammation or kidney function; in patients with normal eGFR, plasma NGAL reflects inflammation but when eGFR is reduced, plasma NGAL reflects kidney function, highlighting the dual perception of plasma NGAL. From a clinical perspective, eGFR may be used to guide the interpretation of elevated NGAL levels in patients with STEMI. PMID:27275154

  3. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    SciTech Connect

    Raswan, T. R. Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-30

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  4. Dynamic nuclear renography kinetic analysis: Four-compartment model for assessing kidney function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raswan, T. R.; Haryanto, F.

    2014-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear renography method produces TACs of kidneys and bladder. Multiple TACs data can be further analyzed to obtain the overview of urinary system's condition. Tracer kinetic analysis was performed using four-compartment models. The system's model consist of four irreversible compartment with four transport constants (k1, k2, k3 and k4). The mathematical expressions of tracer's distributions is fitted to experimental data (TACs) resulting in model constants. This transport constants represent the urinary system behavior, and later can be used for analyzing system's condition. Different intervals of kinetics parameter are clearly shown by abnormal system with respect to the normal one. Furthermore, the system with delayed uptake has 82% lower uptake parameters (k1 and k2) than normal one. Meanwhile, the system with prolonged clearance time has its kinetics parameters k3 or k4 lower than the others. This model is promising for quantitatively describe urinary system's function especially if supplied with more data.

  5. Differential Characteristics of Kidney Transplant Recipients According to 1-Year Chronic Kidney Disease Stage 3a and Stage 3b Graft Function.

    PubMed

    Baek, Chung Hee; Kim, Hyosang; Yang, Won Seok; Han, Duck Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2017-04-01

    The outcomes of transplantation have improved, but more than 50% of kidney transplantation (KT) recipients are still reported to have renal function of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 at 1 year after KT. We reviewed all 1235 patients who received a KT in our institution between 2008 and 2012. Among these recipients, 77 and 289 cases were included in the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at 1 year after KT 30-44 (CKD stage 3b) group and eGFR 45-59 (CKD stage 3a) group, respectively. Longer duration of dialysis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.007, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.000-1.014, P = 0.047), older donors (OR = 1.064, 95% CI, 1.031-1.098, P < 0.001), delayed graft function (OR = 3.601, 95% CI, 1.031-1.098, P < 0.001), BK virus infection (OR = 2.567, 95% CI, 1.242-5.305, P = 0.011), and pneumonia (OR = 4.451, 95% CI, 1.388-14.279, P = 0.012) were contributing factors to eGFR 30-44 mL/min. Especially, ureteral stricture occurred more frequently in eGFR 30-44 group of deceased donor KT. However, acute rejection was not a significant risk factor of lower eGFR. Graft survival was better in the eGFR 45-59 group. However, this difference was smaller in deceased donor KT. Infections and urologic complications are also important contributing factors of lower graft function in CKD stage 3. In addition, dividing CKD stage 3 into subgroups might be more useful in living donor kidney transplantation.

  6. Erythropoietin-mediated protection in kidney transplantation: nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives improve function without increasing risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Willem G; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2014-03-01

    The protective, nonerythropoietic effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have become evident in preclinical models in renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury and kidney transplantation. However, four recently published clinical trials using high-dose EPO treatment following renal transplantation did not reveal any protective effect for short-term renal function and even reported an increased risk of thrombosis. This review focusses on the current status of protective pathways mediated by EPO, the safety concerns using high EPO dosage and discusses the discrepancies between pre-clinical and clinical studies. The protective effects are mediated by binding of EPO to a heteromeric receptor complex consisting of two β-common receptors and two EPO receptors. An important role for the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is proposed. EPO-mediated cytoprotection still has enormous potential. However, only nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may induce protection without increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. In preclinical models, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives, such as carbamoylated EPO and ARA290, have been tested. These EPO derivatives improve renal function and do not affect erythropoiesis. Therefore, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may be able to render EPO-mediated cytoprotection useful and beneficial for clinical transplantation.

  7. Bap1 is essential for kidney function and cooperates with Vhl in renal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Shan; Gu, Yi-Feng; Wolff, Nicholas; Stefanius, Karoliina; Christie, Alana; Dey, Anwesha; Hammer, Robert E.; Xie, Xian-Jin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Pedrosa, Ivan; Carroll, Thomas; McKay, Renée M.; Kapur, Payal; Brugarolas, James

    2014-01-01

    Why different species are predisposed to different tumor spectra is not well understood. In particular, whether the physical location of tumor suppressor genes relative to one another influences tumor predisposition is unknown. Renal cancer presents a unique opportunity to explore this question. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of clear-cell type (ccRCC), the most common type, begins with an intragenic mutation in the von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) gene and loss of 3p (where VHL is located). Chromosome 3p harbors several additional tumor suppressor genes, including BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1). In the mouse, Vhl is on a different chromosome than Bap1. Thus, whereas loss of 3p in humans simultaneously deletes one copy of BAP1, loss of heterozygosity in the corresponding Vhl region in the mouse would not affect Bap1. To test the role of BAP1 in ccRCC development, we generated mice deficient for either Vhl or Vhl together with one allele of Bap1 in nephron progenitor cells. Six2-Cre;VhlF/F;Bap1F/+ mice developed ccRCC, but Six2-Cre;VhlF/F mice did not. Kidneys from Six2-Cre;VhlF/F;Bap1F/+ mice resembled kidneys from humans with VHL syndrome, containing multiple lesions spanning from benign cysts to cystic and solid RCC. Although the tumors were small, they showed nuclear atypia and exhibited features of human ccRCC. These results provide an explanation for why VHL heterozygous humans, but not mice, develop ccRCC. They also explain why a mouse model of ccRCC has been lacking. More broadly, our data suggest that differences in tumor predisposition across species may be explained, at least in part, by differences in the location of two-hit tumor suppressor genes across the genome. PMID:25359211

  8. Bap1 is essential for kidney function and cooperates with Vhl in renal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Shan; Gu, Yi-Feng; Wolff, Nicholas; Stefanius, Karoliina; Christie, Alana; Dey, Anwesha; Hammer, Robert E; Xie, Xian-Jin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Pedrosa, Ivan; Carroll, Thomas; McKay, Renée M; Kapur, Payal; Brugarolas, James

    2014-11-18

    Why different species are predisposed to different tumor spectra is not well understood. In particular, whether the physical location of tumor suppressor genes relative to one another influences tumor predisposition is unknown. Renal cancer presents a unique opportunity to explore this question. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of clear-cell type (ccRCC), the most common type, begins with an intragenic mutation in the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and loss of 3p (where VHL is located). Chromosome 3p harbors several additional tumor suppressor genes, including BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1). In the mouse, Vhl is on a different chromosome than Bap1. Thus, whereas loss of 3p in humans simultaneously deletes one copy of BAP1, loss of heterozygosity in the corresponding Vhl region in the mouse would not affect Bap1. To test the role of BAP1 in ccRCC development, we generated mice deficient for either Vhl or Vhl together with one allele of Bap1 in nephron progenitor cells. Six2-Cre;Vhl(F/F);Bap1(F/+) mice developed ccRCC, but Six2-Cre;Vhl(F/F) mice did not. Kidneys from Six2-Cre;Vhl(F/F);Bap1(F/+) mice resembled kidneys from humans with VHL syndrome, containing multiple lesions spanning from benign cysts to cystic and solid RCC. Although the tumors were small, they showed nuclear atypia and exhibited features of human ccRCC. These results provide an explanation for why VHL heterozygous humans, but not mice, develop ccRCC. They also explain why a mouse model of ccRCC has been lacking. More broadly, our data suggest that differences in tumor predisposition across species may be explained, at least in part, by differences in the location of two-hit tumor suppressor genes across the genome.

  9. Renal progenitors derived from human iPSCs engraft and restore function in a mouse model of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Imberti, Barbara; Tomasoni, Susanna; Ciampi, Osele; Pezzotta, Anna; Derosas, Manuela; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Rizzo, Paola; Papadimou, Evangelia; Novelli, Rubina; Benigni, Ariela; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Morigi, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is one of the most relevant health issues, leading to millions of deaths. The magnitude of the phenomenon remarks the urgent need for innovative and effective therapeutic approaches. Cell-based therapy with renal progenitor cells (RPCs) has been proposed as a possible strategy. Studies have shown the feasibility of directing embryonic stem cells or induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) towards nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm and metanephric mesenchyme (MM). However, the functional activity of iPSC-derived RPCs has not been tested in animal models of kidney disease. Here, through an efficient inductive protocol, we directed human iPSCs towards RPCs that robustly engrafted into damaged tubuli and restored renal function and structure in cisplatin-mice with AKI. These results demonstrate that iPSCs are a valuable source of engraftable cells with regenerative activity for kidney disease and create the basis for future applications in stem cell-based therapy. PMID:25744951

  10. Cyclosporine increases calcium in kidney medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Borowitz, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of rats with 20, 50, or 100 mg/kg of cyclosporine p.o. markedly increased /sup 45/Ca accumulation in kidney slices especially in medulla. The effect was related to dose and duration of treatment, and was also observed in slices of kidney medulla from cyclosporine-treated mice. Total calcium was elevated in kidney medulla of cyclosporine-treated rats so that the effect is not merely an increased exchange but a build-up of calcium in the tissue. No histopathologic evidence of cyclosporine-related cell necrosis was present in mouse kidney, showing that calcium accumulation is not dystrophic in character. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca in slices of rat heart, liver, or brain was not affected by cyclosporine pretreatment of the animals. It is suggested that cyclosporine-induced changes in calcium metabolism in kidney medulla may influence kidney function.

  11. Neurocognitive, Social-Behavioral, and Adaptive Functioning in Preschool Children with Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Gerson, Arlene C.; Johnson, Rebecca J.; Mendley, Susan R.; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Matheson, Matthew B.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Morgenstern, Bruce; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The negative impact of End Stage Kidney Disease on cognitive function in children is well established, but no studies have examined the neurocognitive, social-behavioral, and adaptive behavior skills of preschool children with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods Participants included 124 preschool children with mild to moderate CKD, ages 12-68 months (median=3.7 years), and an associated mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 50.0 ml/min per 1.73m2. In addition to level of function and percent of participants scoring≥1SD below the test mean, regression models examined the associations between biomarkers of CKD (GFR, anemia, hypertension, seizures, abnormal birth history), and Developmental Level/IQ, attention regulation, and parent ratings of executive functions, social-behavior, and adaptive behaviors. Results Median scores for all measures were in the average range; however, 27% were deemed at-risk for a Developmental Level/IQ<85, 20% were at-risk for attention variability, and parent ratings indicated 30% and 37% to be at-risk for executive dysfunction and adaptive behavior problems, respectively. Approximately 43% were deemed at-risk on two or more measures. None of the disease-related variables were significantly associated with these outcomes, although the presence of hypertension approached significance for attention variability (p<.09). Abnormal birth history and lower maternal education were significantly related to lower Developmental Level/IQ; seizures were related to lower parental ratings of executive function and adaptive behavior; and abnormal birth history was significantly related to lower ratings of adaptive behavior. When predicting risk status, the logistic regression did evidence both higher GFR and the lack of anemia to be associated with more intact Developmental Level/IQ. Conclusions These findings suggest relatively intact functioning for preschool children with mild to moderate CKD, but the need for ongoing

  12. Cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia–reperfusion injury in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuczmarski, James M.; Martens, Christopher R.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon L.; Edwards, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction is an independent risk factor of ischemic heart disease and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, yet the relationship between impaired cardiac function and tolerance to ischemia–reperfusion (IR) injury in experimental CKD remains unclear. Methods Cardiac function was assessed in 5/6 ablation–infarction (AI) and sham male Sprague–Dawley rats at 20 weeks of age, 8 weeks post-surgery using an isolated working heart system. This included measures taken during manipulation of preload and afterload to produce left ventricular (LV) function curves as well as during reperfusion following a 15-min ischemic bout. In addition, LV tissue was used for biochemical tissue analysis. Results Cardiac function was impaired in AI animals during preload and afterload manipulations. Cardiac functional impairments persisted post-ischemia in the AI animals, and 36% of AI animals did not recover sufficiently to achieve aortic overflow following ischemia (versus 0% of sham animals). However, for those animals able to withstand the ischemic perturbation, no difference was observed in percent recovery of post-ischemic cardiac function between groups. Urinary NOx (nitrite + nitrate) excretion was lower in AI animals and accompanied by reduced LV endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NOx. LV antioxidants superoxide dismutase-1 and -2 were reduced in AI animals, whereas glutathione peroxidase-1/2 as well as NADPH-oxidase-4 and H2O2 were increased in these animals. Conclusions Impaired cardiac function appears to predispose AI rats to poor outcomes following short-duration ischemic insult. These findings could be, in part, mediated by increased oxidative stress via nitric oxide-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:24151020

  13. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  14. Impact of HLA mismatch at first kidney transplant on lifetime with graft function in young recipients.

    PubMed

    Foster, B J; Dahhou, M; Zhang, X; Platt, R W; Smith, J M; Hanley, J A

    2014-04-01

    As HLA matching has been progressively de-emphasized in the American deceased donor (DD) kidney allocation algorithm, concerns have been raised that poor matching at first transplant may lead to greater sensitization and more difficulty finding an acceptable donor for a second transplant should the first transplant fail. We compared proportion of total observed lifetime with graft function after first transplant, and waiting times for a second transplant between individuals with different levels of HLA mismatch (MM) at first transplant. We studied patients recorded in the United States Renal Data System (1988-2009) who received a first DD transplant at age ≤21 years (n = 8433), and the subgroup who were listed for a second DD transplant following first graft failure (n = 2498). Compared with recipients of 2-3 MM first grafts, 4-6 MM graft recipients spent 12% less of their time and 0-1 MM recipients 15% more time with a functioning graft after the first transplant (both p < 0.0001); 4-6 MM recipients were significantly less likely (hazard ratio [HR] 0.87 [95% confidence interval 0.76, 0.98]; p = 0.03), and 0-1 MM recipients more likely (HR 1.26 [0.99, 1.60]; p = 0.06) to receive a second transplant after listing. The benefits of better HLA matching at first transplant on lifetime with graft function are significant, but relatively small.

  15. Functional significance of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 gene in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazumori; Hirata, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kawamoto, Ken; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-11-15

    Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) has been identified as one of the secreted antagonists that bind Wnt protein. WIF-1 has been described as a tumor suppressor in various types of cancer. However, the molecular function of WIF-1 gene has never been examined in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Therefore, we hypothesized that WIF-1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene and overexpression of this gene may induce apoptosis and inhibit tumor growth in RCC cells. Immunohistochemistry and real-time reverse transcription-PCR revealed that WIF-1 was significantly downregulated in RCC samples and RCC cell lines, respectively. Bisulfite sequencing of the WIF-1 promoter region in RCC cell lines showed it to be densely methylated, whereas there was no methylation of WIF-1 promoter in normal kidney. Significant inhibition of cell growth and colony formation in WIF-1-transfected cells compared with controls were observed. WIF-1 transfection significantly induced apoptosis and suppressed in vivo tumor growth. Also, Wnt signaling activity and beta-catenin expression were reduced by WIF-1 transfection. In conclusion, this is the first report documenting that the WIF-1 is downregulated by promoter methylation and functions as a tumor suppressor gene by inducing apoptosis in RCC cells.

  16. Functional polycystin-1 dosage governs autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease severity.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Katharina; Ward, Christopher J; Hommerding, Cynthia J; Nasr, Samih H; Tuan, Han-Fang; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Rossetti, Sandro; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2012-11-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is caused by mutations to PKD1 or PKD2, triggering progressive cystogenesis and typically leading to end-stage renal disease in midlife. The phenotypic spectrum, however, ranges from in utero onset to adequate renal function at old age. Recent patient data suggest that the disease is dosage dependent, where incompletely penetrant alleles influence disease severity. Here, we have developed a knockin mouse model matching a likely disease variant, PKD1 p.R3277C (RC), and have proved that its functionally hypomorphic nature modifies the ADPKD phenotype. While Pkd1+/null mice are normal, Pkd1RC/null mice have rapidly progressive disease, and Pkd1RC/RC animals develop gradual cystogenesis. These models effectively mimic the pathophysiological features of in utero-onset and typical ADPKD, respectively, correlating the level of functional Pkd1 product with disease severity, highlighting the dosage dependence of cystogenesis. Additionally, molecular analyses identified p.R3277C as a temperature-sensitive folding/trafficking mutant, and length defects in collecting duct primary cilia, the organelle central to PKD pathogenesis, were clearly detected for the first time to our knowledge in PKD1. Altogether, this study highlights the role that in trans variants at the disease locus can play in phenotypic modification of dominant diseases and provides a truly orthologous PKD1 model, optimal for therapeutic testing.

  17. Antiproteinuric therapy and Fabry nephropathy: factors associated with preserved kidney function during agalsidase-beta therapy

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, David G; Thomas, Christie P; Vujkovac, Bojan; Campbell, Ruth C; Charrow, Joel; Laney, Dawn A; Jackson, Leslie L; Wilcox, William R; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephropathy is an important feature of classical Fabry disease, which results in alpha-galactosidase A deficiency and cellular globotriaosylceramide accumulation. We report the safety and efficacy of antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) in a study of classical Fabry patients receiving recombinant agalsidase-beta therapy. Methods and design The goal was maintenance of urine protein to creatinine ratio (UPCR) <0.5 g/g or a 50% reduction in baseline UPCR for 24 patients at eight study sites. The change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 21 months of treatment. Results 18 out of 24 patients achieved the UPCR goal with eGFR slopes that were significantly better than six patients who did not achieve the UPCR goal (−3.6 (−4.8 to −1.1) versus −7.0 (−9.0 to −5.6) mL/min/1.73 m2/year, respectively, p=0.018). Despite achieving the UPCR goal, 67% (12/18 patients) still progressed with an eGFR slope <−2 mL/min/1.73 m2/year. Regression analysis showed that increased age at initiation of agalsidase-beta therapy was significantly associated with worsened kidney outcome. Hypotension and hyperkalaemia occurred in seven and eight patients, respectively, which required modification of antiproteinuric therapy but was not associated with serious adverse events. Conclusions This study documents the effectiveness of agalsidase-beta (1 mg/kg/2 weeks) and antiproteinuric therapy with ACE inhibitors and/or ARB in patients with severe Fabry nephropathy. Patients had preservation of kidney function if agalsidase-beta treatment was initiated at a younger age, and UPCR maintained at or below 0.5 g/g with antiproteinuric therapy. Trial registration number NCT00446862. PMID:26490103

  18. Multiparametric Functional MRI: Non-Invasive Imaging of Inflammation and Edema Formation after Kidney Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutberlet, Marcel; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Jang, Mi-Sun; Thorenz, Anja; Chen, Rongjun; Hertel, Barbara; Barrmeyer, Amelie; Schmidbauer, Martina; Meier, Martin; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle; Khalifa, Abedalrazag; Hartung, Dagmar; Haller, Hermann; Wacker, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (ktx) in mice is used to learn about rejection and to develop new treatment strategies. Past studies have mainly been based on histological or molecular biological methods. Imaging techniques to monitor allograft pathology have rarely been used. Methods Here we investigated mice after isogenic and allogenic ktx over time with functional MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and mapping of T2-relaxation time (T2-mapping) to assess graft inflammation and edema formation. To characterize graft pathology, we used PAS-staining, counted CD3-positive T-lymphocytes, analyzed leukocytes by means flow cytometry. Results DWI revealed progressive restriction of diffusion of water molecules in allogenic kidney grafts. This was paralleled by enhanced infiltration of the kidney by inflammatory cells. Changes in tissue diffusion were not seen following isogenic ktx. T2-times in renal cortex were increased after both isogenic and allogenic transplantation, consistent with tissue edema due to ischemic injury following prolonged cold ischemia time of 60 minutes. Lack of T2 increase in the inner stripe of the inner medulla in allogenic kidney grafts matched loss of tubular autofluorescence and may result from rejection-driven reductions in tubular water content due to tubular dysfunction and renal functional impairment. Conclusions Functional MRI is a valuable non-invasive technique for monitoring inflammation, tissue edema and tubular function. It permits on to differentiate between acute rejection and ischemic renal injury in a mouse model of ktx. PMID:27632553

  19. Natural Killer Cell Subsets and IL-2, IL-15, and IL-18 Genes Expressions in Chronic Kidney Allograft Dysfunction and Graft Function in Kidney Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Assadiasl, S.; Sepanjnia, A.; Aghili, B.; Nafar, M.; Ahmadpoor, P.; Pourrezagholi, F.; Parvin, M.; Shahlaee, A.; Nicknam, M. H.; Amirzargar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: While acute rejection and early graft loss rates have decreased substantially over the past four decades, progressive chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) still remains a common cause of late graft loss in kidney transplant recipients. Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the percentage of natural killer (NK) cell subsets and IL-2, 15 and 18 genes expression in two groups of CAD and well-function graft (WFG) recipients. Methods: 30 renal allograft recipients with biopsy-proven interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IF/TA) and impaired renal function, and 30 sex- and age-matched WFG patients were enrolled in this study. The percentage of NK cell subsets including NK CD56bright and NK CD56dim cells were determined by flowcytometry; IL-2, IL-15, and IL-18 genes expressions were assessed by real-time PCR. Results: Compared to WFG patients, there was a significant (p<0.05) increase in the percentage of NK CD56bright cells in CAD patients. However, the difference in percentage of NK CD56dim cells or CD56dim/CD56bright ratio between the studied groups was not significant. In addition, IL-2, 15 and 18 genes expressions were almost similar in CAD and WFG patients. Conclusion: We found higher percentages of NK CD56bright subset in kidney transplant recipients with CAD without considerable changes in related cytokines’ gene expression, suggesting a possible defect of NK cells maturation in these patients. PMID:28078060

  20. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody, but atypical lexical prosody production. Method 16 children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers participated in three experiments: 1. Perception of affective prosody, 2. Lexical stress perception, 3. Lexical stress production. In Experiment 1, participants labeled sad, happy, and neutral spoken sentences that were low-pass filtered, to eliminate verbal content. In Experiment 2 participants disambiguated word meanings based on lexical stress (HOTdog, vs. hotDOG). In Experiment 3 participants produced these words in a sentence completion task. Productions were analyzed using acoustic measures. Results Accuracy levels showed no group differences. Participants with HFA could determine affect from filtered sentences and disambiguate words based on lexical stress. They produced appropriately differentiated lexical stress patterns but demonstrated atypically long productions indicating reduced ability in natural prosody production. Conclusions Children with HFA were as capable as their TD peers in receptive tasks of lexical stress and affective prosody. Prosody productions were atypically long, despite accurate differentiation of lexical stress patterns. Future research should use larger samples and spontaneous vs. elicited productions. PMID:20530388

  1. Association of apolipoprotein A1 and B with kidney function and chronic kidney disease in two multiethnic population samples

    PubMed Central

    Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Köttgen, Anna; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Coresh, Josef; Astor, Brad C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating lipoproteins and their protein constituents, apolipoproteins, are risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The associations between apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B and their ratio with glomerular filtration rate estimated from the new CKD Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation (eGFR) are not well studied in the general population. Methods Associations between apolipoprotein A1, B and their ratio with the outcomes of eGFR, CKD (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2) and albuminuria were examined in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (ARIC, n = 10 292, 1996–98) and the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, n = 7023, 1988–91). Cross-sectional multivariable-adjusted analyses were performed using linear and logistic regression. Prospective analyses related baseline apolipoprotein levels to subsequent CKD incidence over 10 years using the ARIC Carotid MRI follow-up cohort (n = 1659). Results Higher apolipoprotein A1 quartiles were associated with a lower prevalence of CKD [Q4 versus Q1: odds ratio (OR) 0.73, P-trend = 0.02 in ARIC; Q4 versus Q1: OR 0.53, P-trend <0.01 in NHANES III] as well as with higher eGFR (P-trend <0.01 in ARIC and NHANES III). No consistent significant associations were found for apolipoprotein B in either study. The apolipoprotein B/A1 ratio was significantly associated with eGFR across quartiles in both studies (P-trend <0.01) and with CKD in ARIC (Q4 versus Q1: OR 1.23, P-trend = 0.01). Prospectively, there were trends for the association of apolipoproteins with incident CKD [Q4 versus Q1: incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.68 for apolipoprotein A1, P-trend = 0.1; Q4 versus Q1: IRR = 1.35 for apolipoprotein B, P-trend = 0.2]. Associations were not systematically stronger when comparing traditional lipids (total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein or high-density lipoprotein) to apolipoproteins. Conclusions Higher serum apolipoprotein A1 was associated with lower prevalence of CKD

  2. The impact of meeting donor management goals on the development of delayed graft function in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Malinoski, D J; Patel, M S; Ahmed, O; Daly, M C; Mooney, S; Graybill, C O; Foster, C E; Salim, A

    2013-04-01

    Many organ procurement organizations (OPOs) utilize preset critical care endpoints as donor management goals (DMGs) in order to standardize care and improve outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of meeting DMGs on delayed graft function (DGF) in renal transplant recipients. All eight OPOs of the United Network for Organ Sharing Region 5 prospectively implemented nine DMGs in every donor after neurologic determination of death (DNDD). "DMGs met" was defined a priori as achieving any seven of the nine DMGs and this was recorded at the time of consent for donation to reflect donor hospital ICU management, 12-18 h later, and prior to organ recovery. Multivariable analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of DGF (dialysis in the first week after transplantation) with a p<0.05. A total of 722 transplanted kidneys from 492 DNDDs were included. A total of 28% developed DGF. DMGs were met at consent in 14%, 12-18 h in 32% and prior to recovery in 38%. DGF was less common when DMGs were met at consent (17% vs. 30%, p=0.007). Independent predictors of DGF were age, Cr and cold ischemia time, while meeting DMGs at consent was significantly protective. The management of potential organ donors prior to consent affects outcomes and should remain a priority in the intensive care unit.

  3. When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2-Year-Old When Your Child Needs a Kidney Transplant KidsHealth > For Parents > When Your Child Needs ... to monitor their new kidney function. About the Kidneys Kidneys are bean-shaped organs located near the ...

  4. Testing Danegaptide Effects on Kidney Function after Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in a New Porcine Two Week Model

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Anna K.; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Nørregaard, Rikke; Krag, Søren Palmelund; Møldrup, Ulla; Pedersen, Michael; Jespersen, Bente; Birn, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ischemia/reperfusion injury (I/R-I) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and is associated with increased mortality. Danegaptide is a selective modifier of the gap junction protein connexion 43. It has cytoprotective as well as anti-arrhythmic properties and has been shown to reduce the size of myocardial infarct in pigs. The aim of this study was to investigate the ischemia-protective effect of Danegaptide in a porcine renal I/R-I model with two weeks follow up. Methods Unilateral renal I/R-I was induced in pigs by clamping the left renal artery over a two hour period. The model allowed examination of renal blood flow by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the measurement of single kidney GFR two weeks after injury. Eleven animals were randomized to Danegaptide-infusion while nine animals received placebo. Kidney histology and urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) excretion were included as markers of AKI. Results Unilateral kidney I/R-I resulted in an immediate ~50% GFR reduction, associated with a four-fold increase in urinary NGAL-excretion. Fourteen days after I/R-I, the total GFR was ~75% of baseline with a significantly lower GFR in the injured left kidney compared to the right kidney. No differences in GFR were observed between the treated and non-treated animals immediately after I/R-I or at Day 14. Furthermore, no differences were observed in the urinary excretion of NGAL, renal blood flow or other markers of renal function. Conclusions As expected this porcine renal I/R-I model was associated with reduced GFR two weeks after injury. Danegaptide did not improve renal function after I/R-I. PMID:27760220

  5. Trigonella foenum graecum seed extract protects kidney function and morphology in diabetic rats via its antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wanli; Lei, Jing; Li, Xuanshe; Zhang, Ruijuan

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Because Trigonella foenum graecum has been reported to have antidiabetic and antioxidative effects, we hypothesized that T foenum graecum seed aqueous extract (TE) restores the kidney function of diabetic rats via its antioxidant activity. Rats were fed diets enriched with sucrose (50%, wt/wt), lard (30%, wt/wt), and cholesterol (2.5%, wt/wt) for 8 weeks to induce insulin resistance. After a DN model was induced by streptozotocin, the rats were administered a low (440 mg/kg), medium (870 mg/kg), or high (1740 mg/kg) dose of TE by oral intragastric intubation for 6 weeks. In TE-treated DN rats, blood glucose, kidney/body weight ratio, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, 24-hour content of urinary protein, and creatinine clearance were significantly decreased compared with nontreated DN rats. Diabetic rats showed decreased activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase, increased concentrations of malondialdehyde in the serum and kidney, and increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in urine and renal cortex DNA. Treatment with TE restored the altered parameters in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, all of the ultramorphologic abnormalities in the kidney of diabetic rats, including the uneven thickening of the glomerular base membrane, were markedly ameliorated by TE treatment. We conclude that TE confers protection against functional and morphologic injuries in the kidneys of diabetic rats by increasing activities of antioxidants and inhibiting accumulation of oxidized DNA in the kidney, suggesting a potential drug for the prevention and therapy of DN.

  6. SOS2 and ACP1 Loci Identified through Large-Scale Exome Chip Analysis Regulate Kidney Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Li, Yong; Weeks, Olivia; Mijatovic, Vladan; Teumer, Alexander; Huffman, Jennifer E; Tromp, Gerard; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gorski, Mathias; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nutile, Teresa; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Sorice, Rossella; Tin, Adrienne; Yang, Qiong; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Arking, Dan E; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Böger, Carsten A; Carroll, Robert J; Chasman, Daniel I; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Dehghan, Abbas; Faul, Jessica D; Feitosa, Mary F; Gambaro, Giovanni; Gasparini, Paolo; Giulianini, Franco; Heid, Iris; Huang, Jinyan; Imboden, Medea; Jackson, Anne U; Jeff, Janina; Jhun, Min A; Katz, Ronit; Kifley, Annette; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kumar, Ashish; Laakso, Markku; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lohman, Kurt; Lu, Yingchang; Mägi, Reedik; Malerba, Giovanni; Mihailov, Evelin; Mohlke, Karen L; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Robino, Antonietta; Ruderfer, Douglas; Salvi, Erika; Schick, Ursula M; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Smith, Albert V; Smith, Jennifer A; Traglia, Michela; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Wei; Goodarzi, Mark O; Kraja, Aldi T; Liu, Chunyu; Wessel, Jennifer; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bottinger, Erwin P; Braga, Daniele; Brandslund, Ivan; Brody, Jennifer A; Campbell, Archie; Carey, David J; Christensen, Cramer; Coresh, Josef; Crook, Errol; Curhan, Gary C; Cusi, Daniele; de Boer, Ian H; de Vries, Aiko P J; Denny, Joshua C; Devuyst, Olivier; Dreisbach, Albert W; Endlich, Karlhans; Esko, Tõnu; Franco, Oscar H; Fulop, Tibor; Gerhard, Glenn S; Glümer, Charlotte; Gottesman, Omri; Grarup, Niels; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Hocking, Lynne; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E; Kähönen, Mika; Kardia, Sharon L R; König, Wolfgang; Kooperberg, Charles; Kriebel, Jennifer; Launer, Lenore J; Lauritzen, Torsten; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levy, Daniel; Linksted, Pamela; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J F; Lupo, Antonio; Meisinger, Christine; Melander, Olle; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Paul; Nauck, Matthias; Nürnberg, Peter; Orho-Melander, Marju; Parsa, Afshin; Pedersen, Oluf; Peters, Annette; Peters, Ulrike; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Psaty, Bruce M; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Reiner, Alex P; Rettig, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rossouw, Jacques E; Schmidt, Frank; Siscovick, David; Soranzo, Nicole; Strauch, Konstantin; Toniolo, Daniela; Turner, Stephen T; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Velayutham, Dinesh; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Jie Jin; Weir, David R; Witte, Daniel; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Fox, Caroline S; Franceschini, Nora; Goessling, Wolfram; Köttgen, Anna; Chu, Audrey Y

    2017-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified >50 common variants associated with kidney function, but these variants do not fully explain the variation in eGFR. We performed a two-stage meta-analysis of associations between genotypes from the Illumina exome array and eGFR on the basis of serum creatinine (eGFRcrea) among participants of European ancestry from the CKDGen Consortium (nStage1: 111,666; nStage2: 48,343). In single-variant analyses, we identified single nucleotide polymorphisms at seven new loci associated with eGFRcrea (PPM1J, EDEM3, ACP1, SPEG, EYA4, CYP1A1, and ATXN2L; PStage1<3.7×10(-7)), of which most were common and annotated as nonsynonymous variants. Gene-based analysis identified associations of functional rare variants in three genes with eGFRcrea, including a novel association with the SOS Ras/Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2 gene, SOS2 (P=5.4×10(-8) by sequence kernel association test). Experimental follow-up in zebrafish embryos revealed changes in glomerular gene expression and renal tubule morphology in the embryonic kidney of acp1- and sos2-knockdowns. These developmental abnormalities associated with altered blood clearance rate and heightened prevalence of edema. This study expands the number of loci associated with kidney function and identifies novel genes with potential roles in kidney formation.

  7. Netrin-1 regulates colon-kidney cross talk through suppression of IL-6 function in a mouse model of DSS-colitis.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Santhakumar, Manicassamy; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2013-05-01

    Organ cross talk is increasingly appreciated in human disease, and inflammatory mediators are shown to mediate distant organ injury in many disease models. Colitis and intestinal injury are known to be mediated by infiltrating immune cells and their secreted cytokines. However, its effect on other organs, such as the kidney, has never been studied. In the current study, we examined the effect of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-colitis on kidney injury and inflammation. In addition, we hypothesized that netrin-1 could modulate colon-kidney cross talk through regulation of inflammation and apoptosis. Consistent with our hypothesis, DSS-colitis induced acute kidney injury in mice. Epithelial-specific overexpression of netrin-1 suppressed both colitis and colitis-induced acute kidney injury, which was associated with reduced weight loss, neutrophil infiltration into colon mucosa, intestinal permeability, epithelial cell apoptosis, and cytokine and chemokine production in netrin-1 transgenic mice colon and kidney. To determine whether netrin-1-protective effects were mediated through suppression of IL-6, IL-6 knockout mice were treated with DSS and acute kidney injury was determined. IL-6 knockout was resistant to colitis and acute kidney injury. Moreover, administration of IL-6 to netrin-1 transgenic mice did not affect the netrin-1-protective effects on the colon and kidney, suggesting that netrin-1 may reduce both IL-6 production and its activity. The present study identifies previously unrecognized cross talk between the colon and kidney, and netrin-1 may limit distant organ injury by suppressing inflammatory mediators and apoptosis.

  8. Functional significance of preserved affect recognition in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Johannesen, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Affect recognition (AR) is a core component of social information processing, thus may be critical to understanding social behavior and functioning in broader aspects of daily living. Deficits in AR are well documented in schizophrenia, however, there is also evidence that many individuals with schizophrenia perform AR tasks at near-normal levels. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the functional significance of AR deficits in schizophrenia by comparing subgroups with normal-range and impaired AR performance on proxy and interviewer-rated measures of real-world functioning. Schizophrenia outpatients were classified as normal-range (N=17) and impaired (N=31) based on a logistic cut point in the sample distribution of BLERT scores, referenced to a normative sample of healthy control subjects (N=56). The derived schizophrenia subgroups were then compared on proxy (UCSD, UPSA, SSPA, MMAA) and interviewer-rated (QLS, ILSS) measures of functioning, as well as battery of neurocognitive tests. Initial analyses indicated superior MMAA and QLS performance in the near-normal AR subgroup. Covariate analyses indicated that group differences in neurocognition fully mediated the observed associations between AR and MMAA and attenuated the observed relationships between AR classification and QLS. These results support three main conclusions. First, AR, like many other domains of psychopathology studied in schizophrenia, is preserved in select subgroups. Second, there is a positive relationship between AR performance and functional outcome measures. Third, neurocognition appears to mediate the relationship between AR and measures of functioning. PMID:20202689

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2), or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl 126 affects expression of genes involved in stress-immune interaction in primary cultures of rainbow trout anterior kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Quabius, Elgar Susanne; Krupp, Guido; Secombes, Christopher J

    2005-12-01

    Stress and immune function are linked in all vertebrates, including teleost fish. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are immunotoxic and impair the ability of fish to respond to additional stressors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PCB126 on stress and immune function and the interaction of these systems in fish using primary cultures of rainbow trout anterior kidney cells as a model. Gene expression levels of cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. These genes play important roles in detoxification and immune and stress homeostasis, respectively. Incubation with PCB126 led to increased IL-1beta expression between 30 min and 2 h of exposure, with expression back to basal levels after 6 h. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) incubation evoked normal IL-1beta responses after 2 and 24 h PCB incubation. Gene expression levels of GR and CYP1A increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, reaching a plateau after 12 h of incubation. Preincubation with cortisol resulted in decreased IL-1beta expression, increased expression of CYP1A and GR, and was accompanied by an abolished PCB responsiveness after more than 4 h of cortisol incubation. We conclude that PCB126 exposure is not "stressful," as increased cortisol levels would result in depressed IL-1beta expression. Incubation with PCB126 evokes a transient stimulation rather than permanent damage of the immune system, as LPS stimulation resulted in increased IL-1beta expression after PCB incubation. Prolonged cortisol preincubation, resembling a chronic stress paradigm, negatively affects the immune responsiveness of the cells as well as their capacity for toxicant metabolization.

  11. Abnormal GABAergic function and negative affect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephan F; Demeter, Elise; Phan, K Luan; Tso, Ivy F; Welsh, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system have been reported in postmortem studies of schizophrenia, and therapeutic interventions in schizophrenia often involve potentiation of GABA receptors (GABAR) to augment antipsychotic therapy and treat negative affect such as anxiety. To map GABAergic mechanisms associated with processing affect, we used a benzodiazepine challenge while subjects viewed salient visual stimuli. Fourteen stable, medicated schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients and 13 healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique while they viewed salient emotional images. Subjects received intravenous lorazepam (LRZ; 0.01 mg/kg) or saline in a single-blinded, cross-over design (two sessions separated by 1-3 weeks). A predicted group by drug interaction was noted in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) as well as right superior frontal gyrus and left and right occipital regions, such that psychosis patients showed an increased BOLD signal to LRZ challenge, rather than the decreased signal exhibited by the comparison group. A main effect of reduced BOLD signal in bilateral occipital areas was noted across groups. Consistent with the role of the dmPFC in processing emotion, state negative affect positively correlated with the response to the LRZ challenge in the dmPFC for the patients and comparison subjects. The altered response to LRZ challenge is consistent with altered inhibition predicted by postmortem findings of altered GABAR in schizophrenia. These results also suggest that negative affect in schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder is associated-directly or indirectly-with GABAergic function on a continuum with normal behavior.

  12. Effect of White Kidney Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Beldia) on Small Intestine Morphology and Function in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; Bergaoui, Nacef; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ammar, Aouatef; Trabelsi, Najoua; Zekri, Sami; Guémira, Fathi; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-12-01

    The chronic ingestion of raw or undercooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) causes functional and morphological derangement in various tissues. The major objectives of this study were to investigate the gavage effects of a raw Beldia bean variety that is widely consumed in Tunisia, on the small intestine morphology and jejunal absorption of water, electrolytes, and glucose in Wistar rats. Twenty young male rats were randomly divided into two groups of 10 rats. The first group served as the control and was gavaged with 300 mg of a rodent pellet flour suspension (RPFS), whereas the second experimental group was challenged with 300 mg of a Beldia bean flour suspension (BBFS) for 10 days. Histological studies were performed using light and electron microcopy. The intestinal transport of water, sodium, potassium, and glucose was studied by perfusing the jejunal loops of the small bowels in vivo. The feeding experiments indicated that BBFS did not affect weight gain. Histomorphometric analyses showed that the villus heights, crypt depths, and crypt/villus ratios in the jejunum and ileum were greater in the BBFS-fed rats than controls. Electron microscopy studies demonstrated that the rats exposed to RPFS exhibited intact intestinal tracts; however, the BBFS-treated rats demonstrated intestinal alterations characterized by abnormal microvillus architectures, with short and dense or long and slender features, in addition to the sparse presence of vesicles near the brush border membrane. BBFS administration did not significantly affect glucose absorption. However, significant decreases were observed in water and electrolyte absorption compared with the uptake of the controls. In conclusion, raw Beldia beans distorted jejunum morphology and disturbed hydroelectrolytic flux.

  13. Serum Trimethylamine-N-Oxide Is Strongly Related to Renal Function and Predicts Outcome in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Missailidis, Catharina; Hällqvist, Jenny; Qureshi, Abdel Rashid; Barany, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Lindholm, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background The microbial metabolite Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) has been linked to adverse cardiovascular outcome and mortality in the general population. Objective To assess the contribution of TMAO to inflammation and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients ranging from mild-moderate to end-stage disease and 1) associations with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 2) effect of dialysis and renal transplantation (Rtx) 3) association with inflammatory biomarkers and 4) its predictive value for all-cause mortality. Methods Levels of metabolites were quantified by a novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry-based method in fasting plasma samples from 80 controls and 179 CKD 3–5 patients. Comorbidities, nutritional status, biomarkers of inflammation and GFR were assessed. Results GFR was the dominant variable affecting TMAO (β = -0.41; p<0.001), choline (β = -0.38; p<0.001), and betaine (β = 0.45; p<0.001) levels. A longitudinal study of 74 CKD 5 patients starting renal replacement therapy demonstrated that whereas dialysis treatment did not affect TMAO, Rtx reduced levels of TMAO to that of controls (p<0.001). Following Rtx choline and betaine levels continued to increase. In CKD 3–5, TMAO levels were associated with IL-6 (Rho = 0.42; p<0.0001), fibrinogen (Rho = 0.43; p<0.0001) and hsCRP (Rho = 0.17; p = 0.022). Higher TMAO levels were associated with an increased risk for all-cause mortality that remained significant after multivariate adjustment (HR 4.32, 95% CI 1.32–14.2; p = 0.016). Conclusion Elevated TMAO levels are strongly associated with degree of renal function in CKD and normalize after renal transplantation. TMAO levels correlates with increased systemic inflammation and is an independent predictor of mortality in CKD 3–5 patients. PMID:26751065

  14. Persuading physicians to test their patients' level of kidney functioning: the effects of message frame and point of view.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Anthony J; Goodall, Catherine E; West, Patricia M; Mahan, John D

    2010-03-01

    A two-part field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of message frame (gain vs. loss) and point of view (personal vs. impersonal) on physicians' intentions and behavior to test their patients' level of kidney functioning. One hundred and fifty-one physicians returned a survey that accompanied one of four different experimental cover letters or a generic control letter. One hundred and twelve (74%) of these physicians also completed and returned a follow-up survey sent approximately 4 months later. Physicians who received a letter (vs. the generic-letter control group) believed their patients were more susceptible to kidney disease, believed that kidney disease had more severe consequences, and also demonstrated greater intentions and behavior to test their patients' level of kidney functioning. Additionally, there was a significant frame by point of view interaction effect, in that physicians receiving the gain-framed personal letter or the loss-framed impersonal letter demonstrated greater intentions and behavior than physicians receiving other versions of the letter. These results extend the theoretical scope of the EPPM by suggesting that threat to other can motivate behavior change, and also can have significant practical application for the development of messages targeting physicians.

  15. The Gomez' equations and renal hemodynamic function in kidney disease research.

    PubMed

    Bjornstad, Petter; Škrtić, Marko; Lytvyn, Yuliya; Maahs, David M; Johnson, Richard J; Cherney, David Z I

    2016-09-07

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) remains the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. A major challenge in preventing DKD is the difficulty in identifying high-risk patients at an early, pre-clinical stage. Albuminuria and eGFR as measures of renal function in DKD research and clinical practice are limited by regression of one-third of patients with microalbuminuria to normoalbuminuria and eGFR is biased and imprecise in the normal-elevated range. Moreover, existing methods that are used to assess renal function do not give detailed insight into the location of the renal hemodynamic effects of pharmacological agents at the segmental level. To gain additional information about the intrarenal circulation in-vivo in humans, mathematical equations were developed by Gomez et al in the 1950s. These equations used measurements of GFR, renal blood flow (RBF), effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), renal vascular resistance (RVR), hematocrit and serum protein to calculate afferent and efferent arteriolar resistances, glomerular hydrostatic pressure and filtration pressure. Although indirect and based on physiological assumptions, these techniques have the potential to improve researchers' ability to identify early pre-clinical changes in renal hemodynamic function in patients with a variety of conditions including DKD, thereby offering tremendous potential in mechanistic human research studies. In this review, we focus on the application of Gomez' equations and summarize the potential and limitations of this technique in DKD research. We also summarize illustrative data derived from Gomez' equations in patients with type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hypertension.

  16. Association of Fluid Status and Body Composition with Physical Function in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Shih-Ming; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hui-Mei; Lin, Ming-Yen; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chen, Tzu-Hui; Wang, Shu-Li; Hsiao, Pei-Ni; Kung, Lan-Fang; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Huang, Mei-Feng; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Kuo, Mei-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Impairment of physical function and abnormal body composition are the major presentations in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between body composition and physical function in CKD patients. Methods This cross-sectional study enrolled 172 of CKD stages 1–5 from February 2013 to September 2013. Handgrip strength (upper extremity muscle endurance), 30-second chair-stand test (lower extremity muscle endurance) and 2-minute step test (cardiorespiratory endurance) were used as indices of physical function. Body composition, including fluid status (extracellular water/total body water, ECW/TBW), lean tissue index (LTI), and fat tissue index (FTI), was measured using a bioimpedance spectroscopy method. Results All patients with high ECW/TBW had lower handgrip strength and 30-second chair-stand than those with low ECW/TBW (P<0.001 and P = 0.002). CKD patients with high FTI had lower handgrip strength and 30-second chair-stand than those with low FTI (P<0.001 and P = 0.002). These patients with low LTI had lower handgrip strength than those with high LTI (P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, high ECW/TBW was positively associated with decreased handgrip strength (β = -41.17, P = 0.03) in CKD patients. High FTI was significantly correlated with decreased times of 30-second chair-stand (β = -0.13, P = 0.01). There was no significant relationship between body composition and 2-minute step test. Conclusions Our results show a significant association of impaired upper and lower extremity muscle endurance with high fluid status and fat tissue. Evaluation of body composition may assist in indentifying physical dysfunction earlier in CKD patients. PMID:27798648

  17. Effect of bicarbonate supplementation on renal function and nutritional indices in predialysis advanced chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil; Kim, Hye-Young

    2014-12-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m(2)) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m(2)) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m(2), p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m(2)).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition.

  18. Effect of Bicarbonate Supplementation on Renal Function and Nutritional Indices in Predialysis Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jiwon; Kwon, Soon Kil

    2014-01-01

    Current practice guidelines recommend alkali therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic acidosis to prevent complications. This study aims to investigate the effect of oral sodium bicarbonate supplementation on the progression of renal function and nutritional indices in patients with predialysis advanced CKD. Forty patients with predialysis stage 5 CKD(estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR <15mL/min per 1.73m2) and 40 patients with stage 4 CKD (eGFR 15 to 30mL/min per 1.73m2) who had a total CO2 less than 22mEq/L were assigned into the bicarbonate treatment group or control group for 12 months. In stage 4 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of eGFR during the study between the treatment group and the control group (-2.30±4.49 versus -6.58±6.32mL/min/1.73m2, p<0.05). However, in stage 5 CKD, there were no significant differences in the change of eGFR during the study between the two groups (-2.10±2.06 versus -3.23±1.95mL/min/1.73 m2).There were no significant differences in the changes of nutritional indices such as albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, total lymphocyte count (TLC), and Ondodera's prognostic nutritional index (OPNI) during the study between the two groups. In stage 5 CKD, there were significant differences in the changes of TLC and OPNI between the two groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of decline of renal function in stage 4 CKD and improves nutritional indices in stage 5 CKD. Alkali therapy in advanced CKD may have beneficial effect on renal function and malnutrition. PMID:25606047

  19. The relationships between visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and renal and endothelial function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Chikara; Morimoto, Satoshi; Nakahigashi, Mitsutaka; Kusabe, Makiko; Ueda, Hiroko; Someya, Kazunori; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Iwasaka, Toshiji; Shiojima, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Visit-to-visit blood pressure variability has been shown to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. High visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and endothelial dysfunction are observed in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is therefore assumed that high variability in visit-to-visit blood pressure measurements may be associated with endothelial dysfunction in these patients. The present study investigated the associations between visit-to-visit blood pressure variability and renal and endothelial function in patients with chronic kidney disease. We analyzed 150 consecutive patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease who visited our outpatient clinic from January 2006 to December 2010. The study examined the relationships between variability in visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure levels or mean systolic blood pressure (M SBP) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and flow-mediated dilation, an index of endothelial function. Variability in visit-to-visit systolic blood pressure showed a significant negative association with eGFR, independent of age, hemoglobin A1c, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and uric acid, whereas M SBP did not. Similarly, variability in SBP showed a significant negative association with flow-mediated dilation, independent of age, eGFR, HbA1c, LDL cholesterol and M SBP. These data indicate that variability in visit-to-visit blood pressure measurements is associated with impaired renal and endothelial function in patients with chronic kidney disease. This finding suggests that reducing blood pressure fluctuations might have beneficial effects in patients with chronic kidney disease, although this point needs to be addressed by future studies.

  20. Functional and histologic alterations in growing solitary rat kidney as result of extracorporeal shockwaves.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, U; Claro, J de A; Rodrigues Netto, N; Denardi, F; Figueiredo, J F; Riccetto, C L

    1995-02-01

    The long-term effects of extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) on children treated for renal calculi are unclear. To study the effects on the immature animal, we evaluated 31 Wistar white rats that underwent right nephrectomy at 30 days of age. At 40 days of age they were divided into three groups: a control group of 10 rats that received no shockwaves; Group I (9 rats) that received 1000 shockwaves at 16.0 kV, and Group II (12 animals) that received 1000 shock waves at 17.2 kV. Six months later at maturity (7 months and 10 days of age), the following parameters were measured: (1) body and renal weight; (2) blood lithium, sodium, potassium, and creatinine; (3) fractional lithium, sodium, and potassium excretion; and (4) clearances of lithium and creatinine. The kidneys were studied grossly and histologically. We found no significant changes in overall animal and renal growth between the post-SWL and control groups. However, there were significant changes in renal function. The animals in Groups I and II presented significant increases in blood potassium compared with the control group. Furthermore, the 1000 x 17.2 kV group showed permanent histologic renal changes, including red cells in Bowman's capsule and glomerular congestion. The disorders caused by SWL are compatible with hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism, inappropriately low plasma renin activity, and aldosterone deficiency.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Preservation of residual kidney function in hemodialysis patients: reviving an old concept.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anna T; Fishbane, Steven; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-08-01

    Residual kidney function (RKF) may confer a variety of benefits to patients on maintenance dialysis. RKF provides continuous clearance of middle molecules and protein-bound solutes. Whereas the definition of RKF varies across studies, interdialytic urine volume may emerge as a pragmatic alternative to more cumbersome calculations. RKF preservation is associated with better patient outcomes including survival and quality of life and is a clinical parameter and research focus in peritoneal dialysis. We propose the following practical considerations to preserve RKF, especially in newly transitioned (incident) hemodialysis patients: (1) periodic monitoring of RKF in hemodialysis patients through urine volume and including residual urea clearance with dialysis adequacy and outcome markers such as anemia, fluid gains, minerals and electrolytes, nutritional, status and quality of life; (2) avoidance of nephrotoxic agents such as radiocontrast dye, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and aminoglycosides; (3) more rigorous hypertension control and minimizing intradialytic hypotensive episodes; (4) individualizing the initial dialysis prescription with consideration of an incremental/infrequent approach to hemodialysis initiation (e.g., twice weekly) or peritoneal dialysis; and (5) considering a lower protein diet, especially on nondialysis days. Because RKF appears to be associated with better patient outcomes, it requires more clinical and research focus in the care of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients.

  2. Genome-Wide Association of Copy Number Polymorphisms and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Man; Carey, Jacob; Cristiano, Stephen; Susztak, Katalin; Coresh, Josef; Boerwinkle, Eric; Beaty, Terri H.; Köttgen, Anna; Scharpf, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have identified more than 50 loci associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function. However, significant SNPs account for a small proportion of eGFR variability. Other forms of genetic variation have not been comprehensively evaluated for association with eGFR. In this study, we assess whether changes in germline DNA copy number are associated with GFR estimated from serum creatinine, eGFRcrea. We used hidden Markov models (HMMs) to identify copy number polymorphic regions (CNPs) from high-throughput SNP arrays for 2,514 African (AA) and 8,645 European ancestry (EA) participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Separately for the EA and AA cohorts, we used Bayesian Gaussian mixture models to estimate copy number at regions identified by the HMM or previously reported in the HapMap Project. We identified 312 and 464 autosomal CNPs among individuals of EA and AA, respectively. Multivariate models adjusted for SNP-derived covariates of population structure identified one CNP in the EA cohort near genome-wide statistical significance (Bonferroni-adjusted p = 0.067) located on chromosome 5 (876–880kb). Overall, our findings suggest a limited role of CNPs in explaining eGFR variability. PMID:28135296

  3. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  4. Morphological and Functional Features of Hepatic Cyst Epithelium in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, Domenico; Onori, Paolo; Alpini, Gianfranco; Franchitto, Antonio; Jefferson, Douglas M.; Torrice, Alessia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Stefanelli, Fabrizio; Mancino, Maria Grazia; Strazzabosco, Mario; Angelico, Mario; Attili, Adolfo; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the morphological and functional features of hepatic cyst epithelium in adult autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In six ADPKD patients, we investigated the morphology of cyst epithelium apical surface by scanning electron microscopy and the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), IGF1 receptors (IGF1-R), growth hormone receptor, the proliferation marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Proliferation of liver cyst-derived epithelial cells was evaluated by both MTS proliferation assay and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. The hepatic cyst epithelium displayed heterogeneous features, being normal in small cysts (<1 cm), characterized by rare or shortened cilia in 1- to 3-cm cysts, and exhibiting the absence of both primary cilia and microvilli in large cysts (>3 cm). Cyst epithelium showed marked immunohistochemical expression of ER, growth hormone receptor, IGF1, IGF1-R, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and pAKT. IGF1 was 10-fold more enriched in the hepatic cyst fluid than in serum. Serum-deprived liver cyst-derived epithelial cells proliferated when exposed to 17β-estradiol and IGF1 and when exposed to human cyst fluid. ER or IGF1-R antagonists inhibited the proliferative effect of serum readmission, cyst fluid, 17β-estradiol, and IGF1. Our findings could explain the role of estrogens in accelerating the progression of ADPKD and may suggest a potential benefit of therapeutic strategies based on estrogen antagonism. PMID:18202196

  5. Regulated Synthesis and Functions of Laminin 5 in Polarized Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Grace Z.; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Buschmann, Mary M.; Stickley, Shaun M.; Koch, Manuel; Goss, Kathleen Heppner; Waechter, Holly; Zuk, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Renal tubular epithelial cells synthesize laminin (LN)5 during regeneration of the epithelium after ischemic injury. LN5 is a truncated laminin isoform of particular importance in the epidermis, but it is also constitutively expressed in a number of other epithelia. To investigate the role of LN5 in morphogenesis of a simple renal epithelium, we examined the synthesis and function of LN5 in the spreading, proliferation, wound-edge migration, and apical–basal polarization of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. MDCK cells synthesize LN5 only when subconfluent, and they degrade the existing LN5 matrix when confluent. Through the use of small-interfering RNA to knockdown the LN5 α3 subunit, we were able to demonstrate that LN5 is necessary for cell proliferation and efficient wound-edge migration, but not apical–basal polarization. Surprisingly, suppression of LN5 production caused cells to spread much more extensively than normal on uncoated surfaces, and exogenous keratinocyte LN5 was unable to rescue this phenotype. MDCK cells also synthesized laminin α5, a component of LN10, that independent studies suggest may form an assembled basal lamina important for polarization. Overall, our findings indicate that LN5 is likely to play an important role in regulating cell spreading, migration, and proliferation during reconstitution of a continuous epithelium. PMID:16775009

  6. Acute effects of grayanotoxin in rhododendron honey on kidney functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Silici, S; Doğan, Z; Sahin, H; Atayoğlu, T; Yakan, B

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the acute biochemical and histological changes in rat kidneys after treatment with grayanotoxin (GTX) of rhododendron honey (RH). A total of 60 Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into five groups of 12 rats each, one being a control group (group 1) and group 2 was treated with 0.015 mg/kg/bw of GTX standard preparation via intraperitoneal injection. Groups 3, 4, and 5 were given RH at doses of 0.1, 0.5, and 2.5 g/kg/bw, respectively, via oral gavage. Compared to the control group, significant increases were observed in glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine levels of the GTX-injected groups after 1 h. However, in low dose RH group, such an increase was not observed and had a normal appearance histologically. Therefore, low dose (1 g/kg/bw) of RH produces no acute adverse effects on renal functions of rats.

  7. High intensity interval training favourably affects antioxidant and inflammation mRNA expression in early-stage chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Patrick S; Briskey, David R; Scanlan, Aaron T; Coombes, Jeff S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress and inflammation have been linked to the progression of chronic kidney disease. To reduce oxidative stress and inflammation related to chronic kidney disease, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. Data suggests high intensity interval training may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with explanations of mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. This study assessed effects of eight weeks of high intensity interval training (85% VO2max), versus low intensity exercise (45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour, in an animal model of early-stage chronic kidney disease. We examined kidney-specific mRNA expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity (glutathione peroxidase 1; Gpx1, superoxide dismutase 1; Sod1, and catalase; Cat) and inflammation (kidney injury molecule 1; Kim1 and tumour necrosis factor receptor super family 1b; Tnfrsf1b), as well as plasma F2-isoprostanes, a marker of lipid peroxidation. Compared to sedentary behaviour, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Sod1 (p=0.01) and Cat (p<0.001). Compared to low intensity exercise, high intensity interval training resulted in increased mRNA expression of Cat (p<0.001) and Tnfrsf1b (p=0.047). In this study, high intensity interval training was superior to sedentary behaviour and low intensity exercise as high intensity interval training beneficially influenced expression of genes related to endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity and inflammation.

  8. Lifestyle Factors and Indices of Kidney Function in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Meredith C.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Jacques, Paul F.; Fox, Caroline S.; Chu, Audrey Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Lifestyle characteristics are modifiable factors that could be targeted as part of chronic kidney disease (CKD) prevention. We sought to determine the association of lifestyle characteristics with incident estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60mL/min/1.73m2 and rapid eGFR decline in older adults in the United States. Methods Prospective cohort study of Framingham Offspring participants with baseline eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2 (n=1802) who attended the seventh (1998–2001; baseline) and eighth (2005–2008; follow-up) examinations (mean age=59years, 54.8% women). Predictors included measures of diet quality, physical activity, alcohol intake, and current smoking status assessed during baseline. Outcomes were based on creatinine-based eGFR at baseline and follow-up and included incident eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2 (at follow-up) and rapid eGFR decline (annual eGFR decrease≥3mL/min/1.73m2). Results Over 6.6 years average follow-up 9.5% (n=171) of participants developed incident eGFR<60. A trend was observed across quartiles of diet quality, with higher levels of diet quality associated with a decreased odds ratio [OR] of incident eGFR<60 (p-trend=0.045). Higher diet quality was associated with decreased odds of rapid eGFR decline (p-trend=0.03) and was attenuated with additional adjustment (p-trend=0.07). In sensitivity analysis for rapid eGFR decline using a secondary definition (annual eGFR decrease≥3 and incident eGFR<60), diet associations remained significant with additional adjustment (p-trend=0.04). No associations were observed with physical activity, smoking status, or alcohol intake with incident eGFR<60 or rapid eGFR decline (all p>0.19). Conclusions Higher diet quality may be associated with a decreased risk of incident eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2, and rapid eGFR decline. Whether adherence to a healthy diet can prevent reduction in kidney function warrants further study. PMID:25998023

  9. /sup 99m/Tc-aprotinin: A new tracer for kidney morphology and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Donadio, C.; Tramonti, G.; Lorusso, P.; Bellitto, L.; Lunghi, F.

    1984-01-01

    Aprotinin (Ap), a low molecular weight polyeptide (6500 dalton), is a protease inhibitor which is electively and stably accumulated in the kidney. In 112 adult patients, with either uni- or bilateral renal disease with different degrees of renal impairment (from normal GFR to advanced renal failure), renal scans were performed by means of Ap labelled with /sup 99m/Tc. Highly satisfactory renal scans were obtained in all patients. In 20 patients with renal failure (serum creatinine 1.8 - 8.5 mg/dl, mean 4.7) a comparison was made of the renal scans obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-Ap and with /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA. /sup 99m/Tc-Ap was slightly better than /sup 99m/Tc-DMSA, especially in patients with far advanced renal failure. Some aspects of the pharmacokinetics of /sup 99m/Tc-Ap were studied in 72 cases. In 22 of these patients plasma clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-Ap was determined by the single injection method using a two-compartment model. In patients with GFR>90 ml/min plasma cl of /sup 99m/Tc-Ap was 67.6 +- 8.4 SD ml/min. A good correlation was observed between plasma clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-Ap and GFR (r = 0.74). After i.v. injection /sup 99m/Tc-Ap was stably fixed by the kidney. Renal radioactivity remained stable between the 2nd and the 8th hour after the injection. Urinary excretion of radioactivity measured in 35 patients in the first and in the second 2-hour interval after i.v. injection of /sup 99m/Tc-Ap was negligible in all patients (2.7 +- 1.5 SD percent of the dose in the fist 2 hours; 2.8 +- 1.4 SD between the 2nd and the 4th hour). Conclusions. /sup 99m/Tc-Ap is an excellent agent for renal imaging. It also seems promising for renal function studies.

  10. The Role of Endothelin System in Renal Structure and Function during the Postnatal Development of the Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Albertoni Borghese, María F.; Ortiz, María C.; Balonga, Sabrina; Moreira Szokalo, Rocío; Majowicz, Mónica P.

    2016-01-01

    Renal development in rodents, unlike in humans, continues during early postnatal period. We aimed to evaluate whether the pharmacological inhibition of Endothelin system during this period affects renal development, both at structural and functional level in male and female rats. Newborn rats were treated orally from postnatal day 1 to 20 with vehicle or bosentan (Actelion, 20 mg/kg/day), a dual endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA). The animals were divided in 4 groups: control males, control females, ERA males and ERA females. At day 21, we evaluated renal function, determined the glomerular number by a maceration method and by morphometric analysis and evaluated possible structural renal alterations by three methods: 〈alpha〉-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunohistochemistry, Masson's trichrome and Sirius red staining. The pharmacological inhibition of Endothelin system with a dual ERA during the early postnatal period of the rat did not leads to renal damage in the kidneys of male and female rats. However, ERA administration decreased the number of glomeruli, the juxtamedullary filtration surface area and the glomerular filtration rate and increased the proteinuria. These effects could predispose to hypertension or renal diseases in the adulthood. On the other hand, these effects were more pronounced in male rats, suggesting that there are sex differences that could be greater later in life. These results provide evidence that Endothelin has an important role in rat renal postnatal development. However these results do not imply that the same could happen in humans, since human renal development is complete at birth. PMID:26872270

  11. Can the hydrophilicity of functional monomers affect chemical interaction?

    PubMed

    Feitosa, V P; Ogliari, F A; Van Meerbeek, B; Watson, T F; Yoshihara, K; Ogliari, A O; Sinhoreti, M A; Correr, A B; Cama, G; Sauro, S

    2014-02-01

    The number of carbon atoms and/or ester/polyether groups in spacer chains may influence the interaction of functional monomers with calcium and dentin. The present study assessed the chemical interaction and bond strength of 5 standard-synthesized phosphoric-acid ester functional monomers with different spacer chain characteristics, by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ATR-FTIR, thin-film x-ray diffraction (TF-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtensile bond strength (μTBS). The tested functional monomers were 2-MEP (two-carbon spacer chain), 10-MDP (10-carbon), 12-MDDP (12-carbon), MTEP (more hydrophilic polyether spacer chain), and CAP-P (intermediate hydrophilicity ester spacer). The intensity of monomer-calcium salt formation measured by AAS differed in the order of 12-MDDP=10-MDP>CAP-P>MTEP>2-MEP. FTIR and SEM analyses of monomer-treated dentin surfaces showed resistance to rinsing for all monomer-dentin bonds, except with 2-MEP. TF-XRD confirmed the weaker interaction of 2-MEP. Highest µTBS was observed for 12-MDDP and 10-MDP. A shorter spacer chain (2-MEP) of phosphate functional monomers induced formation of unstable monomer-calcium salts, and lower chemical interaction and dentin bond strength. The presence of ester or ether groups within longer spacer carbon chains (CAP-P and MTEP) may affect the hydrophilicity, μTBS, and also the formation of monomer-calcium salts.

  12. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  13. Acute kidney injury during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, James W

    2014-12-01

    Acute kidney injury complicates the care of a relatively small number of pregnant and postpartum women. Several pregnancy-related disorders such as preeclampsia and thrombotic microangiopathies may produce acute kidney injury. Prerenal azotemia is another common cause of acute kidney injury in pregnancy. This manuscript will review pregnancy-associated acute kidney injury from a renal functional perspective. Pathophysiology of acute kidney injury will be reviewed. Specific conditions causing acute kidney injury and treatments will be compared.

  14. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Garcia, Melissa; Gaunt, Tom R.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Go, Min Jin; Goel, Anuj; Grässler, Jürgen; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Groop, Leif; Guarrera, Simonetta; Guo, Xiuqing; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hardy, Rebecca; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hedblad, Bo; Hercberg, Serge; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hilton, Gina; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Bolton, Judith A Hoffman; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Howard, Philip; Humphries, Steve E.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M. Arfan; Islam, Muhammad; Iwai, Naoharu; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jackson, Anne U.; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Johnson, Toby; Kathiresan, Sekar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kinra, Sanjay; Kita, Yoshikuni; Kivimaki, Mika; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Kuh, Diana; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laakso, Markku; Laan, Maris; Laitinen, Jaana; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Larson, Martin G.; Lathrop, Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, Nanette R.; Levy, Daniel; Li, Yali; Longstreth, Will T.; Luan, Jian'an; Lucas, Gavin; Ludwig, Barbara; Mangino, Massimo; Mani, K. Radha; Marmot, Michael G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Matullo, Giuseppe; McArdle, Wendy L.; McKenzie, Colin A.; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Meneton, Pierre; Meschia, James F.; Miki, Tetsuro; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Richard W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Najjar, Samer; Narisu, Narisu; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Nilsson, Peter; Nyberg, Fredrik; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ong, RickTwee-Hee; Ongen, Halit; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Org, Elin; Orru, Marco; Palmas, Walter; Palmen, Jutta; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Pihur, Vasyl; Platou, Carl G. P.; Plump, Andrew; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Psaty, Bruce M.; Raffel, Leslie J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Rasheed, Asif; Ricceri, Fulvio; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rosengren, Annika; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudock, Megan E.; Sõber, Siim; Salako, Tunde; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Scott, Laura J.; Scott, James; Scuteri, Angelo; Sehmi, Joban S.; Seielstad, Mark; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Shi, Gang; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Sim, Xueling; Singleton, Andrew; Sjögren, Marketa; Smith, Nicholas L.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Spector, Tim D.; Staessen, Jan A.; Stancakova, Alena; Steinle, Nanette I.; Strachan, David P.; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tai, E-Shyong; Talmud, Philippa J.; Taylor, Andrew; Terzic, Janos; Thelle, Dag S.; Tobin, Martin D.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tripathy, Vikal; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Uda, Manuela; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Umemura, Satoshi; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Veldre, Gudrun; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Viigimaa, Margus; Vinay, D. G.; Vineis, Paolo; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Wain, Louise V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Thomas J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Weder, Alan B.; Whincup, Peter H.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wu, Ying; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Yao, Jie; Young, J. H.; Zelenika, Diana; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhu, Haidong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zitting, Paavo; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Okada, Yukinori; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L.; Aung, Tin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S. -J. Cathy; Mei, Hao; Hixson, James E.; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Reilly, Muredach P; Schunkert, Heribert; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Hall, Alistair; Hengstenberg, Christian; König, Inke R.; Laaksonen, Reijo; McPherson, Ruth; Thompson, John R.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Chen, Li; Cupples13, L. Adrienne; Halperin, Eran; Li, Mingyao; Musunuru, Kiran; Preuss, Michael; Schillert, Arne; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wells, George A.; Holm, Hilma; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Fortmann, Stephen; Go, Alan; Hlatky, Mark; Iribarren, Carlos; Knowles, Joshua; Myers, Richard; Quertermous, Thomas; Sidney, Steven; Risch, Neil; Tang, Hua; Blankenberg, Stefan; Schnabel, Renate; Sinning, Christoph; Lackner, Karl J.; Tiret, Laurence; Nicaud, Viviane; Cambien, Francois; Bickel, Christoph; Rupprecht, Hans J.; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Münzel, Thomas F.; Barbalic, Maja; Chen, Ida Yii-Der; Demissie-Banjaw, Serkalem; Folsom, Aaron; Lumley, Thomas; Marciante, Kristin; Taylor, Kent D.; Volcik, Kelly; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Andersen, Karl; Fischer, Marcus; Grosshennig, Anika; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Stark, Klaus; Schreiber, Stefan; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Bruse, Petra; Doering, Angela; Klopp, Norman; Diemert, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Medack, Anja; Nahrstedt, Janja; Peters, Annette; Wagner, Arnika K.; Willenborg, Christina; Böhm, Bernhard O.; Dobnig, Harald; Grammer, Tanja B.; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Meinitzer, Andreas; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Pilz, Stefan; Renner, Wilfried; Scharnagl, Hubert; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Winkler, Karl; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noel; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Dandona, Sonny; Jarinova, Olga; Qu, Liming; Wilensky, Robert; Matthai, William; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Devaney, Joe; Burnett, Mary Susan; Pichard, Augusto D.; Kent, Kenneth M.; Satler, Lowell; Lindsay, Joseph M.; Waksman, Ron; Knouff, Christopher W.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Walker, Max C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Rader, Daniel J.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Loehr, Laura R.; Rosamond, Wayne D.; Benjamin, Emelia; Haritunians, Talin; Couper, David; Murabito, Joanne; Wang, Ying A.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Chang, Patricia P.; Willerson, James T.; Felix, Stephan B.; Watzinger, Norbert; Aragam, Jayashri; Zweiker, Robert; Lind, Lars; Rodeheffer, Richard J.; Greiser, Karin Halina; Deckers, Jaap W.; Stritzke, Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Kullo, Iftikhar; Haerting, Johannes; Reffelmann, Thorsten; Redfield, Margaret M.; Werdan, Karl; Mitchell, Gary F.; Arnett, Donna K.; Gottdiener, John S.; Blettner, Maria; Friedrich, Nele; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Carroll, Robert J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Scott, Rodney J.; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J.; Turner, Stephen T.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H.; Böger, Carsten A.; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I.; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W. H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  15. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    PubMed

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  16. Proteinuria and rate of change in kidney function in a community-based population.

    PubMed

    Turin, Tanvir Chowdhury; James, Matthew; Ravani, Pietro; Tonelli, Marcello; Manns, Braden J; Quinn, Robert; Jun, Min; Klarenbach, Scott; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R

    2013-10-01

    Proteinuria identifies patients at risk for adverse clinical outcomes, but it is unclear whether proteinuria correlates with the rate of renal decline. We examined the association between proteinuria and rate of change in estimated GFR (eGFR) in a cohort of 638,150 adults from a province-wide registry in Alberta, Canada, who had a measure of proteinuria and three or more outpatient serum creatinine measurements over a period of ≥1 year. An adjusted sex-specific linear mixed-effects model was used to determine the rate of change in eGFR per year for patients with normal, mild, and heavy proteinuria, stratified by baseline kidney function (eGFR ≥90, 60-89.9, 45-59.9, 30-44.9, and 15-29.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)). In men, heavy proteinuria and a baseline eGFR of 45-59.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) correlated with a change in eGFR of -2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], -2.37 to -1.95) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year, whereas mild proteinuria and a baseline eGFR of 30-44.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) correlated with a change in eGFR of -0.51 (95% CI, -0.70 to -0.32) ml/min per 1.73 m(2) per year. Similar trends were observed for female, elderly, and diabetic patients. Notably, normal protein levels and a lower baseline eGFR (15-29.9 ml/min per 1.73 m(2)) correlated with stable or improved renal function. In conclusion, our results suggest that proteinuria of increasing severity is associated with a faster rate of renal decline, regardless of baseline eGFR, and the combined effect should be considered in patients with CKD.

  17. Imaging Leukocyte Responses in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Kitching, A Richard; Hickey, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    The kidney can be negatively affected by a range of innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in alterations in the functions of the kidney and, in some cases, progression to renal failure. In many of these responses, infiltration of blood-borne leukocytes into the kidney is central to the response. In addition, a large population of mononuclear phagocytes resident in the kidney can modulate these responses. A great deal of research has investigated both the mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to the kidney and the actions of immune cells resident within the kidney. Because of the dynamic nature of the processes whereby leukocytes enter sites of inflammation, in vivo imaging has been one of the key approaches used for understanding leukocyte recruitment as it occurs throughout the body, and this is also true for kidney. However, imaging this organ and its complicated microvasculature during different forms of renal pathology presents a unique set of challenges. In this review, we examine the approaches used for intravital imaging of the kidney and summarize the insights gained from these studies regarding the mechanisms of leukocyte entry into the kidney during inflammation and the actions of immune cells within this organ.

  18. High-resolution functional imaging with ultrasound contrast agents based on RF processing in an in vivo kidney experiment.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Prinzen, F W; Peschar, M; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge of the relative tissue perfusion distribution is valuable in the diagnosis of numerous diseases. Techniques for the assessment of the relative perfusion distribution, based on ultrasound (US) contrast agents, have several advantages compared to established nuclear techniques. These are, among others, a better spatial and temporal resolution, the lack of exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and the relatively low cost. In the present study, US radiofrequency (RF) image sequences are acquired, containing the signal intensity changes associated with the transit of a bolus contrast agent through the microvasculature of a dog kidney. The primary objective is to explore the feasibility of calculating functional images with high spatial resolution. The functional images characterize the transit of the contrast agent bolus and represent distributions of peak time, peak value, transit time, peak area, wash-in rate and wash-out decay constant. For the evaluation of the method, dog experiments were performed under optimized conditions where motion artefacts were minimized and an IA injection of the contrast agent Levovist was employed. It was demonstrated that processing of RF signals obtained with a 3.5-MHz echo system can provide functional images with a high spatial resolution of 2 mm in axial resolution, 2 to 5 mm in lateral resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. The functional images expose several known aspects of kidney perfusion, like perfusion heterogeneity of the kidney cortex and a different peripheral cortical perfusion compared to the inner cortex. Based on the findings of the present study, and given the results of complimentary studies, it is likely that the functional images reflect the relative perfusion distribution of the kidney.

  19. Early Macrophage Infiltration and Sustained Inflammation in Kidneys From Deceased Donors Are Associated With Long-Term Renal Function.

    PubMed

    Guillén-Gómez, E; Dasilva, I; Silva, I; Arce, Y; Facundo, C; Ars, E; Breda, A; Ortiz, A; Guirado, L; Ballarín, J A; Díaz-Encarnación, M M

    2017-03-01

    Kidney transplants from living donors (LDs) have a better outcome than those from deceased donors (DDs). Different factors have been suggested to justify the different outcome. In this study, we analyzed the infiltration and phenotype of monocytes/macrophages and the expression of inflammatory and fibrotic markers in renal biopsy specimens from 94 kidney recipients (60 DDs and 34 LDs) at baseline and 4 months after transplantation. We evaluated their association with medium- and long-term renal function. At baseline, inflammatory gene expression was higher in DDs than in LDs. These results were confirmed by the high number of CD68-positive cells in DD kidneys, which correlated negatively with long-term renal function. Expression of the fibrotic markers vimentin, fibronectin, and α-smooth muscle actin was more elevated in biopsy specimens from DDs at 4 months than in those from LDs. Gene expression of inflammatory and fibrotic markers at 4 months and difference between 4 months and baseline correlated negatively with medium- and long-term renal function in DDs. Multivariate analysis point to transforming growth factor-β1 as the best predictor of long-term renal function in DDs. We conclude that early macrophage infiltration, sustained inflammation, and transforming growth factor-β1 expression, at least for the first 4 months, contribute significantly to the difference in DD and LD transplant outcome.

  20. Functional MRI for characterization of renal perfusion impairment and edema formation due to acute kidney injury in different mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongjun; Gutberlet, Marcel; Jang, Mi-Sun; Meier, Martin; Mengel, Michael; Hartung, Dagmar; Wacker, Frank; Rong, Song; Hueper, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose was to characterize acute kidney injury (AKI) in C57BL/6 (B6)- and 129/Sv (Sv)-mice by noninvasive measurement of renal perfusion and tissue edema using functional MRI. Methods Different severities of AKI were induced in B6- and Sv-mice by renal ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Unilateral clamping of the renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI) or 45 min (severe AKI) was done. MRI (7-Tesla) was performed 1, 7 and 28 days after surgery using a flow alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) arterial spin labeling (ASL) sequence. Maps of perfusion and T1-relaxation time were calculated. Relative MRI-parameters of the IRI kidney compared to the contralateral not-clipped kidney were compared between AKI severities and between mouse strains using unpaired t-tests. In addition, fibrosis was assessed by Masson Trichrome and collagen IV staining. Results After moderate AKI relative perfusion impairment was significantly higher in B6- than in Sv-mice at d7 (55±7% vs. 82±8%, p<0.05) and d28 (76±7% vs. 102±3%, p<0.01). T1-values increased in the early phase after AKI in both mouse strains. T1-increase was more severe after prolonged ischemia times of 45 min compared to 35 min in both mouse strains, measured in the renal cortex and outer stripe of outer medulla. Kidney volume loss (compared to the contralateral kidney) occurred already after 7 days but proceeded markedly towards 4 weeks in severe AKI. Early renal perfusion impairment was predictive for later kidney volume loss. The progression to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the severe AKI model was similar in both mouse strains as revealed by histology. Conclusion Quantification of renal perfusion and tissue edema by functional MRI allows characterization of strain differences upon AKI. Renal perfusion impairment was stronger in B6- compared to Sv-animals following moderate AKI. Prolonged ischemia times were associated with more severe perfusion impairment and edema formation in the early phase and

  1. [Kidney diseases in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Kolesárova, Eva; Sirotiaková, Jana; Kozárová, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of important morphological, functional and hemodynamic changes occurring in the kidneys during physiological pregnancy is a prerequisite for proper diagnostics and therapy of renal diseases in pregnancy. Kidney diseases may be kidney diseases complicating pregnancy in previously healthy women, or pre-existing or superposed kidney diseases. Knowledge of renal insufficiency management in pregnancy, including haemodialysis treatment and management of pregnancy in patients who have undergone transplantation, is also important.

  2. MicroRNAs affect dendritic cell function and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lesley A; Boardman, Dominic A; Tung, Sim L; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that have been linked with immunity through regulating/modulating gene expression. A role for these molecules in T-cell and B-cell development and function has been well established. An increasing body of literature now highlights the importance of specific miRNA in dendritic cell (DC) development as well as their maturation process, antigen presentation capacity and cytokine release. Given the unique role of DC within the immune system, linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, understanding how specific miRNA affect DC function is of importance for understanding disease. In this review we summarize recent developments in miRNA and DC research, highlighting the requirement of miRNA in DC lineage commitment from bone marrow progenitors and for the development of subsets such as plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC. In addition, we discuss how infections and tumours modulate miRNA expression and consequently DC function. PMID:25244106

  3. Kidney Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  4. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... upcoming screening events. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. About AKF ... support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health ...

  5. Kidney Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney transplant Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A kidney transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy kidney ... bloodstream via a machine (dialysis) or a kidney transplant to stay alive. Mayo Clinic's approach . Mayo Clinic ...

  6. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease Print A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  7. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Kidney Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Kidney Disease A A ... Syndrome Coping With Kidney Conditions What Do the Kidneys Do? You might never think much about some ...

  8. Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Kidneys KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Kidneys A A A ... and it will be lighter. What Else Do Kidneys Do? Kidneys are always busy. Besides filtering the ...

  9. Kidney Cysts

    MedlinePlus

    ... common type of PKD end up with kidney failure. PKD also causes cysts in other parts of ... and lifestyle changes, and if there is kidney failure, dialysis or kidney transplants. Acquired cystic kidney disease ( ...

  10. Using Xenopus to study genetic kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Soeren S

    2016-03-01

    Modern sequencing technology is revolutionizing our knowledge of inherited kidney disease. However, the molecular role of genes affected by the rapidly rising number of identified mutations is lagging behind. Xenopus is a highly useful, but underutilized model organism with unique properties excellently suited to decipher the molecular mechanisms of kidney development and disease. The embryonic kidney (pronephros) can be manipulated on only one side of the animal and its formation observed directly through the translucent skin. The moderate evolutionary distance between Xenopus and humans is a huge advantage for studying basic principles of kidney development, but still allows us to analyze the function of disease related genes. Optogenetic manipulations and genome editing by CRISPR/Cas are exciting additions to the toolbox for disease modelling and will facilitate the use of Xenopus in translational research. Therefore, the future of Xenopus in kidney research is bright.

  11. Common chronic conditions do not affect performance of cell cycle arrest biomarkers for risk stratification of acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Heung, Michael; Ortega, Luis M.; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Self, Wesley H.; Koyner, Jay L.; Shi, Jing; Kellum, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of acute kidney injury (AKI) can be challenging in patients with underlying chronic disease, and biomarkers often perform poorly in this population. In this study we examined the performance characteristics of the novel biomarker panel of urinary tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 ([IGFBP7]) in patients with a variety of comorbid conditions. Methods We analyzed data from two multicenter studies of critically ill patients in which [TIMP2]•[IGFBP7] was validated for prediction of Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Stage 2 or 3 AKI within 12 h. We constructed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for AKI prediction both overall and by comorbid conditions common among patients with AKI, including diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Results In the overall cohort of 1131 patients, 139 (12.3%) developed KDIGO Stage 2 or 3 AKI. [TIMP2]•[IGFBP7] was significantly higher in AKI versus non-AKI patients, both overall and within each comorbidity subgroup. The AUC for [TIMP2]•[IGFBP7] in predicting AKI was 0.81 overall. Higher AUC was noted in patients with versus without CHF (0.89 versus 0.79; P = 0.026) and CKD (0.91 versus 0.80; P = 0.024). Conclusions We observed no significant impairment in the performance of cell cycle arrest biomarkers due to the presence of chronic comorbid conditions. PMID:27342582

  12. [Electrolyte disorders in cadaveric kidney donors before explantation and the functional development of the transplant in the early postoperative period].

    PubMed

    Teplan, V; Schück, O; Nádvorníková, H; Vránová, Z; Kocandrle, V; Martínek, V; Englis, M

    1990-01-01

    In a group of cadaveric kidney transplantations the problem of the dependence of the functional development of the graft on the function of donor kidney before explanation and on the total time of ischaemia in the immediate postoperative period was investigated. Based on the plasma concentration of endogenous creatinine (PKr), urea (PUrea) and the total ischaemic time (GI), the early function of the graft cannot be predicted. On the contrary, the values of PKr, GI and the kidney index (NIKI = PKr x GI) allow an accurate prediction that the early function of the graft will not be sufficient. Early function of the graft is not likely to develop when PKr is higher than 160 mumol/l, total ischaemic time is longer than 30 hours and the NIKI is over 3,500. Severe alterations in the level of serum potassium (SK) occurred in 61.4% of the donors. In cases where SK was 3.0 mmol/l or less, early function of the graft did not develop in 82.3%. With high probability haemodialysis was necessary. More pronounced alterations of the level of SNa occurred in more than 60% of the donors. When SNa was 125 mmol/l or less, early function of the graft did not develop in 76%. Diuresis over 400 ml/h increased significantly the number of early nonfunctional grafts. In cases where fractional sodium excretion (FENa) was over 5%, early function of the graft did not develop. With a FENa less or equal to 1%, early function of the graft was most likely to develop.

  13. Diffuse renal parenchyma uptake with bone scintigraphy in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    Balink, Hans; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Hemmelder, Marc

    2014-03-01

    A 41-year-old woman with a Harrington spondylodesis presented with lower back pain. Bone scintigraphy showed diffusely increased parenchymal uptake in both kidneys. She reported 2 previous periods of dark, almost black, urine. Additional flow cytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The increased renal parenchyma uptake is very probably due to paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-related renal hemosiderosis. Remarkably, the patient did not develop any abnormality of renal function.

  14. Functional and structural abnormalities of the kidney and urinary tract in severely malnourished children - A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Anjum, Misbah; Moorani, Khemchand N; Sameen, Ifra; Mustufa, Muhammad Ayaz; Kulsoom, Shazia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The association of malnutrition and systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. Various urinary tract abnormalities may be associated with malnutrition. So objective of current study was to determine the frequency of functional and structural urinary tract abnormalities in severely malnourished children admitted in Nutritional Rehabilitation Unit (NRU) of a tertiary care facility, Karachi. Methods: This descriptive cases series of 78 children was conducted in NRU from October 2014 - March 2015. All newly admitted children aged 2-60 months, diagnosed as Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) were studied and children with known kidney and urinary tract disorders were excluded. Detailed history, examination and investigations like serum creatinine, ultrasound kidney and urinary tract in addition to routine tests for SAM, were done. A proforma was used to collect demographic data, clinical history, physical findings, and radio-imaging and biochemical investigations. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated using Schwartz equation. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Among 78 children, male to female ratio was equal. Mean age was 18±15.53 months and majority (79.48%) of children were below 24 months. Majority (82%) of children with SAM had marasmus whereas 18% had edematous malnutrition. Out of 78, 57 (73%) children had either functional (80.7%) and or structural (19.3%) abnormalities whereas 21(36.84%) had normal functional and structural status. Most common functional abnormality was subnormal GFR (<90ml/min/1.73 m2) found in all 46 children. Functional abnormities were more common in children below 24 months. Other functional disorders were Bartter syndrome, renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection (UTI) found in two cases each. Common structural abnormalities were echogenic kidneys (n=4, 36%), hydronephrosis (n=3, 27%), hypoplastic kidneys (n=3, 27%) and calculi (n=1, 9%). Subnormal GFR was also

  15. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  16. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  17. Functional properties and in vitro trypsin digestibility of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate: Effect of high-pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Tang, Chuan-He; Wen, Qi-Biao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Li, Lin

    2008-10-15

    The effects of high-pressure (HP) treatment at 200-600MPa, prior to freeze-drying, on some functional properties and in vitro trypsin digestibility of vicilin-rich red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) were investigated. Surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl (SH) and disulfide bond (SS) contents were also evaluated. HP treatment resulted in gradual unfolding of protein structure, as evidenced by gradual increases in fluorescence strength and SS formation from SH groups, and decrease in denaturation enthalpy change. The protein solubility of KPI was significantly improved at pressures of 400MPa or higher, possibly due to formation of soluble aggregate from insoluble precipitate. HP treatment at 200 and 400MPa significantly increased emulsifying activity index (EAI) and emulsion stability index (ESI); however, EAI was significantly decreased at 600MPa (relative to untreated KPI). The thermal stability of the vicilin component was not affected by HP treatment. Additionally, in vitro trypsin digestibility of KPI was decreased only at a pressure above 200MPa and for long incubation time (e.g., 120min). The data suggest that some physiochemical and functional properties of vicilin-rich kidney proteins can be improved by means of high-pressure treatment.

  18. Scorpion venom components that affect ion-channels function

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Hernández, V.; Jiménez-Vargas, J.M.; Gurrola, G.B.; Valdivia, H.H.F.; Possani, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number and types of venom components that affect ion-channel function are reviewed. These are the most important venom components responsible for human intoxication, deserving medical attention, often requiring the use of specific anti-venoms. Special emphasis is given to peptides that recognize Na+-, K+- and Ca++-channels of excitable cells. Knowledge generated by direct isolation of peptides from venom and components deduced from cloned genes, whose amino acid sequences are deposited into databanks are now adays in the order of 1.5 thousands, out of an estimate biodiversity closed to 300,000. Here the diversity of components is briefly reviewed with mention to specific references. Structural characteristic are discussed with examples taken from published work. The principal mechanisms of action of the three different types of peptides are also reviewed. Na+-channel specific venom components usually are modifier of the open and closing kinetic mechanisms of the ion-channels, whereas peptides affecting K+-channels are normally pore blocking agents. The Ryanodine Ca++-channel specific peptides are known for causing sub-conducting stages of the channels conductance and some were shown to be able to internalize penetrating inside the muscle cells. PMID:23891887

  19. Chronic Ifosfamide toxicity: kidney pathology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Akilesh, Shreeram; Juaire, Noemie; Duffield, Jeremy S; Smith, Kelly D

    2014-05-01

    Ifosfamide is a nitrogen mustard alkylating agent used as both a first-line and a salvage chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of testicular germ cell tumors, various sarcomas, carcinomas, and some lymphomas. A well-known complication of ifosfamide therapy is transient acute kidney injury. However, in a minority of patients, the reduction in kidney function is progressive and permanent, sometimes occurring long after exposure to ifosfamide. Scattered reports have described the pathologic findings in kidneys permanently affected by ifosfamide toxicity. We present the findings of an illustrative case and review the pathology and molecular mechanisms of long-term ifosfamide toxicity with implications for personalized medicine.

  20. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  1. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  2. Kidney function and the use of nitrofurantoin to treat urinary tract infections in older women

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Namisha; Gandhi, Sonja; McArthur, Eric; Moist, Louise; Jain, Arsh K.; Liu, Aiden R.; Sood, Manish M.; Garg, Amit X.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The antibiotic nitrofurantoin is commonly used to treat uncomplicated urinary tract infections. However, when this drug is used by patients with reduced kidney function, its urine concentration may be subtherapeutic. Methods: We conducted a population-based study of older women (mean age 79 years) in Ontario, Canada, whose estimated glomerular filtration rate was relatively low (median 38 mL/min per 1.73 m2) and for whom 1 of 4 antibiotics had been prescribed for urinary tract infection: nitrofurantoin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin or trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole. We assessed 2 measures of treatment failure in the subsequent 14 days: receipt of a second antibiotic indicated for urinary tract infection and hospital encounter (emergency department visit or hospital admission) with a urinary tract infection. We repeated the analysis for older women with relatively high estimated glomerular filtration rate (median 69 mL/min per 1.73 m2). Results: The baseline characteristics of the 4 antibiotic groups were similar. Relative to nitrofurantoin, the other antibiotics (including ciprofloxacin) were associated with a lower rate of treatment failure among women with relatively low estimated glomerular filtration rate (for ciprofloxacin v. nitrofurantoin: second antibiotic prescription, 130/1989 [6.5%] v. 516/3739 [13.8%], odds ratio [OR] 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36–0.53; hospital encounter, 21/1989 [1.1%] v. 95/3739 [2.5%], OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.25–0.66). However, a similar risk of treatment failure with nitrofurantoin was also observed among women with relatively high estimated glomerular filtration rate. The results were consistent in multiple additional analyses. Interpretation: In this study, the presence of mild or moderate reductions in estimated glomerular filtration rate did not justify avoidance of nitrofurantoin. PMID:25918178

  3. Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study: Baseline Characteristics and Associations with Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Go, Alan S.; Appel, Lawrence J.; He, Jiang; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Townsend, Raymond R.; Xie, Dawei; Cifelli, Denise; Cohan, Janet; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Fischer, Michael J.; Gadegbeku, Crystal; Hamm, L. Lee; Kusek, John W.; Landis, J. Richard; Narva, Andrew; Robinson, Nancy; Teal, Valerie; Feldman, Harold I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study was established to examine risk factors for the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with CKD. We examined baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Seven clinical centers recruited adults who were aged 21 to 74 yr and had CKD using age-based estimated GFR (eGFR) inclusion criteria. At baseline, blood and urine specimens were collected and information regarding health behaviors, diet, quality of life, and functional status was obtained. GFR was measured using radiolabeled iothalamate in one third of participants. Results: A total of 3612 participants were enrolled with mean age ± SD of 58.2 ± 11.0 yr; 46% were women, and 47% had diabetes. Overall, 45% were non-Hispanic white, 46% were non-Hispanic black, and 5% were Hispanic. Eighty-six percent reported hypertension, 22% coronary disease, and 10% heart failure. Mean body mass index was 32.1 ± 7.9 kg/m2, and 47% had a BP >130/80 mmHg. Mean eGFR was 43.4 ± 13.5 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and median (interquartile range) protein excretion was 0.17 g/24 h (0.07 to 0.81 g/24 h). Lower eGFR was associated with older age, lower socioeconomic and educational level, cigarette smoking, self-reported CVD, peripheral arterial disease, and elevated BP. Conclusions: Lower level of eGFR was associated with a greater burden of CVD as well as lower socioeconomic and educational status. Long-term follow-up of participants will provide critical insights into the epidemiology of CKD and its relationship to adverse outcomes. PMID:19541818

  4. Outcomes of renal function in elderly patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinglin; Zhao, Meng; Du, Jing; Wang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the prognostic impact of clinical factors on the short-term outcomes of renal function (RF) in very elderly patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). Patients and methods We carried out a retrospective cohort study of only very elderly patients who developed AKI at the geriatric department of a tertiary medical center during the period 2007–2015. All patients with AKI were followed up for 90 days after AKI diagnosis or until death. Survivors were divided into recovery and nonrecovery groups according to their RF 90 days post-AKI. RF recovery was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results In total, 668 patients (39.0%) developed AKI, and 652 patients were included in the final analysis. The median age of this population was 87 years, with 95.6% being male. The 90-day mortality rate was 33.6%. Of the 433 survivors, 316 (73.0%) recovered to their baseline eGFR. Body mass index (BMI), baseline eGFR, low mean aortic pressure (MAP), low prealbumin level, hypoalbuminemia, oliguria, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level, and more severe AKI stage were independent risk factors associated with nonrenal recovery or death. AKI etiology, evaluated by peak serum creatinine (SCr) level and the requirement for dialysis, was not associated with nonrenal recovery. Conclusion Risk factors for the poor outcomes of RF in very elderly patients with AKI were BMI, baseline eGFR, low MAP, low prealbumin level, hypoalbuminemia, oliguria, BUN level, and more severe AKI stage. Identifying risk factors may help to improve patient outcomes. PMID:28176909

  5. Morphological and functional characteristics of the kidney of cartilaginous fishes: with special reference to urea reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, Susumu; Kakumura, Keigo; Takagi, Wataru; Hasegawa, Kumi; Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2014-12-15

    For adaptation to high-salinity marine environments, cartilaginous fishes (sharks, skates, rays, and chimaeras) adopt a unique urea-based osmoregulation strategy. Their kidneys reabsorb nearly all filtered urea from the primary urine, and this is an essential component of urea retention in their body fluid. Anatomical investigations have revealed the extraordinarily elaborate nephron system in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes, e.g., the four-loop configuration of each nephron, the occurrence of distinct sinus and bundle zones, and the sac-like peritubular sheath in the bundle zone, in which the nephron segments are arranged in a countercurrent fashion. These anatomical and morphological characteristics have been considered to be important for urea reabsorption; however, a mechanism for urea reabsorption is still largely unknown. This review focuses on recent progress in the identification and mapping of various pumps, channels, and transporters on the nephron segments in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes. The molecules include urea transporters, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporters, and aquaporins, which most probably all contribute to the urea reabsorption process. Although research is still in progress, a possible model for urea reabsorption in the kidney of cartilaginous fishes is discussed based on the anatomical features of nephron segments and vascular systems and on the results of molecular mapping. The molecular anatomical approach thus provides a powerful tool for understanding the physiological processes that take place in the highly elaborate kidney of cartilaginous fishes.

  6. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  7. Estimating Negative Effect of Abdominal Obesity on Mildly Decreased Kidney Function Using a Novel Index of Body-Fat Distribution

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Conventional obesity-related indicators, included body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and conicity index (C-index), have some limitations. We examined the usefulness of trunk/body fat mass ratio (T/Br) to predict negative effect of abnormal fat distribution on excretory kidney function. We analyzed anthropometric, biochemical and densitometric data from a nation-wide, population-based, case-control study (the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey [KNHANES] IV and V). A total of 11,319 participants were divided into 2 groups according to estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL·min-1·1.73 m-2) as follows: Group I (n = 7,980), eGFR ≥ 90 and ≤ 120; and group II (n = 3,339), eGFR ≥ 60 and < 90. Linear regression analysis revealed that T/Br was closely related to eGFR (β = −0.3173, P < 0.001), and the correlation remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, BMI, WC, C-index, systolic blood pressure (BP), hemoglobin, and smoking amount (β = −0.0987, P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis showed that T/Br (odds ratio [OR] = 1.046; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.039–1.054) was significantly associated with early decline of kidney function, and adjustment for age, gender, BMI, C-index, systolic BP, hemoglobin, serum glucose level, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, and smoking amount did not reduce the association (OR = 1.020; 95% CI = 1.007–1.033). T/Br is useful in estimating the negative impact of abdominal obesity on the kidney function. PMID:28244287

  8. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  9. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  10. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, P.; Blackburne, H.; Dixon, L.; Dobbs, B.; Eglinton, T.; Ing, A.; Mulder, R.; Porter, R.J.; Wakeman, C.; Frizelle, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and

  11. Calcium citrate without aluminum antacids does not cause aluminum retention in patients with functioning kidneys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakhaee, K.; Wabner, C. L.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Copley, J. B.; Pak, L.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that calcium citrate might enhance aluminum absorption from food, posing a threat of aluminum toxicity even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore measured serum and urinary aluminum before and following calcium citrate therapy in patients with moderate renal failure and in normal subjects maintained on constant metabolic diets with known aluminum content (967-1034 mumol/day, or 26.1-27.9 mg/day, in patients and either 834 or 1579 mumol/day, or 22.5 and 42.6 mg/day, in normal subjects). Seven patients with moderate renal failure (endogenous creatinine clearance of 43 ml/min) took 50 mmol (2 g) calcium/day as effervescent calcium citrate with meals for 17 days. Eight normal women received 25 mmol (1 g) calcium/day as tricalcium dicitrate tablets with meals for 7 days. In patients with moderate renal failure, serum and urinary aluminum were normal before treatment at 489 +/- 293 SD nmol/l (13.2 +/- 7.9 micrograms/l) and 767 +/- 497 nmol/day (20.7 +/- 13.4 micrograms/day), respectively. They remained within normal limits and did not change significantly during calcium citrate treatment (400 +/- 148 nmol/l and 600 +/- 441 nmol/day, respectively). Similarly, no significant change in serum and urinary aluminum was detected in normal women during calcium citrate administration (271 +/- 59 vs 293 +/- 85 nmol/l and 515 +/- 138 vs 615 +/- 170 nmol/day, respectively). In addition, skeletal bone aluminum content did not change significantly in 14 osteoporotic patients (endogenous creatinine clearance of 68.5 ml/min) treated for 24 months with calcium citrate, 10 mmol calcium twice/day separately from meals (29.3 +/- 13.9 ng/mg ash bone to 27.9 +/0- 10.4, P = 0.727). In them, histomorphometric examination did not show any evidence of mineralization defect. Thus, calcium citrate given alone without aluminum-containing drugs does not pose a risk of aluminum toxicity in subjects with normal or functioning kidneys, when it is administered on an

  12. Kidney Stone Volume Estimation from Computerized Tomography Images Using a Model Based Method of Correcting for the Point Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xinhui; Wang, Jia; Qu, Mingliang; Leng, Shuai; Liu, Yu; Krambeck, Amy; McCollough, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We propose a method to improve the accuracy of volume estimation of kidney stones from computerized tomography images. Materials and Methods The proposed method consisted of 2 steps. A threshold equal to the average of the computerized tomography number of the object and the background was first applied to determine full width at half maximum volume. Correction factors were then applied, which were precalculated based on a model of a sphere and a 3-dimensional Gaussian point spread function. The point spread function was measured in a computerized tomography scanner to represent the response of the scanner to a point-like object. Method accuracy was validated using 6 small cylindrical phantoms with 2 volumes of 21.87 and 99.9 mm3, and 3 attenuations, respectively, and 76 kidney stones with a volume range of 6.3 to 317.4 mm3. Volumes estimated by the proposed method were compared with full width at half maximum volumes. Results The proposed method was significantly more accurate than full width at half maximum volume (p <0.0001). The magnitude of improvement depended on stone volume with smaller stones benefiting more from the method. For kidney stones 10 to 20 mm3 in volume the average improvement in accuracy was the greatest at 19.6%. Conclusions The proposed method achieved significantly improved accuracy compared with threshold methods. This may lead to more accurate stone management. PMID:22819107

  13. Effects of tenofovir and amphotericin B deoxycholate co-administration on kidney function in patients treated for cryptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kiggundu, Reuben; Morawski, Bozena M; Bahr, Nathan C; Rhein, Joshua; Musubire, Abdu K; Williams, Darlisha A; Abassi, Mahsa; Nabeta, Henry W; Hullsiek, Kathy Huppler; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-01-01

    The effect of tenofovir and amphotericin co-administration on kidney function is poorly characterized. We measured creatinine during induction therapy and at 4-weeks post-diagnosis in Ugandans undergoing cryptococcal meningitis therapy, and classified as not receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), receiving non-tenofovir ART, or receiving tenofovir-based ART. Longitudinal creatinine changes and Grade 2-4 creatinine adverse events were evaluated across groups. Creatinine concentrations were similar across ART groups. At 4 weeks post-diagnosis, creatinine was 0.25mg/dL higher than at diagnosis, but similar across groups. Adverse event incidence was also similar across ART groups. Tenofovir and amphotericin co-administration did not increase the risk of kidney dysfunction. PMID:26334743

  14. Functional characterisation of human SGLT-5 as a novel kidney-specific sodium-dependent sugar transporter.

    PubMed

    Grempler, Rolf; Augustin, Robert; Froehner, Stefanie; Hildebrandt, Tobias; Simon, Eric; Mark, Michael; Eickelmann, Peter

    2012-02-03

    Sodium glucose cotransporters (SGLT) actively catalyse carbohydrate transport across cellular membranes. Six of the 12 known SGLT family members have the capacity to bind and/or transport monosaccharides (SGLT-1 to 6); of these, all but SGLT-5 have been characterised. Here we demonstrate that human SGLT-5 is exclusively expressed in the kidney. Four splice variants were detected and the most abundant SGLT-5-mRNA was functionally characterised. SGLT-5 mediates sodium-dependent [(14)C]-α-methyl-D-glucose (AMG) transport that can be inhibited by mannose, fructose, glucose, and galactose. Uptake studies using demonstrated high capacity transport for mannose and fructose and, to a lesser extent, glucose, AMG, and galactose. SGLT-5 mediated mannose, fructose and AMG transport was weakly (μM potency) inhibited by SGLT-2 inhibitors. In summary, we have characterised SGLT-5 as a kidney mannose transporter. Further studies are warranted to explore the physiological role of SGLT-5.

  15. Preserved Renal Function in Kidney Transplantation over a Thrombosed Aortobifemoral Bypass Graft: The Role of Retrograde Flow and Early Thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Alvaro, Sara; Fernández-Rodríguez, Ana; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Sánchez, Juan; Chinchilla, Antonio; Marcén, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Aortobifemoral bypass (ABFB) thrombosis is not uncommon, and when the artery of a renal graft is implanted on a bypass the risk of graft loss is high. We report the case of a 48-year-old woman with a previous history of ABFB under antiplatelet therapy and a kidney allograft implanted on the vascular prosthesis, who presented with acute limb ischemia and severe renal impairment. Imaging techniques revealed a complete thrombosis of the proximal left arm of the ABFB. However, a faint retrograde flow over the graft was observed thanks to the recanalization of distal left bypass by collateral native arteries. This unusual situation not previously reported in a kidney transplant setting, together with an early diagnosis, allowed graft survival until an early local thrombolysis resolved the problem. Two years later, renal function remains normal. PMID:27579209

  16. In chronic kidney disease staging the use of the chronicity criterion affects prognosis and the rate of progression.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, B O; Ingebretsen, O C

    2007-11-01

    The Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative definition and staging of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been adopted by most nephrologists but include a criterion of chronicity that has not been investigated. This criterion specifies that renal structural damage and/or reduction in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) should be present for periods lasting longer than 3 months. We examined the effects of changing this criterion to 6, 9, or 12 months on the prognosis and the rate of progression in population-based cohorts with CKD stages 3 and 4. A 12-month chronicity criterion significantly reduced the number of CKD patients relative to the 3-month criterion for both stages 3 and 4. For both stages, there were statistically significant differences in 5-year mortality between the 6- and 9-month cohorts. For stage 4, the 5-year cumulative incidence of renal failure significantly increased from 6 to 9 months, and the rate of change in GFR significantly decreased between the same two cohorts. The 5-year cumulative incidence of improvement in GFR lasting 1 year or more was significantly higher for the 3-month cohort than for the 12-month cohort in the stage 3 group. Hence, we suggest that the chronicity criterion is an important determinant of the characteristics of the population of patients with CKD stages 3 and 4. This may have practical consequences in both research and clinical work.

  17. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  18. Antidiuretic action of angiotensin II in the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis: evidence for endocrine control of kidney function in cyclostomes.

    PubMed

    Cobb, C S; Brown, J A; Rankin, J C

    2010-10-01

    Intravenous infusion of angiotensin II ([Asn¹ Val⁵]-Ang II) at 10⁻⁹ mol min⁻¹ kg⁻¹ body mass produced a significant antidiuresis in river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis, captured during upstream migration and maintained in fresh water. Although the renin-angiotensin hormonal system (RAS) is now recognized in jawless fishes, until this study, the role of homologous Ang II in L. fluviatilis kidney function had not been examined. This study provides the first evidence for an antidiuretic action of Ang II in cyclostomes and, in evolutionary terms, suggests a renal function for the RAS in early vertebrates.

  19. Echocardiography and right ventricular function in NKF stage III cronic kidney disease: Ultrasound nephrologists' role☆

    PubMed Central

    Floccari, F.; Granata, A.; Rivera, R.; Marrocco, F.; Santoboni, A.; Malaguti, M.; Andrulli, S.; Di Lullo, L.

    2012-01-01

    TAPSE measurement during echocardiography is a well known measure of right heart systo-diastolic function. Low TAPSE means reduced cranio-caudal excursion of tricuspidal annulus, sign of both reduced ejection fraction and reduced distensibility of right ventricle. It is a good prognostic index for cardiac mortality risk in CHF patients, adding significant prognostic information to NYHA stadiation. Nephrologists do not always fully aware of right ventricular function in their patients affected by chronic renal failure (CRF), even if this datum is probably crucial in vascular access policy. Our study was designed to study right ventricle function and TAPSE on 202 patients affected by moderate chronic renal failure, free from overt pulmonary hypertension. TAPSE, PAPs, right chambers diameters, classical Framingham factors, estimated glomerular filtration rate were recorded. TAPSE was reduced (<23 mm) in 43% of patients enrolled, while dilated right chambers were present in 24%. PAPs exceeded 30 mmHg in 29% of patients. Echocardiographic signs of left ventricular hypertrophy were found in 36% of patients. The ejection fraction was normal in all patients. Statistical analysis showed a significant indirect correlation between TAPSE and PAPs and between TAPSE and tele-diastolic diameters and volumes of the right ventricle, while a direct correlation was observed between TAPSE and Framingham score. TAPSE showed a bimodal distribution, with a subpopulation “low TAPSE – high PAPs”, next to a population characterized by normal values ??for both parameters. A reduction in compliance and systolic function of the right heart chambers is quite early and frequent in course of CKD, a fact that the nephrologist should take in due consideration, managing blood volume or planning vascular access for hemodialysis. PMID:23730390

  20. Echocardiography and right ventricular function in NKF stage III cronic kidney disease: Ultrasound nephrologists' role.

    PubMed

    Floccari, F; Granata, A; Rivera, R; Marrocco, F; Santoboni, A; Malaguti, M; Andrulli, S; Di Lullo, L

    2012-12-01

    TAPSE measurement during echocardiography is a well known measure of right heart systo-diastolic function. Low TAPSE means reduced cranio-caudal excursion of tricuspidal annulus, sign of both reduced ejection fraction and reduced distensibility of right ventricle. It is a good prognostic index for cardiac mortality risk in CHF patients, adding significant prognostic information to NYHA stadiation. Nephrologists do not always fully aware of right ventricular function in their patients affected by chronic renal failure (CRF), even if this datum is probably crucial in vascular access policy. Our study was designed to study right ventricle function and TAPSE on 202 patients affected by moderate chronic renal failure, free from overt pulmonary hypertension. TAPSE, PAPs, right chambers diameters, classical Framingham factors, estimated glomerular filtration rate were recorded. TAPSE was reduced (<23 mm) in 43% of patients enrolled, while dilated right chambers were present in 24%. PAPs exceeded 30 mmHg in 29% of patients. Echocardiographic signs of left ventricular hypertrophy were found in 36% of patients. The ejection fraction was normal in all patients. Statistical analysis showed a significant indirect correlation between TAPSE and PAPs and between TAPSE and tele-diastolic diameters and volumes of the right ventricle, while a direct correlation was observed between TAPSE and Framingham score. TAPSE showed a bimodal distribution, with a subpopulation "low TAPSE - high PAPs", next to a population characterized by normal values ??for both parameters. A reduction in compliance and systolic function of the right heart chambers is quite early and frequent in course of CKD, a fact that the nephrologist should take in due consideration, managing blood volume or planning vascular access for hemodialysis.

  1. Aging changes in the kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004010.htm Aging changes in the kidneys and bladder To use ... in the reproductive system can affect bladder control. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE KIDNEYS AND ...

  2. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    PubMed

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  3. Maternal metabolic stress may affect oviduct gatekeeper function.

    PubMed

    Jordaens, Lies; Van Hoeck, Veerle; Maillo, Veronica; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Marei, Waleed Fawzy A; Vlaeminck, Bruno; Thys, Sofie; Sturmey, Roger G S; Bols, Peter; Leroy, Jo

    2017-03-03

    We hypothesized that elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) modify in vitro bovine oviduct epithelial cell (BOEC) metabolism and barrier function. Hereto, BOECs were studied in a polarized system with 24h-treatments at day 9: 1) CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0%EtOH), 2) SOLVENT CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH), 3) BASAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the basal compartment), 4) APICAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the apical compartment). FITC-albumin was used for monolayer permeability assessment, and related to Transepithelial Electric Resistance (TER). Fatty acid (FA), glucose, lactate and pyruvate concentrations were measured in spent medium. Intracellular lipid droplets (LD) and FA-uptake were studied using Bodipy 493/503 and immunolabelling of FA-transporters (FAT/CD36, FABP3 and caveolin1). BOEC-mRNA was retrieved for qRT-PCR. Results revealed that APICAL NEFA reduced relative TER-increase (46.85%) during treatment, and increased FITC-albumin flux (27.59%) compared to other treatments. In BASAL NEFA, FAs were transferred to the apical compartment as free FAs: mostly palmitic and oleic acid increased, respectively 56.0 % and 33.5% of initial FA-concentrations. APICAL NEFA allowed no FA-transfer, but induced LD-accumulation and upregulated FA-transporter expression (↑CD36, ↑FABP3, ↑CAV1-protein-expression). Gene expression in APICAL NEFA indicated increased anti-apoptotic (↑BCL2) and anti-oxidative (↑SOD1) capacity, upregulated lipid metabolism (↑CPT1, ↑ACSL1 and ↓ACACA), and FA-uptake (↑CAV1). All treatments had similar carbohydrate metabolism and oviduct function specific gene expression (=OVGP1, ESR1, FOXJ1). Overall, elevated NEFAs affected BOEC-metabolism and barrier function differently depending on NEFA-exposure side. Data substantiate the concept of the oviduct as a gatekeeper that may actively alter early embryonic developmental conditions.

  4. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    phase of the ID-IF. The combined use of FBP and OS-EM resulted in reduced bias and noise. After performing all the necessary corrections, the areas under the curves (AUCs) of the AD-IF were close to that of the AD-IF (average AUC ratio =1 ± 0.08) during the early phase. When applied in a two-tissue-compartmental kinetic model, the average difference between the estimated model parameters from ID-IF and AD-IF was 10% which was within the error of the estimation method. Conclusions: The bias of radioligand concentration in the aorta from the OS-EM image reconstruction is significantly affected by radioligand uptake in the adjacent kidney and cannot be neglected for quantitative evaluation. With careful calibrations and corrections, the ID-IF derived from quantitative dynamic PET images can be used as the input function of the compartmental model to quantify the renal kinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 in experimental animals and the authors intend to evaluate this method in future human studies.

  5. Dietary supplementation of yucca (Yucca schidigera) affects ovine ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Vlčková, Radoslava; Sopková, Drahomíra; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Valocký, Igor; Kádasi, Attila; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Petrilla, Vladimír; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-01-15

    Yucca (Yucca schidigera) is a popular medicinal plant due to its many positive effects on animal and human physiology, including their reproductive systems. To examine the effect of supplemental yucca feeding on sheep reproduction, including ovarian functions and their hormonal regulators, ewes were fed (or not fed, control) yucca powder (1.5 g/head/day, 30 days). Macromorphometric indexes of the oviduct, ovary, and ovarian folliculogenesis were measured. Reproductive hormone levels in the blood were measured using a radioimmunoassay. Granulosa cells were aspirated from the ovary, and their proliferation and apoptosis were detected using immunocytochemistry. To assess secretory activity and its response to gonadotropin, ovarian fragments of treated and control ewes were cultured with and without follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH; 0, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 IU/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones into the culture medium was evaluated. Finally, to examine the direct action of yucca on the ovary, ovarian fragments from control ewes were cultured with and without yucca extract (1, 10, or 100 μg/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones was measured. Yucca supplementation significantly decreased the size of small antral follicles (2 to <5 mm in diameter), increased accumulation of the apoptosis marker bax, and decreased serum progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) levels. It inhibited the release of P4 (but not other hormones), to prevent the stimulatory action of FSH on P4 output and promoted insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) release by fragments cultured with FSH. However, yucca supplementation did not affect the size of larger follicles and number of follicles, volume and weight of ovaries, length and weight of oviducts, caspase 3 accumulation, cell proliferation, testosterone (T) or IGF-I serum levels, or T or E2 release by cultured ovarian fragments and their response to FSH. Yucca addition to culture medium inhibited P4 and IGF-I, but not T or E2

  6. Kidney flow and function in hypertension: protective effects of pycnogenol in hypertensive participants--a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Belcaro, Gianni; Stuard, Stefano; Schönlau, Frank; Di Renzo, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Dugall, Mark; Cornelli, Umberto; Cacchio, Marisa; Gizzi, Giuseppe; Pellegrini, Luciano

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Pycnogenol as an adjunct to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor ramipril treatment of hypertensive patients presenting with early signs of renal function problems. One group of 26 patients was medicated with 10 mg ramipril per day only; a second group of 29 patients took Pycnogenol in addition to the ACE inhibitor over a period of 6 months. At trial end, a lowered systolic and diastolic blood pressure was found in both groups, with a significant further reduction of diastolic pressure in the group given Pycnogenol in addition to ramipril. The major aim of this study was the investigation of kidney-protective effects of Pycnogenol. Urinary albumin decreased from 87 +/- 23 to 64 +/- 16 mg/d with ramipril only. Additional Pycnogenol lowered albumin significantly better from 91 +/- 25 to 39 +/- 13 mg/day (P < .05). In both groups, serum creatinine was lowered; however, only in the combination treatment group did the effect reached statistical significance. In both groups, CRP levels decreased from 2.1 to 1.8 with ramipril and from 2.2 to 1.1 with the ramipril-Pycnogenol combination; the latter reached statistical significance. Kidney cortical flow velocity was investigated by Doppler color duplex ultrasonography. Both systolic and diastolic flow velocities increased significantly after 6 months medication with ramipril. The addition of Pycnogenol to the regimen statistically significantly further enhanced kidney cortical flow velocities, by 8% for diastolic flow and 12% for systolic flow, relative to values found for the group taking ramipril only. The protective effects of Pycnogenol for initial kidney damage found in this study warrant further research with a larger number of patients and over a longer period of time.

  7. Functional life-long maintenance of engineered liver tissue in mice following transplantation under the kidney capsule.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuo; Koyama, Fumikazu; Tatsumi, Kohei; Shima, Midori; Park, Frank; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Okano, Teruo

    2010-02-01

    The ability to engineer biologically active cells and tissue matrices with long-term functional maintenance has been a principal focus for investigators in the field of hepatocyte transplantation and liver tissue engineering. The present study was designed to determine the efficacy and temporal persistence of functional engineered liver tissue following transplantation under the kidney capsule of a normal mouse. Hepatocytes were isolated from human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hA1AT) transgenic mouse livers. Hepatocytes were subsequently transplanted under the kidney capsule space in combination with extracellular matrix components (Matrigel) for engineering liver tissues. The primary outcome of interest was to assess the level of engineering liver tissue function over the experimental period, which was 450 days. Long-term survival by the engineered liver tissue was confirmed by measuring the serum level of hA1AT in the recipient mice throughout the experimental period. In addition, administration of chemical compounds at day 450 resulted in the ability of the engineered liver tissue to metabolize exogenously circulating compounds and induce drug-metabolizing enzyme production. Moreover, we were able to document that the engineered tissues could retain their native regenerative potential similar to that of naïve livers. Overall, these results demonstrated that liver tissues could be engineered at a heterologous site while stably maintaining its functionality for nearly the life span of a normal mouse.

  8. Renal function, calcium regulation, and time to hospitalization of patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease is associated with disruption of the endocrine system that distorts the balance between calcitriol, calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone in the calcium regulation system. This can lead to calcification of the arterial tree and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. In this study we develop a health metric, based on biomarkers involved in the calcium regulation system, for use in identifying patients at high risk for future high-cost complications. Methods This study is a retrospective observational study involving a secondary analysis of data from the kidney disease registry of a regional managed care organization. Chronic kidney disease patients in the registry from November 2007 through November 2011 with a complete set of observations of estimated glomerular filtration rate, calcitriol, albumin, free calcium, phosphate, and parathyroid hormone were included in the study (n = 284). Weibull regression model was used to identify the most significant lab tests in predicting “waiting time to hospitalization”. A multivariate linear path model was then constructed to investigate direct and indirect effects of the biomarkers on this outcome. Results The results showed negative significant direct effects of phosphate and parathyroid hormone on “waiting time to hospitalization”. Base on this result, the risk of hospitalization increases 16.8% for each 0.55 mg/dl increase in phosphate level and 13.5% for each 0.467 increase in the natural logarithm of parathyroid hormone. Positive indirect effects of calcitriol surrogate (calcidiol), free calcium, albumin and estimated glomerular filtration rate were observed but were relatively small in magnitude. Conclusion Variables involved in the calcium regulation system should be included in future efforts to develop a quality of care index for Chronic Kidney disease patients. PMID:23865435

  9. Do Kidney Stone Formers Have A Kidney Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Anna L.; Evan, Andrew P.; Coe, Fredric L.; Worcester, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent disorder affecting approximately one in eleven people and is associated with multiple complications including hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease. Significant epidemiologic associations with chronic kidney disease and ESRD have been noted and are reviewed herein, but debate persists in the literature as to whether kidney stone formation is a pathogenic process contributing to kidney disease. Corroborating evidence supporting the presence of kidney disease in stone formers includes the variability of renal function by stone type, the positive association of stone size with renal dysfunction, the presence of markers of renal injury in the urine of even asymptomatic stone formers, and direct evidence of renal tissue injury on histopathology. Proposed pathogenic mechanisms include recurrent obstruction and comorbid conditions such as recurrent urinary tract infections and structural abnormalities. Recent work evaluating the renal histopathology of different groups of stone formers adds further granularity, suggesting variability in mechanisms of renal injury by stone type and confirming the pathogenic effects of crystal formation. Genetic abnormalities leading to stone formation including cystinuria and primary hyperoxaluria, among others, contribute to the burden of disease in the stone-forming population. PMID:26376133

  10. Copy number variation analysis identifies novel CAKUT candidate genes in children with a solitary functioning kidney

    PubMed Central

    Westland, Rik; Verbitsky, Miguel; Vukojevic, Katarina; Perry, Brittany J.; Fasel, David A.; Zwijnenburg, Petra J.G.; Bökenkamp, Arend; Gille, Johan J.P.; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; D’Agati, Vivette D.; Schreuder, Michiel F.; Gharavi, Ali G.; van Wijk, Joanna A.E.; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations associate with different developmental phenotypes and represent a major cause of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT). Because rare pathogenic copy number variations are often large and contain multiple genes, identification of the underlying genetic drivers has proven to be difficult. Here we studied the role of rare copy number variations in 80 patients from the KIMONO-study cohort for which pathogenic mutations in three genes commonly implicated in CAKUT were excluded. In total, 13 known or novel genomic imbalances in 11 of 80 patients were absent or extremely rare in 23,362 population controls. To identify the most likely genetic drivers for the CAKUT phenotype underlying these rare copy number variations, we used a systematic in silico approach based on frequency in a large dataset of controls, annotation with publicly available databases for developmental diseases, tolerance and haploinsufficiency scores, and gene expression profile in the developing kidney and urinary tract. Five novel candidate genes for CAKUT were identified that showed specific expression in the human and mouse developing urinary tract. Among these genes, DLG1 and KIF12 are likely novel susceptibility genes for CAKUT in humans. Thus, there is a significant role of genomic imbalance in the determination of kidney developmental phenotypes. Additionally, we defined a systematic strategy to identify genetic drivers underlying rare copy number variations. PMID:26352300

  11. Cognitive function in Stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis: no adverse effects of lanthanum carbonate compared with standard phosphate-binder therapy.

    PubMed

    Altmann, P; Barnett, M E; Finn, W F

    2007-02-01

    Patients with Stage 5 chronic kidney disease who have hyperphosphatemia require treatment with phosphate binders to lower serum phosphorus levels. Existing binders are effective but may be associated with important safety disadvantages. Lanthanum carbonate is a phosphate binder with demonstrated efficacy, safety, and tolerability in clinical trials. Changes in cognitive function were evaluated over time using the Cognitive Drug Research computerized cognitive assessment system (Simple Reaction Time, Digit Vigilance Task, Choice Reaction Time, Numeric Working Memory, and Delayed Picture Recognition) in 360 hemodialysis patients who were enrolled in a 2-year, multicenter, comparative study of lanthanum carbonate versus standard therapy. A decline in cognitive function from baseline was observed in both groups. The deterioration in cognitive function was similar in both the lanthanum carbonate and standard therapy groups. One parameter - Numeric Working Memory - showed a statistically significant between-group difference in favor of lanthanum carbonate (P=0.02). Given the magnitude of the changes, however, and the differences that were observed at baseline between treatment groups, the clinical significance of this difference is doubtful. This study demonstrates that cognitive function deteriorates in hemodialysis patients over a 2-year time period. Use of lanthanum carbonate as a phosphate binder does not adversely affect cognitive function compared with standard therapy.

  12. Biochemical studies on the effect of different water resources in Hail region on liver and kidney functions of rats.

    PubMed

    Talkhan, Ola F A; Abd Elwahab, Safaa A E; Shalapy, Ebtessam M

    2016-08-01

    Low concentration of a heavy metal is toxic and can be classified as one of the pollution sources. Industrial and human waste can pollute water with heavy metals and soils breaking down under the effect of acidic rain, which release heavy metals into river, streams, lakes, and ground water. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals in vital organs of the human body damages these organs, including the liver and kidney, which are the main organs for metabolism, detoxification, and excretion. The present study aims to investigate into concentrations of such heavy metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb) in both ground and tap water samples collected from different areas in Hail region, KSA. Then, this study moves forward to examine the effects of such concentrations on the biochemistry of serum in rats. In this regard, the results demonstrate the presence of significant differences (p < 0.05) in the liver function parameters, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total proteins, albumin, and globulin between all the studied groups that were exposed to heavy-metals-polluted water, when compared with the control group. In addition, there were significant differences (p < 0.05) in the kidney function parameters, uric acid, urea, and creatinine, when compared with the control group. Thence, and as this study indicates, heavy-metals-polluted water can cause disturbance in the liver and kidney function parameters, which highlights health risks of the water polluted with heavy metals. In this sense, the concerned authorities should regularly carry out survey and should monitor underground water, and people have to be aware of such risks.

  13. Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Böger, Carsten A.; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Coassin, Stefan; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Köttgen, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10−9) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10−4–2.2 × 10−7. Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general. PMID:22962313

  14. Functional neuroimaging of human vocalizations and affective speech.

    PubMed

    Frühholz, Sascha; Sander, David; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have verified the important integrative role of the basal ganglia during affective vocalizations. They, however, also point to additional regions supporting vocal monitoring, auditory-motor feedback processing, and online adjustments of vocal motor responses. For the case of affective vocalizations, we suggest partly extending the model to fully consider the link between primate-general and human-specific neural components.

  15. Sympathoactivation and rho-kinase-dependent baroreflex function in experimental renovascular hypertension with reduced kidney mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system is frequent in subjects with cardiovascular disease. The contribution of different forms of renovascular hypertension and the mechanisms contributing to autonomic dysfunction in hypertension are incompletely understood. Here, murine models of renovascular hypertension with preserved (2-kidneys-1 clip, 2K1C) and reduced (1-kidney-1 clip, 1K1C) kidney mass were studied with regard to autonomic nervous system regulation (sympathetic tone: power-spectral analysis of systolic blood pressure; parasympathetic tone: power-spectral analysis of heart rate) and baroreflex sensitivity of heart rate by spontaneous, concomitant changes of systolic blood pressure and pulse interval. Involvement of the renin-angiotensin system and the rho-kinase pathway were determined by application of inhibitors. Results C57BL6N mice (6 to 11) with reduced kidney mass (1K1C) or with preserved kidney mass (2K1C) developed a similar degree of hypertension. In comparison to control mice, both models presented with a significantly increased sympathetic tone and lower baroreflex sensitivity of heart rate. However, only 2K1C animals had a lower parasympathetic tone, whereas urinary norepinephrine excretion was reduced in the 1K1C model. Rho kinase inhibition given to a subset of 1K1C and 2K1C animals improved baroreflex sensitivity of heart rate selectively in the 1K1C model. Rho kinase inhibition had no additional effects on autonomic nervous system in either model of renovascular hypertension and did not change the blood pressure. Blockade of AT1 receptors (in 2K1C animals) normalized the sympathetic tone, decreased resting heart rate, improved baroreflex sensitivity of heart rate and parasympathetic tone. Conclusions Regardless of residual renal mass, blood pressure and sympathetic tone are increased, whereas baroreflex sensitivity is depressed in murine models of renovascular hypertension. Reduced norepinephrine excretion and/or degradation

  16. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  17. Kidney Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cancers in the United States. Cancer Home Kidney Cancer Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... work with the chemical trichloroethylene. What Are the Kidneys? The body has two kidneys, one on each ...

  18. Kidney Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Kidney Problems Basic Facts & Information The kidneys are two ... the production of red blood cells. What are Kidney Diseases? For about one-third of older people, ...

  19. Kidney School

    MedlinePlus

    ... copies? Read our licensing agreement Living Successfully with Kidney Disease People with kidney disease can live long ... Listen Printing multiple copies? Read our licensing agreement Kidneys: How They Work, How They Fail, What You ...

  20. Kidney Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray called a voiding cystourethrogram. Antibiotics for kidney infections Antibiotics are the first line of treatment ... the infection is completely eliminated. Hospitalization for severe kidney infections For a severe kidney infection, your doctor ...

  1. Pre-transplant Evaluation of Donor Urinary Biomarkers can Predict Reduced Graft Function After Deceased Donor Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Lee, Yonggu; Ko, Kwang-Pil; Lee, Kyoung-Bun; Lee, Sik; Park, Suk Joo; Park, Jae Berm; Han, Miyeon; Lim, Hye Jin; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recipient biomarkers are reported to predict graft dysfunction, but these are not useful in decision making for the acceptance or allocation of deceased donor kidneys; thus, it is necessary to develop donor biomarkers predictive of graft dysfunction. To address this issue, we prospectively enrolled 94 deceased donors and their 109 recipients who underwent transplantation between 2010 and 2013 at 4 Korean transplantation centers. We investigated the predictive values of donor urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and L-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) for reduced graft function (RGF). We also developed a prediction model of RGF using these donor biomarkers. RGF was defined as delayed or slow graft function. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to generate a prediction model, which was internally validated using a bootstrapping method. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association of biomarkers with 1-year graft function. Notably, donor urinary NGAL levels were associated with donor AKI (P = 0.014), and donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP were predictive for RGF, with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC) of 0.758 and 0.704 for NGAL and L-FABP, respectively. The best-fit model including donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine conveyed a better predictive value for RGF than donor serum creatinine alone (P = 0.02). In addition, we generated a scoring method to predict RGF based on donor urinary NGAL, L-FABP, and serum creatinine levels. Diagnostic performance of the RGF prediction score (AUROC 0.808) was significantly better than that of the DGF calculator (AUROC 0.627) and the kidney donor profile index (AUROC 0.606). Donor urinary L-FABP levels were also predictive of 1-year graft function (P = 0.005). Collectively, these findings suggest donor urinary NGAL and L-FABP to be useful biomarkers for RGF, and support

  2. Cadmium affects the mitochondrial viability and the acid soluble thiols concentration in liver, kidney, heart and gills of Ancistrus brevifilis (Eigenmann, 1920)

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez-Vottelerd, P.; Anton, Y.; Salazar-Lugo, R.

    2015-01-01

    The freshwater fish Ancistrus brevifilis, which is found in Venezuelan rivers, is considered a potential sentinel fish in ecotoxicological studies. The cadmium (Cd) effect on the mitochondrial viability (MV) and acid soluble thiols levels (AST) in A. brevifilis tissues (liver, kidney, heart, and gill) was evaluated. Forty-two fish with similar sizes and weights were randomly selected, of which 7 fish (with their respective replicate) were exposed for 7 and 30 days to a Cd sublethal concentration (0.1 mg.l-1). We determined the MV through a Janus Green B colorimetric assay and we obtained the concentration of AST by Ellman’s method. Mitochondrial viability decreased in fish exposed to Cd for 30 days with the liver being the most affected tissue. We also detected a significant decrease in AST levels was in fishes exposed to Cd for 7 days in liver and kidney tissues; these results suggests that AST levels are elevated in some tissues may act as cytoprotective and adaptive alternative mechanism related to the ROS detoxification, maintenance redox status and mitochondrial viability. Organ-specifics variations were observed in both assays. We conclude that the Cd exposure effect on AST levels and MV, vary across fish tissues and is related to the exposure duration, the molecule dynamics in different tissues, the organism and environmental conditions. PMID:26623384

  3. Lymphocytes as an Indicator for Initial Kidney Function: A Single Center Analysis of Outcome after Alemtuzumab or Basiliximab Induction

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Hautz, Theresa; Kimelman, Michael; Oberhuber, Rupert; Ulmer, Hanno; Bösmüller, Claudia; Maglione, Manuel; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 T-cell and B-cell depleting monoclonal antibody, is established for induction therapy in renal transplantation (KTx). We herein provide a comparative analysis between alemtuzumab and basiliximab induction therapy and correlate lymphocyte depletion and recovery with the clinical course after KTx. This is a single center retrospective analysis of 225 patients/consecutive kidney transplantations treated with alemtuzumab for lymphocyte depletion and 205 recipients treated with basiliximab. Mean lymphocyte counts were 22.8 ± 9.41% before Tx and 2.61 ± 3.11% between week 1 and week 3 in the alemtuzumab group and 23.77 ± 10.42% before Tx and 13.92 ± 8.20% in the basiliximab group. Delayed graft function (DGF), cytomegalovirus (CMV) status, and recipient age showed a significant correlation with lymphocyte counts in the alemtuzumab group only. The outcome was read in reference to the velocity of lymphocyte recovery and in comparison to the control group. Lymphocyte counts early after transplantation, following alemtuzumab treatment, could be identified as a predictive factor for kidney function early after transplantation. A detailed analysis of phenotype and function of lymphocytes after alemtuzumab induction together with a correlation with the clinical course is warranted. PMID:26171403

  4. Lymphocytes as an Indicator for Initial Kidney Function: A Single Center Analysis of Outcome after Alemtuzumab or Basiliximab Induction.

    PubMed

    Weissenbacher, Annemarie; Hautz, Theresa; Kimelman, Michael; Oberhuber, Rupert; Ulmer, Hanno; Bösmüller, Claudia; Maglione, Manuel; Schneeberger, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab, an anti-CD52 T-cell and B-cell depleting monoclonal antibody, is established for induction therapy in renal transplantation (KTx). We herein provide a comparative analysis between alemtuzumab and basiliximab induction therapy and correlate lymphocyte depletion and recovery with the clinical course after KTx. This is a single center retrospective analysis of 225 patients/consecutive kidney transplantations treated with alemtuzumab for lymphocyte depletion and 205 recipients treated with basiliximab. Mean lymphocyte counts were 22.8 ± 9.41% before Tx and 2.61 ± 3.11% between week 1 and week 3 in the alemtuzumab group and 23.77 ± 10.42% before Tx and 13.92 ± 8.20% in the basiliximab group. Delayed graft function (DGF), cytomegalovirus (CMV) status, and recipient age showed a significant correlation with lymphocyte counts in the alemtuzumab group only. The outcome was read in reference to the velocity of lymphocyte recovery and in comparison to the control group. Lymphocyte counts early after transplantation, following alemtuzumab treatment, could be identified as a predictive factor for kidney function early after transplantation. A detailed analysis of phenotype and function of lymphocytes after alemtuzumab induction together with a correlation with the clinical course is warranted.

  5. Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 is epigenetically downregulated and functions as a tumor suppressor in kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazumori; Yamamura, Soichiro; Hirata, Hiroshi; Ueno, Koji; Saini, Sharanjot; Majid, Shahana; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Kawamoto, Ken; Enokida, Hideki; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2011-02-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein-5 (sFRP-5) has been identified as 1 of the secreted antagonists that bind Wnt protein. However, the functional significance of sFRP-5 in renal cell cancer (RCC) has not been reported. We hypothesized that sFRP-5 may be epigenetically downregulated through DNA methylation and histone modification and function as a tumor suppressor gene in RCC. Using tissue microarray and real-time RT-PCR, we found that sFRP-5 was significantly downregulated in kidney cancer tissues and cell lines, respectively. DNA bisulfite sequencing of the sFRP-5 promoter region in RCC cell lines showed it to be densely methylated, whereas there was few promoter methylation in normal kidney. The sFRP-5 expression was restored and the acetylation of H3 and H4 histones associated with the sFRP-5 promoter region were significantly increased after treatment with demethylation agent (5-Aza-dc) and histone deacetylase inhibitor (TSA). When RCC cells were transfected with the sFRP-5 gene, significant inhibition of anchorage independent colony formation and cell invasion were observed compared to controls. The sFRP-5 transfection also significantly induced apoptosis in RCC cells. In conclusion, this is the first report documenting that the sFRP-5 is downregulated by promoter methylation and histone acetylation and functions as a tumor suppressor gene by inducing apoptosis in RCC cells.

  6. Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease: a rare autoimmune disorder affecting the kidney and the lung.

    PubMed

    Lahmer, Tobias; Heemann, Uwe

    2012-12-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease is a rare, but well characterized cause of glomerulonephritis. By definition serum anti-GBM antibody and/or a linear binding of IgG detected by direct immunofluorescence (IF) in a histological specimen of the kidney or the lung have to be detected. These antibodies can lead to acute rapid progressive glomerulonephritis(RPGN) and/or pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) because of collagen similarities in the basement membrane. Principally anti-GBM antibody disease can be divided into two groups: anti-GBM antibody disease without PH was regarded as renal-limited anti-GBM antibody disease and that with PH was defined as Goodpasture's syndrome (GPS). The important determinant for the response of therapy and long term diagnosis on anti-GBM disease is early diagnosis to prevent endstage renal disease. Therefore, standard treatment is a combined therapy of plasmapherisis, prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. The aim of this review is an overview of the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of anti-GBM disease.

  7. Frozen Soil Characteristics That Affect Land Mine Functioning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    ii Introduction .............................................. 1 Backgroun ...Table 3 also presents the results of the mine functioning perform- ance . The M12 mine requires between 1739 and 3287 N to function, as indicated by the

  8. Assessment of Metabolomic and Proteomic Biomarkers in Detection and Prognosis of Progression of Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Duranton, Flore; Gayrard, Nathalie; Argilés, Àngel; Lundin, Ulrika; Weinberger, Klaus M.; Dakna, Mohammed; Delles, Christian; Mullen, William; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Koeck, Thomas; Zürbig, Petra; Mischak, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is part of a number of systemic and renal diseases and may reach epidemic proportions over the next decade. Efforts have been made to improve diagnosis and management of CKD. We hypothesised that combining metabolomic and proteomic approaches could generate a more systemic and complete view of the disease mechanisms. To test this approach, we examined samples from a cohort of 49 patients representing different stages of CKD. Urine samples were analysed for proteomic changes using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and urine and plasma samples for metabolomic changes using different mass spectrometry-based techniques. The training set included 20 CKD patients selected according to their estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at mild (59.9±16.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) or advanced (8.9±4.5 mL/min/1.73 m2; n = 10) CKD and the remaining 29 patients left for the test set. We identified a panel of 76 statistically significant metabolites and peptides that correlated with CKD in the training set. We combined these biomarkers in different classifiers and then performed correlation analyses with eGFR at baseline and follow-up after 2.8±0.8 years in the test set. A solely plasma metabolite biomarker-based classifier significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function in the test set at baseline and follow-up (ρ = −0.8031; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.6009; p = 0.0019, respectively). Similarly, a urinary metabolite biomarker-based classifier did reveal significant association to kidney function (ρ = −0.6557; p = 0.0001 and ρ = −0.6574; p = 0.0005). A classifier utilising 46 identified urinary peptide biomarkers performed statistically equivalent to the urinary and plasma metabolite classifier (ρ = −0.7752; p<0.0001 and ρ = −0.8400; p<0.0001). The combination of both urinary proteomic and urinary and plasma metabolic biomarkers did not improve the correlation with eGFR. In

  9. [The effect of exenatide analogs on hydruretic function of rat kidney under water load].

    PubMed

    Bogolepova, A E; Shakhmatova, E I

    2012-01-01

    Injection (0.05 nmol/100 g b.w.) of exenatide or its amino-acid-substituted synthetic analogs I (substitution at positions 14 and 39) and II (substitution at positions 14, 35, and 39) led to an increase in diuresis and excretion of sodium, magnesium and potassium, but only exenatide caused the excretion of solute free water. In experiments with 1% water load, only exenatide analog I stimulated the solute free water excretion. These features of exenatide and its analogs show the possibility of searching for substances with various power of action upon ion and water excretion by the kidney, which may have a clinical significance.

  10. The Aristotelian kidney.

    PubMed

    Marandola, P; Musitelli, S; Jallous, H; Speroni, A; de Bastiani, T

    1994-01-01

    Aristotle incorrectly observed the absence of the kidney in fish and birds and deduced that it was not essential for the existence of a living organism. This underlies his observations on structure and function of the kidney. From examination of rhesus monkeys he generalized that the right kidney is higher than the left. Aristotle did not consider that the renal pelvis is divided by a filter membrane into 2 chambers, and wrote that no blood reaches the renal pelvis. The theory of the 'filter kidney' cannot thus be attributed to Aristotle. The function of the kidney was described as being to separate the surplus liquid from the blood inside the renal meat (not in the renal pelvis) and to transform this liquid into what Aristotle called residuum, i.e. the urine. Aristotle also considered that the kidneys acted to anchor the blood vessels to the body. He only briefly considered renal pathology.

  11. Evaluation of renal function following treatment with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL): the use of whole-kidney, parenchymal and pelvic transit times.

    PubMed

    Ilgin, N; Iftehar, S A; Vural, G; Bozkirli, I; Gokcora, N

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of using whole-kidney, mean parenchymal and pelvic transit times to evaluate renal function following treatment with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Fifteen patients were evaluated 24-48 h before and after ESWL therapy using 99Tcm-DTPA renal scintigraphy. Using deconvolution analysis, whole-kidney, mean parenchymal and pelvic transit times were calculated and the pre-ESWL values were compared with the post-ESWL values. In both kidneys, there were no significant changes in the glomerular filtration rate or relative renal uptake when compared with the pre-ESWL values. The mean whole-kidney transit time of the tracer did not change significantly during the post-ESWL period. In the treated kidney, the mean post-ESWL parenchymal transit time was significantly increased (P < 0.05), while the mean pelvic transit time was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In the untreated kidney, there were no significant changes in any of these parameters. We conclude that the dual use of parenchymal and pelvic transit times is more sensitive than the mean whole-kidney transit time and other measures, such as glomerular filtration rate and relative renal uptake, for the assessment of outcome of therapy and other related post-ESWL changes.

  12. Effects of pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass on biochemical markers and kidney function in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Alireza; Jafari, Naser; Hasanpour, Mohammad; Sahandifar, Soheil; Ghafari, Masoud; Alaei, Vahed

    2013-01-01

    For several years there is no conclusive guideline on the effectiveness of pulsatile or non-pulsatile perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in patients undergoing cardiac surgeries. In this study, we evaluated the effect of pulsatile versus continuous perfusion on the myocardial release of the cardiac biochemical markers including, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), cardiac creatine kinase (CK-MB), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and also kidney function tests including: blood urea nitrogen test (BUN) and creatinine test (Cr) in patients that underwent both pulsatile and non-pulsatile methods before and after heart surgeries. A total of 80 patients were enrolled in this study, 40 patients in each pulsatile and non-pulsatile group. Venous blood samples were drown from each patient in two groups before operation and after operation at, 24, 48, and 72 h and analyzed separately for CPK, its cardiac isoenzyme (CK-MB), LDH, BUN and Cr. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to preoperative parameters such as sex, age, and body surface area. Our study shows that the effect of pulsatile perfusion on cardiac and kidney function is better than the non-pulsatile method.

  13. Icariin combined with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells significantly improve the impaired kidney function in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Li; Chu, Xiaoqian; Cui, Huantian; Bian, Yuhong

    2017-04-01

    At present, the main therapy for chronic renal failure (CRF) is dialysis and renal transplantation, but neither obtains satisfactory results. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) are isolated from the fetal umbilical cord which has a high self-renewal and multi-directional differentiation potential. Icariin (ICA), a kidney-tonifying Chinese Medicine can enhance the multipotency of huMSCs. Therefore, this work seeks to employ the use of ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of chronic renal failure. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) analyses showed amelioration of functional parameters in ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of CRF rats at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation. ICA-treated huMSCs can obviously increase the number of cells in injured renal tissues at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation by optical molecular imaging system. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the levels of fibrosis in CRF rats at 14 days after transplantation. Superoxide dismutase and Malondialdehyde analyses showed that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the oxidative damage in CRF rats. Moreover, transplantation with ICA-treated huMSCs decreased inflammatory responses, promoted the expression of growth factors, and protected injured renal tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that ICA-treated huMSCs could improve the kidney function in CRF rats.

  14. Structural and functional analyses of liver cysts from the BALB/c-cpk mouse model of polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Muchatuta, Monalisa N; Gattone, Vincent H; Witzmann, Frank A; Blazer-Yost, Bonnie L

    2009-01-01

    Liver cysts arising from hepatic bile ducts are a common extra-renal pathology associated with both autosomal dominant and recessive polycystic kidney disease in humans. To elucidate the functional and structural changes inherent in cyst formation and growth, hepatic bile duct epithelia were isolated from the BALB/ c-cpk mouse model of polycystic kidney disease. Light and transmission electron microscopy revealed substantial fibrosis in the basal lamina surrounding hepatic bile duct cysts isolated from heterozygous (BALB/c-cpk/+) and homozygous (BALB/c-cpk/cpk) animals. Scanning electron microscopy and length analysis of normal, precystic and cystic bile ducts provided the unique observation that primary cilia in cholangiocytes isolated from bile ducts and cysts of animals expressing the mutated cpk gene had lengths outside the minimal and maximal ranges of those in cells lining bile ducts of wild-type animals. Based on the hypothesis that PKD is one of several diseases characterized as ciliopathies, this abnormal variability in the length of the primary cilia may have functional implications. Electrophysiological analyses of freshly isolated cysts indicate that the amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is inactive/absent and cAMP-mediated anion secretion is the electrogenic transport process contributing to cyst fluid accumulation. Anion secretion can be stimulated by the luminal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase.

  15. Treatment with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, associates with better renal function and higher hemoglobin levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with impaired kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Hasslacher, Christoph; Kulozik, Felix; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The influence of type of insulin treatment - insulin analogs versus human insulin - on the development of diabetes related vascular complications has been sparsely investigated. We examine here possible differences regarding kidney function and hemoglobin levels. Methods: Multiple linear regression was used to investigate the relationship between the following characteristics measured in 509 type 1 diabetic patients who were recruited in an outpatient practice: current clinical status and treatment modalities, type of injected insulin and the routine laboratory parameters hemoglobin, HbA1c, serum creatinine, eGFR, hs CRP and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Results: Compared with human insulin, multiple regression analysis taking into account possible confounders revealed that treatment with insulin analogs was associated with increased eGFR (+7.1 ml/min; P=0.0002), lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ratio logarithm -0.4; P=0.003) and higher hemoglobin concentration (+0.31 g/dl; P=0.04). Stratification by type of insulin showed the best renal status for treatment with insulins Glargine and Lispro. Differences were consistent both for patients with normal (eGFR → 90 ml/min) and with an impaired (eGFR ← 90 ml/min) kidney function. Conclusions: Present results suggest that treatment of type 1 diabetic patients with normal and impaired renal function with insulin analogs, especially Glargine and Lispro, is associated with better kidney function, lower urinary albumin/creatinine ratio and lower hemoglobin concentration compared to therapy with human insulin. If confirmed by other studies, treatment with insulin analogs may be a further possibility in delaying progression of nephropathy and in preventing early hemoglobin decline. PMID:27540462

  16. Concomitant gastroparesis negatively affects children with functional gallbladder disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis and biliary dyskinesia (BD) occur in children, and if so, to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis affects clinical outcome in children with BD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with BD (ejecti...

  17. Degree and Predictors of Functional Loss of the Operated Kidney following Nephron-Sparing Surgery: Assessment by Quantitative SPECT of 99m Tc-Dimercaptosuccinic Acid Scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Nativ, Ofer; Levi, Amos; Farfara, Roy; Halachmi, Sarel; Moskovitz, Boaz

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the degree and predictors of renal function loss of the operated kidney following nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). Material and methods. The study group included 113 patients with renal mass who underwent NSS at our institution. QDMSA before and 3–6 months after surgery was used for evaluation differences in renal function of each kidney. Mean change of percent uptake by the kidney was correlated with various clinical and pathological variables. Results. The overall average decrease of renal function of the operated kidney as measured by QDMSA was 10.5% ± 2.6 SER. Among the studied variables, the most important predictors of postoperative ipsilateral residual kidney function were estimated blood loss (EBL), P = 0.0003, duration of warm ischemia, P = 0.008, patient's age at surgery, P = 0.024, method used for tumor bed closure, P = 0.06, and location of the lesion, P = 0.08. Conclusions. Carful hemostasis, minimal duration of arterial clamping, and use of tissue adhesives to seal tumor bed are associated with maximal preservation of postoperative residual renal function after NSS. These variables should be considered by the operative team when planning the surgical procedure . PMID:21845188

  18. Cystatin C estimated glomerular filtration rate to assess renal function in early stages of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Laia; Radosevic, Aleksandar; Quintian, Claudia; Montañés, Rosario; Gràcia, Silvia; Vilaplana, Carles; Mojal, Sergi; Ballarin, José A.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) is the best marker of disease progression in early autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) when renal function still remains normal. The usefulness of cystatin-C as a biomarker to assess renal function according to renal volume has not been studied in ADPKD patients. Methods Observational and cross-sectional study of 62 ADPKD patients. htTKV, creatinine and cystatin-C estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were determined. Correlations between htTKV and eGFR were studied. A control group was used to determine the association between renal function differences and htTKV. Results htTKV significantly correlated with cystatin-C-eGFR (r = -0.384, p = 0.002) but not with creatinine-eGFR (r = -0.225, p = 0.078). With htTKV stratified into tertiles, a significant difference of cystatin-C-eGFR but not in creatinine-eGFR was detected in the third tertile when compared with the first tertile group (110.0±22.2 vs 121.3±7.2; p = 0.023 and 101.8±17.2 vs 106.9±15.1; p = 0.327 respectively). When cystatin-C-eGFR of the controls was used as the reference, htTKV above 605 ml/m identified with a 75% sensitivity and 84.9% specificity those patients with a significant worse kidney function. However, this cut-off value could not be identified using creatinine-eGFR. Conclusions Cystatin-C-eGFR but not creatinine-eGFR correlated with htTKV in ADPKD patients in early stages of the disease. Differences in cystatin-C-eGFR but not in creatinine-eGFR have been identified through htTKV tertiles. A htTKV above 605 ml/m is associated with a worse renal function only if cystatin-C-eGFR is used. Cystatin-C-eGFR should be studied in prospective studies of early stages of ADPKD to determine its usefulness as an early marker of disease progression. PMID:28346513

  19. Plasma and urine renalase levels and activity during the recovery of renal function in kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Quelhas-Santos, Janete; Soares-Silva, Isabel; Fernandes-Cerqueira, Cátia; Simões-Silva, Liliana; Ferreira, Inês; Carvalho, Catarina; Coentrão, Luís; Vaz, Raquel; Sampaio-Maia, Benedita; Pestana, Manuel

    2014-04-01

    Renalase is a recently described enzyme secreted by the kidney into both plasma and urine, where it was suggested to degrade catecholamines contributing to blood pressure control. While there is a controversy regarding the relationship between renal function and plasma renalase levels, there is virtually no data in humans on plasma renalase activity as well as on both urine renalase levels and activity. We prospectively examined the time course of plasma and urine renalase levels and activity in 26 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients receiving a cadaver kidney transplant (cadaver kidney recipients [CKR]) before surgery and during the recovery of renal function up to day 90 post transplant. The relationship with sympathetic and renal dopaminergic activities was also evaluated. The recovery of renal function in CKR closely predicted decreases in plasma renalase levels (r = 0.88; P < 0.0001), urine renalase levels (r = 0.75; P < 0.0001) and urine renalase activity (r = 0.56; P < 0.03), but did not predict changes in plasma renalase activity (r = -0.02; NS). Plasma norepinephrine levels positively correlated with plasma renalase levels (r = 0.64, P < 0.002) as well as with urine renalase levels and activity (r = 0.47 P < 0.02; r = 0.71, P < 0.0005, respectively) and negatively correlated with plasma renalase activity (r = -0.57, P < 0.002). By contrast, plasma epinephrine levels positively correlated with plasma renalase activity (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with plasma renalase levels (r = -0.62, P < 0.003). A significant negative relationship was observed between urine dopamine output and urine renalase levels (r = -0.48; P < 0.03) but not with urine renalase activity (r = -0.33, NS). We conclude that plasma and urine renalase levels closely depend on renal function and sympathetic nervous system activity. It is suggested that epinephrine-mediated activation of circulating renalase may occur in renal transplant recipients with good recovery of

  20. Effect of low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kostogrys, Renata B; Franczyk-Żarów, Magdalena; Maślak, Edyta; Topolska, Kinga

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare effects of Western diet (WD) with low carbohydrate high protein (LCHP) diet on lipid metabolism, liver and kidney function in rats. Eighteen rats were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and fed for the next 2 months. The experimental diets were: Control (7% of soybean oil, 20% protein), WD (21% of butter, 20% protein), and LCHP (21% of butter and 52.4% protein) diet. The LCHP diet significantly decreased the body weight of the rats. Diet consumption was differentiated among groups, however significant changes were observed since third week of the experiment duration. Rats fed LCHP diet ate significantly less (25.2g/animal/day) than those from Control (30.2g/animal/day) and WD (27.8 g/animal/day) groups. Additionally, food efficiency ratio (FER) tended to decrease in LCHP fed rats. Serum homocysteine concentration significantly decreased in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. Liver weights were significantly higher in rats fed WD and LCHP diets. At the end of the experiment (2 months) the triacylglycerol (TAG) was significantly decreased in animals fed LCHP compared to WD. qRT-PCR showed that SCD-1 and FAS were decreased in LCHP fed rats, but WD diet increased expression of lipid metabolism genes. Rats receiving LCHP diet had two fold higher kidney weight and 54.5% higher creatinin level compared to Control and WD diets. In conclusion, LCHP diet decreased animal's body weight and decreased TAG in rat's serum. However, kidney damage in LCHP rats was observed.

  1. Kidney Function and Cardiovascular Events in Postmenopausal Women: The Impact of Race and Ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Cristina M.; Rhee, Jinnie J.; Cheung, Katharine L.; Hedlin, Haley; Kapphahn, Kristopher; Franceschini, Nora; Kalil, Roberto S.; Martin, Lisa W.; Qi, Lihong; Shara, Nawar M.; Desai, Manisha; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney disease disproportionately affects minority populations including African Americans and Hispanics; therefore, understanding the relationship of kidney function to cardiovascular (CV) outcomes within different racial/ethnic groups is of considerable interest. We investigated the relationship between kidney function and CV events and assessed effect modification by race/ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative. Study Design Prospective cohort study Setting & Participants Baseline serum creatinine concentrations (assay traceable to isotope-dilution mass spectrometry standard) of 19,411 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years who self-identified as either non-Hispanic white (n=8921), African American (n=7436), or Hispanic (n=3054) were used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs). Predictors Categories of eGFR (exposure); race/ethnicity (effect modifier). Outcomes The primary outcome was the composite of three physician-adjudicated CV events: myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or CV-related death. Measurements We evaluated the multivariable-adjusted associations between categories of eGFR and CV events using proportional hazards regression and formally tested for effect modification by race/ethnicity. Results Over a mean follow-up of 7.6 years, 1424 CV events (653 MI, 627 strokes, 297 CV-related deaths) were observed. The association between eGFR and CV events was curvilinear; however, the association of eGFR with CV outcomes differed by race (P=0.006). In stratified analyses, we observed that the U-shaped association was present in non-Hispanic whites, whereas African American participants had a rather curvilinear relationship with lower eGFR being associated with higher CV risk and higher eGFR with reduced CV risk. Analyses among Hispanic women were inconclusive owing to few Hispanic women having very low or high eGFR and very few events occurring in these categories. Limitations Lack of urinary albumin measurements; residual

  2. Systemic and renal lipids in kidney disease development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Patricia; Ducasa, Gloria Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Altered lipid metabolism characterizes proteinuria and chronic kidney diseases. While it is thought that dyslipidemia is a consequence of kidney disease, a large body of clinical and experimental studies support that altered lipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of kidney disease. In fact, accumulation of renal lipids has been observed in several conditions of genetic and nongenetic origins, linking local fat to the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Statins, which target cholesterol synthesis, have not been proven beneficial to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease. Therefore, other therapeutic strategies to reduce cholesterol accumulation in peripheral organs, such as the kidney, warrant further investigation. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) have revealed that functional HDL, rather than total HDL per se, may protect from both cardiovascular and kidney diseases, strongly supporting a role for altered cholesterol efflux in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Although the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for lipid-induced renal damage have yet to be uncovered, several studies suggest novel mechanisms by which cholesterol, free fatty acids, and sphingolipids may affect glomerular and tubular cell function. This review will focus on the clinical and experimental evidence supporting a causative role of lipids in the pathogenesis of proteinuria and kidney disease, with a primary focus on podocytes. PMID:26697982

  3. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease, defined by a decreased glomerular filtration rate or albuminuria, is recognized as a major global health burden, mainly because it is an established risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The magnitude of the effect of chronic kidney disease on incident stroke seems to be higher in persons of Asian ethnicity. Since the kidney and brain share unique susceptibilities to vascular injury due to similar anatomical and functional features of small artery diseases, kidney impairment can be predictive of the presence and severity of cerebral small vessel diseases. Chronic kidney disease has been reported to be associated with silent brain infarcts, cerebral white matter lesions, and cerebral microbleeds, independently of vascular risk factors. In addition, chronic kidney disease affects cognitive function, partly via the high prevalence of cerebral small vessel diseases. Retinal artery disease also has an independent relationship with chronic kidney disease and cognitive impairment. Stroke experts are no longer allowed to be ignorant of chronic kidney disease. Close liaison between neurologists and nephrologists can improve the management of cerebral small vessel diseases in kidney patients. PMID:25692105

  4. Effects of Single and Combined Losartan and Tempol Treatments on Oxidative Stress, Kidney Structure and Function in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Early Course of Proteinuric Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Grujic-Milanovic, Jelica; Miloradovic, Zoran; Ivanov, Milan; Jovovic, Djurdjica; Vajic, Una-Jovana; Zivotic, Maja; Markovic-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Mihailovic-Stanojevic, Nevena

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been widely implicated in both hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension is a major risk factor for CKD progression. In the present study we have investigated the effects of chronic single tempol (membrane-permeable radical scavenger) or losartan (angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker) treatment, and their combination on systemic oxidative status (plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (pTBARS) production, plasma antioxidant capacity (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid, pABTS), erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activities) and kidney oxidative stress (kTBARS, kABTS, kidney antioxidant enzymes activities), kidney function and structure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with the early course of adriamycin-induced nephropathy. Adult SHR were divided into five groups. The control group received vehicle, while the other groups received adriamycin (2 mg/kg, i.v.) twice in a 21-day interval, followed by vehicle, losartan (L,10 mg/kg/day), tempol (T,100 mg/kg/day) or combined T+L treatment (by gavage) during a six-week period. Adriamycin significantly increased proteinuria, plasma lipid peroxidation, kidney protein oxidation, nitrite excretion, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) protein expression and nestin immunostaining in the kidney. Also, it decreased kidney antioxidant defense, kidney NADPH oxidase 4 (kNox4) protein expression and abolished anti-inflammatory response due to significant reduction of kidney NADPH oxidase 2 (kNox2) protein expression in SHR. All treatments reduced protein-to-creatinine ratio (marker of proteinuria), pTBARS production, kidney protein carbonylation, nitrite excretion, increased antioxidant capacity and restored kidney nestin expression similar to control. Both single treatments significantly improved systemic and kidney antioxidant defense, bioavailability of renal nitric oxide, reduced kMMP-1 protein expression and renal injury, thus retarded CKD progression

  5. Impact of obesity on kidney function and blood pressure in children

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Wei; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, obesity has become an increasingly important epidemic health problem in children and adolescents. The prevalence of the overweight status in children grew from 5% to 11% from 1960s to 1990s. The epidemic of obesity has been paralleled by an increase in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension. Results of several studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome were independent predictors of renal injury. The pathophysiology of obesity related hypertension is complex, including activation of sympathetic nervous system, renin angiotensin aldosterone system, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation. These same mechanisms likely contribute to the development of increased blood pressure in children. This review summarizes the recent epidemiologic data linking obesity with CKD and hypertension in children, as well as the potential mechanisms. PMID:25949935

  6. Role of Vitamin D in Cognitive Function in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhen; Lin, Jing; Qian, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Both vitamin D deficiency and cognitive impairment are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Vitamin D exerts neuroprotective and regulatory roles in the central nervous system. Hypovitaminosis D has been associated with muscle weakness and bone loss, cardiovascular diseases (hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidemia), inflammation, oxidative stress, immune suppression and neurocognitive impairment. The combination of hypovitaminosis D and CKD can be even more debilitating, as cognitive impairment can develop and progress through vitamin D-associated and CKD-dependent/independent processes, leading to significant morbidity and mortality. Although an increasingly recognized comorbidity in CKD, cognitive impairment remains underdiagnosed and often undermanaged. Given the association of cognitive decline and hypovitaminosis D and their deleterious effects in CKD patients, determination of vitamin D status and when appropriate, supplementation, in conjunction with neuropsychological screening, should be considered integral to the clinical care of the CKD population. PMID:27187460

  7. Impact of obesity on kidney function and blood pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2015-05-06

    In recent years, obesity has become an increasingly important epidemic health problem in children and adolescents. The prevalence of the overweight status in children grew from 5% to 11% from 1960s to 1990s. The epidemic of obesity has been paralleled by an increase in the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and hypertension. Results of several studies have demonstrated that obesity and metabolic syndrome were independent predictors of renal injury. The pathophysiology of obesity related hypertension is complex, including activation of sympathetic nervous system, renin angiotensin aldosterone system, hyperinsulinemia and inflammation. These same mechanisms likely contribute to the development of increased blood pressure in children. This review summarizes the recent epidemiologic data linking obesity with CKD and hypertension in children, as well as the potential mechanisms.

  8. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation affects brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Dan Cao; Yingjie Li; Ling Wei; Yingying Tang

    2016-08-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in the emotional processing as well as in the functional brain network. Hyperactivity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) would be found in anxious participants. However, it is still unclear what the role of PFC played in a resting functional network. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) is an effective tool to create virtual lesions on brain regions. In this paper, we applied cTBS over right prefrontal area, and investigated the effects of cTBS on the brain activity for functional connectivity by the method of graph theory. We recorded 64-channels EEG on thirteen healthy participants in the resting condition and emotional tasks before and after 40 s of cTBS. This work focused on the effect of cTBS on cortical activities in the resting condition by calculating the coherence between EEG channels and building functional networks before and after cTBS in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Results revealed that 1) The functional connectivity after cTBS was significantly increased compared with that before cTBS in delta, theta, alpha and beta bands in the resting condition; 2) The efficiency-cost reached the maximum before and after cTBS both with the cost about 0.3 in the bands above, which meant that the information transmission of functional brain network with this cost was highly efficient; 3) the clustering coefficient and path length after cTBS was significantly increased in delta, theta and beta bands. In conclusion, cTBS over PFC indeed enhanced the functional connectivity in the resting condition. In addition, the information transmission in the resting brain network was highly efficient with the cost about 0.3.

  9. Association between fluid intake and kidney function, and survival outcomes analysis: a nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Wei; Chen, Wei-Liang; Liaw, Fang-Yih; Sun, Yu-Shan; Yang, Hui-Fang; Wang, Chung-Ching; Lin, Chien-Ming; Tsao, Yu-Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Fluid intake, one of the most common daily activities, has not been well studied in chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations, and clinical outcomes are rarely addressed. The aim of this nationwide study is to explore the influence of daily fluid intake on cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and its association with renal function. Design Observational cohort study. Participants In all, 2182 participants aged more than 20 years participated in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988–1994). Main outcome measures Survival outcomes in patients with or without CKD, using multiple variable adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. Results In a longitudinal survey with a median follow-up length of 15.4 years, 1080 participants died and 473 cardiovascular deaths were recorded. For all-cause mortality in the CKD group, individuals in the highest quartile of fluid intake (≧3.576 L/day) had better survival outcomes than those in the lowest quartile of fluid intake (≤2.147 L/day) (p=0.029) after adjustment of several pertinent variables. Conclusions Although the interpretation of this observational study was limited by the failure to identify the compositions of ingested fluids, adequate hydration may offer some advantages in patients with CKD. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of the responses of normal and injured kidneys to chronic changes in fluid consumption warrant further investigation. PMID:27173809

  10. The adverse effects of long-term l-carnitine supplementation on liver and kidney function in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zhang, D-M; Wang, M-X; Fan, C-Y; Zhou, F; Wang, S-J; Kong, L-D

    2015-11-01

    Levo-Carnitine (l-carnitine) is widely used in health and food. This study was to focus on the adverse effects of 8-week oral supplementation of l-carnitine (0.3 and 0.6 g/kg) in female and male Sprague Dawley rats. l-carnitine reduced body and fat weights, as well as serum, liver, and kidney lipid levels in rats. Simultaneously, hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation and lipid synthesis were disturbed in l-carnitine-fed rats. Moreover, l-carnitine accelerated reactive oxygen species production in serum and liver, thereby triggering hepatic NOD-like receptor 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation to elevate serum interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 levels in rats. Alteration of serum alkaline phosphatase levels further confirmed liver dysfunction in l-carnitine-fed rats. Additionally, l-carnitine may potentially disturb kidney function by altering renal protein levels of rat organic ion transporters. These observations may provide the caution information for the safety of long-term l-carnitine supplementation.

  11. Factors affecting the development of lung function in Tunisian children.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Y; Pariès, J; Harrabi, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z; Richalet, J P; Buvry, A

    2008-01-01

    We undertook to evaluate the impacts of morphology at birth, physical activity, anthropometric, socioeconomic and environmental factors on lung function in healthy Tunisian children. Pulmonary function parameters were measured with a Minato portable spirometer in a randomized population of 756 healthy children (388 males and 368 females) aged between 6 and 16. The morphology at birth, the gestational age, the physical activity, the socioeconomic status, the type of habitation, and the environmental factors were all assessed by a standard questionnaire. Using univariate analysis, we found that: (1) morphometric parameters (height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory perimeter), as well as sex were highly associated with pulmonary function parameters; (2) Height at birth showed strong significant relations with FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(1)/FVC; (3) lung function parameters were influenced by physical training of our children, socioeconomic status, indoor pollution, and passive smoking; and (4) we did not observe any association between the gestational age and the weight at their birth and lung function parameters. Using a general linear model analysis, morphometric parameters, age, sex, type of heating, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory perimeters had significant relation with respiratory parameters. In our population of healthy Tunisian children, the main predictive factors of the pulmonary development were the morphological factors such as height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory thoracic perimeter, sex and age, and the environmental conditions such as type of heating but not morphology at birth, physical activity, or socioeconomic status.

  12. Effect of CTLA-4 gene polymorphisms on long-term kidney allograft function in Han Chinese recipients

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4 gene (CTLA-4) have been associated with graft rejection and long-term clinical outcome after organ transplantation. Our aim was to examine the association between CTLA-4 SNPs (rs733618, rs4553808, rs5742909, rs231775, rs3087243) and long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Genotyping of CTLA-4 SNPs was performed in 292 renal transplantation recipients. To assess long-term allograft function, the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after renal transplantation. CTLA-4 rs733618 and rs3087243 alleles and genotypes as well as the rs5742909 and rs231775 genotypes were significantly associated with long-term allograft function after transplantation (P<0.05). Patients with favorable genotypes had higher allograft function during the 60 months after transplantation. The TACGG, CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes were also associated with long-term kidney function after renal transplantation (P<0.05 or P<0.01). In sum, the favorable CTLA-4 rs5742909TT genotype, CTLA-4 rs733618C and rs3087243A alleles, and CACAG and CGTAA haplotypes, as well as the unfavorable rs733618TT, rs3087243GG and rs231775GG genotypes and TACGG haplotype could potentially serve as effective indicators of long-term allograft function in Chinese renal transplantation recipients. PMID:27081086

  13. Cellular localization of adenine receptors in the rat kidney and their functional significance in the inner medullary collecting duct

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Kohan, Donald E.; Schiedel, Anke C.; Müller, Christa E.; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    The Gi-coupled adenine receptor (AdeR) binds adenine with high affinity and potentially reduces cellular cAMP levels. Since cAMP is an important second messenger in the renal transport of water and solutes, we localized AdeR in the rat kidney. Real-time RT-PCR showed higher relative expression of AdeR mRNA in the cortex and outer medulla compared with the inner medulla. Immunoblots using a peptide-derived and affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for an 18-amino acid COOH-terminal sequence of rat AdeR, which we generated, detected two bands between ∼30 and 40 kDa (molecular mass of native protein: 37 kDa) in the cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla. These bands were ablated by preadsorption of the antibody with the immunizing peptide. Immunofluorescence labeling showed expression of AdeR protein in all regions of the kidney. Immunoperoxidase revealed strong labeling of AdeR protein in the cortical vasculature, including the glomerular arterioles, and less intense labeling in the cells of the collecting duct system. Confocal immunofluorescence imaging colocalized AdeR with aquaporin-2 protein to the apical plasma membrane in the collecting duct. Functionally, adenine (10 μM) significantly decreased (P < 0.01) 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (10 nM)-induced cAMP production in ex vivo preparations of inner medullary collecting ducts, which was reversed by PSB-08162 (20 μM, P < 0.01), a selective antagonist of AdeR. Thus, we demonstrated the expression of AdeR in the renal vasculature and collecting ducts and its functional relevance. This study may open a new avenue for the exploration of autocrine/paracrine regulation of renal vascular and tubular functions by the nucleobase adenine in health and disease. PMID:23986514

  14. Cellular localization of adenine receptors in the rat kidney and their functional significance in the inner medullary collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Bellamkonda K; Zhang, Yue; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Kohan, Donald E; Schiedel, Anke C; Müller, Christa E; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-11-01

    The Gi-coupled adenine receptor (AdeR) binds adenine with high affinity and potentially reduces cellular cAMP levels. Since cAMP is an important second messenger in the renal transport of water and solutes, we localized AdeR in the rat kidney. Real-time RT-PCR showed higher relative expression of AdeR mRNA in the cortex and outer medulla compared with the inner medulla. Immunoblots using a peptide-derived and affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for an 18-amino acid COOH-terminal sequence of rat AdeR, which we generated, detected two bands between ∼30 and 40 kDa (molecular mass of native protein: 37 kDa) in the cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla. These bands were ablated by preadsorption of the antibody with the immunizing peptide. Immunofluorescence labeling showed expression of AdeR protein in all regions of the kidney. Immunoperoxidase revealed strong labeling of AdeR protein in the cortical vasculature, including the glomerular arterioles, and less intense labeling in the cells of the collecting duct system. Confocal immunofluorescence imaging colocalized AdeR with aquaporin-2 protein to the apical plasma membrane in the collecting duct. Functionally, adenine (10 μM) significantly decreased (P < 0.01) 1-deamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin (10 nM)-induced cAMP production in ex vivo preparations of inner medullary collecting ducts, which was reversed by PSB-08162 (20 μM, P < 0.01), a selective antagonist of AdeR. Thus, we demonstrated the expression of AdeR in the renal vasculature and collecting ducts and its functional relevance. This study may open a new avenue for the exploration of autocrine/paracrine regulation of renal vascular and tubular functions by the nucleobase adenine in health and disease.

  15. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria.

  16. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  17. Chemical Modifications that Affect Nutritional and Functional Properties of Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, T.; Kester, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical alterations of selected amino acids resulting from environmental effects (photooxidations, pH extremes, thermally induced effects). Also dicusses use of intentional chemical derivatizations of various functional groups in amino acid residue side chains and how recombinant DNA techniques might be useful in structure/function…

  18. The influence of kidney function on dapagliflozin exposure, metabolism and pharmacodynamics in healthy subjects and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj; Liu, Xiaoni; Pe Benito, Melanie; Yao, Ming; Pfister, Marc; LaCreta, Frank P; Humphreys, William Griffith; Boulton, David W

    2013-01-01

    Aim(s) This study assessed the effect of differences in renal function on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of dapagliflozin, a renal sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitor for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A single 50 mg dose of dapagliflozin was used to assess pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in five groups: healthy non-diabetic subjects; patients with T2DM and normal kidney function and patients with T2DM and mild, moderate or severe renal impairment based on estimated creatinine clearance. Subsequently, 20 mg once daily multiple doses of dapagliflozin were evaluated in the patients with T2DM. Formation rates of dapagliflozin 3-O-glucuronide (D3OG), an inactive metabolite, were evaluated using human isolated kidney and liver microsomes. Results Plasma concentrations of dapagliflozin and D3OG were incrementally increased with declining kidney function. Steady-state Cmax for dapagliflozin were 4%, 6% and 9% higher and for D3OG were 20%, 37% and 52% higher in patients with mild, moderate and severe renal impairment, respectively, compared with normal function. AUC(0,τ) was likewise higher. D3OG formation in kidney microsomes was three-fold higher than in liver microsomes and 109-fold higher than in intestine microsomes. Compared with patients with normal renal function, pharmacodynamic effects were attenuated with renal impairment. Steady-state renal glucose clearance was reduced by 42%, 83% and 84% in patients with mild, moderate or severe renal impairment, respectively. Conclusions These results indicate that both kidney and liver significantly contribute to dapagliflozin metabolism, resulting in higher systemic exposure with declining kidney function. Dapagliflozin pharmacodynamics in diabetic subjects with moderate to severe renal impairment are consistent with the observation of reduced efficacy in this patient population. PMID:23210765

  19. Comparison of Gait Speed and Peripheral Nerve Function Between Chronic Kidney Disease Patients With and Without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare overall physical function, including gait speed and peripheral nerve function, between diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and nondiabetic CKD patients and to investigate the association between gait speed and peripheral nerve function in CKD patients. Methods Sixty adult CKD patients (35 with and 25 without diabetes), who received maintenance hemodialysis (HD), were included in this study. Demographic data, past medical history, current medical condition and functional data—usual gait speed, vibration perception threshold for the index finger (VPT-F) and the great toe (VPT-T), activity of daily living (ADL) difficulty, and peripheral neuropathy (PN) along with the degree of its severity—were collected and compared between the two groups. Correlations between the severity of PN and the impairment of other functions were identified. Results Diabetic CKD patients showed significantly slower gait speed (p=0.029), impaired sensory function (VPT-F, p=0.011; VPT-T, p=0.023), and more frequent and severe PN (number of PN, p<0.001; severity of PN, p<0.001) as compared to those without diabetes. Usual gait speed had a significant negative correlation with the severity of PN (rho=−0.249, p=0.013). By contrast, VPT-F (rho=0.286, p=0.014) and VPT-T (rho=0.332, p=0.035) were positively correlated with the severity of PN. ADL difficulty was comparatively more frequent in the patients with more severe PN (p=0.031). Conclusion In CKD patients with maintenance HD, their gait speed, sensory functions, and peripheral nerve functions were all significantly impaired when they have diabetes, and the severity of PN was negatively correlated with their gait speed, sensory function, and ADL function. Adverse effects of diabetes impacted physical performance of CKD patients. The physical disability of those patients might be attributable to PN and its severity. PMID:28289638

  20. Combined thermosensitive in situ gel with AMD3100 in sutureless technique improves the survival and function of kidney transplants in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nengwang; Fu, Shuai; Hao, Junwen; Zhang, Aimin; Fu, Zhihou

    2016-01-01

    The mouse is an optimal animal model for kidney transplantation. Recent reports suggest that application of poloxamer 407, a thermosensitive in situ gel, during the sutureless technique significantly increases animal survival, compared to traditional methods. However, further improvement of this technology is greatly needed but remains unexplored. Here, we detected significant inflammation at the region of ureter anastomosis, after kidney transplantation using poloxamer 407. Since chemokines play a pivotal role during inflammation, we implanted an Alzet osmotic pump that gradually releases AMD3100 (a specific inhibitor of the binding of stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) to its receptor, CXCR4) at the site of ureter anastomosis in mice that had undergone kidney transplantation. We found that AMD3100 significantly reduced local inflammation, significantly improved animal survival after kidney transplantation, and significantly improved kidney function. Together, these data suggest that inhibition of chemokine signaling at the site of ureter anastomosis may substantially improve animal survival after kidney transplantation through suppression of suturing-related inflammation. PMID:28078036

  1. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  2. Alginate Overproduction Affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, Gail M.; Balzer, Grant J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant communities of microorganisms organized in biofilms. Although biofilm formation and the conversion to mucoidy are both important aspects of CF pathogenesis, the relationship between them is at the present unclear. In this study, we report that the overproduction of alginate affects biofilm development on an abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate-overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:11514525

  3. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  4. Prenatal Drug Exposure Affects Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala–frontal, insula–frontal, and insula–sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala–frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  5. How optimization of potential functions affects protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Hao, M H; Scheraga, H A

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between the optimization of the potential function and the foldability of theoretical protein models is studied based on investigations of a 27-mer cubic-lattice protein model and a more realistic lattice model for the protein crambin. In both the simple and the more complicated systems, optimization of the energy parameters achieves significant improvements in the statistical-mechanical characteristics of the systems and leads to foldable protein models in simulation experiments. The foldability of the protein models is characterized by their statistical-mechanical properties--e.g., by the density of states and by Monte Carlo folding simulations of the models. With optimized energy parameters, a high level of consistency exists among different interactions in the native structures of the protein models, as revealed by a correlation function between the optimized energy parameters and the native structure of the model proteins. The results of this work are relevant to the design of a general potential function for folding proteins by theoretical simulations. PMID:8643516

  6. Does caregiving stress affect cognitive function in older women?

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmin; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women provide care to their ill spouses; however, no studies have examined possible effects of caregiving stress on cognitive function. We administered 6 tests of cognitive function to 13740 Nurses' Health Study participants aged 70-79 years. We collected information on caregiving and numerous potential confounding variables via biennial mailed questionnaires. After adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, mental health index, vitality index, use of antidepressants, and history of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease), we found modest but significantly increased risks of low cognitive function on three of the cognitive tests among women who provided care to a disabled or ill spouse compared with women who did not provide any care. For example, on the TICS, a test of general cognition, the risk of a low score was 31% higher in women who provided care compared with women who did not (RR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10, 1.56). We found a moderately increased risk of poor performance on several cognitive tests among women who provided care to their disabled or ill husbands.

  7. Microplastics Affect the Ecological Functioning of an Important Biogenic Habitat.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; O'Connor, Nessa E; Thompson, Richard

    2017-01-03

    Biological effects of microplastics on the health of bivalves have been demonstrated elsewhere, but ecological impacts on the biodiversity and ecosystem functioning of bivalve-dominated habitats are unknown. Thus, we exposed intact sediment cores containing European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) or blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in seawater to two different densities (2.5 or 25 μg L(-1)) of biodegradable or conventional microplastics in outdoor mesocosms. We hypothesized that filtration rates of the bivalves, inorganic nitrogen cycling, primary productivity of sediment dwelling microphytobenthos, and the structure of invertebrate benthic assemblages would be influenced by microplastics. After 50 days, filtration by M. edulis was significantly less when exposed to 25 μg L(-1) of either type of microplastics, but there were no effects on ecosystem functioning or the associated invertebrate assemblages. Contrastingly, filtration by O. edulis significantly increased when exposed to 2.5 or 25 μg L(-1) of microplastics, and porewater ammonium and biomass of benthic cyanobacteria decreased. Additionally the associated infaunal invertebrate assemblages differed, with significantly less polychaetes and more oligochaetes in treatments exposed to microplastics. These findings highlight the potential of microplastics to impact the functioning and structure of sedimentary habitats and show that such effects may depend on the dominant bivalve present.

  8. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  9. Protein-enriched meal replacements do not adversely affect liver, kidney or bone density: an outpatient randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is concern that recommending protein-enriched meal replacements as part of a weight management program could lead to changes in biomarkers of liver or renal function and reductions in bone density. This study was designed as a placebo-controlled clinical trial utilizing two isocaloric meal plans utilizing either a high protein-enriched (HP) or a standard protein (SP) meal replacement in an outpatient weight loss program. Subjects/methods 100 obese men and women over 30 years of age with a body mass index (BMI) between 27 to 40 kg/m2 were randomized to one of two isocaloric weight loss meal plans 1). HP group: providing 2.2 g protein/kg of lean body mass (LBM)/day or 2). SP group: providing 1.1 g protein/kg LBM/day. Meal replacement (MR) was used twice daily (one meal, one snack) for 3 months and then once a day for 9 months. Body weight, lipid profiles, liver function, renal function and bone density were measured at baseline and 12 months. Results Seventy subjects completed the study. Both groups lost weight (HP -4.29 ± 5.90 kg vs. SP -4.66 ± 6.91 kg, p < 0.01) and there was no difference in weight loss observed between the groups at one year. There was no significant change noted in liver function [AST (HP -2.07 ± 10.32 U/L, p = 0.28; SP 0.27 ± 6.67 U/L, p = 0.820), ALT (HP -1.03 ± 10.08 U/L, p = 0.34; SP -2.6 ± 12.51 U/L, p = 0.24), bilirubin (HP 0.007 ± 0.33, U/L, p = 0.91; SP 0.07 ± 0.24 U/L, p = 0.120), alkaline phosphatase (HP 2.00 ± 9.07 U/L, p = 0.240; SP -2.12 ± 11.01 U/L, p = 0.280)], renal function [serum creatinine (HP 0.31 ± 1.89 mg/dL, p = 0.380; SP -0.05 ± 0.15 mg/dL, p = 0.060), urea nitrogen (HP 1.33 ± 4.68 mg/dL, p = 0.130; SP -0.24 ± 3.03 mg/dL, p = 0.650), 24 hour urine creatinine clearance (HP -0.02 ± 0.16 mL/min, p = 0.480; SP 1.18 ± 7.53 mL/min, p = 0.400), and calcium excretion (HP -0.41 ± 9.48 mg/24 hours, p = 0.830; SP -0.007 ± 6.76 mg/24 hours, p = 0.990)] or in bone mineral density by DEXA (HP 0.04

  10. Encrustation of the Ureteral Double J Stent in Patients with a Solitary Functional Kidney – a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Milicevic, Snjezana; Bijelic, Radojka; Jakovljevic, Branislava

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of ureteric stents in the management of various urological conditions causing the upper urinary tract obstruction has been extensively proven, and their contribution to urology remains enormous. The clinical use of ureteric stents is associated with several complications. “Stent syndrome,” encrustation, migration and urothelial hyperplasia are the most common problems related to long-term ureteral stenting. Case report: This work presents an interesting case from our practice: a complete encrustation of a classical polyurethane double J stent two and a half months after its initial instillation, in a 70 year old man, with a solitary functioning kidney, as well as successful removal of it by using a simultaneous treatment of extracorporeal lithotripsy and ureteroscopy with a contact disintegration of encrustations and with percutaneous nephrostomy, as an auxiliary procedure for providing of additional urine derivation. Conclusion: These problems can be overcome by the introduction of new advanced ureteral stent designs and biomaterials. PMID:26543316

  11. Acute kidney injury, long-term renal function and mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Joana; Neves, Joana Briosa; Rodrigues, Natacha; Bekerman, Catarina; Melo, Maria João; Pereira, Marta; Teixeira, Catarina; Mendes, Inês; Jorge, Sofia; Rosa, Rosário; Lopes, José António

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent during hospitalization and may contribute to adverse consequences. We aimed to evaluate long-term adverse renal function and mortality after postoperative AKI in a cohort of patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of adult patients who underwent major non-vascular abdominal surgery between January 2010 and February 2011 at the Department of Surgery II of Hospital de Santa Maria–Centro Hospitalar Lisboa Norte, Portugal. Exclusion criteria were as follows: chronic kidney disease on renal replacement therapy, undergoing renal replacement therapy the week before surgery, death before discharge and loss to follow-up through January 2014. Patients were categorized according to the development of postoperative AKI in the first 48 h after surgery using the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes classification. AKI was defined by an increase in absolute serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.3 mg/dL or by a percentage increase in SCr ≥50% and/or by a decrease in urine output to <0.5 mL/kg/h for >6 h. Adverse renal outcomes (need for long-term dialysis and/or a 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate after hospital discharge) and mortality after discharge were evaluated. Cumulative mortality was analysed with the Kaplan–Meier method and log-rank test and outcome predictive factors with the Cox regression. Significance was set at P < 0.05. Results Of 390 selected patients, 72 (18.5%) developed postoperative AKI. The median follow-up was 38 months. Adverse renal outcomes and death after hospital discharge were more frequent among AKI patients (47.2 versus 22.0%, P < 0.0001; and 47.2 versus 20.5%, P < 0.0001, respectively). The 4 year cumulative probability of death was 44.4% for AKI patients, while it was 19.8% for patients with no AKI (log-rank test, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, AKI was a risk factor for adverse renal outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio 1.6, P

  12. Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevent fibrosis and preserve renal function in a preclinical porcine model of kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baulier, Edouard; Favreau, Frederic; Le Corf, Amélie; Jayle, Christophe; Schneider, Fabrice; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Feraud, Olivier; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Hauet, Thierry; Turhan, Ali G

    2014-07-01

    It is well known that ischemia/reperfusion injuries strongly affect the success of human organ transplantation. Development of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy is the main deleterious phenomenon involved. Stem cells are a promising therapeutic tool already validated in various ischemic diseases. Amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (af-MSCs), a subpopulation of multipotent cells identified in amniotic fluid, are known to secrete growth factors and anti-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, these cells are easy to collect, present higher proliferation and self-renewal rates compared with other adult stem cells (ASCs), and are suitable for banking. Consequently, af-MSCs represent a promising source of stem cells for regenerative therapies in humans. To determine the efficiency and the safety of af-MSC infusion in a preclinical porcine model of renal autotransplantation, we injected autologous af-MSCs in the renal artery 6 days after transplantation. The af-MSC injection improved glomerular and tubular functions, leading to full renal function recovery and abrogated fibrosis development at 3 months. The strong proof of concept generated by this translational porcine model is a first step toward evaluation of af-MSC-based therapies in human kidney transplantation.

  13. Visual function affects prosocial behaviors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Teoli, Dac A; Smith, Merideth D; Leys, Monique J; Jain, Priyanka; Odom, J Vernon

    2016-02-01

    Eye-related pathological conditions such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration commonly lead to decreased peripheral/central field, decreased visual acuity, and increased functional disability. We sought to answer if relationships exist between measures of visual function and reported prosocial behaviors in an older adult population with eye-related diagnoses. The sample consisted of adults, aged ≥ 60 years old, at an academic hospital's eye institute. Vision ranged from normal to severe impairment. Medical charts determined the visual acuities, ocular disease, duration of disease (DD), and visual fields (VF). Measures of giving help were via validated questionnaires on giving formal support (GFS) and giving informal support; measures of help received were perceived support (PS) and informal support received (ISR). ISR had subscales: tangible support (ISR-T), emotional support (ISR-E), and composite (ISR-C). Visual acuities of the better and worse seeing eyes were converted to LogMAR values. VF information converted to a 4-point rating scale of binocular field loss severity. DD was in years. Among 96 participants (mean age 73.28; range 60-94), stepwise regression indicated a relationship of visual variables to GFS (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.1679 with acuity-better eye, VF rating, and DD), PS (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.2254 with acuity-better eye), ISR-C (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.041 with acuity-better eye), and ISR-T (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.1421 with acuity-better eye). The findings suggest eye-related conditions can impact levels and perceptions of support exchanges. Our data reinforces the importance of visual function as an influence on prosocial behavior in older adults.

  14. Injury - kidney and ureter

    MedlinePlus

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  15. Brood stock segregation for the control of bacterial kidney disease can affect mortality of progeny chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in seawater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; Pascho, Ronald J.; Palmisano, Aldo N.

    1995-01-01

    Segregation of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) brood stock based on the measurement of maternal Renibacterium salmoninarum infection levels by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was previously shown to affect the prevalence and levels of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in progeny fish during hatchery rearing. Smolts from that study were subjected to standardized fish health and condition evaluation procedures 2 weeks before the conclusion of hatchery rearing and release of the fish for migration to the Pacific Ocean. The results suggested that the general health of the smolts in the progeny group from parents that had low R. salmoninarum infection levels or tested negative for R. salmoninarum (low-BKD group) was better than that of the smolts in the progeny group from female parents with high R. salmoninarum infection levels (high-BKD group). Testing by the ELISA showed that the overall severity of R. salmoninarum infection also was lower in the smolts from the low-BKD group. Subgroups of smolts from the study were acclimated to tanks of seawater for extended holding. After a 22-day acclimation period and 98 days in full-strength (29 ppt salinity) seawater, total mortality was 12% in the low-BKD group and 44% in the high-BKD group. All of the mortality in the low-BKD group and 85% of the mortality in the high-BKD group occurred after the fish were transferred to full-strength seawater. Testing of kidney tissues from all dead fish by the FAT revealed that 85% of the fish that died in the high-BKD group had high R. salmoninarum numbers, indicating that BKD was the cause of death. In contrast, none of the fish that died in the low-BKD group had detectable numbers of R. salmoninarum. We concluded that brood stock segregation by use of the ELISA and the FAT can affect mortality and the R. salmoninarum status of progeny chinook salmon for as long as 21 months after hatching, even after the fish have

  16. Affected functional networks associated with sentence production in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; van den Hurk, Job; Hofman, Paul Am; Zimmermann, Luc Ji; Uludağ, Kâmil; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-08-07

    Patients with the inherited metabolic disorder classic galactosemia have language production impairments in several planning stages. Here, we assessed potential deviations in recruitment and connectivity across brain areas responsible for language production that may explain these deficits. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study neural activity and connectivity while participants carried out a language production task. This study included 13 adolescent patients and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Participants passively watched or actively described an animated visual scene using two conditions, varying in syntactic complexity (single words versus a sentence). Results showed that patients recruited additional and more extensive brain regions during sentence production. Both groups showed modulations with syntactic complexity in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a region associated with syntactic planning, and in right insula. In addition, patients showed a modulation with syntax in left superior temporal gyrus (STG), whereas the controls did not. Further, patients showed increased activity in right STG and right supplementary motor area (SMA). The functional connectivity data showed similar patterns, with more extensive connectivity with frontal and motor regions, and restricted and weaker connectivity with superior temporal regions. Patients also showed higher baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) in right IFG and trends towards higher CBF in bilateral STG, SMA and the insula. Taken together, the data demonstrate that language abnormalities in classic galactosemia are associated with specific changes within the language network. These changes point towards impairments related to both syntactic planning and speech motor planning in these patients.

  17. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  18. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  19. Chronic kidney disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chinnappa, V; Ankichetty, S; Angle, P; Halpern, S H

    2013-07-01

    Parturients with renal insufficiency or failure present a significant challenge for the anesthesiologist. Impaired renal function compromises fertility and increases both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Close communication amongst medical specialists, including nephrologists, obstetricians, neonatologists and anesthesiologists is required to ensure the safety of mother and child. Pre-existing diseases should be optimized and close surveillance of maternal and fetal condition is required. Kidney function may deteriorate during pregnancy, necessitating early intervention. The goal is to maintain hemodynamic and physiologic stability while the demands of the pregnancy change. Drugs that may adversely affect the fetus, are nephrotoxic or are dependent on renal elimination should be avoided.

  20. The Effect of Osmotherapy and Tight Control of Acidosis on Early Graft Function among Deceased-Donor Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Etezadi, F.; Najafi Abrandabadi, A. H.; Motaharinia, J.; Mojtahedzadeh, M.; Pourfakhr, P.; Khajavi, M. R.; Gooran, S.; Shariat Moharari, R.; Dehghani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Reperfusion injury and the acid-base status of the transplant are important factors affecting post-transplantation graft function. Objective: We hypothesized that infusing hypertonic saline (HS) or tight control of acid-base status of the blood rushing through renal graft using sodium bicarbonate may have beneficial effects on early graft function. Methods: Candidates for deceased-donor kidney transplant were randomized into three groups. HS group (n=33) received 50 mL/kg normal saline (NS) titrated during operation plus 4 mL/kg of 5% HS just within graft reperfusion phase; bicarbonate group (n=37) was administered 60 mL/kg NS while their metabolic acidosis (base excess ≤5 mEq/L) was tightly corrected every 30 min with sodium bicarbonate; and a control group (n=36) that received 60 mL/kg normal saline while they were administered sodium bicarbonate only, if they encountered severe metabolic acidosis (base excess ≤15 mEq/L). The primary outcome was defined as early post-operative renal function evaluated based on serial serum creatinine levels. The study was registered in Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2013122815841N19). Results: Post-operative early graft function improved significantly during the first 3 days in the intervention groups (p<0.05). However, that beneficial effect no longer remained at the same level after the day four. Conclusion: Timely administration of HS or tight control of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate infusion improve early renal function during renal transplant surgery. PMID:28299023

  1. Urinary CD133+ Extracellular Vesicles Are Decreased in Kidney Transplanted Patients with Slow Graft Function and Vascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dimuccio, Veronica; Ranghino, Andrea; Praticò Barbato, Loredana; Fop, Fabrizio; Biancone, Luigi; Camussi, Giovanni; Bussolati, Benedetta

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) present in the urine are mainly released from cells of the nephron and can therefore provide information on kidney function. We here evaluated the presence of vesicles expressing the progenitor marker CD133 in the urine of normal subjects and of patients undergoing renal transplant. We found that EV expressing CD133 were present in the urine of normal subjects, but not of patients with end stage renal disease. The first day after transplant, urinary CD133+ EVs were present at low levels, to increase thereafter (at day 7). Urinary CD133+ EVs significantly increased in patients with slow graft function in respect to those with early graft function. In patients with a severe pre-transplant vascular damage of the graft, CD133+ EVs did not increase at day 7. At variance, the levels of EVs expressing the renal exosomal marker CD24 did not vary in the urine of patients with end stage renal disease or in transplanted patients in respect to controls. Sorted CD133+ EVs were found to express glomerular and proximal tubular markers. These data indicate that urinary CD133+ EVs are continuously released during the homeostatic turnover of the nephron and may provide information on its function or regenerative potential. PMID:25100147

  2. Low level methylmercury exposure affects neuropsychological function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yokoo, Edna M; Valente, Joaquim G; Grattan, Lynn; Schmidt, Sérgio Luís; Platt, Illeane; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2003-01-01

    -dependent effect. Conclusions This study suggests that adults exposed to MeHg may be at risk for deficits in neurocognitive function. The functions disrupted in adults, namely attention, fine-motor function and verbal memory, are similar to some of those previously reported in children with prenatal exposures. PMID:12844364

  3. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-09-19

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies.

  5. Enhanced serotonin transporter function during depression in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Matthäus; Sitte, Harald H; Thierry, Nikolaus; Michalek, Klaus; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Zill, Peter; Winkler, Dietmar; Brannath, Werner; Fischer, Michael B; Bondy, Brigitta; Kasper, Siegfried; Singer, Ernst A

    2008-06-01

    Decreased synaptic serotonin during depressive episodes is a central element of the monoamine hypothesis of depression. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT, SERT) is a key molecule for