Science.gov

Sample records for affect large numbers

  1. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  2. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  3. Reading the World through Very Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian; Mukhopadhyay, Swapna

    2010-01-01

    One original, and continuing, source of interest in large numbers is observation of the natural world, such as trying to count the stars on a clear night or contemplation of the number of grains of sand on the seashore. Indeed, a search of the internet quickly reveals many discussions of the relative numbers of stars and grains of sand. Big…

  4. Insights into Our Understandings of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; Walker, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    This article explores prospective teachers' understandings of one million to gain insights into the development of adult understanding of large numbers. Themes in the prospective teachers' work included number associated with a quantity of objects, number as an abstraction, and additive and multiplicative approaches. The authors suggest that the…

  5. Tutoring Large Numbers: An Unmet Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentell, Helen; O'Rourke, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Open and distance learning (ODL) is increasingly being regarded as a viable policy option for developing countries with limited educational resources for buildings, books and trained teachers, seeking to increase accessibility for large numbers of learners in education and training opportunities. Advocates of ODL as an appropriate solution to…

  6. Large numbers hypothesis. I - Classical formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent formulation of physics at the classical level embodying Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) is developed based on units covariance. A scalar 'field' phi(x) is introduced and some fundamental results are derived from the resultant equations. Some unusual properties of phi are noted such as the fact that phi cannot be the correspondence limit of a normal quantum scalar field.

  7. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  8. Forecasting distribution of numbers of large fires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Howard, Stephen; Burgan, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems to estimate forest fire potential commonly utilize one or more indexes that relate to expected fire behavior; however they indicate neither the chance that a large fire will occur, nor the expected number of large fires. That is, they do not quantify the probabilistic nature of fire danger. In this work we use large fire occurrence information from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, and satellite and surface observations of fuel conditions in the form of the Fire Potential Index, to estimate two aspects of fire danger: 1) the probability that a 1 acre ignition will result in a 100+ acre fire, and 2) the probabilities of having at least 1, 2, 3, or 4 large fires within a Predictive Services Area in the forthcoming week. These statistical processes are the main thrust of the paper and are used to produce two daily national forecasts that are available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and via the Wildland Fire Assessment System. A validation study of our forecasts for the 2013 fire season demonstrated good agreement between observed and forecasted values.

  9. A Large number of fast cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Jun; Kazin, E.; Blake, C.

    2014-01-01

    Mock galaxy catalogs are essential tools to analyze large-scale structure data. Many independent realizations of mock catalogs are necessary to evaluate the uncertainties in the measurements. We perform 3600 cosmological simulations for the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey to obtain the new improved Baron Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) cosmic distance measurements using the density field "reconstruction" technique. We use 1296^3 particles in a periodic box of 600/h Mpc on a side, which is the minimum requirement from the survey volume and observed galaxies. In order to perform such large number of simulations, we developed a parallel code using the COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration (COLA) method, which can simulate cosmological large-scale structure reasonably well with only 10 time steps. Our simulation is more than 100 times faster than conventional N-body simulations; one COLA simulation takes only 15 minutes with 216 computing cores. We have completed the 3600 simulations with a reasonable computation time of 200k core hours. We also present the results of the revised WiggleZ BAO distance measurement, which are significantly improved by the reconstruction technique.

  10. [International migration: small numbers, large challenges].

    PubMed

    Garcia Y Griego, M

    1988-01-01

    Mexican immigration into the United States during the period of 1850-1980 is analyzed relying on census data. In the late 1800's immigrants worked on railway construction and on farms in the central and northern plains, but they numbered only 68,000 in 1880. Between 1900-1930 their numbers exploded from 103,000 to close to 1 million due to the demand for agricultural laborers in California and Texas. The Great Depression saw en masse repatriation, by 1940 their numbers dwindled to 377,000, and it was not until the 60's that a resurgence started. By 1970 their number was 789,000, and the corrected 1980 census figure puts their number at 2,531,000 of which 1.1 million were illegals. Most were males 15-44 years old. Mexicans born outside Mexico were only 269,000 in 1980, a figure slightly higher than Mexicans registered in the U.S. in 1910. North Americans and Spanish have been the most numerous immigrants into Mexico since the 19th century, but in recent years a massive immigration from Central America has occurred as a result of political turmoil and war. Mexican immigration into the U.S. served as a safety valve for the economy and it has been compared to other demographic phenomena such as births and deaths. The legalization of immigrants in 1986 under a U.S. law has significantly dissipated a constant source of friction with the U.S.

  11. A Feel for Numbers: Affect, Data and Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between commensuration and affect in various contexts of education policy. Commensuration is the process through which disparate qualities are transformed into a common metric and is central to the production of performance data. The rise of governance through numbers in education has resulted in a…

  12. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  13. All Numbers Are Not Equal: An Electrophysiological Investigation of Small and Large Number Representations

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Daniel C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral and brain imaging research indicates that human infants, humans adults, and many non-human animals represent large non-symbolic numbers approximately, discriminating between sets with a ratio limit on accuracy. Some behavioral evidence, especially with human infants, suggests that these representations differ from representations of small numbers of objects. To investigate neural signatures of this distinction, event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded as adult humans passively viewed the sequential presentation of dot arrays in an adaptation paradigm. In two studies, subjects viewed successive arrays of a single number of dots interspersed with test arrays presenting the same or a different number; numerical range (small numerical quantities 1-3 vs. large numerical quantities 8-24) and ratio difference varied across blocks as continuous variables were controlled. An early-evoked component (N1), observed over widespread posterior scalp locations, was modulated by absolute number with small but not large number arrays. In contrast, a later component (P2p), observed over the same scalp locations, was modulated by the ratio difference between arrays for large but not small numbers. Despite many years of experience with symbolic systems that apply equally to all numbers, adults spontaneously process small and large numbers differently. They appear to treat small-number arrays as individual objects to be tracked through space and time, and large-number arrays as cardinal values to be compared and manipulated. PMID:18752403

  14. Resurrection of large lepton number asymmetries from neutrino flavor oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Kinney, William H.; Park, Wan-Il

    2017-02-01

    We numerically solve the evolution equations of neutrino three-flavor density matrices, and show that, even if neutrino oscillations mix neutrino flavors, large lepton number asymmetries are still allowed in certain limits by big bang nucleosynthesis.

  15. Towards large-Chern-number topological phases by periodic quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tian-Shi; Gong, Jiangbin; An, Jun-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Topological phases with large Chern numbers have important implications. They were previously predicted to exist by considering fabricated long-range interactions or multilayered materials. Stimulated by recent wide interests in Floquet topological phases, here we propose a scheme to engineer large-Chern-number phases with ease by periodic quenching. Using a two-band system as an example, we theoretically show how a variety of topological phases with widely tunable Chern numbers can be generated by periodic quenching between two simple Hamiltonians that otherwise give low Chern numbers. The obtained large Chern numbers are explained through the emergence of multiple Dirac cones in the Floquet spectra. The transition lines between different topological phases in the two-band model are also explicitly found, thus establishing a class of easily solvable but very rich systems useful for further understandings and applications of topological phases in periodically driven systems.

  16. Large Number Discrimination in 6-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Fei; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments examined 6-month-olds' ability to discriminate between visual displays of various number of dots varying in size and position, and with controls for other extraneous variables. Findings indicated that infants could discriminate between large sets on the basis of numerosity if they differed by a large ratio (8 versus 16, but not 8…

  17. Explicit and probabilistic constructions of distance graphs with small clique numbers and large chromatic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupavskii, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    We study distance graphs with exponentially large chromatic numbers and without k-cliques, that is, complete subgraphs of size k. Explicit constructions of such graphs use vectors in the integer lattice. For a large class of graphs we find a sharp threshold for containing a k-clique. This enables us to improve the lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers of such graphs. We give a new probabilistic approach to the construction of distance graphs without k-cliques, and this yields better lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers for large k.

  18. Effects of Rotation on a Large Rayleigh Number Bridgman Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. R.

    1998-11-01

    It is known that rotating a Bridgman furnace in a centrifuge improves the crystal quality at large Rayleigh number(W.Weber, G. Neumann & G. Mddot u)ller, J. Crys. Growth 100, 145 (1990). Here we determine improvements achieved by rotating the ampoule about its vertical axis. We know that, in the absence of rotation, if the Rayleigh number, Ra, is large and Biot number is small, much larger solutal variations in the crystal are produced by azimuthal variations in the side-wall heating than from the axisymmetric component. However, at moderately large Taylor numbers, the first effects are to reduce the helical variation in solute concentration by inhibiting vertical motion in the melt, and so for Taylor numbers larger than O(Ra^1/6), the melt convection due to axisymmetric heating produces the larger solutal variation than that from azimuthal variations. As the Taylor number increases, the helical component of material segregation continues to decline in magnitude. However, in spite of changes in the interfacial boundary layer for Taylor numbers of order Ra^1/3 and larger, the outer flow/boundary layer coupling is unaltered for axisymmetry. It is not until the Taylor number is O(Ra^1/2) that the axisymmetric flow undergoes a change sufficiently dramatic to allow significant reduction in the material segregation from the zero-rotation case.

  19. Factors affecting European badger (Meles meles) capture numbers in one county in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew W; O'Keeffe, James; Sleeman, D Paddy; Davenport, John; Martin, S Wayne

    2013-04-01

    Understanding factors affecting the number of badgers captured at and around badger setts (burrows) is of considerable applied importance. These factors could be used to estimate probable badger densities for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) control and also for monitoring badger populations from a conservation perspective. Furthermore, badger management and vaccination programs would benefit by increasing the probability of efficiently capturing the target badger populations. Within this context, it was investigated whether badger capture numbers can be estimated from field signs and previous capture histories. Badger capture records (initial and repeated capture numbers at a sett) from a large-scale removal program (405 km(2), 643 setts) were used. Univariable count models indicated that there were a number of significant potential predictors of badger numbers, during initial capture attempts. Using a multivariable zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model of initial captures we found that badger capture numbers were significantly affected by sett type, season, year, and the number of sett entrances in active use. Badger capture numbers were also affected by the total previous catch during repeated capture events and by the number of previous capture attempts. There was a significant negative trend in badger captures across events. Measures of the ability of these models to estimate badger captures suggested that the models might be useful in estimating badger numbers across a population; however the confidence intervals associated with these predictions were large.

  20. The factorization of large composite numbers on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckurdy, Kathy J.; Wunderlich, Marvin C.

    1987-01-01

    The continued fraction method for factoring large integers (CFRAC) was an ideal algorithm to be implemented on a massively parallel computer such as the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). After much effort, the first 60 digit number was factored on the MPP using about 6 1/2 hours of array time. Although this result added about 10 digits to the size number that could be factored using CFRAC on a serial machine, it was already badly beaten by the implementation of Davis and Holdridge on the CRAY-1 using the quadratic sieve, an algorithm which is clearly superior to CFRAC for large numbers. An algorithm is illustrated which is ideally suited to the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) massively parallel architecture and some of the modifications which were needed in order to make the parallel implementation effective and efficient are described.

  1. Large negative numbers in number theory, thermodynamics, information theory, and human thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2016-10-01

    We show how the abstract analytic number theory of Maier, Postnikov, and others can be extended to include negative numbers and apply this to thermodynamics, information theory, and human thermodynamics. In particular, we introduce a certain large number N 0 on the "zero level" with a high multiplicity number q i ≫ 1 related to the physical concept of gap in the spectrum. We introduce a general notion of "hole," similar to the Dirac hole in physics, in the theory. We also consider analogs of thermodynamical notions in human thermodynamics, in particular, in connection with the role of the individual in history.

  2. Synthetic gene design with a large number of hidden stops.

    PubMed

    Phan, Vinhthuy; Saha, Sudip; Pandey, Ashutosh; Wong, Tit-Yee

    2010-01-01

    Hidden stops are nucleotide triples TAA, TAG and TGA that appear on the second and third reading frames of a protein coding gene. Recent studies suggested the important role of hidden stops in preventing misread of mRNA. We study the problem of designing protein-encoding genes with large number of hidden stops under several biological constraints. With simple constraints, redesigned genes have provable maximal number of hidden stops. With more complex constraints, redesigned genes still have many more hidden stops than wild-type genes. We showed that redesigned genes have a distinct positional advantage in assisting early termination of frame-shifts.

  3. Stellar convection 3: Convection at large Rayleigh numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    A three dimensional study of convection in a self gravitating sphere of Boussinesq fluid with a Rayleigh number of 10 to the 10th power and a Prandtl of 1 is presented. The velocity and temperature of the fluid are computed at the largest wavelengths using spectral methods. A confirmation that the fluid is anisotropic and that the energy spectra are not smooth functions of wavelength but have a large amount of fine structure is discussed. The parameterization of the transport properties of the unresolvable inertial subrange with eddy viscosities and diffusivities is described. The time dependent fluctuations in the energy spectra and how they cascade from large to small wavelengths is examined.

  4. Automated DNA extraction for large numbers of plant samples.

    PubMed

    Mehle, Nataša; Nikolić, Petra; Rupar, Matevž; Boben, Jana; Ravnikar, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2013-01-01

    The method described here is a rapid, total DNA extraction procedure applicable to a large number of plant samples requiring pathogen detection. The procedure combines a simple and quick homogenization step of crude extracts with DNA extraction based upon the binding of DNA to magnetic beads. DNA is purified in an automated process in which the magnetic beads are transferred through a series of washing buffers. The eluted DNA is suitable for efficient amplification in PCR reactions.

  5. Nonlinear instability of elementary stratified flows at large Richardson number.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J.; Shefter, Michael G.

    2000-03-01

    Elementary stably stratified flows with linear instability at all large Richardson numbers have been introduced recently by the authors [J. Fluid Mech. 376, 319-350 (1998)]. These elementary stratified flows have spatially constant but time varying gradients for velocity and density. Here the nonlinear stability of such flows in two space dimensions is studied through a combination of numerical simulations and theory. The elementary flows that are linearly unstable at large Richardson numbers are purely vortical flows; here it is established that from random initial data, linearized instability spontaneously generates local shears on buoyancy time scales near a specific angle of inclination that nonlinearly saturates into localized regions of strong mixing with density overturning resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It is also established here that the phase of these unstable waves does not satisfy the dispersion relation of linear gravity waves. The vortical flows are one family of stably stratified flows with uniform shear layers at the other extreme and elementary stably stratified flows with a mixture of vorticity and strain exhibiting behavior between these two extremes. The concept of effective shear is introduced for these general elementary flows; for each large Richardson number there is a critical effective shear with strong nonlinear instability, density overturning, and mixing for elementary flows with effective shear below this critical value. The analysis is facilitated by rewriting the equations for nonlinear perturbations in vorticity-stream form in a mean Lagrangian reference frame. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  6. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  7. Analog Magnitudes Support Large Number Ordinal Judgments in Infancy.

    PubMed

    vanMarle, Kristy; Mou, Yi; Seok, Jin H

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored the source of infants' ordinal knowledge, and those that have are equivocal regarding the underlying representational system. The present study sought clear evidence that the approximate number system, which underlies children's cardinal knowledge, may also support ordinal knowledge in infancy; 10 - to 12-month-old infants' were tested with large sets (>3) in an ordinal choice task in which they were asked to choose between two hidden sets of food items. The difficulty of the comparison varied as a function of the ratio between the sets. Infants reliably chose the greater quantity when the sets differed by a 2:3 ratio (4v6 and 6v9), but not when they differed by a 3:4 ratio (6v8) or a 7:8 ratio (7v8). This discrimination function is consistent with previous studies testing the precision of number and time representations in infants of roughly this same age, thus providing evidence that the approximate number system can support ordinal judgments in infancy. The findings are discussed in light of recent proposals that different mechanisms underlie infants' reasoning about small and large numbers.

  8. All Numbers Are Not Equal: An Electrophysiological Investigation of Small and Large Number Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Daniel C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral and brain imaging research indicates that human infants, humans adults, and many nonhuman animals represent large nonsymbolic numbers approximately, discriminating between sets with a ratio limit on accuracy. Some behavioral evidence, especially with human infants, suggests that these representations differ from representations of small…

  9. Dirac cosmology. [large dimensionless numbers relation to universe age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Lodenquai, J.

    1977-01-01

    The large numbers hypothesis (LNH) linking the magnitude of large dimensionless ratios in physics (on the order of 10 to the 40th power) to cosmic time is examined. The LNH is checked against evidence on 3K background radiation of the universe and the (log N, log S)-relation for radio galaxies. Earlier criticisms of LNH by Gamow and Teller are examined, and alternative hypotheses put forth by Dicke and Carter (1974) are discussed. The discussion covers: continuous (additive or multiplicative) creation of matter, the Einstein metric and the atomic metric, and general cosmological and local astronomical implications of LNH. LNH is also viewed in relation to solar evolution and pulsar physics.

  10. Improving CASINO performance for models with large number of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, L; Alfe, D; Hood, R Q; Tanqueray, D

    2009-05-13

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations have at their core algorithms based on statistical ensembles of multidimensional random walkers which are straightforward to use on parallel computers. Nevertheless some computations have reached the limit of the memory resources for models with more than 1000 electrons because of the need to store a large amount of electronic orbitals related data. Besides that, for systems with large number of electrons, it is interesting to study if the evolution of one configuration of random walkers can be done faster in parallel. We present a comparative study of two ways to solve these problems: (1) distributed orbital data done with MPI or Unix inter-process communication tools, (2) second level parallelism for configuration computation.

  11. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  12. Saturation of the magnetorotational instability at large Elsasser number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, B.; Julien, K.; Knobloch, E.

    2008-09-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still but not negligible. The regime explored retains the condition that (viscous and ohmic) dissipative forces do not play a role in the leading order linear instability mechanism. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  13. Saturation of the Magnetorotational Instability at Large Elssaser Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Keith; Jamroz, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2009-11-01

    The MRI is believed to play an important role in accretion disk physics in extracting angular momentum from the disk and allowing accretion to take place. The instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation under conditions of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory. The shear is taken to be the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are suffiently weak that the Elsasser number is large. Thus dissipative forces do not play a role in the leading order linear instability mechanism. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from simulations of the model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of angular momentum transport.

  14. Viscous range of turbulent scalar of large Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, J.

    1995-02-01

    The analytical theory of a turbulent scalar, developed in previous papers is extended to the case of large Prandtl number. The fluctuation character of the least principal rate of strain gamma has an important effect upon the scalar spectrum. The scalar variance spectrum in the viscous range is F(k) = 4.472 (nu/epsilon)(exp 1/2) chi k(exp -1) H(x), X is identical to (k/k(sub b))(exp 2), H(x) is a dimensionless universal function and is determined by solving numerically the closed spectral dynamical equations. A simple fitting formula of the numerical result is H(x) = 0.7687 exp(- 3.79x) + 0.2313 exp(-11.13 x), which corresponds a two-values fluctuation model of gamma. Here upsilon is the kinematic viscosity, k(sub b) is identical to (epsilon/upsilon mu(exp 2))(exp 1/4) is the Batchelor wavenumber, mu is the scalar diffusivity, and epsilon and eni are respectively the energy and variance dissipation rates.

  15. First Contact with Astronomy for a Large Number of Pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Spanish Royal Society of Physics (RSEF) co-operates with several European institutions to promote Physics and Astronomy in schools through the project ""Fisica en Acción"". This project started in 2000 integrated with the project ""Physics on Stage"" created by CERN ESA and ESO. ""Fisica en Accion"" is a Spanish competition bringing together a group of teachers in a common endeavour: * showing ""physics demonstrations"" to general audiences * engaging pedagogical presentations to introduce science into the classroom. The national final event of this competition takes place annually in a science museum during one weekend (entrance is free). The Science Fair is especially well received by visitors who can ask the demonstrators-teachers questions. Younger visitors enjoy experimenting for themselves. After the first year the RSEF introduced special prizes to encourage schools to participate in astronomical categories. The ""Centro de Astrobiologia de Madrid"" gave a cash prize and a visit to their headquarters to the winners. The ""Instituto Astrofísico de Canarias"" offered a prize of a trip to its observatories. In summary the astronomical elements of ""Fisica en Acción"" stimulate the teachers and students' interest in international activities and has been the first contact with Astronomy for a large number of pupils.

  16. Multiassignment for tracking a large number of overlapping objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov; Pattipati, Krishna R.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for data association using multiassignment for tracking a large number of closely spaced (and overlapping) objects. The algorithm is illustrated on a biomedical problem, namely the tracking of a group of fibroblast (tissue) cells from an image sequence, which motivated this work. The algorithm presents a novel iterated approach to multiassignment using successive one-to-one assignments of decreasing size with modified costs. The cost functions, which are adjusted depending on the 'depth' of the current assignment level and on the tracking results, are derived. The resulting assignments are used to form, maintain and terminate tracks with a modified version of the probabilistic data association filter, which can handle the contention for a single measurement among multiple tracks in addition to the association of multiple measurements to a single track. Estimation results are given and compared with those of the standard 2-dimensional one-to-one assignment algorithm. It is shown that iterated multiassignment results in superior measurement-to- track association.

  17. Generation of Large Numbers of Independently Transformed Fertile Barley Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Y.; Lemaux, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    A rapid, efficient, and reproducible system to generate large numbers of independently transformed, self-fertile, transgenic barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants is described. Immature zygotic embryos, young callus, and microspore-derived embryos were bombarded with a plasmid containing bar and uidA either alone or in combination with another plasmid containing a barley yellow dwarf virus coat protein (BYDVcp) gene. A total of 91 independent bialaphos-resistant callus lines expressed functional phosphinothricin acetyltransferase, the product of bar. Integration of bar was confirmed by DNA hybridization in the 67 lines analyzed. Co-transformation frequencies of 84 and 85% were determined for the two linked genes (bar and uidA) and for two unlinked genes (bar and the BYDVcp gene), respectively. More than 500 green, fertile, transgenic plants were regenerated from 36 transformed callus lines on bialaphos-containing medium; albino plants only were regenerated from 41 lines. T0 plants in 25 lines (three plants per line) were analyzed by DNA hybridization, and all contained bar. Most contained the same integration patterns for the introduced genes (bar, uidA, and the BYDVcp gene) as their parental callus lines. Transmission of the genes to T1 progeny was confirmed in the five families analyzed by DNA hybridization. A germination test of immature T1 embryos on bialaphos-containing medium was useful for selecting individuals that were actively expressing bar, although this was not a good indicator of the presence or absence of bar. Expression of bar in some progeny plants was indicated by resistance to the herbicide Basta. The T1 plants were in soil approximately 7 months after bombardment of the immature embryo. PMID:12232059

  18. The large lungs of elite swimmers: an increased alveolar number?

    PubMed

    Armour, J; Donnelly, P M; Bye, P T

    1993-02-01

    In order to obtain further insight into the mechanisms relating to the large lung volumes of swimmers, tests of mechanical lung function, including lung distensibility (K) and elastic recoil, pulmonary diffusion capacity, and respiratory mouth pressures, together with anthropometric data (height, weight, body surface area, chest width, depth and surface area), were compared in eight elite male swimmers, eight elite male long distance athletes and eight control subjects. The differences in training profiles of each group were also examined. There was no significant difference in height between the subjects, but the swimmers were younger than both the runners and controls, and both the swimmers and controls were heavier than the runners. Of all the training variables, only the mean total distance in kilometers covered per week was significantly greater in the runners. Whether based on: (a) adolescent predicted values; or (b) adult male predicted values, swimmers had significantly increased total lung capacity ((a) 145 +/- 22%, (mean +/- SD) (b) 128 +/- 15%); vital capacity ((a) 146 +/- 24%, (b) 124 +/- 15%); and inspiratory capacity ((a) 155 +/- 33%, (b) 138 +/- 29%), but this was not found in the other two groups. Swimmers also had the largest chest surface area and chest width. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was largest in the swimmers ((b) 122 +/- 17%) and FEV1 as a percentage of forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC)% was similar for the three groups. Pulmonary diffusing capacity (DLCO) was also highest in the swimmers (117 +/- 18%). All of the other indices of lung function, including pulmonary distensibility (K), elastic recoil and diffusion coefficient (KCO), were similar. These findings suggest that swimmers may have achieved greater lung volumes than either runners or control subjects, not because of greater inspiratory muscle strength, or differences in height, fat free mass, alveolar distensibility, age at start of training or sternal length or

  19. Detecting Large Copy Number Variants Using Exome Genotyping Arrays In a Large Swedish Schizophrenia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Neale, Benjamin M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Fromer, Menachem; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Chambert, Kimberly; Kähler, Anna; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Hultman, Christina M.; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steven A.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Although copy number variants (CNVs) are important in genomic medicine, CNVs have not been systematically assessed for many complex traits. Several large rare CNVs increase risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism and often demonstrate pleiotropic effects; however, their frequencies in the general population and other complex traits are unknown. Genotyping large numbers of samples is essential for progress. Large cohorts from many different diseases are being genotyped using exome-focused arrays designed to detect uncommon or rare protein-altering sequence variation. Although these arrays were not designed for CNV detection, the hybridization intensity data generated in each experiment could, in principle, be used for gene-focused CNV analysis. Our goal was to evaluate the extent to which CNVs can be detected using data from one particular exome array (the Illumina Human Exome Bead Chip). We genotyped 9, 100 Swedish subjects (3, 962 cases with SCZ and 5, 138 controls) using both standard GWAS arrays and exome arrays. In comparison to CNVs detected using GWAS arrays, we observed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting genic CNVs ≥400 kb including known pathogentic CNVs along with replicating the literature finding that cases with SCZ had greater enrichment for genic CNVs. Our data confirm the association of SCZ with 16p11.2 duplications and 22q11.2 deletions and suggest a novel association with deletions at 11q12.2. Our results suggest the utility of exome focused arrays in surveying large genic CNVs in very large samples; and thereby open the door for new opportunities such as conducting well-powered CNV assessment and comparisons between different diseases. The use of a single platform also minimizes potential confounding factors that could impact accurate detection. PMID:23938935

  20. 27% Probable: Estimating Whether or Not Large Numbers Are Prime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This brief investigation exemplifies such considerations by relating concepts from number theory, set theory, probability, logic, and calculus. Satisfying the call for students to acquire skills in estimation, the following technique allows one to "immediately estimate" whether or not a number is prime. (MM)

  1. A MODEL OF NONBELIEF IN THE LAW OF LARGE NUMBERS

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel J.; Rabin, Matthew; Raymond, Collin

    2015-01-01

    People believe that, even in very large samples, proportions of binary signals might depart significantly from the population mean. We model this “non-belief in the Law of Large Numbers” by assuming that a person believes that proportions in any given sample might be determined by a rate different than the true rate. In prediction, a non-believer expects the distribution of signals will have fat tails. In inference, a non-believer remains uncertain and influenced by priors even after observing an arbitrarily large sample. We explore implications for beliefs and behavior in a variety of economic settings. PMID:27087795

  2. The Law of Large Numbers and Poker Machine Simulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Rod

    2000-01-01

    Creates graphs to see how the relative frequency of an event tends to approach the probability of that event as the number of trials increases. Uses a simulation of a poker machine to provide context for this subject. (ASK)

  3. The absence of numbers to express the amount may affect delay discounting with humans.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Huerta, Hugo E; Dos Santos, Cristiano V

    2016-09-01

    Human delay discounting is usually studied with experimental protocols that use symbols to express delay and amount. In order to further understand discounting, we evaluated whether the absence of numbers to represent reward amounts affects discount rate in general, and whether the magnitude effect is generalized to nonsymbolic situations in particular. In Experiment 1, human participants were exposed to a delay-discounting task in which rewards were presented using dots to represent monetary rewards (nonsymbolic); under this condition the magnitude effect did not occur. Nevertheless, the magnitude effect was observed when equivalent reward amounts were presented using numbers (symbolic). Moreover, in estimation tasks, magnitude increments produced underestimation of large amounts. In Experiment 2, participants were exposed only to the nonsymbolic discounting task and were required to estimate reward amounts in each trial. Consistent with Experiment 1, the absence of numbers representing reward amounts produced similar discount rates of small and large rewards. These results suggest that value of nonsymbolic rewards is a nonlinear function of amount and that value attribution depends on perceived difference between the immediate and the delayed nonsymbolic rewards.

  4. Planing-surface Tests at Large Froude Numbers - Airfoil Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambraus, A

    1938-01-01

    The take-off capacity of a flying boat depends upon the design of the hull bottom ahead as well as aft of the step. Systematic tests - largely made by industry itself - had proved the benefit accruing from a well designed hull bottom long before theoretical insight into the flow phenomena involved had been obtained. The theoretical framing of the problem was beset with serious difficulties and, though restricted to the processes within range of the planing bottom ahead of the step, the solutions do not yet afford a comprehensive survey.

  5. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Harvey F; Patterson, William R; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m x 8 m x 3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  6. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Harvey F.; Patterson, William R.; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m×8 m×3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  7. Inclined layer convection in a colloidal suspension with negative Soret coefficient at large solutal Rayleigh numbers.

    PubMed

    Italia, Matteo; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Scheffold, Frank; Vailati, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Convection in an inclined layer of fluid is affected by the presence of a component of the acceleration of gravity perpendicular to the density gradient that drives the convective motion. In this work we investigate the solutal convection of a colloidal suspension characterized by a negative Soret coefficient. Convection is induced by heating the suspension from above, and at large solutal Rayleigh numbers (of the order of 10(7)-10(8)) convective spoke patterns form. We show that in the presence of a marginal inclination of the cell as small as 19 mrad the isotropy of the spoke pattern is broken and the convective patterns tend to align in the direction of the inclination. At intermediate inclinations of the order of 33 mrad ordered square patterns are obtained, while at inclination of the order of 67 mrad the strong shear flow determined by the inclination gives rise to ascending and descending sheets of fluid aligned parallel to the direction of inclination.

  8. Small and Large Number Processing in Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Ansari, Daniel; Xu, Fei; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that typically developing 6-month-old infants are able to discriminate between small and large numerosities. However, discrimination between small numerosities in young infants is only possible when variables continuous with number (e.g. area or circumference) are confounded. In contrast, large number discrimination…

  9. High resolution mapping of genetic factors affecting abdominal bristle number in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A.D. |; Mullaney, S.L.; Langley, C.H.; Reid, L.A.; Fry, J.D.; Mackay, T.F.C.

    1995-03-01

    Factors responsible for selection response for abdominal bristle number and correlated responses in sternopleural bristle number were mapped to the X and third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Lines divergent for high and low abdominal bristle number were created by 25 generations of artificial selection from a large base population, with an intensity of 25 individuals of each sex selected from 100 individuals of each sex scored per generation. Isogenic chromosome substitution lines in which the high (H) X or third chromosome were placed in an isogenic low (L) background were derived from the selection lines and from the 93 recombinant isogenic (RI) HL X and 67 RI chromosome 3 lines constructed from them. Highly polymorphic neutral roo transposable elements were hybridized in situ to the polytene chromosomes of the RI lines to create a set of cytogenetic markers. These techniques yielded a dense map with an average spacing of 4 cM between informative markers. Two factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were mapped on the X chromosome and five factors on the third chromosome. One factor with a large effect on sternopleural bristle number was mapped to the X and two were mapped to the third chromosome; all factors with sternopleural effects corresponded to those with effects on abdominal bristle number. Two of the chromosome 3 factors with large effects on abdominal bristle number were also associated with reduced viability. Significant sex-specific effects and epistatic interactions between mapped factors of the same order of magnitude as the additive effects were observed. All factors mapped to the approximate positions of likely candidate loci previously characterized by mutations with large effects on bristle number. 55 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Cosmonumerology, Cosmophysics, and the Large Numbers Hypothesis: British Cosmology in the 1930s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Ian

    2001-04-01

    A number of unorthodox cosmological models were developed in the 1930s, many by British theoreticians. Three of the most notable of these theories included Eddington's cosmonumerology, Milne's cosmophysics, and Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). Dirac's LNH was based partly on the other two and it has been argued that modern steady-state theories are based partly on Milne's cosmophysics. But what influenced Eddington and Milne? Both were products of the late Victorian education system in Britain and could conceivably have been influenced by Victorian thought which, in addition to its strict (though technically unoffical) social caste system, had a flair for the unusual. Victorianism was filled with a fascination for the occult and the supernatural, and science was not insulated from this trend (witness the Henry Slade trial in 1877). It is conceivable that the normally strict mentality of the scientific process in the minds of Eddington and Milne was affected, indirectly, by this trend for the unusual, possibly pushing them into thinking "outside the box" as it were. In addition, cosmonumerology and the LNH exhibit signs of Pythagorean and Aristotelian thought. It is the aim of this ongoing project at St. Andrews to determine the influences and characterize the relations existing in and within these and related theories.

  11. How large-scale subsidence affects stratocumulus transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Dussen, J. J.; de Roode, S. R.; Siebesma, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Some climate modeling results suggest that the Hadley circulation might weaken in a future climate, causing a subsequent reduction in the large-scale subsidence velocity in the subtropics. In this study we analyze the cloud liquid water path (LWP) budget from large-eddy simulation (LES) results of three idealized stratocumulus transition cases, each with a different subsidence rate. As shown in previous studies a reduced subsidence is found to lead to a deeper stratocumulus-topped boundary layer, an enhanced cloud-top entrainment rate and a delay in the transition of stratocumulus clouds into shallow cumulus clouds during its equatorwards advection by the prevailing trade winds. The effect of a reduction of the subsidence rate can be summarized as follows. The initial deepening of the stratocumulus layer is partly counteracted by an enhanced absorption of solar radiation. After some hours the deepening of the boundary layer is accelerated by an enhancement of the entrainment rate. Because this is accompanied by a change in the cloud-base turbulent fluxes of moisture and heat, the net change in the LWP due to changes in the turbulent flux profiles is negligibly small.

  12. Does NBPTS Certification Affect the Number of Colleagues a Teacher Helps with Instructional Matters?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Kenneth A.; Sykes, Gary; Anagnostopoulos, Dorothea; Cannata, Marisa; Chard, Linda; Krause, Ann; McCrory, Raven

    2008-01-01

    In addition to identifying and developing superior classroom teaching, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification process is intended to identify and cultivate teachers who are more engaged in their schools. Here the authors ask, "Does NBPTS certification affect the number of colleagues a teacher helps with…

  13. Passage number affects the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells as judged by tetraploid embryo aggregation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Jia, Qing; Di, Ke-Qian; Gao, Shu-Min; Wen, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Rong-Yan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Li-Ze

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the number of passages affected the developmental pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells as measured by the attainment of adult fertile mice derived from embryonic stem (ES) cell/tetraploid embryo complementation. Thirty-six newborns were produced by the aggregation of tetraploid embryos and hybrid ES cells after various numbers of passages. These newborns were entirely derived from ES cells as judged by microsatellite DNA, coat-color phenotype, and germline transmission. Although 15 survived to adulthood, 17 died of respiratory failure, and four were eaten by their foster mother. From the 15 mice that reached adulthood and that could reproduce, none arose from ES cells at passage level 15 or more. All 15 arose from cells at passages 3-11. Our results demonstrate that the number of passages affects the developmental pluripotency of ES cells.

  14. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  15. Ratio dependence in small number discrimination is affected by the experimental procedure

    PubMed Central

    Agrillo, Christian; Piffer, Laura; Bisazza, Angelo; Butterworth, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Adults, infants and some non-human animals share an approximate number system (ANS) to estimate numerical quantities, and are supposed to share a second, ‘object-tracking,’ system (OTS) that supports the precise representation of a small number of items (up to 3 or 4). In relative numerosity judgments, accuracy depends on the ratio of the two numerosities (Weber’s Law) for numerosities >4 (the typical ANS range), while for numerosities ≤4 (OTS range) there is usually no ratio effect. However, recent studies have found evidence for ratio effects for small numerosities, challenging the idea that the OTS might be involved for small number discrimination. Here we tested the hypothesis that the lack of ratio effect in the numbers 1–4 is largely dependent on the type of stimulus presentation. We investigated relative numerosity judgments in college students using three different procedures: a simultaneous presentation of intermingled and separate groups of dots in separate experiments, and a further experiment with sequential presentation. As predicted, in the large number range, ratio dependence was observed in all tasks. By contrast, in the small number range, ratio insensitivity was found in one task (sequential presentation). In a fourth experiment, we showed that the presence of intermingled distractors elicited a ratio effect, while easily distinguishable distractors did not. As the different ratio sensitivity for small and large numbers has been often interpreted in terms of the activation of the OTS and ANS, our results suggest that numbers 1–4 may be represented by both numerical systems and that the experimental context, such as the presence/absence of task-irrelevant items in the visual field, would determine which system is activated. PMID:26579032

  16. Large-Eddy Simulation Analysis of Unsteady Separation Over a Pitching Airfoil at High Reynolds Number

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-24

    helicopter rotor blades, wind turbine blades, pitching and flapping airfoils and wings , and rotating turbomachinery blades. For instance, helicopter...of turbulent flow over a pitching airfoil at realistic Reynolds and Mach numbers is performed. Numerical stability at high Reynolds number...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Large-Eddy Simulation Analysis of Unsteady Separation Over a Pitching Airfoil at High Reynolds

  17. Toddler Subtraction with Large Sets: Further Evidence for an Analog-Magnitude Representation of Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Virginia; Kamppi, Dorian; Paynter, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that toddlers have access to an analog-magnitude number representation that supports numerical reasoning about relatively large numbers. Three-year-olds were presented with subtraction problems in which initial set size and proportions subtracted were systematically varied. Two sets of cookies…

  18. On the period of the coherent structure in boundary layers at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, M. A. B.; Marvin, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The period of the large coherent structure in a subsonic, compressible, turbulent boundary layer was determined using the autocorrelation of the velocity and pressure fluctuations for Reynolds numbers between 5,000 and 35,000. In low Reynolds number flows the overall correlation period scaled with the outer variables - namely, the free stream velocity and the boundary layer thickness.

  19. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  20. Airfoil Section Characteristics as Affected by Variations of the Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Sherman, Albert

    1937-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation of a systematically chosen representative group of related airfoils conducted in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel over a wide range of Reynolds number extending well into the flight range. The tests were made to provide information from which the variations of airfoil section characteristics with changes in the Reynolds number could be inferred and methods of allowing for these variations in practice could be determined. This work is one phase of an extensive and general airfoil investigation being conducted in the variable-density tunnel and extends the previously published researches concerning airfoil characteristics as affected by variations in airfoil profile determined at a single value of the Reynolds number.

  1. A method for estimating the effective number of loci affecting a quantitative character.

    PubMed

    Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-11-01

    A likelihood method is introduced that jointly estimates the number of loci and the additive effect of alleles that account for the genetic variance of a normally distributed quantitative character in a randomly mating population. The method assumes that measurements of the character are available from one or both parents and an arbitrary number of full siblings. The method uses the fact, first recognized by Karl Pearson in 1904, that the variance of a character among offspring depends on both the parental phenotypes and on the number of loci. Simulations show that the method performs well provided that data from a sufficient number of families (on the order of thousands) are available. This method assumes that the loci are in Hardy-Weinberg and linkage equilibrium but does not assume anything about the linkage relationships. It performs equally well if all loci are on the same non-recombining chromosome provided they are in linkage equilibrium. The method can be adapted to take account of loci already identified as being associated with the character of interest. In that case, the method estimates the number of loci not already known to affect the character. The method applied to measurements of crown-rump length in 281 family trios in a captive colony of African green monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiopus sabaeus) estimates the number of loci to be 112 and the additive effect to be 0.26 cm. A parametric bootstrap analysis shows that a rough confidence interval has a lower bound of 14 loci.

  2. Solar concentration properties of flat fresnel lenses with large F-numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The solar concentration performances of flat, line-focusing sun-tracking Fresnel lenses with selected f-numbers between 0.9 and 2.0 were analyzed. Lens transmittance was found to have a weak dependence on f-number, with a 2% increase occuring as the f-number is increased from 0.9 to 2.0. The geometric concentration ratio for perfectly tracking lenses peaked for an f-number near 1.35. Intensity profiles were more uniform over the image extent for large f-number lenses when compared to the f/0.9 lens results. Substantial decreases in geometri concentration ratios were observed for transverse tracking errors equal to or below 1 degree for all f-number lenses. With respect to tracking errors, the solar performance is optimum for f-numbers between 1.25 and 1.5.

  3. Effect of the capillary meniscus height on the instability of large Prandtl number Czochralski melt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, E.; Kit, E.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of the capillary meniscus on the instability of large Prandtl number Czochralski melt flow is studied experimentally. The measurements are conducted in two experimental facilities by two independent non-intrusive optical techniques. The quantitative results are presented as dependencies of the critical Grashof number (critical temperature difference) on the meniscus height for different Prandtl numbers, radii and aspect ratios. The results show that with increase of the meniscus height the critical temperature difference noticeably grows and sometimes doubles. Recently reported parametric relations for the critical Grashof number and oscillations frequency are extended to include parameters of the meniscus.

  4. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  5. Factors affecting the numbers of expected viable lactic acid bacteria in inoculant applicator tanks.

    PubMed

    Windle, M C; Kung, L

    2016-11-01

    The application of correct numbers of viable microorganisms to forages at the time of ensiling is one of the most important factors affecting the probability of a beneficial effect from an inoculant. The objective of this study was to determine relationships between numbers of expected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from silage inoculants in application tanks and various factors that might affect their viability. The pH and temperature of inoculant-water mixes were measured in applicator tanks (n=53) on farms in Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and California during the corn harvest season of 2012. Samples were collected on-farm and plated on de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe agar to enumerate LAB and establish the number of viable LAB (cfu/mL). Expected numbers of LAB were calculated from the minimum label guarantees for viable bacteria and mixing rates with water. In addition, the pH of the inoculant-water mixes at sampling, the ambient temperature at sampling, and the length of time that the samples had been in the tank were measured and obtained. The log difference between the measured and expected numbers of LAB was calculated and expressed as ΔM - E in log scale. Ambient temperature at sampling had no relationship with time in the tank or ΔM - E. Most (83%) of the inoculants had been mixed with water in the applicator tanks for <10h. For these samples, a negative linear correlation (R(2)=0.36) existed between time that the inoculant-water mixes were in the applicators tanks and ΔM - E. The pH of the inoculant-water mixes was also negatively correlated (R(2)=0.28) with time in the applicator tank, but pH was not related to ΔM - E. The temperatures of the inoculant-water mixtures were negatively correlated with ΔM - E (R(2)=0.39). Seven of 8 samples whose ΔM - E were at least -0.95 or more lower than expected (equivalent of about 1 or more log concentration less than expected) had water temperatures above 35°C. These data support our previous laboratory findings

  6. Factors which affect spatial resolving power in large array biomagnetic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, E.R. )

    1994-04-01

    A reduced chi-squared test has been used to evaluate factors that affect the spatial resolving power of large array biomagnetic sensors for the brain. Realistic array geometries are used and a classical description of spatial resolving power is applied to determine when two separate sources may be resolved. Array parameters such as sensor spacing, coil diameter, and gradiometer type are varied to determine their effect on spatial resolving power. The consequences of the number of sensors is considered and a comparison of existing systems is made. The effects of the vector nature of magnetic sources on spatial resolving power is also considered. It is shown that spatial resolving power is not strongly dependent upon individual sensor diameter, but that sensor spacing is important. It is also found that the instrumental spatial resolving power as a function of depth degrades much more quickly when planar gradiometers are used, as compared to axial gradiometers.

  7. Number Frequency in L1 Differentially Affects Immediate Serial Recall of Numbers in L2 between Beginning and Intermediate Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumioka, Norihiko; Williams, Atsuko; Yamada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A list number recall test in English (L2) was administered to both Japanese (L1) students with beginning-level English proficiency who attended evening high school and Japanese college students with intermediate-level English proficiency. The major findings were that, only for the high school group, the small numbers 1 and 2 in middle positions of…

  8. On large-scale dynamo action at high magnetic Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic activity—dynamo waves—in the astrophysical limit of very large magnetic Reynolds number. We consider kinematic dynamo action for a system consisting of helical flow and large-scale shear. We demonstrate that large-scale dynamo waves persist at high Rm if the helical flow is characterized by a narrow band of spatial scales and the shear is large enough. However, for a wide band of scales the dynamo becomes small scale with a further increase of Rm, with dynamo waves re-emerging only if the shear is then increased. We show that at high Rm, the key effect of the shear is to suppress small-scale dynamo action, allowing large-scale dynamo action to be observed. We conjecture that this supports a general 'suppression principle'—large-scale dynamo action can only be observed if there is a mechanism that suppresses the small-scale fluctuations.

  9. Eulerian models for particle trajectory crossing in turbulent flows over a large range of Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Vie, Aymeric; Laurent, Frederique; Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Numerous applications involve a disperse phase carried by a gaseous flow. To simulate such flows, one can resort to a number density function (NDF) governed a kinetic equation. Traditionally, Lagrangian Monte-Carlo methods are used to solve for the NDF, but are expensive as the number of numerical particles needed must be large to control statistical errors. Moreover, such methods are not well adapted to high-performance computing because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the NDF. To overcome these issues, Eulerian methods can be used to solve for the moments of the NDF resulting in an unclosed Eulerian system of hyperbolic conservation laws. To obtain closure, in this work a multivariate bi-Gaussian quadrature is used, which can account for particle trajectory crossing (PTC) over a large range of Stokes numbers. This closure uses up to four quadrature points in 2-D velocity phase space to capture large-scale PTC, and an anisotropic Gaussian distribution around each quadrature point to model small-scale PTC. Simulations of 2-D particle-laden isotropic turbulence at different Stokes numbers are employed to validate the Eulerian models against results from the Lagrangian approach. Good agreement is found for the number density fields over the entire range of Stokes numbers tested. Research carried out at the Center for Turbulence Research 2012 Summer Program.

  10. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  11. Assessment of sugarcane yield potential across large numbers of genotypes using canopy reflectance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy reflectance indices have been used to monitor plant growth and estimate yields in many field crops. Little is known if canopy reflectance of sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) can be used to estimate growth and yield potential across large numbers of genotypes (clones) in the earl...

  12. Resistance law for a turbulent Taylor-Couette flow at very large Taylor numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balonishnikov, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Based on the semi-empirical model of the transport of the specific rate of turbulence energy dissipation, it has been concluded that the resistance laws are observed for a turbulent Taylor-Couette flow between independently rotating coaxial cylinders for very large Taylor numbers.

  13. Infants Use Different Mechanisms to Make Small and Large Number Ordinal Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vanMarle, Kristy

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown indirectly that infants may use two different mechanisms-an object tracking system and an analog magnitude mechanism--to represent small (less than 4) and large (greater than or equal to 4) numbers of objects, respectively. The current study directly tested this hypothesis in an ordinal choice task by presenting 10- to…

  14. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    PubMed Central

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier–Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number’. PMID:28167585

  15. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  16. Unusually Large Number of Mutations in Asexually Reproducing Clonal Planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Osamu; Hosoda, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Eri; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Inoue, Takeshi; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    We established a laboratory clonal strain of freshwater planarian (Dugesia japonica) that was derived from a single individual and that continued to undergo autotomous asexual reproduction for more than 20 years, and we performed large-scale genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis on it. Despite the fact that a completely clonal strain of the planarian was used, an unusually large number of mutations were detected. To enable quantitative genetic analysis of such a unique organism, we developed a new model called the Reference Gene Model, and used it to conduct large-scale transcriptome analysis. The results revealed large numbers of mutations not only outside but also inside gene-coding regions. Non-synonymous SNPs were detected in 74% of the genes for which valid ORFs were predicted. Interestingly, the high-mutation genes, such as metabolism- and defense-related genes, were correlated with genes that were previously identified as diverse genes among different planarian species. Although a large number of amino acid substitutions were apparently accumulated during asexual reproduction over this long period of time, the planarian maintained normal body-shape, behaviors, and physiological functions. The results of the present study reveal a unique aspect of asexual reproduction.

  17. Unusually Large Number of Mutations in Asexually Reproducing Clonal Planarian Dugesia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Osamu; Hosoda, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Eri; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Inoue, Takeshi; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    We established a laboratory clonal strain of freshwater planarian (Dugesia japonica) that was derived from a single individual and that continued to undergo autotomous asexual reproduction for more than 20 years, and we performed large-scale genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis on it. Despite the fact that a completely clonal strain of the planarian was used, an unusually large number of mutations were detected. To enable quantitative genetic analysis of such a unique organism, we developed a new model called the Reference Gene Model, and used it to conduct large-scale transcriptome analysis. The results revealed large numbers of mutations not only outside but also inside gene-coding regions. Non-synonymous SNPs were detected in 74% of the genes for which valid ORFs were predicted. Interestingly, the high-mutation genes, such as metabolism- and defense-related genes, were correlated with genes that were previously identified as diverse genes among different planarian species. Although a large number of amino acid substitutions were apparently accumulated during asexual reproduction over this long period of time, the planarian maintained normal body-shape, behaviors, and physiological functions. The results of the present study reveal a unique aspect of asexual reproduction. PMID:26588467

  18. Scaling of heat flux and energy spectrum for very large Prandtl number convection.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ambrish; Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K

    2014-02-01

    Under the limit of infinite Prandtl number, we derive analytical expressions for the large-scale quantities, e.g., Péclet number Pe, Nusselt number Nu, and rms value of the temperature fluctuations θ(rms). We complement the analytical work with direct numerical simulations, and show that Nu ∼ Ra(γ) with γ ≈ (0.30-0.32), Pe ∼ Ra(η) with η ≈ (0.57-0.61), and θ(rms) ∼ const. The Nusselt number is observed to be an intricate function of Pe, θ(rms), and a correlation function between the vertical velocity and temperature. Using the scaling of large-scale fields, we show that the energy spectrum E(u)(k) ∼ k(-13/3), which is in a very good agreement with our numerical results. The entropy spectrum E(θ)(k), however, exhibits dual branches consisting of k(-2) and k(0) spectra; the k(-2) branch corresponds to the Fourier modes θ[over ̂](0,0,2n), which are approximately -1/(2 nπ). The scaling relations for Prandtl number beyond 10(2) match with those for infinite Prandtl number.

  19. Large Chern-number topological superfluids in a coupled-layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Beibing; Chan, Chun Fai; Gong, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Large Chern-number topological phase is always an important topic in modern physics. Here we investigate the topological superfluids in a coupled-layer system, in which transitions between different topological superfluids can be realized by controlling the binding energy, interlayer tunneling, and layer asymmetry, etc. These topological transitions are characterized by energy gap closing and reopening at the critical points at zero momentum, where the Chern number and sign of Pfaffian undergo a discontinuous change. Topological protected edge modes at the boundaries are ensured by the bulk-edge correspondence. In a trapped potential the edge modes are spatially localized at the interfaces between distinct topological superfluids, where the number of edge modes is equal to the Chern-number difference between the left and right superfluids. These topological transitions can be detected by spin texture at or near zero momentum, which changes discretely across the critical points due to band inversion. The model can be generalized to a multilayer system in which the Chern number can be equal to any positive integer. These large Chern-number topological superfluids provide fertile grounds for exploring exotic quantum matters in the context of ultracold atoms.

  20. Genome size variation affects song attractiveness in grasshoppers: evidence for sexual selection against large genomes.

    PubMed

    Schielzeth, Holger; Streitner, Corinna; Lampe, Ulrike; Franzke, Alexandra; Reinhold, Klaus

    2014-12-01

    Genome size is largely uncorrelated to organismal complexity and adaptive scenarios. Genetic drift as well as intragenomic conflict have been put forward to explain this observation. We here study the impact of genome size on sexual attractiveness in the bow-winged grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus. Grasshoppers show particularly large variation in genome size due to the high prevalence of supernumerary chromosomes that are considered (mildly) selfish, as evidenced by non-Mendelian inheritance and fitness costs if present in high numbers. We ranked male grasshoppers by song characteristics that are known to affect female preferences in this species and scored genome sizes of attractive and unattractive individuals from the extremes of this distribution. We find that attractive singers have significantly smaller genomes, demonstrating that genome size is reflected in male courtship songs and that females prefer songs of males with small genomes. Such a genome size dependent mate preference effectively selects against selfish genetic elements that tend to increase genome size. The data therefore provide a novel example of how sexual selection can reinforce natural selection and can act as an agent in an intragenomic arms race. Furthermore, our findings indicate an underappreciated route of how choosy females could gain indirect benefits.

  1. Trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptomatology in older persons affected by a large-magnitude disaster.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert H; Van Ness, Peter H; Fried, Terri R; Galea, Sandro; Norris, Fran H

    2013-04-01

    This study examined the nature and determinants of longitudinal trajectories of disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in older persons affected by a large-magnitude disaster. Two hundred six adults age 60 or older (mean = 69, range = 60-92) who resided in the Galveston Bay area when Hurricane Ike struck in September 2008 completed telephone interviews an average of 3-, 6-, and 15-months after this disaster. Latent growth mixture modeling was employed to identify predominant trajectories of disaster-related PTSD symptoms over time; and pre-, peri-, and post-disaster determinants of these trajectories were then examined. A 3-class solution optimally characterized PTSD symptom trajectories, with the majority (78.7%) of the sample having low/no PTSD symptoms over all assessments (i.e., resistant); 16.0% having chronically elevated symptoms (i.e., chronic); and 5.3% having a delayed onset course of symptoms (i.e., delayed-onset). Lower education, greater severity of Hurricane Ike exposure (i.e., Ike-related physical illness or injury and high level of community destruction), and greater number of traumatic and stressful life events after Hurricane Ike, particularly financial problems, were associated with a chronic PTSD trajectory. Greater number of traumatic and stressful life events, particularly financial problems after Hurricane Ike, was also associated with a delayed-onset trajectory. These findings suggest that there are heterogeneous trajectories of disaster-related PTSD symptoms in older adults and that these trajectories have common and unique determinants. They also underscore the importance of prevention efforts designed to mitigate the deleterious effects of post-disaster stressors, most notably financial distress, in older persons affected by disasters.

  2. Indirect interband transition induced by optical near fields with large wave numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Optical near fields (ONFs) have Fourier components with large wave numbers that are two or three orders of magnitude larger than those of far-field propagating light owing to their nonuniformity in space. By utilizing these large wave numbers, the ONF is expected to induce an indirect interband transition between Bloch states having different wave numbers and directly generate an electron-hole pair without electron-phonon coupling. We perform time-dependent dynamics calculations of a one-dimensional periodic potential with an indirect band-gap structure and demonstrate that the ONF definitely induces an indirect interband transition. Instead of using the general Bloch boundary condition, which is usually imposed in conventional band structure calculations, we adopt an alternative boundary condition, the Born-von Kármán boundary condition, to appropriately treat indirect interband transitions. The calculated absorption spectra for the far-field and ONF excitations show different absorption edges and spectral patterns. We argue that this difference can be experimentally measured as evidence of the effects of the large wave numbers of the ONF.

  3. Does the learning of two symbolic sets of numbers affect the automaticity of number processing in children?

    PubMed

    Hochman Cohen, Hila; Berger, Andrea; Rubinsten, Orly; Henik, Avishai

    2014-05-01

    We explored the effects of learning two different symbolic sets of numerals (Arabic and Indian) on the development of automatic number processing. Children in the school we examined learn Indian numerals between first and third grades. In third grade, they switch to a new set of numerals (i.e., Arabic numbers). Participants in this study performed a numerical Stroop-like task in which they assessed the numerical value or physical size of stimuli varying along these two dimensions. Each participant saw either Arabic or Indian numerals. The results of the size congruity effect in the physical task, for both Indian and Arabic numerals, suggest that studying two sets of numerals interferes with the acquisition of an automatic association of a numerical symbol and magnitude. This is true both for the first learned set of numerals (i.e., Indian numerals) and for the second one (i.e., Arabic numerals). Furthermore, we found an absence of the distance effect, which further supports this conclusion. This learning program gave us the unique opportunity to examine the connection between symbolic sets and the mental representation of numbers in a novel fashion.

  4. Large deviations of the shifted index number in the Gaussian ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-06-01

    We show that, using the Coulomb fluid approach, we are able to derive a rate function \\Psi(c,x) of two variables that captures: (i) the large deviations of bulk eigenvalues; (ii) the large deviations of extreme eigenvalues (both left and right large deviations); (iii) the statistics of the fraction c of eigenvalues to the left of a position x. Thus, \\Psi(c,x) explains the full order statistics of the eigenvalues of large random Gaussian matrices as well as the statistics of the shifted index number. All our analytical findings are thoroughly compared with Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining excellent agreement. A summary of preliminary results has already been presented in Pérez Castillo (2014 Phys. Rev. E 90 040102) in the context of one-dimensional trapped spinless fermions in a harmonic potential.

  5. Selective rapid eye movement sleep deprivation affects cell size and number in kitten locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Shaffery, James P; Allard, Joanne S; Manaye, Kebreten F; Roffwarg, Howard P

    2012-01-01

    Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC) constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE) in the brain and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP) of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD) remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for 1 week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir) was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD)-, treatment-control (TXC)-, and home cage-reared (HCC) animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA) were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in the HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. HCC cells were significantly larger than TH-ir cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with presumed reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by 1 week of REMSD.

  6. The cost of large numbers of hypothesis tests on power, effect size and sample size.

    PubMed

    Lazzeroni, L C; Ray, A

    2012-01-01

    Advances in high-throughput biology and computer science are driving an exponential increase in the number of hypothesis tests in genomics and other scientific disciplines. Studies using current genotyping platforms frequently include a million or more tests. In addition to the monetary cost, this increase imposes a statistical cost owing to the multiple testing corrections needed to avoid large numbers of false-positive results. To safeguard against the resulting loss of power, some have suggested sample sizes on the order of tens of thousands that can be impractical for many diseases or may lower the quality of phenotypic measurements. This study examines the relationship between the number of tests on the one hand and power, detectable effect size or required sample size on the other. We show that once the number of tests is large, power can be maintained at a constant level, with comparatively small increases in the effect size or sample size. For example at the 0.05 significance level, a 13% increase in sample size is needed to maintain 80% power for ten million tests compared with one million tests, whereas a 70% increase in sample size is needed for 10 tests compared with a single test. Relative costs are less when measured by increases in the detectable effect size. We provide an interactive Excel calculator to compute power, effect size or sample size when comparing study designs or genome platforms involving different numbers of hypothesis tests. The results are reassuring in an era of extreme multiple testing.

  7. Prospectus: towards the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klewicki, J. C.; Chini, G. P.; Gibson, J. F.

    2017-03-01

    Recent and on-going advances in mathematical methods and analysis techniques, coupled with the experimental and computational capacity to capture detailed flow structure at increasingly large Reynolds numbers, afford an unprecedented opportunity to develop realistic models of high Reynolds number turbulent wall-flow dynamics. A distinctive attribute of this new generation of models is their grounding in the Navier-Stokes equations. By adhering to this challenging constraint, high-fidelity models ultimately can be developed that not only predict flow properties at high Reynolds numbers, but that possess a mathematical structure that faithfully captures the underlying flow physics. These first-principles models are needed, for example, to reliably manipulate flow behaviours at extreme Reynolds numbers. This theme issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A provides a selection of contributions from the community of researchers who are working towards the development of such models. Broadly speaking, the research topics represented herein report on dynamical structure, mechanisms and transport; scale interactions and self-similarity; model reductions that restrict nonlinear interactions; and modern asymptotic theories. In this prospectus, the challenges associated with modelling turbulent wall-flows at large Reynolds numbers are briefly outlined, and the connections between the contributing papers are highlighted.

  8. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT. PMID:27819035

  9. Increased Night Temperature Negatively Affects Grain Yield, Biomass and Grain Number in Chilean Quinoa

    PubMed Central

    Lesjak, Jurka; Calderini, Daniel F.

    2017-01-01

    Quinoa high nutritive value increases interest worldwide, especially as a crop that could potentially feature in different cropping systems, however, climate change, particularly rising temperatures, challenges this and other crop species. Currently, only limited knowledge exists regarding the grain yield and other key traits response to higher temperatures of this crop, especially to increased night temperatures. In this context, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of increased night temperature on quinoa yield, grain number, individual grain weight and processes involved in crop growth under the environmental conditions (control treatment) and night thermal increase at two phases: flowering (T1) and grain filling (T2) in southern Chile. A commercial genotype, Regalona, and a quinoa accession (Cod. BO5, N°191, grain bank from Semillas Baer, hereby referred to as Accession) were used, due to their adaptability to Southern Chilean conditions and contrasting grain yield potential, grain weight and size of plants. Temperature was increased ≈4°C above the ambient from 8 pm until 9 am the next morning. Control treatments reached a high grain yield (600 and 397 g m-2, i.e., Regalona and Accession). Temperature increase reduced grain yield by 31% under T1 treatment and 12% when under T2 in Regalona and 23 and 26% in Accession, respectively. Aboveground biomass was negatively affected by the thermal treatments and a positive linear association was found between grain yield and aboveground biomass across treatments. By contrast, the harvest index was unaffected either by genotype, or by thermal treatments. Grain number was significantly affected between treatments and this key trait was linearly associated with grain yield. On the other hand, grain weight showed a narrow range of variation across treatments. Additionally, leaf area index was not affected, but significant differences were found in SPAD values at the end of T1 treatment, compared

  10. Investigating the evolution of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways with a large number of scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, V. J.; Guivarch, C.; Rozenberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    The new scenario framework for climate change research includes alternative possible trends for socioeconomic development called Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). The SSPs bear some similarities to other scenarios used for global change research, but they also have important differences. Like the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios or the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, SSPs are defined by a scenario logic consisting of two axes. However, these axes define SSPs with respect to their location in an outcome space for challenges to mitigation and to adaptation rather than by their drivers. Open questions for the SSPs include what their drivers are and how the time dimension could be interpreted with the outcomes space. We present a new analytical approach for addressing both questions by studying large numbers of scenarios produced by an integrated assessment model, IMACLIM-R. We systematically generated 432 scenarios and used the SSP framework to classify them by typology. We then analyzed them dynamically, tracing their evolution through the SSP challenges space at annual time steps over the period 2010-2090. Through this approach, we found that many scenarios do not remain fixed to a particular SSP domain; they drift from one domain to another. In papers describing the framework for new scenarios, SSPs are envisioned as hypothetical (counter-factual) reference scenarios that remain fixed in one domain over some time period of interest. However, we conclude that it may be important to also research scenarios that shift across SSP domains. This is relevant for another open question, which is what scenarios are important to explore given their consequences. Through a data mining technique, we uncovered prominent drivers for scenarios that shift across SSP domains. Scenarios with different challenges for adaptation and mitigation (that is, mitigation and adaptation challenges that are not co-varying) were found to be the least stable, and the following

  11. Dissociation between two subgroups of the suprachiasmatic nucleus affected by the number of damped oscillated neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos HT

    2017-03-01

    In mammals, the main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the brain synchronizes the body rhythms to the environmental light-dark cycle. The SCN is composed of about 2 ×104 neurons which can be classified into three oscillatory phenotypes: self-sustained oscillators, damped oscillators, and arrhythmic neurons. Exposed to an artificial external light-dark cycle with a period of 22 h instead of 24 h , two subgroups of the SCN can become desynchronized (dissociated). The ventrolateral (VL) subgroup receives photic input and is entrained to the external cycle and a dorsomedial (DM) subgroup oscillates with its endogenous (i.e., free running) period and is synchronized to the external light-dark cycle through coupling from the VL. In the present study, we examined the effects of damped oscillatory neurons on the dissociation between VL and DM under an external 22 h cycle. We found that, with increasing numbers of damped oscillatory neurons located in the VL, the dissociation between the VL and DM emerges, but if these neurons are increasingly present in the DM the dissociation disappears. Hence, the damped oscillatory neurons in different subregions of the SCN play distinct roles in the dissociation between the two subregions of the SCN. This shows that synchrony between SCN subregions is affected by the number of damped oscillatory neurons and the location of these cells. We suggest that more knowledge on the number and the location of these cells may explain why some species do show a dissociation between the subregions and others do not, as the distribution of oscillatory types of neurons offers a plausible and novel candidate mechanism to explain heterogeneity.

  12. Topological superconductor with a large Chern number and a large bulk excitation gap in single-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Wu, M. W.

    2016-02-01

    We show that a two-dimensional topological superconductor (TSC) can be realized in a hybrid system with a conventional s -wave superconductor proximity coupled to a quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state from the Rashba and exchange effects in single-layer graphene. With very low or even zero doping near the Dirac points, i.e., two inequivalent valleys, this TSC has a Chern number as large as 4, which supports four Majorana edge modes. More importantly, we show that this TSC has a robust topologically nontrivial bulk excitation gap, which can be larger or even 1 order of magnitude larger than the proximity-induced superconducting gap. This unique property paves a way for the application of QAH insulators as seed materials to realize robust TSCs and Majorana modes.

  13. Large herbivore grazing affects the vegetation structure and greenhouse gas balance in a high arctic mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Julie Maria; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Christensen, Torben R.; Ström, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Herbivory is an important part of most ecosystems and affects the ecosystems’ carbon balance both directly and indirectly. Little is known about herbivory and its impact on the carbon balance in high arctic mire ecosystems. We hypothesized that trampling and grazing by large herbivores influences the vegetation density and composition and thereby also the carbon balance. In 2010, we established fenced exclosures in high arctic Greenland to prevent muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) from grazing. During the growing seasons of 2011 to 2013 we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes in these ungrazed blocks and compared them to blocks subjected to natural grazing. Additionally, we measured depth of the water table and active layer, soil temperature, and in 2011 and 2013 an inventory of the vegetation density and composition were made. In 2013 a significant decrease in total number of vascular plant (33-44%) and Eriophorum scheuchzeri (51-53%) tillers were found in ungrazed plots, the moss-layer and amount of litter had also increased substantially in these plots. This resulted in a significant decrease in net ecosystem uptake of CO2 (47%) and likewise a decrease in CH4 emission (44%) in ungrazed plots in 2013. While the future of the muskoxen in a changing arctic is unknown, this experiment points to a potentially large effect of large herbivores on the carbon balance in natural Arctic ecosystems. It thus sheds light on the importance of grazing mammals, and hence adds to our understanding of natural ecosystem greenhouse gas balance in the past and in the future.

  14. Wave propagation in randomly stratified media and the law of large numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulski, Z.

    1992-10-01

    The propagation of scalar harmonic waves through a randomly stratified slab is investigated. The transition matrix method is applied for the analysis of the problem. To obtain the effective parameters of the material of the slab the law of large numbers for non-commuting products is applied. The results are illustrated with the numerical example of the propagation of elastic waves in steel-titanium laminate in an aluminium environment.

  15. Phase retrieval from a single near-field diffraction pattern with a large Fresnel number.

    PubMed

    Li, Enrong; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zhili; Hong, Youli; Yuan, Qingxi; Huang, Wanxia; Marcelli, Augusto; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2008-11-01

    A new method of phase retrieval from a single near-field diffraction image with a large Fresnel number is presented and discussed. This method requires only the oversampled diffraction pattern without any other information such as the object envelope. Moreover, we show that the combination with a fast computational method is possible when the linear oversampling ratio is an integer. Numerical simulations are also presented, showing that the method works well with noisy data.

  16. An autostereoscopic display with high resolution and large number of view zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wu-Li; Hsu, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Chao-Hsu; Wang, Chy-Lin; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Cheng, Shu-Chuan

    2008-02-01

    For a spatial-multiplexed 3D display, trade-off between resolution and number of view-zones are usually unavoidable due to the limited number of pixels on the screen. In this paper, we present a new autostereoscopic system, named as "integrated-screen system," to substantially increase the total number of pixels on the screen, which in turn increase both the resolution and number of view-zones. In the integrated-screen system, a large number of mini-projectors are arrayed and the images are tiled together without seams in between. For displaying 3D images, the lenticular screen with predesigned tilted angle is used for distributing different viewing zones. In order to achieve good performance, we design a brand-new projector with special lens set to meet the low-distortion requirement because the distortion of the image will induce serious crosstalk between view-zones. The proposed system has two advantages. One is the extensibility of the screen size. The size of the display can be chosen based on the applications we deal with, including the size of the projected pixel and the number of viewing zones. The other advantage is that the integrated-screen system provides projected pixels in great density to solve the major problem of the poor resolution that a lenticular-type 3D display has.

  17. Thermocapillary Migration of Deformable Bubbles at Moderate to Large Marangoni Number in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Fu; Li, Zhen-Dong; Li, Hui-Xiong; Li, Jing

    2010-09-01

    Using the level-set method and the continuum interface model, the axisymmetric thermocapillary migration of gas bubbles in an immiscible bulk liquid with a temperature gradient at moderate to large Marangoni number is simulated numerically. Constant material properties of the two phases are assumed. Steady state of the motion can always be reached. The terminal migration velocity decreases monotonously with the increase of the Marangoni number due to the wrapping of isotherms around the front surface of the bubble. Good agreements with space experimental data and previous theoretical and numerical studies in the literature are evident. Slight deformation of bubble is observed, but no distinct influence on the motion occurs. It is also found that the influence of the convective transport of heat inside bubbles cannot be neglected at finite Marangoni number, while the influence of the convective transport of momentum inside bubbles may be actually negligible.

  18. Monitoring a large number of pesticides and transformation products in water samples from Spain and Italy.

    PubMed

    Rousis, Nikolaos I; Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Zuccato, Ettore; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Castiglioni, Sara

    2017-03-14

    Assessing the presence of pesticides in environmental waters is particularly challenging because of the huge number of substances used which may end up in the environment. Furthermore, the occurrence of pesticide transformation products (TPs) and/or metabolites makes this task even harder. Most studies dealing with the determination of pesticides in water include only a small number of analytes and in many cases no TPs. The present study applied a screening method for the determination of a large number of pesticides and TPs in wastewater (WW) and surface water (SW) from Spain and Italy. Liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used to screen a database of 450 pesticides and TPs. Detection and identification were based on specific criteria, i.e. mass accuracy, fragmentation, and comparison of retention times when reference standards were available, or a retention time prediction model when standards were not available. Seventeen pesticides and TPs from different classes (fungicides, herbicides and insecticides) were found in WW in Italy and Spain, and twelve in SW. Generally, in both countries more compounds were detected in effluent WW than in influent WW, and in SW than WW. This might be due to the analytical sensitivity in the different matrices, but also to the presence of multiple sources of pollution. HRMS proved a good screening tool to determine a large number of substances in water and identify some priority compounds for further quantitative analysis.

  19. Dot Display Affects Approximate Number System Acuity and Relationships with Mathematical Achievement and Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Jade Eloise; Castronovo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Much research has investigated the relationship between the Approximate Number System (ANS) and mathematical achievement, with continued debate surrounding the existence of such a link. The use of different stimulus displays may account for discrepancies in the findings. Indeed, closer scrutiny of the literature suggests that studies supporting a link between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement in adults have mostly measured the ANS using spatially intermixed displays (e.g. of blue and yellow dots), whereas those failing to replicate a link have primarily used spatially separated dot displays. The current study directly compared ANS acuity when using intermixed or separate dots, investigating how such methodological variation mediated the relationship between ANS acuity and mathematical achievement. ANS acuity was poorer and less reliable when measured with intermixed displays, with performance during both conditions related to inhibitory control. Crucially, mathematical achievement was significantly related to ANS accuracy difference (accuracy on congruent trials minus accuracy on incongruent trials) when measured with intermixed displays, but not with separate displays. The findings indicate that methodological variation affects ANS acuity outcomes, as well as the apparent relationship between the ANS and mathematical achievement. Moreover, the current study highlights the problem of low reliabilities of ANS measures. Further research is required to construct ANS measures with improved reliability, and to understand which processes may be responsible for the increased likelihood of finding a correlation between the ANS and mathematical achievement when using intermixed displays. PMID:27195749

  20. The 3 K blackbody radiation, Dirac's Large Numbers Hypothesis, and scale-covariant cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1978-01-01

    A program is described which is intended to derive a generalized system of gravitational equations that allow (but do not require) G to vary, to use the 3-K blackbody radiation to fix the relation between G and the gauge function, and to employ Dirac's (1937) Large Numbers Hypothesis to derive the geometry of the universe. Einstein's equations are retained in their total integrity, but the specification is made that they are valid only when gravitational units are used. A scale-invariant form of Einstein's equations is obtained, and from this are derived the energy conservation law, the baryon-number conservation law, and the appropriate cosmological equations. Dirac's proposals of 1937 and 1973 are incorporated into the formalism, and a gauge based on consolidation of the 3-K blackbody radiation is presented. A unique solution for the geometry of the universe is determined for zero curvature solely from the 3-K radiation and the Large Numbers Hypothesis; this solution predicts a deceleration parameter exactly equal to unity.

  1. The genus Drosophila is characterized by a large number of sibling species showing evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bashisth N

    2016-12-01

    Mayr (1942) defined sibling species as sympatric forms which are morphologically very similar or indistinguishable, but which possess specific biological characteristics and are reproductively isolated. Another term, cryptic species has also been used for such species. However, this concept changed later. Sibling species are as similar as twins. This category does not necessarily include phylogenetic siblings as members of a superspecies. Since the term sibling species was defined by Mayr, a large number of cases of sibling species pairs/groups have been reported and thus they are widespread in the animal kingdom. However, they seem to be more common in some groups such as insects. In insects, they have been reported in diptera, lepidoptera, coleoptera, orthoptera, hymenoptera and others. Sibling species are widespread among the dipteran insects and as such are well studied because some species are important medically (mosquitoes), genetically (Drosophila) and cytologically (Sciara and Chironomus). The well-studied classical pairs of sibling species in Drosophila are: D. pseudoobscura and D. persimilis, and D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Subsequently, a number of sibling species have been added to these pairs and a large number of other sibling species pairs/groups in different species groups of the genus Drosophila have been reported in literature. The present review briefly summarizes the cases of sibling species pairs/groups in the genus Drosophila with their evolutionary significance.

  2. Measuring effective radium concentration with large numbers of samples. Part II--general properties and representativity.

    PubMed

    Girault, Frédéric; Perrier, Frédéric

    2012-11-01

    Effective radium concentration EC(Ra), product of radium concentration and radon emanation, is the source term for radon release into the pore space of rocks and the environment. Over a period of three years, we performed more than 6000 radon-222 accumulation experiments in the laboratory with scintillation flasks and SSNTDs and we obtained experimental EC(Ra) values from more than 1570 rock and soil samples. With this method, which allowed the measurement of EC(Ra) from large numbers of samples with sufficient accuracy and uncertainty, as detailed in the companion paper, the dependence of the emanation factor on temperature and moisture content is revisited. In addition, with such a large EC(Ra) dataset, dispersion of EC(Ra) can be studied at sample-scale (cm to dm) and at scarp-scale (m to tens of m). Furthermore, we are able to discuss the representativity of obtained EC(Ra) values at field-scale, and to investigate the spatial variations of EC(Ra) over kilometric scales, within geological formations and across formations and faults. This experimental study opens new perspectives in the understanding of radium geochemistry and illustrates the importance of studying the radon source term with large numbers of samples for the modelling of geological and environmental processes, and also for the assessment of the radon health hazard.

  3. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography.

    PubMed

    Bost, Charles A; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-27

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  4. Large-scale climatic anomalies affect marine predator foraging behaviour and demography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bost, Charles A.; Cotté, Cedric; Terray, Pascal; Barbraud, Christophe; Bon, Cécile; Delord, Karine; Gimenez, Olivier; Handrich, Yves; Naito, Yasuhiko; Guinet, Christophe; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2015-10-01

    Determining the links between the behavioural and population responses of wild species to environmental variations is critical for understanding the impact of climate variability on ecosystems. Using long-term data sets, we show how large-scale climatic anomalies in the Southern Hemisphere affect the foraging behaviour and population dynamics of a key marine predator, the king penguin. When large-scale subtropical dipole events occur simultaneously in both subtropical Southern Indian and Atlantic Oceans, they generate tropical anomalies that shift the foraging zone southward. Consequently the distances that penguins foraged from the colony and their feeding depths increased and the population size decreased. This represents an example of a robust and fast impact of large-scale climatic anomalies affecting a marine predator through changes in its at-sea behaviour and demography, despite lack of information on prey availability. Our results highlight a possible behavioural mechanism through which climate variability may affect population processes.

  5. Analogue algorithm for parallel factorization of an exponential number of large integers: I. Theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    We describe a novel analogue algorithm that allows the simultaneous factorization of an exponential number of large integers with a polynomial number of experimental runs. It is the interference-induced periodicity of "factoring" interferograms measured at the output of an analogue computer that allows the selection of the factors of each integer. At the present stage, the algorithm manifests an exponential scaling which may be overcome by an extension of this method to correlated qubits emerging from n-order quantum correlations measurements. We describe the conditions for a generic physical system to compute such an analogue algorithm. A particular example given by an "optical computer" based on optical interference will be addressed in the second paper of this series (Tamma in Quantum Inf Process 11128:1189, 2015).

  6. Estimating the effective Reynolds number in implicit large-eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Haines, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    In implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES), energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter out unresolved scales and to implicitly model subgrid scale effects. From an applied perspective, it is highly desirable to estimate a characteristic Reynolds number (Re)-and therefore a relevant effective viscosity-so that the impact of resolution on predicted flow quantities and their macroscopic convergence can usefully be characterized. We argue in favor of obtaining robust Re estimates away from the smallest scales of the simulated flow-where numerically controlled dissipation takes place and propose a theoretical basis and framework to determine such measures. ILES examples include forced turbulence as a steady flow case, the Taylor-Green vortex to address transition and decaying turbulence, and simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment illustrating a fairly complex turbulence problem of current practical interest.

  7. Differences in Factors Affecting Various Crash Types with High Numbers of Fatalities and Injuries in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; He, Jie; Ding, Jianxun; Shi, Qin; Wang, Changjun; Li, Pingfan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Road traffic crashes that involve very high numbers of fatalities and injuries arouse public concern wherever they occur. In China, there are two categories of such crashes: a crash that results in 10–30 fatalities, 50–100 serious injuries or a total cost of 50–100 million RMB ($US8-16m) is a “serious road traffic crash” (SRTC), while a crash that is even more severe or costly is a “particularly serious road traffic crash” (PSRTC). The aim of this study is to identify the main factors affecting different types of these crashes (single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact) with the ultimate goal of informing prevention activities and policies. Methods Detailed descriptions of the SRTCs and PSRTCs that occurred from 2007 to 2014 were collected from the database “In-depth Investigation and Analysis System for Major Road Traffic Crashes” (IIASMRTC), which is maintained by the Traffic Management Research Institute of the Ministry of Public Security of China (TMRI). 18 main risk factors, which were categorized into four areas (participant, vehicle, road and environment-related) were chosen as potential independent variables for the multinomial logistic regression analysis. Comparisons were made among the single-vehicle, head-on, rear-end and side impact crashes in terms of factors affecting crash occurrence. Findings Five risk factors were significant for the six multinomial logistic regression models, which were location, vertical alignment, roadside safety rating, driver distraction and overloading of cargo. It was indicated that intersections were more likely to have side impact SRTCs and PSRTCs, especially with poor visibility at night. Overloaded freight vehicles were more likely to be involved in a rear-end crash than other freight vehicles. Driver distraction is an important risk factor for head-on crashes, while vertical alignment and roadside safety rating are positively associated with single-vehicle crashes. Conclusion Based

  8. Impact factors for Reggeon-gluon transition in N=4 SYM with large number of colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. S.; Fiore, R.

    2014-06-01

    We calculate impact factors for Reggeon-gluon transition in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with four supercharges at large number of colours Nc. In the next-to-leading order impact factors are not uniquely defined and must accord with BFKL kernels and energy scales. We obtain the impact factor corresponding to the kernel and the energy evolution parameter, which is invariant under Möbius transformation in momentum space, and show that it is also Möbius invariant up to terms taken into account in the BDS ansatz.

  9. Analyzing large numbers of data with a programmable calculator. Technic and applications.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, C C

    1979-08-01

    Programmable calculators or minicomputers can be used in many laboratory activities, including tasks for which large numbers of data must be analyzed. A technic for organizing data into records and files for storage on magnetic tape and for using an index to find the locations of stored data quickly is described. Applications of the technic for analysis of quality control results, determination of potential HLA-compatible tissue donors, and analysis of laboratory administrative data are presented. These applications were written for use with a small programmable calculator.

  10. Diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number: Challenge of dynamic mesoscale imaging with hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John L.; Barnes, Cris W.; Sandberg, Richard L.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2014-05-01

    Real materials have structure at both the atomic or crystalline scale as well as at interfaces and defects at the larger scale of grains. There is a need for the study of materials at the "mesoscale," the scale at which subgranular physical processes and intergranular organization couple to determine microstructure, crucially impacting constitutive response at the engineering macroscale. Diffractive imaging using photons that can penetrate multiple grains of material would be a transformative technique for the study of the performance of materials in dynamic extremes. Thicker samples imply higher energy photons of shorter wavelength, and imaging of multiple grains implies bigger spot sizes. Such imaging requires the use of future planned and proposed hard x-ray free electron lasers (such as the European XFEL) to provide both the spatial coherence transverse to the large spots and the peak brilliance to provide the short illumination times. The result is that the Fresnel number of the system becomes large and is no longer in the Fraunhofer far-field limit. The interrelated issues of diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number are analyzed, including proof that diffractive imaging is possible in this limit and estimates of the signal-to-noise possible. In addition, derivation of the heating rates for brilliant pulses of x rays are presented. The potential and limitations on multiple dynamic images are derived. This paper will present a study of x-ray interactions with materials in this new regime of spatially coherent but relatively large mesoscale spots at very hard energies. It should provide the theory and design background for the experiments and facilities required to control materials in extreme environments, in particular for the next generation of very-hard-x-ray free electron lasers.

  11. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  12. A top-down model to generate ensembles of runoff from a large number of hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, P. R.; Gupta, V. K.; Troutman, B. M.

    2013-09-01

    We hypothesize that total hillslope water loss for a rainfall-runoff event is inversely related to a function of a lognormal random variable, based on basin- and point-scale observations taken from the 21 km2 Goodwin Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW) in Mississippi, USA. A top-down approach is used to develop a new runoff generation model both to test our physical-statistical hypothesis and to provide a method of generating ensembles of runoff from a large number of hillslopes in a basin. The model is based on the assumption that the probability distributions of a runoff/loss ratio have a space-time rescaling property. We test this assumption using streamflow and rainfall data from GCEW. For over 100 rainfall-runoff events, we find that the spatial probability distributions of a runoff/loss ratio can be rescaled to a new distribution that is common to all events. We interpret random within-event differences in runoff/loss ratios in the model to arise from soil moisture spatial variability. Observations of water loss during events in GCEW support this interpretation. Our model preserves water balance in a mean statistical sense and supports our hypothesis. As an example, we use the model to generate ensembles of runoff at a large number of hillslopes for a rainfall-runoff event in GCEW.

  13. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals.

  14. Superposition of elliptic functions as solutions for a large number of nonlinear equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-03-01

    For a large number of nonlinear equations, both discrete and continuum, we demonstrate a kind of linear superposition. We show that whenever a nonlinear equation admits solutions in terms of both Jacobi elliptic functions cn(x, m) and dn(x, m) with modulus m, then it also admits solutions in terms of their sum as well as difference. We have checked this in the case of several nonlinear equations such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, MKdV, a mixed KdV-MKdV system, a mixed quadratic-cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the Ablowitz-Ladik equation, the saturable nonlinear Schrödinger equation, λϕ4, the discrete MKdV as well as for several coupled field equations. Further, for a large number of nonlinear equations, we show that whenever a nonlinear equation admits a periodic solution in terms of dn2(x, m), it also admits solutions in terms of dn^2(x,m) ± sqrt{m} cn(x,m) dn(x,m), even though cn(x, m)dn(x, m) is not a solution of these nonlinear equations. Finally, we also obtain superposed solutions of various forms for several coupled nonlinear equations.

  15. Methods to produce and safely work with large numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts and bradyzoite cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Barr, B.; Packham, A.; Melli, A.; Conrad, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Two major obstacles to conducting studies with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are the difficulty in reliably producing large numbers of this life stage and safety concerns because the oocyst is the most environmentally resistant stage of this zoonotic organism. Oocyst production requires oral infection of the definitive feline host with adequate numbers of T. gondii organisms to obtain unsporulated oocysts that are shed in the feces for 3-10 days after infection. Since the most successful and common mode of experimental infection of kittens with T. gondii is by ingestion of bradyzoite tissue cysts, the first step in successful oocyst production is to ensure a high bradyzoite tissue cyst burden in the brains of mice that can be used for the oral inoculum. We compared two methods for producing bradyzoite brain cysts in mice, by infecting them either orally or subcutaneously with oocysts. In both cases, oocysts derived from a low passage T. gondii Type II strain (M4) were used to infect eight-ten week-old Swiss Webster mice. First the number of bradyzoite cysts that were purified from infected mouse brains was compared. Then to evaluate the effect of the route of oocyst inoculation on tissue cyst distribution in mice, a second group of mice was infected with oocysts by one of each route and tissues were examined by histology. In separate experiments, brains from infected mice were used to infect kittens for oocyst production. Greater than 1.3 billion oocysts were isolated from the feces of two infected kittens in the first production and greater than 1.8 billion oocysts from three kittens in the second production. Our results demonstrate that oral delivery of oocysts to mice results in both higher cyst loads in the brain and greater cyst burdens in other tissues examined as compared to those of mice that received the same number of oocysts subcutaneously. The ultimate goal in producing large numbers of oocysts in kittens is to generate adequate amounts of starting material

  16. Methods to produce and safely work with large numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts and bradyzoite cysts.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H; Barr, B; Packham, A; Melli, A; Conrad, P A

    2012-01-01

    Two major obstacles to conducting studies with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are the difficulty in reliably producing large numbers of this life stage and safety concerns because the oocyst is the most environmentally resistant stage of this zoonotic organism. Oocyst production requires oral infection of the definitive feline host with adequate numbers of T. gondii organisms to obtain unsporulated oocysts that are shed in the feces for 3-10 days after infection. Since the most successful and common mode of experimental infection of kittens with T. gondii is by ingestion of bradyzoite tissue cysts, the first step in successful oocyst production is to ensure a high bradyzoite tissue cyst burden in the brains of mice that can be used for the oral inoculum. We compared two methods for producing bradyzoite brain cysts in mice, by infecting them either orally or subcutaneously with oocysts. In both cases, oocysts derived from a low passage T. gondii Type II strain (M4) were used to infect eight-ten week-old Swiss Webster mice. First the number of bradyzoite cysts that were purified from infected mouse brains was compared. Then to evaluate the effect of the route of oocyst inoculation on tissue cyst distribution in mice, a second group of mice was infected with oocysts by one of each route and tissues were examined by histology. In separate experiments, brains from infected mice were used to infect kittens for oocyst production. Greater than 1.3 billion oocysts were isolated from the feces of two infected kittens in the first production and greater than 1.8 billion oocysts from three kittens in the second production. Our results demonstrate that oral delivery of oocysts to mice results in both higher cyst loads in the brain and greater cyst burdens in other tissues examined as compared to those of mice that received the same number of oocysts subcutaneously. The ultimate goal in producing large numbers of oocysts in kittens is to generate adequate amounts of starting material

  17. The power of sensitivity analysis and thoughts on models with large numbers of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Havlacek, William

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory systems that allow cells to adapt to their environments are exceedingly complex, and although we know a great deal about the intricate mechanistic details of many of these systems, our ability to make accurate predictions about their system-level behaviors is severely limited. We would like to make such predictions for a number of reasons. How can we reverse dysfunctional molecular changes of these systems that cause disease? More generally, how can we harness and direct cellular activities for beneficial purposes? Our ability to make accurate predictions about a system is also a measure ofour fundamental understanding of that system. As evidenced by our mastery of technological systems, a useful understanding ofa complex system can often be obtained through the development and analysis ofa mathematical model, but predictive modeling of cellular regulatory systems, which necessarily relies on quantitative experimentation, is still in its infancy. There is much that we need to learn before modeling for practical applications becomes routine. In particular, we need to address a number of issues surrounding the large number of parameters that are typically found in a model for a cellular regulatory system.

  18. Large-eddy simulations of impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Piomelli, Ugo

    2013-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of an impinging jet with embedded azimuthal vortices. We used a hybrid approach in which the near-wall layer is modelled using the RANS equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model, while away from the wall Lagrangian-averaged dynamic eddy-viscosity modelled LES is used. This method allowed us to reach Reynolds numbers that would be prohibitively expensive for wall-resolving LES. First, we compared the results of the hybrid calculation with a wall-resolved one at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 66 , 000 (based on jet diameter and velocity). The mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were in good agreement between the simulations, and, in particular, the generation of secondary vorticity at the wall and its liftup were captured well. The simulation cost was reduced by 86%. We then carried out simulations at Re = 266 , 000 and 1.3 million. The effect of Reynolds number on vortex development will be discussed. Canada Research Chair in Computational Turbulence, HPCVL-Sun Microsystems Chair in Computational Science and Engineering.

  19. Laws of Large Numbers and Langevin Approximations for Stochastic Neural Field Equations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we consider limit theorems for microscopic stochastic models of neural fields. We show that the Wilson–Cowan equation can be obtained as the limit in uniform convergence on compacts in probability for a sequence of microscopic models when the number of neuron populations distributed in space and the number of neurons per population tend to infinity. This result also allows to obtain limits for qualitatively different stochastic convergence concepts, e.g., convergence in the mean. Further, we present a central limit theorem for the martingale part of the microscopic models which, suitably re-scaled, converges to a centred Gaussian process with independent increments. These two results provide the basis for presenting the neural field Langevin equation, a stochastic differential equation taking values in a Hilbert space, which is the infinite-dimensional analogue of the chemical Langevin equation in the present setting. On a technical level, we apply recently developed law of large numbers and central limit theorems for piecewise deterministic processes taking values in Hilbert spaces to a master equation formulation of stochastic neuronal network models. These theorems are valid for processes taking values in Hilbert spaces, and by this are able to incorporate spatial structures of the underlying model. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000): 60F05, 60J25, 60J75, 92C20. PMID:23343328

  20. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  1. Perceptual and intellectual factors affecting number concept development in retarded and nonretarded children.

    PubMed

    Cohn-Jones, L; Seim, R

    1978-07-01

    The role of MA and visual-perceptual ability in number concept development was examined with nonretarded and retarded children from regular school settings. Both groups were matched on MA and divided into high and low perceptual-ability levels. Using the Dodwell Number Concept Test, we tested each subject on various Piagetian tasks. Although retarded and nonretarded groups differed in IQ and CA, equivalence in MA resulted in equivalent number concept performance. For both groups, regardless of variation in IQ and CA, perceptual ability exerted a significant influence on number concept, with high perceptual ability resulting in superior number concept performance.

  2. Timeless: A Large Sample Study on the Temporal Robustness of Affective Responses

    PubMed Central

    Postzich, Christopher; Blask, Katarina; Frings, Christian; Walther, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Emotion and its effects on other psychological phenomena are frequently studied by presenting emotional pictures for a short amount of time. However, the duration of exposure strongly differs across paradigms. In order to ensure the comparability of affective response elicitation across those paradigms, it is crucial to empirically validate emotional material not only with regard to the affective dimensions valence and arousal, but also with regard to varying presentation times. Despite this operational necessity for the temporal robustness of emotional material, there is only tentative empirical evidence on this issue. To close this gap, we conducted a large sample study testing for the influence of presentation time on affective response elicitation. Two hundred and forty emotional pictures were presented for either 200 or 1000 ms and were rated by 302 participants on the core affect dimensions valence and arousal. The most important finding was that affective response elicitation was comparable for 200 and 1000 ms presentation times, indicating reliable temporal robustness of affective response elicitation within the supra-liminal spectrum. Yet, a more detailed look on the data showed that presentation time impacted particularly on high arousing negative stimuli. However, because these interaction effects were exceedingly small, they must be interpreted with caution and do not endanger the main finding, namely the quite reliable temporal robustness of affective response elicitation. Results are discussed with regard to the comparability of affective response elicitation across varying paradigms. PMID:27313561

  3. A genome-wide association study in large white and landrace pig populations for number piglets born alive.

    PubMed

    Bergfelder-Drüing, Sarah; Grosse-Brinkhaus, Christine; Lind, Bianca; Erbe, Malena; Schellander, Karl; Simianer, Henner; Tholen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The number of piglets born alive (NBA) per litter is one of the most important traits in pig breeding due to its influence on production efficiency. It is difficult to improve NBA because the heritability of the trait is low and it is governed by a high number of loci with low to moderate effects. To clarify the biological and genetic background of NBA, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed using 4,012 Large White and Landrace pigs from herdbook and commercial breeding companies in Germany (3), Austria (1) and Switzerland (1). The animals were genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Because of population stratifications within and between breeds, clusters were formed using the genetic distances between the populations. Five clusters for each breed were formed and analysed by GWAS approaches. In total, 17 different significant markers affecting NBA were found in regions with known effects on female reproduction. No overlapping significant chromosome areas or QTL between Large White and Landrace breed were detected.

  4. Support for the involvement of large copy number variants in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kirov, George; Grozeva, Detelina; Norton, Nadine; Ivanov, Dobril; Mantripragada, Kiran K; Holmans, Peter; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C

    2009-04-15

    We investigated the involvement of rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in 471 cases of schizophrenia and 2792 controls that had been genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array. Large CNVs >1 Mb were 2.26 times more common in cases (P = 0.00027), with the effect coming mostly from deletions (odds ratio, OR = 4.53, P = 0.00013) although duplications were also more common (OR = 1.71, P = 0.04). Two large deletions were found in two cases each, but in no controls: a deletion at 22q11.2 known to be a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia and a deletion on 17p12, at 14.0-15.4 Mb. The latter is known to cause hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The same deletion was found in 6 of 4618 (0.13%) cases and 6 of 36 092 (0.017%) controls in the re-analysed data of two recent large CNV studies of schizophrenia (OR = 7.82, P = 0.001), with the combined significance level for all three studies achieving P = 5 x 10(-5). One large duplication on 16p13.1, which has been previously implicated as a susceptibility factor for autism, was found in three cases and six controls (0.6% versus 0.2%, OR = 2.98, P = 0.13). We also provide the first support for a recently reported association between deletions at 15q11.2 and schizophrenia (P = 0.026). This study confirms the involvement of rare CNVs in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and contributes to the growing list of specific CNVs that are implicated.

  5. Number of deaths due to lung diseases: How large is the problem

    SciTech Connect

    Wagener, D.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The importance of lung disease as an indicator of environmentally induced adverse health effects has been recognized by inclusion among the Health Objectives for the Nation. The 1990 Health Objectives for the Nation (US Department of Health and Human Services, 1986) includes an objective that there should be virtually no new cases among newly exposed workers for four preventable occupational lung diseases-asbestosis, byssinosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis. This brief communication describes two types of cause-of-death statistics- underlying and multiple cause-and demonstrates the differences between the two statistics using lung disease deaths among adult men. The choice of statistic has a large impact on estimated lung disease mortality rates. The choice of statistics also may have large effect on the estimated mortality rates due to other chromic diseases thought to be environmentally mediated. Issues of comorbidity and the way causes of death are reported become important in the interpretation of these statistics. The choice of which statistic to use when comparing data from a study population with national statistics may greatly affect the interpretations of the study findings.

  6. Genome-Wide Survey of Large Rare Copy Number Variants in Alzheimer’s Disease Among Caribbean Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Mahdi; Pinto, Dalila; Lee, Joseph H.; Grinberg, Yakov; Sato, Christine; Moreno, Danielle; Scherer, Stephen W.; Mayeux, Richard; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Rogaeva, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    Recently genome-wide association studies have identified significant association between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and variations in CLU, PICALM, BIN1, CR1, MS4A4/MS4A6E, CD2AP, CD33, EPHA1, and ABCA7. However, the pathogenic variants in these loci have not yet been found. We conducted a genome-wide scan for large copy number variation (CNV) in a dataset of Caribbean Hispanic origin (554 controls and 559 AD cases that were previously investigated in a SNP-based genome-wide association study using Illumina HumanHap 650Y platform). We ran four CNV calling algorithms to obtain high-confidence calls for large CNVs (>100 kb) that were detected by at least two algorithms. Global burden analyses did not reveal significant differences between cases and controls in CNV rate, distribution of deletions or duplications, total or average CNV size; or number of genes affected by CNVs. However, we observed a nominal association between AD and a ∼470 kb duplication on chromosome 15q11.2 (P = 0.037). This duplication, encompassing up to five genes (TUBGCP5, CYFIP1, NIPA2, NIPA1, and WHAMML1) was present in 10 cases (2.6%) and 3 controls (0.8%). The dosage increase of CYFIP1 and NIPA1 genes was further confirmed by quantitative PCR. The current study did not detect CNVs that affect novel AD loci identified by recent genome-wide association studies. However, because the array technology used in our study has limitations in detecting small CNVs, future studies must carefully assess novel AD genes for the presence of disease-related CNVs. PMID:22384383

  7. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  8. Variation of froude number with discharge for large-gradient steams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Under chemical-control conditions, the Froude number (f) for a cross-section can be approximated as a function of the ratio R2/ 3/d 1/2 , where R is the hydraulic radius and d is the average depth. For cross sections where the ratio increases with increasing depth, F can also increase with depth Current-meter measurement data for 433 streamflow gaging stations in Colorado were reviewed, and 62 stations were identified at which F increases with depth of flow. Data for four streamflow gaging stations are presented. In some cases, F approaches 1 as the discharge approaches the magnitude of the median annual peak discharge. The data also indicate that few actual current meter measurement have been made at the large discharges where velocities can be supercritical.

  9. Numerical Investigation on Large Scale Eddy Structure in Unsteady Pipe Elbow Flow at High Reynolds Number Conditions with Large Eddy Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    Flow induced vibration in primary cooling system of the Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) has been investigated. The primary cooling system consists of a large diameter pipe and a pipe elbow with short curvature radius corresponding to its diameter (short-elbow). Flow-induced vibration by flow through the short-elbow is an important issue in design study of the JSFR, because it may affect to structural integrity of the piping. In this paper, numerical simulations for several pipe elbows with different pipe diameters and curvature radii in literature were conducted at Reynolds number conditions from Re=500 to 1.47x107 to investigate unsteady flow behavior through the short-elbow, including validation study of an in-house LES code (MUGTHES). Numerical results in each condition were compared with the experimental results in literature. Unsteady flow characteristics and pressure fluctuation generation mechanism in the short-elbow were clarified in relation to the large-scale eddy motion.

  10. Large Deviation Function for the Number of Eigenvalues of Sparse Random Graphs Inside an Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Fernando L.; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-09-01

    We present a general method to obtain the exact rate function Ψ[a ,b ](k ) controlling the large deviation probability Prob[IN[a ,b ]=k N ]≍e-N Ψ[a ,b ](k ) that an N ×N sparse random matrix has IN[a ,b ]=k N eigenvalues inside the interval [a ,b ]. The method is applied to study the eigenvalue statistics in two distinct examples: (i) the shifted index number of eigenvalues for an ensemble of Erdös-Rényi graphs and (ii) the number of eigenvalues within a bounded region of the spectrum for the Anderson model on regular random graphs. A salient feature of the rate function in both cases is that, unlike rotationally invariant random matrices, it is asymmetric with respect to its minimum. The asymmetric character depends on the disorder in a way that is compatible with the distinct eigenvalue statistics corresponding to localized and delocalized eigenstates. The results also show that the level compressibility κ2/κ1 for the Anderson model on a regular graph satisfies 0 <κ2/κ1<1 in the bulk regime, in contrast with the behavior found in Gaussian random matrices. Our theoretical findings are thoroughly compared to numerical diagonalization in both cases, showing a reasonable good agreement.

  11. Large Deviation Function for the Number of Eigenvalues of Sparse Random Graphs Inside an Interval.

    PubMed

    Metz, Fernando L; Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-09-02

    We present a general method to obtain the exact rate function Ψ_{[a,b]}(k) controlling the large deviation probability Prob[I_{N}[a,b]=kN]≍e^{-NΨ_{[a,b]}(k)} that an N×N sparse random matrix has I_{N}[a,b]=kN eigenvalues inside the interval [a,b]. The method is applied to study the eigenvalue statistics in two distinct examples: (i) the shifted index number of eigenvalues for an ensemble of Erdös-Rényi graphs and (ii) the number of eigenvalues within a bounded region of the spectrum for the Anderson model on regular random graphs. A salient feature of the rate function in both cases is that, unlike rotationally invariant random matrices, it is asymmetric with respect to its minimum. The asymmetric character depends on the disorder in a way that is compatible with the distinct eigenvalue statistics corresponding to localized and delocalized eigenstates. The results also show that the level compressibility κ_{2}/κ_{1} for the Anderson model on a regular graph satisfies 0<κ_{2}/κ_{1}<1 in the bulk regime, in contrast with the behavior found in Gaussian random matrices. Our theoretical findings are thoroughly compared to numerical diagonalization in both cases, showing a reasonable good agreement.

  12. Conflict of Interest Policies for Organizations Producing a Large Number of Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Burda, Brittany U.; Ogden, Lauren A.; Fu, Rongwei

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflict of interest (COI) of clinical practice guideline (CPG) sponsors and authors is an important potential source of bias in CPG development. The objectives of this study were to describe the COI policies for organizations currently producing a significant number of CPGs, and to determine if these policies meet 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) standards. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified organizations with five or more guidelines listed in the National Guideline Clearinghouse between January 1, 2009 and November 5, 2010. We obtained the COI policy for each organization from publicly accessible sources, most often the organization's website, and compared those polices to IOM standards related to COI. 37 organizations fulfilled our inclusion criteria, of which 17 (46%) had a COI policy directly related to CPGs. These COI policies varied widely with respect to types of COI addressed, from whom disclosures were collected, monetary thresholds for disclosure, approaches to management, and updating requirements. Not one organization's policy adhered to all seven of the IOM standards that were examined, and nine organizations did not meet a single one of the standards. Conclusions/Significance COI policies among organizations producing a large number of CPGs currently do not measure up to IOM standards related to COI disclosure and management. CPG developers need to make significant improvements in these policies and their implementation in order to optimize the quality and credibility of their guidelines. PMID:22629391

  13. A New Approach to Reduce Number of Split Fields in Large Field IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chen-Chiao; Wu, Andrew; Garg, Madhur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Kalnicki, Shalom; Sayed, Gary; Mah, Dennis

    2011-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been applied for treatments of primary head with neck nodes, lung with supraclavicular nodes, and high-risk prostate cancer with pelvis wall nodes, all of which require large fields. However, the design of the Varian multileaf collimator requires fields >14 cm in width to be split into 2 or more carriage movements. With the split-field technique, both the number of monitor units (MUs) and total treatment time are significantly increased. Although many different approaches have been investigated to reduce the MU, including introducing new leaf segmentation algorithms, none have resulted in widespread success. In addition, for most clinics, writing such algorithms is not a feasible solution, particularly with commercial treatment planning systems. We introduce a new approach that can minimize the number of split fields and reduce the total MUs, thereby reducing treatment time. The technique is demonstrated on the Eclipse planning system V7.3, but could be generalized to any other system.

  14. A new approach to reduce number of split fields in large field IMRT.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chiao; Wu, Andrew; Garg, Madhur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Kalnicki, Shalom; Sayed, Gary; Mah, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been applied for treatments of primary head with neck nodes, lung with supraclavicular nodes, and high-risk prostate cancer with pelvis wall nodes, all of which require large fields. However, the design of the Varian multileaf collimator requires fields >14 cm in width to be split into 2 or more carriage movements. With the split-field technique, both the number of monitor units (MUs) and total treatment time are significantly increased. Although many different approaches have been investigated to reduce the MU, including introducing new leaf segmentation algorithms, none have resulted in widespread success. In addition, for most clinics, writing such algorithms is not a feasible solution, particularly with commercial treatment planning systems. We introduce a new approach that can minimize the number of split fields and reduce the total MUs, thereby reducing treatment time. The technique is demonstrated on the Eclipse planning system V7.3, but could be generalized to any other system.

  15. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA-DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA-DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place.

  16. Large eddy simulation of the FDA benchmark nozzle for a Reynolds number of 6500.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the flow in a benchmark nozzle model of an idealized medical device proposed by the FDA using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It was in particular shown that a proper modeling of the transitional flow features is particularly challenging, leading to large discrepancies and inaccurate predictions from the different research groups using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In spite of the relatively simple, axisymmetric computational geometry, the resulting turbulent flow is fairly complex and non-axisymmetric, in particular due to the sudden expansion. The resulting flow cannot be well predicted with simple modeling approaches. Due to the varying diameters and flow velocities encountered in the nozzle, different typical flow regions and regimes can be distinguished, from laminar to transitional and to weakly turbulent. The purpose of the present work is to re-examine the FDA-CFD benchmark nozzle model at a Reynolds number of 6500 using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES results are compared with published experimental data obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an excellent agreement can be observed considering the temporally averaged flow velocities. Different flow regimes are characterized by computing the temporal energy spectra at different locations along the main axis.

  17. Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case–control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated ‘hotspots') from 24 loci in 31 516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13 696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

  18. Exploring the Effects of Large Networks on Evolution in Low Mach Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orvedahl, Ryan; Zingale, M.; Almgren, A.; Bell, J.; Nonaka, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many phenomena in Astrophysics are largely subsonic and require special techniques for long-time integration. MAESTRO is a low Mach number stellar hydrodynamics code that can be used to simulate long-time, low-speed flows that would be extremely time consuming using traditional compressible codes. MAESTRO filters sound waves while retaining both local and large-scale compressibility which gives increased accuracy and efficiency. In this project we describe the results of applying MAESTRO to thermonuclear flames (thin propagating thermonuclear fusion fronts) as well as the convective layer of a nova. The nova is a carbon-oxygen white dwarf with a hydrogen-helium envelope in tight hydrostatic equilibrium. As the envelope increases in mass, the pressure and temperature increase at the base of the accreted layer. When the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, nuclear fusion (burning) occurs. To capture this burning, MAESTRO models multiple species using the mass density of the fluid and the mass fraction of the species. A typical MAESTRO carbon burning reaction network only carries 3 species; C12, O16 and Mg24. We present the results of combining the extensive reaction network of the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA) code with the MAESTRO code. MESA provides various values including atomic mass and atomic weight for over 5400 isotopes. We apply these large networks to study the dynamics of the convective layer in the nova as well as the dynamics of thermonuclear flames. This work was supported in part by a DOE/Office of Nuclear Physics grant No. DE-FG02-06ER41448 to Stony Brook.

  19. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  20. HPC-Colony: Services and Interfaces to Aupport Systems With Very Large Numbers of Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Tauferner, A; Inglett, T

    2007-01-31

    The HPC-Colony Project, a collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and IBM, is focused on services and interfaces for very large numbers of processors. Advances in parallel systems in the last decade have delivered phenomenal progress in the overall capability available to a single parallel application. Several systems with peak capability of over 100TF are already available and systems are expected to exceed 1PF within a few years. Despite these impressive advances in peak performance capability, the sustained performance of these systems continues to fall as a percentage of the peak capability. Initial analysis suggests that key architectural bottlenecks (in hardware and software) are responsible for the lower sustained performance and some architectural change of direction may be necessary to address the declining sustained performance. In this proposal we focus on addressing software architectural bottlenecks, in the areas of operating system and runtime systems. While the trend towards larger processor counts benefits application developers through more processing power, it also challenges application developers to harness ever-increasing numbers of processors for productive work. Much of the burden falls to operating systems and runtime systems that were originally designed for much smaller processor counts. Under the Colony project, we are researching and developing system software to enable general purpose operating and runtime systems for tens of thousands of processors. Difficulties in achieving a balanced partitioning and dynamically scheduling workloads can limit scaling for complex problems on large machines. Scientific simulations that span components of large machines require common operating system services, such as process scheduling, event notification, and job management to scale to large machines. Today, application programmers must explicitly manage these resources. We address

  1. Accurately assessing the risk of schizophrenia conferred by rare copy-number variation affecting genes with brain function.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Korn, Joshua M; McCarroll, Steven A; Altshuler, David; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J

    2010-09-09

    Investigators have linked rare copy number variation (CNVs) to neuropsychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. One hypothesis is that CNV events cause disease by affecting genes with specific brain functions. Under these circumstances, we expect that CNV events in cases should impact brain-function genes more frequently than those events in controls. Previous publications have applied "pathway" analyses to genes within neuropsychiatric case CNVs to show enrichment for brain-functions. While such analyses have been suggestive, they often have not rigorously compared the rates of CNVs impacting genes with brain function in cases to controls, and therefore do not address important confounders such as the large size of brain genes and overall differences in rates and sizes of CNVs. To demonstrate the potential impact of confounders, we genotyped rare CNV events in 2,415 unaffected controls with Affymetrix 6.0; we then applied standard pathway analyses using four sets of brain-function genes and observed an apparently highly significant enrichment for each set. The enrichment is simply driven by the large size of brain-function genes. Instead, we propose a case-control statistical test, cnv-enrichment-test, to compare the rate of CNVs impacting specific gene sets in cases versus controls. With simulations, we demonstrate that cnv-enrichment-test is robust to case-control differences in CNV size, CNV rate, and systematic differences in gene size. Finally, we apply cnv-enrichment-test to rare CNV events published by the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). This approach reveals nominal evidence of case-association in neuronal-activity and the learning gene sets, but not the other two examined gene sets. The neuronal-activity genes have been associated in a separate set of schizophrenia cases and controls; however, testing in independent samples is necessary to definitively confirm this association. Our method is implemented in the PLINK software package.

  2. Identification of loci affecting teat number by genome-wide association studies on three pig populations

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianhong; Zhang, Zhiyan; Yang, Bin; Guo, Yuanmei; Ai, Huashui; Long, Yi; Su, Ying; Cui, Leilei; Zhou, Liyu; Wang, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chengbin; Ren, Jun; Huang, Lusheng; Ding, Nengshui

    2017-01-01

    Objective Three genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a meta-analysis of GWAS were conducted to explore the genetic mechanisms underlying variation in pig teat number. Methods We performed three GWAS and a meta-analysis for teat number on three pig populations, including a White Duroc×Erhualian F2 resource population (n = 1,743), a Chinese Erhualian pig population (n = 320) and a Chinese Sutai pig population (n = 383). Results We detected 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that surpassed the genome-wide significant level on Sus Scrofa chromosomes (SSC) 1, 7, and 12 in the F2 resource population, corresponding to four loci for pig teat number. We highlighted vertnin (VRTN) and lysine demethylase 6B (KDM6B) as two interesting candidate genes at the loci on SSC7 and SSC12. No significant associated SNPs were identified in the meta-analysis of GWAS. Conclusion The results verified the complex genetic architecture of pig teat number. The causative variants for teat number may be different in the three populations PMID:27165028

  3. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology.

  4. Laboratory astrophysics using differential rotation of unmagnetized plasma at large magnetic Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David

    2016-10-01

    Differentially rotating plasma flow has been measured in the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX). Spherical cusp-confined plasmas have been stirred both from the plasma boundary using electrostatic stirring in the magnetized edge and in the plasma core using weak global fields and cross-field currents to impose a body-force torque. Laminar velocity profiles conducive to shear-driven MHD instabilities like the dynamo and the MRI are now being generated and controlled with magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm < 250 and fluid Reynolds numbers of Re < 200 . The measured plasma confinement contradicts existing theories for magnetic cusp confinement, and a new quasi-1D ambipolar diffusion model is presented to explain measurements of cusp loss widths that do not fit the classic hybrid gyroradius theory. Emissive electrode discharge is shown to be an efficient method for plasma heating, but limits on input heating power have been observed (believed to be caused by the formation of double-layers at anodes). These confinement studies have culminated in large (R = 1.4 m), warm (Te < 20 eV), dense (ne < 5 ×1018 m-3), unmagnetized (MA > 1), steady-state plasmas. Results of the ambipolar transport model are good fits to measurements of pressure gradients and fluid drifts in the cusp, and offer a predictive tool for future cusp-confined devices. Hydrodynamic modeling is shown to be a good description for measured plasma flows, where ion viscosity proves to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. In addition, the body-force stirring technique produces velocity profiles conducive to MRI experiments where dΩ / dr < 0 . Measured values of Rm and Re are significantly higher than previous flow experiments in cusp-confined plasmas, setting the stage for future progress in laboratory research of flow-driven astrophysical MHD instabilities.

  5. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  6. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  7. Space Situational Awareness of Large Numbers of Payloads From a Single Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerman, A.; Byers, J.; Emmert, J.; Nicholas, A.

    2014-09-01

    The nearly simultaneous deployment of a large number of payloads from a single vehicle presents a new challenge for space object catalog maintenance and space situational awareness (SSA). Following two cubesat deployments last November, it took five weeks to catalog the resulting 64 orbits. The upcoming Kicksat mission will present an even greater SSA challenge, with its deployment of 128 chip-sized picosats. Although all of these deployments are in short-lived orbits, future deployments will inevitably occur at higher altitudes, with a longer term threat of collision with active spacecraft. With such deployments, individual scientific payload operators require rapid precise knowledge of their satellites' locations. Following the first November launch, the cataloguing did not initially associate a payload with each orbit, leaving this to the satellite operators. For short duration missions, the time required to identify an experiment's specific orbit may easily be a large fraction of the spacecraft's lifetime. For a Kicksat-type deployment, present tracking cannot collect enough observations to catalog each small object. The current approach is to treat the chip cloud as a single catalog object. However, the cloud dissipates into multiple subclouds and, ultimately, tiny groups of untrackable chips. One response to this challenge may be to mandate installation of a transponder on each spacecraft. Directional transponder transmission detections could be used as angle observations for orbit cataloguing. Of course, such an approach would only be employable with cooperative spacecraft. In other cases, a probabilistic association approach may be useful, with the goal being to establish the probability of an element being at a given point in space. This would permit more reliable assessment of the probability of collision of active spacecraft with any cloud element. This paper surveys the cataloguing challenges presented by large scale deployments of small spacecraft

  8. Storage conditions affecting increase in falling number of soft red winter wheat grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Falling number (FN) of wheat grain, a measure of preharvest sprouting, tends to increase during storage; however, grain and storage conditions that impact FN changes are poorly understood. Wheat grain samples of varying FN from several cultivars were obtained by malting, by incubating wheat stalks,...

  9. Language affects symbolic arithmetic in children: the case of number word inversion.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Silke M; Moeller, Korbinian; Pixner, Silvia; Kaufmann, Liane; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Specific language influences have been observed in basic numerical tasks such as magnitude comparison, transcoding, and the number line estimation task. However, so far language influences in more complex calculations have not been reported in children. In this translingual study, 7- to 9-year-old German- and Italian-speaking children were tested on a symbolic addition task. Whereas the order of tens and units in Italian number words follows the order of the Arabic notation, the order is inverted in German number words. For both language groups, addition problems were more difficult when a carry operation was needed, that is, when a manipulation within the place-value structure of the Arabic number system was particularly important. Most important, this carry effect was more pronounced in response latencies for children speaking German, a language with inverted verbal mapping of the place-value structure. In addition, independent of language group, the size of the carry effect was significantly related to verbal working memory. The current study indicates that symbolic arithmetic and the carry effect in particular are modulated by language-specific characteristics. Our results underline the fact that the structure of the language of instruction is an important factor in children's mathematical education and needs to be taken into account even for seemingly nonverbal symbolic Arabic tasks.

  10. Does the Number of Post-Secondary Agricultural Mechanics Courses Completed Affect Teacher Competence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Alex Preston; Anderson, Ryan G.; Paulsen, Thomas H.; Shultz, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Preparing teachers to teach agricultural mechanics is a difficult task since many topic areas are included in the curriculum. This study examines the effect of the number of college courses taken on a teacher's perceived competence to teach agricultural mechanics. Agricultural education teachers in Iowa ranked themselves according to their…

  11. Atoms and quantum dots with a large number of electrons: The ground-state energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Herve; Rueedi, Rico

    2010-03-15

    We compute the ground-state energy of atoms and quantum dots with a large number N of electrons. Both systems are described by a nonrelativistic Hamiltonian of electrons in a d-dimensional space. The electrons interact via the Coulomb potential. In the case of atoms (d=3), the electrons are attracted by the nucleus via the Coulomb potential. In the case of quantum dots (d=2), the electrons are confined by an external potential, whose shape can be varied. We show that the dominant terms of the ground-state energy are those given by a semiclassical Hartree-exchange energy, whose N{yields}{infinity} limit corresponds to Thomas-Fermi theory. This semiclassical Hartree-exchange theory creates oscillations in the ground-state energy as a function of N. These oscillations reflect the dynamics of a classical particle moving in the presence of the Thomas-Fermi potential. The dynamics is regular for atoms and some dots, but in general in the case of dots, the motion contains a chaotic component. We compute the correlation effects. They appear at the order NlnN for atoms, in agreement with available data. For dots, they appear at the order N.

  12. An evidential approach to problem solving when a large number of knowledge systems is available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekorvin, Andre

    1989-01-01

    Some recent problems are no longer formulated in terms of imprecise facts, missing data or inadequate measuring devices. Instead, questions pertaining to knowledge and information itself arise and can be phrased independently of any particular area of knowledge. The problem considered in the present work is how to model a problem solver that is trying to find the answer to some query. The problem solver has access to a large number of knowledge systems that specialize in diverse features. In this context, feature means an indicator of what the possibilities for the answer are. The knowledge systems should not be accessed more than once, in order to have truly independent sources of information. Moreover, these systems are allowed to run in parallel. Since access might be expensive, it is necessary to construct a management policy for accessing these knowledge systems. To help in the access policy, some control knowledge systems are available. Control knowledge systems have knowledge about the performance parameters status of the knowledge systems. In order to carry out the double goal of estimating what units to access and to answer the given query, diverse pieces of evidence must be fused. The Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence is used to pool the knowledge bases.

  13. Large ν - \\overline{ν} oscillations from high-dimensional lepton number violating operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da

    2017-03-01

    It is usually believed that the observation of the neutrino-antineutrino ( ν - \\overline{ν} ) oscillations is almost impossible since the oscillation probabilities are expected to be greatly suppressed by the square of tiny ratio of neutrino masses to energies. Such an argument is applicable to most models for neutrino mass generation based on the Weinberg operator, including the seesaw models. However, in the present paper, we shall give a counterexample to this argument, and show that large ν - \\overline{ν} oscillation probabilities can be obtained in a class of models in which both neutrino masses and neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decays are induced by the high-dimensional lepton number violating operator O}_7={\\overline{u}}_R{l}_R^c{\\overline{L}}_L{H}^{\\ast }{d}_R+H.c. with u and d representing the first two generations of quarks. In particular, we find that the predicted 0 νββ decay rates have already placed interesting constraints on the {ν}_e\\leftrightarrow {\\overline{ν}}_e oscillation. Moreover, we provide an UV-complete model to realize this scenario, in which a dark matter candidate naturally appears due to the new U(1) d symmetry.

  14. Wall-modeled large-eddy simulation of transonic airfoil buffet at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Yuma; Kawai, Soshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we conduct the wall-modeled large-eddy simulation (LES) of transonic buffet phenomena over the OAT15A supercritical airfoil at high Reynolds number. The transonic airfoil buffet involves shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions and shock vibration associated with the flow separation downstream of the shock wave. The wall-modeled LES developed by Kawai and Larsson PoF (2012) is tuned on the K supercomputer for high-fidelity simulation. We first show the capability of the present wall-modeled LES on the transonic airfoil buffet phenomena and then investigate the detailed flow physics of unsteadiness of shock waves and separated boundary layer interaction phenomena. We also focus on the sustaining mechanism of the buffet phenomena, including the source of the pressure waves propagated from the trailing edge and the interactions between the shock wave and the generated sound waves. This work was supported in part by MEXT as a social and scientific priority issue to be tackled by using post-K computer. Computer resources of the K computer was provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science (Project ID: hp150254).

  15. Why are small and large numbers enumerated differently? A limited-capacity preattentive stage in vision.

    PubMed

    Trick, L M; Pylyshyn, Z W

    1994-01-01

    "Subitizing," the process of enumeration when there are fewer than 4 items, is rapid (40-100 ms/item), effortless, and accurate. "Counting," the process of enumeration when there are more than 4 items, is slow (250-350 ms/item), effortful, and error-prone. Why is there a difference in the way the small and large numbers of items are enumerated? A theory of enumeration is proposed that emerges from a general theory of vision, yet explains the numeric abilities of preverbal infants, children, and adults. We argue that subitizing exploits a limited-capacity parallel mechanism for item individuation, the FINST mechanism, associated with the multiple target tracking task (Pylyshyn, 1989; Pylyshyn & Storm, 1988). Two kinds of evidence support the claim that subitizing relies on preattentive information, whereas counting requires spatial attention. First, whenever spatial attention is needed to compute a spatial relation (cf. Ullman, 1984) or to perform feature integration (cf. Treisman & Gelade, 1980), subitizing does not occur (Trick & Pylyshyn, 1993a). Second, the position of the attentional focus, as manipulated by cue validity, has a greater effect on counting than subitizing latencies (Trick & Pylyshyn, 1993b).

  16. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  17. Environmental Factors Affecting Large-Bodied Coral Reef Fish Assemblages in the Mariana Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Benjamin L.; Williams, Ivor D.; Vetter, Oliver J.; Williams, Gareth J.

    2012-01-01

    Large-bodied reef fishes represent an economically and ecologically important segment of the coral reef fish assemblage. Many of these individuals supply the bulk of the reproductive output for their population and have a disproportionate effect on their environment (e.g. as apex predators or bioeroding herbivores). Large-bodied reef fishes also tend to be at greatest risk of overfishing, and their loss can result in a myriad of either cascading (direct) or indirect trophic and other effects. While many studies have investigated habitat characteristics affecting populations of small-bodied reef fishes, few have explored the relationship between large-bodied species and their environment. Here, we describe the distribution of the large-bodied reef fishes in the Mariana Archipelago with an emphasis on the environmental factors associated with their distribution. Of the factors considered in this study, a negative association with human population density showed the highest relative influence on the distribution of large-bodied reef fishes; however, depth, water temperature, and distance to deep water also were important. These findings provide new information on the ecology of large-bodied reef fishes can inform discussions concerning essential fish habitat and ecosystem-based management for these species and highlight important knowledge gaps worthy of additional research. PMID:22384014

  18. Controller certification: The generalized stability margin inference for a large number of MIMO controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisang

    In this dissertation, we investigate MIMO stability margin inference of a large number of controllers using pre-established stability margins of a small number of nu-gap-wise adjacent controllers. The generalized stability margin and the nu-gap metric are inherently able to handle MIMO system analysis without the necessity of repeating multiple channel-by-channel SISO analyses. This research consists of three parts: (i) development of a decision support tool for inference of the stability margin, (ii) computational considerations for yielding the maximal stability margin with the minimal nu-gap metric in a less conservative manner, and (iii) experiment design for estimating the generalized stability margin with an assured error bound. A modern problem from aerospace control involves the certification of a large set of potential controllers with either a single plant or a fleet of potential plant systems, with both plants and controllers being MIMO and, for the moment, linear. Experiments on a limited number of controller/plant pairs should establish the stability and a certain level of margin of the complete set. We consider this certification problem for a set of controllers and provide algorithms for selecting an efficient subset for testing. This is done for a finite set of candidate controllers and, at least for SISO plants, for an infinite set. In doing this, the nu-gap metric will be the main tool. We provide a theorem restricting a radius of a ball in the parameter space so that the controller can guarantee a prescribed level of stability and performance if parameters of the controllers are contained in the ball. Computational examples are given, including one of certification of an aircraft engine controller. The overarching aim is to introduce truly MIMO margin calculations and to understand their efficacy in certifying stability over a set of controllers and in replacing legacy single-loop gain and phase margin calculations. We consider methods for the

  19. An initiator protein for plasmid R6K DNA replication. Mutations affecting the copy-number control.

    PubMed

    Inuzuka, M; Wada, Y

    1988-02-08

    Two kinds of mutations affecting the copy-number control of plasmid R6K were isolated and identified in an initiator pi protein by DNA sequencing. Firstly, a temperature-sensitive replication mutation, ts22, with decreased copy number results in a substitution of threonine to isoleucine at position 138 of the 305-amino-acid pi protein. Secondly, a high-copy-number (cop21) mutant was isolated from this ts mutant and was identified by an alteration of alanine to serine at position 162. This cop21 mutation suppressed the Ts character and was recessive to the wild-type allele in the copy control.

  20. Affective video retrieval: violence detection in Hollywood movies by large-scale segmental feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Eyben, Florian; Weninger, Felix; Lehment, Nicolas; Schuller, Björn; Rigoll, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Without doubt general video and sound, as found in large multimedia archives, carry emotional information. Thus, audio and video retrieval by certain emotional categories or dimensions could play a central role for tomorrow's intelligent systems, enabling search for movies with a particular mood, computer aided scene and sound design in order to elicit certain emotions in the audience, etc. Yet, the lion's share of research in affective computing is exclusively focusing on signals conveyed by humans, such as affective speech. Uniting the fields of multimedia retrieval and affective computing is believed to lend to a multiplicity of interesting retrieval applications, and at the same time to benefit affective computing research, by moving its methodology "out of the lab" to real-world, diverse data. In this contribution, we address the problem of finding "disturbing" scenes in movies, a scenario that is highly relevant for computer-aided parental guidance. We apply large-scale segmental feature extraction combined with audio-visual classification to the particular task of detecting violence. Our system performs fully data-driven analysis including automatic segmentation. We evaluate the system in terms of mean average precision (MAP) on the official data set of the MediaEval 2012 evaluation campaign's Affect Task, which consists of 18 original Hollywood movies, achieving up to .398 MAP on unseen test data in full realism. An in-depth analysis of the worth of individual features with respect to the target class and the system errors is carried out and reveals the importance of peak-related audio feature extraction and low-level histogram-based video analysis.

  1. Affective Video Retrieval: Violence Detection in Hollywood Movies by Large-Scale Segmental Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Eyben, Florian; Weninger, Felix; Lehment, Nicolas; Schuller, Björn; Rigoll, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Without doubt general video and sound, as found in large multimedia archives, carry emotional information. Thus, audio and video retrieval by certain emotional categories or dimensions could play a central role for tomorrow's intelligent systems, enabling search for movies with a particular mood, computer aided scene and sound design in order to elicit certain emotions in the audience, etc. Yet, the lion's share of research in affective computing is exclusively focusing on signals conveyed by humans, such as affective speech. Uniting the fields of multimedia retrieval and affective computing is believed to lend to a multiplicity of interesting retrieval applications, and at the same time to benefit affective computing research, by moving its methodology “out of the lab” to real-world, diverse data. In this contribution, we address the problem of finding “disturbing” scenes in movies, a scenario that is highly relevant for computer-aided parental guidance. We apply large-scale segmental feature extraction combined with audio-visual classification to the particular task of detecting violence. Our system performs fully data-driven analysis including automatic segmentation. We evaluate the system in terms of mean average precision (MAP) on the official data set of the MediaEval 2012 evaluation campaign's Affect Task, which consists of 18 original Hollywood movies, achieving up to .398 MAP on unseen test data in full realism. An in-depth analysis of the worth of individual features with respect to the target class and the system errors is carried out and reveals the importance of peak-related audio feature extraction and low-level histogram-based video analysis. PMID:24391704

  2. Rhythm in number: exploring the affective, social and mathematical dimensions of using TouchCounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Nathalie; Chorney, Sean; Rodney, Sheree

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the mathematical, social and affective nature of children's engagement with TouchCounts, a multitouch application for counting and doing arithmetic. In order to study these dimensions of engagement in a way that recognizes their fundamental intertwinement, we use rhythm as a primary unit of analysis. Drawing on over 8 hours of research sessions with children aged 6, 7 and 8 years old, we show how various rhythms emerged from their interactions and how these rhythms changed over time—moving from the particular to the more general. We also show how important rhythm is to children's carrying of activity, which relates to aspects of interest and motivation.

  3. In silico identification of conserved microRNAs in large number of diverse plant species

    PubMed Central

    Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Jagadeeswaran, Guru

    2008-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recently discovered small non-coding RNAs that play pivotal roles in gene expression, specifically at the post-transcriptional level in plants and animals. Identification of miRNAs in large number of diverse plant species is important to understand the evolution of miRNAs and miRNA-targeted gene regulations. Now-a-days, publicly available databases play a central role in the in-silico biology. Because, at least ~21 miRNA families are conserved in higher plants, a homology based search using these databases can help identify orthologs or paralogs in plants. Results We searched all publicly available nucleotide databases of genome survey sequences (GSS), high-throughput genomics sequences (HTGS), expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) and nonredundant (NR) nucleotides and identified 682 miRNAs in 155 diverse plant species. We found more than 15 conserved miRNA families in 11 plant species, 10 to14 families in 10 plant species and 5 to 9 families in 29 plant species. Nineteen conserved miRNA families were identified in important model legumes such as Medicago, Lotus and soybean. Five miRNA families – miR319, miR156/157, miR169, miR165/166 and miR394 – were found in 51, 45, 41, 40 and 40 diverse plant species, respectively. miR403 homologs were found in 16 dicots, whereas miR437 and miR444 homologs, as well as the miR396d/e variant of the miR396 family, were found only in monocots, thus providing large-scale authenticity for the dicot- and monocot-specific miRNAs. Furthermore, we provide computational and/or experimental evidence for the conservation of 6 newly found Arabidopsis miRNA homologs (miR158, miR391, miR824, miR825, miR827 and miR840) and 2 small RNAs (small-85 and small-87) in Brassica spp. Conclusion Using all publicly available nucleotide databases, 682 miRNAs were identified in 155 diverse plant species. By combining the expression analysis with the computational approach, we found that 6 miRNAs and 2 small RNAs that have

  4. XCAN project : coherent beam combining of large number fibers in femtosecond regime (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, Marie; Le Dortz, Jeremy; Bourderionnet, Jerome; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Daniault, Louis; Fsaifes, Ihsan; Heilmann, Anke; Bellanger, Severine; Simon-Boisson, Christophe; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Brignon, Arnaud

    2016-10-01

    The XCAN project, which is a three years project and began in 2015, carried out by Thales and the Ecole Polytechnique aims at developing a laser system based on the coherent combination of laser beams produced through a network of amplifying optical fibers. This technique provides an attractive mean of reaching simultaneously the high peak and high average powers required for various industrial, scientific and defense applications. The architecture has to be compatible with very large number of fibers (1000-10000). The goal of XCAN is to overcome all the key scientific and technological barriers to the design and development of an experimental laser demonstrator. The coherent addition of multiple individual phased beams is aimed to provide tens of Gigawatt peak power at 50 kHz repetition rate. Coherent beam combining (CBC) of fiber amplifiers involves a master oscillator which is split into N fiber channels and then amplified through series of polarization maintaining fiber pre-amplifiers and amplifiers. In the so-called tiled aperture configuration, the N fibers are arranged in an array and collimated in the near field of the laser output. The N beamlets then interfere constructively in the far field, and give a bright central lobe. CBC techniques with active phase locking involve phase mismatch detection, calculation of the correction and phase compensation of each amplifier by means of phase modulators. Interferometric phase measurement has proven to be particularly well suited to phase-lock a very large number of fibers in continuous regime. A small fraction of the N beamlets is imaged onto a camera. The beamlets interfere separately with a reference beam. The phase mismatch of each beam is then calculated from the interferences' position. In this presentation, we demonstrate the phase locking of 19 fibers in femtosecond pulse regime with this technique. In our first experiment, a master oscillator generates pulses of 300 fs (chirped at 200 ps). The beam is

  5. Does the DFT Self-Interaction Error Affect Energies Calculated in Proteins with Large QM Systems?

    PubMed

    Fouda, Adam; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-11-08

    We have examined how the self-interaction error in density-functional theory (DFT) calculations affects energies calculated on large systems (600-1000 atoms) involving several charged groups. We employ 18 different quantum mechanical (QM) methods, including Hartree-Fock, as well as pure, hybrid, and range-separated DFT methods. They are used to calculate reaction and activation energies for three different protein models in vacuum, in a point-charge surrounding, or with a continuum-solvent model. We show that pure DFT functionals give rise to a significant delocalization of the charges in charged groups in the protein, typically by ∼0.1 e, as evidenced from the Mulliken charges. This has a clear effect on how the surroundings affect calculated reaction and activation energies, indicating that these methods should be avoided for DFT calculations on large systems. Fortunately, methods such as CAM-B3LYP, BHLYP, and M06-2X give results that agree within a few kilojoules per mole, especially when the calculations are performed in a point-charge surrounding. Therefore, we recommend these methods to estimate the effect of the surroundings with large QM systems (but other QM methods may be used to study the intrinsic reaction and activation energies).

  6. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Affects Progenitor Cell Numbers in Olfactory Bulbs and Dentate Gyrus of Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Mark W.; Inyatkin, Alexey; Ptito, Maurice; Ervin, Frank R.; Palmour, Roberta M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) alters hippocampal cell numbers in rodents and primates, and this may be due, in part, to a reduction in the number or migration of neuronal progenitor cells. The olfactory bulb exhibits substantial postnatal cellular proliferation and a rapid turnover of newly formed cells in the rostral migratory pathway, while production and migration of postnatal neurons into the dentate gyrus may be more complex. The relatively small size of the olfactory bulb, compared to the hippocampus, potentially makes this structure ideal for a rapid analysis. This study used the St. Kitts vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) to (1) investigate the normal developmental sequence of post-natal proliferation in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus and (2) determine the effects of naturalistic prenatal ethanol exposure on proliferation at three different ages (neonate, five months and two years). Using design-based stereology, we found an age-related decrease of actively proliferating cells in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus for both control and FAE groups. Furthermore, at the neonatal time point, the FAE group had fewer actively proliferating cells as compared to the control group. These data are unique with respect to fetal ethanol effects on progenitor proliferation in the primate brain and suggest that the olfactory bulb may be a useful structure for studies of cellular proliferation. PMID:27801790

  7. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells.

  8. What caused a large number of fatalities in the Tohoku earthquake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, M.; Ishida, M.; Nishikawa, Y.; Mizuki, C.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Mw9.0 earthquake caused 20,000 deaths and missing persons in northeastern Japan. 115 years prior to this event, there were three historical tsunamis that struck the region, one of which is a "tsunami earthquake" resulted with a death toll of 22,000. Since then, numerous breakwaters were constructed along the entire northeastern coasts and tsunami evacuation drills were carried out and hazard maps were distributed to local residents on numerous communities. However, despite the constructions and preparedness efforts, the March 11 Tohoku earthquake caused numerous fatalities. The strong shaking lasted three minutes or longer, thus all residents recognized that this is the strongest and longest earthquake that they had been ever experienced in their lives. The tsunami inundated an enormous area at about 560km2 over 35 cities along the coast of northeast Japan. To find out the reasons behind the high number of fatalities due to the March 11 tsunami, we interviewed 150 tsunami survivors at public evacuation shelters in 7 cities mainly in Iwate prefecture in mid-April and early June 2011. Interviews were done for about 30min or longer focused on their evacuation behaviors and those that they had observed. On the basis of the interviews, we found that residents' decisions not to evacuate immediately were partly due to or influenced by earthquake science results. Below are some of the factors that affected residents' decisions. 1. Earthquake hazard assessments turned out to be incorrect. Expected earthquake magnitudes and resultant hazards in northeastern Japan assessed and publicized by the government were significantly smaller than the actual Tohoku earthquake. 2. Many residents did not receive accurate tsunami warnings. The first tsunami warning were too small compared with the actual tsunami heights. 3. The previous frequent warnings with overestimated tsunami height influenced the behavior of the residents. 4. Many local residents above 55 years old experienced

  9. Anatomical, physiological and experimental factors affecting the bioavailability of sc administered large biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Fathallah, Anas M.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2014-01-01

    Subcutaneous route of administration is highly desirable for protein therapeutics. It improves patient compliance and quality of life1,2, while reducing healthcare cost2. Recent evidence also suggests that sc administration of protein therapeutics can increase tolerability to some treatments such as intravenous immunoglobulin therapy (IVIG) by administering it subcutaneously (subcutaneous immunoglobulin therapy SCIG), which will reduce fluctuation in plasma drug concentration3. Furthermore, sc administration may reduce the risk of systemic infections associated with iv infusion1,2. This route, however, has its challenges especially for large multi-domain proteins. Poor bioavailability and poor scalability from preclinical models are often cited. This commentary will discuss barriers to sc absorption as well as physiological and experimental factors that could affect pharmacokinetics of subcutaneously administered large protein therapeutics in preclinical models. A mechanistic pharmacokinetic model is proposed as a potential tool to address the issue of scalability of sc pharmacokinetic from preclinical models to humans PMID:25411114

  10. Researchers' choice of the number and range of levels in experiments affects the resultant variance-accounted-for effect size.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kensuke; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2016-08-08

    In psychology, the reporting of variance-accounted-for effect size indices has been recommended and widely accepted through the movement away from null hypothesis significance testing. However, most researchers have paid insufficient attention to the fact that effect sizes depend on the choice of the number of levels and their ranges in experiments. Moreover, the functional form of how and how much this choice affects the resultant effect size has not thus far been studied. We show that the relationship between the population effect size and number and range of levels is given as an explicit function under reasonable assumptions. Counterintuitively, it is found that researchers may affect the resultant effect size to be either double or half simply by suitably choosing the number of levels and their ranges. Through a simulation study, we confirm that this relation also applies to sample effect size indices in much the same way. Therefore, the variance-accounted-for effect size would be substantially affected by the basic research design such as the number of levels. Simple cross-study comparisons and a meta-analysis of variance-accounted-for effect sizes would generally be irrational unless differences in research designs are explicitly considered.

  11. Higher-order interaction between molluscs and sheep affecting seedling numbers in grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clear Hill, B. H.; Silvertown, J.

    Vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores are both important in mesotrophic grasslands and these two different classes of herbivore potentially interact in their effect upon plant populations. We used two field experiments to test for higher order interactions (HOIs) among sheep, slugs and seedlings, using the mechanistic definition that an HOI occurs when the presence of one species modifies the interaction between two others. In each experiment slug addition and slug-removal treatments were nested inside treatments that altered sheep grazing intensity and timing, and the emergence, of seedlings from experimentally sown seeds was monitored. In Experiment 1, seedling numbers of Cerastium fontanum were increased by intense summer grazing by sheep in both slug-addition and slugremoval treatment, but winter grazing by sheep only increased seedling emergence if slugs were removed. In Experiment 2, winter grazing by sheep significantly reduced total seedling emergence of four species sown ( Lotus corniculatus, Plantago lanceolata, Leucanthemum vulgare, Achillea millefolium), but the effect was only seen where slugs were removed. Though the experimental system is a relatively simple one with only four components (sheep, slugs, seedlings and the matrix vegetation), higher order interactions, a combination of direct and indirect effects and possible switching behaviour by slugs are all suggested by our results.

  12. Noggin inactivation affects the number and differentiation potential of muscle progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Mommaerts, Hendrik; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Tylzanowski, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of Noggin, a secreted antagonist of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs), in mice leads, among others, to severe malformations of the appendicular skeleton and defective skeletal muscle fibers. To determine the molecular basis of the phenotype, we carried out a histomorphological and molecular analysis of developing muscles Noggin−/− mice. We show that in 18.5 dpc embryos there is a marked reduction in muscle fiber size and a failure of nuclei migration towards the cell membrane. Molecularly, the absence of Noggin results in an increased BMP signaling in muscle tissue as shown by the increase in SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation, concomitant with the induction of BMP target genes such as Id1, 2, 3 as well as Msx1. Finally, upon removal of Noggin, the number of mesenchymal Pax7+ muscle precursor cells is reduced and they are more prone to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Thus, our results highlight the importance of Noggin/BMP balance for myogenic commitment of early fetal progenitor cells. PMID:27573479

  13. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid‐derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. Methods In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. Results The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. Conclusions These data indicate that alterations in tumor‐reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci. PMID:28250928

  14. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Tick, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer–aquitard complexes.

  15. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

  16. Comparison of jet Mach number decay data with a correlation and jet spreading contours for a large variety of nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.; Vonglahn, U. H.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale circular, noncircular, single- and multi-element nozzles with flow areas as large as 122 sq cm were tested with cold airflow at exit Mach numbers from 0.28 to 1.15. The effects of multi-element nozzle shape and element spacing on jet Mach number decay were studied in an effort to reduce the noise caused by jet impingement on externally blown flap (EBF) STOL aircraft. The jet Mach number decay data are well represented by empirical relations. Jet spreading and Mach number decay contours are presented for all configurations tested.

  17. Practical quantum metrology with large precision gains in the low-photon-number regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, P. A.; Proctor, T. J.; Hayes, A. J.; Cooling, J. P.; Dunningham, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum metrology exploits quantum correlations to make precise measurements with limited particle numbers. By utilizing inter- and intramode correlations in an optical interferometer, we find a state that combines entanglement and squeezing to give a sevenfold enhancement in the quantum Fisher information (QFI)—a metric related to the precision—over the shot-noise limit, for low photon numbers. Motivated by practicality we then look at the squeezed cat state, which has recently been made experimentally, and shows further precision gains over the shot-noise limit and a threefold improvement in the QFI over the optimal Gaussian state. We present a conceptually simple measurement scheme that saturates the QFI, and we demonstrate a robustness to loss for small photon numbers. The squeezed cat state can therefore give a significant precision enhancement in optical quantum metrology in practical and realistic conditions.

  18. Accelerated Modular Multiplication Algorithm of Large Word Length Numbers with a Fixed Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Nikolaos; Drigas, Athanasios; Markovskyy, Alexander; Vrettaros, John

    A new algorithm is proposed for the software implementation of modular multiplication, which uses pre-computations with a constant module. The developed modular multiplication algorithm provides high performance in comparison with the already known algorithms, and is oriented at the variable value of the module, especially with the software implementation on micro controllers and smart cards with a small number of bits.

  19. Distance graphs having large chromatic numbers and containing no cliques or cycles of a given size

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, Evgenii E; Raigorodskii, Andrei M; Rubanov, Oleg I

    2013-04-30

    It is established that there exist sequences of distance graphs G{sub n} subset of R{sup n}, with chromatic numbers which grow exponentially, but, at the same time, without cliques or cycles of a given size. Bibliography: 42 titles.

  20. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  1. Reduced rDNA copy number does not affect "competitive" chromosome pairing in XYY males of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Maggert, Keith A

    2014-03-20

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a "competitive" situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments.

  2. Reduced rDNA Copy Number Does Not Affect “Competitive” Chromosome Pairing in XYY Males of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Maggert, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The ribosomal DNA (rDNA) arrays are causal agents in X-Y chromosome pairing in meiosis I of Drosophila males. Despite broad variation in X-linked and Y-linked rDNA copy number, polymorphisms in regulatory/spacer sequences between rRNA genes, and variance in copy number of interrupting R1 and R2 retrotransposable elements, there is little evidence that different rDNA arrays affect pairing efficacy. I investigated whether induced rDNA copy number polymorphisms affect chromosome pairing in a “competitive” situation in which complex pairing configurations were possible using males with XYY constitution. Using a common normal X chromosome, one of two different full-length Y chromosomes, and a third chromosome from a series of otherwise-isogenic rDNA deletions, I detected no differences in X-Y or Y-Y pairing or chromosome segregation frequencies that could not be attributed to random variation alone. This work was performed in the context of an undergraduate teaching program at Texas A&M University, and I discuss the pedagogical utility of this and other such experiments. PMID:24449686

  3. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus)

    PubMed Central

    Burger, D.; Dolivo, G.; Marti, E.; Sieme, H.; Wedekind, C.

    2015-01-01

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies. PMID:25904670

  4. Female major histocompatibility complex type affects male testosterone levels and sperm number in the horse (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Burger, D; Dolivo, G; Marti, E; Sieme, H; Wedekind, C

    2015-05-22

    Odours of vertebrates often contain information about the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and are used in kin recognition, mate choice or female investment in pregnancy. It is, however, still unclear whether MHC-linked signals can also affect male reproductive strategies. We used horses (Equus caballus) to study this question under experimental conditions. Twelve stallions were individually exposed either to an unfamiliar MHC-similar mare and then to an unfamiliar MHC-dissimilar mare, or vice versa. Each exposure lasted over a period of four weeks. Peripheral blood testosterone levels were determined weekly. Three ejaculates each were collected in the week after exposure to both mares (i.e. in the ninth week) to determine mean sperm number and sperm velocity. We found high testosterone levels when stallions were kept close to MHC-dissimilar mares and significantly lower ones when kept close to MHC-similar mares. Mean sperm number per ejaculate (but not sperm velocity) was positively correlated to mean testosterone levels and also affected by the order of presentation of mares: sperm numbers were higher if MHC-dissimilar mares were presented last than if MHC-similar mares were presented last. We conclude that MHC-linked signals influence testosterone secretion and semen characteristics, two indicators of male reproductive strategies.

  5. Cell Number Regulator1 affects plant and organ size in maize: implications for crop yield enhancement and heterosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei; Rupe, Mary A; Dieter, Jo Ann; Zou, Jijun; Spielbauer, Daniel; Duncan, Keith E; Howard, Richard J; Hou, Zhenglin; Simmons, Carl R

    2010-04-01

    Genes involved in cell number regulation may affect plant growth and organ size and, ultimately, crop yield. The tomato (genus Solanum) fruit weight gene fw2.2, for instance, governs a quantitative trait locus that accounts for 30% of fruit size variation, with increased fruit size chiefly due to increased carpel ovary cell number. To expand investigation of how related genes may impact other crop plant or organ sizes, we identified the maize (Zea mays) gene family of putative fw2.2 orthologs, naming them Cell Number Regulator (CNR) genes. This family represents an ancient eukaryotic family of Cys-rich proteins containing the PLAC8 or DUF614 conserved motif. We focused on native expression and transgene analysis of the two maize members closest to Le-fw2.2, namely, CNR1 and CNR2. We show that CNR1 reduced overall plant size when ectopically overexpressed and that plant and organ size increased when its expression was cosuppressed or silenced. Leaf epidermal cell counts showed that the increased or decreased transgenic plant and organ size was due to changes in cell number, not cell size. CNR2 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tissue growth activity and hybrid seedling vigor. The effects of CNR1 on plant size and cell number are reminiscent of heterosis, which also increases plant size primarily through increased cell number. Regardless of whether CNRs and other cell number-influencing genes directly contribute to, or merely mimic, heterosis, they may aid generation of more vigorous and productive crop plants.

  6. A comment on "bats killed in large numbers at United States wind energy facilities"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Dalthorp, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Widespread reports of bat fatalities caused by wind turbines have raised concerns about the impacts of wind power development. Reliable estimates of the total number killed and the potential effects on populations are needed, but it is crucial that they be based on sound data. In a recent BioScience article, Hayes (2013) estimated that over 600,000 bats were killed at wind turbines in the United States in 2012. The scientific errors in the analysis are numerous, with the two most serious being that the included sites constituted a convenience sample, not a representative sample, and that the individual site estimates are derived from such different methodologies that they are inherently not comparable. This estimate is almost certainly inaccurate, but whether the actual number is much smaller, much larger, or about the same is uncertain. An accurate estimate of total bat fatality is not currently possible, given the shortcomings of the available data.

  7. Analogue algorithm for parallel factorization of an exponential number of large integers: II—optical implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamma, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    We report a detailed analysis of the optical realization of the analogue algorithm described in the first paper of this series (Tamma in Quantum Inf Process 11128:1190, 2015) for the simultaneous factorization of an exponential number of integers. Such an analogue procedure, which scales exponentially in the context of first-order interference, opens up the horizon to polynomial scaling by exploiting multi-particle quantum interference.

  8. Combining configuration interaction with perturbation theory for atoms with a large number of valence electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzuba, V. A.; Berengut, J. C.; Harabati, C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    A version of the configuration interaction (CI) method is developed which treats highly excited many-electron basis states perturbatively, so that their inclusion does not affect the size of the CI matrix. This removes, at least in principle, the main limitation of the CI method in dealing with many-electron atoms or ions. We perform calculations of the spectra of iodine and its ions, tungsten, and ytterbium as examples of atoms with open s , p , d , and f shells. Good agreement of the calculated data with experiment illustrates the power of the method. Its advantages and limitations are discussed.

  9. A novel method to accurately locate and count large numbers of steps by photobleaching

    PubMed Central

    Tsekouras, Konstantinos; Custer, Thomas C.; Jashnsaz, Hossein; Walter, Nils G.; Pressé, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Photobleaching event counting is a single-molecule fluorescence technique that is increasingly being used to determine the stoichiometry of protein and RNA complexes composed of many subunits in vivo as well as in vitro. By tagging protein or RNA subunits with fluorophores, activating them, and subsequently observing as the fluorophores photobleach, one obtains information on the number of subunits in a complex. The noise properties in a photobleaching time trace depend on the number of active fluorescent subunits. Thus, as fluorophores stochastically photobleach, noise properties of the time trace change stochastically, and these varying noise properties have created a challenge in identifying photobleaching steps in a time trace. Although photobleaching steps are often detected by eye, this method only works for high individual fluorophore emission signal-to-noise ratios and small numbers of fluorophores. With filtering methods or currently available algorithms, it is possible to reliably identify photobleaching steps for up to 20–30 fluorophores and signal-to-noise ratios down to ∼1. Here we present a new Bayesian method of counting steps in photobleaching time traces that takes into account stochastic noise variation in addition to complications such as overlapping photobleaching events that may arise from fluorophore interactions, as well as on-off blinking. Our method is capable of detecting ≥50 photobleaching steps even for signal-to-noise ratios as low as 0.1, can find up to ≥500 steps for more favorable noise profiles, and is computationally inexpensive. PMID:27654946

  10. Distributed calculation method for large-pixel-number holograms by decomposition of object and hologram planes.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Miyata, Hiroaki; Ohkawa, Takeshi; Ootsu, Kanemitsu; Yokota, Takashi; Hayasaki, Yoshio; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Baba, Takanobu

    2014-12-15

    A method has been proposed to reduce the communication overhead in computer-generated hologram (CGH) calculations on parallel and distributed computing devices. The method uses the shifting property of Fourier transform to decompose calculations, thereby avoiding data dependency and communication. This enables the full potential of parallel and distributed computing devices. The proposed method is verified by simulation and optical experiments and can achieve a 20 times speed improvement compared to conventional methods, while using large data sizes.

  11. Detailed Measurements of Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm J. Andrews, Ph.D.

    2004-12-14

    This project has two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. Also, studies of multi-layer mixing with the existing water channel facility. Over the last twelve (12) months there has been excellent progress, detailed in this report, with both tasks. As of December 10, 2004, the air/helium facility is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Currently experiments with air/helium up to Atwood numbers of 0.25 (the maximum is 0.75, but the highest Reynolds numbers are at 0.25) are being performed. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget, and we expect this to continue for 2005. With interest expressed from LLNL we have continued with initial condition studies using the water channel. This work has also progressed well, with one of the graduate Research Assistants (Mr. Nick Mueschke) visiting LLNL the past two summers to work with Dr. O. Schilling. Several journal papers are in preparation that describe the work. Two MSc.'s have been completed (Mr. Nick Mueschke, and Mr. Wayne Kraft, 12/1/03). Nick and Wayne are both pursuing Ph.D.s' funded by this DOE Alliances project. Presently three (3) Ph.D. graduate Research Assistants are supported on the project, and two (2) undergraduate Research Assistants. During the year two (2) journal papers and two (2) conference papers have been published, ten (10) presentations made at conferences, and three (3) invited presentations.

  12. Large-Eddy Simulation of Conductive Flows at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Moin, P.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the LES method with dynamic procedure in the context of conductive flows subject to an applied external magnetic field at low magnetic Reynolds number R(sub m). These kind of flows are encountered in many industrial applications. For example, in the steel industry, applied magnetic fields can be used to damp turbulence in the casting process. In nuclear fusion devices (Tokamaks), liquid-lithium flows are used as coolant blankets and interact with the surrounding magnetic field that drives and confines the fusion plasma. Also, in experimental facilities investigating the dynamo effect, the flow consists of liquid-sodium for which the Prandtl number and, as a consequence, the magnetic Reynolds number is low. Our attention is focused here on the case of homogeneous (initially isotropic) decaying turbulence. The numerical simulations performed mimic the thought experiment described in Moffatt in which an initially homogeneous isotropic conductive flow is suddenly subjected to an applied magnetic field and freely decays without any forcing. Note that this flow was first studied numerically by Schumann. It is well known that in that case, extra damping of turbulence occurs due to the Joule effect and that the flow tends to become progressively independent of the coordinate along the direction of the magnetic field. Our comparison of filtered direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions and LES predictions show that the dynamic Smagorinsky model enables one to capture successfully the flow with LES, and that it automatically incorporates the effect of the magnetic field on the turbulence. Our paper is organized as follows. In the next section we summarize the LES approach in the case of MHD turbulence at low R(sub m) and recall the definition of the dynamic Smagorinsky model. In Sec. 3 we describe the parameters of the numerical experiments performed and the code used. Section 4 is devoted to the comparison of filtered DNS results and LES results

  13. A comparison of three approaches to compute the effective Reynolds number of the implicit large-eddy simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ye; Thornber, Ben

    2016-04-12

    Here, the implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) has been utilized as an effective approach for calculating many complex flows at high Reynolds number flows. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) induced flow can be viewed as a homogeneous decaying turbulence (HDT) after the passage of the shock. In this article, a critical evaluation of three methods for estimating the effective Reynolds number and the effective kinematic viscosity is undertaken utilizing high-resolution ILES data. Effective Reynolds numbers based on the vorticity and dissipation rate, or the integral and inner-viscous length scales, are found to be the most self-consistent when compared to the expected phenomenology and wind tunnel experiments.

  14. Laboratory Study of Magnetorotational Instability and Hydrodynamic Stability at Large Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, H.; Burin, M.; Schartman, E.; Goodman, J.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01

    Two plausible mechanisms have been proposed to explain rapid angular momentum transport during accretion processes in astrophysical disks: nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities and magnetorotational instability (MRI). A laboratory experiment in a short Taylor-Couette flow geometry has been constructed in Princeton to study both mechanisms, with novel features for better controls of the boundary-driven secondary flows (Ekman circulation). Initial results on hydrodynamic stability have shown negligible angular momentum transport in Keplerian-like flows with Reynolds numbers approaching one million, casting strong doubt on the viability of nonlinear hydrodynamic instability as a source for accretion disk turbulence.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Free-Convection Heat Transfer in Vertical Tube at Large Grashof Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study free-convection heat transfer in a stationary vertical tube closed at the bottom. The walls of the tube were heated, and heated air in the tube was continuously replaced by fresh cool air at the top. The tube was designed to provide a gravitational field with Grashof numbers of a magnitude comparable with those generated by the centrifugal field in rotating-blade coolant passages (10(8) to 10(13)). Local heat-transfer coefficients in the turbulent-flow range and the temperature field within the fluid were obtained.

  16. Location, number and morphology of parathyroid glands: results from a large anatomical series.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Dimitrios; Noussios, George; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Adamidou, Fotini; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2012-09-01

    Surgical management of parathyroid gland disease may sometimes be difficult, due mainly to the surgeon's failure to successfully detect parathyroids in unusual locations. The records of 942 cadavers (574 men and 368 women) who underwent autopsy in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Athens during the period 1988-2009 were reviewed. In total, 3,796 parathyroid glands were resected and histologically verified. Parathyroid glands varied in number. In 47 cases (5 %), one supernumerary (fifth) parathyroid was found, while in 19 cases (2 %) three parathyroid glands found. Superior glands were larger than inferior ones. However, there was no significant difference between the genders with respect to gland size. In 324 (8.5 %) out of 3,796, the glands were detected in an ectopic location: 7 (0.2 %) in the thyroid parenchyma, 79 (2 %) in different sites in the neck and 238 (6.3 %) in the mediastinum, 152 (4.1 %) of which were found in the upper and 86 (2.2 %) in the lower mediastinum. Significant anatomical variations of normal parathyroid glands may exist regarding number and location-knowledge that is essential for their successful identification and surgical management.

  17. Itinerary profiling to analyze a large number of protein-folding trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Motonori; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Kidera, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how proteins fold through a vast number of unfolded states is a major subject in the study of protein folding. Herein, we present itinerary profiling as a simple method to analyze molecular dynamics trajectories, and apply this method to Trp-cage. In itinerary profiling, structural clusters included in a trajectory are represented by a bit sequence, and a number of trajectories, as well as the structural clusters, can be compared and classified. As a consequence, the structural clusters that characterize the foldability of trajectories were able to be identified. The connections between the clusters were then illustrated as a network and the structural features of the clusters were examined. We found that in the true folding funnel, Trp-cage formed a left-handed main-chain topology and the Trp6 side-chain was located at the front of the main-chain ring, even in the initial unfolded states. In contrast, in the false folding funnel of the pseudo-native states, in which the Trp6 side-chain is upside down in the protein core, Trp-cage had a right-handed main-chain topology and the Trp side-chain was at the back. The initial topological partition, as determined by the main-chain handedness and the location of the Trp residue, predetermines Trp-cage foldability and the destination of the trajectory to the native state or the pseudo-native states.

  18. The Empirical Distribution of a Large Number of Correlated Normal Variables

    PubMed Central

    Azriel, David; Schwartzman, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the advent of high dimensional highly correlated data, this work studies the limit behavior of the empirical cumulative distribution function (ecdf) of standard normal random variables under arbitrary correlation. First, we provide a necessary and sufficient condition for convergence of the ecdf to the standard normal distribution. Next, under general correlation, we show that the ecdf limit is a random, possible infinite, mixture of normal distribution functions that depends on a number of latent variables and can serve as an asymptotic approximation to the ecdf in high dimensions. We provide conditions under which the dimension of the ecdf limit, defined as the smallest number of effective latent variables, is finite. Estimates of the latent variables are provided and their consistency proved. We demonstrate these methods in a real high-dimensional data example from brain imaging where it is shown that, while the study exhibits apparently strongly significant results, they can be entirely explained by correlation, as captured by the asymptotic approximation developed here. PMID:26858467

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoil Self-Noise at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocheemoolayil, Joseph; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The trailing edge noise section (Category 1) of the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC) workshop features five canonical problems. No first-principles based approach free of empiricism and tunable coefficients has successfully predicted trailing edge noise for the five configurations to date. Our simulations predict trailing edge noise accurately for all five configurations. The simulation database is described in detail, highlighting efforts undertaken to validate the results through systematic comparison with dedicated experiments and establish insensitivity to grid resolution, domain size, alleatory uncertainties such as the tripping mechanism used to force transition to turbulence and epistemic uncertainties such as models for unresolved near-wall turbulence. Ongoing efforts to extend the predictive capability to non-canonical configurations featuring flow separation are summarized. A novel, large-span calculation that predicts the flow past a wind turbine airfoil in deep stall with unprecedented accuracy is presented. The simulations predict airfoil noise in the near-stall regime accurately. While the post-stall noise predictions leave room for improvement, significant uncertainties in the experiment might preclude a fair comparison in this regime. We thank Cascade Technologies Inc. for providing access to the CharLES toolkit - a massively-parallel, unstructured large eddy simulation framework.

  20. Ecological specialization and rarity indices estimated for a large number of plant species in France.

    PubMed

    Mobaied, Samira; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    The biological diversity of the Earth is being rapidly depleted due to the direct and indirect consequences of human activities. Specialist or rare species are generally thought to be more extinction prone than generalist or common species. Testing this assumption however requires that the rarity and ecological specialization of the species are quantified. Many indices have been developed to classify species as generalists vs. specialists or as rare vs. common, but large data sets are needed to calculate these indices. Here, we present a list of specialization and rarity values for more than 2800 plant species of continental France, which were computed from the large botanical and ecological dataset SOPHY. Three specialization indices were calculated using species co-occurrence data. All three indices are based on (dis)similarity among plant communities containing a focal species, quantified either as beta diversity in an additive (Fridley et al., 2007 [6]) or multiplicative (Zeleny, 2008 [15]) partitioning of diversity or as the multiple site similarity of Baselga et al. (2007) [1]. Species rarity was calculated as the inverse of a species occurrence.

  1. Ecological specialization and rarity indices estimated for a large number of plant species in France

    PubMed Central

    Mobaied, Samira; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    The biological diversity of the Earth is being rapidly depleted due to the direct and indirect consequences of human activities. Specialist or rare species are generally thought to be more extinction prone than generalist or common species. Testing this assumption however requires that the rarity and ecological specialization of the species are quantified. Many indices have been developed to classify species as generalists vs. specialists or as rare vs. common, but large data sets are needed to calculate these indices. Here, we present a list of specialization and rarity values for more than 2800 plant species of continental France, which were computed from the large botanical and ecological dataset SOPHY. Three specialization indices were calculated using species co-occurrence data. All three indices are based on (dis)similarity among plant communities containing a focal species, quantified either as beta diversity in an additive (Fridley et al., 2007 [6]) or multiplicative (Zeleny, 2008 [15]) partitioning of diversity or as the multiple site similarity of Baselga et al. (2007) [1]. Species rarity was calculated as the inverse of a species occurrence. PMID:26217738

  2. Exploring the feasibility of using copy number variants as genetic markers through large-scale whole genome sequencing experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variants (CNV) are large scale duplications or deletions of genomic sequence that are caused by a diverse set of molecular phenomena that are distinct from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation. Due to their different mechanisms of formation, CNVs are often difficult to track us...

  3. Large-scale brain networks are distinctly affected in right and left mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Brunno Machado; Coan, Ana Carolina; Lin Yasuda, Clarissa; Casseb, Raphael Fernandes; Cendes, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampus sclerosis (HS) is associated with functional and structural alterations extending beyond the temporal regions and abnormal pattern of brain resting state networks (RSNs) connectivity. We hypothesized that the interaction of large-scale RSNs is differently affected in patients with right- and left-MTLE with HS compared to controls. We aimed to determine and characterize these alterations through the analysis of 12 RSNs, functionally parceled in 70 regions of interest (ROIs), from resting-state functional-MRIs of 99 subjects (52 controls, 26 right- and 21 left-MTLE patients with HS). Image preprocessing and statistical analysis were performed using UF(2) C-toolbox, which provided ROI-wise results for intranetwork and internetwork connectivity. Intranetwork abnormalities were observed in the dorsal default mode network (DMN) in both groups of patients and in the posterior salience network in right-MTLE. Both groups showed abnormal correlation between the dorsal-DMN and the posterior salience, as well as between the dorsal-DMN and the executive-control network. Patients with left-MTLE also showed reduced correlation between the dorsal-DMN and visuospatial network and increased correlation between bilateral thalamus and the posterior salience network. The ipsilateral hippocampus stood out as a central area of abnormalities. Alterations on left-MTLE expressed a low cluster coefficient, whereas the altered connections on right-MTLE showed low cluster coefficient in the DMN but high in the posterior salience regions. Both right- and left-MTLE patients with HS have widespread abnormal interactions of large-scale brain networks; however, all parameters evaluated indicate that left-MTLE has a more intricate bihemispheric dysfunction compared to right-MTLE. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3137-3152, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Delayed entanglement echo for individual control of a large number of nuclear spins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B

    2017-03-03

    Methods to selectively detect and manipulate nuclear spins by single electrons of solid-state defects play a central role for quantum information processing and nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, with standard techniques, no more than eight nuclear spins have been resolved by a single defect centre. Here we develop a method that improves significantly the ability to detect, address and manipulate nuclear spins unambiguously and individually in a broad frequency band by using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre as model system. On the basis of delayed entanglement control, a technique combining microwave and radio frequency fields, our method allows to selectively perform robust high-fidelity entangling gates between hardly resolved nuclear spins and the NV electron. Long-lived qubit memories can be naturally incorporated to our method for improved performance. The application of our ideas will increase the number of useful register qubits accessible to a defect centre and improve the signal of nanoscale NMR.

  5. Delayed entanglement echo for individual control of a large number of nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2017-03-01

    Methods to selectively detect and manipulate nuclear spins by single electrons of solid-state defects play a central role for quantum information processing and nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, with standard techniques, no more than eight nuclear spins have been resolved by a single defect centre. Here we develop a method that improves significantly the ability to detect, address and manipulate nuclear spins unambiguously and individually in a broad frequency band by using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre as model system. On the basis of delayed entanglement control, a technique combining microwave and radio frequency fields, our method allows to selectively perform robust high-fidelity entangling gates between hardly resolved nuclear spins and the NV electron. Long-lived qubit memories can be naturally incorporated to our method for improved performance. The application of our ideas will increase the number of useful register qubits accessible to a defect centre and improve the signal of nanoscale NMR.

  6. Large boson number IBM calculations and their relationship to the Bohr model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiamova, G.; Rowe, D. J.

    2009-08-01

    Recently, the SO(5) Clebsch-Gordan (CG) coefficients up to the seniority v max = 40 were computed in floating point arithmetic (T.A. Welsh, unpublished (2008)); and, in exact arithmetic, as square roots of rational numbers (M.A. Caprio et al., to be published in Comput. Phys. Commun.). It is shown in this paper that extending the QQQ model calculations set up in the work by D.J. Rowe and G. Thiamova (Nucl. Phys. A 760, 59 (2005)) to N = v max = 40 is sufficient to obtain the IBM results converged to its Bohr contraction limit. This will be done by comparing some important matrix elements in both models, by looking at the seniority decomposition of low-lying states and at the behavior of the energy and B( E2) transition strengths ratios with increasing seniority.

  7. Delayed entanglement echo for individual control of a large number of nuclear spins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Casanova, Jorge; Plenio, Martin B.

    2017-01-01

    Methods to selectively detect and manipulate nuclear spins by single electrons of solid-state defects play a central role for quantum information processing and nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, with standard techniques, no more than eight nuclear spins have been resolved by a single defect centre. Here we develop a method that improves significantly the ability to detect, address and manipulate nuclear spins unambiguously and individually in a broad frequency band by using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre as model system. On the basis of delayed entanglement control, a technique combining microwave and radio frequency fields, our method allows to selectively perform robust high-fidelity entangling gates between hardly resolved nuclear spins and the NV electron. Long-lived qubit memories can be naturally incorporated to our method for improved performance. The application of our ideas will increase the number of useful register qubits accessible to a defect centre and improve the signal of nanoscale NMR. PMID:28256508

  8. Large-Scale Numerical Simulation of Fluid Structure Interactions in Low Reynolds Number Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eken, Ali; Sahin, Mehmet

    2011-11-01

    A fully coupled numerical algorithm has been developed for the numerical simulation of large-scale fluid structure interaction problems. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are discretized using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on the side-centered unstructured finite volume method. A special attention is given to satisfy the discrete continuity equation within each element at discrete level as well as the Geometric Conservation Law (GCL). The linear elasticity equations are discretized within the structure domain using the Galerkin finite element method. The resulting algebraic linear equations are solved in a fully coupled form using a monolitic multigrid method. The implementation of the fully coupled iterative solvers is based on the PETSc library for improving the efficiency of the parallel code. The present numerical algorithm is initially validated for a beam in cross flow and then it is used to simulate the fluid structure interaction of a membrane-wing micro aerial vehicle (MAV).

  9. Factors affecting fuel break effectiveness in the control of large fires on the Los Padres National Forest, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Brennan, Teresa J.

    2011-01-01

    As wildfires have increased in frequency and extent, so have the number of homes developed in the wildland-urban interface. In California, the predominant approach to mitigating fire risk is construction of fuel breaks, but there has been little empirical study of their role in controlling large fires.We constructed a spatial database of fuel breaks on the Los Padres National Forest in southern California to better understand characteristics of fuel breaks that affect the behaviour of large fires and to map where fires and fuel breaks most commonly intersect. We evaluated whether fires stopped or crossed over fuel breaks over a 28-year period and compared the outcomes with physical characteristics of the sites, weather and firefighting activities during the fire event. Many fuel breaks never intersected fires, but others intersected several, primarily in historically fire-prone areas. Fires stopped at fuel breaks 46% of the time, almost invariably owing to fire suppression activities. Firefighter access to treatments, smaller fires and longer fuel breaks were significant direct influences, and younger vegetation and fuel break maintenance indirectly improved the outcome by facilitating firefighter access. This study illustrates the importance of strategic location of fuel breaks because they have been most effective where they provided access for firefighting activities.

  10. Solar effects on circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, R.; Cahynová, M.; Kyselý, J.

    2010-09-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, defined over central Europe, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases present in any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal are eliminated once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the solar 10.7 cm flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. An enhanced frequency under solar minima and a reduced frequency under solar maxima are observed almost exclusively for the types with easterly flow over central Europe. On the other hand, a reduced frequency under solar minima and an enhanced frequency under solar maxima are found for the types with westerly flow over central Europe. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  11. Circulating megakaryocytes: delivery of large numbers of intact, mature megakaryocytes to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Levine, R F; Eldor, A; Shoff, P K; Kirwin, S; Tenza, D; Cramer, E M

    1993-10-01

    To determine the locus of platelet production, we sought to determine if sufficient megakaryocytes reach the lungs in a state that could produce platelets. Elutriation was used to isolate megakaryocytes from blood reaching and leaving the lungs of 20 patients undergoing routine cardiac catheterizations. A mean of 5.0 intact megakaryocytes/ml were found in pulmonary artery blood, compared to only 0.5 megakaryocytes/ml, with partial cytoplasmic content, in aortic samples. The megakaryocytes in central venous and aortic samples were all mature. The identity of these cells as megakaryocytes, their maturity and normal morphology were confirmed by standard and immunoelectron microscopy. Cardiac outputs were obtained for each patient at the time of blood sampling, allowing an extrapolation that 40 x 10(6) intact, mature megakaryocytes were being delivered to the lungs every day in the average patient, compared to only 4.0 x 10(6) partially spent megakaryocytes exiting the lungs daily. About 98% of megakaryocyte cytoplasm reaching the lungs did not exit as recognizable megakaryocytes or fragments. The number and state of the megakaryocytes apparently filtered in the lungs is consistent with the hypothesis that megakaryocytes may shed platelets within the pulmonary microvasculature, which may be the primary site of platelet production.

  12. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Hutchins, Nicholas; Monty, Jason; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-11-01

    The present study reconsiders the control scheme proposed by Schoppa & Hussain, using new direct numerical simulations (DNS). The DNS are performed in a turbulent channel at friction Reynolds number (Reτ) between 104 (employed value in original study) and 550. The aim is to better characterise the physics of the control, investigate the optimal parameters and Re dependence. The former purpose lead to a re-design of the method: moving from imposing the mean flow to the application of a volume force. Results show that the original method only provides transient drag reduction (DR) but actually increases the drag for longer times. The forcing method, instead, leads to sustained DR, and is therefore superior for all wavelengths investigated. A DR of 18% is obtained at the lowest Reτ for a viscous-scaled spanwise wavelength of the vortices of 230; the optimal wavelength increases with Reτ , but the efficiency is reduced, leading to a zero DR for Reτ = 550 , confining the method to low Re for internal flows. Although the findings by Schoppa & Hussain are invalidated, the forcing method is currently implemented in a spatially developing boundary layer to check whether it might lead to a different conclusion in external flows.

  13. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-28

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this paper uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent.

  14. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-11-03

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this paper uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages. The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take place in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed.

  15. Normal zone detectors for a large number of inductively coupled coils

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.

    1983-01-10

    In order to protect a set of inductively coupled superconducting magnets, it is necessary to locate and measure normal zone voltages that are small compared with the mutual and self-induced voltages. The method described in this report uses two sets of voltage measurements to locate and measure one or more normal zones in any number of coupled coils. One set of voltages is the outputs of bridges that balance out the self-induced voltages The other set of voltages can be the voltages across the coils, although alternatives are possible. The two sets of equations form a single combined set of equations. Each normal zone location or combination of normal zones has a set of these combined equations associated with it. It is demonstrated that the normal zone can be located and the correct set chosen, allowing determination of the size of the normal zone. Only a few operations take plae in a working detector: multiplication of a constant, addition, and simple decision-making. In many cases the detector for each coil, although weakly linked to the other detectors, can be considered to be independent. An example of the detector design is given for four coils with realistic parameters. The effect on accuracy of changes in the system parameters is discussed.

  16. High Reynolds Number Investigation of a Flush-Mounted, S-Duct Inlet With Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a flush-mounted, S-duct inlet with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion has been conducted at Reynolds numbers up to full scale. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. In addition, a supplemental computational study on one of the inlet configurations was conducted using the Navier-Stokes flow solver, OVERFLOW. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on aerodynamic interface plane diameter) from 5.1 million to 13.9 million (full-scale value), and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.29 to 1.22, depending on Mach number. Results of the study indicated that increasing Mach number, increasing boundary layer thickness (relative to inlet height) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted profile decreased inlet performance. At Mach numbers above 0.4, increasing inlet airflow increased inlet pressure recovery but also increased distortion. Finally, inlet distortion was found to be relatively insensitive to Reynolds number, but pressure recovery increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number.

  17. High Reynolds Number Investigation of a Flush Mounted, S-Duct Inlet With Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a flush-mounted, S-duct inlet with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion has been conducted at Reynolds numbers up to full scale. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. In addition, a supplemental computational study on one of the inlet configurations was conducted using the Navier-Stokes flow solver, OVERFLOW. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on aerodynamic interface plane diameter) from 5.1 million to 13.9 million (full-scale value), and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.29 to 1.22, depending on Mach number. Results of the study indicated that increasing Mach number, increasing boundary layer thickness (relative to inlet height) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted profile decreased inlet performance. At Mach numbers above 0.4, increasing inlet airflow increased inlet pressure recovery but also increased distortion. Finally, inlet distortion was found to be relatively insensitive to Reynolds number, but pressure recovery increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number.This CD-ROM supplement contains inlet data including: Boundary layer data, Duct static pressure data, performance-AIP (fan face) data, Photos, Tunnel wall P-PTO data and definitions.

  18. Differential replication dynamics for large and small Vibrio chromosomes affect gene dosage, expression and location

    PubMed Central

    Dryselius, Rikard; Izutsu, Kaori; Honda, Takeshi; Iida, Tetsuya

    2008-01-01

    Background Replication of bacterial chromosomes increases copy numbers of genes located near origins of replication relative to genes located near termini. Such differential gene dosage depends on replication rate, doubling time and chromosome size. Although little explored, differential gene dosage may influence both gene expression and location. For vibrios, a diverse family of fast growing gammaproteobacteria, gene dosage may be particularly important as they harbor two chromosomes of different size. Results Here we examined replication dynamics and gene dosage effects for the separate chromosomes of three Vibrio species. We also investigated locations for specific gene types within the genome. The results showed consistently larger gene dosage differences for the large chromosome which also initiated replication long before the small. Accordingly, large chromosome gene expression levels were generally higher and showed an influence from gene dosage. This was reflected by a higher abundance of growth essential and growth contributing genes of which many locate near the origin of replication. In contrast, small chromosome gene expression levels were low and appeared independent of gene dosage. Also, species specific genes are highly abundant and an over-representation of genes involved in transcription could explain its gene dosage independent expression. Conclusion Here we establish a link between replication dynamics and differential gene dosage on one hand and gene expression levels and the location of specific gene types on the other. For vibrios, this relationship appears connected to a polarisation of genetic content between its chromosomes, which may both contribute to and be enhanced by an improved adaptive capacity. PMID:19032792

  19. Large volcanic eruptions affect climate in many more ways than just cooling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, P. L.

    2009-12-01

    . Each of the largest sulfur-emitting eruptions since 1600 (Huaynaputina, Laki, Tambora, Krakatau, Santa Maria, Novarupta, Pinatubo) were in the same year as moderate to strong El Niños but were typically followed by very strong El Niños within 6 to 8 years (Data: Bradley and Jones, 1992). During El Niños, warm water heats the tropical Pacific atmosphere. Many ocean currents are affected over short time scales by atmospheric teleconnections but then affect atmospheric conditions over longer time scales. The sum of these processes with different time constants varies when the rate of volcanic activity changes by orders of magnitude. Ward (2009, doi:10.1016/j.tsf.2009.01.005) presents data suggesting large eruptions occurring on average once per century (current rate) provide only short-term changes in climate, but when they occur every few decades, they supplement Milanković cycles and increment the world into ice ages, and when they occur as often as once per year, they cause rapid global warming. Volcanic-like sulfate deposited in Greenland from man burning fossil fuels between 1930 and 1980 was as high as the highest levels of sulfate deposited during rapid warming at the end of the last ice age. Man did not eject sulfur into the stratosphere, but it remained in the atmosphere long enough to be deposited in Greenland. Understanding how volcanoes caused abrupt warming in the past would help us understand how man is causing abrupt warming today.

  20. Positrons for Antihydrogen with ATRAP: efficient transfer of large positron numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storry, Cody; Comeau, Daniel; Dror, Asaf; Fitzakerley, Daniel; George, Matthew; Hessels, Eric; Weel, Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Positrons accumulated in a room-temperature buffer-gas-cooled positron accumulator are efficiently transferred into a superconducting solenoid which houses the ATRAP cryogenic Penning trap for antihydrogen research. The positrons are guided along a 9-meter-long magnetic guide which connects the central field lines of the 0.15-tesla field in the positron accumulator to central magnetic field lines of the superconducting solenoid. Seventy independently-controllable electromagnets are required to overcome the fringing field of the large-bore superconducting solenoid. The guide includes both a 15 degree upward bend and a 105 degree downward bend to account for the orthogonal orientation of the accumulator with respect to the cryogenic Penning trap. Low-energy positrons ejected from the accumulator follow the magnetic field lines within the guide and are transferred into the superconducting solenoid with nearly 100% efficiency. 7 meters of 5-cm-diameter stainless-steel tube, and a 20-mm-long, 1.5-mm-diameter cryogenic pumping restriction ensure that the 10-2 mbar pressure in the accumulator is well isolated from the extreme vacuum required in the Penning trap to allow long antimatter storage times.

  1. Spectrum of large copy number variations in 26 diverse Indian populations: potential involvement in phenotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Jha, Pankaj; Kumar, Dhirendra; Tyagi, Shivani; Varma, Binuja; Dash, Debasis; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Mukerji, Mitali

    2012-01-01

    Copy number variations (CNVs) have provided a dynamic aspect to the apparently static human genome. We have analyzed CNVs larger than 100 kb in 477 healthy individuals from 26 diverse Indian populations of different linguistic, ethnic and geographic backgrounds. These CNVRs were identified using the Affymetrix 50K Xba 240 Array. We observed 1,425 and 1,337 CNVRs in the deletion and amplification sets, respectively, after pooling data from all the populations. More than 50% of the genes encompassed entirely in CNVs had both deletions and amplifications. There was wide variability across populations not only with respect to CNV extent (ranging from 0.04-1.14% of genome under deletion and 0.11-0.86% under amplification) but also in terms of functional enrichments of processes like keratinization, serine proteases and their inhibitors, cadherins, homeobox, olfactory receptors etc. These did not correlate with linguistic, ethnic, geographic backgrounds and size of populations. Certain processes were near exclusive to deletion (serine proteases, keratinization, olfactory receptors, GPCRs) or duplication (homeobox, serine protease inhibitors, embryonic limb morphogenesis) datasets. Populations having same enriched processes were observed to contain genes from different genomic loci. Comparison of polymorphic CNVRs (5% or more) with those cataloged in Database of Genomic Variants revealed that 78% (2473) of the genes in CNVRs in Indian populations are novel. Validation of CNVs using Sequenom MassARRAY revealed extensive heterogeneity in CNV boundaries. Exploration of CNV profiles in such diverse populations would provide a widely valuable resource for understanding diversity in phenotypes and disease.

  2. Large numbers of vertebrates began rapid population decline in the late 19th century

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haipeng; Xiang-Yu, Jinggong; Dai, Guangyi; Gu, Zhili; Ming, Chen; Yang, Zongfeng; Ryder, Oliver A.; Li, Wen-Hsiung; Fu, Yun-Xin; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated losses of biodiversity are a hallmark of the current era. Large declines of population size have been widely observed and currently 22,176 species are threatened by extinction. The time at which a threatened species began rapid population decline (RPD) and the rate of RPD provide important clues about the driving forces of population decline and anticipated extinction time. However, these parameters remain unknown for the vast majority of threatened species. Here we analyzed the genetic diversity data of nuclear and mitochondrial loci of 2,764 vertebrate species and found that the mean genetic diversity is lower in threatened species than in related nonthreatened species. Our coalescence-based modeling suggests that in many threatened species the RPD began ∼123 y ago (a 95% confidence interval of 20–260 y). This estimated date coincides with widespread industrialization and a profound change in global living ecosystems over the past two centuries. On average the population size declined by ∼25% every 10 y in a threatened species, and the population size was reduced to ∼5% of its ancestral size. Moreover, the ancestral size of threatened species was, on average, ∼22% smaller than that of nonthreatened species. Because the time period of RPD is short, the cumulative effect of RPD on genetic diversity is still not strong, so that the smaller ancestral size of threatened species may be the major cause of their reduced genetic diversity; RPD explains 24.1–37.5% of the difference in genetic diversity between threatened and nonthreatened species. PMID:27872315

  3. Biological soil crusts emit large amounts of NO and HONO affecting the nitrogen cycle in drylands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, Alexandra; Wu, Dianming; Ruckteschler, Nina; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Steinkamp, Jörg; Meusel, Hannah; Elbert, Wolfgang; Behrendt, Thomas; Sörgel, Matthias; Cheng, Yafang; Crutzen, Paul J.; Su, Hang; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina

    2016-04-01

    to the latest IPCC report. In summary, our measurements show that dryland emissions of nitrogen oxides are largely driven by biocrusts and not by the underlying soil. As precipitation patterns, which influence biocrust activity, are affected by climate change, alterations in global nitrogen oxide emissions are to be expected. Thus, the role of biocrusts in the global cycling of reactive nitrogen needs to be followed and also implemented in regional and global models of biogeochemistry, air chemistry and climate.

  4. CRE dating on the scarps of large landslides affecting the Belledonne massif ( French Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrouc, V.; Baillet, L.; Schwartz, S.; Jongmans, D.; Gamond, J. F.; Bourles, D.; Le Roux, O.; Carcaillet, J.; Braucher, R.

    2012-04-01

    The southwestern edge of the Belledonne Massif (French Alps) consists of micaschists unconformably covered with Mesozoic sediments and Quaternary deposits. The morphology corresponds to a glacial plateau (Mont Sec plateau) bordered by steep slopes (around 40°), where moraines and peat bog subsist. The massif is incised by the East-West trending Romanche valley that was shaped by several cycles of quaternary glaciations and deglaciations. Slopes are affected by several active or past large scale rock mass instabilities. Cosmic Ray Exposure (CRE) dating was applied on the head scarps of three large landslides, one of which being the active Séchilienne landslide whose headscarp was already dated by Leroux et al. [2009]. Dating results suggest a concomitant initiation of these instabilities at about 7 ± 2 10Be ka, thousands years after the total downwastage of the valley. A different kinematic behaviour was however observed on two contiguous landslides for which continuous exposure profiles were obtained. On the Séchilienne landslide, 23 samples were collected from internal and lateral scarps, as well as on polished bedrock surfaces, with the aim of dating the internal kinematics of the landslide. Preliminary dating results obtained on polished surfaces and near the top of the scarps show unexpected low 10Be concentrations, suggesting the existence of thin moraine or peat bog deposits masking the bedrock, which have been subsequently eroded. The minimum thickness of these deposits was estimated assuming a constant denudation rate over time. Exposure date profiles show that the studied lateral and internal scarps were initiated at the same period as the Sechilienne headscarp. An increase in the exposure rate was also observed between 2 and 1 ka, in agreement with that evidenced along the headscarp. Forty other samples have been collected in the landslide to corroborate these results. Reference Le Roux, O., S. Schwartz , J.-F. Gamond, D. Jongmans, D. Bourles, R

  5. How Venus surface conditions evolution can be affected by large impacts at long timescales?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmann, Cedric; Golabek, Gregor; Tackley, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Using numerical simulations, we investigate how the evolution of Venus' atmosphere and mantle is modified by large impacts, during Late Veneer and Late Heavy Bombardment. We propose a coupled model of mantle/atmosphere feedback. We also focus on volatile fluxes in and out of the atmosphere: atmospheric escape and degassing. The solid part of the planet is simulated using the StagYY code (Armann and Tackley, 2012) and releases volatiles into the atmosphere through degassing. Physical properties are depth-dependent. The assumed rheology is Newtonian diffusion creep plus plastic yielding. Atmospheric escape modeling involves two different aspects: hydrodynamic escape (0-500 Myr) and non-thermal escape mechanisms (dominant post 4 Ga). Hydrodynamic escape is the massive outflow of volatiles occurring when the solar energy input is strong. Post 4 Ga escape from non-thermal processes is comparatively low. The evolution of surface temperature is calculated from the greenhouse effect dependent on CO2 and water concentrations in the atmosphere, using a one-dimensional gray radiative-convective atmosphere model. It allows us to complete the coupling of the model: feedback of the atmosphere on the mantle is obtained by using surface temperature as a boundary condition for the convection. Large impacts are capable of contributing to (i) atmospheric escape, (ii) volatile replenishment and (iii) energy transfer to the mantle of the solid planet. We test a wide range of impactor parameters (size, velocity, timing) and different assumptions related to impact erosion (Shuvalov, 2010). For energy transfer, 2D distribution of the thermal anomaly created by the impact is used, leading to melting and subjected to transport by the mantle convection. Small (0-50 km) meteorites have a negligible effect on the global scale: they only affect the impact point and do not have lasting consequences on surface conditions. Medium ones (50-150 km) have strong short term influence through volatile

  6. Vitellogenin knockdown strongly affects cotton boll weevil egg viability but not the number of eggs laid by females.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Roberta R; de Souza Júnior, José Dijair Antonino; Firmino, Alexandre A P; de Macedo, Leonardo L P; Fonseca, Fernando C A; Terra, Walter R; Engler, Gilbert; de Almeida Engler, Janice; da Silva, Maria Cristina M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria Fatima

    2016-09-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg), a yolk protein precursor, is the primary egg nutrient source involved in insect reproduction and embryo development. The Cotton Boll weevil (CBW) Anthonomus grandis Boheman, the most important cotton pest in Americas, accumulates large amounts of Vg during reproduction. However, the precise role of this protein during embryo development in this insect remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the effects of vitellogenin (AgraVg) knockdown on the egg-laying and egg viability in A. grandis females, and also characterized morphologically the unviable eggs. AgraVg transcripts were found during all developmental stages of A. grandis, with highest abundance in females. Silencing of AgraVg culminated in a significant reduction in transcript amount, around 90%. Despite this transcriptional reduction, egg-laying was not affected in dsRNA-treated females but almost 100% of the eggs lost their viability. Eggs from dsRNA-treated females showed aberrant embryos phenotype suggesting interference at different stages of embryonic development. Unlike for other insects, the AgraVg knockdown did not affect the egg-laying ability of A. grandis, but hampered A. grandis reproduction by perturbing embryo development. We concluded that the Vg protein is essential for A. grandis reproduction and a good candidate to bio-engineer the resistance against this devastating cotton pest.

  7. Digital Genotyping of Macrosatellites and Multicopy Genes Reveals Novel Biological Functions Associated with Copy Number Variation of Large Tandem Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5–10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality ‘finished’ human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed “repeat induced gene silencing”, which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in

  8. Design and test of a natural laminar flow/large Reynolds number airfoil with a high design cruise lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity on an airfoil designed for a large airplane capable of very long endurance times at a low Mach number of 0.22 is examined. Airplane mission objectives and design optimization resulted in requirements for a very high design lift coefficient and a large amount of laminar flow at high Reynolds number to increase the lift/drag ratio and reduce the loiter lift coefficient. Natural laminar flow was selected instead of distributed mechanical suction for the measurement technique. A design lift coefficient of 1.5 was identified as the highest which could be achieved with a large extent of laminar flow. A single element airfoil was designed using an inverse boundary layer solution and inverse airfoil design computer codes to create an airfoil section that would achieve performance goals. The design process and results, including airfoil shape, pressure distributions, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented. A two dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and tested in a NASA Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel which enabled testing at full scale design Reynolds number. A comparison is made between theoretical and measured results to establish accuracy and quality of the airfoil design technique.

  9. Abdominally implanted satellite transmitters affect reproduction and survival rather than migration of large shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooijmeijer, Jos C. E. W.; Gill, Robert E.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Kentie, Rosemarie; Gerritsen, Gerrit J.; Bruinzeel, Leo W.; Tijssen, David C.; Harwood, Christopher M.; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-01-01

    Satellite telemetry has become a common technique to investigate avian life-histories, but whether such tagging will affect fitness is a critical unknown. In this study, we evaluate multi-year effects of implanted transmitters on migratory timing and reproductive performance in shorebirds. Shorebirds increasingly are recognized as good models in ecology and evolution. That many of them are of conservation concern adds to the research responsibilities. In May 2009, we captured 56 female Black-tailed Godwits Limosa limosa limosa during late incubation in The Netherlands. Of these, 15 birds were equipped with 26-g satellite transmitters with a percutaneous antenna (7.8 % ± 0.2 SD of body mass), surgically implanted in the coelom. We compared immediate nest survival, timing of migration, subsequent nest site fidelity and reproductive behaviour including egg laying with those of the remaining birds, a comparison group of 41 females. We found no effects on immediate nest survival. Fledging success and subsequent southward and northward migration patterns of the implanted birds conformed to the expectations, and arrival time on the breeding grounds in 2010–2012 did not differ from the comparison group. Compared with the comparison group, in the year after implantation, implanted birds were equally faithful to the nest site and showed equal territorial behaviour, but a paucity of behaviours indicating nests or clutches. In the 3 years after implantation, the yearly apparent survival of implanted birds was 16 % points lower. Despite intense searching, we found only three eggs of two implanted birds; all were deformed. A similarly deformed egg was reported in a similarly implanted Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus returning to breed in central Alaska. The presence in the body cavity of an object slightly smaller than a normal egg may thus lead to egg malformation and, likely, reduced egg viability. That the use of implanted satellite transmitters in these large shorebirds

  10. Reynolds Number Versus Roughness Effects in the Princeton “Super-Pipe” Re-examined in the Context of Large Reynolds Number Asymptotics*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagib, Hassan; Monkewitz, Peter; Österlund, Jens; Christensen, Kenneth; Adrian, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Tony Perry, et al. (J. Fluid Mech., v. 439, 2001) have recently contributed to the discussion concerning the reasons for systematic deviations with Re’s (Reynolds numbers) in the Princeton “Super-Pipe” data. Perry et al. demonstrate that the deviation of the constant within the “log-law” is compatible with the “Colebrook formula” for transitionally rough pipes. Since the experiments were completed, Lex Smits and the Princeton Group have argued that the pipe is smooth for at least the majority of the Re range. Here we show that the observed deviations are equally compatible with the finite Re effects obtained from a methodology based on matched asymptotic expansion techniques proposed by us (see abstract at this meeting), in which the infinite-Re limit of the “log-law”, as well as its correction for large but finite Re’s, are derived in a systematic manner. As argued by Perry et al., in these cases one cannot rely on the variation of the centerline velocity with Re to extract the log-law coefficients. The values of the “Karman constant” extracted using either interpretation is significantly lower than the 0.436 value originally proposed and it is closer to the value of 0.38 based on our recent work on boundary layers; see two publications by Österlund et al. (Phys. of Fluids, v. 12 no. 1 and no. 9, 2001). *Supported by NSF, AFOSR & ERCOFTAC.

  11. The number of patients with severe encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is decreasing in a large referral center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Segerer, Stephan; Latus, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is the most severe complication associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). Previous studies noticed a sharp decline in new patients with severe EPS. We investigated the number of severe EPS patients in our large referral center over almost 20 years. Methods All late-stage EPS patients who underwent major surgery due to extensive symptoms caused by bowel obstruction (vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss) between March 1997 and end of December 2015 in our hospital were included in the present study. An index was calculated between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted PD catheters in our center. Results Between 1979 and 2015, a total of 745 PD catheters were implanted in our center, with a steady increase in the numbers between 2003 and 2015. First patient with severe EPS was treated in 1998, then a rise in the number of patients with EPS was present in 2005. The number of patients with EPS peaked in the period of 2010–2012 (15 patients within 3 years). Afterward, both the absolute numbers and the index between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted catheters demonstrated a prominent reduction in the next 3-year period from 2013 to 2015. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that there seems to be a decrease of late-stage EPS incidence over the last years, but data about milder or asymptomatic patients are lacking. This should be kept in mind while giving the patients information about different renal replacement therapies at start of dialysis. PMID:27540308

  12. A large-domain approach for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Y.; Stern, F.

    1996-09-01

    A large-domain approach is developed for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are solved with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, exact nonlinear kinematic and approximate dynamic free-surface boundary conditions, and a body/free-surface conforming grid. The results are validated through comparisons with data for the Series 60 C{sub B} = 0.6 ship model at low and high Froude numbers and results of a precursory interactive approach. Both approaches yield satisfactory results; however, the large-domain results indicate improved resolution of the flow close to the hull and wake centerplane and of the Froucle number differences due to near-wall turbulence modeling and non-linear free-surface boundary conditions. Additional evaluation is provided through discussion of the recent CFD Workshop Tokyo 1994, where both methods were among the best. Last, some concluding remarks are made. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Discovery and characterization of a large number of diagnostic markers to discriminate Oncorhynchus mykiss and O. clarkii.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, V L; Abadía-Cardoso, A; Garza, J C

    2012-09-01

    Hybridization of cutthroat trout and steelhead/rainbow trout is ubiquitous where they are sympatric, either naturally or owing to introductions. The ability to detect hybridization and introgression between the two species would be greatly improved by the development of more diagnostic markers validated across the two species' many phylogenetic lineages. Here, we describe 81 novel genetic markers and associated assays for discriminating the genomes of these sister species. These diagnostic nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered by sequencing of rainbow trout expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a diverse panel of both cutthroat trout and steelhead/rainbow trout. The resulting markers were validated in a large number of lineages of both species, including all extant subspecies of cutthroat trout and most of the lineages of rainbow trout that are found in natural sympatry with cutthroat trout or used in stocking practices. Most of these markers (79%) distinguish genomic regions for all lineages of the two species, but a small number do not reliably diagnose coastal, westslope and/or other subspecies of cutthroat trout. Surveys of natural populations and hatchery strains of trout and steelhead found rare occurrences of the alternative allele, which may be due to either previous introgression or shared polymorphism. The availability of a large number of genetic markers for distinguishing genomic regions originating in these sister species will allow the detection of both recent and more distant hybridization events, facilitate the study of the evolutionary dynamics of hybridization and provide a powerful set of tools for the conservation and management of both species.

  14. Ultrabright fluorescent silica particles with a large number of complex spectra excited with a single wavelength for multiplex applications.

    PubMed

    Palantavida, S; Peng, B; Sokolov, I

    2017-02-08

    We report on a novel approach to synthesize ultrabright fluorescent silica particles capable of producing a large number of complex spectra. The spectra can be excited using a single wavelength which is paramount in quantitative fluorescence imaging, flow cytometry and sensing applications. The approach employs the physical encapsulation of organic fluorescent molecules inside a nanoporous silica matrix with no dye leakage. As was recently demonstrated, such an encapsulation allowed for the encapsulation of very high concentrations of organic dyes without quenching their fluorescent efficiency. As a result, dye molecules are distanced within ∼5 nm from each other; it theoretically allows for efficient exchange of excitation energy via Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here we present the first experimental demonstration of the encapsulation of fluorescent dyes in the FRET sequence. Attaining a FRET sequence of up to five different dyes is presented. The number of distinguishable spectra can be further increased by using different relative concentrations of encapsulated dyes. Combining these approaches allows for creating a large number of ultrabright fluorescent particles with substantially different fluorescence spectra. We also demonstrate the utilization of these particles for potential multiplexing applications. Though fluorescence spectra of the obtained multiplex probes are typically overlapping, they can be distinguished by using standard linear decomposition algorithms.

  15. On the variational computation of a large number of vibrational energy levels and wave functions for medium-sized molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mátyus, Edit; Šimunek, Ján; Császár, Attila G.

    2009-08-01

    In a recent publication [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 084102 (2007)], the nearly variational DEWE approach (DEWE denotes Discrete variable representation of the Watson Hamiltonian using the Eckart frame and an Exact inclusion of a potential energy surface expressed in arbitrarily chosen coordinates) was developed to compute a large number of (ro)vibrational eigenpairs for medium-sized semirigid molecules having a single well-defined minimum. In this publication, memory, CPU, and hard disk usage requirements of DEWE, and thus of any DEWE-type approach, are carefully considered, analyzed, and optimized. Particular attention is paid to the sparse matrix-vector multiplication, the most expensive part of the computation, and to rate-determining steps in the iterative Lanczos eigensolver, including spectral transformation, reorthogonalization, and restart of the iteration. Algorithmic improvements are discussed in considerable detail. Numerical results are presented for the vibrational band origins of the C12H4 and C12H2D2 isotopologues of the methane molecule. The largest matrix handled on a personal computer during these computations is of the size of (4•108)×(4•108). The best strategy for determining vibrational eigenpairs depends largely on the actual details of the required computation. Nevertheless, for a usual scenario requiring a large number of the lowest eigenpairs of the Hamiltonian matrix the combination of the thick-restart Lanczos method, shift-fold filtering, and periodic reorthogonalization appears to result in the computationally most feasible approach.

  16. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  17. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    PubMed Central

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented. PMID:23814604

  18. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels.

    PubMed

    Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G; Mikhaylova, E; Chmeissani, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y; Ozsahin, I; Uzun, D

    2013-04-29

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 10(6)). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  19. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  20. High-resolution copy number analysis of paired normal-tumor samples from diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Elena; Alcoceba, Miguel; Martín-García, David; Blanco, Óscar; Sanchez-Barba, Mercedes; Balanzategui, Ana; Marín, Luis; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; González-Barca, Eva; Pardal, Emilia; Jiménez, Cristina; García-Álvarez, María; Clot, Guillem; Carracedo, Ángel; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Sarasquete, M Eugenia; Chillón, Carmen; Corral, Rocío; Prieto-Conde, M Isabel; Caballero, M Dolores; Salaverria, Itziar; García-Sanz, Ramón; González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Copy number analysis can be useful for assessing prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We analyzed copy number data from tumor samples of 60 patients diagnosed with DLBCL de novo and their matched normal samples. We detected 63 recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs), including 33 gains, 30 losses, and nine recurrent acquired copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH). Interestingly, 20 % of cases acquired CNN-LOH of 6p21 locus, which involves the HLA region. In normal cells, there were no CNAs but we observed CNN-LOH involving some key lymphoma regions such as 6p21 and 9p24.1 (5 %) and 17p13.1 (2.5 %) in DLBCL patients. Furthermore, a model with some specific CNA was able to predict the subtype of DLBCL, 1p36.32 and 10q23.31 losses being restricted to germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL. In contrast, 8p23.3 losses and 11q24.3 gains were strongly associated with the non-GCB subtype. A poor prognosis was associated with biallelic inactivation of TP53 or 18p11.32 losses, while prognosis was better in cases carrying 11q24.3 gains. In summary, CNA abnormalities identify specific DLBCL groups, and we describe CNN-LOH in germline cells from DLBCL patients that are associated with genes that probably play a key role in DLBCL development.

  1. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  2. Multiplex titration RT-PCR: rapid determination of gene expression patterns for a large number of genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nebenfuhr, A.; Lomax, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an improved method for determination of gene expression levels with RT-PCR. The procedure is rapid and does not require extensive optimization or densitometric analysis. Since the detection of individual transcripts is PCR-based, small amounts of tissue samples are sufficient for the analysis of expression patterns in large gene families. Using this method, we were able to rapidly screen nine members of the Aux/IAA family of auxin-responsive genes and identify those genes which vary in message abundance in a tissue- and light-specific manner. While not offering the accuracy of conventional semi-quantitative or competitive RT-PCR, our method allows quick screening of large numbers of genes in a wide range of RNA samples with just a thermal cycler and standard gel analysis equipment.

  3. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  4. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  5. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  6. The number of cysteine residues per mole in apolipoprotein E affects systematically synchronous neural interactions in women's healthy brains.

    PubMed

    Leuthold, Arthur C; Mahan, Margaret Y; Stanwyck, John J; Georgopoulos, Angeliki; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2013-05-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is involved in lipid metabolism in the brain, but its effects on brain function are not understood. Three apoE isoforms (E4, E3, and E2) are the result of cysteine-arginine interchanges at two sites: there are zero interchanges in E4, one interchange in E3, and two interchanges in E2. The resulting six apoE genotypes (E4/4, E4/3, E4/2, E3/3, E3/2, E2/2) yield five groups with respect to the number of cysteine residues per mole (CysR/mole), as follows. ApoE4/4 has zero cysteine residues per mole (0-CysR/mole), E4/3 has one (1-CysR/mole), E4/2 and E3/3 each has two (2-CysR/mole), E3/2 has three (3-CysR/mole), and E2/2 has four (4-CysR/mole). The use of the number of CysR/mole to characterize the apoE molecule converts the categorical apoE genotype scale, consisting of 6 distinct genotypes above, to a 5-point continuous scale (0-4 CysR/mole). This allows the use of statistical analyses suitable for continuous variables (e.g. regression) to quantify the relations between various variables and apoE. Using such analyses, here, we show for the first time that apoE affects in a graded and orderly manner neural communication, as assessed by analyzing the relation between the number of CysR/mole and synchronous neural interactions (SNI) measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 130 cognitively healthy women. At the one end of the CysR/mole range, the 4-CysR/mole (E2/2) SNI distribution had the highest mean, lowest variance, lowest range, and lowest coefficient of variation, whereas at the other end, 0-CysR/mole (E4/4) SNI distribution had the lowest mean, highest variance, highest range, and highest coefficient of variation. The special status of the 4-CysR/mole distribution was reinforced by the results of a hierarchical tree analysis where the 4-CysR/mole (E2/2) SNI distribution occupied a separate branch by itself and the remaining CysR/mole SNI distributions were placed at increasing distances from the 4-CysR/mole distribution, according to

  7. Agricultural land management options following large-scale environmental contamination - evaluation for Fukushima affected agricultural land

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenhove, Hildegarde

    2013-07-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has raised questions about the accumulation of radionuclides in soils, the transfer in the food chain and the possibility of continued restricted future land use. This paper summarizes what is generally understood about the application of agricultural countermeasures as a land management option to reduce the radionuclides transfer in the food chain and to facilitate the return of potentially affected soils to agricultural practices in areas impacted by a nuclear accident. (authors)

  8. Calculating impact factor: how bibliographical classification of journal items affects the impact factor of large and small journals.

    PubMed

    Golubic, Rajna; Rudes, Mihael; Kovacic, Natasa; Marusic, Matko; Marusic, Ana

    2008-03-01

    As bibliographical classification of published journal items affects the denominator in this equation, we investigated how the numerator and denominator of the impact factor (IF) equation were generated for representative journals in two categories of the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). We performed a full text search of the 1st-ranked journal in 2004 JCR category "Medicine, General and Internal" (New England Journal of Medicine, NEJM, IF = 38.570) and 61st-ranked journal (Croatian Medical Journal, CMJ, IF = 0.690), 1st-ranked journal in category "Multidisciplinary Sciences" (Nature, IF = 32.182) and journal with a relative rank of CMJ (Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias, AABC, IF = 0.435). Large journals published more items categorized by Web of Science (WoS) as non-research items (editorial material, letters, news, book reviews, bibliographical items, or corrections): 63% out of total 5,193 items in Nature and 81% out of 3,540 items in NEJM, compared with 31% out of 283 items in CMJ and only 2 (2%) out of 126 items in AABC. Some items classified by WoS as non-original contained original research data (9.5% in Nature, 7.2% in NEJM, 13.7% in CMJ and none in AABC). These items received a significant number of citations: 6.9% of total citations in Nature, 14.7% in NEJM and 18.5% in CMJ. IF decreased for all journals when only items presenting original research and citations to them were used for IF calculation. Regardless of the journal's size or discipline, publication of non-original research and its classification by the bibliographical database have an effect on both numerator and denominator of the IF equation.

  9. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, C. A.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.; Vyacheslavov, L.; Sanin, A.

    2015-09-15

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO{sub 2} laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1.

  10. The Isolation and Enrichment of Large Numbers of Highly Purified Mouse Spleen Dendritic Cell Populations and Their In Vitro Equivalents.

    PubMed

    Vremec, David

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) form a complex network of cells that initiate and orchestrate immune responses against a vast array of pathogenic challenges. Developmentally and functionally distinct DC subtypes differentially regulate T-cell function. Importantly it is the ability of DC to capture and process antigen, whether from pathogens, vaccines, or self-components, and present it to naive T cells that is the key to their ability to initiate an immune response. Our typical isolation procedure for DC from murine spleen was designed to efficiently extract all DC subtypes, without bias and without alteration to their in vivo phenotype, and involves a short collagenase digestion of the tissue, followed by selection for cells of light density and finally negative selection for DC. The isolation procedure can accommodate DC numbers that have been artificially increased via administration of fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L), either directly through a series of subcutaneous injections or by seeding with an Flt3L secreting murine melanoma. Flt3L may also be added to bone marrow cultures to produce large numbers of in vitro equivalents of the spleen DC subsets. Total DC, or their subsets, may be further purified using immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometric cell sorting. Cell sorting may be completely bypassed by separating DC subsets using a combination of fluorescent antibody labeling and anti-fluorochrome magnetic beads. Our procedure enables efficient separation of the distinct DC subsets, even in cases where mouse numbers or flow cytometric cell sorting time is limiting.

  11. Large wood budget assessment along a gravel bed river affected by volcanic eruption: the Rio Blanco study case (Chile).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oss-Cazzador, Daniele; Iroume, Andres; Lenzi, Mario; Picco, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Wood in riverine environments exerts different functions on ecological and geomorphic settings, influencing morphological processes, and increasing risks for sensitive structures. Large wood (LW) is defined as wood material, dead or alive, larger than 10 cm in diameter and 1 m in length. Natural hazards can strongly increase the presence of LW in waterways and flood events can transport it affecting the ecosystem and landscape. This study aims to increase the knowledge of wood budget, considering the effects of two subsequent slight flood events along a sub-reach of the Rio Blanco gravel bed river , in Chilean Patagonia, strongly affected by the eruption of Chaiten volcano in 2008. The volcanic eruption affected almost 3,5 km 2 of evergreen forest on the southern (left) bank, because of primary direct effects from pyroclastic density currents and lahar-floods that caused deposition up to 8 m of reworked tephra, alluvium, and wood on floodplains and terrace along the Rio Blanco. After the eruption, there was a considerable increase of LW into the main channel: into the bankfull channel, volume exceeds 100 m 3 /ha. Field surveys were carried out in January and March 2015, before and after two slight flood events (Recurrence Intervals lower than 1 year). The pre-event phase permitted to detect and analyze the presence of LW into the study area, along a 80 m-long reach of Rio Blanco (7500 m 2 . Every LW element was manually measured and described, a numbered metal tag was installed, and the position was recorded by GPS device. In January, there was a total amount of 113 m 3 /ha, 90% accumulated in LW jams (WJ) and 10% as single logs. The LW was characterized by mean dimensions of 3,36 m height, 0,25 m diameter and 0,26 m 3 volume, respectively. The WJ are characterized by wide range of dimension: volume varies from 0,28 m 3 to 672 m 3 , length from 1,20 m to 56 m, width from 0,40 m to 8,70 m and height from 0,20 m to 3 m, respectively. After the flood events, field

  12. Product-selective blot: a technique for measuring enzyme activities in large numbers of samples and in native electrophoresis gels

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.A.; Davies, H.M.; McDonald, N.

    1985-08-01

    A method termed product-selective blotting has been developed for screening large numbers of samples for enzyme activity. The technique is particularly well suited to detection of enzymes in native electrophoresis gels. The principle of the method was demonstrated by blotting samples from glutaminase or glutamate synthase reactions into an agarose gel embedded with ion-exchange resin under conditions favoring binding of product (glutamate) over substrates and other substances in the reaction mixture. After washes to remove these unbound substances, the product was measured using either fluorometric staining or radiometric techniques. Glutaminase activity in native electrophoresis gels was visualized by a related procedure in which substrates and products from reactions run in the electrophoresis gel were blotted directly into a resin-containing image gel. Considering the selective-binding materials available for use in the image gel, along with the possible detection systems, this method has potentially broad application.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of circular cylinder flow at subcritical Reynolds number: Turbulent wake and sound radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2016-02-01

    The flows past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 3900 are simulated using large-eddy simulation (LES) and the far-field sound is calculated from the LES results. A low dissipation energy-conserving finite volume scheme is used to discretize the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamic global coefficient version of the Vreman's subgrid scale (SGS) model is used to compute the sub-grid stresses. Curle's integral of Lighthill's acoustic analogy is used to extract the sound radiated from the cylinder. The profiles of mean velocity and turbulent fluctuations obtained are consistent with the previous experimental and computational results. The sound radiation at far field exhibits the characteristic of a dipole and directivity. The sound spectra display the -5/3 power law. It is shown that Vreman's SGS model in company with dynamic procedure is suitable for LES of turbulence generated noise.

  14. Can large scale sea ice cover changes affect precipitation patterns over California?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvijanovic, I.; Bonfils, C.; Lucas, D. D.; Santer, B. D.; Chiang, J. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Pronounced Arctic sea ice loss since the beginning of the satellite era has intensified the interest into whether these high latitude changes can significantly influence the weather and climate far from the Arctic. Current attempts to demonstrate statistically significant remote responses to sea ice changes have been hindered by factors such as large high latitude variability, relatively short observational datasets, and model limitations in adequately representing current sea ice changes. In this study, we sample uncertainty in sea ice physics parameters and variability in atmospheric initial conditions to obtain an ensemble of simulations with substantially different states of Arctic and Antarctic sea ice cover. This large ensemble isolates a robust, statistically significant climate change response arising from changes in sea ice cover only. Our results show a significant link between Arctic and Antarctic sea ice cover changes and precipitation across the tropical Atlantic and Pacific basins, the Sahel, and the west coast of the United States. For example, large Arctic sea ice decline leads to a northward shift of the tropical convergence zone, increased subsidence over the southwest United States and a geopotential anomaly over the North Pacific; with all of these factors resulting in significant drying over California. We conclude that high-latitude sea ice cover changes are an important driver of low-latitude precipitation. Consequently, reliable predictions of future precipitation changes over areas such as California (and the Sahel) will strongly depend on our ability to adequately simulate both Arctic and Antarctic sea ice changes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and is released as LLNL-ABS-675694.

  15. Large-scale dynamics associated with clustering of extratropical cyclones affecting Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Joaquim G.; Gómara, Iñigo; Masato, Giacomo; Dacre, Helen F.; Woollings, Tim; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2014-12-01

    Some recent winters in Western Europe have been characterized by the occurrence of multiple extratropical cyclones following a similar path. The occurrence of such cyclone clusters leads to large socio-economic impacts due to damaging winds, storm surges, and floods. Recent studies have statistically characterized the clustering of extratropical cyclones over the North Atlantic and Europe and hypothesized potential physical mechanisms responsible for their formation. Here we analyze 4 months characterized by multiple cyclones over Western Europe (February 1990, January 1993, December 1999, and January 2007). The evolution of the eddy driven jet stream, Rossby wave-breaking, and upstream/downstream cyclone development are investigated to infer the role of the large-scale flow and to determine if clustered cyclones are related to each other. Results suggest that optimal conditions for the occurrence of cyclone clusters are provided by a recurrent extension of an intensified eddy driven jet toward Western Europe lasting at least 1 week. Multiple Rossby wave-breaking occurrences on both the poleward and equatorward flanks of the jet contribute to the development of these anomalous large-scale conditions. The analysis of the daily weather charts reveals that upstream cyclone development (secondary cyclogenesis, where new cyclones are generated on the trailing fronts of mature cyclones) is strongly related to cyclone clustering, with multiple cyclones developing on a single jet streak. The present analysis permits a deeper understanding of the physical reasons leading to the occurrence of cyclone families over the North Atlantic, enabling a better estimation of the associated cumulative risk over Europe.

  16. Large-scale dynamics associated with clustering of extratropical cyclones affecting Western Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Joaquim G.; Gómara, Iñigo; Masato, Giacomo; Dacre, Helen F.; Woollings, Tim; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2015-04-01

    Some recent winters in Western Europe have been characterized by the occurrence of multiple extratropical cyclones following a similar path. The occurrence of such cyclone clusters leads to large socio-economic impacts due to damaging winds, storm surges, and floods. Recent studies have statistically characterized the clustering of extratropical cyclones over the North Atlantic and Europe and hypothesized potential physical mechanisms responsible for their formation. Here we analyze 4 months characterized by multiple cyclones over Western Europe (February 1990, January 1993, December 1999, and January 2007). The evolution of the eddy driven jet stream, Rossby wave-breaking, and upstream/downstream cyclone development are investigated to infer the role of the large-scale flow and to determine if clustered cyclones are related to each other. Results suggest that optimal conditions for the occurrence of cyclone clusters are provided by a recurrent extension of an intensified eddy driven jet toward Western Europe lasting at least 1 week. Multiple Rossby wave-breaking occurrences on both the poleward and equatorward flanks of the jet contribute to the development of these anomalous large-scale conditions. The analysis of the daily weather charts reveals that upstream cyclone development (secondary cyclogenesis, where new cyclones are generated on the trailing fronts of mature cyclones) is strongly related to cyclone clustering, with multiple cyclones developing on a single jet streak. The present analysis permits a deeper understanding of the physical reasons leading to the occurrence of cyclone families over the North Atlantic, enabling a better estimation of the associated cumulative risk over Europe.

  17. Large number of rebounding/founder HIV variants emerge from multifocal infection in lymphatic tissues after treatment interruption.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Meghan K; Keele, Brandon F; Wietgrefe, Stephen W; Fletcher, Courtney V; Beilman, Gregory J; Chipman, Jeffrey G; Khoruts, Alexander; Estes, Jacob D; Anderson, Jodi; Callisto, Samuel P; Schmidt, Thomas E; Thorkelson, Ann; Reilly, Cavan; Perkey, Katherine; Reimann, Thomas G; Utay, Netanya S; Nganou Makamdop, Krystelle; Stevenson, Mario; Douek, Daniel C; Haase, Ashley T; Schacker, Timothy W

    2015-03-10

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV replication in most individuals but cannot eradicate latently infected cells established before ART was initiated. Thus, infection rebounds when treatment is interrupted by reactivation of virus production from this reservoir. Currently, one or a few latently infected resting memory CD4 T cells are thought be the principal source of recrudescent infection, but this estimate is based on peripheral blood rather than lymphoid tissues (LTs), the principal sites of virus production and persistence before initiating ART. We, therefore, examined lymph node (LN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) biopsies from fully suppressed subjects, interrupted therapy, monitored plasma viral load (pVL), and repeated biopsies on 12 individuals as soon as pVL became detectable. Isolated HIV RNA-positive (vRNA+) cells were detected by in situ hybridization in LTs obtained before interruption in several patients. After interruption, multiple foci of vRNA+ cells were detected in 6 of 12 individuals as soon as pVL was measureable and in some subjects, in more than one anatomic site. Minimal estimates of the number of rebounding/founder (R/F) variants were determined by single-gene amplification and sequencing of viral RNA or DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma obtained at or just before viral recrudescence. Sequence analysis revealed a large number of R/F viruses representing recrudescent viremia from multiple sources. Together, these findings are consistent with the origins of recrudescent infection by reactivation from many latently infected cells at multiple sites. The inferred large pool of cells and sites to rekindle recrudescent infection highlights the challenges in eradicating HIV.

  18. A Very Large Number of GABAergic Neurons Are Activated in the Tuberal Hypothalamus during Paradoxical (REM) Sleep Hypersomnia

    PubMed Central

    Sapin, Emilie; Bérod, Anne; Léger, Lucienne; Herman, Paul A.; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Peyron, Christelle

    2010-01-01

    We recently discovered, using Fos immunostaining, that the tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus contain a massive population of neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep (PS) hypersomnia. We further showed that some of the activated neurons of the tuberal hypothalamus express the melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neuropeptide and that icv injection of MCH induces a strong increase in PS quantity. However, the chemical nature of the majority of the neurons activated during PS had not been characterized. To determine whether these neurons are GABAergic, we combined in situ hybridization of GAD67 mRNA with immunohistochemical detection of Fos in control, PS deprived and PS hypersomniac rats. We found that 74% of the very large population of Fos-labeled neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia were GAD-positive. We further demonstrated combining MCH immunohistochemistry and GAD67 in situ hybridization that 85% of the MCH neurons were also GAD-positive. Finally, based on the number of Fos-ir/GAD+, Fos-ir/MCH+, and GAD+/MCH+ double-labeled neurons counted from three sets of double-staining, we uncovered that around 80% of the large number of the Fos-ir/GAD+ neurons located in the tuberal hypothalamus after PS hypersomnia do not contain MCH. Based on these and previous results, we propose that the non-MCH Fos/GABAergic neuronal population could be involved in PS induction and maintenance while the Fos/MCH/GABAergic neurons could be involved in the homeostatic regulation of PS. Further investigations will be needed to corroborate this original hypothesis. PMID:20668680

  19. An Examination of Parameters Affecting Large Eddy Simulations of Flow Past a Square Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, M. R.; Georgiadis, N. J.

    2014-01-01

    Separated flow over a bluff body is analyzed via large eddy simulations. The turbulent flow around a square cylinder features a variety of complex flow phenomena such as highly unsteady vortical structures, reverse flow in the near wall region, and wake turbulence. The formation of spanwise vortices is often times artificially suppressed in computations by either insufficient depth or a coarse spanwise resolution. As the resolution is refined and the domain extended, the artificial turbulent energy exchange between spanwise and streamwise turbulence is eliminated within the wake region. A parametric study is performed highlighting the effects of spanwise vortices where the spanwise computational domain's resolution and depth are varied. For Re=22,000, the mean and turbulent statistics computed from the numerical large eddy simulations (NLES) are in good agreement with experimental data. Von-Karman shedding is observed in the wake of the cylinder. Mesh independence is illustrated by comparing a mesh resolution of 2 million to 16 million. Sensitivities to time stepping were minimized and sampling frequency sensitivities were nonpresent. While increasing the spanwise depth and resolution can be costly, this practice was found to be necessary to eliminating the artificial turbulent energy exchange.

  20. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monty, J. P.; Allen, J. J.; Lien, K.; Chong, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of `superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements.

  1. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  2. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  3. Can interface features affect aggression resulting from violent video game play? An examination of realistic controller and large screen size.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Joon; Sundar, S Shyam

    2013-05-01

    Aggressiveness attributed to violent video game play is typically studied as a function of the content features of the game. However, can interface features of the game also affect aggression? Guided by the General Aggression Model (GAM), we examine the controller type (gun replica vs. mouse) and screen size (large vs. small) as key technological aspects that may affect the state aggression of gamers, with spatial presence and arousal as potential mediators. Results from a between-subjects experiment showed that a realistic controller and a large screen display induced greater aggression, presence, and arousal than a conventional mouse and a small screen display, respectively, and confirmed that trait aggression was a significant predictor of gamers' state aggression. Contrary to GAM, however, arousal showed no effects on aggression; instead, presence emerged as a significant mediator.

  4. Large number of replacement polymorphisms in rapidly evolving genes of Drosophila. Implications for genome-wide surveys of DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K J; Nigro, L; Aquadro, C F; Tautz, D

    1999-01-01

    We present a survey of nucleotide polymorphism of three novel, rapidly evolving genes in populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Levels of silent polymorphism are comparable to other loci, but the number of replacement polymorphisms is higher than that in most other genes surveyed in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Tests of neutrality fail to reject neutral evolution with one exception. This concerns a gene located in a region of high recombination rate in D. simulans and in a region of low recombination rate in D. melanogaster, due to an inversion. In the latter case it shows a very low number of polymorphisms, presumably due to selective sweeps in the region. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism suggest that most substitutions are neutral or nearly neutral and that weak (positive and purifying) selection plays a significant role in the evolution of these genes. At all three loci, purifying selection of slightly deleterious replacement mutations appears to be more efficient in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster, presumably due to different effective population sizes. Our analysis suggests that current knowledge about genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism is far from complete with respect to the types and range of nucleotide substitutions and that further analysis of differences between local populations will be required to understand the forces more completely. We note that rapidly diverging and nearly neutrally evolving genes cannot be expected only in the genome of Drosophila, but are likely to occur in large numbers also in other organisms and that their function and evolution are little understood so far. PMID:10581279

  5. Rapid Percolation of Water through Soil Macropores Affects Reading and Calibration of Large Encapsulated TDR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Svatopluk; Dolezal, Frantisek; Moreira Barradas, Joao Manuel

    2015-04-01

    The electromagnetic soil water content sensors are invaluable tools because of their selective sensitivity to water, versatility, ease of automation and large resolution. A common drawback of most their types is their preferential sensitivity to water near to their surfaces. The ways in which the drawback manifests itself were explored for the case of large Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors Aqua-Tel-TDR (Automata, Inc., now McCrometer CONNECT). Their field performance was investigated and compared with the results of field and laboratory calibration. The field soil was loamy Chernozem on a carbonate-rich loess substrate, while the laboratory calibration was done in fine quartz sand. In the field, the sensors were installed horizontally into pre-bored holes after being wrapped in slurry of native soil or fine earth. Large sensor-to-sensor variability of readings was observed. It was partially removed by field calibration. The occurrence of percolation events could be easily recognised, because they made the TDR readings suddenly rising and sometimes considerably exceeding the saturated water content. After the events, the TDR readings fell, usually equally suddenly, remaining afterwards at the levels somewhat higher than those before the event. These phenomena can be explained by the preferential flow of water in natural and artificial soil macropores around the sensors. It is hypothesised that the percolating water which enters the gaps and other voids around the sensors accumulates there for short time, being hindered by the sensors themselves. This water also has a enlarged opportunity to get absorbed by the adjacent soil matrix. The variance of TDR readings obtained during the field calibration does not differ significantly from the variance of the corresponding gravimetric sampling data. This suggests that the slope of the field calibration equation is close to unity, in contrast to the laboratory calibration in quartz sand. This difference in slopes can

  6. Development and application of an optogenetic platform for controlling and imaging a large number of individual neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    The understanding and treatment of brain disorders as well as the development of intelligent machines is hampered by the lack of knowledge of how the brain fundamentally functions. Over the past century, we have learned much about how individual neurons and neural networks behave, however new tools are critically needed to interrogate how neural networks give rise to complex brain processes and disease conditions. Recent innovations in molecular techniques, such as optogenetics, have enabled neuroscientists unprecedented precision to excite, inhibit and record defined neurons. The impressive sensitivity of currently available optogenetic sensors and actuators has now enabled the possibility of analyzing a large number of individual neurons in the brains of behaving animals. To promote the use of these optogenetic tools, this thesis integrates cutting edge optogenetic molecular sensors which is ultrasensitive for imaging neuronal activity with custom wide field optical microscope to analyze a large number of individual neurons in living brains. Wide-field microscopy provides a large field of view and better spatial resolution approaching the Abbe diffraction limit of fluorescent microscope. To demonstrate the advantages of this optical platform, we imaged a deep brain structure, the Hippocampus, and tracked hundreds of neurons over time while mouse was performing a memory task to investigate how those individual neurons related to behavior. In addition, we tested our optical platform in investigating transient neural network changes upon mechanical perturbation related to blast injuries. In this experiment, all blasted mice show a consistent change in neural network. A small portion of neurons showed a sustained calcium increase for an extended period of time, whereas the majority lost their activities. Finally, using optogenetic silencer to control selective motor cortex neurons, we examined their contributions to the network pathology of basal ganglia related to

  7. Atypical Features in a Large Turkish Family Affected with Friedreich Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Betul; Aksoy, Durdane; Sahbaz, E. Irmak; Basak, A. Nazli

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe the clinical features of several members of the same family diagnosed with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) and cerebral lesions, demyelinating neuropathy, and late-age onset without a significant cardiac involvement and presenting with similar symptoms, although genetic testing was negative for the GAA repeat expansion in one patient of the family. The GAA repeat expansion in the frataxin gene was shown in all of the family members except in a young female patient. MRI revealed arachnoid cysts in two patients; MRI was consistent with both cavum septum pellucidum-cavum vergae and nodular signal intensity increase in one patient. EMG showed demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy in another patient. The GAA expansion-negative 11-year-old female patient had mental-motor retardation, epilepsy, and ataxia. None of the patients had significant cardiac symptoms. Description of FRDA families with different ethnic backgrounds may assist in identifying possible phenotypic and genetic features of the disease. Furthermore, the genetic heterogeneity observed in this family draws attention to the difficulty of genetic counseling in an inbred population and to the need for genotyping all affected members before delivering comprehensive genetic counseling. PMID:27668106

  8. Density affects mating mode and large male mating advantage in a fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Pablo D; Daleo, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar O

    2010-12-01

    Fiddler crabs show two different mating modes: either females search and crabs mate underground in male burrows, or males search and crabs mate on the surface near female burrows. We explored the relationship between crab density, body size, the searching behavior of both sexes, and the occurrence of both mating modes in the fiddler crab Uca uruguayensis. We found that crabs change their mating mode depending on their size and crab density. Crabs mated mostly on the surface at low densities, and underground at high densities. The proportion of wandering receptive females but not courting males accounted for the variation in mating modes. This suggests that whether crabs mate underground (or on the surface) is determined by the presence (or absence) of searching females. We found that the change in the mating mode affected the level of assortative mating; males mating underground were bigger than those mating on the surface, suggesting active female choice. Given that fiddler crabs experience multiple reproductive cycles, they are prone to showing behavioral plasticity in their mating strategy whenever the payoffs of using different mating modes differ between reproductive events. Our results suggest that the incorporation of different levels of environmental variability may be important in theoretical models aimed at improving our understanding of the evolution of alternative mating tactics and strategies.

  9. Factors affecting pesticide occurrence and transport in a large Midwestern river basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.

    2001-01-01

    Several factors affect the occurrence and transport of pesticides in surface waters of the 29,400 km2 White River Basin in Indiana. A relationship was found between pesticide use and the average annual concentration of that pesticide in the White River, although this relationship varies for different classes of pesticides. About one percent of the mass applied of each of the commonly used agricultural herbicides was transported from the basin via the White River. Peak pesticide concentrations were typically highest in late spring or early summer and were associated with periods of runoff following application. Concentrations of diazinon were higher in an urban basin than in two agricultural basins, corresponding to the common use of this insecticide on lawns and gardens in urban areas. Concentrations of atrazine, a corn herbicide widely used in the White River Basin, were higher in an agricultural basin with permeable, well-drained soils, than in an agricultural basin with less permeable, more poorly drained soils. Although use of butylate and cyanazine was comparable in the White River Basin between 1992 and 1994, concentrations in the White River of butylate, which is incorporated into soil, were substantially less than for cyanazine, which is typically applied to the soil surface.

  10. How historic simulation-observation discrepancy affects future warming projections in a very large model ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Projections of future climate made by model-ensembles have credibility because the historic simulations by these models are consistent with, or near-consistent with, historic observations. However, it is not known how small inconsistencies between the ranges of observed and simulated historic climate change affects the future projections made by a model ensemble. Here, the impact of historical simulation-observation inconsistencies on future warming projections is quantified in a 4-million member Monte Carlo ensemble from a new efficient Earth System Model (ESM). Of the 4-million ensemble members, a subset of 182,500 are consistent with historic ranges of warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake simulated by the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) ensemble. This simulation-consistent subset projects similar future warming ranges to the CMIP5 ensemble for all four RCP scenarios, indicating the new ESM represents an efficient tool to explore parameter space for future warming projections based on historic performance. A second subset of 14,500 ensemble members are consistent with historic observations for warming, heat uptake and carbon uptake. This observation-consistent subset projects a narrower range for future warming, with the lower bounds of projected warming still similar to CMIP5, but the upper warming bounds reduced by 20-35 %. These findings suggest that part of the upper range of twenty-first century CMIP5 warming projections may reflect historical simulation-observation inconsistencies. However, the agreement of lower bounds for projected warming implies that the likelihood of warming exceeding dangerous levels over the twenty-first century is unaffected by small discrepancies between CMIP5 models and observations.

  11. A dynamic response model for pressure sensors in continuum and high Knudsen number flows with large temperature gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Petersen, Brian J.; Scott, David D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a dynamic model for pressure sensors in continuum and rarefied flows with longitudinal temperature gradients. The model was developed from the unsteady Navier-Stokes momentum, energy, and continuity equations and was linearized using small perturbations. The energy equation was decoupled from momentum and continuity assuming a polytropic flow process. Rarefied flow conditions were accounted for using a slip flow boundary condition at the tubing wall. The equations were radially averaged and solved assuming gas properties remain constant along a small tubing element. This fundamental solution was used as a building block for arbitrary geometries where fluid properties may also vary longitudinally in the tube. The problem was solved recursively starting at the transducer and working upstream in the tube. Dynamic frequency response tests were performed for continuum flow conditions in the presence of temperature gradients. These tests validated the recursive formulation of the model. Model steady-state behavior was analyzed using the final value theorem. Tests were performed for rarefied flow conditions and compared to the model steady-state response to evaluate the regime of applicability. Model comparisons were excellent for Knudsen numbers up to 0.6. Beyond this point, molecular affects caused model analyses to become inaccurate.

  12. The large X-effect on secondary sexual characters and the genetics of variation in sex comb tooth number in Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    Mittleman, Briana E; Manzano-Winkler, Brenda; Hall, Julianne B; Korunes, Katharine L; Noor, Mohamed A F

    2017-01-01

    Genetic studies of secondary sexual traits provide insights into whether and how selection drove their divergence among populations, and these studies often focus on the fraction of variation attributable to genes on the X-chromosome. However, such studies may sometimes misinterpret the amount of variation attributable to the X-chromosome if using only simple reciprocal F1 crosses, or they may presume sexual selection has affected the observed phenotypic variation. We examined the genetics of a secondary sexual trait, male sex comb size, in Drosophila subobscura. This species bears unusually large sex combs for its species group, and therefore, this trait may be a good candidate for having been affected by natural or sexual selection. We observed significant heritable variation in number of teeth of the distal sex comb across strains. While reciprocal F1 crosses seemed to implicate a disproportionate X-chromosome effect, further examination in the F2 progeny showed that transgressive autosomal effects inflated the estimate of variation associated with the X-chromosome in the F1. Instead, the X-chromosome appears to confer the smallest contribution of all major chromosomes to the observed phenotypic variation. Further, we failed to detect effects on copulation latency or duration associated with the observed phenotypic variation. Overall, this study presents an examination of the genetics underlying segregating phenotypic variation within species and illustrates two common pitfalls associated with some past studies of the genetic basis of secondary sexual traits.

  13. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main processes controlling peatland hydrology. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from peatlands are in turn strongly controlled by the groundwater table. Through the increasing political and scientific interest to reduce GHG emissions, monitoring and modelling strategies to optimize re-wetting strategies and to quantify GHG emissions are needed. To achieve these aims, an accurate determination of the evapotranspiration as an essential part of the water balance is required. Many different approaches are known to determine the evapotranspiration. They are mostly either expensive or hard to parameterize. Plant specific crop coefficients (Kc-values) are an option to calculate plant-specific evapotranspiration but due to the lack of Kc-values for typical peatland vegetation types more data on evapotranspiration from peatlands in the temperate zone are required. Furthermore, simple methods to estimate evapotranspiration are needed especially for monitoring projects. Diurnal groundwater table fluctuations caused by root water uptake and groundwater inflow can be used to calculate daily evapotranspiration rates. This approach was first described by White (1932) who compared groundwater recovery rates at night to the decline during daytime. Besides the groundwater table data only the specific yield (Sy) is needed to calculate evapotranspiration. However, the method has some limitations because not all days can be evaluated which leads to data gaps during rainy and very dry or very wet periods. This study presents an automated method to calculate the specific yield, evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of sites covering all major peatland types and their typical land uses in Germany. As an input for our method, only groundwater level, precipitation and grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data is required. In a first step, the groundwater level data was smoothed by a LOESS function. In a second step, site-specific SY

  14. Knowledge on the line: manipulating beliefs about the magnitudes of symbolic numbers affects the linearity of line estimation tasks.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Dana L; Matthews, Percival G

    2013-12-01

    It has been suggested that differences in performance on number-line estimation tasks are indicative of fundamental differences in people's underlying representations of numerical magnitude. However, we were able to induce logarithmic-looking performance in adults for magnitude ranges over which they can typically perform linearly by manipulating their familiarity with the symbolic number formats that we used for the stimuli. This serves as an existence proof that individuals' performances on number-line estimation tasks do not necessarily reflect the functional form of their underlying numerical magnitude representations. Rather, performance differences may result from symbolic difficulties (i.e., number-to-symbol mappings), independently of the underlying functional form. We demonstrated that number-line estimates that are well fit by logarithmic functions need not be produced by logarithmic functions. These findings led us to question the validity of considering logarithmic-looking performance on number-line estimation tasks as being indicative that magnitudes are being represented logarithmically, particularly when symbolic understanding is in question.

  15. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  16. Quorum sensing signals affect spoilage of refrigerated large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) by Shewanella baltica.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junli; Zhao, Aifei; Feng, Lifang; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-18

    In this work we investigated the specific spoilage organism (SSO) of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) stored at 4°C and role of quorum sensing (QS) system of SSO isolated from the spoiled fish. According to microbial count and 16S rRNA gene of the isolated pure strains, Shewanella, mainly Shewanella baltica and Shewanella putrefaciens, was predominant genera at the end of shelf-life of P. crocea. Among Shewanella isolates, S.baltica02 was demonstrated as SSO in spoilage potential characteristics by inoculation into sterile fish juice using sensory and chemical analyses. Autoinducer 2 and two cyclic dipeptides (DKPs) including cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) and cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe), no any AHLs, were detected in cell-free S. baltica culture. Interestingly, S.baltica02 had the highest QS activity among three spoilers of S. baltica. The production of biofilm, trimethylamines (TMA) and putrescine in these spoilers significantly increased in the presence of cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu), rather than cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the AI-2 precursor, DPD). In accordance with the effect of signal molecules on the spoilage phenotype, exposure to exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) was also showed to up-regulate the transcription levels of luxR, torA and ODC, and no effect of luxS indicated that S. baltica could sense cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu). In the fish homogenate, exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) shortened lag phase durations and enhanced growth rates of the dominant bacteria, H2S producing bacteria, under refrigerated storage, while exogenous DPD retarded growth of competing bacteria, such as Enterobacteriaceae. Meanwhile, cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) also promoted the accumulation of metabolites on the spoilage process of homogenate. S.baltica02 luxS mutant preliminarily proved that AI-2 might not play a signaling role in the spoilage. The present study suggested that the spoilage potential of S. baltica in P. crocea might be regulated by DKP-based quorum sensing.

  17. International Airport Impacts to Air Quality: Size and Related Properties of Large Increases in Ultrafine Particle Number Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, N; Fruin, S A

    2016-04-05

    We measured particle size distributions and spatial patterns of particle number (PN) and particle surface area concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) where large increases (over local background) in PN concentrations routinely extended 18 km downwind. These elevations were mostly comprised of ultrafine particles smaller than 40 nm. For a given downwind distance, the greatest increases in PN concentrations, along with the smallest mean sizes, were detected at locations under the landing jet trajectories. The smaller size of particles in the impacted area, as compared to the ambient urban aerosol, increased calculated lung deposition fractions to 0.7-0.8 from 0.5-0.7. A diffusion charging instrument (DiSCMini), that simulates alveolar lung deposition, measured a fivefold increase in alveolar-lung deposited surface area concentrations 2-3 km downwind from the airport (over local background), decreasing steadily to a twofold increase 18 km downwind. These ratios (elevated lung-deposited surface area over background) were lower than the corresponding ratios for elevated PN concentrations, which decreased from tenfold to twofold over the same distance, but the spatial patterns of elevated concentrations were similar. It appears that PN concentration can serve as a nonlinear proxy for lung deposited surface area downwind of major airports.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation study of the development of finite-channel lock-release currents at high Grashof numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Seng-Keat

    2005-11-01

    Lock-exchange gravity current flows produced by the instantaneous release of a heavy fluid are investigated using 3-D well resolved Large Eddy Simulation simulations at Grashof numbers up to 8*10^9. It is found the 3-D simulations correctly predict a constant front velocity over the initial slumping phase and a front speed decrease proportional to t-1/3 (the time t is measured from the release) over the inviscid phase, in agreement with theory. The evolution of the current in the simulations is found to be similar to that observed experimentally by Hacker et al. (1996). The effect of the dynamic LES model on the solutions is discussed. The energy budget of the current is discussed and the contribution of the turbulent dissipation to the total dissipation is analyzed. The limitations of less expensive 2D simulations are discussed; in particular their failure to correctly predict the spatio-temporal distributions of the bed shear stresses which is important in determining the amount of sediment the gravity current can entrain in the case in advances of a loose bed.

  19. Meta-ethnography 25 years on: challenges and insights for synthesising a large number of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Studies that systematically search for and synthesise qualitative research are becoming more evident in health care, and they can make an important contribution to patient care. Our team was funded to complete a meta-ethnography of patients’ experience of chronic musculoskeletal pain. It has been 25 years since Noblit and Hare published their core text on meta-ethnography, and the current health research environment brings additional challenges to researchers aiming to synthesise qualitative research. Noblit and Hare propose seven stages of meta-ethnography which take the researcher from formulating a research idea to expressing the findings. These stages are not discrete but form part of an iterative research process. We aimed to build on the methods of Noblit and Hare and explore the challenges of including a large number of qualitative studies into a qualitative systematic review. These challenges hinge upon epistemological and practical issues to be considered alongside expectations about what determines high quality research. This paper describes our method and explores these challenges. Central to our method was the process of collaborative interpretation of concepts and the decision to exclude original material where we could not decipher a concept. We use excerpts from our research team’s reflexive statements to illustrate the development of our methods. PMID:24951054

  20. Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics to Large Angles of Attack of a Cruciform Missile Configuration at a Mach Number of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, J. R.

    1954-01-01

    The lift, pitching-moment, and drag characteristics of a missile configuration having a body of fineness ratio 9.33 and a cruciform triangular wing and tail of aspect ratio 4 were measured at a Mach number of 1.99 and a Reynolds number of 6.0 million, based on the body length. The tests were performed through an angle-of-attack range of -5 deg to 28 deg to investigate the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of roll angle, wing-tail interdigitation, wing deflection, and interference among the components (body, wing, and tail). Theoretical lift and moment characteristics of the configuration and its components were calculated by the use of existing theoretical methods which have been modified for application to high angles of attack, and these characteristics are compared with experiment. The lift and drag characteristics of all combinations of the body, wing, and tail were independent of roll angle throughout the angle-of-attack range. The pitching-moment characteristics of the body-wing and body-wing-tail combinations, however, were influenced significantly by the roll angle at large angles of attack (greater than 10 deg). A roll from 0 deg (one pair of wing panels horizontal) to 45 deg caused a forward shift in the center of pressure which was of the same magnitude for both of these combinations, indicating that this shift originated from body-wing interference effects. A favorable lift-interference effect (lift of the combination greater than the sum of the lifts of the components) and a rearward shift in the center of pressure from a position corresponding to that for the components occurred at small angles of attack when the body was combined with either the exposed wing or tail surfaces. These lift and center-of-pressure interference effects were gradually reduced to zero as the angle of attack was increased to large values. The effect of wing-tail interference, which influenced primarily the pitching-moment characteristics, is dependent on the distance

  1. Longitudinal Aerodynamic Characteristics to Large Angles of Attack of a Cruciform Missile Configuration at a Mach Number of 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spahr, J Richard

    1954-01-01

    The lift, pitching-moment, and drag characteristics of a missile configuration having a body of fineness ratio 9.33 and a cruciform triangular wing and tail of aspect ratio 4 were measured at a Mach number of 1.99 and a Reynolds number of 6.0 million, based on the body length. The tests were performed through an angle-of-attack range of -5 deg to 28 deg to investigate the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics of roll angle, wing-tail interdigitation, wing deflection, and interference among the components (body, wing, and tail). Theoretical lift and moment characteristics of the configuration and its components were calculated by the use of existing theoretical methods which have been modified for application to high angles of attack, and these characteristics are compared with experiment. The lift and drag characteristics of all combinations of the body, wing, and tail were independent of roll angle throughout the angle-of-attack range. The pitching-moment characteristics of the body-wing and body-wing- tail combinations, however, were influenced significantly by the roll angle at large angles of attack (greater than 10 deg). A roll from 0 deg (one pair of wing panels horizontal) to 45 deg caused a forward shift in the center of pressure which was of the same magnitude for both of these combinations, indicating that this shift originated from body-wing interference effects. A favorable lift - interference effect (lift of the combination greater than the sum of the lifts of the components) and a rearward shift in the center of pressure from a position corresponding to that for the components occurred at small angles of attack when the body was combined with either the exposed wing or tail surfaces. These lift and center-of-pressure interference effects were gradually reduced to zero as the angle of attack was increased to large values. The effect of wing-tail interference, which influenced primarily the pitching-moment characteristics, is dependent on the

  2. How do parcellation size and short-range connectivity affect dynamics in large-scale brain network models?

    PubMed

    Proix, Timothée; Spiegler, Andreas; Schirner, Michael; Rothmeier, Simon; Ritter, Petra; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2016-11-15

    Recent efforts to model human brain activity on the scale of the whole brain rest on connectivity estimates of large-scale networks derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI). This type of connectivity describes white matter fiber tracts. The number of short-range cortico-cortical white-matter connections is, however, underrepresented in such large-scale brain models. It is still unclear on the one hand, which scale of representation of white matter fibers is optimal to describe brain activity on a large-scale such as recorded with magneto- or electroencephalography (M/EEG) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and on the other hand, to which extent short-range connections that are typically local should be taken into account. In this article we quantified the effect of connectivity upon large-scale brain network dynamics by (i) systematically varying the number of brain regions before computing the connectivity matrix, and by (ii) adding generic short-range connections. We used dMRI data from the Human Connectome Project. We developed a suite of preprocessing modules called SCRIPTS to prepare these imaging data for The Virtual Brain, a neuroinformatics platform for large-scale brain modeling and simulations. We performed simulations under different connectivity conditions and quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics in terms of Shannon Entropy, dwell time and Principal Component Analysis. For the reconstructed connectivity, our results show that the major white matter fiber bundles play an important role in shaping slow dynamics in large-scale brain networks (e.g. in fMRI). Faster dynamics such as gamma oscillations (around 40 Hz) are sensitive to the short-range connectivity if transmission delays are considered.

  3. Large numbers of novel miRNAs originate from DNA transposons and are coincident with a large species radiation in bats.

    PubMed

    Platt, Roy N; Vandewege, Michael W; Kern, Colin; Schmidt, Carl J; Hoffmann, Federico G; Ray, David A

    2014-06-01

    Vesper bats (family Vespertilionidae) experienced a rapid adaptive radiation beginning around 36 Ma that resulted in the second most species-rich mammalian family (>400 species). Coincident with that radiation was an initial burst of DNA transposon activity that has continued into the present in some species. Such extensive and recent DNA transposon activity has not been seen in any other extant mammal. Indeed, retrotransposon activity is much more common in all other sequenced mammal genomes. Deep sequencing of the small RNA fraction from a vespertilionid bat, Eptesicus fuscus, as well as a dog and horse revealed large numbers of 17-24 bp putative miRNAs (p/miRNAs). Although the origination rate of p/miRNAs is similar in all three taxa, 61.1% of postdivergence p/miRNAs in Eptesicus are derived from transposable elements (TEs) compared with only 23.9% and 16.5% in the dog and horse, respectively. Not surprisingly, given the retrotransposon bias of dog and horse, the majority of TE-derived p/miRNAs are associated with retrotransposons. In Eptesicus, however, 58.7% of the TE-derived and 35.9% of the total p/miRNAs arose not from retrotransposons but from bat-specific DNA transposons. Notably, we observe that the timing of the DNA transposon expansion and the resulting introduction of novel p/miRNAs coincide with the rapid diversification of the family Vespertilionidae. Furthermore, potential targets of the DNA transposon-derived p/miRNAs are identifiable and enriched for genes that are important for regulation of transcription. We propose that lineage-specific DNA transposon activity lead to the rapid and repeated introduction of novel p/miRNAs. Some of these p/miRNAs are likely functional miRNAs and potentially influenced the diversification of Vespertilionidae. Our observations suggest a mechanism for introducing functional genomic variation rapidly through the expansion of DNA transposons that fits within the TE-thrust hypothesis.

  4. Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Phenotypic Plasticity and the Allometric Relationship of Ovariole Number and Thorax Length in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bergland, Alan O.; Genissel, Anne; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.; Tatar, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Environmental factors during juvenile growth such as temperature and nutrition have major effects on adult morphology and life-history traits. In Drosophila melanogaster, ovary size, measured as ovariole number, and body size, measured as thorax length, are developmentally plastic traits with respect to larval nutrition. Herein we investigated the genetic basis for plasticity of ovariole number and body size, as well the genetic basis for their allometric relationship using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a natural population in Winters, California. We reared 196 RILs in four yeast concentrations and measured ovariole number and body size. The genetic correlation between ovariole number and thorax length was positive, but the strength of this correlation decreased with increasing yeast concentration. Genetic variation and genotype-by-environment (G × E) interactions were observed for both traits. We identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), epistatic, QTL-by-environment, and epistatic-by-environment interactions for both traits and their scaling relationships. The results are discussed in the context of multivariate trait evolution. PMID:18716336

  5. High fat feeding affects the number of GPR120 cells and enteroendocrine cells in the mouse stomach

    PubMed Central

    Widmayer, Patricia; Goldschmid, Hannah; Henkel, Helena; Küper, Markus; Königsrainer, Alfred; Breer, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Long-term intake of dietary fat is supposed to be associated with adaptive reactions of the organism and it is assumptive that this is particularly true for fat responsive epithelial cells in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Recent studies suggest that epithelial cells expressing the receptor for medium and long chain fatty acids, GPR120 (FFAR4), may operate as fat sensors. Changes in expression level and/or cell density are supposed to be accompanied with a consumption of high fat (HF) diet. To assess whether feeding a HF diet might impact on the expression of fatty acid receptors or the number of lipid sensing cells as well as enteroendocrine cell populations, gastric tissue samples of non-obese and obese mice were compared using a real time PCR and immunohistochemical approach. In this study, we have identified GPR120 cells in the corpus region of the mouse stomach which appeared to be brush cells. Monitoring the effect of HF diet on the expression of GPR120 revealed that after 3 weeks and 6 months the level of mRNA for GPR120 in the tissue was significantly increased which coincided with and probably reflected a significant increase in the number of GPR120 positive cells in the corpus region; in contrast, within the antrum region, the number of GPR120 cells decreased. Furthermore, dietary fat intake also led to changes in the number of enteroendocrine cells producing either ghrelin or gastrin. After 3 weeks and even more pronounced after 6 months the number of ghrelin cells and gastrin cells was significantly increased. These results imply that a HF diet leads to significant changes in the cellular repertoire of the stomach mucosa. Whether these changes are a consequence of the direct exposure to HF in the luminal content or a physiological response to the high level of fat in the body remains elusive. PMID:25774135

  6. Passage number of porcine embryonic germ cells affects epigenetic status and blastocyst rate following somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Gao, Yu; Petkov, Stoyan; Purup, Stig; Hyttel, Poul; Callesen, Henrik

    2014-06-10

    Epigenetic instability of donor cells due to long-term in vitro culture may influence the success rate of subsequent somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Therefore, the present study was designed (1) to investigate the epigenetic changes after prolonged culture in vitro of porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells, including differences in expression levels of both DNA methylation and demethylation-related genes and catalyses of histone modifications, and (2) to assess the efficiency of SCNT using EG cells from different passages. Results showed that genes either associated with DNA demethylation including DNMTs and TET1 or genes related to histone acetylation including HDACs were highly expressed in EG cells at higher passages when compared to EG cells at lower passages. In addition, the expression level of H3K27me3 functional methylase EZH2 increased while no changes were observed on H3K27me3 demethylase JMJD3 in relation to passage number. Moreover, the expression levels of both the H3K4me3 methylase MLL1 and the H3K4me3 demethylase RBP2 were increased at high passages. By using lower passage (numbers 3-5) EG cells as donor cells, the SCNT efficiency was significantly lower compared with use of fetal fibroblast donor cells. However, similar blastocyst rates were achieved when using higher passage (numbers 9-12) EG cells as donor cells. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the epigenetic status of EG cells change with increasing passage numbers, and that higher passage number EG cells are better primed for SCNT.

  7. Large-scale brain networks in affective and social neuroscience: towards an integrative functional architecture of the brain.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Satpute, Ajay Bhaskar

    2013-06-01

    Understanding how a human brain creates a human mind ultimately depends on mapping psychological categories and concepts to physical measurements of neural response. Although it has long been assumed that emotional, social, and cognitive phenomena are realized in the operations of separate brain regions or brain networks, we demonstrate that it is possible to understand the body of neuroimaging evidence using a framework that relies on domain general, distributed structure-function mappings. We review current research in affective and social neuroscience and argue that the emerging science of large-scale intrinsic brain networks provides a coherent framework for a domain-general functional architecture of the human brain.

  8. Email-Based Informed Consent: Innovative Method for Reaching Large Numbers of Subjects for Data Mining Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lesley R.; Mason, Sara S.; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana; Ray, Stacie L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Since the 2010 NASA authorization to make the Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA) and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) data archives more accessible by the research and operational communities, demand for data has greatly increased. Correspondingly, both the number and scope of requests have increased, from 142 requests fulfilled in 2011 to 224 in 2014, and with some datasets comprising up to 1 million data points. To meet the demand, the LSAH and LSDA Repositories project was launched, which allows active and retired astronauts to authorize full, partial, or no access to their data for research without individual, study-specific informed consent. A one-on-one personal informed consent briefing is required to fully communicate the implications of the several tiers of consent. Due to the need for personal contact to conduct Repositories consent meetings, the rate of consenting has not kept up with demand for individualized, possibly attributable data. As a result, other methods had to be implemented to allow the release of large datasets, such as release of only de-identified data. However the compilation of large, de-identified data sets places a significant resource burden on LSAH and LSDA and may result in diminished scientific usefulness of the dataset. As a result, LSAH and LSDA worked with the JSC Institutional Review Board Chair, Astronaut Office physicians, and NASA Office of General Counsel personnel to develop a "Remote Consenting" process for retrospective data mining studies. This is particularly useful since the majority of the astronaut cohort is retired from the agency and living outside the Houston area. Originally planned as a method to send informed consent briefing slides and consent forms only by mail, Remote Consenting has evolved into a means to accept crewmember decisions on individual studies via their method of choice: email or paper copy by mail. To date, 100 emails have been sent to request participation in eight HRP

  9. 20 CFR 10.416 - How does a change in the number of beneficiaries affect the amount of compensation paid to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Related Benefits Compensation for Death § 10.416 How does a change in the number of beneficiaries affect... reapportioned. Similarly, the birth of a posthumous child may result in a reapportionment of the amount of compensation payable to other beneficiaries. The parent, or someone acting on the child's behalf,...

  10. Timing and number of colonizations but not diversification rates affect diversity patterns in hemosporidian lineages on a remote oceanic archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cornuault, Josselin; Warren, Ben H; Bertrand, Joris A M; Milá, Borja; Thébaud, Christophe; Heeb, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    Parasite diversity on remote oceanic archipelagos is determined by the number and timing of colonizations and by in situ diversification rate. In this study, we compare intra-archipelago diversity of two hemosporidian parasite genera, Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon, infecting birds of the Mascarene archipelago. Despite the generally higher vagility of Plasmodium parasites, we report a diversity of Plasmodium cytochrome b haplotypes in the archipelago much lower than that of Leucocytozoon. Using phylogenetic data, we find that this difference in diversity is consistent with differences in the timing and number of colonizations, while rates of diversification do not vary significantly between the two genera. The prominence of immigration history in explaining current diversity patterns highlights the importance of historical contingencies in driving disparate biogeographic patterns in potentially harmful blood parasites infecting island birds.

  11. Number and size of acquired melanocytic nevi and affecting risk factors in cases admitted to the dermatology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Ülker; Kılıç, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The size and number of acquired melanocytic nevi (AMN) and presence of dysplastic nevi are the leading risk factors that should be recognized in the development of malignant melanoma. Aim To evaluate AMN and risk factors in the development of AMN in all age groups admitted to a dermatology outpatient clinic. Material and methods Four hundred and twelve patients who were admitted to the dermatology outpatient clinic for any dermatological symptom and who accepted to participate in the study were randomly included in the study. For each case, background-family history and dermatological findings were recorded. All AMN observed in the patients were dermatoscopically examined. Results The presence of more than 50 nevi was significantly higher in males, in individuals who had a history of sunburn and smokers. The number of nevi that were 5 mm and below was found to be higher in individuals who regularly sunbathed their face/body, in individuals using sunscreen, in individuals who had a history of sunburn, smokers and alcohol users. The number of nevi that were above 5 mm was higher in smokers. The total dermatoscopy score between 4.75 and 5.45 was found to be higher in individuals who had more than 50 nevi, in individuals exposed to more than one chemical substance and in alcohol users. Conclusions When determining the patient’s risk factors, factors such as the patient’s sunbathing habits and chemical substance exposure features should be taken into consideration besides the number and size of nevi. PMID:27881943

  12. Small on the Left, Large on the Right: Numbers Orient Visual Attention onto Space in Preverbal Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulf, Hermann; de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Numbers are represented as ordered magnitudes along a spatially oriented number line. While culture and formal education modulate the direction of this number-space mapping, it is a matter of debate whether its emergence is entirely driven by cultural experience. By registering 8-9-month-old infants' eye movements, this study shows that numerical…

  13. Experimental manipulation of queen number affects colony sex ratio investment in the highly polygynous ant Formica exsecta

    PubMed Central

    Kümmerli, Rolf; Helms, Ken R; Keller, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    In polygynous (multiple queens per nest) ants, queen dispersal is often limited with young queens being recruited within the parental colony. This mode of dispersal leads to local resource competition between nestmate queens and is frequently associated with extremely male-biased sex ratios at the population level. The queen-replenishment hypothesis has been recently proposed to explain colony sex ratio investment under such conditions. It predicts that colonies containing many queens (subject to high local resource competition) should only produce males, whereas colonies hosting few queens (reduced or no local resource competition) should produce new queens in addition to males. We experimentally tested this hypothesis in the ant Formica exsecta by manipulating queen number over three consecutive years in 120 colonies of a highly polygynous population. Queens were transferred from 40 colonies into another 40 colonies while queen number was not manipulated in 40 control colonies. Genetic analyses of worker offspring revealed that our treatment significantly changed the number of reproductive queens. The sex ratio of colonies was significantly different between treatments in the third breeding season following the experiment initiation. We found that, as predicted by the queen-replenishment hypothesis, queen removal resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of colonies that produced new queens. These results provide the first experimental evidence for the queen-replenishment hypothesis, which might account for sex ratio specialization in many highly polygynous ant species. PMID:16096090

  14. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  15. Factors Affecting the Rate of Penetration of Large-Scale Electricity Technologies: The Case of Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    James R. McFarland; Howard J. Herzog

    2007-05-14

    This project falls under the Technology Innovation and Diffusion topic of the Integrated Assessment of Climate Change Research Program. The objective was to better understand the critical variables that affect the rate of penetration of large-scale electricity technologies in order to improve their representation in integrated assessment models. We conducted this research in six integrated tasks. In our first two tasks, we identified potential factors that affect penetration rates through discussions with modeling groups and through case studies of historical precedent. In the next three tasks, we investigated in detail three potential sets of critical factors: industrial conditions, resource conditions, and regulatory/environmental considerations. Research to assess the significance and relative importance of these factors involved the development of a microeconomic, system dynamics model of the US electric power sector. Finally, we implemented the penetration rate models in an integrated assessment model. While the focus of this effort is on carbon capture and sequestration technologies, much of the work will be applicable to other large-scale energy conversion technologies.

  16. Nuclear LSm8 affects number of cytoplasmic processing bodies via controlling cellular distribution of Like-Sm proteins

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Ivan; Podolská, Kateřina; Blažíková, Michaela; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Svoboda, Petr; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Processing bodies (P-bodies) are dynamic cytoplasmic structures involved in mRNA degradation, but the mechanism that governs their formation is poorly understood. In this paper, we address a role of Like-Sm (LSm) proteins in formation of P-bodies and provide evidence that depletion of nuclear LSm8 increases the number of P-bodies, while LSm8 overexpression leads to P-body loss. We show that LSm8 knockdown causes relocalization of LSm4 and LSm6 proteins to the cytoplasm and suggest that LSm8 controls nuclear accumulation of all LSm2–7 proteins. We propose a model in which redistribution of LSm2–7 to the cytoplasm creates new binding sites for other P-body components and nucleates new, microscopically visible structures. The model is supported by prolonged residence of two P-body proteins, DDX6 and Ago2, in P-bodies after LSm8 depletion, which indicates stronger interactions between these proteins and P-bodies. Finally, an increased number of P-bodies has negligible effects on microRNA-mediated translation repression and nonsense mediated decay, further supporting the view that the function of proteins localized in P-bodies is independent of visible P-bodies. PMID:22875987

  17. Small on the left, large on the right: numbers orient visual attention onto space in preverbal infants.

    PubMed

    Bulf, Hermann; de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2016-05-01

    Numbers are represented as ordered magnitudes along a spatially oriented number line. While culture and formal education modulate the direction of this number-space mapping, it is a matter of debate whether its emergence is entirely driven by cultural experience. By registering 8-9-month-old infants' eye movements, this study shows that numerical cues are critical in orienting infants' visual attention towards a peripheral region of space that is congruent with the number's relative position on a left-to-right oriented representational continuum. This finding provides the first direct evidence that, in humans, the association between numbers and oriented spatial codes occurs before the acquisition of symbols or exposure to formal education, suggesting that the number line is not merely a product of human invention.

  18. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries 4 Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt... Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries As required by § 63.10900(b),...

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries 4 Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt... Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries As required by § 63.10900(b),...

  20. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries 4 Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt... Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries As required by § 63.10900(b),...

  1. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries 4 Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt... Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries As required by § 63.10900(b),...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Compliance Certifications for New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries 4 Table 4 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part... Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Iron and Steel Foundries Area Sources Pt. 63, Subpt... Affected Sources Classified as Large Iron and Steel Foundries As required by § 63.10900(b),...

  3. Formation and decay of fluorobenzene radical anions affected by their isomeric structures and the number of fluorine atoms.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Saki; Saeki, Akinori; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Tagawa, Seiichi; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2010-08-12

    Aryl fluoride has attracted much attention as a resist component for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography, because of the high absorption cross section of fluorine for EUV photons; however, less is known about electron attachment to fluorobenzene (FBz) and the stability of the reduced state. Picosecond and nanosecond pulse radiolysis of tetrahydrofuran solutions of FBz from mono-, di-, tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexafluorobenzene was performed, and the effects of isomeric structure and number of fluorine atoms were examined. Scavenging of solvated electrons was found to correlate with the electron affinity obtained by density functional theory in the gas phase, whereas the decay of FBz radical anions was dominated by the activation energy of fluorine anion dissociation calculated using a polarized continuum model (PCM). A sharp contrast in the lifetimes of ortho-, meta-, and para-position difluorobenzene was observed, which could provide information on the molecular design of functional materials.

  4. Factors affecting phosphate uptake by Aerobacter aerogenes in a system relating cell numbers to 32P uptake.

    PubMed

    White, L A; MacLeod, R A

    1971-03-01

    The uptake of phosphate, from media limited in this ion, by resting cells of Aerobacter aerogenes has been investigated and shown to be dependent upon several factors. An incubation medium composed of 10(-2)m K(+), 5 x 10(-3)m Mg(2+), 1 mg of glucose per ml, and 1 muCi of (32)PO(4) (3-) per ml, buffered at pH 6.55 with 0.05 mN-2-hydroxyethyl-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), was found to stimulate optimum accumulation of (32)P-orthophosphate. The temperature of incubation, incubation time, the concentration of unlabeled orthophosphate, as well as arsenate, and several metabolic inhibitors were found to affect the accumulation. The labeled cells were collected on a membrane filter, which had been previously boiled in glass-distilled water, for measurement of the radioactivity accumulated. Under optimum conditions, as few as 20,000 cells were capable of accumulating detectable amounts of (32)P-orthophosphate in 1 hr of incubation.

  5. Intervention for First Graders with Limited Number Knowledge: Large-Scale Replication of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell; Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Replication studies are extremely rare in education. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a scale-up replication of Fuchs et al., which in a sample of 139 found a statistically significant positive impact for Number Rockets, a small-group intervention for at-risk first graders that focused on building understanding of number operations. The…

  6. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  7. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rowbotham, David A.; Enfield, Katey S. S.; Martinez, Victor D.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Vucic, Emily A.; Stewart, Greg L.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Lam, Wan L.

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation. PMID:25298778

  8. Multiple Components of the VHL Tumor Suppressor Complex Are Frequently Affected by DNA Copy Number Loss in Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, David A; Enfield, Katey S S; Martinez, Victor D; Thu, Kelsie L; Vucic, Emily A; Stewart, Greg L; Bennewith, Kevin L; Lam, Wan L

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCC) are rare tumors that arise in chromaffin tissue of the adrenal gland. PCC are frequently inherited through predisposing mutations in genes such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor. VHL is part of the VHL elongin BC protein complex that also includes CUL2/5, TCEB1, TCEB2, and RBX1; in normoxic conditions this complex targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A) for degradation, thus preventing a hypoxic response. VHL inactivation by genetic mechanisms, such as mutation and loss of heterozygosity, inhibits HIF1A degradation, even in the presence of oxygen, and induces a pseudohypoxic response. However, the described <10% VHL mutation rate cannot account for the high frequency of hypoxic response observed. Indeed, little is known about genetic mechanisms disrupting other complex component genes. Here, we show that, in a panel of 171 PCC tumors, 59.6% harbored gene copy number loss (CNL) of at least one complex component. CNL significantly reduced gene expression and was associated with enrichment of gene targets controlled by HIF1. Interestingly, we show that VHL-related renal clear cell carcinoma harbored disruption of VHL alone. Our results indicate that VHL elongin BC protein complex components other than VHL could be important for PCC tumorigenesis and merit further investigation.

  9. The concentration of plasma metabolites varies throughout reproduction and affects offspring number in wild brown trout (Salmo trutta).

    PubMed

    Gauthey, Zoé; Freychet, Marine; Manicki, Aurélie; Herman, Alexandre; Lepais, Olivier; Panserat, Stéphane; Elosegi, Arturo; Tentelier, Cédric; Labonne, Jacques

    2015-06-01

    In wild populations, measuring energy invested in the reproduction and disentangling investment in gametes versus investment in reproductive behavior (such as intrasexual competition or intersexual preference) remain challenging. In this study, we investigated the energy expenditure in brown trout reproductive behavior by using two proxies: variation in weight and variation of plasma metabolites involved in energy production, over the course of reproductive season in a semi natural experimental river. We estimated overall reproductive success using genetic assignment at the end of the reproductive season. Results show that triglycerides and free fatty acid concentrations vary negatively during reproduction, while amino-acids and glucose concentrations remain stable. Decrease in triglyceride and free fatty acid concentrations during reproduction is not related to initial concentration levels or to weight variation. Both metabolite concentration variations and weight variations are correlated to the number of offspring produced, which could indicate that gametic and behavioral reproductive investments substantially contribute to reproductive success in wild brown trout. This study opens a path to further investigate variations in reproductive investment in wild populations.

  10. The Number of Perforators Included in Reversed Flow Posterior Interosseous Artery Flap: Does It Affect the Incidence of Venous Congestion?

    PubMed Central

    Shaker, Ayman A.; Elbarbary, Amir S.; Sayed, Mohamed A.; Elghareeb, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to decrease the incidence of venous congestion occurring in the reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap used for coverage of hand defects. Methods: This may be achieved by studying the incidence of venous congestion in flaps including only 1 perforator and comparing the results with others including more than 1 perforator both in small and large sized flaps. Results: This study showed that inclusion of only 1 perforator in the flap decreased the incidence of venous congestion with complete flap loss in flaps to 5%. Also, it decreased the incidence of venous congestion with partial flap loss in flaps to 10%. Conclusions: The small sized reversed flow posterior interosseous artery flap should be less than 40 cm2 and should include only 1 perforator to decrease the incidence of venous congestion with partial and complete loss of the flap. The level of evidence for this study is the type II prospective comparative study. PMID:28293513

  11. Population growth of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee colonies is affected by the number of foragers with mites.

    PubMed

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Zazueta, Victor; Chambers, Mona; Hidalgo, Geoffrey; deJong, Emily Watkins

    2016-05-01

    Varroa mites are a serious pest of honey bees and the leading cause of colony losses. Varroa have relatively low reproductive rates, so populations should not increase rapidly, but often they do. Other factors might contribute to the growth of varroa populations including mite migration into colonies on foragers from other hives. We measured the proportion of foragers carrying mites on their bodies while entering and leaving hives, and determined its relationship to the growth of varroa populations in those hives at two apiary sites. We also compared the estimates of mite population growth with predictions from a varroa population dynamics model that generates estimates of mite population growth based on mite reproduction. Samples of capped brood and adult bees indicated that the proportion of brood cells infested with mites and adult bees with phoretic mites was low through the summer but increased sharply in the fall especially at site 1. The frequency of capturing foragers with mites on their bodies while entering or leaving hives also increased in the fall. The growth of varroa populations at both sites was not significantly related to our colony estimates of successful mite reproduction, but instead to the total number of foragers with mites (entering and leaving the colony). There were more foragers with mites at site 1 than site 2, and mite populations at site 1 were larger especially in the fall. The model accurately estimated phoretic mite populations and infested brood cells until November when predictions were much lower than those measured in colonies. The rapid growth of mite populations particularly in the fall being a product of mite migration rather than mite reproduction only is discussed.

  12. Specific collagen XVIII isoforms promote adipose tissue accrual via mechanisms determining adipocyte number and affect fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Aikio, Mari; Elamaa, Harri; Vicente, David; Izzi, Valerio; Kaur, Inderjeet; Seppinen, Lotta; Speedy, Helen E; Kaminska, Dorota; Kuusisto, Sanna; Sormunen, Raija; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Jones, Emma L; Muilu, Mikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Savolainen, Markku J; Shoulders, Carol C; Pihlajaniemi, Taina

    2014-07-29

    Collagen XVIII is an evolutionary conserved ubiquitously expressed basement membrane proteoglycan produced in three isoforms via two promoters (P). Here, we assess the function of the N-terminal, domain of unknown function/frizzled-like sequences unique to medium/long collagen XVIII by creating P-specific null mice. P2-null mice, which only produce short collagen XVIII, developed reduced bulk-adiposity, hepatic steatosis, and hypertriglyceridemia. These abnormalities did not develop in P1-null mice, which produce medium/long collagen XVIII. White adipose tissue samples from P2-null mice contain larger reserves of a cell population enriched in early adipocyte progenitors; however, their embryonic fibroblasts had ∼ 50% lower adipocyte differentiation potential. Differentiating 3T3-L1 fibroblasts into mature adipocytes produced striking increases in P2 gene-products and dramatic falls in P1-transcribed mRNA, whereas Wnt3a-induced dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes produced reciprocal changes in P1 and P2 transcript levels. P2-derived gene-products containing frizzled-like sequences bound the potent adipogenic inhibitor, Wnt10b, in vitro. Previously, we have shown that these same sequences bind Wnt3a, inhibiting Wnt3a-mediated signaling. P2-transcript levels in visceral fat were positively correlated with serum free fatty acid levels, suggesting that collagen α1 (XVIII) expression contributes to regulation of adipose tissue metabolism in visceral obesity. Medium/long collagen XVIII is deposited in the Space of Disse, and interaction between hepatic apolipoprotein E and this proteoglycan is lost in P2-null mice. These results describe a previously unidentified extracellular matrix-directed mechanism contributing to the control of the multistep adipogenic program that determines the number of precursors committing to adipocyte differentiation, the maintenance of the differentiated state, and the physiological consequences of its impairment on ectopic fat

  13. Challenges of Diabetes Self-Management in Adults Affected by Food Insecurity in a Large Urban Centre of Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chan, Justine; DeMelo, Margaret; Gingras, Jacqui; Gucciardi, Enza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how food insecurity affects individuals' ability to manage their diabetes, as narrated by participants living in a large, culturally diverse urban centre. Design. Qualitative study comprising of in-depth interviews, using a semistructured interview guide. Setting. Participants were recruited from the local community, three community health centres, and a community-based diabetes education centre servicing a low-income population in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants. Twenty-one English-speaking adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and having experienced food insecurity in the past year (based on three screening questions). Method. Using six phases of analysis, we used qualitative, deductive thematic analysis to transcribe, code, and analyze participant interviews. Main Findings. Three themes emerged from our analysis of participants' experiences of living with food insecurity and diabetes: (1) barriers to accessing and preparing food, (2) social isolation, and (3) enhancing agency and resilience. Conclusion. Food insecurity appears to negatively impact diabetes self-management. Healthcare professionals need to be cognizant of resources, skills, and supports appropriate for people with diabetes affected by food insecurity. Study findings suggest foci for enhancing diabetes self-management support.

  14. Challenges of Diabetes Self-Management in Adults Affected by Food Insecurity in a Large Urban Centre of Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Justine; DeMelo, Margaret; Gingras, Jacqui; Gucciardi, Enza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how food insecurity affects individuals' ability to manage their diabetes, as narrated by participants living in a large, culturally diverse urban centre. Design. Qualitative study comprising of in-depth interviews, using a semistructured interview guide. Setting. Participants were recruited from the local community, three community health centres, and a community-based diabetes education centre servicing a low-income population in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants. Twenty-one English-speaking adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and having experienced food insecurity in the past year (based on three screening questions). Method. Using six phases of analysis, we used qualitative, deductive thematic analysis to transcribe, code, and analyze participant interviews. Main Findings. Three themes emerged from our analysis of participants' experiences of living with food insecurity and diabetes: (1) barriers to accessing and preparing food, (2) social isolation, and (3) enhancing agency and resilience. Conclusion. Food insecurity appears to negatively impact diabetes self-management. Healthcare professionals need to be cognizant of resources, skills, and supports appropriate for people with diabetes affected by food insecurity. Study findings suggest foci for enhancing diabetes self-management support. PMID:26576154

  15. Insights into hemolytic uremic syndrome: segregation of three independent predisposition factors in a large, multiple affected pedigree.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Gordillo, Jorge; Jorge, Elena Goicoechea de; Garrido, Cynthia Abarrategui; Carreras, Luis; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Sánchez-Corral, Pilar; de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2006-04-01

    Mutations in the complement regulators factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), and factor I are associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, MIM 235400), suggesting that the disease develops as a consequence of the inefficient protection of the renal endothelium from damage by the complement system. Incomplete penetrance of the disease in individuals carrying these mutations is, however, relatively frequent. Here, we report the identification of a large, multiple affected aHUS pedigree in which there is independent segregation of three different aHUS risk factors: a MCP missense mutation (c.-598C>T; Pro165Ser) that decreases MCP expression on the cell surface, a dinucleotide insertion in the coding sequence of factor I (c.-1610insAT) that introduces a premature stop codon in the factor I protein, and the MCPggaac SNP haplotype block that was previously shown to decrease the transcription activity from the MCP promoter. Interestingly, individuals affected by aHUS in the pedigree are only those who have inherited the three aHUS risk factors. These data show an additive effect for mutations in MCP and factor I and provide definitive support to the conclusion that aHUS results from a defective protection of cellular surfaces from complement activation. Furthermore, they help to explain the incomplete penetrance of the disease, illustrating that concurrence of multiple hits in complement regulatory proteins may be necessary to significantly impair host tissue protection and to confer susceptibility to aHUS.

  16. Silica distinctively affects cell wall features and lignocellulosic saccharification with large enhancement on biomass production in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zou, Weihua; Li, Ying; Feng, Yongqing; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Zhiliang; Tu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yanting; Cai, Xiwen; Peng, Liangcai

    2015-10-01

    Rice is a typical silicon-accumulating crop with enormous biomass residues for biofuels. Silica is a cell wall component, but its effect on the plant cell wall and biomass production remains largely unknown. In this study, a systems biology approach was performed using 42 distinct rice cell wall mutants. We found that silica levels are significantly positively correlated with three major wall polymers, indicating that silica is associated with the cell wall network. Silicon-supplied hydroculture analysis demonstrated that silica distinctively affects cell wall composition and major wall polymer features, including cellulose crystallinity (CrI), arabinose substitution degree (reverse Xyl/Ara) of xylans, and sinapyl alcohol (S) proportion in three typical rice mutants. Notably, the silicon supplement exhibited dual effects on biomass enzymatic digestibility in the mutant and wild type (NPB) after pre-treatments with 1% NaOH and 1% H2SO4. In addition, silicon supply largely enhanced plant height, mechanical strength and straw biomass production, suggesting that silica rescues mutant growth defects. Hence, this study provides potential approaches for silicon applications in biomass process and bioenergy rice breeding.

  17. Factors affecting individual foraging specialization and temporal diet stability across the range of a large “generalist” apex predator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenblatt, Adam E.; Nifong, James C.; Heithaus, Michael R.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Elsey, Ruth M.; Decker, Rachel A.; Silliman, Brian R.; Guillette, Louis J.; Lowers, Russell H.; Larson, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    Individual niche specialization (INS) is increasingly recognized as an important component of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. However, most studies that have investigated INS have focused on the effects of niche width and inter- and intraspecific competition on INS in small-bodied species for short time periods, with less attention paid to INS in large-bodied reptilian predators and the effects of available prey types on INS. We investigated the prevalence, causes, and consequences of INS in foraging behaviors across different populations of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis), the dominant aquatic apex predator across the southeast US, using stomach contents and stable isotopes. Gut contents revealed that, over the short term, although alligator populations occupied wide ranges of the INS spectrum, general patterns were apparent. Alligator populations inhabiting lakes exhibited lower INS than coastal populations, likely driven by variation in habitat type and available prey types. Stable isotopes revealed that over longer time spans alligators exhibited remarkably consistent use of variable mixtures of carbon pools (e.g., marine and freshwater food webs). We conclude that INS in large-bodied reptilian predator populations is likely affected by variation in available prey types and habitat heterogeneity, and that INS should be incorporated into management strategies to efficiently meet intended goals. Also, ecological models, which typically do not consider behavioral variability, should include INS to increase model realism and applicability.

  18. A few large roads or many small ones? How to accommodate growth in vehicle numbers to minimise impacts on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Jonathan R; Lunney, Daniel; Callaghan, John; McAlpine, Clive A

    2014-01-01

    Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on wildlife. Nonetheless, we currently have few principles for guiding decisions on road network planning to reduce impacts on wildlife in real landscapes. We addressed this issue by developing an approach for quantifying the impact on wildlife mortality of two alternative mechanisms for accommodating growth in vehicle numbers: (1) increasing the number of roads, and (2) increasing traffic volumes on existing roads. We applied this approach to a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population in eastern Australia and quantified the relative impact of each strategy on mortality. We show that, in most cases, accommodating growth in traffic through increases in volumes on existing roads has a lower impact than building new roads. An exception is where the existing road network has very low road density, but very high traffic volumes on each road. These findings have important implications for how we design road networks to reduce their impacts on biodiversity.

  19. A Few Large Roads or Many Small Ones? How to Accommodate Growth in Vehicle Numbers to Minimise Impacts on Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.; Lunney, Daniel; Callaghan, John; McAlpine, Clive A.

    2014-01-01

    Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on wildlife. Nonetheless, we currently have few principles for guiding decisions on road network planning to reduce impacts on wildlife in real landscapes. We addressed this issue by developing an approach for quantifying the impact on wildlife mortality of two alternative mechanisms for accommodating growth in vehicle numbers: (1) increasing the number of roads, and (2) increasing traffic volumes on existing roads. We applied this approach to a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population in eastern Australia and quantified the relative impact of each strategy on mortality. We show that, in most cases, accommodating growth in traffic through increases in volumes on existing roads has a lower impact than building new roads. An exception is where the existing road network has very low road density, but very high traffic volumes on each road. These findings have important implications for how we design road networks to reduce their impacts on biodiversity. PMID:24646891

  20. Community-Organizing Agent: An Artificial Intelligent System for Building Learning Communities among Large Numbers of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Minjuan; Shen, Ruimin; Han, Peng

    2007-01-01

    Web-based (or online) learning provides an unprecedented flexibility and convenience to both learners and instructors. However, large online classes relying on instructor-centered presentations could tend to isolate many learners. The size of these classes and the wide dispersion of the learners make it challenging for instructors to interact with…

  1. Does Decision Quality (Always) Increase with the Size of Information Samples? Some Vicissitudes in Applying the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiedler, Klaus; Kareev, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive decision making requires that contingencies between decision options and their relative assets be assessed accurately and quickly. The present research addresses the challenging notion that contingencies may be more visible from small than from large samples of observations. An algorithmic account for such a seemingly paradoxical effect…

  2. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  3. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  4. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  5. A sequencing-based survey of functional APAF1 alleles in a large sample of individuals with affective illness and population controls.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zenab; Kanarek, Katarzyna; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Walderhaug, Espen; Ilomäki, Risto; Blumberg, Hilary; Price, Lawrence H; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; Magnusson, Andres; Landrø, Nils Inge; Zvartau, Edwin; Gelernter, Joel; Epperson, C Neill; Räsänen, Pirkko; Siironen, Jari; Lappalainen, Jaakko

    2010-01-05

    Rare apoptosis-promoting functional variants in the apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (APAF1) gene were recently reported to co-segregate with major depression in male members of families from Utah. In order to estimate the impact of these variants on risk for major depressive disorder (MDD) in the general population, we surveyed the frequency of the APAF1 putative MDD risk alleles using re-sequencing in a large sample of northern European and European-American subjects, including a large number of males with MDD. The E777K and N782T APAF1 variants previously described by Harlan et al. [Harlan et al. (2006) Mol Psychiatry 11(1):76-85] were found at low frequencies in affected individuals and population controls. The C450W and Q465R variants were not detected in any of the 632 subjects sequenced. These results show that the APAF1 variants associated with risk for MDD in the Utah pedigrees are very rare in Northern European and European-American populations. In addition, the E777K and N782T variants were found at low frequencies both in patients and population controls, suggesting that these variants have limited impact on risk for MDD.

  6. Coherence of interacting bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with a large number of subbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygiel, B.; Patucha, K.; Zaleski, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the behavior of interacting ultracold bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with wide range of in-cell fluxes α =p /q . The problem is similar to the one of an electron moving in a tight-binding scheme in the magnetic field and becomes difficult to tackle for a growing number of magnetic subbands, q . To overcome this, we focus on the interplay of the width, shape, and number of the subbands on the formation of the coherent state of cold bosons. Using the quantum rotor approach, which goes beyond the mean-field approximation, we are able to pinpoint the elements of the band structure, which are the most significant in a proper theoretical description of the synthetic magnetic field in a bosonic lattice system. As a result, we propose a method of reconstruction of the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum by replacing the magnetic subbands with renormalized bands of a square lattice. This allows us to effectively investigate the properties of the studied system for a wide range of magnetic fluxes and their impact on the Mott-insulator-superfluid transition.

  7. Robust fast direct integral equation solver for quasi-periodic scattering problems with a large number of layers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Hyung; Barnett, Alex H

    2015-01-26

    We present a new boundary integral formulation for time-harmonic wave diffraction from two-dimensional structures with many layers of arbitrary periodic shape, such as multilayer dielectric gratings in TM polarization. Our scheme is robust at all scattering parameters, unlike the conventional quasi-periodic Green's function method which fails whenever any of the layers approaches a Wood anomaly. We achieve this by a decomposition into near- and far-field contributions. The former uses the free-space Green's function in a second-kind integral equation on one period of the material interfaces and their immediate left and right neighbors; the latter uses proxy point sources and small least-squares solves (Schur complements) to represent the remaining contribution from distant copies. By using high-order discretization on interfaces (including those with corners), the number of unknowns per layer is kept small. We achieve overall linear complexity in the number of layers, by direct solution of the resulting block tridiagonal system. For device characterization we present an efficient method to sweep over multiple incident angles, and show a 25× speedup over solving each angle independently. We solve the scattering from a 1000-layer structure with 3 × 105 unknowns to 9-digit accuracy in 2.5 minutes on a desktop workstation.

  8. Estimating Latent Variable Interactions with the Unconstrained Approach: A Comparison of Methods to Form Product Indicators for Large, Unequal Numbers of Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, M. Grace-Anne; Leite, Walter L.; Cochrane, David J.

    2011-01-01

    This Monte Carlo simulation study investigated methods of forming product indicators for the unconstrained approach for latent variable interaction estimation when the exogenous factors are measured by large and unequal numbers of indicators. Product indicators were created based on multiplying parcels of the larger scale by indicators of the…

  9. How to implement a quantum algorithm on a large number of qubits by controlling one central qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagoskin, Alexander; Ashhab, Sahel; Johansson, J. R.; Nori, Franco

    2010-03-01

    It is desirable to minimize the number of control parameters needed to perform a quantum algorithm. We show that, under certain conditions, an entire quantum algorithm can be efficiently implemented by controlling a single central qubit in a quantum computer. We also show that the different system parameters do not need to be designed accurately during fabrication. They can be determined through the response of the central qubit to external driving. Our proposal is well suited for hybrid architectures that combine microscopic and macroscopic qubits. More details can be found in: A.M. Zagoskin, S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Quantum two-level systems in Josephson junctions as naturally formed qubits, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 077001 (2006); and S. Ashhab, J.R. Johansson, F. Nori, Rabi oscillations in a qubit coupled to a quantum two-level system, New J. Phys. 8, 103 (2006).

  10. Estimating Upper Bounds for Occupancy and Number of Manatees in Areas Potentially Affected by Oil from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Julien; Edwards, Holly H.; Bled, Florent; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.; Dupuis, Jérôme A.; Gardner, Beth; Koslovsky, Stacie M.; Aven, Allen M.; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I.; Carmichael, Ruth H.; Fagan, Daniel E.; Ross, Monica A.; Reinert, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform created the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, we applied an innovative modeling approach to obtain upper estimates for occupancy and for number of manatees in areas potentially affected by the oil spill. Our data consisted of aerial survey counts in waters of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi. Our method, which uses a Bayesian approach, allows for the propagation of uncertainty associated with estimates from empirical data and from the published literature. We illustrate that it is possible to derive estimates of occupancy rate and upper estimates of the number of manatees present at the time of sampling, even when no manatees were observed in our sampled plots during surveys. We estimated that fewer than 2.4% of potentially affected manatee habitat in our Florida study area may have been occupied by manatees. The upper estimate for the number of manatees present in potentially impacted areas (within our study area) was estimated with our model to be 74 (95%CI 46 to 107). This upper estimate for the number of manatees was conditioned on the upper 95%CI value of the occupancy rate. In other words, based on our estimates, it is highly probable that there were 107 or fewer manatees in our study area during the time of our surveys. Because our analyses apply to habitats considered likely manatee habitats, our inference is restricted to these sites and to the time frame of our surveys. Given that manatees may be hard to see during aerial surveys, it was important to account for imperfect detection. The approach that we described can be useful for determining the best allocation of resources for monitoring and conservation. PMID:24670971

  11. Estimating upper bounds for occupancy and number of manatees in areas potentially affected by oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Edwards, Holly H; Bled, Florent; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; Dupuis, Jérôme A; Gardner, Beth; Koslovsky, Stacie M; Aven, Allen M; Ward-Geiger, Leslie I; Carmichael, Ruth H; Fagan, Daniel E; Ross, Monica A; Reinert, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The explosion of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform created the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history. As part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, we applied an innovative modeling approach to obtain upper estimates for occupancy and for number of manatees in areas potentially affected by the oil spill. Our data consisted of aerial survey counts in waters of the Florida Panhandle, Alabama and Mississippi. Our method, which uses a Bayesian approach, allows for the propagation of uncertainty associated with estimates from empirical data and from the published literature. We illustrate that it is possible to derive estimates of occupancy rate and upper estimates of the number of manatees present at the time of sampling, even when no manatees were observed in our sampled plots during surveys. We estimated that fewer than 2.4% of potentially affected manatee habitat in our Florida study area may have been occupied by manatees. The upper estimate for the number of manatees present in potentially impacted areas (within our study area) was estimated with our model to be 74 (95%CI 46 to 107). This upper estimate for the number of manatees was conditioned on the upper 95%CI value of the occupancy rate. In other words, based on our estimates, it is highly probable that there were 107 or fewer manatees in our study area during the time of our surveys. Because our analyses apply to habitats considered likely manatee habitats, our inference is restricted to these sites and to the time frame of our surveys. Given that manatees may be hard to see during aerial surveys, it was important to account for imperfect detection. The approach that we described can be useful for determining the best allocation of resources for monitoring and conservation.

  12. Uterine Artery Embolization in 101 Cases of Uterine Fibroids: Do Size, Location, and Number of Fibroids Affect Therapeutic Success and Complications?

    SciTech Connect

    Firouznia, Kavous Ghanaati, Hossein; Jalali, Amir H.; Shakiba, Madjid

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the size, location, or number of fibroids affects therapeutic efficacy or complications of uterine artery embolization (UAE). Patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids (n = 101) were treated by selective bilateral UAE using 500- to 710-{mu}m polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Baseline measures of clinical symptoms, sonography, and MRI taken before the procedure were compared to those taken 1, 3, 6, and 12 months later. Complications and outcomes were analyzed for associations with fibroid size, location, and number. Reductions in mean fibroid volume were similar in patients with single (66.6 {+-} 21.5%) and multiple (67.4 {+-} 25.0%) fibroids (p-value = 0.83). Menstrual improvement occurred in patients with single (93.3%) and multiple (72.2%) fibroids (p = 0.18). Changes in submucosal and other fibroids were not significantly different between the two groups (p's > 0.56). Linear regression analysis between primary fibroid volume as independent variable and percentage reduction of fibroid volume after 1 year yielded an R{sup 2} of 0.083 and the model coefficient was not statistically significant (p = 0.072). Multivariate regression models revealed no statistically or clinically significant coefficients or odds ratios for three independent variables (primary fibroid size, total number, and fibroid location) and all outcome variables (percent reduction of uterus and fibroid volumes in 1 year, improvement of clinical symptoms [menstrual, bulk related, and urinary] in 1 year, and complications after UAE). In conclusion, neither the success rate nor the probability of complications was affected by the primary fibroid size, location, or total number of fibroids.

  13. The Calibration of a Large Number of Scientific Instruments for the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Sub-Orbital Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, A.; Miller, J.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Swenson, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission to be launched in the early January 2015 time frame from the Poker Flat Research Range. The primary scientific objective of this mission is to determine the contribution of small spatial and temporal scale fluctuations of the electric fields to the larger-scale processes during active aurora. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of six small payloads ejected at high velocity from a sounding rocket. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow images) observations.Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of electric field double-probe sensors, a three-axis magnetometer, and a Langmuir probe. In total there are eight of each instrument type requireing calibration. Since the instruments need to be calibrated over temperature a full calibration of a single instrument is very time-consuming. The decision was made to automate the calibration process. Measurements were taken using a relay switch-box connecting the instruments to test sources. Calibration data were saved into a database. Using post-processing scripts on these databases a calibration for each instrument at each temperature point was made. This approach is a prototype process that might be used for calibrating a large constellation of CubeSats with similar instruments. In this poster we review the ASSP science and mission, and the results of the pre-flight calibration of the science instruments.

  14. Copy number variation affecting the Photoperiod-B1 and Vernalization-A1 genes is associated with altered flowering time in wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Díaz, Aurora; Zikhali, Meluleki; Turner, Adrian S; Isaac, Peter; Laurie, David A

    2012-01-01

    The timing of flowering during the year is an important adaptive character affecting reproductive success in plants and is critical to crop yield. Flowering time has been extensively manipulated in crops such as wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during domestication, and this enables them to grow productively in a wide range of environments. Several major genes controlling flowering time have been identified in wheat with mutant alleles having sequence changes such as insertions, deletions or point mutations. We investigated genetic variants in commercial varieties of wheat that regulate flowering by altering photoperiod response (Ppd-B1 alleles) or vernalization requirement (Vrn-A1 alleles) and for which no candidate mutation was found within the gene sequence. Genetic and genomic approaches showed that in both cases alleles conferring altered flowering time had an increased copy number of the gene and altered gene expression. Alleles with an increased copy number of Ppd-B1 confer an early flowering day neutral phenotype and have arisen independently at least twice. Plants with an increased copy number of Vrn-A1 have an increased requirement for vernalization so that longer periods of cold are required to potentiate flowering. The results suggest that copy number variation (CNV) plays a significant role in wheat adaptation.

  15. Visual Search in the Real World: Color Vision Deficiency Affects Peripheral Guidance, but Leaves Foveal Verification Largely Unaffected

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Günter; 't Hart, Bernard M.; Kohlbecher, Stefan; Bartl, Klaus; Schumann, Frank; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Schneider, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with color vision deficiencies report numerous limitations in daily life, restricting, for example, their access to some professions. However, they use basic color terms systematically and in a similar manner as people with normal color vision. We hypothesize that a possible explanation for this discrepancy between color perception and behavioral consequences might be found in the gaze behavior of people with color vision deficiency. Methods: A group of participants with color vision deficiencies and a control group performed several search tasks in a naturalistic setting on a lawn. All participants wore a mobile eye-tracking-driven camera with a high foveal image resolution (EyeSeeCam). Search performance as well as fixations of objects of different colors were examined. Results: Search performance was similar in both groups in a color-unrelated search task as well as in a search for yellow targets. While searching for red targets, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited a strongly degraded performance. This was closely matched by the number of fixations on red objects shown by the two groups. Importantly, once they fixated a target, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited only few identification errors. Conclusions: In contrast to controls, participants with color vision deficiencies are not able to enhance their search for red targets on a (green) lawn by an efficient guiding mechanism. The data indicate that the impaired guiding is the main influence on search performance, while foveal identification (verification) is largely unaffected by the color vision deficiency. PMID:26733851

  16. Widespread retinal degenerative disease mutation (rdAc) discovered among a large number of popular cat breeds.

    PubMed

    Menotti-Raymond, M; David, V A; Pflueger, S; Roelke, M E; Kehler, J; O'Brien, S J; Narfström, K

    2010-10-01

    The recent discovery of a mutational variant in the CEP290 gene (CEP290: IVS50+9T>G), conferring recessive retinal degeneration in Abyssinian and Somali (long-haired Abyssinian) cats (rdAc) prompted a survey among 41 cat breeds (846 individuals) to assess the incidence, frequency and clinical consequence of rdAc. The rdAc allele displayed widespread distribution, observed in 16/43 (37%) breeds, exhibiting a high allele frequency (∼33%) in North American and European Siamese populations. Clinical evaluations demonstrated high concordance between rdAc pathology and the CEP290 (IVS50+9T>G) homozygous genotype (P=1.1E-6), with clinical disease similar to affected Abyssinians/Somalis. This retinal degeneration has not been reported in breeds other than the Abyssinian/Somali and poses a significant health risk particularly in the Siamese breed group. Alertness of the veterinary community and the present availability of commercial diagnostic testing could synergistically enable breeders to reduce the incidence of rdAc blindness in pure-bred cat populations.

  17. Bacterial fermentation affects net mineral flux in the large intestine of pigs fed diets with viscous and fermentable nonstarch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Hooda, S; Mosenthin, R; Gänzle, M G; Zijlstra, R T

    2010-10-01

    CEL than for CMC, LG, and HG. In conclusion, these data indicate that the stimulation of fermentation by dietary NSP affects net mineral flux in the large intestine that, in turn, can influence mineral excretion in feces. Additionally, negative effects of CEL on apparent retention may increase the daily requirement for minerals of grower pigs.

  18. The application of large numbers of pleasure boats to collect synoptic sea-truth for ERTS-1 overpasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G.; Philpot, W.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In order to interpret and annotate current circulation and suspended sediment concentration maps derived from ERTS-1 digital tapes, the University of Delaware has been collecting water samples and other data from boats and helicopters. In order to increase the number of samples at the exact time of the ERTS-1 pass over Delaware Bay, pleasure craft were organized to obtain samples of the entire test site. On the ERTS-1 pass of July second, scientists were stationed at three public boat launches along the Bay to hand out sampling packets to interested boaters. The packets contained two litre sampling bottles, a map, data card, and a pen. The boaters were asked to fill the two bottles between 11 and 11:15 a.m., mark their location on the map, and fill out the data card. Forty-nine packets were handed out of which 40 were returned (82%). Only four of the 40 were not in the alloted time range. This gave 36 real time data points covering approximately 30 nautical miles. The samples are being analyzed for sediment concentration, particle size, and salinity. Participating boaters will receive a copy of an ERTS image of the Delaware Bay and a summary report of the project. Because of the success of the project, future use of pleasure boaters is being planned.

  19. Molecular sexing of unusually large numbers of Spheniscus magellanicus (Spheniscidae) washed ashore along the Brazilian coast in 2008.

    PubMed

    Reis, E C; Aires, R M; Moura, J F; Matias, C A R; Tavares, M; Ott, P H; Siciliano, S; Lôbo-Hajdu, G

    2011-12-05

    There have been few studies on Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus). In 2008, these penguins washed ashore along the Brazilian coast in unusually high numbers, some reaching as far as northeast Brazil. As Magellanic penguins show little sexual dimorphism, sex determination by morphological features is not accurate. Here, we tested a molecular procedure for sexing specimens of S. magellanicus washed ashore along the coasts of Sergipe, Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul in 2008, comparing the sex ratio between these localities. Tissue samples were collected from 135 dead, beached specimens. We carried out total genomic DNA extraction and CHD-Z/CHD-W gene amplification by PCR using P2 and P8 primers. Amplicons were separated by 12% acrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a greater proportion of females (70%). Sex could be determined because females have two intronic regions of CHD gene of different size in the sex chromosomes, visualized as two bands on the gel (380 and 400 bp approximately), while males have only one (400 bp). Therefore, this method proved to be effective and sensitive for sex determination of S. magellanicus individuals. Data on sex ratios are useful for understanding the dynamics and ecology of Magellanic penguin populations.

  20. Experimental validation of the regulated expression of large numbers of non-coding RNAs from the mouse genome

    PubMed Central

    Ravasi, Timothy; Suzuki, Harukazu; Pang, Ken C.; Katayama, Shintaro; Furuno, Masaaki; Okunishi, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Ru, Kelin; Frith, Martin C.; Gongora, M. Milena; Grimmond, Sean M.; Hume, David A.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Mattick, John S.

    2006-01-01

    Recent large-scale analyses of mainly full-length cDNA libraries generated from a variety of mouse tissues indicated that almost half of all representative cloned sequences did not contain an apparent protein-coding sequence, and were putatively derived from non-protein-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes. However, many of these clones were singletons and the majority were unspliced, raising the possibility that they may be derived from genomic DNA or unprocessed pre-mRNA contamination during library construction, or alternatively represent nonspecific “transcriptional noise.” Here we show, using reverse transcriptase-dependent PCR, microarray, and Northern blot analyses, that many of these clones were derived from genuine transcripts of unknown function whose expression appears to be regulated. The ncRNA transcripts have larger exons and fewer introns than protein-coding transcripts. Analysis of the genomic landscape around these sequences indicates that some cDNA clones were produced not from terminal poly(A) tracts but internal priming sites within longer transcripts, only a minority of which is encompassed by known genes. A significant proportion of these transcripts exhibit tissue-specific expression patterns, as well as dynamic changes in their expression in macrophages following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Taken together, the data provide strong support for the conclusion that ncRNAs are an important, regulated component of the mammalian transcriptome. PMID:16344565

  1. Drug discovery using very large numbers of patents. General strategy with extensive use of match and edit operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Barry; Li, Jin; Dettinger, Richard; Peters, Amanda; Boyer, Stephen K.

    2011-05-01

    A patent data base of 6.7 million compounds generated by a very high performance computer (Blue Gene) requires new techniques for exploitation when extensive use of chemical similarity is involved. Such exploitation includes the taxonomic classification of chemical themes, and data mining to assess mutual information between themes and companies. Importantly, we also launch candidates that evolve by "natural selection" as failure of partial match against the patent data base and their ability to bind to the protein target appropriately, by simulation on Blue Gene. An unusual feature of our method is that algorithms and workflows rely on dynamic interaction between match-and-edit instructions, which in practice are regular expressions. Similarity testing by these uses SMILES strings and, less frequently, graph or connectivity representations. Examining how this performs in high throughput, we note that chemical similarity and novelty are human concepts that largely have meaning by utility in specific contexts. For some purposes, mutual information involving chemical themes might be a better concept.

  2. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  3. The mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata: a mitogenome with a large number of intergenic spacers.

    PubMed

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans.

  4. Major factors affecting in situ biodegradation rates of jet-fuel during large-scale biosparging project in sedimentary bedrock.

    PubMed

    Machackova, Jirina; Wittlingerova, Zdena; Vlk, Kvetoslav; Zima, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), mainly jet fuel, had taken place at the former Soviet Army air base in the Czech Republic. The remediation of large-scale petroleum contamination of soil and groundwater has provided valuable information about biosparging efficiency in the sandstone sedimentary bedrock. In 1997 petroleum contamination was found to be present in soil and groundwater across an area of 28 hectares, divided for the clean-up purpose into smaller clean-up fields (several hectares). The total estimated quantity of TPH released to the environment was about 7,000 metric tons. Biosparging was applied as an innovative clean-up technology at the site and was operated over a 10-year period (1997-2008). Importance of a variety of factors that affect bacterial activity in unsaturated and saturated zones was widely studied on the site and influence of natural and technological factors on clean-up efficiency in heavily contaminates areas of clean-up fields (initial contaminant mass 111-452 metric ton/ha) was evaluated. Long-term monitoring of the groundwater temperature has shown seasonal rises and falls of temperature which have caused a fluctuation in biodegradation activity during clean-up. By contrast, an overall rise of average groundwater temperature was observed in the clean-up fields, most probably as a result of the biological activity during the clean-up process. The significant rise of biodegradation rates, observed after air sparging intensification, and strong linear correlation between the air injection rates and biodegradation activities have shown that the air injection rate is the principal factor in biodegradation efficiency in heavily contaminated areas. It has a far more important role for achieving a biodegradation activity than the contamination content which appeared to have had only a slight effect after the removal of about 75% of initial contamination.

  5. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    DOE PAGES

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; ...

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling,more » the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.« less

  6. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; Garaizar, Xabier; Klein, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling, the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.

  7. SU-E-T-629: Feasibility Study of Treating Multiple Brain Tumors with Large Number of Noncoplanar IMRT Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P; Ma, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of treating multiple brain tumors withlarge number of noncoplanar IMRT beams. Methods: Thirty beams are selected from 390 deliverable beams separated by six degree in 4pi space. Beam selection optimization is based on a column generation algorithm. MLC leaf size is 2 mm. Dose matrices are calculated with collapsed cone convolution and superposition method in a 2 mm by 2mm by 2 mm grid. Twelve brain tumors of various shapes, sizes and locations are used to generate four plans treating 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumors. The radiation dose was 20 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose Volume Histograms for tumor and brain were compared. Results: All results are based on a 2 mm by 2 mm by 2 mm CT grid. For 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumor plans, minimum tumor doses are all 20 Gy. Mean tumor dose are 20.0, 20.1, 20.1 and 20.1 Gy. Maximum tumor dose are 23.3, 23.6, 25.4 and 25.4 Gy. Mean ventricles dose are 0.7, 1.7, 2.4 and 3.1 Gy.Mean subventricular zone dose are 0.8, 1.3, 2.2 and 3.2 Gy. Average Equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values for tumor are 20.1, 20.1, 20.2 and 20.2 Gy. The conformity index (CI) values are close to 1 for all 4 plans. The gradient index (GI) values are 2.50, 2.05, 2.09 and 2.19. Conclusion: Compared with published Gamma Knife treatment studies, noncoplanar IMRT treatment plan is superior in terms of dose conformity. Due to maximum limit of beams per plan, Gamma knife has to treat multiple tumors separately in different plans. Noncoplanar IMRT plans theoretically can be delivered in a single plan on any modern linac with an automated couch and image guidance. This warrants further study of using noncoplanar IMRT as a viable treatment solution for multiple brain tumors.

  8. Temperature-related mortality in 17 large Chinese cities: how heat and cold affect mortality in China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjuan; Chen, Renjie; Kan, Haidong

    2014-10-01

    Few multicity studies have been conducted to investigate the acute health effects of cold and hot temperatures in China. We aimed to examine the relationship between temperature and daily mortality in 17 large Chinese cities. We first calculated city-specific effect of temperature using time-series regression models combined with distributed lag nonlinear models; then we pooled the city-specific estimates with the Bayesian hierarchical models. The cold effects lasted longer than the hot effects. For the cold effects, a 1 °C decrease from the 25th to 1st percentiles of temperature over lags 0-14 days was associated with increases of 1.69% [95% posterior intervals (PI): 1.01%, 2.36%], 2.49% (95% PI: 1.53%, 3.46%) and 1.60% (95% PI: 0.32%, 2.87%) in total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively. For the hot effects, a 1 °C increase from the 75th to 99th percentiles of temperature was associated with corresponding increases of 2.83% (95% PI: 1.42%, 4.24%), 3.02% (95% PI: 1.33%, 4.71%) and 4.64% (95% PI: 1.96%, 7.31%). The latitudes, number of air conditioning per household and disposable income per capita were significant modifiers for cold effects; the proportion of the elderly was a significant modifier for hot effects. This largest epidemiological study of temperature to date in China suggested that both cold and hot temperatures were associated with increased mortality. Our findings may have important implications for the public health policies in China.

  9. In Vitro Acute Exposure to DEHP Affects Oocyte Meiotic Maturation, Energy and Oxidative Stress Parameters in a Large Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Pocar, Paola; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Amati, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental contaminants because of their use in plastics and other common consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most abundant phthalate and it impairs fertility by acting as an endocrine disruptor. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of in vitro acute exposure to DEHP on oocyte maturation, energy and oxidative status in the horse, a large animal model. Cumulus cell (CC) apoptosis and oxidative status were also investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from the ovaries of slaughtered mares were cultured in vitro in presence of 0.12, 12 and 1200 µM DEHP. After in vitro maturation (IVM), CCs were removed and evaluated for apoptosis (cytological assessment and TUNEL) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oocytes were evaluated for nuclear chromatin configuration. Matured (Metaphase II stage; MII) oocytes were further evaluated for cytoplasmic energy and oxidative parameters. DEHP significantly inhibited oocyte maturation when added at low doses (0.12 µM; P<0.05). This effect was related to increased CC apoptosis (P<0.001) and reduced ROS levels (P<0.0001). At higher doses (12 and 1200 µM), DEHP induced apoptosis (P<0.0001) and ROS increase (P<0.0001) in CCs without affecting oocyte maturation. In DEHP-exposed MII oocytes, mitochondrial distribution patterns, apparent energy status (MitoTracker fluorescence intensity), intracellular ROS localization and levels, mt/ROS colocalization and total SOD activity did not vary, whereas increased ATP content (P<0.05), possibly of glycolytic origin, was found. Co-treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine reversed apoptosis and efficiently scavenged excessive ROS in DEHP-treated CCs without enhancing oocyte maturation. In conclusion, acute in vitro exposure to DEHP inhibits equine oocyte maturation without altering ooplasmic energy and oxidative stress parameters in matured oocytes which retain the potential to be fertilized and develop into embryos

  10. Large Gradient High Magnetic Fields Affect Osteoblast Ultrastructure and Function by Disrupting Collagen I or Fibronectin/αβ1 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ai-Rong; Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Jing-Bao; Wang, Yang; Di, Sheng-Meng; Hu, Li-Fang; Shang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    The superconducting magnet generates a field and field gradient product that can levitate diamagnetic materials. In this study a specially designed superconducting magnet with a large gradient high magnetic field (LG-HMF), which can provide three apparent gravity levels (μ-g, 1-g, and 2-g), was used to simulate a space-like gravity environment. The effects of LG-HMF on the ultrastructure and function of osteoblast-like cells (MG-63 and MC3T3-E1) and the underlying mechanism were investigated by transmission electromicroscopy (TEM), MTT, and cell western (ICW) assays. Under LG-HMF significant morphologic changes in osteoblast-like cells occurred, including expansion of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, an increased number of lysosomes, distorted microvilli, and aggregates of actin filaments. Compared to controls, cell viability and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) secretion were significantly increased, and collagen I (col I), fibronectin (FN), vinculin, integrin α3, αv, and β1 expression were changed under LG-HMF conditions. In conclusion, LG-HMF affects osteoblast ultrastructure, cell viability, and ALP secretion, and the changes caused by LG-HMF may be related to disrupting col I or FN/αβ1 integrin. PMID:23382804

  11. Low frequency of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies during chronic infection even in quaternary epitope targeting antibodies containing large numbers of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Kalams, Spyros A; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are thought to be a critical component of an appropriate HIV vaccine response. It has been proposed that Abs recognizing conformationally dependent quaternary epitopes on the HIV envelope (Env) trimer may be necessary to neutralize diverse HIV strains. A number of recently described broadly neutralizing monoclonal Abs (mAbs) recognize complex and quaternary epitopes. Generally, many such Abs exhibit extensive numbers of somatic mutations and unique structural characteristics. We sought to characterize the native antibody (Ab) response against circulating HIV focusing on such conformational responses, without a prior selection based on neutralization. Using a capture system based on VLPs incorporating cleaved envelope protein, we identified a selection of B cells that produce quaternary epitope targeting Abs (QtAbs). Similar to a number of broadly neutralizing Abs, the Ab genes encoding these QtAbs showed extensive numbers of somatic mutations. However, when expressed as recombinant molecules, these Abs failed to neutralize virus or mediate ADCVI activity. Molecular analysis showed unusually high numbers of mutations in the Ab heavy chain framework 3 region of the variable genes. The analysis suggests that large numbers of somatic mutations occur in Ab genes encoding HIV Abs in chronically infected individuals in a non-directed, stochastic, manner.

  12. Low frequency of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies during chronic infection even in quaternary epitope targeting antibodies containing large numbers of somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hicar, Mark D.; Chen, Xuemin; Kalams, Spyros A.; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are thought to be a critical component of an appropriate HIV vaccine response. It has been proposed that Abs recognizing conformationally dependent quaternary epitopes on the HIV envelope (Env) trimer may be necessary to neutralize diverse HIV strains. A number of recently described broadly neutralizing monoclonal Abs (mAbs) recognize complex and quaternary epitopes. Generally, many such Abs exhibit extensive numbers of somatic mutations and unique structural characteristics. We sought to characterize the native antibody (Ab) response against circulating HIV focusing on such conformational responses, without a prior selection based on neutralization. Using a capture system based on VLPs incorporating cleaved envelope protein, we identified a selection of B cells that produce quaternary epitope targeting Abs (QtAbs). Similar to a number of broadly neutralizing Abs, the Ab genes encoding these QtAbs showed extensive numbers of somatic mutations. However, when expressed as recombinant molecules, these Abs failed to neutralize virus or mediate ADCVI activity. Molecular analysis showed unusually high numbers of mutations in the Ab heavy chain framework 3 region of the variable genes. The analysis suggests that large numbers of somatic mutations occur in Ab genes encoding HIV Abs in chronically infected individuals in a non-directed, stochastic, manner. PMID:26748387

  13. Interpretation of clinical relevance of X-chromosome copy number variations identified in a large cohort of individuals with cognitive disorders and/or congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Marjolein H; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Pfundt, Rolph; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Yntema, Helger G; Nillesen, Willy M; de Vries, Bert B A; van Bokhoven, Hans; Kleefstra, Tjitske

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide array studies are now routinely being used in the evaluation of patients with cognitive disorders (CD) and/or congenital anomalies (CA). Therefore, inevitably each clinician is confronted with the challenging task of the interpretation of copy number variations detected by genome-wide array platforms in a diagnostic setting. Clinical interpretation of autosomal copy number variations is already challenging, but assessment of the clinical relevance of copy number variations of the X-chromosome is even more complex. This study provides an overview of the X-Chromosome copy number variations that we have identified by genome-wide array analysis in a large cohort of 4407 male and female patients. We have made an interpretation of the clinical relevance of each of these copy number variations based on well-defined criteria and previous reports in literature and databases. The prevalence of X-chromosome copy number variations in this cohort was 57/4407 (∼1.3%), of which 15 (0.3%) were interpreted as (likely) pathogenic.

  14. Does Acute Maternal Stress in Pregnancy Affect Infant Health Outcomes? Examination of a Large Cohort of Infants Born After the Terrorist Attacks of September 11, 2001

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Spandorfer S, Grill E, Davis O, Fasouliotis S, Rosenwaks Z: Septem- ber 11th in New York City (NYC): the effect of a catastrophe on IVF outcome in a...Naval Health Research Center Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes ? Examination of A Large Cohort of Infants Born...California 92106 BioMed CentralBMC Public Health ssOpen AcceResearch article Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes

  15. Effect of aerosol number concentration on cloud droplet dispersion: A large-eddy simulation study and implications for aerosol indirect forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Miao-Ling; Seinfeld, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Through three-dimensional large-eddy simulations of marine stratocumulus we explore the factors that control the cloud spectral relative dispersion (ratio of cloud droplet spectral width to the mean radius of the distribution) as a function of aerosol number concentration and the extent to which the relative dispersion either enhances or mitigates the Twomey effect. We find that relative dispersion decreases with increasing aerosol number concentration (for aerosol number concentrations less than about 1000 cm-3) because smaller droplets resulting from higher aerosol number concentrations inhibit precipitation and lead to (1) less spectral broadening by suppressed collision and coalescence processes and (2) more spectral narrowing by droplet condensational growth at higher updraft velocity because reduced drizzle latent heating at cloud top results in increased boundary layer turbulent kinetic energy production by buoyancy and thereby stronger turbulence. Increased spectral broadening owing to increased cloud-top entrainment mixing, also as a result of increased boundary layer turbulence, is relatively insignificant compared with outcomes 1 and 2. The coefficient k, an important parameter that relates cloud droplet effective radius and volume mean radius in large-scale models, is a function of skewness and relative dispersion of the distribution and is negatively correlated with relative dispersion. Increasing k with increasing aerosol number concentration leads to maximum enhancement of the cloud susceptibility (the change of cloud optical depth due to change of cloud droplet number concentration) over that attributable to the Twomey effect alone by about 4.2% and 39% for simulated FIRE and ASTEX cases, respectively.

  16. Testosterone levels and their associations with lifetime number of opposite sex partners and remarriage in a large sample of American elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Thomas V; van der Meij, Leander; Cobey, Kelly D; Buunk, Abraham P

    2011-06-01

    Testosterone (T) has been argued to modulate mating and parenting behavior in many species, including humans. The role of T for these behaviors has been framed as the challenge hypothesis. Following this hypothesis, T should be positively associated with the number of opposite sex partners a male has. Indeed research in humans has shown that T is positively related to the number of opposite sex partners a young man has had. Here we test, in both men and women, whether this relationship extends to the lifetime number of sex partners. We also explored whether or not T was associated with current marital status, partnership status and whether or not the participant remarried. Using a large sample of elderly men and women (each sample n>700), we show that T is positively and sizably associated with the number of opposite sex partners in men. When controlling for potential confounding variables such as educational attainment, age, BMI, ethnicity, specific use of a medication and time of sampling this effect remained. For women, the relationship between T and number of opposite sex partners was positive but did not prove to be robust. In both men and women there was no evidence for an association between T and current marital status and partnership status (being in a relationship or not). However, remarriage was positively associated with T, but only in males. Results are discussed with reference to the literature on T and sex partners, remarriage and more broadly the challenge hypothesis.

  17. Exploring Individual and Item Factors that Affect Assessment Validity for Diverse Learners: Results from a Large-Scale Cognitive Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Phoebe C.; Kopriva, Rebecca J.; Chen, Chen-Su; Emick, Jessica E.

    2006-01-01

    A cognitive lab technique (n=156) was used to investigate interactions between individual factors and item factors presumed to affect assessment validity for diverse students, including English language learners. Findings support the concept of "access"--an interaction between specific construct-irrelevant item features and individual…

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Applicability of General Provisions to New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... test dates. 63.8(a)(1)-(a)(3), (b), (c)(1)-(c)(3), (c)(6)-(c)(8), (d), (e), (f)(1)-(f)(6), (g)(1)-(g)(4... reporting requirements Yes. 63.10(c)(1)-(6), (c)(9)-(15) Additional records for continuous monitoring... New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part...

  19. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Zzzzz of... - Applicability of General Provisions to New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... test dates. 63.8(a)(1)-(a)(3), (b), (c)(1)-(c)(3), (c)(6)-(c)(8), (d), (e), (f)(1)-(f)(6), (g)(1)-(g)(4... reporting requirements Yes. 63.10(c)(1)-(6), (c)(9)-(15) Additional records for continuous monitoring... New and Existing Affected Sources Classified as Large Foundries 3 Table 3 to Subpart ZZZZZ of Part...

  20. Reduction in 50-kHz call-numbers and suppression of tickling-associated positive affective behaviour after lesioning of the lateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Roccaro-Waldmeyer, Diana M; Babalian, Alexandre; Müller, Annelies; Celio, Marco R

    2016-02-01

    The parvafox nucleus is located ventrolaterally in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). Its core and shell are composed of neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) and the transcription factor Foxb1, respectively. Given the known functions of the LHA and that the parvafox nucleus receives afferents from the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and projects to the periaqueductal gray matter, a functional role of this entity in the expression of positive emotions has been postulated. The purpose of the present study was to ascertain whether the deletion of neurons in the parvafox nucleus influenced the tickling-induced 50-kHz calls, which are thought to reflect positive affective states, in rats. To this end, tickling of the animals (heterospecific play) was combined with intracerebral injections of the excitotoxin kainic acid into the parvafox nucleus. The most pronounced surgery-associated reduction in 50-kHz call-numbers was observed in the group of rats in which, on the basis of PV-immunoreactive-cell counts in the parvafox nucleus, bilateral lesions had been successfully produced. Two other parameters that were implemented to quantify positive affective behaviour, namely, an approach towards and a following of the hand of the tickling experimenter, were likewise most markedly suppressed in the group of rats with bilaterally successful lesions. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between each of the investigated parameters. Our data afford evidence that the parvafox nucleus plays a role in the production of 50-kHz calls in rats, and, more generally, in the expression of positive emotions.

  1. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  2. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  3. A short-term extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure increases circulating leukocyte numbers and affects HPA-axis signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, Stan; Ferwerda, Gerben; Wiese, Michelle; Trentelman, Jos; Cuppen, Jan; Kozicz, Tamas; de Jager, Linda; Hermans, Peter W M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2016-10-01

    There is still uncertainty whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) can induce health effects like immunomodulation. Despite evidence obtained in vitro, an unambiguous association has not yet been established in vivo. Here, mice were exposed to ELF-EMF for 1, 4, and 24 h/day in a short-term (1 week) and long-term (15 weeks) set-up to investigate whole body effects on the level of stress regulation and immune response. ELF-EMF signal contained multiple frequencies (20-5000 Hz) and a magnetic flux density of 10 μT. After exposure, blood was analyzed for leukocyte numbers (short-term and long-term) and adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration (short-term only). Furthermore, in the short-term experiment, stress-related parameters, corticotropin-releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CYP11A1 gene-expression, respectively, were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, pituitary, and adrenal glands. In the short-term but not long-term experiment, leukocyte counts were significantly higher in the 24 h-exposed group compared with controls, mainly represented by increased neutrophils and CD4 ± lymphocytes. POMC expression and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone were significantly lower compared with unexposed control mice. In conclusion, short-term ELF-EMF exposure may affect hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation in mice. Changes in stress hormone release may explain changes in circulating leukocyte numbers and composition. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:433-443, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A short‐term extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure increases circulating leukocyte numbers and affects HPA‐axis signaling in mice

    PubMed Central

    de Kleijn, Stan; Ferwerda, Gerben; Wiese, Michelle; Trentelman, Jos; Cuppen, Jan; Kozicz, Tamas; de Jager, Linda; Hermans, Peter W. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is still uncertainty whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF‐EMF) can induce health effects like immunomodulation. Despite evidence obtained in vitro, an unambiguous association has not yet been established in vivo. Here, mice were exposed to ELF‐EMF for 1, 4, and 24 h/day in a short‐term (1 week) and long‐term (15 weeks) set‐up to investigate whole body effects on the level of stress regulation and immune response. ELF‐EMF signal contained multiple frequencies (20–5000 Hz) and a magnetic flux density of 10 μT. After exposure, blood was analyzed for leukocyte numbers (short‐term and long‐term) and adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration (short‐term only). Furthermore, in the short‐term experiment, stress‐related parameters, corticotropin‐releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CYP11A1 gene‐expression, respectively, were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, pituitary, and adrenal glands. In the short‐term but not long‐term experiment, leukocyte counts were significantly higher in the 24 h‐exposed group compared with controls, mainly represented by increased neutrophils and CD4 ± lymphocytes. POMC expression and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone were significantly lower compared with unexposed control mice. In conclusion, short‐term ELF‐EMF exposure may affect hypothalamic‐pituitary‐adrenal axis activation in mice. Changes in stress hormone release may explain changes in circulating leukocyte numbers and composition. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:433–443, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27553635

  5. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002), 10.1098/rsta.2001.0942]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number.

  6. Large field of view multi-resolution experimental measurement of the spatial structure of a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Atkinson, Callum; de Silva, Charitha; Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Hutchins, Nicholas; Soria, Julio; Marusic, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A multiple camera, multiple resolution PIV system consisting of nine highe resolution cameras and two dual cavity lasers is used to instantaneously measure a large streamwise, wall-normal field of view (2 δ × 1 . 5 δ), while simultaneously resolving the near-wall flow down to a height of y + ~ 3 at Reynolds numbers of Re τ ~ 8, 000 to 30, 000. The high spatial resolution in the near-wall vicinity enables direct estimation of the wall shear stress and allows for subsequent and conditional analysis of both the near-wall and larger outer flow structures and fluctuations. The quality of this measurement is assessed via statistical comparison with previous measurements made using hot-wire anemometry and compared with the highest available Reynolds number DNS. Conditional two-point correlations, and conditional mean structures will be presented.

  7. Rayleigh- and Prandtl-number dependence of the large-scale flow-structure in weakly-rotating turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Stephan; Wei, Ping; Ahlers, Guenter

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection under rotation shows a remarkable variety of different flow states. The Nusselt number (Nu) at slow rotation rates (expressed as the dimensionless inverse Rossby number 1/Ro), for example, is not a monotonic function of 1/Ro. Different 1/Ro-ranges can be observed with different slopes ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) . Some of these ranges are connected by sharp transitions where ∂Nu / ∂ (1 / Ro) changes discontinuously. We investigate different regimes in cylindrical samples of aspect ratio Γ = 1 by measuring temperatures at the sidewall of the sample for various Prandtl numbers in the range 3 < Pr < 35 and Rayleigh numbers in the range of 108 < Ra < 4 ×1011 . From these measurements we deduce changes of the flow structure. We learn about the stability and dynamics of the large-scale circulation (LSC), as well as about its breakdown and the onset of vortex formation close to the top and bottom plate. We shall examine correlations between these measurements and changes in the heat transport. This work was supported by NSF grant DRM11-58514. SW acknowledges support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  8. Random numbers free analytical implementation of Monte Carlo for laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing: application to human bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Martelli, Fabrizio

    2015-03-20

    Classical Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF) often necessitate too long computation times and specialized hardware. This is particularly true for LDF at large interoptode spacing with low absorption coefficients and large anisotropic factors representing real biological tissues. For this reason, a random numbers free "analytical" implementation of the classical MC (MCan) is proposed. The MCan approach allows to obtain noise exempt LDF spectra in a short time and with a simple personal laptop. The proposed MCan holds for a diffusive regime of light propagation and it is practically implemented for a semi-infinite geometry. Its validity is demonstrated by comparisons with the classical MC.

  9. ProReg XL Tool: an easy-to-use computer tool suite for rapidly regrouping a large number of identical electrophoretic profiles.

    PubMed

    Massias, Bastien; Urdaci, Maria C

    2009-05-01

    The ProReg XL Tool (Profile Regrouping Excel Tool) is a new tool suite designed to rapidly regroup a large number of identical electrophoretic profiles. This tool suite is coded in Visual Basic Application for Microsoft Excel, and thus requires this spreadsheet software to operate. It was designed for use with a new screening strategy of clones from an rrs (16S rDNA) clone library, but it may also be helpful in other electrophoretic applications. ProReg XL Tool is organized in different steps where the user has the capability--in addition to regrouping electrophoretic profiles--to control gel quality, determine signal attenuation, and draw pie charts.

  10. Factors affecting the willingness of nursing students to receive annual seasonal influenza vaccination: A large-scale cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kin; Ho, Sin Man Simone; Lam, Winsome

    2017-03-13

    Nursing students are at high risk of exposure to vaccine-preventable diseases such as seasonal influenza. However, due to the limited number of studies conducted in this area, the prevalence and factors affecting annual seasonal influenza vaccination (ASIV) uptake remain unclear. This was a large-scale cross-sectional survey study conducted among 902 nursing students in different years of study. The questionnaire was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM), and logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of ASIV uptake. The results of our study reveal that only 15.2% of nursing students declared having the vaccine in the previous year, and that ASIV uptake was self-reported. ASIV uptake was associated with perceived susceptibility (odds ratio=2.76), perceived seriousness (odds ratio=2.06) and perceived barriers (odds ratio=0.50). The odds of receiving ASIV were 17.96times higher for those participants having had ASIV at least once than those who had not received ASIV in the previous five years. In addition, the odds of receiving ASIV were 4.01times higher for master's than undergraduate students. Our study concludes that the ASIV uptake among nursing students is low. In order to increase vaccination uptake in subsequent years, future studies should promote vaccination based on HBM, focusing on nursing students in undergraduate studies by emphasizing not only vaccination knowledge, but also their social responsibility to protect patients. Influenza vaccination can be viewed as an ethical professional responsibility and a patient safety issue, as well as being an infection control strategy.

  11. In the Middle: Factors Affecting a Black Male's Decision to Join a Traditionally White Fraternity at a Large Diverse Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to examine the pre-college factors, attitudes, and experiences of black men who joined traditionally white fraternities (TWFs) at large public predominantly white institutions (PWIs) over approximately the past four decades. These factors, with special emphasis on issues of identity, self- and group-esteem,…

  12. Taking large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded flows to higher Reynolds numbers by use of anisotropy-resolving subgrid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecchia, Matteo; Brethouwer, Geert; Johansson, Arne V.; Wallin, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Properly resolved large-eddy simulations of wall-bounded high Reynolds number flows using standard subgrid-scale (SGS) models requires high spatial and temporal resolution. We have shown that a more elaborate SGS model taking into account the SGS Reynolds stress anisotropies can relax the requirement for the number of grid points by at least an order of magnitude for the same accuracy. This was shown by applying the recently developed explicit algebraic subgrid-scale model (EAM) [Marstorp et al., J. Fluid Mech. 639, 403 (2009), 10.1017/S0022112009991054] to fully developed high Reynolds number channel flows with friction Reynolds numbers of 550, 2000, and 5200. The near-wall region is fully resolved, i.e., no explicit wall modeling or wall functions are applied. A dynamic procedure adjusts the model at the wall for both low and high Reynolds numbers. The resolution is reduced, from the typically recommended 50 and 15 wall units in the stream- and spanwise directions respectively, by up to a factor of 5 in each direction. It was shown by comparison with direct numerical simulations that the EAM is much less sensitive to reduced resolution than the dynamic Smagorinsky model. Skin friction coefficients, mean flow profiles, and Reynolds stresses are better predicted by the EAM for a given resolution. Even the notorious overprediction of the streamwise fluctuation intensity typically seen in poorly resolved LES is significantly reduced when EAM is used on coarse grids. The improved prediction is due to the capability of the EAM to capture the SGS anisotropy, which becomes significant close to the wall.

  13. SU-E-T-230: Creating a Large Number of Focused Beams with Variable Patient Head Tilt to Improve Dose Fall-Off for Brain Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, J; Ma, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a treatment delivery and planning strategy by increasing the number of beams to minimize dose to brain tissue surrounding a target, while maximizing dose coverage to the target. Methods: We analyzed 14 different treatment plans via Leksell PFX and 4C. For standardization, single tumor cases were chosen. Original treatment plans were compared with two optimized plans. The number of beams was increased in treatment plans by varying tilt angles of the patient head, while maintaining original isocenter and the beam positions in the x-, y- and z-axes, collimator size, and beam blocking. PFX optimized plans increased beam numbers with three pre-set tilt angles, 70, 90, 110, and 4C optimized plans increased beam numbers with tilt angles increasing arbitrarily from range of 30 to 150 degrees. Optimized treatment plans were compared dosimetrically with original treatment plans. Results: Comparing total normal tissue isodose volumes between original and optimized plans, the low-level percentage isodose volumes decreased in all plans. Despite the addition of multiple beams up to a factor of 25, beam-on times for 1 tilt angle versus 3 or more tilt angles were comparable (<1 min.). In 64% (9/14) of the studied cases, the volume percentage decrease by >5%, with the highest value reaching 19%. The addition of more tilt angles correlates to a greater decrease in normal brain irradiated volume. Selectivity and coverage for original and optimized plans remained comparable. Conclusion: Adding large number of additional focused beams with variable patient head tilt shows improvement for dose fall-off for brain radiosurgery. The study demonstrates technical feasibility of adding beams to decrease target volume.

  14. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  15. Rapid identification of high particle number emitting on-road vehicles and its application to a large fleet of diesel buses.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, E R; Morawska, L; Ristovski, Z D; He, C

    2007-07-15

    Pollutant concentrations measured in the exhaust plume of a vehicle may be related to the pollutant emission factor using the CO2 concentration as a measure of the dilution factor. We have used this method for the rapid identification of high particle number (PN) emitting on-road vehicles. The method was validated for PN using a medium-duty vehicle and successfully applied to measurements of PN emissions from a large fleet of on-road diesel buses. The ratio of PN concentration to CO2 concentration, Z, in the exhaust plume was estimated for individual buses. On the average, a bus emitted about 1.5 x 10(9) particles per mg of CO2 emitted. A histogram of the number of buses as a function of Z showed, for the first time, that the PN emissions from diesel buses followed a gamma distribution, with most of the values within a narrow range and a few buses exhibiting relatively large values. It was estimated that roughly 10% and 50% of the PN emissions came from just 2% and 25% of the buses, respectively. A regression analysis showed that there was a positive correlation between Z and age of buses, with the slope of the best line being significantly different from zero. The mean Z value for the pre-Euro buses was significantly greater than each of the values for the Euro I and II buses.

  16. Use of Two-Body Correlated Basis Functions with van der Waals Interaction to Study the Shape-Independent Approximation for a Large Number of Trapped Interacting Bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekala, M. L.; Chakrabarti, B.; Das, T. K.; Rampho, G. J.; Sofianos, S. A.; Adam, R. M.; Haldar, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    We study the ground-state and the low-lying excitations of a trapped Bose gas in an isotropic harmonic potential for very small (˜ 3) to very large (˜ 10^7 ) particle numbers. We use the two-body correlated basis functions and the shape-dependent van der Waals interaction in our many-body calculations. We present an exhaustive study of the effect of inter-atomic correlations and the accuracy of the mean-field equations considering a wide range of particle numbers. We calculate the ground-state energy and the one-body density for different values of the van der Waals parameter C6 . We compare our results with those of the modified Gross-Pitaevskii results, the correlated Hartree hypernetted-chain equations (which also utilize the two-body correlated basis functions), as well as of the diffusion Monte Carlo for hard sphere interactions. We observe the effect of the attractive tail of the van der Waals potential in the calculations of the one-body density over the truly repulsive zero-range potential as used in the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and discuss the finite-size effects. We also present the low-lying collective excitations which are well described by a hydrodynamic model in the large particle limit.

  17. Numerical studies of the effects of neutrally buoyant large particles on turbulent channel flow at the friction Reynolds number up to 395

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhaosheng; Wang, Yu; Shao, Xueming

    2012-11-01

    A direct-forcing fictitious domain method was employed to perform fully-resolved numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow laden with large neutrally buoyant particles at constant pressure gradients. The effects of the particles on the turbulence (including the fluid-phase average velocity, the root-mean-square (rms) of the velocity fluctuation, the probability density function of the velocity and the vortex structures) at the friction Reynolds number of 180 and 395 were investigated. The results show that the drag-reduction effect caused by the spherical particle at low particle volumes is very small. The presence of particles decreases the maximum rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation near wall via weakening the large-scale streamwise vortices, and on the other hand increases the rms of transverse and spanwise fluctuating velocities in vicinity of the wall via inducing smaller-scale vortices. The effects of the particles on the fluid velocity PDF (probability density function) normalized with the rms velocity are small, irrespective of the particle size, particle volume fraction and Reynolds number. The work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11072217 and 11132008), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University.

  18. Characterization of high-copy-number retrotransposons from the large genomes of the louisiana iris species and their use as molecular markers.

    PubMed Central

    Kentner, Edward K; Arnold, Michael L; Wessler, Susan R

    2003-01-01

    The Louisiana iris species Iris brevicaulis and I. fulva are morphologically and karyotypically distinct yet frequently hybridize in nature. A group of high-copy-number TY3/gypsy-like retrotransposons was characterized from these species and used to develop molecular markers that take advantage of the abundance and distribution of these elements in the large iris genome. The copy number of these IRRE elements (for iris retroelement), is approximately 1 x 10(5), accounting for approximately 6-10% of the approximately 10,000-Mb haploid Louisiana iris genome. IRRE elements are transcriptionally active in I. brevicaulis and I. fulva and their F(1) and backcross hybrids. The LTRs of the elements are more variable than the coding domains and can be used to define several distinct IRRE subfamilies. Transposon display or S-SAP markers specific to two of these subfamilies have been developed and are highly polymorphic among wild-collected individuals of each species. As IRRE elements are present in each of 11 iris species tested, the marker system has the potential to provide valuable comparative data on the dynamics of retrotransposition in large plant genomes. PMID:12807789

  19. Evaluation of list-mode ordered subset expectation maximization image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state compton gamma camera with large number of channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-04-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For Compton camera, especially with a large number of readout channels, image reconstruction presents a big challenge. In this work, results are presented for the List-Mode Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (LM-OSEM) image reconstruction algorithm on simulated data with the VIP Compton camera design. For the simulation, all realistic contributions to the spatial resolution are taken into account, including the Doppler broadening effect. The results show that even with a straightforward implementation of LM-OSEM, good images can be obtained for the proposed Compton camera design. Results are shown for various phantoms, including extended sources and with a distance between the field of view and the first detector plane equal to 100 mm which corresponds to a realistic nuclear medicine environment.

  20. Mean convergence theorems and weak laws of large numbers for weighted sums of random variables under a condition of weighted integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez Cabrera, Manuel; Volodin, Andrei I.

    2005-05-01

    From the classical notion of uniform integrability of a sequence of random variables, a new concept of integrability (called h-integrability) is introduced for an array of random variables, concerning an array of constantsE We prove that this concept is weaker than other previous related notions of integrability, such as Cesàro uniform integrability [Chandra, Sankhya Ser. A 51 (1989) 309-317], uniform integrability concerning the weights [Ordóñez Cabrera, Collect. Math. 45 (1994) 121-132] and Cesàro [alpha]-integrability [Chandra and Goswami, J. Theoret. ProbabE 16 (2003) 655-669]. Under this condition of integrability and appropriate conditions on the array of weights, mean convergence theorems and weak laws of large numbers for weighted sums of an array of random variables are obtained when the random variables are subject to some special kinds of dependence: (a) rowwise pairwise negative dependence, (b) rowwise pairwise non-positive correlation, (c) when the sequence of random variables in every row is [phi]-mixing. Finally, we consider the general weak law of large numbers in the sense of Gut [Statist. Probab. Lett. 14 (1992) 49-52] under this new condition of integrability for a Banach space setting.

  1. Small beetle, large-scale drivers: how regional and landscape factors affect outbreaks of the European spruce bark beetle.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Rupert; Müller, Jörg; Hothorn, Torsten; Bässler, Claus; Heurich, Marco; Kautz, Markus

    2015-10-14

    1. Unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks have been observed for a variety of forest ecosystems recently, and damage is expected to further intensify as a consequence of climate change. In Central Europe, the response of ecosystem management to increasing infestation risk has hitherto focused largely on the stand level, while the contingency of outbreak dynamics on large-scale drivers remains poorly understood. 2. To investigate how factors beyond the local scale contribute to the infestation risk from Ips typographus (Col., Scol.), we analysed drivers across seven orders of magnitude in scale (from 10(3) to 10(10) m(2)) over a 23-year period, focusing on the Bavarian Forest National Park. Time-discrete hazard modelling was used to account for local factors and temporal dependencies. Subsequently, beta regression was applied to determine the influence of regional and landscape factors, the latter characterized by means of graph theory. 3. We found that in addition to stand variables, large-scale drivers also strongly influenced bark beetle infestation risk. Outbreak waves were closely related to landscape-scale connectedness of both host and beetle populations as well as to regional bark beetle infestation levels. Furthermore, regional summer drought was identified as an important trigger for infestation pulses. Large-scale synchrony and connectivity are thus key drivers of the recently observed bark beetle outbreak in the area. 4.Synthesis and applications. Our multiscale analysis provides evidence that the risk for biotic disturbances is highly dependent on drivers beyond the control of traditional stand-scale management. This finding highlights the importance of fostering the ability to cope with and recover from disturbance. It furthermore suggests that a stronger consideration of landscape and regional processes is needed to address changing disturbance regimes in ecosystem management.

  2. Small beetle, large-scale drivers: how regional and landscape factors affect outbreaks of the European spruce bark beetle

    PubMed Central

    Seidl, Rupert; Müller, Jörg; Hothorn, Torsten; Bässler, Claus; Heurich, Marco; Kautz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1. Unprecedented bark beetle outbreaks have been observed for a variety of forest ecosystems recently, and damage is expected to further intensify as a consequence of climate change. In Central Europe, the response of ecosystem management to increasing infestation risk has hitherto focused largely on the stand level, while the contingency of outbreak dynamics on large-scale drivers remains poorly understood. 2. To investigate how factors beyond the local scale contribute to the infestation risk from Ips typographus (Col., Scol.), we analysed drivers across seven orders of magnitude in scale (from 103 to 1010 m2) over a 23-year period, focusing on the Bavarian Forest National Park. Time-discrete hazard modelling was used to account for local factors and temporal dependencies. Subsequently, beta regression was applied to determine the influence of regional and landscape factors, the latter characterized by means of graph theory. 3. We found that in addition to stand variables, large-scale drivers also strongly influenced bark beetle infestation risk. Outbreak waves were closely related to landscape-scale connectedness of both host and beetle populations as well as to regional bark beetle infestation levels. Furthermore, regional summer drought was identified as an important trigger for infestation pulses. Large-scale synchrony and connectivity are thus key drivers of the recently observed bark beetle outbreak in the area. 4. Synthesis and applications. Our multiscale analysis provides evidence that the risk for biotic disturbances is highly dependent on drivers beyond the control of traditional stand-scale management. This finding highlights the importance of fostering the ability to cope with and recover from disturbance. It furthermore suggests that a stronger consideration of landscape and regional processes is needed to address changing disturbance regimes in ecosystem management. PMID:27041769

  3. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  4. Copy number gain at 12q12-14 may be important in the transformation from follicular lymphoma to diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hough, R E; Goepel, J R; Alcock, H E; Hancock, B W; Lorigan, P C; Hammond, D W

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify novel areas of genomic copy number change associated with transformation from follicular lymphoma (FL) to diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBL). DNA was extracted from tumour cells micro-dissected from paraffin- embedded tissue sections in 24 patients with FL and subsequent transformation to DLBL and 18 patients with de novo DLBL. Tumour DNA was compared to reference DNA using comparative genomic hybridization. Abnormalities common to all 3 groups were gains on chromosomes 4q, 5q, 7q, 11q and X and losses on 3p, 8p and 10q. Copy number changes seen in both transformed and de novo DLBL and not seen in FL were gains on 2p and losses on 1q, 15q and Xq. Gains on 2q, 6p, 7p and 17q and losses on 5p and 8q were specific to transformed DLBL cases. Gain on 12q12-14 was found in 52% of the transformed DLBL cases and was never seen in its follicular counterpart. Patterns of genomic copy number change associated with specific clinical events in NHL have been demonstrated and suggest that gains on 2q, 6p, 7p, 12q and 17q and losses on 5p and 8q may be important in the transformation from low to high-grade disease. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11207045

  5. Ion-kinetic simulations of D-3He gas-filled inertial confinement fusion target implosions with moderate to large Knudsen number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroche, O.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Atzeni, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Séguin, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments designed to investigate the transition to non-collisional behavior in D3He-gas inertial confinement fusion target implosions display increasingly large discrepancies with respect to simulations by standard hydrodynamics codes as the expected ion mean-free-paths λc increase with respect to the target radius R (i.e., when the Knudsen number NK=λc/R grows). To take properly into account large NK's, multi-ion-species Vlasov-Fokker-Planck computations of the inner gas in the capsules have been performed, for two different values of NK, one moderate and one large. The results, including nuclear yield, reactivity-weighted ion temperatures, nuclear emissivities, and surface brightness, have been compared with the experimental data and with the results of hydrodynamical simulations, some of which include an ad hoc modeling of kinetic effects. The experimental results are quite accurately rendered by the kinetic calculations in the smaller-NK case, much better than by the hydrodynamical calculations. The kinetic effects at play in this case are thus correctly understood. However, in the higher-NK case, the agreement is much worse. The remaining discrepancies are shown to arise from kinetic phenomena (e.g., inter-species diffusion) occurring at the gas-pusher interface, which should be investigated in the future work.

  6. Ion-kinetic simulations of D-3He gas-filled inertial confinement fusion target implosions with moderate to large Knudsen number

    DOE PAGES

    Larroche, O.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; ...

    2016-01-06

    Experiments designed to investigate the transition to non-collisional behavior in D3He-gas inertial confinement fusion target implosions display increasingly large discrepancies with respect to simulations by standard hydrodynamics codes as the expected ion mean-free-paths λc increase with respect to the target radius R (i.e., when the Knudsen number NK = λc/R grows). To take properly into account large NK's, multi-ion-species Vlasov-Fokker-Planck computations of the inner gas in the capsules have been performed, for two different values of NK, one moderate and one large. The results, including nuclear yield, reactivity-weighted ion temperatures, nuclear emissivities, and surface brightness, have been compared with themore » experimental data and with the results of hydrodynamical simulations, some of which include an ad hocmodeling of kinetic effects. The experimental results are quite accurately rendered by the kinetic calculations in the smaller-NK case, much better than by the hydrodynamical calculations. The kinetic effects at play in this case are thus correctly understood. However, in the higher-NK case, the agreement is much worse. Furthermore, the remaining discrepancies are shown to arise from kinetic phenomena (e.g., inter-species diffusion) occurring at the gas-pusher interface, which should be investigated in the future work.« less

  7. Ion-kinetic simulations of D-3He gas-filled inertial confinement fusion target implosions with moderate to large Knudsen number

    SciTech Connect

    Larroche, O.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Atzeni, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Seguin, F. H.

    2016-01-06

    Experiments designed to investigate the transition to non-collisional behavior in D3He-gas inertial confinement fusion target implosions display increasingly large discrepancies with respect to simulations by standard hydrodynamics codes as the expected ion mean-free-paths λc increase with respect to the target radius R (i.e., when the Knudsen number NK = λc/R grows). To take properly into account large NK's, multi-ion-species Vlasov-Fokker-Planck computations of the inner gas in the capsules have been performed, for two different values of NK, one moderate and one large. The results, including nuclear yield, reactivity-weighted ion temperatures, nuclear emissivities, and surface brightness, have been compared with the experimental data and with the results of hydrodynamical simulations, some of which include an ad hocmodeling of kinetic effects. The experimental results are quite accurately rendered by the kinetic calculations in the smaller-NK case, much better than by the hydrodynamical calculations. The kinetic effects at play in this case are thus correctly understood. However, in the higher-NK case, the agreement is much worse. Furthermore, the remaining discrepancies are shown to arise from kinetic phenomena (e.g., inter-species diffusion) occurring at the gas-pusher interface, which should be investigated in the future work.

  8. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  9. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  10. Numbers in Action.

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL.

  11. A study of the effectiveness of machine learning methods for classification of clinical interview fragments into a large number of categories.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Kotov, Alexander; Idalski Carcone, April; Dong, Ming; Naar, Sylvie; Brogan Hartlieb, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of state-of-the-art supervised machine learning methods in conjunction with different feature types for the task of automatic annotation of fragments of clinical text based on codebooks with a large number of categories. We used a collection of motivational interview transcripts consisting of 11,353 utterances, which were manually annotated by two human coders as the gold standard, and experimented with state-of-art classifiers, including Naïve Bayes, J48 Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), AdaBoost, DiscLDA, Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) in conjunction with lexical, contextual (label of the previous utterance) and semantic (distribution of words in the utterance across the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count dictionaries) features. We found out that, when the number of classes is large, the performance of CNN and CRF is inferior to SVM. When only lexical features were used, interview transcripts were automatically annotated by SVM with the highest classification accuracy among all classifiers of 70.8%, 61% and 53.7% based on the codebooks consisting of 17, 20 and 41 codes, respectively. Using contextual and semantic features, as well as their combination, in addition to lexical ones, improved the accuracy of SVM for annotation of utterances in motivational interview transcripts with a codebook consisting of 17 classes to 71.5%, 74.2%, and 75.1%, respectively. Our results demonstrate the potential of using machine learning methods in conjunction with lexical, semantic and contextual features for automatic annotation of clinical interview transcripts with near-human accuracy.

  12. A rapid and robust sequence-based genotyping method for BoLA-DRB3 alleles in large numbers of heterozygous cattle.

    PubMed

    Baxter, R; Hastings, N; Law, A; Glass, E J

    2008-10-01

    The BoLA-DRB3 gene is a highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex class II gene of cattle with over one hundred alleles reported. Most of the polymorphisms are located in exon 2, which encodes the peptide-binding cleft, and these sequence differences play a role in variability of immune responsiveness and disease resistance. However, the high degree of polymorphism in exon 2 leads to difficulty in accurately genotyping cattle, especially heterozygous animals. In this study, we have improved and simplified an earlier sequence-based typing method to easily and reliably genotype cattle for BoLA-DRB3. In contrast to the earlier method, which used a nested primer set to amplify exon 2 followed by sequencing with internal primers, the new method uses only internal primers for both amplification and sequencing, which results in high-quality sequence across the entire exon. The haplofinder software, which assigns alleles from the heterozygous sequence, now has a pre-processing step that uses a consensus of all known alleles and checks for errors in base calling, thus improving the ability to process large numbers of samples. In addition, advances in sequencing technology have reduced the requirement for manual editing and improved the clarity of heterozygous base calls, resulting in longer and clearer sequence reads. Taken together, this has resulted in a rapid and robust method for genotyping large numbers of heterozygous samples for BoLA-DRB3 polymorphisms. Over 400 Holstein-Charolais cattle have now been genotyped for BoLA-DRB3 using this approach.

  13. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility: results from a large-scale collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Permuth, Jennifer B.; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene; Chen, Y. Ann; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Chen, Zhihua; Group, AOCS Study; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Lambrechts, Diether; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Niewenhuyse, Els Van; Vergote, Ignace; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle; Goodman, Marc T.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P.; Ness, Roberta B.; Kelley, Joseph; Heitz, Florian; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham; Hildebrandt, Michelle; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H.; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A.; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Winham, Stacey J.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bjorge, Line; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon; Pejovic, Tanja; Moffitt, Melissa; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E.; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hanna; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Iain; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Phelan, Catherine M.; Risch, Harvey; Narod, Steven; McLaughlin, John; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Cheng, Jin Q.; Goode, Ellen L.; Sellers, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for European ancestry. We conducted gene-level analyses using the Admixture Maximum Likelihood (AML) test and the Sequence-Kernel Association test for common and rare variants (SKAT-CR). Association analysis revealed top risk-associated SNP rs77027562 (OR (95% CI)= 1.39 (1.17-1.64), P=1.0×10−4) in ADAR3 and rs185455523 in SND1 (OR (95% CI)= 0.68 (0.56-0.83), P=2.0×10−4). When restricting to serous histology (n=6,500), the magnitude of association strengthened for rs185455523 (OR=0.60, P=1.0×10−4). Gene-level analyses revealed that variation in ADAR was associated (P<0.05) with EOC susceptibility, with PAML=0.022 and PSKAT-CR=0.020. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in EOC tissue revealed significant associations (P<0.05) with ADAR expression for several SNPs in ADAR, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3′ untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing. PMID:27911851

  14. Inherited variants affecting RNA editing may contribute to ovarian cancer susceptibility: results from a large-scale collaboration.

    PubMed

    Permuth, Jennifer B; Reid, Brett; Earp, Madalene; Chen, Y Ann; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chen, Zhihua; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Van Niewenhuyse, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten; Odunsi, Kunle; Goodman, Marc T; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Wilkens, Lynne R; Thompson, Pamela J; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa; Leminen, Arto; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; Kelley, Joseph; Heitz, Florian; Karlan, Beth; Lester, Jenny; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham; Hildebrandt, Michelle; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Poole, Elizabeth M; Bandera, Elisa V; Fridley, Brooke; Cunningham, Julie; Winham, Stacey J; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Bjorge, Line; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon; Pejovic, Tanja; Moffitt, Melissa; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hanna; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Pharoah, Paul D P; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana; McNeish, Iain; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey; Narod, Steven; McLaughlin, John; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Cheng, Jin Q; Goode, Ellen L; Sellers, Thomas A

    2016-11-08

    RNA editing in mammals is a form of post-transcriptional modification in which adenosine is converted to inosine by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) family of enzymes. Based on evidence of altered ADAR expression in epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC), we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ADAR genes modify EOC susceptibility, potentially by altering ovarian tissue gene expression. Using directly genotyped and imputed data from 10,891 invasive EOC cases and 21,693 controls, we evaluated the associations of 5,303 SNPs in ADAD1, ADAR, ADAR2, ADAR3, and SND1. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), with adjustment for European ancestry. We conducted gene-level analyses using the Admixture Maximum Likelihood (AML) test and the Sequence-Kernel Association test for common and rare variants (SKAT-CR). Association analysis revealed top risk-associated SNP rs77027562 (OR (95% CI)= 1.39 (1.17-1.64), P=1.0x10-4) in ADAR3 and rs185455523 in SND1 (OR (95% CI)= 0.68 (0.56-0.83), P=2.0x10-4). When restricting to serous histology (n=6,500), the magnitude of association strengthened for rs185455523 (OR=0.60, P=1.0x10-4). Gene-level analyses revealed that variation in ADAR was associated (P<0.05) with EOC susceptibility, with PAML=0.022 and PSKAT-CR=0.020. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in EOC tissue revealed significant associations (P<0.05) with ADAR expression for several SNPs in ADAR, including rs1127313 (G/A), a SNP in the 3' untranslated region. In summary, germline variation involving RNA editing genes may influence EOC susceptibility, warranting further investigation of inherited and acquired alterations affecting RNA editing.

  15. An experimental study of the flow pattern and heat transport behavior in horizontal convection with large Rayleigh number and small aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Huang, Shi-Di

    2014-11-01

    Horizontal convection is a simple conceptual model to understand the role of buoyancy in the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). Here we report an experimental study of the flow pattern and heat transport behavior in horizontal convection with Rayleigh number Ra up to 2 ×1012 and aspect ratio of 0.1 using a long apparatus. Flow visualization studies reveal that it is not necessary for the returning flow to penetrate the strong stratification in the thermal BLs, suggesting that much less energy may be required to maintain a global circulation than is generally believed. Moreover, both the heat transport efficiency and thermal BL thicknesses are found to follow a 0.3 power law, which indicates a stronger heat transport in horizontal convection with large Ra number than is suggested in the literature. These findings on horizontal convection may be relevant to the driving mechanism of the MOC. This work is supported by the Hong Kong Research Grants Council under Grant No. CUHK403811.

  16. Proteomic analysis of salinity-stressed Chlamydomonas reinhardtii revealed differential suppression and induction of a large number of important housekeeping proteins.

    PubMed

    Yokthongwattana, Chotika; Mahong, Bancha; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Phaonaklop, Narumon; Narangajavana, Jarunya; Yokthongwattana, Kittisak

    2012-03-01

    Salinity stress is one of the most common abiotic stresses that hamper plant productivity worldwide. Successful plant adaptations to salt stress require substantial changes in cellular protein expression. In this work, we present a 2-DE-based proteomic analysis of a model unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, subjected to 300 mM NaCl for 2 h. Results showed that, in addition to the protein spots that showed partial up- or down-regulation patterns, a number of proteins were exclusively present in the proteome of the control cells, but were absent from the salinity-stressed samples. Conversely, a large number of proteins exclusively appeared in the proteome of the salinity-stressed samples. Of those exclusive proteins, we could successfully identify, via LC-MS/MS, 18 spots uniquely present in the control cells and 99 spots specific to NaCl-treated cells. Interestingly, among the salt-exclusive protein spots, we identified several important housekeeping proteins like molecular chaperones and proteins of the translation machinery, suggesting that they may originate from post-translational modifications rather than from de novo biosynthesis. The possible role and the salt-specific modification of these proteins by salinity stress are discussed.

  17. HerMES: a search for high-redshift dusty galaxies in the HerMES Large Mode Survey - catalogue, number counts and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asboth, V.; Conley, A.; Sayers, J.; Béthermin, M.; Chapman, S. C.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Dannerbauer, H.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maloney, P. R.; Marques-Chaves, R.; Martinez-Navajas, P. I.; Oliver, S. J.; Pérez-Fournon, I.; Riechers, D. A.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Scott, Douglas; Siegel, S. R.; Vieira, J. D.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.; Wheeler, J.

    2016-10-01

    Selecting sources with rising flux densities towards longer wavelengths from Herschel/Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) maps is an efficient way to produce a catalogue rich in high-redshift (z > 4) dusty star-forming galaxies. The effectiveness of this approach has already been confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up observations, but the previously available catalogues made this way are limited by small survey areas. Here we apply a map-based search method to 274 deg2 of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) Large Mode Survey and create a catalogue of 477 objects with SPIRE flux densities S500 > S350 > S250 and a 5σ cut-off S500 > 52 mJy. From this catalogue we determine that the total number of these `red' sources is at least an order of magnitude higher than predicted by galaxy evolution models. These results are in agreement with previous findings in smaller HerMES fields; however, due to our significantly larger sample size we are also able to investigate the shape of the red source counts for the first time. We have obtained spectroscopic redshift measurements for two of our sources using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. The redshifts z = 5.1 and 3.8 confirm that with our selection method we can indeed find high-redshift dusty star-forming galaxies.

  18. Numerical studies on the dynamics of two-layer Rayleigh-Bénard convection with an infinite Prandtl number and large viscosity contrasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2016-11-01

    The fundamental physics and dynamics relating to two-layer convection with an infinite Prandtl number and large viscosity contrasts have not yet been quantitatively resolved by previous numerical analyses or simulations and laboratory experiments. Here, a series of high-resolution numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection with a highly viscous outer layer (HVL) and a low-viscosity inner layer (LVL) in 2-D spherical-shell geometry were performed to investigate the dynamics of convection between the two layers with large viscosity contrasts of up to 103. To achieve a two-layer thermal convection system considering a thermally and mechanically continuous interface between the two layers without any specified boundary conditions, an "effective thermal expansion coefficient" was introduced to the buoyancy term of the momentum equation, discretized in a finite-volume-based regular grid system. In this study, the heat transport efficiency of two-layer convection was evaluated, and the coupling modes between the two layers were directly analyzed using the temperature anomaly and deviatoric stress fields near the interface. Results show that the mechanical coupling mode is dominant in two-layer convection when the absolute viscosity contrast between the two layers is sufficiently small, and it weakens, becoming closer to the thermal coupling mode, as the LVL viscosity decreases. This transition from the mechanical coupling to the thermal coupling modes is quantitatively detected even when the viscosity contrast between the two layers is 10-3, and results in the stabilizing of the convection speed and the heat transport efficiency of the HVL. Applying the mantle-outer core coupling of the present Earth with an extremely large absolute viscosity contrast, our numerical results imply that thermal convection in the mantle may control the heat transport efficiency of a layered whole solid-earth system and the convective style in the outer core.

  19. Melanocytes Affect Nodal Expression and Signaling in Melanoma Cells: A Lesson from Pediatric Large Congenital Melanocytic Nevi.

    PubMed

    Margaryan, Naira V; Gilgur, Alina; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Purnell, Chad; Arva, Nicoleta C; Gosain, Arun K; Hendrix, Mary J C; Strizzi, Luigi

    2016-03-22

    Expression of Nodal, a Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) related growth factor, is associated with aggressive melanoma. Nodal expression in adult dysplastic nevi may predict the development of aggressive melanoma in some patients. A subset of pediatric patients diagnosed with giant or large congenital melanocytic nevi (LCMN) has shown increased risk for development of melanoma. Here, we investigate whether Nodal expression can help identify the rare cases of LCMN that develop melanoma and shed light on why the majority of these patients do not. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining results show varying degree of Nodal expression in pediatric dysplastic nevi and LCMN. Moreover, median scores from Nodal IHC expression analysis were not significantly different between these two groups. Additionally, none of the LCMN patients in this study developed melanoma, regardless of Nodal IHC levels. Co-culture experiments revealed reduced tumor growth and lower levels of Nodal and its signaling molecules P-SMAD2 and P-ERK1/2 when melanoma cells were grown in vivo or in vitro with normal melanocytes. The same was observed in melanoma cells cultured with melanocyte conditioned media containing pigmented melanocyte derived melanosomes (MDM). Since MDM contain molecules capable of inactivating radical oxygen species, to investigate potential anti-oxidant effect of MDM on Nodal expression and signaling in melanoma, melanoma cells were treated with either N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), a component of the anti-oxidant glutathione or synthetic melanin, which in addition to providing pigmentation can also exert free radical scavenging activity. Melanoma cells treated with NAC or synthetic melanin showed reduced levels of Nodal, P-SMAD2 and P-ERK1/2 compared to untreated melanoma cells. Thus, the potential role for Nodal in melanoma development in LCMN is less evident than in adult dysplastic nevi possibly due to melanocyte cross-talk in LCMN capable of offsetting or delaying the pro

  20. No evidence of a threshold in traffic volume affecting road-kill mortality at a large spatio-temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grilo, Clara; Ferreira, Flavio Zanchetta; Revilla, Eloy

    2015-11-15

    Previous studies have found that the relationship between wildlife road mortality and traffic volume follows a threshold effect on low traffic volume roads. We aimed at evaluating the response of several species to increasing traffic intensity on highways over a large geographic area and temporal period. We used data of four terrestrial vertebrate species with different biological and ecological features known by their high road-kill rates: the barn owl (Tyto alba), hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Additionally, we checked whether road-kill likelihood varies when traffic patterns depart from the average. We used annual average daily traffic (AADT) and road-kill records observed along 1000 km of highways in Portugal over seven consecutive years (2003–2009). We fitted candidate models using Generalized Linear Models with a binomial distribution through a sample unit of 1 km segments to describe the effect of traffic on the probability of finding at least one victim in each segment during the study. We also assigned for each road-kill record the traffic of that day and the AADT on that year to test for differences using Paired Student's t-test. Mortality risk declined significantly with traffic volume but varied among species: the probability of finding road-killed red foxes and rabbits occurs up to moderate traffic volumes (< 20,000 AADT) whereas barn owls and hedgehogs occurred up to higher traffic volumes (40,000 AADT). Perception of risk may explain differences in responses towards high traffic highway segments. Road-kill rates did not vary significantly when traffic intensity departed from the average. In summary, we did not find evidence of traffic thresholds for the analysed species and traffic intensities. We suggest mitigation measures to reduce mortality be applied in particular on low traffic roads (< 5000 AADT) while additional measures to reduce barrier effects should take into account

  1. Changes in the number and timing of days of ice-affected flow on northern New England rivers, 1930-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, G.A.; Dudley, R.W.; Huntington, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    Historical dates of ice-affected flows for 16 rural, unregulated rivers in northern New England, USA were analyzed. The total annual days of ice-affected flow decreased significantly (p < 0.1) over the 20th century at 12 of the 16 rivers. On average, for the nine longest-record rivers, the total annual days of ice-affected flow decreased by 20 days from 1936 to 2000, with most of the decrease occurring from the 1960s to 2000. Four of the 16 rivers had significantly later first dates of ice-affected flow in the fall. Twelve of the 16 rivers had significantly earlier last dates of ice-affected flow in the spring. On average, the last dates became earlier by 11 days from 1936 to 2000 with most of the change occurring from the 1960s to 2000. The total annual days of ice-affected flow were significantly correlated with November through April air temperatures (r = -0.70) and with November through April precipitation (r = -0.52). The last spring dates were significantly correlated with March through April air temperatures (r = -0.73) and with January through April precipitation (r = -0.37). March mean river flows increased significantly at 13 of the 16 rivers in this study. ?? Springer 2005.

  2. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  3. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies with Relatively Old Stellar Populations at Z approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at zeta approximately 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 less than z less than 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H(Beta) (lambda 4861 Angstroms), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (lambda 4304 Angstroms), Mg I (lambda 5175 Angstroms), and Na i (lambda 5894 Angstroms). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approximately 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3(+0.1/-0.3) Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6(+0.5/-0.4) Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9(+0.2/-0.1) Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and Hß emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L(sub OIII) = 1.7 +/- 0.3 × 10(exp 40 erg s-1, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  4. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  5. PII Overexpression in Lotus japonicus Affects Nodule Activity in Permissive Low-Nitrogen Conditions and Increases Nodule Numbers in High Nitrogen Treated Plants.

    PubMed

    D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Valkov, Vladimir Totev; Parlati, Aurora; Omrane, Selim; Barbulova, Ani; Sainz, Maria Martha; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Rogato, Alessandra; Chiurazzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    We report here the first characterization of a GLNB1 gene coding for the PII protein in leguminous plants. The main purpose of this work was the investigation of the possible roles played by this multifunctional protein in nodulation pathways. The Lotus japonicus LjGLB1 gene shows a significant transcriptional regulation during the light-dark cycle and different nitrogen availability, conditions that strongly affect nodule formation, development, and functioning. We also report analysis of the spatial profile of expression of LjGLB1 in root and nodule tissues and of the protein's subcellular localization. Transgenic L. japonicus lines overexpressing the PII protein were obtained and tested for the analysis of the symbiotic responses in different conditions. The uncoupling of PII from its native regulation affects nitrogenase activity and nodule polyamine content. Furthermore, our results suggest the involvement of PII in the signaling of the nitrogen nutritional status affecting the legumes' predisposition for nodule formation.

  6. Studies of a Large Odd‐Numbered Odd‐Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8Mn

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J.; Barker, Claire; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U.; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Möller, Johannes S.; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L.; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna‐Piggott, Philip L. W.; Vitorica‐Yrezabal, Iñigo J.; Timco, Grigore A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The spin dynamics of Cr8Mn, a nine‐membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8Mn is a rare example of a large odd‐membered AF ring, and has an odd‐number of 3d‐electrons present. Odd‐membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated‐spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground‐spin‐state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin‐pair correlations and scalar‐spin chirality, shows a non‐collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non‐planar states of opposite chiralities. PMID:26748964

  7. Correlation between the structural and cathodoluminescence properties in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with large number of quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Degang Jiang, Desheng; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Liu, Zongshun; Le, Lingcong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui; Jahn, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics on 30-period InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) solar cell structures are investigated, revealing the relationship between optical and structural properties of the MQW structures with a large number of quantum wells. In the bottom MQW layers, a blueshift of CL peak along the growth direction is found and attributed to the decrease of indium content due to the compositional pulling effect. An obvious split of emission peak and a redshift of the main emission energy are found in the top MQW layers when the MQW grows above the critical layer thickness. They are attributed to the segregation of In-rich InGaN clusters rather than the increase of indium content in quantum well layer. The MQW structure is identified to consist of two regions: a strained one in the bottom, where the indium content is gradually decreased, and a partly relaxed one in the top with segregated In-rich InGaN clusters.

  8. Studies of a Large Odd-Numbered Odd-Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8 Mn.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael L; Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J; Barker, Claire; Blundell, Stephen J; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J L; Möller, Johannes S; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna-Piggott, Philip L W; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J; Timco, Grigore A; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-01-26

    The spin dynamics of Cr8 Mn, a nine-membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8 Mn is a rare example of a large odd-membered AF ring, and has an odd-number of 3d-electrons present. Odd-membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated-spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8 Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground-spin-state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8 Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin-pair correlations and scalar-spin chirality, shows a non-collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non-planar states of opposite chiralities.

  9. Improved estimation of the noncentrality parameter distribution from a large number of t-statistics, with applications to false discovery rate estimation in microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Long; Nettleton, Dan; Dekkers, Jack C M

    2012-12-01

    Given a large number of t-statistics, we consider the problem of approximating the distribution of noncentrality parameters (NCPs) by a continuous density. This problem is closely related to the control of false discovery rates (FDR) in massive hypothesis testing applications, e.g., microarray gene expression analysis. Our methodology is similar to, but improves upon, the existing approach by Ruppert, Nettleton, and Hwang (2007, Biometrics, 63, 483-495). We provide parametric, nonparametric, and semiparametric estimators for the distribution of NCPs, as well as estimates of the FDR and local FDR. In the parametric situation, we assume that the NCPs follow a distribution that leads to an analytically available marginal distribution for the test statistics. In the nonparametric situation, we use convex combinations of basis density functions to estimate the density of the NCPs. A sequential quadratic programming procedure is developed to maximize the penalized likelihood. The smoothing parameter is selected with the approximate network information criterion. A semiparametric estimator is also developed to combine both parametric and nonparametric fits. Simulations show that, under a variety of situations, our density estimates are closer to the underlying truth and our FDR estimates are improved compared with alternative methods. Data-based simulations and the analyses of two microarray datasets are used to evaluate the performance in realistic situations.

  10. Large number of putative chemoreception and pheromone biosynthesis genes revealed by analyzing transcriptome from ovipositor-pheromone glands of Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi-Han; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Hou, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fei; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-01-20

    The chemoreception role of moth ovipositor has long been suggested, but its molecular mechanism is mostly unknown. By transcriptomic analysis of the female ovipositor-pheromone glands (OV-PG) of Chilo suppressalis, we obtained 31 putative chemoreception genes (9 OBPs, 10 CSPs, 2 ORs, 1 SNMP, 8 CXEs and 1 AOX), in addition to 32 genes related to sex pheromone biosynthesis (1 FAS, 6 Dess, 10 FARs, 2 ACOs, 1 ACC, 4 FATPs, 3 ACBPs and 5 ELOs). Tissue expression profiles further revealed that CsupCSP2 and CsupCSP10 were OV-PG biased, while most chemoreception genes were highly and preferably expressed in antennae. This suggests that OV-PG employs mostly the same chemoreception proteins as in antennae, although the physiological roles of these proteins might be different in OV-PG. Of the 32 pheromone biosynthesis related genes, CsupDes4, CsupDes5 and CsupFAR2 are strongly OV-PG biased, and clustered with functionally validated genes from other moths, strongly indicating their involvement in specific step of the pheromone biosynthesis. Our study for the first time identified a large number of putative chemoreception genes, and provided an important basis for exploring the chemoreception mechanisms of OV-PG in C. suppressalis, as well as other moth species.

  11. Collapsin response mediator protein 4 affects the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the sexually dimorphic nucleus in female mice.

    PubMed

    Iwakura, Takashi; Sakoh, Miyuki; Tsutiya, Atsuhiro; Yamashita, Naoya; Ohtani, Akiko; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; Tsukahara, Shinji; Nishihara, Masugi; Shiga, Takashi; Goshima, Yoshio; Kato, Tomohiro; Ohtani-Kaneko, Ritsuko

    2013-07-01

    In the sexually dimorphic anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of the hypothalamus, females have a greater number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) and kisspeptin-immunoreactive (kisspeptin-ir) neurons than males. In this study, we used proteomics analysis and gene-deficient mice to identify proteins that regulate the number of TH-ir and kisspeptin-ir neurons in the AVPV. Analysis of protein expressions in the rat AVPV on postnatal day 1 (PD1; the early phase of sex differentiation) using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-MS identified collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4) as a protein exhibiting sexually dimorphic expression. Interestingly, this sexually differential expressions of CRMP4 protein and mRNA in the AVPV was not detected on PD6. Prenatal testosterone exposure canceled the sexual difference in the expression of Crmp4 mRNA in the rat AVPV. Next, we used CRMP4-knockout (CRMP4-KO) mice to determine the in vivo function of CRMP4 in the AVPV. Crmp4 knockout did not change the number of kisspeptin-ir neurons in the adult AVPV in either sex. However, the number of TH-ir neurons was increased in the AVPV of adult female CRMP4-KO mice as compared with the adult female wild-type mice. During development, no significant difference in the number of TH-ir neurons was detected between sexes or genotypes on embryonic day 15, but a female-specific increase in TH-ir neurons was observed in CRMP4-KO mice on PD1, when the sex difference was not yet apparent in wild-type mice. These results indicate that CRMP4 regulates the number of TH-ir cell number in the female AVPV.

  12. Influences of a Socially Interactive Robot on the Affective Behavior of Young Children with Disabilities. Social Robots Research Reports, Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Prior, Jeremy; Hamby, Deborah W.; Trivette, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from two studies of 11 young children with autism, Down syndrome, or attention deficit disorders investigating the effects of Popchilla, a socially interactive robot, on the children's affective behavior are reported. The children were observed under two conditions, child-toy interactions and child-robot interactions, and ratings of child…

  13. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle, and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Michael F.; Anderson, Olof L.

    1989-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similiar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full-span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The primary objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality data base for the assessment of rotor passage heat transfer computational procedures. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. Heat transfer data were obtained using thermocouple and liquid-crystal techniques to measure temperature distributions on the thin, electrically-heated skin of the rotor passage model. Test data were obtained for various combinations of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and model surface roughness. The data are reported in the form of contour maps of Stanton number. These heat distribution maps revealed numerous local effects produced by the three-dimensional flows within the rotor passage. Of particular importance were regions of local enhancement produced on the airfoil suction surface by the main-passage and tip-leakage vortices and on the hub endwall by the leading-edge horseshoe vortex system. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis to the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating the a gas turbine passage. These cases include a 90 deg turning duct, a gas turbine cascade simulating a stator passage, and a gas turbine rotor passage including Coriolis forces. The calculated results were evaluated using experimental data of the three-dimensional velocity fields, wall static pressures, and wall heat transfer on the suction surface of the turbine airfoil and on the end wall. Particular attention was paid to an

  14. scaling theory of floods for predictions in a changing climate: a model to generate ensembles of runoff from a large number of hillslopes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, P.; Gupta, V. K.; Troutman, B. M.

    2013-12-01

    the model, we develop a method for representing ensembles of runoff in a large number of hillslopes within an unnested subbasin in GCEW. Our model preserves water balance in a mean statistical sense and supports our hypothesis. Self-similarity in river networks is not expected to change over decadal to centennial time scales at which climate change is viewed. Therefore, applicability of the theory does not depend on assumptions regarding climatic stationarity or non-stationarity.

  15. Analysis of the latitudinal variability of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic using the large number of aircraft and ozonesonde observations in early summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancellet, Gerard; Daskalakis, Nikos; Raut, Jean Christophe; Tarasick, David; Hair, Jonathan; Quennehen, Boris; Ravetta, François; Schlager, Hans; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Johnson, Bryan; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Katharine S.

    2016-10-01

    During the 2008 International Polar Year, the POLARCAT (Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements, and Models of Climate Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport) campaign, conducted in summer over Greenland and Canada, produced a large number of measurements from three aircraft and seven ozonesonde stations. Here we present an observation-integrated analysis based on three different types of O3 measurements: airborne lidar, airborne UV absorption or chemiluminescence measurement, and intensified electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesonde profiles. Discussion of the latitudinal and vertical variability of tropospheric ozone north of 55° N during this period is performed with the aid of a regional model (WFR-Chem). The model is able to reproduce the O3 latitudinal and vertical variability but with a negative O3 bias of 6-15 ppbv in the free troposphere above 4 km, especially over Canada. For Canada, large average CO concentrations in the free troposphere above 4 km ( > 130 ppbv) and the weak correlation (< 30 %) of O3 and PV suggest that stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) is not the major contributor to average tropospheric ozone at latitudes less than 70° N, due to the fact that local biomass burning (BB) emissions were significant during the 2008 summer period. Conversely, significant STE is found over Greenland according to the better O3 vs. PV correlation ( > 40 %) and the higher values of the 75th PV percentile. It is related to the persistence of cyclonic activity during the summer over Baffin Bay. Using differences between average concentration above Northern and Southern Canada, a weak negative latitudinal summer ozone gradient of -6 to -8 ppbv is found in the mid-troposphere between 4 and 8 km. This is attributed to an efficient O3 photochemical production from BB emissions at latitudes less than 65° N, while the STE contribution is more homogeneous in the latitude range 55-70° N. A positive ozone latitudinal gradient of

  16. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine.

  17. Children Affected by AIDS in Brazil: Estimates of the Number of Children at Risk of Being Orphaned and Displaced by AIDS in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Miguel B.; Hillis, Janette; Wasek, Glenn K.

    1998-01-01

    Estimated the number of Brazilian children under 14 whose mothers are HIV-positive, living with AIDS, or dead due to AIDS. Found that of the 210,150 children, 17,600 were HIV-positive Findings underscore the urgent need for new programs to increase the longevity of persons with AIDS and to decrease the likelihood of child displacement and severe…

  18. A Survey of Pre-Health Advisors and Black Students in South Carolina. Factors Affecting the Decreasing Number of South Carolina Applicants to the Dental Profession. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamrick, Fitzbugh N.; Brown, Wilma Sykes

    This study investigated factors responsible for the consistently low numbers of black students applying to the College of Dental Medicine of South Carolina. The project was structured to obtain feedback from two entities at the undergraduate level: the pre-health advisors (Phase I); and black students (Phase II). Thirty-four responses were…

  19. 70 Years of Sunspot Observations at the Kanzelhöhe Observatory: Systematic Study of Parameters Affecting the Derivation of the Relative Sunspot Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzi, Werner; Veronig, Astrid M.; Temmer, Manuela; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Freislich, Heinrich; Strutzmann, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    The Kanzelhöhe Observatory (KSO) was founded during World War II by the Deutsche Luftwaffe (German Airforce) as one station of a network of observatories that were set up to provide information on solar activity in order to better assess the actual conditions of the Earth's ionosphere in terms of radio-wave propagation. Solar observations began in 1943 with photographs of the photosphere and drawings of sunspots, plage regions, and faculae, as well as patrol observations of the solar corona. At the beginning, all data were sent to Freiburg (Germany). After WW II, international cooperation was established and the data were sent to Zurich, Paris, Moscow, and Greenwich. Relative sunspot numbers have been derived since 1944. The agreement between relative sunspot numbers derived at KSO and the new International Sunspot Number (ISN) (SILSO World Data Center in International Sunspot Number Monthly Bulletin and online catalogue, 1945 - 2015) lies within {≈} 10 %. However, revisiting the historical data, we also find periods with larger deviations. The reasons for the deviations were twofold: On the one hand, a major instrumental change took place during which the instrument was relocated and modified. On the other hand, a period of frequent replacements of personnel caused significant deviations; this clearly shows the importance of experienced observers. In the long term, the instrumental improvements led to better image quality. Additionally, we find a long-term trend towards better seeing conditions that began in 2000.

  20. An Examination of Psychotropic Medication Side Effects: Does Taking a Greater Number of Psychotropic Medications from Different Classes Affect Presentation of Side Effects in adults with ID?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahan, Sara; Holloway, Jodie; Bamburg, Jay W.; Hess, Julie A.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the number of psychotropic medications an individual is taking across classes influences side effects among adults with Intellectual Disability (ID). Participants were 80 adults diagnosed with ID. Dependent variables were the composite score and domain scores of the "Matson Evaluation of Drug Side-Effects" ("MEDS"),…

  1. The design for off-axis multimirror optical system with large field and small F number using coaxial assembly of two mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Yan, Shi-qiang; Pei, Yun-tian; Hu, Lei; Xu, Song

    2012-09-01

    The reflection optical system gets more and more attention nowadays owing to without chromatic aberration and small volume. The manufacturing and assembly/calibration technology for the coaxial reflection optical system is more mature relative to the other reflection optical systems. But the coaxial reflection optical system will obstruct the incidence ray especially when the field is large, which will reduce the energy entering the optical system and reduce the resolution. The off-axis Three-Mirror Optical Systems can conquer those disadvantages of the coaxial reflection optical system, however the manufacturing and assembly/calibration for the off-axis Optical Systems is very difficult which must use computer-aided technology. The manufacturing and assembly/calibration technology is the main bottleneck for the off-axis Optical Systems to the engineering application. The Author of this thesis researched the design theory of the Three-Mirror Optical System, and then schemed out off-axis Three-Mirror and Multi-Mirror Optical System smartly using coaxial two-mirror optical structure which conquers the disadvantage of small field and possesses of the all advantages of the coaxial reflection optical system. This new optical system has two mirrors, one of which is a parabolic mirror with high-order aspheric term and the other is a hyperboloid mirror with high-order aspheric term. The characteristics of this new optical system are as follows: the F Number is 1.25, the field of view is 2°×2° and the total length is only 115mm with coaxial assembly of the two mirrors.

  2. Identification of Rare Recurrent Copy Number Variants in High-Risk Autism Families and Their Prevalence in a Large ASD Population

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, G. Bryce; Kim, Cecilia; Frackelton, Edward; Thomas, Kelly; da Silva, Renata Pellegrino; Stevens, Jeff; Baird, Lisa; Otterud, Brith; Ho, Karen; Varvil, Tena; Leppert, Tami; Lambert, Christophe G.; Leppert, Mark; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation is thought to play a major etiological role in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and numerous studies documenting the relevance of copy number variants (CNVs) in ASD have been published since 2006. To determine if large ASD families harbor high-impact CNVs that may have broader impact in the general ASD population, we used the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0 to identify 153 putative autism-specific CNVs present in 55 individuals with ASD from 9 multiplex ASD pedigrees. To evaluate the actual prevalence of these CNVs as well as 185 CNVs reportedly associated with ASD from published studies many of which are insufficiently powered, we designed a custom Illumina array and used it to interrogate these CNVs in 3,000 ASD cases and 6,000 controls. Additional single nucleotide variants (SNVs) on the array identified 25 CNVs that we did not detect in our family studies at the standard SNP array resolution. After molecular validation, our results demonstrated that 15 CNVs identified in high-risk ASD families also were found in two or more ASD cases with odds ratios greater than 2.0, strengthening their support as ASD risk variants. In addition, of the 25 CNVs identified using SNV probes on our custom array, 9 also had odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting that these CNVs also are ASD risk variants. Eighteen of the validated CNVs have not been reported previously in individuals with ASD and three have only been observed once. Finally, we confirmed the association of 31 of 185 published ASD-associated CNVs in our dataset with odds ratios greater than 2.0, suggesting they may be of clinical relevance in the evaluation of children with ASDs. Taken together, these data provide strong support for the existence and application of high-impact CNVs in the clinical genetic evaluation of children with ASD. PMID:23341896

  3. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis Reveals Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Associated with Clinical Outcome in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; Marconato, Laura; Comazzi, Stefano; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL) is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs) by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30%) were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%). In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL. PMID:25372838

  4. Does the number of cancer patients' close social ties affect cancer-related information seeking through communication efficacy? Testing a mediation model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Nehama; Martinez, Lourdes S

    2014-09-01

    This study addresses whether having a broad social network of close friends equips cancer patients with increased efficacy to engage in communication about their cancer, which then leads to an increased likelihood of patients actively seeking cancer-related information. Guided by the theory of motivated information management, the study also tests whether the effect of the number of close social ties on information seeking is mediated, in part, by communication efficacy. Results are based on data collected from a randomly drawn sample from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry of 2,013 cancer patients who completed mail surveys in the Fall of 2006. Results are consistent with a cross-sectional mediation effect in which the number of close social ties in one's social network is positively associated with communication efficacy (b = .17, p = .001), which, in turn, is positively associated with cancer-related information seeking (b = .13, p < .001).

  5. Could test length or order affect scores on letter number sequencing of the WAIS-III and WMS-III? Ruling out effects of fatigue.

    PubMed

    Tulsky, D S; Zhu, J

    2000-11-01

    The Letter Number Sequencing subtest of the WAIS-III and WMS-III was administered at the end of the standardization edition of the WMS-III. It was not administered as part of the WAIS-III standardization battery. Nevertheless, the subtest was included in the published version of the WAIS-III. This study examines differences between examinees administered the Letter Number Sequencing subtest at three different times during a psychological battery: (1) as part of the published battery, (2) as part of the WMS-III when the WMS-III was administered as the first test in a sequence, and (3) as part of the WMS-III standardization when the WAIS-III was administered immediately preceding the WMS-III. The participants were 372 examinees ( n = 124 in each condition) who were matched on key demographic variables. A repeated measures MANOVA yielded no difference in subtest scores when administered in any of these conditions. The results show no evidence of fatigue or ordering effects on the Letter Number Sequencing subtest.

  6. The novel GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 improves glucose homeostasis and increases β-cell mass without affecting islet number in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Dalbøge, Louise S; Almholt, Dorthe L C; Neerup, Trine S R; Vrang, Niels; Jelsing, Jacob; Fosgerau, Keld

    2014-08-01

    Antidiabetic treatments aiming to preserve or even to increase β-cell mass are currently gaining increased interest. Here we investigated the effect of chronic treatment with the novel glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 (HGEGTFTSDLSKQMEEEAVRLFIEWLKN-8Ado-8Ado-YGWLDF-NH2) on glycemic control, β-cell mass and proliferation, and islet number. Male db/db mice were treated with ZP3022, liraglutide, or vehicle for 2, 4, or 8 weeks, with terminal assessment of hemoglobin A1c, basal blood glucose, and plasma insulin concentrations. Pancreata were removed for immunohistochemical staining and stereological quantification of β-cell mass, islet numbers, proliferation, and apoptosis. Treatment with ZP3022 or liraglutide led to a significant improvement in glycemic control. ZP3022 treatment resulted in a sustained increase in β-cell mass after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment, whereas the effect of liraglutide was transient. The expansion in β-cell mass observed in the ZP3022-treated mice appeared to be driven by increased β-cell proliferation in existing islets rather than by formation of new islets, as mean islet mass increased but the number of islets remained constant. Our data demonstrate that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist ZP3022 causes a sustained improvement in glycemic control accompanied by an increase in β-cell mass, increased proliferation, and increased mean islet mass. The results highlight that the GLP-1-gastrin dual agonist increases β-cell mass more than liraglutide and that dual agonists could potentially be developed into a new class of antidiabetic treatments.

  7. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali

  8. Sequence and Copy Number Analyses of HEXB Gene in Patients Affected by Sandhoff Disease: Functional Characterization of 9 Novel Sequence Variants

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Stefania; Cattarossi, Silvia; Oller Ramirez, Ana Maria; Rosano, Camillo; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Passon, Nadia; Moroni, Isabella; Uziel, Graziella; Pettinari, Antonella; Stanzial, Franco; de Kremer, Raquel Dodelson; Azar, Nydia Beatriz; Hazan, Filiz; Filocamo, Mirella; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a lysosomal disorder caused by mutations in the HEXB gene. To date, 43 mutations of HEXB have been described, including 3 large deletions. Here, we have characterized 14 unrelated SD patients and developed a Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay to investigate the presence of large HEXB deletions. Overall, we identified 16 alleles, 9 of which were novel, including 4 sequence variation leading to aminoacid changes [c.626C>T (p.T209I), c.634C>A (p.H212N), c.926G>T (p.C309F), c.1451G>A (p.G484E)] 3 intronic mutations (c.1082+5G>A, c.1242+1G>A, c.1169+5G>A), 1 nonsense mutation c.146C>A (p.S49X) and 1 small in-frame deletion c.1260_1265delAGTTGA (p.V421_E422del). Using the new MLPA assay, 2 previously described deletions were identified. In vitro expression studies showed that proteins bearing aminoacid changes p.T209I and p.G484E presented a very low or absent activity, while proteins bearing the p.H212N and p.C309F changes retained a significant residual activity. The detrimental effect of the 3 novel intronic mutations on the HEXB mRNA processing was demonstrated using a minigene assay. Unprecedentedly, minigene studies revealed the presence of a novel alternative spliced HEXB mRNA variant also present in normal cells. In conclusion, we provided new insights into the molecular basis of SD and validated an MLPA assay for detecting large HEXB deletions. PMID:22848519

  9. Two novel pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting organelle number and protein synthesis. Is the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene an etiologic hot spot?

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, C T; Ciacci, F; Bonilla, E; Jansen, C; Hirano, M; Rao, N; Lovelace, R E; Rowland, L P; Schon, E A; DiMauro, S

    1993-01-01

    We identified two patients with pathogenic single nucleotide changes in two different mitochondrial tRNA genes: the first mutation in the tRNA(Asn) gene, and the ninth known mutation in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. The mutation in tRNA(Asn) was associated with isolated ophthalmoplegia, whereas the mutation in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) caused a neurological syndrome resembling MERRF (myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers) plus optic neuropathy, retinopathy, and diabetes. Both mutations were heteroplasmic, with higher percentages of mutant mtDNA in affected tissues, and undetectable levels in maternal relatives. Analysis of single muscle fibers indicated that morphological and biochemical alterations appeared only when the proportions of mutant mtDNA exceeded 90% of the total cellular mtDNA pool. The high incidence of mutations in the tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene suggests that this region is an "etiologic hot spot" in mitochondrial disease. Images PMID:8254046

  10. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion.

  11. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  12. Film Excerpts Shown to Specifically Elicit Various Affects Lead to Overlapping Activation Foci in a Large Set of Symmetrical Brain Regions in Males

    PubMed Central

    Karama, Sherif; Armony, Jorge; Beauregard, Mario

    2011-01-01

    While the limbic system theory continues to be part of common scientific parlance, its validity has been questioned on multiple grounds. Nonetheless, the issue of whether or not there exists a set of brain areas preferentially dedicated to emotional processing remains central within affective neuroscience. Recently, a widespread neural reference space for emotion which includes limbic as well as other regions was characterized in a large meta-analysis. As methodologically heterogeneous studies go into such meta-analyses, showing in an individual study in which all parameters are kept constant, the involvement of overlapping areas for various emotion conditions in keeping with the neural reference space for emotion, would serve as valuable confirmatory evidence. Here, using fMRI, 20 young adult men were scanned while viewing validated neutral and effective emotion-eliciting short film excerpts shown to quickly and specifically elicit disgust, amusement, or sexual arousal. Each emotion-specific run included, in random order, multiple neutral and emotion condition blocks. A stringent conjunction analysis revealed a large overlap across emotion conditions that fit remarkably well with the neural reference space for emotion. This overlap included symmetrical bilateral activation of the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the temporo-occipital junction, the basal ganglia, the brainstem, the amygdala, the hippocampus, the thalamus, the subthalamic nucleus, the posterior hypothalamus, the cerebellum, as well as the frontal operculum extending towards the anterior insula. This study clearly confirms for the visual modality, that processing emotional stimuli leads to widespread increases in activation that cluster within relatively confined areas, regardless of valence. PMID:21818311

  13. Planning Alternative Organizational Frameworks For a Large Scale Educational Telecommunications System Served by Fixed/Broadcast Satellites. Memorandum Number 73/3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkmeyer, John

    Considerations relating to the design of organizational structures for development and control of large scale educational telecommunications systems using satellites are explored. The first part of the document deals with four issues of system-wide concern. The first is user accessibility to the system, including proximity to entry points, ability…

  14. Does acute maternal stress in pregnancy affect infant health outcomes? Examination of a large cohort of infants born after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001

    PubMed Central

    Endara, Skye M; Ryan, Margaret AK; Sevick, Carter J; Conlin, Ava Marie S; Macera, Caroline A; Smith, Tyler C

    2009-01-01

    Background Infants in utero during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 may have been negatively affected by maternal stress. Studies to date have produced contradictory results. Methods Data for this retrospective cohort study were obtained from the Department of Defense Birth and Infant Health Registry and included up to 164,743 infants born to active-duty military families. Infants were considered exposed if they were in utero on September 11, 2001, while the referent group included infants gestating in the same period in the preceding and following year (2000 and 2002). We investigated the association of this acute stress during pregnancy with the infant health outcomes of male:female sex ratio, birth defects, preterm birth, and growth deficiencies in utero and in infancy. Results No difference in sex ratio was observed between infants in utero in the first trimester of pregnancy on September 11, 2001 and infants in the referent population. Examination of the relationship between first-trimester exposure and birth defects also revealed no significant associations. In adjusted multivariable models, neither preterm birth nor growth deficiencies were significantly associated with the maternal exposure to the stress of September 11 during pregnancy. Conclusion The findings from this large population-based study suggest that women who were pregnant during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 had no increased risk of adverse infant health outcomes. PMID:19619310

  15. TGF-β regulates LARG and GEF-H1 during EMT to affect stiffening response to force and cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Lukas D; Li, George Z; How, Tam; O'Brien, E Tim; Blobe, Gerard C; Superfine, Richard; Mythreye, Karthikeyan

    2014-11-05

    Recent studies implicate a role for cell mechanics in cancer progression. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulates the detachment of cancer cells from the epithelium and facilitates their invasion into stromal tissue. Although classic EMT hallmarks include loss of cell-cell adhesions, morphology changes, and increased invasion capacity, little is known about the associated mechanical changes. Previously, force application on integrins has been shown to initiate cytoskeletal rearrangements that result in increased cell stiffness and a stiffening response. Here we demonstrate that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-induced EMT results in decreased stiffness and loss of the normal stiffening response to force applied on integrins. We find that suppression of the RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) LARG and GEF-H1 through TGF-β/ALK5-enhanced proteasomal degradation mediates these changes in cell mechanics and affects EMT-associated invasion. Taken together, our results reveal a functional connection between attenuated stiffness and stiffening response and the increased invasion capacity acquired after TGF-β-induced EMT.

  16. Load Frequency Control by use of a Number of Both Heat Pump Water Heaters and Electric Vehicles in Power System with a Large Integration of Renewable Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Shimizu, Koichiro; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    In Japan, from the viewpoints of global warming countermeasures and energy security, it is expected to establish a smart grid as a power system into which a large amount of generation from renewable energy sources such as wind power generation and photovoltaic generation can be installed. Measures for the power system stability and reliability are necessary because a large integration of these renewable energy sources causes some problems in power systems, e.g. frequency fluctuation and distribution voltage rise, and Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) is one of effective solutions to these problems. Due to a high cost of the BESS, our research group has studied an application of controllable loads such as Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH) and Electric Vehicle (EV) to the power system control for reduction of the required capacity of BESS. This paper proposes a new coordinated Load Frequency Control (LFC) method for the conventional power plants, the BESS, the HPWHs, and the EVs. The performance of the proposed LFC method is evaluated by the numerical simulations conducted on a power system model with a large integration of wind power generation and photovoltaic generation.

  17. Numbers and distribution of immune cells in the tunica mucosa of the small and large intestine of full-thickness biopsies from healthy pet cats.

    PubMed

    Marsilio, S; Kleinschmidt, S; Harder, J; Nolte, I; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    2011-02-01

    In this study, CD3(+) T lymphocytes and IgA(+) , IgG(+) and IgM(+) plasma cells were quantified in the tunica mucosa of the intestinal tract of 12 pet cats without gastrointestinal diseases. The study included full-thickness biopsies of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. The distribution and quantification of CD3(+) T cells, IgA(+) , IgG(+) and IgM(+) plasma cells within the intestinal tunica mucosa was performed by using immunohistochemical methods and computer-aided morphometry. CD3(+) T cells were significantly prominent in the villi and their numbers increased from duodenum to ileum but decreased towards the colon. The predominant type of plasma cells was IgA(+) cells, followed by IgM(+) cells. The number of IgG(+) cells was generally low compared to the other plasma cell types investigated. The results of the vertical distribution showed that IgA(+) and IgM(+) plasma cells were most numerous in the lower crypt areas, whilst IgG(+) plasma cells accumulated in the upper crypt region with a decline towards the villi and the lower crypt areas of control cats. All types of plasma cells showed a general decline from the duodenum towards the caudal sections of the intestinal tract regarding the horizontal distribution of plasma cells. This study provides a comprehensive overview on the vertical and horizontal distribution and the number of CD3(+) T cells and IgA(+) , IgG(+) and IgM(+) plasma cells in the intestinal tunica mucosa of pet cats.

  18. Experimental investigation of free-convection heat transfer in vertical tube at large Grashof numbers / E. R. G. Eckert, A. J. Diaguila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1952-01-01

    Local free-convection heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in the turbulent flow range were obtained within a vertical, stationary tube closed at the boom, heated along its walls, and having a length-to-diameter ratio of 5. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were correlated by the general relations for free-convection heat transfer. These coefficients, converted to dimensionless Nusselt numbers were 35 percent below known relations for vertical flat plates. Air temperature measurements within the tube indicated a thin boundary layer along the heated wall surface and unstable conditions in the air flow.

  19. Design and analysis of an efficient recursive linking algorithm for constructing likelihood based genetic maps for a large number of markers.

    PubMed

    Tewari, S; Bhandarkar, S M; Arnold, J

    2007-04-01

    A multi-locus likelihood of a genetic map is computed based on a mathematical model of chromatid exchange in meiosis that accounts for any type of bivalent configuration in a genetic interval in any specified order of genetic markers. The computational problem is to calculate the likelihood (L) and maximize L by choosing an ordering of genetic markers on the map and the recombination distances between markers. This maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) could be found either with a straightforward algorithm or with the proposed recursive linking algorithm that implements the likelihood computation process involving an iterative procedure is called Expectation Maximization (EM). The time complexity of the straightforward algorithm is exponential without bound in the number of genetic markers, and implementation of the model with a straightforward algorithm for more than seven genetic markers is not feasible, thus motivating the critical importance of the proposed recursive linking algorithm. The recursive linking algorithm decomposes the pool of genetic markers into segments and renders the model implementable for hundreds of genetic markers. The recursive algorithm is shown to reduce the order of time complexity from exponential to linear in the number of markers. The improvement in time complexity is shown theoretically by a worst-case analysis of the algorithm and supported by run time results using data on linkage group-II of the fungal genome Neurospora crassa.

  20. Laminar-to-turbulence and relaminarization zones detection by simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent blood flow in large stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Reza; Ghalichi, Farzan; Hossainpour, Siamak; Ghasemzadeh, Kamran

    2016-08-12

    Laminar, turbulent, transitional, or combine areas of all three types of viscous flow can occur downstream of a stenosis depending upon the Reynolds number and constriction shape parameter. Neither laminar flow solver nor turbulent models for instance the k-ω (k-omega), k-ε (k-epsilon), RANS or LES are opportune for this type of flow. In the present study attention has been focused vigorously on the effect of the constriction in the flow field with a unique way. It means that the laminar solver was employed from entry up to the beginning of the turbulent shear flow. The turbulent model (k-ω SST Transitional Flows) was utilized from starting of turbulence to relaminarization zone while the laminar model was applied again with onset of the relaminarization district. Stenotic flows, with 50 and 75% cross-sectional area, were simulated at Reynolds numbers range from 500 to 2000 employing FLUENT (v6.3.17). The flow was considered to be steady, axisymmetric, and incompressible. Achieving results were reported as axial velocity, disturbance velocity, wall shear stress and the outcomes were compared with previously experimental and CFD computations. The analogy of axial velocity profiles shows that they are in acceptable compliance with the empirical data. As well as disturbance velocity and wall shear stresses anticipated by this new approach, part by part simulation, are reasonably valid with the acceptable experimental studies.

  1. Solar and geomagnetic effects on the frequency of atmospheric circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Radan; Cahynová, Monika; Kyselý, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The collection contains both objective and subjective classifications. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases of any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal vanish once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the F10.7 flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  2. Grasping numbers.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Giovanna; di Pellegrino, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Both theoretical and empirical studies suggest that numerical processing is intimately linked to representations of goal-directed hand actions. Further evidence for this possibility is provided here by the results of two experiments, both of which revealed a powerful influence of numerical magnitude on the selection of hand grasping movements. Human participants performed either power or precision grip responses based on the semantic properties (e.g., parity) of visual Arabic numerals, in Experiment 1, or depending on their surface characteristics (e.g., colour), in Experiment 2. In both the experiments, it was found that small numerical values facilitated precision grip (commonly used to grasp small objects), while large numerical value potentiated power grip (commonly used to grasp large objects). These findings reveal that perceiving numbers can automatically prime grasping gestures, in a similar manner to viewing physical objects. This result is coherent with the view that processing of symbolic (numerical) and physical quantitative information converges onto a shared magnitude system representing the coordinates of action.

  3. Common Clinical Conditions – Age, Low BMI, Ritonavir Use, Mild Renal Impairment - Affect Tenofovir Pharmacokinetics in a Large Cohort of HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    BAXI, Sanjiv M.; GREENBLATT, Ruth M.; BACCHETTI, Peter; SCHERZER, Rebecca; MINKOFF, Howard; HUANG, Yong; ANASTOS, Kathryn; COHEN, Mardge; GANGE, Stephen J.; YOUNG, Mary; SHLIPAK, Michael G.; GANDHI, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Objective Tenofovir is used commonly in HIV treatment and prevention settings, but factors that correlate with tenofovir exposure in real-world setting are unknown. Design Intensive pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of tenofovir in a large, diverse cohort of HIV-infected women over 24-hours at steady-state were performed and factors that influenced exposure (assessed by areas-under-the-time-concentration curves, AUCs) identified Methods HIV-infected women (n=101) on tenofovir-based therapy underwent intensive 24-hour PK sampling. Data on race/ethnicity, age, exogenous steroid use, menstrual cycle phase, concomitant medications, recreational drugs and/or tobacco, hepatic and renal function, weight and body mass index (BMI) were collected. Multivariable models using forward stepwise selection identified factors associated with effects on AUC. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) prior to starting tenofovir were estimated by the CKD-EPI equation using both creatinine and cystatin-C measures Results The median (range) of tenofovir AUCs was 3350 (1031–13,911) ng x h/mL. Higher AUCs were associated with concomitant ritonavir use (1.33-fold increase, p 0.002), increasing age (1.21-fold increase per decade, p=0.0007) and decreasing BMI (1.04-fold increase per 10% decrease in BMI). When GFR was calculated using cystatin-C measures, mild renal insufficiency prior to tenofovir initiation was associated with higher subsequent exposure (1.35-fold increase when pre-tenofovir GFR <70mL/min, p=0.0075). Conclusions Concomitant ritonavir use, increasing age, decreasing BMI and lower GFR prior to tenofovir initiation as estimated by cystatin C were all associated with elevated tenofovir exposure in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected women. Clinicians treating HIV-infected women should be aware of common clinical conditions that affect tenofovir exposure when prescribing this medication. PMID:24275255

  4. Satellite and ground detection of very dense smoke clouds produced on the islands of the Paraná river delta that affected a large region in Central Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipiña, A.; Salum, G. M.; Crinó, E.; Piacentini, R. D.

    2012-03-01

    Intense fires were produced on the Paraná river delta islands, Argentina, during most part of 2008, by a combination of an exceptionally dry period and the farmers' use of a fire land-cleaning technique. In April 2008, those fires significantly affected the nearby regions and their inhabitants, from Rosario city to Buenos Aires mega-city. In this work we present satellite as well as ground Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 550 nm data obtained during the propagation of pollution clouds to the central zone of Argentina. The highest value (1.18) was registered at Buenos Aires by atmospheric remote sensing, using the satellite instrument MODIS/Terra on April 18th 2008 at 10:35 local time (= UT - 3 h). On the same day, ground air quality detectors also measured in this city the highest Total Suspended Particle (TSP) value of the month, 2.02 mg/m3. The AOD(550) daily variation at Rosario Astronomical Observatory, which is located near the Paraná riverside, was derived by combining solar ultraviolet erythemal irradiance data (measured with a YES biometre) with model calculations. On April 25th 2008, from 12:00 to 15:30 local time, a rather high and constant AOD(550) value was registered, with a mean value of (0.90 ± 0.21). Cities located on the side of the Rosario-Buenos Aires highway (San Nicolás, Baradero and San Pedro) were also affected, showing a mean AOD(550) between the Rosario and Buenos Aires values. The particulate matter was collected with gridded samplers placed on the Paraná river islands as well as at the Rosario Observatory. They were analysed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and mainly showed a biological origin. Even if normally large particles travel small distances from the source, organic aerosol in the range of 40-100 μm and complex asymmetric structures were registered several kilometres away from the aerosol sources on the islands. Another event of intense UV index attenuation (98.6%) occurred on September 18th 2008, due to very dense

  5. Generation of large numbers of highly purified dendritic cells from bone marrow progenitor cells after co-culture with syngeneic murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Tahereh; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Safavi, Farinaz; Lauretti, Elisabetta; Khedmati, Mohammad-Esmaeil; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are called the sentinels of the human immune system because of their function as antigen presenting cells (APCs) that elicit a protective immune response. Given that DCs have been used for many years as target cells in a great number of experiments, it became essential to devise a new method for producing DCs in higher quantities and of greater purity. Here we report a novel technique for obtaining more dendritic cells, and with higher purity, from in-vitro co-culture of bone marrow (BM) cells with splenocytes. From a total of 20 × 10(6) BM cells and 120 × 10(6)splenocytes, 3 × 10(6) BM cells along with 20 × 10(6)splenocytes were co-cultured in petri dishes for DC generation; 120 × 10(6) splenocytes from one C57BL/6 mouse were also co-cultured in petri dishes for DC generation. BM cells were the control group cultured in the same conditions except for the presence of splenocytes. Purity and maturation state of DCs were checked by lineage surface markers (CD11c, CD11b, CD8α, and F4/80) and the expression levels of MHCII as well as co-stimulatory molecules (CD86, CD80, and CD40). Endocytosis and thymidine uptake capacity were also used to test the functionality of DCs. The levels of IL-12p70, IL-23, and IL-10 were also checked in the supernatant of cultured cells by ELISA. The number of DCs derived from co-culture of BM and splenocytes (DCs(TME)) was at least twice that of BM-derived DCs in the absence of splenocytes. In addition, the purity of DCs after co-culture of BM and splenocytes was greater than that of DCs in the control culture (90.2% and 77.2%, respectively; p<0.05). While functional assays showed no differences between co-culture and control groups, IL-10 levels were significantly lower in DCs(TME) compared to BM-derived DCs in the absence of splenocytes (193 pg/ml and 630 pg/ml, respectively; p<0.05). The results of the present study show that the generation of DCs from BM progenitors is accelerated in the presence of

  6. Implementation of genomic recursions in single-step genomic best linear unbiased predictor for US Holsteins with a large number of genotyped animals.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Y; Misztal, I; Tsuruta, S; Legarra, A; Aguilar, I; Lourenco, D A L; Fragomeni, B O; Lawlor, T J

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate an efficient implementation in the computation of the inverse of genomic relationship matrix with the recursion algorithm, called the algorithm for proven and young (APY), in single-step genomic BLUP. We validated genomic predictions for young bulls with more than 500,000 genotyped animals in final score for US Holsteins. Phenotypic data included 11,626,576 final scores on 7,093,380 US Holstein cows, and genotypes were available for 569,404 animals. Daughter deviations for young bulls with no classified daughters in 2009, but at least 30 classified daughters in 2014 were computed using all the phenotypic data. Genomic predictions for the same bulls were calculated with single-step genomic BLUP using phenotypes up to 2009. We calculated the inverse of the genomic relationship matrix GAPY(-1) based on a direct inversion of genomic relationship matrix on a small subset of genotyped animals (core animals) and extended that information to noncore animals by recursion. We tested several sets of core animals including 9,406 bulls with at least 1 classified daughter, 9,406 bulls and 1,052 classified dams of bulls, 9,406 bulls and 7,422 classified cows, and random samples of 5,000 to 30,000 animals. Validation reliability was assessed by the coefficient of determination from regression of daughter deviation on genomic predictions for the predicted young bulls. The reliabilities were 0.39 with 5,000 randomly chosen core animals, 0.45 with the 9,406 bulls, and 7,422 cows as core animals, and 0.44 with the remaining sets. With phenotypes truncated in 2009 and the preconditioned conjugate gradient to solve mixed model equations, the number of rounds to convergence for core animals defined by bulls was 1,343; defined by bulls and cows, 2,066; and defined by 10,000 random animals, at most 1,629. With complete phenotype data, the number of rounds decreased to 858, 1,299, and at most 1,092, respectively. Setting up GAPY(-1

  7. A modification to linearized theory for prediction of pressure loadings on lifting surfaces at high supersonic Mach numbers and large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A new linearized-theory pressure-coefficient formulation was studied. The new formulation is intended to provide more accurate estimates of detailed pressure loadings for improved stability analysis and for analysis of critical structural design conditions. The approach is based on the use of oblique-shock and Prandtl-Meyer expansion relationships for accurate representation of the variation of pressures with surface slopes in two-dimensional flow and linearized-theory perturbation velocities for evaluation of local three-dimensional aerodynamic interference effects. The applicability and limitations of the modification to linearized theory are illustrated through comparisons with experimental pressure distributions for delta wings covering a Mach number range from 1.45 to 4.60 and angles of attack from 0 to 25 degrees.

  8. High Frequency Design Considerations for the Large Detector Number and Small Form Factor Dual Electron Spectrometer of the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kujawski, Joseph T.; Gliese, Ulrik B.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M. A.; White, D.; Chornay, D. J; Lobell, J. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Piepgrass, B.; Auletti, C.; Weidner, S.; Jacques, A. D.; Pollock, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Each half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission utilizes a microchannel plate Chevron stack feeding 16 separate detection channels each with a dedicated anode and amplifier/discriminator chip. The desire to detect events on a single channel with a temporal spacing of 100 ns and a fixed dead-time drove our decision to use an amplifier/discriminator with a very fast (GHz class) front end. Since the inherent frequency response of each pulse in the output of the DES microchannel plate system also has frequency components above a GHz, this produced a number of design constraints not normally expected in electronic systems operating at peak speeds of 10 MHz. Additional constraints are imposed by the geometry of the instrument requiring all 16 channels along with each anode and amplifier/discriminator to be packaged in a relatively small space. We developed an electrical model for board level interactions between the detector channels to allow us to design a board topology which gave us the best detection sensitivity and lowest channel to channel crosstalk. The amplifier/discriminator output was designed to prevent the outputs from one channel from producing triggers on the inputs of other channels. A number of Radio Frequency design techniques were then applied to prevent signals from other subsystems (e.g. the high voltage power supply, command and data handling board, and Ultraviolet stimulation for the MCP) from generating false events. These techniques enabled us to operate the board at its highest sensitivity when operated in isolation and at very high sensitivity when placed into the overall system.

  9. Genome Reduction Uncovers a Large Dispensable Genome and Adaptive Role for Copy Number Variation in Asexually Propagated Solanum tuberosum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hardigan, Michael A.; Crisovan, Emily; Hamilton, John P.; Laimbeer, Parker; Leisner, Courtney P.; Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Newton, Linsey; Pham, Gina M.; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Zeng, Zixian; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Clonally reproducing plants have the potential to bear a significantly greater mutational load than sexually reproducing species. To investigate this possibility, we examined the breadth of genome-wide structural variation in a panel of monoploid/doubled monoploid clones generated from native populations of diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum), a highly heterozygous asexually propagated plant. As rare instances of purely homozygous clones, they provided an ideal set for determining the degree of structural variation tolerated by this species and deriving its minimal gene complement. Extensive copy number variation (CNV) was uncovered, impacting 219.8 Mb (30.2%) of the potato genome with nearly 30% of genes subject to at least partial duplication or deletion, revealing the highly heterogeneous nature of the potato genome. Dispensable genes (>7000) were associated with limited transcription and/or a recent evolutionary history, with lower deletion frequency observed in genes conserved across angiosperms. Association of CNV with plant adaptation was highlighted by enrichment in gene clusters encoding functions for environmental stress response, with gene duplication playing a part in species-specific expansions of stress-related gene families. This study revealed unique impacts of CNV in a species with asexual reproductive habits and how CNV may drive adaption through evolution of key stress pathways. PMID:26772996

  10. Correlation between the VITEK2 system and cefoxitin disk diffusion for the daily detection of oxacillin resistance in a large number of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Bemer, P; Juvin, M E; Le Gargasson, G; Drugeon, H; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the new VITEK2 AST-P551 card with the cefoxitin disk diffusion method for the daily detection of methicillin resistance with a high number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. Detection of the PBP2a protein or mecA gene was performed for each discordant case. Seventy (3.3%) isolates out of 2,107 clinical strains showed discordant results, two very major errors, four major errors and 64 minor errors. Fifty-nine (84%) discordant results were resolved, with a final overall agreement of 99.5%. Eleven (0.5%) strains remained discordant (minor error [mE]). Four of 370 MRSA strains were misclassified as susceptible in daily practice by the cefoxitin disk diffusion method. All of these strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones. The VITEK2 system is highly reliable for methicillin resistance detection at the routine level. Oxacillin-susceptible classified clinical strains with associated resistance patterns required attention.

  11. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality database for the assessment of rotor heat transfer computational techniques. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis of the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating a gas turbine package. The results of this assessment indicate that the procedure has the potential to predict the aerodynamics and the heat transfer in a gas turbine passage and can be used to develop detailed three dimensional turbulence models for the prediction of skin friction and heat transfer in complex three dimensional flow passages.

  12. Construction and validation of an RNA trans-splicing molecule suitable to repair a large number of COL7A1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tockner, B; Kocher, T; Hainzl, S; Reichelt, J; Bauer, J W; Koller, U; Murauer, E M

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing has become a versatile tool in the gene therapy of monogenetic diseases. This technique is especially valuable for the correction of mutations in large genes such as COL7A1, which underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa. Over 800 mutations spanning the entire length of the COL7A1 gene have been associated with defects in type VII collagen, leading to excessive fragility of epithelial tissues, the hallmark of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). In the present study, we designed an RNA trans-splicing molecule (RTM) that is capable of repairing any given mutation within a 4200 nucleotide region spanning the 3′ half of COL7A1. The selected RTM, RTM28, was able to induce accurate trans-splicing into endogenous COL7A1 pre-mRNA transcripts in a type VII collagen-deficient DEB patient-derived cell line. Correct trans-splicing was detected at the RNA level by semiquantitative RT-PCR and correction of full-length type VII collagen was confirmed at the protein level by immunofluorescence and western blot analyses. Our results demonstrate that RTM28, which covers >60% of all mutations reported in DEB and is thus the longest RTM described so far for the repair of COL7A1, represents a promising candidate for therapeutic applications. PMID:27434145

  13. Prominent use of distal 5′ transcription start sites and discovery of a large number of additional exons in ENCODE regions

    PubMed Central

    Denoeud, France; Kapranov, Philipp; Ucla, Catherine; Frankish, Adam; Castelo, Robert; Drenkow, Jorg; Lagarde, Julien; Alioto, Tyler; Manzano, Caroline; Chrast, Jacqueline; Dike, Sujit; Wyss, Carine; Henrichsen, Charlotte N.; Holroyd, Nancy; Dickson, Mark C.; Taylor, Ruth; Hance, Zahra; Foissac, Sylvain; Myers, Richard M.; Rogers, Jane; Hubbard, Tim; Harrow, Jennifer; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Reymond, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    This report presents systematic empirical annotation of transcript products from 399 annotated protein-coding loci across the 1% of the human genome targeted by the Encyclopedia of DNA elements (ENCODE) pilot project using a combination of 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and high-density resolution tiling arrays. We identified previously unannotated and often tissue- or cell-line-specific transcribed fragments (RACEfrags), both 5′ distal to the annotated 5′ terminus and internal to the annotated gene bounds for the vast majority (81.5%) of the tested genes. Half of the distal RACEfrags span large segments of genomic sequences away from the main portion of the coding transcript and often overlap with the upstream-annotated gene(s). Notably, at least 20% of the resultant novel transcripts have changes in their open reading frames (ORFs), most of them fusing ORFs of adjacent transcripts. A significant fraction of distal RACEfrags show expression levels comparable to those of known exons of the same locus, suggesting that they are not part of very minority splice forms. These results have significant implications concerning (1) our current understanding of the architecture of protein-coding genes; (2) our views on locations of regulatory regions in the genome; and (3) the interpretation of sequence polymorphisms mapping to regions hitherto considered to be “noncoding,” ultimately relating to the identification of disease-related sequence alterations. PMID:17567994

  14. Suspect screening of large numbers of emerging contaminants in environmental waters using artificial neural networks for chromatographic retention time prediction and high resolution mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Hernández, Felix

    2015-12-15

    The recent development of broad-scope high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) screening methods has resulted in a much improved capability for new compound identification in environmental samples. However, positive identifications at the ng/L concentration level rely on analytical reference standards for chromatographic retention time (tR) and mass spectral comparisons. Chromatographic tR prediction can play a role in increasing confidence in suspect screening efforts for new compounds in the environment, especially when standards are not available, but reliable methods are lacking. The current work focuses on the development of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for tR prediction in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography and applied along with HRMS data to suspect screening of wastewater and environmental surface water samples. Based on a compound tR dataset of >500 compounds, an optimized 4-layer back-propagation multi-layer perceptron model enabled predictions for 85% of all compounds to within 2min of their measured tR for training (n=344) and verification (n=100) datasets. To evaluate the ANN ability for generalization to new data, the model was further tested using 100 randomly selected compounds and revealed 95% prediction accuracy within the 2-minute elution interval. Given the increasing concern on the presence of drug metabolites and other transformation products (TPs) in the aquatic environment, the model was applied along with HRMS data for preliminary identification of pharmaceutically-related compounds in real samples. Examples of compounds where reference standards were subsequently acquired and later confirmed are also presented. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time, the successful application of an accurate retention time predictor and HRMS data-mining using the largest number of compounds to preliminarily identify new or emerging contaminants in wastewater and surface waters.

  15. Tissue expression map of a large number of expressed sequence tags and its application to in silico screening of stress response genes in common wheat.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Keiichi; Kawaura, Kanako; Shimosaka, Etsuo; Kawakami, Naoto; Shin-I, Tadasu; Kohara, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2006-09-01

    In order to assess global changes in gene expression patterns in stress-induced tissues, we conducted large-scale analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in common wheat. Twenty-one cDNA libraries derived from stress-induced tissues, such as callus, as well as liquid cultures and abiotic stress conditions (temperature treatment, desiccation, photoperiod, moisture and ABA) were constructed. Several thousand colonies were randomly selected from each of these 21 cDNA libraries and sequenced from both the 5' and 3' ends. By computing abundantly expressed ESTs, correlated expression patterns of genes across the tissues were monitored. Furthermore, the relationships between gene expression profiles among the stress-induced tissues were inferred from the gene expression patterns. Multi-dimensional analysis of EST data is analogous to microarray experiments. As an example, genes specifically induced and/or suppressed by cold acclimation and heat-shock treatments were selected in silico. Four hundred and ninety genes showing fivefold induction or 218 genes for suppression in comparison to the control expression level were selected. These selected genes were annotated with the BLAST search. Furthermore, gene ontology was conducted for these genes with the InterPro search. Because genes regulated in response to temperature treatment were successfully selected, this method can be applied to other stress-treated tissues. Then, the method was applied to screen genes in response to abiotic stresses such as drought and ABA treatments. In silico selection of screened genes from virtual display should provide a powerful tool for functional plant genomics.

  16. The Arabidopsis gene DIG6 encodes a large 60S subunit nuclear export GTPase 1 that is involved in ribosome biogenesis and affects multiple auxin-regulated development processes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huayan; Lü, Shiyou; Li, Ruixi; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Huoming; Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Liu, Pei; Wang, Guangchao; Xia, Yiji; Running, Mark P; Xiong, Liming

    2015-11-01

    The circularly permuted GTPase large subunit GTPase 1 (LSG1) is involved in the maturation step of the 60S ribosome and is essential for cell viability in yeast. Here, an Arabidopsis mutant dig6 (drought inhibited growth of lateral roots) was isolated. The mutant exhibited multiple auxin-related phenotypes, which included reduced lateral root number, altered leaf veins, and shorter roots. Genetic mapping combined with next-generation DNA sequencing identified that the mutation occurred in AtLSG1-2. This gene was highly expressed in regions of auxin accumulation. Ribosome profiling revealed that a loss of function of AtLSG1-2 led to decreased levels of monosomes, further demonstrating its role in ribosome biogenesis. Quantitative proteomics showed that the expression of certain proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis was differentially regulated, indicating that ribosome biogenesis processes were impaired in the mutant. Further investigations showed that an AtLSG1-2 deficiency caused the alteration of auxin distribution, response, and transport in plants. It is concluded that AtLSG1-2 is integral to ribosome biogenesis, consequently affecting auxin homeostasis and plant development.

  17. An Exploratory Study on Initial STEM Classes and African American Freshman Males Who Are STEM Majors at a Large Mid-Atlantic State University: Factors Affecting Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Persistence in the STEM Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calhoun, William Jason

    The purpose of this study was to test how well social cognitive career theory (SCCT) explains the effects of an introductory freshman year science course on the career perspectives of African American males at a large, public mid-Atlantic state university. Embracing SCCT as the foundation of this project, the dissertation intended to gather data from these young men to develop insight into how and in what ways their self-efficacy throughout the semester was influenced by their first science course, and changing their outlook on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) careers while in school and after graduation. To a small number of freshman African American male students who have declared themselves STEM majors, I utilized a qualitative study investigating this phenomenon. The major findings detailed themes that affected these young men including concerns about mathmatics preparation, isolation, balance, microagression, and help-seeking. Results indicate that there was an impact on the confidence, achievement, and goal setting for these young men due to these factors and that social cognitive career theory was an appropriate framework from which to test these questions.

  18. The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A.

    2006-11-15

    Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a

  19. Analysis of the Latitudinal Variability of Tropospheric Ozone in the Arctic Using the Large Number of Aircraft and Ozonesonde Observations in Early Summer 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ancellet, Gerard; Daskalakis, Nikos; Raut, Jean Christophe; Tarasick, David; Hair, Jonathan; Quennehen, Boris; Ravetta, Francois; Schlager, Hans; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Thompson, Anne M.; Johnson, Bryan; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Katherine S.

    2016-01-01

    The goals of the paper are to: (1) present tropospheric ozone (O3) climatologies in summer 2008 based on a large amount of measurements, during the International Polar Year when the Polar Study using Aircraft, Remote Sensing, Surface Measurements, and Models of Climate Chemistry, Aerosols, and Transport (POLARCAT) campaigns were conducted (2) investigate the processes that determine O3 concentrations in two different regions (Canada and Greenland) that were thoroughly studied using measurements from 3 aircraft and 7 ozonesonde stations. This paper provides an integrated analysis of these observations and the discussion of the latitudinal and vertical variability of tropospheric ozone north of 55oN during this period is performed using a regional model (WFR-Chem). Ozone, CO and potential vorticity (PV) distributions are extracted from the simulation at the measurement locations. The model is able to reproduce the O3 latitudinal and vertical variability but a negative O3 bias of 6-15 ppbv is found in the free troposphere over 4 km, especially over Canada. Ozone average concentrations are of the order of 65 ppbv at altitudes above 4 km both over Canada and Greenland, while they are less than 50 ppbv in the lower troposphere. The relative influence of stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) and of ozone production related to the local biomass burning (BB) emissions is discussed using differences between average values of O3, CO and PV for Southern and Northern Canada or Greenland and two vertical ranges in the troposphere: 0-4 km and 4-8 km. For Canada, the model CO distribution and the weak correlation ( 30) of O3 and PV suggests that stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) is not the major contribution to average tropospheric ozone at latitudes less than 70oN, due to the fact that local biomass burning (BB) emissions were significant during the 2008 summer period. Conversely over Greenland, significant STE is found according to the better O3 versus PV correlation

  20. Leveraging Affective Learning for Developing Future Airmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    sity, the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or any other US government agency. Cleared for public release: distribution unlimited...clude affective objectives in their lessons. A student’s affective state influences his or her learning pre- disposition, and educators should consider...but may not be possible for a large number of students or for dispersed learning activity. The ability to discern the affective state of students

  1. A Combined Classical Genetic and High Resolution Two-Dimensional Electrophoretic Approach to the Assessment of the Number of Genes Affecting Hybrid Male Sterility in Drosophila Simulans and Drosophila Sechellia

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, L. W.; Singh, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    We have attempted to estimate the number of genes involved in postzygotic reproductive isolation between two closely related species, Drosophila simulans and Drosophila sechellia, by a novel approach that involves the use of high resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) to examine testis proteins in parents, hybrids and fertile and sterile backcross progenies. The important results that have emerged from this study are as follows: (1) about 8% of about 1000 proteins examined showed divergence (presence/absence) between the two species; (2) by tracing individual proteins in parental, hybrid and backcross males, we were able to associate the divergent proteins with different chromosomes and found that most divergent proteins are associated with autosomes and very few with X chromosome, Y chromosome and cytoplasm; (3) when proteins showing both quantitative and qualitative differences between the two species were examined in F(1) hybrid males, most (97.4%) proteins were expressed at levels between the two parents and no sign of large scale changes in spot density was observed. All the proteins observed in the two parental species were present in F(1) hybrid males except two species-specific proteins that may be encoded (or regulated) by sex chromosomes; (4) when different fertile and sterile backcross male testes were compared, a few D. sechellia-specific proteins were identified to be consistently associated with male sterility. These results along with the observation that a large proportion (23.6%) of first generation backcross males were fertile show that hybrid male sterility between D. simulans and D. sechellia involves a relatively small number of genes. Role of large scale genetic changes due to general genome incompatibility is not supported. The results also suggest that the large effect of X chromosome on hybrid male sterility is not due to higher divergence of X chromosome than autosomes. PMID:8224814

  2. Measurement of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressure on a Single Rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-fan with Angular and Wake Inflow at Mach Numbers from 0.02 to 0.70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, P.; Gruber, M.; Parzych, D.

    1988-01-01

    Unsteady blade surface pressure data for the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade operation with angular inflow, wake inflow and uniform flow over a range of inflow Mach numbers of 0.02 to 0.70 is provided. The data are presented as Fourier coefficients for the first 35 harmonics of shaft rotational frequency. Also presented is a brief discussion of the unsteady blade response observed at takeoff and cruise conditions with angular and wake inflow.

  3. Factors affecting compliance with colorectal cancer screening among households residing in the largely Haitian community of Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Meredith Leigh; Acuña, Juan Manuel; de la Vega, Pura Rodriguez; Castro, Grettel; Madhivanan, Purnima

    2015-05-01

    The United States Black population is disproportionately affected by colorectal cancer (CRC) in terms of incidence and mortality. Studies suggest that screening rates are lower among Blacks compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHWs). However, studies on CRC screening within Black subgroups are lacking. This study examined disparities in blood stool test (BST) compliance and colonoscopy use by race/ethnicity (Haitian, NHW, non-Hispanic Black [NHB], and Hispanic) among randomly selected households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida.This study used cross-sectional, health and wellness data from a random-sample, population-based survey conducted within 951 households in Little Haiti between November 2011 and December 2012. BST compliance and colonoscopy use were self-reported and defined, conservatively, as the use of BST within the past 2 years and the ever use of colonoscopy by any household member. Factors associated with BST compliance and colonoscopy use were identified using logistic regression models. Analyses were restricted to households containing at least 1 member ≥50 years (n = 666).Nearly half of the households were compliant with BST (rate [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 45% [41%-49%]) and completed colonoscopy (rate [95% CI] = 53% [49%-58%]). Compliance with BST was not associated with race/ethnicity (P = 0.76). Factors independently associated with BST compliance included low educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.63, P = 0.03), being single (AOR = 0.47, P = 0.004), retirement (AOR = 1.96, P = 0.01), and the presence of diagnosed health problems (AOR = 1.24, P = 0.01). Colonoscopy use was lower among Haitian households (46%) compared with NHW (63%), NHB (62%), and Hispanic households (54%) (P = 0.002). Factors independently associated with colonoscopy use included identifying as NHB (compared with Haitian) (AOR = 1.80, P = 0.05), being single (AOR = 0.44, P = 0

  4. Number relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Philip

    Number relativity 1.Every equation of the relativity is just the way to understand through to solve one question of the math problem. We just add the hypothesis into the number. 2. Sequence of number is the machine physics for software(computer) as the number order is program equation as calculator. 3. When zero is denominator, it is not existing as it is doing something by nothing. So nothing means time as we put zero denominator into time. My personal physics imagine.

  5. Implementation factors affecting the large-scale deployment of digital health and well-being technologies: A qualitative study of the initial phases of the 'Living-It-Up' programme.

    PubMed

    Agbakoba, Ruth; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Watson, Nicholas; Mair, Frances S

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the factors which facilitate or impede the large-scale deployment of health and well-being consumer technologies. The Living-It-Up project is a large-scale digital intervention led by NHS 24, aiming to transform health and well-being services delivery throughout Scotland. We conducted a qualitative study of the factors affecting the implementation and deployment of the Living-It-Up services. We collected a range of data during the initial phase of deployment, including semi-structured interviews (N = 6); participant observation sessions (N = 5) and meetings with key stakeholders (N = 3). We used the Normalisation Process Theory as an explanatory framework to interpret the social processes at play during the initial phases of deployment.Initial findings illustrate that it is clear - and perhaps not surprising - that the size and diversity of the Living-It-Up consortium made implementation processes more complex within a 'multi-stakeholder' environment. To overcome these barriers, there is a need to clearly define roles, tasks and responsibilities among the consortium partners. Furthermore, varying levels of expectations and requirements, as well as diverse cultures and ways of working, must be effectively managed. Factors which facilitated implementation included extensive stakeholder engagement, such as co-design activities, which can contribute to an increased 'buy-in' from users in the long term. An important lesson from the Living-It-Up initiative is that attempting to co-design innovative digital services, but at the same time, recruiting large numbers of users is likely to generate conflicting implementation priorities which hinder - or at least substantially slow down - the effective rollout of services at scale.The deployment of Living-It-Up services is ongoing, but our results to date suggest that - in order to be successful - the roll-out of digital health and well-being technologies at scale requires a delicate and pragmatic trade

  6. Implementation factors affecting the large-scale deployment of digital health and well-being technologies: A qualitative study of the initial phases of the ‘Living-It-Up’ programme

    PubMed Central

    Agbakoba, Ruth; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Watson, Nicholas; Mair, Frances S

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the factors which facilitate or impede the large-scale deployment of health and well-being consumer technologies. The Living-It-Up project is a large-scale digital intervention led by NHS 24, aiming to transform health and well-being services delivery throughout Scotland. We conducted a qualitative study of the factors affecting the implementation and deployment of the Living-It-Up services. We collected a range of data during the initial phase of deployment, including semi-structured interviews (N = 6); participant observation sessions (N = 5) and meetings with key stakeholders (N = 3). We used the Normalisation Process Theory as an explanatory framework to interpret the social processes at play during the initial phases of deployment. Initial findings illustrate that it is clear − and perhaps not surprising − that the size and diversity of the Living-It-Up consortium made implementation processes more complex within a ‘multi-stakeholder’ environment. To overcome these barriers, there is a need to clearly define roles, tasks and responsibilities among the consortium partners. Furthermore, varying levels of expectations and requirements, as well as diverse cultures and ways of working, must be effectively managed. Factors which facilitated implementation included extensive stakeholder engagement, such as co-design activities, which can contribute to an increased ‘buy-in’ from users in the long term. An important lesson from the Living-It-Up initiative is that attempting to co-design innovative digital services, but at the same time, recruiting large numbers of users is likely to generate conflicting implementation priorities which hinder − or at least substantially slow down − the effective rollout of services at scale. The deployment of Living-It-Up services is ongoing, but our results to date suggest that − in order to be successful − the roll-out of digital health and well-being technologies at scale requires a delicate

  7. Vaccination with a genetically modified Brugia malayi cysteine protease inhibitor-2 reduces adult parasite numbers and affects the fertility of female worms following a subcutaneous challenge of Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus) with B. malayi infective larvae.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Sridhar; Wei, Junfei; Ward, Danielle; Abraham, David; Lustigman, Sara; Zhan, Bin; Klei, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of Mongolian gerbils with Brugia malayi cysteine protease inhibitor-2 in which the amino acid Asn66 was mutated to Lys66 (Bm-CPI-2M) resulted in reduced parasite numbers of 48.6% and 48.0% at 42 and 90 days p.i. with B. malayi L3s. Fertility of female worms was also affected at 90 days p.i. In vitro killing of L3s observed in the presence of gerbil peritoneal exudate cells and anti-Bm-CPI-2M sera suggests antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity as a putative protective mechanism. These observations suggest that Bm-CPI-2M is a promising prophylactic and anti-fecundity vaccine candidate.

  8. Primordial nucleosynthesis and Dirac's large numbers hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the analysis of Falik (1979) which attempted to show that the cosmological model proposed by Canuto and Hsieh (1978) in which the gravitational constant varies with time contradicts observations of primordial helium. It is shown that the analysis was based on the assumptions that (1) the energy density of radiation in local thermodynamic equilibrium is approximately equal to the fourth power of the equilibrium temperature, where the product of the equilibrium temperature with the scale factor of the Robertson-Walker metric is constant, and (2) the gravitational constant is approximately equal to the inverse of the time even at early cosmological epochs. These assumptions are demonstrated to be invalid in the scale covariant theory of gravitation used to develop the model, thus negating the conclusion that the Canuto and Hsieh model excludes the primordial synthesis of helium.

  9. Strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information of visual stimuli: an approach using large-size Navon letters.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Tomoike, Kouta

    2016-01-12

    Recent studies argue that strongly-motivated positive emotions (e.g. desire) narrow a scope of attention. This argument is mainly based on an observation that, while humans normally respond faster to global than local information of a visual stimulus (global advantage), positive affects eliminated the global advantage by selectively speeding responses to local (but not global) information. In other words, narrowing of attentional scope was indirectly evidenced by the elimination of global advantage (the same speed of processing between global and local information). No study has directly shown that strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information while excluding a bias for global information (global advantage) in a baseline (emotionally-neutral) condition. In the present study, we addressed this issue by eliminating the global advantage in a baseline (neutral) state. Induction of positive affects under this state resulted in faster responses to local than global information. Our results provided direct evidence that positive affects in high motivational intensity narrow a scope of attention.

  10. Genotype and fetal size affect maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal endocrinology in Large White × Landrace and Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Cheryl J; Nwagwu, Margaret O; McArdle, Harry J

    2013-01-01

    This study compared maternal plasma amino acid concentrations, placental protein secretion in vitro and fetal body composition and plasma amino acid and hormone concentrations in feto-placental units from the smallest and a normally-sized fetus carried by Large White × Landrace or Meishan gilts on Day 100 of pregnancy. Compared with Large White × Landrace, Meishan placental tissue secreted more protein and Meishan fetuses contained relatively more fat and protein, but less moisture. Fetal plasma concentrations of insulin, triiodothryonine, thyroxine and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. In both breeds, fetal cortisol concentrations were inversely related to fetal size, whereas concentrations of IGF-I were higher in average-sized fetuses. Concentrations of 10 amino acids were higher in Large White × Landrace than Meishan gilts, while glutamine concentrations were higher in Meishan gilts. Concentrations of alanine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid and threonine were higher in Meishan than Large White × Landrace fetuses. Average-sized fetuses had higher concentrations of asparagine, leucine, lysine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine and valine than the smallest fetus. This study revealed novel genotype and fetal size differences in porcine maternal-fetal amino acid status and fetal hormone and metabolite concentrations.

  11. Genome-wide study refines the quantitative trait locus for number of ribs in a Large White × Minzhu intercross pig population and reveals a new candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Chao; Yue, Jing-Wei; Pu, Lei; Wang, Li-Gang; Liu, Xin; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Ke-Bin; Li, Na; Shi, Hui-Bi; Zhang, Yue-Bo; Wang, Li-Xian

    2016-10-01

    In China, sparerib is one of the most valuable parts of the pork carcass. As a result, candidate gene mining for number of ribs has become an interesting study focus. To examine the genetic basis for this major trait, we genotyped 596 individuals from an F2 Large White × Minzhu intercross pig population using the PorcineSNP60 Genotyping BeadChip. The genome-wide association study identified a locus for number of ribs in a 2.38-Mb region on Sus scrofa chromosome 7 (SSC7 of Sus scrofa genome assembly, Sscrofa10.2). We identified the top significant SNP ASGA0035536, which explained 16.51 % of the phenotypic variance. A previously reported candidate causal mutation (g.19034 A>C) in vertebrae development-associated gene VRTN explained 8.79 % of the phenotypic variation on number of ribs and had a much lower effect than ASGA0035536. Haplotype sharing analysis in F1 boars localized the rib number QTL to a 951-kb interval on SSC7. This interval encompassed 17 annotated genes in Sscrofa10.2, including the previously reported VRTN candidate gene. Of the 17 candidate genes, LTBP2, which encodes a latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein, was previously reported to indirectly regulate the activity of growth differentiation factor Gdf11, which has been shown to increase the number of ribs in knock-out mice. Thus, we propose LTBP2 as a good new candidate gene for number of ribs in the pig population. This finding advances our understanding of the genetic architecture of rib number in pigs.

  12. Number Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Terese A.

    2004-01-01

    This article features Number Time, a site developed by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for young mathematics learners, located at www.bbc.co.uk/schools/numbertime. The site uses interactive animation to help children in pre-K through grade 2 understand and practice number basics. Users will find online games, videos that tell number…

  13. Phentermine, sibutramine and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    An, Hoyoung; Sohn, Hyunjoo; Chung, Seockhoon

    2013-04-01

    A safe and effective way to control weight in patients with affective disorders is needed, and phentermine is a possible candidate. We performed a PubMed search of articles pertaining to phentermine, sibutramine, and affective disorders. We compared the studies of phentermine with those of sibutramine. The search yielded a small number of reports. Reports concerning phentermine and affective disorders reported that i) its potency in the central nervous system may be comparatively low, and ii) it may induce depression in some patients. We were unable to find more studies on the subject; thus, it is unclear presently whether phentermine use is safe in affective disorder patients. Reports regarding the association of sibutramine and affective disorders were slightly more abundant. A recent study that suggested that sibutramine may have deleterious effects in patients with a psychiatric history may provide a clue for future phentermine research. Three explanations are possible concerning the association between phentermine and affective disorders: i) phentermine, like sibutramine, may have a depression-inducing effect that affects a specific subgroup of patients, ii) phentermine may have a dose-dependent depression-inducing effect, or iii) phentermine may simply not be associated with depression. Large-scale studies with affective disorder patients focusing on these questions are needed to clarify this matter before investigation of its efficacy may be carried out and it can be used in patients with affective disorders.

  14. Historical analysis of sockeye salmon growth among populations affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill and large spawning escapements. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project 86048-BAA: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggerone, G.T.; Rogers, D.E.

    1998-12-01

    Adult sockeye salmon scales, which provide an index of annual salmon growth in fresh and marine waters during 1965--1997, were measured to examine the effects on growth and adult returns of large spawning escapements influenced by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. Scale growth in freshwater was significantly reduced by the large 1989 spawning escapements in the Kenai River system, Red Lake, and Akalura Lake, but not in Chignik Lake. These data suggest that sockeye growth in freshwater may be less stable following the large escapement. Furthermore, the observations of large escapement adversely affecting growth of adjacent brood years of salmon has important implications for stock-recruitment modeling. In Prince William Sound, Coghill Lake sockeye salmon that migrated through oil-contaminated waters did not exhibit noticeably reduced marine growth, but a model was developed that might explain low adult returns in recent years.

  15. Modeling of Individual and Organizational Factors Affecting Traumatic Occupational Injuries Based on the Structural Equation Modeling: A Case Study in Large Construction Industries

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadfam, Iraj; Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Akbarzadeh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Individual and organizational factors are the factors influencing traumatic occupational injuries. Objectives The aim of the present study was the short path analysis of the severity of occupational injuries based on individual and organizational factors. Materials and Methods The present cross-sectional analytical study was implemented on traumatic occupational injuries within a ten-year timeframe in 13 large Iranian construction industries. Modeling and data analysis were done using the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach and the IBM SPSS AMOS statistical software version 22.0, respectively. Results The mean age and working experience of the injured workers were 28.03 ± 5.33 and 4.53 ± 3.82 years, respectively. The portions of construction and installation activities of traumatic occupational injuries were 64.4% and 18.1%, respectively. The SEM findings showed that the individual, organizational and accident type factors significantly were considered as effective factors on occupational injuries’ severity (P < 0.05). Conclusions Path analysis of occupational injuries based on the SEM reveals that individual and organizational factors and their indicator variables are very influential on the severity of traumatic occupational injuries. So, these should be considered to reduce occupational accidents’ severity in large construction industries. PMID:27800465

  16. Mtf-1 lymphoma-susceptibility locus affects retention of large thymocytes with high ROS levels in mice after {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Masaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kohara, Yuki; Katsuragi, Yoshinori; Mishima, Yukio; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Kominami, Ryo; E-mail: rykomina@med.niigata-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Mouse strains exhibit different susceptibilities to {gamma}-ray-induced thymic lymphomas. Our previous study identified Mtf-1 (metal responsive transcription factor-1) as a candidate susceptibility gene, which is involved in the radiation-induced signaling pathway that regulates the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). To reveal the mechanism for the increased susceptibility conferred by Mtf-1 locus, we examined early effects of {gamma}-ray on ROS levels in vivo and its difference between Mtf-1 susceptible and resistant congenic mice. Here, we show the detection of clonally growing thymocytes at 4 weeks after irradiation, indicating the start of clonal expansion at a very early stage. We also show that large thymocytes with higher ROS levels and a proliferation capacity were more numerous in the Mtf-1 susceptible mice than the resistant mice when examined at 7 days after irradiation, although such tendency was not found in mice lacking one allele of Bcl11b tumor suppressor gene. This high retention of the large thymocytes, at a high risk for ROS-induced mutation, is a compensatory proliferation and regeneration response to depletion of the thymocytes after irradiation and the response is likely to augment the development of prelymphoma cells leading to thymic lymphomas.

  17. The use of spent renal dialysis membranes for the isolation of large numbers of human neutrophils for biochemical studies. Application to purification of the myeloid IgA receptor (Fc alpha R).

    PubMed

    Mazengera, R L; Kerr, M A; Todd, A S

    1992-01-21

    Human neutrophils (PMN) can be eluted from spent Cuprophan renal dialysis membranes in large numbers (10(9)-10(10) per dialyser cartridge) and in relatively high purity by washing the membranes with 0.35 M NaCl. This offers the possibility of isolating relatively large amounts (10(-4)-10(-3) g) of minor PMN proteins such as those expressed on the cell surface. Here the technique is applied to the purification of the neutrophil IgA receptor (Fc alpha R). Affinity chromatography on IgA-Sepharose of NP-40 extracts of 125I-labelled PMN isolated from fresh venous blood routinely gave a receptor preparation showing one diffuse band, Mr 50-70 kDa, upon analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. When the same method was used with larger numbers of unlabelled PMN from fresh venous blood or renal dialysis membranes a preparation was obtained which gave multiple bands upon analysis by SDS-PAGE silver stained gels due to contamination of the receptor with cytoplasmic proteins which bound non-specifically to the IgA-Sepharose. Most of these contaminants could be removed by chromatography of the IgA-Sepharose eluates on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose.

  18. Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.