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Sample records for affect ligand binding

  1. Factors affecting binding of galacto ligands to Actinomyces viscosus lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, M J; Marini, A M; Gabriel, O

    1985-01-01

    The specificity requirements for the binding of Actinomyces viscosus T14V were examined by testing simple sugars, oligopeptides, and glycoproteins as inhibitors of the aggregation of glycoprotein-coated latex beads and washed A. viscosus cells. Lactose was the most inhibitory simple sugar; D-fucose and D-galactose were equally inhibitory, methyl-alpha-D-fucoside was slightly less inhibitory, and L-fucose and raffinose were not inhibitory. The concentration of galactose residues required for 50% inhibition of aggregation was 15 times higher in the form of lactose than in the form of asialoglycoprotein, suggesting an enhancement of lectin binding when galactose residues are clustered. However, when the inhibitory power of bi-, tri-, and tetraantennary asialooligopeptides of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was compared with that of equivalent concentrations of galactose in the form of lactose, the biantennary form was slightly less effective than lactose, the triantennary form was approximately as effective as lactose, and the tetraantennary form was slightly more effective than lactose. Steric interference may prevent this type of clustering from enhancing lectin binding. The O-linked asialooligopeptides of asialofetuin were 10 times more inhibitory than an equivalent concentration of galactose in the form of N-linked asialooligopeptides. Thus, galactose beta-1----3 linked to N-acetylgalactosamine exhibits greater specificity for the A. viscosus lectin than does galactose beta-1----4 linked to N-acetylglucosamine. These results, taken together with previously reported data, are consistent with a lectin of low affinity, binding enhanced by multivalency, and specificity for beta-linked galactose. PMID:2578122

  2. Fine mapping of inhibitory anti-alpha5 monoclonal antibody epitopes that differentially affect integrin-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, L; Clark, K; Mould, A P; Humphries, M J

    1999-01-01

    The high-affinity interaction of integrin alpha5beta1 with the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin requires both the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence (in the tenth type III repeat) and a second site Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) in the adjacent ninth type III repeat, which synergizes with RGD. Arg-Arg-Glu-Thr-Ala-Trp-Ala (RRETAWA) is a novel peptidic ligand for alpha5beta1, identified by phage display, which blocks alpha5beta1-mediated cell adhesion to fibronectin. A key question is the location of the binding sites for these ligand sequences within the integrin. In this study we have identified residues that form part of the epitopes of three inhibitory anti-alpha5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs): 16, P1D6 and SNAKA52. These mAbs have distinct functional properties. mAb 16 blocks the recognition of RGD and RRETAWA, whereas P1D6 blocks binding to the synergy sequence. The binding of SNAKA52 is inhibited by anti-beta1 mAbs, indicating that its epitope is close to the interface between the alpha and beta subunits. Residues in human alpha5 were replaced with the corresponding residues in mouse alpha5 by site-directed mutagenesis; wild-type or mutant human alpha5 was expressed on the surface of alpha5-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. mAb binding was assessed by flow cytometry and by adhesion to the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin or RRETAWA by cell attachment assay. All three epitopes were located to different putative loops in the N-terminal domain of alpha5. As expected, disruption of these epitopes had no effect on ligand recognition by alpha5beta1. The locations of these epitopes are consistent with the beta-propeller model for integrin alpha-subunit structure and allow us to propose a topological image of the integrin-ligand complex. PMID:10567237

  3. Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, V B; Babayan, S Y; Tairyan, V I; Arakelyan, A V; Parsadanyan, M A; Vardevanyan, P O

    2006-02-01

    Ligand binding to nucleic acids (NA) is considered as a stationary Markov process. It is shown that the probabilistic description of ligand-NA binding allows one to describe not only the kinetics of the change of number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. The general analysis of absorption isotherms and kinetics of ligand binding to NA make it possible to determine of rate constants of ligand-NA complex formation and dissociation.

  4. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  5. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  6. Cooperative Ligand Binding to Linear Chain Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applequist, Jon

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes the Ising model of ligand binding as it applies to cooperative binding to long chain molecules. Also presents some illustrations which help to visualize the connection between the interaction parameters and the shape of the binding isotherm. (Author/MR)

  7. Mapping structural landmarks, ligand binding sites, and missense mutations to the collagen IV heterotrimers predicts major functional domains, novel interactions, and variation in phenotypes in inherited diseases affecting basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Parkin, J Des; San Antonio, James D; Pedchenko, Vadim; Hudson, Billy; Jensen, Shane T; Savige, Judy

    2011-02-01

    Collagen IV is the major protein found in basement membranes. It comprises three heterotrimers (α1α1α2, α3α4α5, and α5α5α6) that form distinct networks, and are responsible for membrane strength and integrity.We constructed linear maps of the collagen IV heterotrimers ("interactomes") that indicated major structural landmarks, known and predicted ligand-binding sites, and missense mutations, in order to identify functional and disease-associated domains, potential interactions between ligands, and genotype–phenotype relationships. The maps documented more than 30 known ligand-binding sites as well as motifs for integrins, heparin, von Willebrand factor (VWF), decorin, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). They predicted functional domains for angiogenesis and haemostasis, and disease domains for autoimmunity, tumor growth and inhibition, infection, and glycation. Cooperative ligand interactions were indicated by binding site proximity, for example, between integrins, matrix metalloproteinases, and heparin. The maps indicated that mutations affecting major ligand-binding sites, for example, for Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in the α1 chain or integrins in the α5 chain, resulted in distinctive phenotypes (Hereditary Angiopathy, Nephropathy, Aneurysms, and muscle Cramps [HANAC] syndrome, and early-onset Alport syndrome, respectively). These maps further our understanding of basement membrane biology and disease, and suggest novel membrane interactions, functions, and therapeutic targets.

  8. Ligand binding to a high-energy partially unfolded protein.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Joseph R; Park, Chiwook

    2015-01-01

    The conformational energy landscape of a protein determines populations of all possible conformations of the protein and also determines the kinetics of the conversion between the conformations. Interaction with ligands influences the conformational energy landscapes of proteins and shifts populations of proteins in different conformational states. To investigate the effect of ligand binding on partial unfolding of a protein, we use Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its functional ligand NADP(+) as a model system. We previously identified a partially unfolded form of DHFR that is populated under native conditions. In this report, we determined the free energy for partial unfolding of DHFR at varying concentrations of NADP(+) and found that NADP(+) binds to the partially unfolded form as well as the native form. DHFR unfolds partially without releasing the ligand, though the binding affinity for NADP(+) is diminished upon partial unfolding. Based on known crystallographic structures of NADP(+) -bound DHFR and the model of the partially unfolded protein we previously determined, we propose that the adenosine-binding domain of DHFR remains folded in the partially unfolded form and interacts with the adenosine moiety of NADP(+) . Our result demonstrates that ligand binding may affect the conformational free energy of not only native forms but also high-energy non-native forms.

  9. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    PubMed

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  10. Time, the Forgotten Dimension of Ligand Binding Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corzo, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding is generally explained in terms of the equilibrium constant K[subscript d] for the protein-ligand complex dissociation. However, both theoretical considerations and experimental data point to the life span of the protein-ligand complex as an important, but generally overlooked, aspect of ligand binding by macromolecules. Short-lived…

  11. Copper(I) and nickel(II) complexes with 1:1 vs. 1:2 coordination of ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands: do the geometry and composition of complexes affect DNA binding/cleavage, protein binding, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities?

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Paramasivam; Sathyadevi, Palanisamy; Butorac, Rachel R; Cowley, Alan H; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Dharmaraj, Nallasamy

    2012-04-21

    A new series of geometrically different complexes containing ferrocenyl hydrazone ligands were synthesised by reacting suitable precursor complex [MCl(2)(PPh(3))(2)] with the ligands HL(1) or HL(2) (where M = Cu(II) or Ni(II); HL(1) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(6)H(5))] (1) and HL(2) = [Cp(2)Fe(CH=N-NH-CO-C(5)H(4)N)]) (2). The new complexes of the composition [Cu(L(1))(PPh(3))(2)], (3) [Cu(L(2))(PPh(3))(2)] (4), [Ni(L(1))(2)] (5) and [Ni(L(2))(2)] (6) were characterised by various spectral studies. Among them, complexes 3 and 5 characterised by single crystal X-ray diffraction showed a distorted tetrahedral structure for the former with 1:1 metal-ligand stoichiometry, but a distorted square planar geometry with 1:2 metal-ligand stoichiometry in the case of the latter. Systematic biological investigations like DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, free radical scavenging and cytotoxicity activities were carried out using all the synthesised compounds and the results obtained were explained on the basis of structure-activity relationships. The binding constant (K(b)) values of the synthesised compounds are found to be in the order of magnitude 10(3)-10(5) M(-1) and also they exhibit significant cleavage of supercoiled (SC) pUC19 DNA in the presence of H(2)O(2) as co-oxidant. The conformational changes of bovine serum albumin (BSA) upon binding with the above complexes were also studied. In addition, concentration dependent free radical scavenging potential of all the synthesised compounds (1-6) was also carried out under in vitro conditions. Assays on the cytotoxicity of the above complexes against HeLa and A431 tumor cells and NIH 3T3 normal cells were also carried out.

  12. EGFR kinase possesses a broad specificity for ErbB phosphorylation sites, and ligand increases catalytic-centre activity without affecting substrate binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    We previously found that EGF (epidermal growth factor) increases the EGFR (EGF receptor) kinase-binding affinity towards the major tyrosine phosphorylation sites in downstream adaptor proteins such as Gab1 (Grb2-associated binding protein 1) and Shc [Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and collagen containing protein], but not that towards EGFR autophosphorylation sites [Fan, Wong, Deb and Johnson (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 38143–38150]. EGFR activation can also result in transphosphorylation of tyrosine resides in the C-terminal region of the related receptors ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 in heterodimers which are formed upon ligand stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the specificity of EGFR kinase by comparing the steady state kinetic parameters for peptides derived from all four ErbBs in the absence or presence of EGF. Our results demonstrated that (i) EGFR kinase can efficiently phosphorylate a broad range of diverse peptide sequences representing ErbB sites; (ii) certain ErbB2, ErbB3 and ErbB4 sites had higher specificity constants than any EGFR sequence and (iii) EGF stimulation consistently increases the kcat approx. 5-fold, but does not significantly alter the Km for any ErbB peptides. Furthermore, peptides containing lysine at position −2 or −3 N-terminal to the target tyrosine were found to be poor EGFR kinase substrates, and substitution of these lysines with glutamine decreased the Km and increased the kcat for these substrates. We conclude that EGFR kinase-mediated ErbB transphosphorylations are mostly controlled at the level of oligomerization, and not by a preference of the EGFR kinase for phosphorylation sites in any particular ErbB. The results also demonstrated that, unlike phosphorylation sites in select downstream targets, EGF does not regulate the recognition of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of any of the ErbBs. PMID:16122376

  13. Landscape of protein–small ligand binding modes

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small‐molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long‐standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein–ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all‐against‐all comparison of 20,040 protein–ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein–ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein‐ and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R 2 = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein–ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  14. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  15. [Kinetics of ligand binding to nucleic acids at random fillings].

    PubMed

    Arakelian, V B; Babaian, S Iu; Tairian, V I; Arakelian, A V; Parsadanian, M A; Vardevanian, P O

    2006-01-01

    Ligand binding with nucleic acids is described in frames of the theory of random processes. It is shown that the probabilistic description of binding of a ligand to nucleic acid allows one to describe not only the kinetics of changes in the number of bound ligands at arbitrary fillings but also to calculate stationary values of the number of bound ligands and its dispersion. A general analysis of absorption isotherms and the kinetics of ligand binding with nucleic acids allows one to determine the rate constants of formation and decomposition of the ligand-nucleic acid complex. A comparison of the results obtained with the case of low fillings is conducted.

  16. Helix 8 of the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is essential for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiong; Waxse, Bennett; Riquelme, Denise; Zhang, Jiabao; Aguilera, Greti

    2015-06-15

    Membrane association of estrogen receptors (ER) depends on cysteine palmitoylation and two leucines in the ligand binding domain (LBD), conserved in most steroid receptors. The role of this region, corresponding to helix 8 of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) LBD, on membrane association of GR was studied in 4B cells, expressing endogenous GR, and Cos-7 cells transfected EGFP-GR constructs. 4B cells preloaded with radiolabeled palmitic acid showed no radioactivity incorporation into immunoprecipitated GR. Moreover, mutation C683A (corresponding to ER palmitoylation site) did not affect corticosterone-induced membrane association of GR. Mutations L687-690A, L682A, E680G and K685G prevented membrane and also nuclear localization through reduced ligand binding. L687-690A mutation decreased association of GR with heat shock protein 90 and transcriptional activity, without overt effects on receptor protein stability. The data demonstrate that palmitoylation does not mediate membrane association of GR, but that the region 680-690 (helix 8) is critical for ligand binding and receptor function.

  17. CD22 ligand binding regulates normal and malignant B lymphocyte survival in vivo.

    PubMed

    Haas, Karen M; Sen, Suman; Sanford, Isaac G; Miller, Ann S; Poe, Jonathan C; Tedder, Thomas F

    2006-09-01

    The CD22 extracellular domain regulates B lymphocyte function by interacting with alpha2,6-linked sialic acid-bearing ligands. To understand how CD22 ligand interactions affect B cell function in vivo, mouse anti-mouse CD22 mAbs were generated that inhibit CD22 ligand binding to varying degrees. Remarkably, mAbs which blocked CD22 ligand binding accelerated mature B cell turnover by 2- to 4-fold in blood, spleen, and lymph nodes. CD22 ligand-blocking mAbs also inhibited the survival of adoptively transferred normal (73-88%) and malignant (90%) B cells in vivo. Moreover, mAbs that bound CD22 ligand binding domains induced significant CD22 internalization, depleted marginal zone B cells (82-99%), and reduced mature recirculating B cell numbers by 75-85%. The CD22 mAb effects were independent of complement and FcRs, and the CD22 mAbs had minimal effects in CD22AA mice that express mutated CD22 that is not capable of ligand binding. These data demonstrate that inhibition of CD22 ligand binding can disrupt normal and malignant B cell survival in vivo and suggest a novel mechanism of action for therapeutics targeting CD22 ligand binding domains.

  18. The Study Of The Successive Metal-Ligand Binding Energies For Fe+, Fe-, V+ and Co+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschicher, Charles W., Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra; Maitre, Philippe; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The successive binding energies of CO and H2O to Fe(+), CO to Fe(-), and H2 to Co(+) and V(+) are presented. Overall the computed results are in good agreement with experiment. The trends in binding energies are analyzed in terms of metal to ligand donation, ligand to metal donation, ligand-ligand repulsion, and changes in the metal atom, such as hybridization, promotion, and spin multiplicity. The geometry and vibrational frequencies are also shown to be directly affected by these effects.

  19. The Study of the Successive Metal-ligand Binding Energies for Fe(+), Fe(-), V(+) and Co(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra; Maitre, Philippe; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The successive binding energies of CO and H2O to Fe(+), CO to Fe(-), and H2 to Co(+) and V(+) are presented. Overall the computed results are in good agreement with experiment. The trends in binding energies are analyzed in terms of metal to ligand donation, ligand to metal donation, ligand-ligand repulsion, and changes in the metal atom, such as hybridization, promotion, and spin multiplicity. The geometry and vibrational frequencies are also shown to be directly affected by these effects.

  20. Plasmon resonance enhanced mechanical detection of ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-01-05

    Small molecule binding to the active site of enzymes typically modifies the mechanical stiffness of the enzyme. We exploit this effect, in a setup which combines nano-mechanics and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) enhanced optics, for the label free detection of ligand binding to an enzyme. The large dynamic range of the signal allows to easily obtain binding curves for small ligands, in contrast to traditional SPR methods which rely on small changes in index of refraction. Enzyme mechanics, assessed by nano-rheology, thus emerges as an alternative to electronic and spin resonances, assessed by traditional spectroscopies, for detecting ligand binding.

  1. Oxytocin receptors: ligand binding, signalling and cholesterol dependence.

    PubMed

    Gimpl, Gerald; Reitz, Julian; Brauer, Sabine; Trossen, Conny

    2008-01-01

    The G protein coupled oxytocin receptor (OTR) reveals some specific molecular and physiological characteristics. Ligand-receptor interaction has been analysed by photoaffinity labelling, site-directed mutagenesis, the construction of receptor chimeras and molecular modelling. Major results of these studies will be summarized. The N-terminus of the OTR is mainly involved in agonist binding. Notably, antagonists that are derived from the ground structure of oxytocin, bind the receptor at distinct sites partly non-overlapping with the agonist binding site. OTRs are able to couple to different G proteins, with a subsequent stimulation of phospholipase C-beta isoforms. In dependence on G protein coupling, OTRs can transduce growth-inhibitory or proliferatory signals. Some evidence is provided that OTRs are also present in form of dimeric or oligomeric complexes at the cell surface. The affinity of the receptor for ligands is strongly dependent on the presence of divalent cations (Mg(2+)) and cholesterol that both act like positive allosteric modulators. While the high-affinity state of the receptor for agonists requires divalent cations and cholesterol, the high-affinity state for antagonists is only dependent on a sufficient amount of cholesterol. Cholesterol affects ligand-binding affinity, receptor signalling and stability. Since the purification of the OTR has never been achieved, alternative methods to study the receptor in its native environment are necessary. Promising strategies for the site-specific labelling of the OTR will be presented. The employment of diverse reporter molecules introduced at different positions within the OTR might allow us in the near future to measure conformational changes of the receptor in its native lipid environment.

  2. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  3. Interrupting autocrine ligand-receptor binding: comparison between receptor blockers and ligand decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Stimulation of cell behavioral functions by ligand/receptor binding can be accomplished in autocrine fashion, where cells secrete ligand capable of binding to receptors on their own surfaces. This proximal secretion of autocrine ligands near the surface receptors on the secreting cell suggests that control of these systems by inhibitors of receptor/ligand binding may be more difficult than for systems involving exogenous ligands. Hence, it is of interest to predict the conditions under which successful inhibition of cell receptor binding by the autocrine ligand can be expected. Previous theoretical work using a compartmentalized model for autocrine cells has elucidated the conditions under which addition of solution decoys for the autocrine ligand can interrupt cell receptor/ligand binding via competitive binding of the secreted molecules (Forsten, K. E., and D. A. Lauffenburger. 1992. Biophys. J. 61:1-12.) We now apply a similar modeling approach to examine the addition of solution blockers targeted against the cell receptor. Comparison of the two alternative inhibition strategies reveals that a significantly lower concentration of receptor blockers, compared to ligand decoys, will obtain a high degree of inhibition. The more direct interruption scheme characteristic of the receptor blockers may make them a preferred strategy when feasible. PMID:1330038

  4. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking: orchestrated dancing of ligands in binding sites of protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Huameng; Li, Chenglong

    2010-07-30

    Present docking methodologies simulate only one single ligand at a time during docking process. In reality, the molecular recognition process always involves multiple molecular species. Typical protein-ligand interactions are, for example, substrate and cofactor in catalytic cycle; metal ion coordination together with ligand(s); and ligand binding with water molecules. To simulate the real molecular binding processes, we propose a novel multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD) strategy, which can deal with all the above processes, vastly improving docking sampling and binding free energy scoring. The work also compares two search strategies: Lamarckian genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization, which have respective advantages depending on the specific systems. The methodology proves robust through systematic testing against several diverse model systems: E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) complex with two substrates, SHP2NSH2 complex with two peptides and Bcl-xL complex with ABT-737 fragments. In all cases, the final correct docking poses and relative binding free energies were obtained. In PNP case, the simulations also capture the binding intermediates and reveal the binding dynamics during the recognition processes, which are consistent with the proposed enzymatic mechanism. In the other two cases, conventional single-ligand docking fails due to energetic and dynamic coupling among ligands, whereas MLSD results in the correct binding modes. These three cases also represent potential applications in the areas of exploring enzymatic mechanism, interpreting noisy X-ray crystallographic maps, and aiding fragment-based drug design, respectively.

  5. CLiBE: a database of computed ligand binding energy for ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Ji, Z L; Zhi, D G; Chen, Y Z

    2002-11-01

    Consideration of binding competitiveness of a drug candidate against natural ligands and other drugs that bind to the same receptor site may facilitate the rational development of a candidate into a potent drug. A strategy that can be applied to computer-aided drug design is to evaluate ligand-receptor interaction energy or other scoring functions of a designed drug with that of the relevant ligands known to bind to the same binding site. As a tool to facilitate such a strategy, a database of ligand-receptor interaction energy is developed from known ligand-receptor 3D structural entries in the Protein Databank (PDB). The Energy is computed based on a molecular mechanics force field that has been used in the prediction of therapeutic and toxicity targets of drugs. This database also contains information about ligand function and other properties and it can be accessed at http://xin.cz3.nus.edu.sg/group/CLiBE.asp. The computed energy components may facilitate the probing of the mode of action and other profiles of binding. A number of computed energies of some PDB ligand-receptor complexes in this database are studied and compared to experimental binding affinity. A certain degree of correlation between the computed energy and experimental binding affinity is found, which suggests that the computed energy may be useful in facilitating a qualitative analysis of drug binding competitiveness.

  6. BINANA: A Novel Algorithm for Ligand-Binding Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Computational chemists and structural biologists are often interested in characterizing ligand-receptor complexes for hydrogen-bond, hydrophobic, salt-bridge, van der Waals, and other interactions in order to assess ligand binding. When done by hand, this characterization can become tedious, especially when many complexes need be analyzed. In order to facilitate the characterization of ligand binding, we here present a novel Python-implemented computer algorithm called BINANA (BINding ANAlyzer), which is freely available for download at http://www.nbcr.net/binana/. To demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm, we use BINANA to confirm that the number of hydrophobic contacts between a ligand and its protein receptor is positively correlated with ligand potency. Additionally, we show how BINANA can be used to search through a large ligand-receptor database to identify those complexes that are remarkable for selected binding features, and to identify lead candidates from a virtual screen with specific, desirable binding characteristics. We are hopeful that BINANA will be useful to computational chemists and structural biologists who wish to automatically characterize many ligand-receptor complexes for key binding characteristics. PMID:21310640

  7. Exploiting Ultra Tight-Binding Ligands for Separations Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Daryle; Givens, Richard S.; Zuo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Chi; Mosha, Donnati; Lee, Jong0Ill; Bushan, K. Mani; Hassan, Mansour M.; Loving, Galen

    2003-09-10

    The classic slowness that has kept the most powerful ligands from being used in separations applications is under attack in two ways: (1) replacing metal ion - ligand equilibration with switch binding and release as the mode of complexation. By exploiting the tight-binding capabilities of cryptands, the capture of selected metal ions isolates them from their environment. These cryptands are constructed with photoactivatable functions that sever the cryptand, releasing encapsulated metal ions. The precursors have been modified to capture the metal ion concomitant with crytate formation. (2) developing a methodology (the soil poultice) so slow that powerful ligands can be used. A solution containing the specially designed ligand is mixed with a solid macroporous imprinted polymer (MIPs) and applied to the contaminated area. The ligand captures the metal ion and the MIPs captures the resulting complex. Current studies focus on combinations of MIPs-complex interactions to optimize strength of binding and selectivity.

  8. Ligand binding analysis and screening by chemical denaturation shift.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Brown, Richard K; Hutchins, Burleigh M; Freire, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    The identification of small molecule ligands is an important first step in drug development, especially drugs that target proteins with no intrinsic activity. Toward this goal, it is important to have access to technologies that are able to measure binding affinities for a large number of potential ligands in a fast and accurate way. Because ligand binding stabilizes the protein structure in a manner dependent on concentration and binding affinity, the magnitude of the protein stabilization effect elicited by binding can be used to identify and characterize ligands. For example, the shift in protein denaturation temperature (Tm shift) has become a popular approach to identify potential ligands. However, Tm shifts cannot be readily transformed into binding affinities, and the ligand rank order obtained at denaturation temperatures (≥60°C) does not necessarily coincide with the rank order at physiological temperature. An alternative approach is the use of chemical denaturation, which can be implemented at any temperature. Chemical denaturation shifts allow accurate determination of binding affinities with a surprisingly wide dynamic range (high micromolar to sub nanomolar) and in situations where binding changes the cooperativity of the unfolding transition. In this article, we develop the basic analytical equations and provide several experimental examples.

  9. Hysteresis of ligand binding in CNGA2 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Nache, Vasilica; Eick, Thomas; Schulz, Eckhard; Schmauder, Ralf; Benndorf, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels mediate receptor potentials in olfaction and vision. The channels are activated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a binding domain embedded in the C terminus of each subunit. Here using a fluorescent cGMP derivative (fcGMP), we show for homotetrameric CNGA2 channels that ligand unbinding is ~50 times faster at saturating than at subsaturating fcGMP. Analysis with complex Markovian models reveals two pathways for ligand unbinding; the partially liganded open channel unbinds its ligands from closed states only, whereas the fully liganded channel reaches a different open state from which it unbinds all four ligands rapidly. Consequently, the transition pathways for ligand binding and activation of a fully liganded CNGA2 channel differ from that of ligand unbinding and deactivation, resulting in pronounced hysteresis of the gating mechanism. This concentration-dependent gating mechanism allows the channels to respond to changes in the cyclic nucleotide concentration with different kinetics. PMID:24287615

  10. Ligand clouds around protein clouds: a scenario of ligand binding with intrinsically disordered proteins.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fan; Yu, Chen; Lai, Luhua; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) were found to be widely associated with human diseases and may serve as potential drug design targets. However, drug design targeting IDPs is still in the very early stages. Progress in drug design is usually achieved using experimental screening; however, the structural disorder of IDPs makes it difficult to characterize their interaction with ligands using experiments alone. To better understand the structure of IDPs and their interactions with small molecule ligands, we performed extensive simulations on the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide and its binding to a reported small molecule inhibitor, ligand 10074-A4. We found that the conformational space of the apo c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ peptide was rather dispersed and that the conformations of the peptide were stabilized mainly by charge interactions and hydrogen bonds. Under the binding of the ligand, c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ remained disordered. The ligand was found to bind to c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ at different sites along the chain and behaved like a 'ligand cloud'. In contrast to ligand binding to more rigid target proteins that usually results in a dominant bound structure, ligand binding to IDPs may better be described as ligand clouds around protein clouds. Nevertheless, the binding of the ligand and a non-ligand to the c-Myc₃₇₀₋₄₀₉ target could be clearly distinguished. The present study provides insights that will help improve rational drug design that targets IDPs.

  11. Molecular simulations of multimodal ligand-protein binding: elucidation of binding sites and correlation with experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alexander S; Garde, Shekhar; Cramer, Steven M

    2011-11-17

    Multimodal chromatography, which employs more than one mode of interaction between ligands and proteins, has been shown to have unique selectivity and high efficacy for protein purification. To test the ability of free solution molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water to identify binding regions on the protein surface and to shed light on the "pseudo affinity" nature of multimodal interactions, we performed MD simulations of a model protein ubiquitin in aqueous solution of free ligands. Comparisons of MD with NMR spectroscopy of ubiquitin mutants in solutions of free ligands show a good agreement between the two with regard to the preferred binding region on the surface of the protein and several binding sites. MD simulations also identify additional binding sites that were not observed in the NMR experiments. "Bound" ligands were found to be sufficiently flexible and to access a number of favorable conformations, suggesting only a moderate loss of ligand entropy in the "pseudo affinity" binding of these multimodal ligands. Analysis of locations of chemical subunits of the ligand on the protein surface indicated that electrostatic interaction units were located on the periphery of the preferred binding region on the protein. The analysis of the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity maps, and the binding of both acetate and benzene probes were used to further study the localization of individual ligand moieties. These results suggest that water-mediated electrostatic interactions help the localization and orientation of the MM ligand to the binding region with additional stability provided by nonspecific hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Facile dimer synthesis for DNA-binding polyamide ligands.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, Modi; Wemmer, David E

    2010-08-06

    Pyrrole-imidazole polyamide ligands are highly sequence specific synthetic DNA-binding ligands that bind with high affinity. To counter the synthetic difficulties associated with coupling the electron-rich heterocyclic acids to the electron-deficient nucleophilic imidazole amine, a novel approach is described for synthesis of Fmoc-protected dimers for solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method produces the dimers in high yields, is broadly applicable to other heterocyclic-containing polyamides, and results in improved ligand yields and synthesis times.

  13. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of <0.05 mol/kg of these organic anions changes calcite dissolution rates by less than a factor of 2.5 with the exception of citrate and EDTA 4-. The presence of 0.05 mol/kg citrate and EDTA 4- increases calcite dissolution rates by as much as a factor of 35 and 500, respectively, compared to rates in organic anion-free solutions. Further calcite dissolution experiments were performed in the presence of organic polymers similar to bacterial exudates, cell exopolysaccharides, and analogs of microbial cell envelopes: alginate, lichen extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  14. Analyzing Ligand Depletion in a Saturation Equilibrium Binding Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claro, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    I present a proposal for a laboratory practice to generate and analyze data from a saturation equilibrium binding experiment addressed to advanced undergraduate students. [[superscript 3]H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate is a nonselective muscarinic ligand with very high affinity and very low nonspecific binding to brain membranes, which contain a high…

  15. A model for ligand binding to hexacoordinate hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Trent, J T; Hvitved, A N; Hargrove, M S

    2001-05-22

    Hexacoordinate hemoglobins are heme proteins capable of reversible intramolecular coordination of the ligand binding site by an amino acid side chain from within the heme pocket. Examples of these proteins are found in many living organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. The nonsymbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) are a class of hexacoordinate heme proteins present in all plants. The nsHb from rice (rHb1) has been used as a model system to develop methods for determining rate constants characterizing binding and dissociation of the His residue responsible for hexacoordination. Measurement of these reactions exploits laser flash photolysis to initiate the reaction from the unligated, pentacoordinate form of the heme protein. A model for ligand binding is presented that incorporates the reaction following rapid mixing with the reaction starting from the pentacoordinate hemoglobin (Hb). This model is based on results indicating that ligand binding to hexacoordinate Hbs is not a simple combination of competing first order (hexacoordination) and second order (exogenous ligand binding) reactions. Ligand binding following rapid mixing is a multiphasic reaction displaying time courses ranging from milliseconds to minutes. The new model incorporates a "closed", slow reacting form of the protein that is not at rapid equilibrium with the reactive conformation. It is also demonstrated that formation of the closed protein species is not dependent on hexacoordination.

  16. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  17. Binding kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands: Molecular dynamics simulations and theory.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2015-12-28

    The adhesion of biological membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. Central questions are how the binding kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring of the proteins. In this article, we (i) present detailed data for the binding of membrane-anchored proteins from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and (ii) provide a theory that describes how the binding kinetics depends on the average separation and thermal roughness of the adhering membranes and on the anchoring, lengths, and length variations of the proteins. An important element of our theory is the tilt of bound receptor-ligand complexes and transition-state complexes relative to the membrane normals. This tilt results from an interplay of the anchoring energy and rotational entropy of the complexes and facilitates the formation of receptor-ligand bonds at membrane separations smaller than the preferred separation for binding. In our simulations, we have considered both lipid-anchored and transmembrane receptor and ligand proteins. We find that the binding equilibrium constant and binding on-rate constant of lipid-anchored proteins are considerably smaller than the binding constant and on-rate constant of rigid transmembrane proteins with identical binding domains.

  18. Ion exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies: effect of resin ligand density on dynamic binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Ann Marie; Harinarayan, Chithkala; Malmquist, Gunnar; Axén, Andreas; van Reis, Robert

    2009-05-15

    Dynamic binding capacity (DBC) of a monoclonal antibody on agarose based strong cation exchange resins is determined as a function of resin ligand density, apparent pore size of the base matrix, and protein charge. The maximum DBC is found to be unaffected by resin ligand density, apparent pore size, or protein charge within the tested range. The critical conductivity (conductivity at maximum DBC) is seen to vary with ligand density. It is hypothesized that the maximum DBC is determined by the effective size of the proteins and the proximity to which they can approach one another. Once a certain minimum resin ligand density is supplied, additional ligand is not beneficial in terms of resin capacity. Additional ligand can provide flexibility in designing ion exchange resins for a particular application as the critical conductivity could be matched to the feedstock conductivity and it may also affect the selectivity.

  19. Calculation of cooperativity and equilibrium constants of ligands binding to G-quadruplex DNA in solution.

    PubMed

    Kudrev, A G

    2013-11-15

    Equilibrium model of a ligand binding with DNA oligomer has been considered as a process of small molecule adsorption onto a lattice of multiple binding sites. An experimental example has been used to verify the assertion that during saturation of the macromolecule by a ligand should expect effect of cooperativity due to changes in DNA conformation or the mutual influence between bound ligands. Such phenomenon cannot be entirely described by the classical stepwise complex formation model. To evaluate a ligand binding affinity and cooperativity of ligand-oligomer complex formation the statistical approach has been proposed. This new computational approach used to re-examine previously studded ligand binding towards DNA quadruplexes targets with multiple binding sites. The intrinsic equilibrium constants K1-3 of the mesotetrakis-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (TMPyP4) binding with the [d(T4G4)]4 and with the [AG3(T2AG3)3] quadruplexes and the correction for the mutual influence between bound ligands (cooperativity parameters ω) was determined from the Job plots based upon the nonlinear least-squares fitting procedure. The re-examination of experimental curves reveals that the equilibrium is affected by the positive cooperative (ω>1) binding of the TMPyP4 ligand with tetramolecular [d(T4G4)]4. However for an intramolecular antiparallel-parallel hybrid structure [AG3(T2AG3)3] the weak anti-cooperativity of TMPyP4 accommodation (ω<1) onto two from three nonidentical sites was detected.

  20. Ligand binding was acquired during evolution of nuclear receptors

    PubMed Central

    Escriva, Hector; Safi, Rachid; Hänni, Catherine; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Stehelin, Dominique; Capron, André; Pierce, Raymond; Laudet, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily comprises, in addition to ligand-activated transcription factors, members for which no ligand has been identified to date. We demonstrate that orphan receptors are randomly distributed in the evolutionary tree and that there is no relationship between the position of a given liganded receptor in the tree and the chemical nature of its ligand. NRs are specific to metazoans, as revealed by a screen of NR-related sequences in early- and non-metazoan organisms. The analysis of the NR gene duplication pattern during the evolution of metazoans shows that the present NR diversity arose from two waves of gene duplications. Strikingly, our results suggest that the ancestral NR was an orphan receptor that acquired ligand-binding ability during subsequent evolution. PMID:9192646

  1. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  2. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  3. Structural and functional characterization of the human formyl peptide receptor ligand-binding region.

    PubMed Central

    Radel, S J; Genco, R J; De Nardin, E

    1994-01-01

    The formyl peptide (N-formyl-1-methionyl-1-leucyl-1-phenylalanine [FMLP]) receptor is involved in the activation of neutrophils and their subsequent response to chemotactic N-formylated peptides. Recently, we found that the first extracellular loop closest to the N-terminal end of the FMLP receptor exhibited the strongest ligand binding compared with that shown by other extracellular regions. By constructing amino acid substitutional variants of this domain, we have determined that residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 on this loop play major roles in ligand-binding activity. Furthermore, random rearrangement of the residues of this receptor region demonstrated that the position of these charged amino acids did not affect their involvement in ligand binding, although their presence was essential for this binding to occur. We propose that the portion of the first N-terminal extracellular loop of the FMLP receptor containing residues Arg-84 and Lys-85 contributes significantly to the active site in ligand-receptor binding. We further propose that this binding is not dependent on defined structure but rather that these charged moieties may function as important "contacts" in receptor-ligand interactions. Images PMID:8168934

  4. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    SciTech Connect

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  5. Evidence for chemoreceptors with bimodular ligand-binding regions harboring two signal-binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Molina, Estela; Reyes-Darias, José-Antonio; Lacal, Jesús; Ramos, Juan L.; García-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Gavira, Jose A.; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemoreceptor-based signaling is a central mechanism in bacterial signal transduction. Receptors are classified according to the size of their ligand-binding region. The well-studied cluster I proteins have a 100- to 150-residue ligand-binding region that contains a single site for chemoattractant recognition. Cluster II receptors, which contain a 220- to 300-residue ligand-binding region and which are almost as abundant as cluster I receptors, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report high-resolution structures of the ligand-binding region of the cluster II McpS chemotaxis receptor (McpS-LBR) of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 in complex with different chemoattractants. The structure of McpS-LBR represents a small-molecule binding domain composed of two modules, each able to bind different signal molecules. Malate and succinate were found to bind to the membrane-proximal module, whereas acetate binds to the membrane-distal module. A structural alignment of the two modules revealed that the ligand-binding sites could be superimposed and that amino acids involved in ligand recognition are conserved in both binding sites. Ligand binding to both modules was shown to trigger chemotactic responses. Further analysis showed that McpS-like receptors were found in different classes of proteobacteria, indicating that this mode of response to different carbon sources may be universally distributed. The physiological relevance of the McpS architecture may lie in its capacity to respond with high sensitivity to the preferred carbon sources malate and succinate and, at the same time, mediate lower sensitivity responses to the less preferred but very abundant carbon source acetate. PMID:23112148

  6. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  7. Ligand-Receptor Binding Measured by Laser-Scanning Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuck, Paul; Lao, Zhege; Skwish, Stephen; Fraser Glickman, J.; Yang, Ke; Burbaum, Jonathan; Inglese, James

    1999-09-01

    This report describes the integration of laser-scanning fluorometric cytometry and nonseparation ligand-binding techniques to provide new assay methods adaptable to miniaturization and high-throughput screening. Receptor-bound, cyanine dye-labeled ligands, [Cy]ligands, were discriminated from those free in solution by measuring the accumulated fluorescence associated with a receptor-containing particle. To illustrate the various binding formats accommodated by this technique, saturation- and competition-binding analyses were performed with [Cy]ligands and their cognate receptors expressed in CHO cells or as fusion proteins coated on polystyrene microspheres. We have successfully applied this technique to the analysis of G protein-coupled receptors, cytokine receptors, and SH2 domains. Multiparameter readouts from ligands labeled separately with Cy5 and Cy5.5 demonstrate the simultaneous analysis of two target receptors in a single well. In addition, laser-scanning cytometry has been used to assay enzymes such as phosphatases and in the development of single-step fluorescent immunoassays.

  8. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  9. Kinetics of binding of fluorescent ligands to enzymes with engineered access tunnels.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Shubhangi; Prokop, Zbynek; Damborsky, Jiri; Chaloupkova, Radka

    2017-01-01

    Molecular recognition mechanisms and kinetics of binding of ligands to buried active sites via access tunnels are not well understood. Fluorescence polarization enables rapid and non-destructive real-time quantification of the association between small fluorescent ligands and large biomolecules. In this study, we describe analysis of binding kinetics of fluorescent ligands resembling linear halogenated alkanes to haloalkane dehalogenases. Dehalogenases possess buried active sites connected to the surrounding solvent by access tunnels. Modification of these tunnels by mutagenesis has emerged as a novel strategy to tailor the enzyme properties. We demonstrate that the fluorescence polarization method can sense differences in binding kinetics originating from even single mutations introduced to the tunnels. The results show, strikingly, that the rate constant of the dehalogenase variants varied across seven orders of magnitude, and the type of ligand used strongly affected the binding kinetics of the enzyme. Furthermore, fluorescence polarization could be applied to cell-free extracts instead of purified proteins, extending the method's application to medium-throughput screening of enzyme variant libraries generated in directed evolution experiments. The method can also provide in-depth kinetic information about the rate-determining step in binding kinetics and reveals the bottlenecks of enzyme accessibility. Assuming availability of appropriate fluorescent ligand, the method could be applied for analysis of accessibility of tunnels and buried active sites of enzymes forming a covalent alkyl-enzyme intermediate during their catalytic cycle, such as α/β-hydrolases containing > 100 000 protein sequences based on the Pfam database.

  10. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  11. Enhanced Ligand Sampling for Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Free energy calculations are used to study how strongly potential drug molecules interact with their target receptors. The accuracy of these calculations depends on the accuracy of the molecular dynamics (MD) force field as well as proper sampling of the major conformations of each molecule. However, proper sampling of ligand conformations can be difficult when there are large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. An example of this is for ligands with an asymmetrically substituted phenyl ring, where the presence of protein loops hinders the proper sampling of the different ring conformations. These ring conformations become more difficult to sample when the size of the functional groups attached to the ring increases. The Adaptive Integration Method (AIM) has been developed, which adaptively changes the alchemical coupling parameter λ during the MD simulation so that conformations sampled at one λ can aid sampling at the other λ values. The Accelerated Adaptive Integration Method (AcclAIM) builds on AIM by lowering potential barriers for specific degrees of freedom at intermediate λ values. However, these methods may not work when there are very large barriers separating the major ligand conformations. In this work, we describe a modification to AIM that improves sampling of the different ring conformations, even when there is a very large barrier between them. This method combines AIM with conformational Monte Carlo sampling, giving improved convergence of ring populations and the resulting free energy. This method, called AIM/MC, is applied to study the relative binding free energy for a pair of ligands that bind to thrombin and a different pair of ligands that bind to aspartyl protease β-APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). These protein–ligand binding free energy calculations illustrate the improvements in conformational sampling and the convergence of the free energy compared to both AIM and AcclAIM. PMID:25906170

  12. Dynamics of biomolecules, ligand binding & biological functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myunggi

    Proteins are flexible and dynamic. One static structure alone does not often completely explain biological functions of the protein, and some proteins do not even have high resolution structures. In order to provide better understanding to the biological functions of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, Diphtheria toxin repressor and M2 proton channel, the dynamics of these proteins are investigated using molecular modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With absence of high resolution structure of alpha7 receptor, the homology models of apo and cobra toxin bound forms have been built. From the MD simulations of these model structures, we observed one subunit of apo simulation moved away from other four subunits. With local movement of flexible loop regions, the whole subunit tilted clockwise. These conformational changes occurred spontaneously, and were strongly correlated with the conformational change when the channel is activated by agonists. Unlike other computational studies, we directly compared our model of open conformation with the experimental data. However, the subunits of toxin bound form were stable, and conformational change is restricted by the bound cobra toxin. These results provide activation and inhibition mechanisms of alpha7 receptors and a possible explanation for intermediate conductance of the channel. Intramolecular complex of SH3-like domain with a proline-rich (Pr) peptide segment in Diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is stabilized in inactive state. Upon activation of DtxR by transition metal binding, this intramolecular complex should be dissociated. The dynamics of this intramolecular complex is investigated using MD simulations and NMR spectroscopy. We observed spontaneous opening and closing motions of the Pr segment binding pockets in both Pr-SH3 and SH3 simulations. The MD simulation results and NMR relaxation data suggest that the Pr segment exhibits a binding ↔ unbinding equilibrium. Despite a wealth of experimental

  13. Gaussian mapping of chemical fragments in ligand binding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Murcia, Marta; Constans, Pere; Pérez, Carlos; Ortiz, Angel R.

    2004-02-01

    We present a new approach to automatically define a quasi-optimal minimal set of pharmacophoric points mapping the interaction properties of a user-defined ligand binding site. The method is based on a fitting algorithm where a grid of sampled interaction energies of the target protein with small chemical fragments in the binding site is approximated by a linear expansion of Gaussian functions. A heuristic approximation selects from this expansion the smallest possible set of Gaussians required to describe the interaction properties of the binding site within a prespecified accuracy. We have evaluated the performance of the approach by comparing the computed Gaussians with the positions of aromatic sites found in experimental protein-ligand complexes. For a set of 53 complexes, good correspondence is found in general. At a 95% significance level, ˜65% of the predicted interaction points have an aromatic binding site within 1.5 Å. We then studied the utility of these points in docking using the program DOCK. Short docking times, with an average of ˜0.18 s per conformer, are obtained, while retaining, both for rigid and flexible docking, the ability to sample native-like binding modes for the ligand. An average 4-5-fold speed-up in docking times and a similar success rate is estimated with respect to the standard DOCK protocol. Abbreviations: RMSD - root mean square deviation; ASA - Atomic Shell Approximation; LSF - Least-Squares Fitting; 3D - three-dimensional; VDW - Van der Waals.

  14. Formyl peptide receptor chimeras define domains involved in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Perez, H D; Holmes, R; Vilander, L R; Adams, R R; Manzana, W; Jolley, D; Andrews, W H

    1993-02-05

    We have begun to study the structural requirements for the binding of formyl peptides to their specific receptors. As an initial approach, we constructed C5a-formyl peptide receptor chimeras. Unique (and identical) restriction sites were introduced within the transmembrane domains of these receptors that allowed for the exchange of specific areas. Four types of chimeric receptors were generated. 1) The C5a receptor was progressively substituted by the formyl peptide receptor. 2) The formyl peptide receptor was progressively substituted by the C5a receptor. 3) Specific domains of the C5a receptor were substituted by the corresponding domain of the formyl peptide receptor. 4) Specific domains of the formyl peptide receptor were replaced by the same corresponding domain of the C5a receptor. Wild type and chimeric receptors were transfected into COS 7 cells and their ability to bind formyl peptide determined, taking into account efficiency of transfection and expression of chimeric protein. Based on these results, a ligand binding model is presented in which the second, third, and fourth extracellular (and/or their transmembrane) domains together with the first transmembrane domain form a ligand binding pocket for formyl peptides. It is proposed that the amino-terminal domain plays a role by presumably providing a "lid" to the pocket. The carboxyl-terminal cytoplasmic tail appears to modulate ligand binding by regulating receptor affinity.

  15. Current Trends in Ligand Binding Real-Time Measurement Technologies.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Stephanie; Shih, Judy Y; Ware, Mark; O'Connor, Edward; Cameron, Mark J; Schwickart, Martin; Zhao, Xuemei; Regnstrom, Karin

    2017-03-20

    Numerous advances in ligand binding assay (LBA) real-time measurement technologies have been made within the last several years, ranging from the development of novel platforms to drive technology expansion to the adaptation of existing platforms to optimize performance and throughput. In this review, we have chosen to focus on technologies that provide increased value to two distinct segments of the LBA community. First, experimentally, by measuring real-time binding events, these technologies provide data that can be used to interrogate receptor/ligand binding interactions. While overall the platforms are not new, they have made significant advances in throughput, multiplexing, and/or sensitivity. Second, clinically, these point-of-care (POC) technologies provide instantaneous information which facilitates rapid treatment decisions.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Grove, Anne

    2010-10-01

    Bacteria and archaea encode members of the large multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family of transcriptional regulators. Generally, MarR homologs regulate activity of genes involved in antibiotic resistance, stress responses, virulence or catabolism of aromatic compounds. They constitute a diverse group of transcriptional regulators that includes both repressors and activators, and the conventional mode of regulation entails a genetic locus in which the MarR homolog and a gene under its regulation are encoded divergently; binding of the MarR homolog to the intergenic region typically represses transcription of both genes, while binding of a specific ligand to the transcription factor results in attenuated DNA binding and hence activated gene expression. For many homologs, the natural ligand is unknown. Crystal structures reveal a common architecture with a characteristic winged helix domain for DNA binding, and recent structural information of homologs solved both in the absence and presence of their respective ligands, as well as biochemical data, is finally converging to illuminate the mechanisms by which ligand-binding causes attenuated DNA binding. As MarR homologs regulate pathways that are critical to bacterial physiology, including virulence, a molecular understanding of mechanisms by which ligands affect a regulation of gene activity is essential. Specifying the position of ligand-binding pockets further has the potential to aid in identifying the ligands for MarR homologs for which the ligand remains unknown.

  17. myo-Inositol and d-Ribose Ligand Discrimination in an ABC Periplasmic Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Herrou, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds d-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and d-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for d-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on d-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands. PMID:23504019

  18. Ligand Migration and Binding in Myoglobin Mutant L29W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Waschipky, Robert; Nienhaus, Karin; Minkow, Oleksandr; Ostermann, Andreas; Parak, Fritz G.

    2001-09-01

    Myoglobin, a small globular heme protein that binds gaseous ligands such as O2, CO, and NO reversibly at the heme iron, has for many years been a paradigm for studying the effects of structure and dynamics on protein reactions. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements after photodissociation of the ligand reveal a complex ligand binding reaction with multiple kinetic intermediates, resulting from protein relaxation and movements of the ligand within the protein. To observe structural changes induced by ligand dissociation, we have investigated carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) mutant L29W using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in combination with x-ray crystallography. The presence of two distinct infrared stretch bands of the bound CO, AI at 1945 cm-1 and AII at 1955 cm-1, implies that L29W MbCO assumes two different conformations at neutral pH. Low-temperature flash photolysis experiments with monitoring of the absorption changes in the individual CO lines reveal markedly different rebinding properties. While recombination in AII is conceptually simple and well described by a two-state transition involving a distribution of enthalpy barriers, recombination in AI is more complicated: Besides a fast kinetic component, a second, slower kinetic component appears; its population grows with increasing temperature. X-ray crystallography of crystals illuminated below 180 K to photodissociate the CO reveals that the slow component arises from ligands that have migrated from their initial docking site to a remote site within the distal heme pocket. This process occurs in an essentially immobilized, frozen protein. Subsequently, ligands rebind by thermal activation over a barrier that is much higher than the barrier for recombination from the initial docking site. Upon photodissociation above 180 K, ligands escape from the distal pocket, aided by protein fluctuations that transiently open exit channels. The x-ray structure shows a large proportion of ligands in a cavity on

  19. Using chemical shift perturbation to characterise ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Mike P

    2013-08-01

    Chemical shift perturbation (CSP, chemical shift mapping or complexation-induced changes in chemical shift, CIS) follows changes in the chemical shifts of a protein when a ligand is added, and uses these to determine the location of the binding site, the affinity of the ligand, and/or possibly the structure of the complex. A key factor in determining the appearance of spectra during a titration is the exchange rate between free and bound, or more specifically the off-rate koff. When koff is greater than the chemical shift difference between free and bound, which typically equates to an affinity Kd weaker than about 3μM, then exchange is fast on the chemical shift timescale. Under these circumstances, the observed shift is the population-weighted average of free and bound, which allows Kd to be determined from measurement of peak positions, provided the measurements are made appropriately. (1)H shifts are influenced to a large extent by through-space interactions, whereas (13)Cα and (13)Cβ shifts are influenced more by through-bond effects. (15)N and (13)C' shifts are influenced both by through-bond and by through-space (hydrogen bonding) interactions. For determining the location of a bound ligand on the basis of shift change, the most appropriate method is therefore usually to measure (15)N HSQC spectra, calculate the geometrical distance moved by the peak, weighting (15)N shifts by a factor of about 0.14 compared to (1)H shifts, and select those residues for which the weighted shift change is larger than the standard deviation of the shift for all residues. Other methods are discussed, in particular the measurement of (13)CH3 signals. Slow to intermediate exchange rates lead to line broadening, and make Kd values very difficult to obtain. There is no good way to distinguish changes in chemical shift due to direct binding of the ligand from changes in chemical shift due to allosteric change. Ligand binding at multiple sites can often be characterised, by

  20. Genetic deletion of the EGFR ligand epigen does not affect mouse embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dahlhoff, Maik; Schäfer, Matthias; Wolf, Eckhard; Schneider, Marlon R

    2013-02-15

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor with manifold functions during development, tissue homeostasis and disease. EGFR activation, the formation of homodimers or heterodimers (with the related ERBB2-4 receptors) and downstream signaling is initiated by the binding of a family of structurally related growth factors, the EGFR ligands. Genetic deletion experiments clarified the biological function of all family members except for the last characterized ligand, epigen. We employed gene targeting in mouse embryonic stem cells to generate mice lacking epigen expression. Loss of epigen did not affect mouse development, fertility, or organ physiology. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed increased expression of betacellulin and EGF in a few organs of epigen-deficient mice, suggesting a functional compensation by these ligands. In conclusion, we completed the genetic analysis of EGFR ligands and show that epigen has non-essential functions or functions that can be compensated by other EGFR ligands during growth and tissue homeostasis.

  1. Does the ligand-biopolymer equilibrium binding constant depend on the number of bound ligands?

    PubMed

    Beshnova, Daria A; Lantushenko, Anastasia O; Evstigneev, Maxim P

    2010-11-01

    Conventional methods, such as Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel analyses, used to treat ligand-biopolymer interactions, indirectly make the assumption that the microscopic binding constant is independent of the number of ligands, i, already bound to the biopolymer. Recent results on the aggregation of aromatic molecules (Beshnova et al., J Chem Phys 2009, 130, 165105) indicated that the equilibrium constant of self-association depends intrinsically on the number of molecules in an aggregate due to loss of translational and rotational degrees of freedom on formation of the complex. The influence of these factors on the equilibrium binding constant for ligand-biopolymer complexation was analyzed in this work. It was shown that under the conditions of binding of "small" molecules, these factors can effectively be ignored and, hence, do not provide any hidden systematic error in such widely-used approaches, such as the Scatchard or McGhee-von Hippel methods for analyzing ligand-biopolymer complexation. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 93: 932-935, 2010.

  2. ITC analysis of ligand binding to preQ₁ riboswitches.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Bogue, Jarrod T; Jenkins, Jermaine L; Salim, Mohammad; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches regulate genes by binding to small-molecule effectors. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a label-free method to quantify the equilibrium association constant, K(A), of a riboswitch interaction with its cognate ligand. In addition to probing affinity and specific chemical contributions that contribute to binding, ITC can be used to measure the thermodynamic parameters of an interaction (ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS), in addition to the binding stoichiometry (N). Here, we describe methods developed to measure the binding affinity of various preQ1 riboswitch classes for the pyrrolopyrimidine effector, preQ1. Example isotherms are provided along with a review of various preQ1-II (class 2) riboswitch mutants that were interrogated by ITC to quantify the energetic contributions of specific interactions visualized in the crystal structure. Protocols for ITC are provided in sufficient detail that the reader can reproduce experiments independently, or develop derivative methods suitable for analyzing novel riboswitch-ligand binding interactions.

  3. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae).

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 Å(³) compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 Å(³). Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP.

  4. Structure-Based Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Mechanism for DhelOBP21, a C-minus Odorant Binding Protein, from Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire; Coleoptera: Bothrideridae)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dong-Zhen; Yu, Guang-Qiang; Yi, Shan-Cheng; Zhang, Yinan; Kong, De-Xin; Wang, Man-Qun

    2015-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) transport hydrophobic odor molecules across the sensillar lymph to trigger a neuronal response. Herein, the Minus-C OBP (DhelOBP21) was characterized from Dastarcus helophoroides, the most important natural parasitic enemy insect that targets Monochamus alternatus. Homology modeling and molecular docking were conducted on the interaction between DhelOBP21 and 17 volatile molecules (including volatiles from pine bark, the larva of M. alternatus, and the faeces of the larva). The predicted three-dimensional structure showed only two disulfide bridges and a hydrophobic binding cavity with a short C-terminus. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenylnaphthylamine (1-NPN) as a fluorescent probe showed that DhelOBP21 exhibited better binding affinities against those ligands with a molecular volume between 100 and 125 ų compared with ligands with a molecular volume between 160 and 185 ų. Molecules that are too big or too small are not conducive for binding. We mutated the amino acid residues of the binding cavity to increase either hydrophobicity or hydrophilia. Ligand-binding experiments and cyber molecular docking assays indicated that hydrophobic interactions are more significant than hydrogen-bonding interactions. Although hydrogen-bond interactions could be predicted for some binding complexes, the hydrophobic interactions had more influence on binding following hydrophobic changes that affected the cavity. The orientation of ligands affects binding by influencing hydrophobic interactions. The binding process is controlled by multiple factors. This study provides a basis to explore the ligand-binding mechanisms of Minus-C OBP. PMID:26435694

  5. Leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein contracts upon binding of ligand.

    PubMed

    Olah, G A; Trakhanov, S; Trewhella, J; Quiocho, F A

    1993-08-05

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and computer modeling have been used to study the effects of ligand binding to the leucine/isoleucine/valine-binding protein, an initial component of the high-affinity active transport system for branched-chain aliphatic amino acids in Escherichia coli. Measurements were made with no ligand present and with either L-leucine or L-valine present. Upon binding of either leucine or valine, there is a decrease in the radius of gyration, from 23.2 +/- 0.2 to 22.2 +/- 0.2 A, and in the maximum particle dimension, from 82 +/- 3 to 73 +/- 3 A. The x-ray structure of the unbound form has been determined and gives a radius of gyration and a maximum dimension consistent with the values found for the solution structure in this study (Sack, J. S., Saper, M. A., and Quiocho, F. A. (1989) J. Mol. Biol. 206, 171-191). The reduction in the radius of gyration and maximum dimension upon ligand binding can be accounted for by a substrate-induced cleft closure in a combined "hinge-twist" motion. Modeling of the substrate-bound state was done by comparison of this protein with another periplasmic binding protein (L-arabinose-binding protein), which possesses a similar two-lobe structure and for which the x-ray structure is known in its ligand-bound form.

  6. Ligand binding by recombinant domains from insect ecdysone receptors.

    PubMed

    Graham, L D; Johnson, W M; Pawlak-Skrzecz, A; Eaton, R E; Bliese, M; Howell, L; Hannan, G N; Hill, R J

    2007-06-01

    The ligand binding domains (LBDs) from the EcR and USP proteins of four insect pests (Lucilia cuprina, Myzus persicae, Bemisia tabaci, Helicoverpa armigera) were purified as recombinant heterodimers. The K(d) values for [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding by LBD heterodimers that included the hinge regions (i.e., DE/F heterodimers) ranged 0.7-2.5 nM, with K(i) values for ecdysteroid and dibenzoylhydrazine ligands ranging from 0.1 nM to >448 microM. The K(d) and K(i) values for a recombinant H. armigera LBD heterodimer that lacked D-regions (i.e., an E/F heterodimer) were approximately 4 times higher than those for its DE/F counterpart. Rate constants were estimated for the L. cuprina LBD heterodimer. A fluorescein-inokosterone conjugate (K(i)~40 nM) was used to develop a novel binding assay based on fluorescence polarization. This assay, which ranked the affinity of competitor ecdysteroids in the same order as the [(3)H]-ponasterone A binding assay, is well suited to high-throughput screening. Ponasterone A had a higher affinity than muristerone A for the recombinant hemipteran LBD heterodimers, whereas the reverse was true for the recombinant dipteran one. The same preference was observed when these ligands were tested as inducers of ecdysone receptor-controlled gene expression in transfected mammalian cells. The binding data obtained in vitro using recombinant LBD heterodimers reflects the ability of agonists to induce transgene expression in recombinant mammalian cells, and can also reflect their efficacy as larvicides.

  7. Engineering cofactor and ligand binding in an artificial neuroglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    HP-7 is one artificial mutated oxygen transport protein, which operates via a mechanism akin to human neuroglobin and cytoglobin. This protein destabilizes one of two heme-ligating histidine residues by coupling histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Replacement of these glutamate residues with alanine, which has a neutral hydrophobicity, slows gaseous ligand binding 22-fold, increases the affinity of the distal histidine ligand by a factor of thirteen, and decreases the binding affinity of carbon monoxide, a nonreactive oxygen analogue, three-fold. Paradoxically, it also decreases heme binding affinity by a factor of three in the reduced state and six in the oxidized state. Application of a two-state binding model, in which an initial pentacoordinate binding event is followed by a protein conformational change to hexacoordinate, provides insight into the mechanism of this seemingly counterintuitive result: the initial pentacoordinate encounter complex is significantly destabilized by the loss of the glutamate side chains, and the increased affinity for the distal histidine only partially compensates. These results point to the importance of considering each oxidation and conformational state in the design of functional artificial proteins. We have also examined the effects these mutations have on function. The K d of the nonnreactive oxygen analogue carbon monoxide (CO) is only decreased three-fold, despite the large increase in distal histidine affinity engendered by the 22-fold decrease in the histidine ligand off-rate. This is a result of the four-fold increase in affinity for CO binding to the pentacoordinate state. Oxygen binds to HP7 with a Kd of 117 µM, while the mutant rapidly oxidizes when exposed to oxygen. EPR analysis of both ferric hemoproteins demonstrates that the mutation increases disorder at the heme binding site. NMR-detected deuterium exchange demonstrates that the mutation causes a

  8. LibME-automatic extraction of 3D ligand-binding motifs for mechanistic analysis of protein-ligand recognition.

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Liang, Zhi; Teng, MaiKun; Niu, LiWen

    2016-12-01

    Identifying conserved binding motifs is an efficient way to study protein-ligand recognition. Most 3D binding motifs only contain information from the protein side, and so motifs that combine information from both protein and ligand sides are desired. Here, we propose an algorithm called LibME (Ligand-binding Motif Extractor), which automatically extracts 3D binding motifs composed of the target ligand and surrounding conserved residues. We show that the motifs extracted by LibME for ATP and its analogs are highly similar to well-known motifs reported by previous studies. The superiority of our method to handle flexible ligands was also demonstrated using isocitric acid as an example. Finally, we show that these motifs, together with their visual exhibition, permit better investigating and understanding of protein-ligand recognition process.

  9. Small Molecule Ligands of Methyl-Lysine Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herold, J. Martin; Wigle, Tim J.; Norris, Jacqueline L.; Lam, Robert; Korboukh, Victoria K.; Gao, Cen; Ingerman, Lindsey A.; Kireev, Dmitri B.; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins which bind methylated lysines (“readers” of the histone code) are important components in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and can also modulate other proteins that contain methyl-lysine such as p53 and Rb. Recognition of methyl-lysine marks by MBT domains leads to compaction of chromatin and a repressed transcriptional state. Antagonists of MBT domains would serve as probes to interrogate the functional role of these proteins and initiate the chemical biology of methyl-lysine readers as a target class. Small molecule MBT antagonists were designed based on the structure of histone peptide-MBT complexes and their interaction with MBT domains determined using a chemiluminescent assay and ITC. The ligands discovered antagonize native histone peptide binding, exhibiting 5-fold stronger binding affinity to L3MBTL1 than its preferred histone peptide. The first co-crystal structure of a small molecule bound to L3MBTL1 was determined and provides new insights into binding requirements for further ligand design. PMID:21417280

  10. Small-molecule ligands of methyl-lysine binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Herold, J Martin; Wigle, Tim J; Norris, Jacqueline L; Lam, Robert; Korboukh, Victoria K; Gao, Cen; Ingerman, Lindsey A; Kireev, Dmitri B; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Brown, Peter J; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V

    2011-04-14

    Proteins which bind methylated lysines ("readers" of the histone code) are important components in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and can also modulate other proteins that contain methyl-lysine such as p53 and Rb. Recognition of methyl-lysine marks by MBT domains leads to compaction of chromatin and a repressed transcriptional state. Antagonists of MBT domains would serve as probes to interrogate the functional role of these proteins and initiate the chemical biology of methyl-lysine readers as a target class. Small-molecule MBT antagonists were designed based on the structure of histone peptide-MBT complexes and their interaction with MBT domains determined using a chemiluminescent assay and ITC. The ligands discovered antagonize native histone peptide binding, exhibiting 5-fold stronger binding affinity to L3MBTL1 than its preferred histone peptide. The first cocrystal structure of a small molecule bound to L3MBTL1 was determined and provides new insights into binding requirements for further ligand design.

  11. CO Binding and Ligand Discrimination in Human Myeloperoxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Emma J.; Maréchal, Amandine; Segal, Anthony W.; Rich, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that ferrous myeloperoxidase (MPO) can bind both O2 and NO, its ability to bind CO has been questioned. UV/visible spectroscopy was used to confirm that CO induces small spectral shifts in ferrous MPO, and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy showed definitively that these arose from formation of a heme ferrous–CO compound. Recombination rates after CO photolysis were monitored at 618 and 645 nm as a function of CO concentration and pH. At pH 6.3, kon and koff were 0.14 mM−1·s−1 and 0.23 s−1, respectively, yielding an unusually high KD of 1.6 mM. This affinity of MPO for CO is 10 times weaker than its affinity for O2. The observed rate constant for CO binding increased with increasing pH and was governed by a single protonatable group with a pKa of 7.8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed two different conformations of bound CO with frequencies at 1927 and 1942 cm−1. Their recombination rate constants were identical, indicative of two forms of bound CO that are in rapid thermal equilibrium rather than two distinct protein populations with different binding sites. The ratio of bound states was pH-dependent (pKa ≈ 7.4) with the 1927 cm−1 form favored at high pH. Structural factors that account for the ligand-binding properties of MPO are identified by comparisons with published data on a range of other ligand-binding heme proteins, and support is given to the recent suggestion that the proximal His336 in MPO is in a true imidazolate state. PMID:20146436

  12. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  13. A determination of Mg(+)-ligand binding energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical calculations employing large basis sets and including correlation are carried out for Mg(+) with methanol, water, and formaldehyde. For Mg(+) with ethanol and acetaldehyde, the trends in the binding energies are studied at the self-consistent-field level. The predictions for the binding energy of Mg(+) to methanol and water of 41 + or - 5 and 36 + or - 5 kcal/mol, respectively, are much less than the experimental upper bounds, of 61 + or - 5 and 60 + or - 5 kcal mol, determined by using photodissociation techniques. The theoretical results are inconsistent with the onset of Mg(+) production observed in the photodissociation experiments, as the smallest absorptions are calculated at about 80 kcal/mol for both Mg(+)-CH3OH and Mg(+)-H2O, and these transitions are to bound excited states. The binding energy for Mg(+) with formaldehyde is predicted to be similar to Mg(+)-H2O. The relative binding energies are in reasonable agreement with experiment. The binding energy of a second water molecule to Mg(+) is predicted to be similar to the first. This suggests that the reduced reaction rate observed for the second ligand is not a consequence of a significantly smaller binding energy, at least for the smaller ligards such as those considered in this work.

  14. Ligand-binding properties of a juvenile hormone receptor, Methoprene-tolerant

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Jean-Philippe; Iwema, Thomas; Epa, V. Chandana; Takaki, Keiko; Rynes, Jan; Jindra, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a sesquiterpenoid of vital importance for insect development, yet the molecular basis of JH signaling remains obscure, mainly because a bona fide JH receptor has not been identified. Mounting evidence points to the basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH)/Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein Methoprene-tolerant (Met) as the best JH receptor candidate. However, details of how Met transduces the hormonal signal are missing. Here, we demonstrate that Met specifically binds JH III and its biologically active mimics, methoprene and pyriproxyfen, through its C-terminal PAS domain. Substitution of individual amino acids, predicted to form a ligand-binding pocket, with residues possessing bulkier side chains reduces JH III binding likely because of steric hindrance. Although a mutation that abolishes JH III binding does not affect a Met–Met complex that forms in the absence of methoprene, it prevents both the ligand-dependent dissociation of the Met–Met dimer and the ligand-dependent interaction of Met with its partner bHLH-PAS protein Taiman. These results show that Met can sense the JH signal through direct, specific binding, thus establishing a unique class of intracellular hormone receptors. PMID:22167806

  15. Ligand-binding properties of a juvenile hormone receptor, Methoprene-tolerant.

    PubMed

    Charles, Jean-Philippe; Iwema, Thomas; Epa, V Chandana; Takaki, Keiko; Rynes, Jan; Jindra, Marek

    2011-12-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a sesquiterpenoid of vital importance for insect development, yet the molecular basis of JH signaling remains obscure, mainly because a bona fide JH receptor has not been identified. Mounting evidence points to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain protein Methoprene-tolerant (Met) as the best JH receptor candidate. However, details of how Met transduces the hormonal signal are missing. Here, we demonstrate that Met specifically binds JH III and its biologically active mimics, methoprene and pyriproxyfen, through its C-terminal PAS domain. Substitution of individual amino acids, predicted to form a ligand-binding pocket, with residues possessing bulkier side chains reduces JH III binding likely because of steric hindrance. Although a mutation that abolishes JH III binding does not affect a Met-Met complex that forms in the absence of methoprene, it prevents both the ligand-dependent dissociation of the Met-Met dimer and the ligand-dependent interaction of Met with its partner bHLH-PAS protein Taiman. These results show that Met can sense the JH signal through direct, specific binding, thus establishing a unique class of intracellular hormone receptors.

  16. Life cycle management of critical ligand-binding reagents.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Denise M; Theobald, Valerie

    2013-11-01

    Bioanalytical laboratories develop and validate ligand-binding assays (LBA) used to quantify the concentration of analytes of interest in various buffers and relevant biological matrices. The building blocks of LBA are reagents that recognize molecular and structural motifs on ligands, which are combined in various LBA formats to minimize biological matrix interferences and specifically detect and quantify the analyte of interest. The use of these LBA-requiring critical reagents, can span decades as programs mature to commercialization. Since critical reagents are generated mostly from biological systems, attention to their life cycle management, quality, characterization and sustainability are vital to the success of bioanalytical laboratories. Integrating de novo reagent generation, reagent biophysical characterization, LBA development, validation, and use, with reagent resupply processes leverages interdisciplinary activities and ensures smooth operations of a bioanalytical laboratory.

  17. Exploring Hydrophobic Binding Surfaces Using Comfa and Flexible Hydrophobic Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Sanchez, Rosa. I.; Bhuveneswaran, Chidambaram; Compadre, Cesar M.

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are a very important group of enzymes involved in a variety of physiological and pathological processes including cancer metastasis and rheumatoid arthritis. In this investigation we used 3D-Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques to model the binding of a variety of substrates to two cysteine proteinases, papain, and cathepsin B. The analysis was performed using Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA). The molecules were constructed using standard bond angles and lengths, minimized and aligned. Charges were calculated using the PM3 method in MOPAC. The CoMFA models derived for the binding of the studied substrates to the two proteinases were compared with the expected results from the experimental X-ray crystal structures of the same proteinases. The results showed the value of CoMFA modeling of flexible hydrophobic ligands to analyze ligand binding to protein receptors, and could also serve as the basis to design specific inhibitors of cysteine proteinases with potential therapeutic value.

  18. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  19. Predictions of Ligand Selectivity from Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Binding selectivity is a requirement for the development of a safe drug, and it is a critical property for chemical probes used in preclinical target validation. Engineering selectivity adds considerable complexity to the rational design of new drugs, as it involves the optimization of multiple binding affinities. Computationally, the prediction of binding selectivity is a challenge, and generally applicable methodologies are still not available to the computational and medicinal chemistry communities. Absolute binding free energy calculations based on alchemical pathways provide a rigorous framework for affinity predictions and could thus offer a general approach to the problem. We evaluated the performance of free energy calculations based on molecular dynamics for the prediction of selectivity by estimating the affinity profile of three bromodomain inhibitors across multiple bromodomain families, and by comparing the results to isothermal titration calorimetry data. Two case studies were considered. In the first one, the affinities of two similar ligands for seven bromodomains were calculated and returned excellent agreement with experiment (mean unsigned error of 0.81 kcal/mol and Pearson correlation of 0.75). In this test case, we also show how the preferred binding orientation of a ligand for different proteins can be estimated via free energy calculations. In the second case, the affinities of a broad-spectrum inhibitor for 22 bromodomains were calculated and returned a more modest accuracy (mean unsigned error of 1.76 kcal/mol and Pearson correlation of 0.48); however, the reparametrization of a sulfonamide moiety improved the agreement with experiment. PMID:28009512

  20. A Comprehensive Evaluation of the Activity and Selectivity Profile of Ligands for RGD-binding Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, Tobias G.; Rechenmacher, Florian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Maltsev, Oleg V.; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta A.; Zarka, Revital; Reuning, Ute; Notni, Johannes; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Spatz, Joachim; Geiger, Benjamin; Kessler, Horst

    2017-01-01

    Integrins, a diverse class of heterodimeric cell surface receptors, are key regulators of cell structure and behaviour, affecting cell morphology, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Consequently, mutations in specific integrins, or their deregulated expression, are associated with a variety of diseases. In the last decades, many integrin-specific ligands have been developed and used for modulation of integrin function in medical as well as biophysical studies. The IC50-values reported for these ligands strongly vary and are measured using different cell-based and cell-free systems. A systematic comparison of these values is of high importance for selecting the optimal ligands for given applications. In this study, we evaluate a wide range of ligands for their binding affinity towards the RGD-binding integrins αvβ3, αvβ5, αvβ6, αvβ8, α5β1, αIIbβ3, using homogenous ELISA-like solid phase binding assay. PMID:28074920

  1. Ligand concentration regulates the pathways of coupled protein folding and binding.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kyle G; Tonthat, Nam K; McClure, David R; Chang, Yu-Chu; Liu, Xin; Schumacher, Maria A; Fierke, Carol A; Schmidler, Scott C; Oas, Terrence G

    2014-01-22

    Coupled ligand binding and conformational change plays a central role in biological regulation. Ligands often regulate protein function by modulating conformational dynamics, yet the order in which binding and conformational change occurs are often hotly debated. Here we show that the "conformational selection versus induced fit" distinction on which this debate is based is a false dichotomy because the mechanism depends on ligand concentration. Using the binding of pyrophosphate (PPi) to Bacillus subtilis RNase P protein as a model, we show that coupled reactions are best understood as a change in flux between competing pathways with distinct orders of binding and conformational change. The degree of partitioning through each pathway depends strongly on PPi concentration, with ligand binding redistributing the conformational ensemble toward the folded state by both increasing folding rates and decreasing unfolding rates. These results indicate that ligand binding induces marked and varied changes in protein conformational dynamics, and that the order of binding and conformational change is ligand concentration dependent.

  2. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  3. MODELING THE BINDING OF THE METABOLITES OF SOME POLYCYCLIC AROMTIC HYDROCARBONS TO THE LIGAND BINDING DOMAIN OF THE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling the binding of the metabolites of some Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons to the ligand binding domain of the estrogen receptor
    James Rabinowitz, Stephen Little, Katrina Brown, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC; Un...

  4. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Gene A.; Kostellow, Adele B.

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, “band 3,” which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane “band 3” attachment site. “Band 3” contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and

  5. Molecular Properties of Globin Channels and Pores: Role of Cholesterol in Ligand Binding and Movement.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B

    2016-01-01

    Globins contain one or more cavities that control or affect such functions as ligand movement and ligand binding. Here we report that the extended globin family [cytoglobin (Cygb); neuroglobin (Ngb); myoglobin (Mb); hemoglobin (Hb) subunits Hba(α); and Hbb(β)] contain either a transmembrane (TM) helix or pore-lining region as well as internal cavities. Protein motif/domain analyses indicate that Ngb and Hbb each contain 5 cholesterol- binding (CRAC/CARC) domains and 1 caveolin binding motif, whereas the Cygb dimer has 6 cholesterol-binding domains but lacks caveolin-binding motifs. Mb and Hba each exhibit 2 cholesterol-binding domains and also lack caveolin-binding motifs. The Hb αβ-tetramer contains 14 cholesterol-binding domains. Computer algorithms indicate that Cygb and Ngb cavities display multiple partitions and C-terminal pore-lining regions, whereas Mb has three major cavities plus a C-terminal pore-lining region. The Hb tetramer exhibits a large internal cavity but the subunits differ in that they contain a C-terminal TM helix (Hba) and pore-lining region (Hbb). The cavities include 43 of 190 Cygb residues, 38 of 151 of Ngb residues, 55 of 154 Mb residues, and 137 of 688 residues in the Hb tetramer. Each cavity complex includes 6 to 8 residues of the TM helix or pore-lining region and CRAC/CARC domains exist within all cavities. Erythrocyte Hb αβ-tetramers are largely cytosolic but also bind to a membrane anion exchange protein, "band 3," which contains a large internal cavity and 12 TM helices (5 being pore-lining regions). The Hba TM helix may be the erythrocyte membrane "band 3" attachment site. "Band 3" contributes 4 caveolin binding motifs and 10 CRAC/CARC domains. Cholesterol binding may create lipid-disordered phases that alter globin cavities and facilitate ligand movement, permitting ion channel formation and conformational changes that orchestrate anion and ligand (O2, CO2, NO) movement within the large internal cavities and channels of the

  6. Protein-Ligand Binding Detected by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knab, J.; Chen, J. Y.; Mader, M.; Markelz, A.

    2004-03-01

    Established measures of protein flexibility through the B-factor use time intensive and facility limited techniques such as X-ray crystallography, NMR structure analysis and inelastic neutron scattering. We demonstrate a novel technique that may be used for determination of ligand binding for proteins as well as a measure of protein flexibility. Using the method of terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy, we measured the far infrared dielectric response as a function of the binding of N (1-4)-acetylglucosamine (NAG) to hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). Vibrational modes associated with tertiary structure conformational motions lay in the THz frequency range. The THz dielectric response reflects the density and amplitude of these normal modes through dipole coupling. Transmission measurements on thin films show that while there is no change in the real part of the refractive index as a function of binding, there is a decrease in the absorbance for the HEWL+NAG thin films relative to HEWL films. This decrease can be attributed to a reduction in the flexibility of the protein with binding. These results are compared to calculated absorbance spectra.

  7. Modeling of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) ligand binding domain and its utility in virtual ligand screening to predict new AhR ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, William; Koch, Daniel; O’Donnell, Edmond; Khalil, Sammy M.; Kerkvliet, Nancy; Tanguay, Robert; Abagyan, Ruben; Kolluri, Siva Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor; the AhR Per-AhR/Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain binds ligands. We developed homology models of the AhR PAS domain to characterize previously observed intra- and inter-species differences in ligand binding using Molecular Docking. In silico structure-based virtual ligand screening using our model resulted in the identification of pinocembrin and 5-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavone, which promoted nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of AhR and AhR-dependent induction of endogenous target genes. PMID:19719119

  8. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  9. A kinetic description of ligand binding to sperm whale myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Q H; Olson, J S; McKinnie, R E; Rohlfs, R J

    1986-08-05

    Nanosecond recombination time courses were measured by photolyzing O2, NO, CO, methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, n-butyl, and tert-butyl isocyanide complexes of sperm whale myoglobin with a 30-ns laser pulse at pH 7, 20 degrees C. Absorbance was measured both during and after the excitation pulse and as a function of laser light intensity. The results were analyzed quantitatively in terms of a three-step reaction scheme, MbX in equilibrium B in equilibrium C in equilibrium Mb + X, where Mb is myoglobin, B represents a geminate state in which the ligand is present in the distal pocket but not covalently bound to the iron atom, and C, a state in which the ligand is still embedded in the protein but further away from the heme group. The fitted rate parameters were required to be consistent with the observed overall quantum yield, Q, which had been measured independently using much longer (approximately 0.5 ms) xenon flash pulses. Three major conclusions were derived from these analyses. First, the overall quantum yield of the ligand complex is determined primarily by the competition between the rate of iron-ligand bond formation from the initial photoproduct, kB----MbX, and the rate of migration away from state B, kB----C. For example, kB----C approximately equal to 30-100 microseconds-1 for all three gaseous ligands, whereas both Q and kB----MbX vary over 3 orders of magnitude (i.e. NO, Q = 0.001, kB----MbX approximately equal to 16,000 microseconds-1; O2, Q = 0.1, kB----MbX approximately equal to 500 microseconds-1; CO, Q = 1.0, kB----MbX approximately equal to 2 microseconds-1). Second, for NO, O2, and the isonitriles, the rate-limiting step in the overall association reaction starting from ligand in solution is the formation of state B. The rate constant for this process varies from 2 X 10(7) M-1 s-1 for the gaseous ligands to 0.02-1.4 X 10(5) M-1 s-1 for the isonitriles. In contrast, the B to MbX transition is limiting for CO binding. Third, for all the ligands except CO

  10. Ligand specificity and conformational stability of human fatty acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, A W; van Moerkerk, H T; Veerkamp, J H

    2001-09-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are small cytosolic proteins with virtually identical backbone structures that facilitate the solubility and intracellular transport of fatty acids. At least eight different types of FABP occur, each with a specific tissue distribution and possibly with a distinct function. To define the functional characteristics of all eight human FABPs, viz. heart (H), brain (B), myelin (M), adipocyte (A), epidermal (E), intestinal (I), liver (L) and ileal lipid-binding protein (I-LBP), we studied their ligand specificity, their conformational stability and their immunological crossreactivity. Additionally, binding of bile acids to I-LBP was studied. The FABP types showed differences in fatty acid binding affinity. Generally, the affinity for palmitic acid was lower than for oleic and arachidonic acid. All FABP types, except E-FABP, I-FABP and I-LBP interacted with 1-anilinonaphtalene-8-sulphonic acid (ANS). Only L-FABP, I-FABP and M-FABP showed binding of 11-((5-dimethylaminonaphtalene-1-sulfonyl)amino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA). I-LBP showed increasing binding of bile acids in the order taurine-conjugated>glycine-conjugated>unconjugated bile acids. A hydroxylgroup of bile acids at position 7 decreased and at position 12 increased the binding affinity to I-LBP. The fatty acid-binding affinity and the conformation of FABP types were differentially affected in the presence of urea. Our results demonstrate significant differences in ligand binding, conformational stability and surface properties between different FABP types which may point to a specific function in certain cells and tissues. The preference of I-LBP (but not L-FABP) for conjugated bile acids is in accordance with a specific role in bile acid reabsorption in the ileum.

  11. Ligand Binding and Substrate Discrimination by UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, Todd D.; Borrok, M. Jack; Westler, William M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2009-07-31

    Galactofuranose (Galf) residues are present in cell wall glycoconjugates of numerous pathogenic microbes. Uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate (UDP) Galf, the biosynthetic precursor of Galf-containing glycoconjugates, is produced from UDP-galactopyranose (UDP-Galp) by the flavoenzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM). The gene encoding UGM (glf) is essential for the viability of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this finding underscores the need to understand how UGM functions. Considerable effort has been devoted to elucidating the catalytic mechanism of UGM, but progress has been hindered by a lack of structural data for an enzyme-substrate complex. Such data could reveal not only substrate binding interactions but how UGM can act preferentially on two very different substrates, UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf, yet avoid other structurally related UDP sugars present in the cell. Herein, we describe the first structure of a UGM-ligand complex, which provides insight into the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis for substrate selectivity. The structure of UGM from Klebsiella pneumoniae bound to the substrate analog UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) was solved by X-ray crystallographic methods and refined to 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. The ligand is proximal to the cofactor, a finding that is consistent with a proposed mechanism in which the reduced flavin engages in covalent catalysis. Despite this proximity, the glucose ring of the substrate analog is positioned such that it disfavors covalent catalysis. This orientation is consistent with data indicating that UDP-Glc is not a substrate for UGM. The relative binding orientations of UDP-Galp and UDP-Glc were compared using saturation transfer difference NMR. The results indicate that the uridine moiety occupies a similar location in both ligand complexes, and this relevant binding mode is defined by our structural data. In contrast, the orientations of the glucose and galactose sugar moieties differ. To understand the

  12. Albumin binds self-assembling dyes as specific polymolecular ligands.

    PubMed

    Stopa, Barbara; Rybarska, Janina; Drozd, Anna; Konieczny, Leszek; Król, Marcin; Lisowski, Marek; Piekarska, Barbara; Roterman, Irena; Spólnik, Paweł; Zemanek, Grzegorz

    2006-12-15

    Self-assembling dyes with a structure related to Congo red (e.g. Evans blue) form polymolecular complexes with albumin. The dyes, which are lacking a self-assembling property (Trypan blue, ANS) bind as single molecules. The supramolecular character of dye ligands bound to albumin was demonstrated by indicating the complexation of dye molecules outnumbering the binding sites in albumin and by measuring the hydrodynamic radius of albumin which is growing upon complexation of self-assembling dye in contrast to dyes lacking this property. The self-assembled character of Congo red was also proved using it as a carrier introducing to albumin the intercalated nonbonding foreign compounds. Supramolecular, ordered character of the dye in the complex with albumin was also revealed by finding that self-assembling dyes become chiral upon complexation. Congo red complexation makes albumin less resistant to low pH as concluded from the facilitated N-F transition, observed in studies based on the measurement of hydrodynamic radius. This particular interference with protein stability and the specific changes in digestion resulted from binding of Congo red suggest that the self-assembled dye penetrates the central crevice of albumin.

  13. Ligand deconstruction: Why some fragment binding positions are conserved and others are not.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Hall, David R; Jehle, Stefan; Jehle, Sefan; Luo, Lingqi; Ochiana, Stefan O; Jones, Elizabeth V; Pollastri, Michael; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-19

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) relies on the premise that the fragment binding mode will be conserved on subsequent expansion to a larger ligand. However, no general condition has been established to explain when fragment binding modes will be conserved. We show that a remarkably simple condition can be developed in terms of how fragments coincide with binding energy hot spots--regions of the protein where interactions with a ligand contribute substantial binding free energy--the locations of which can easily be determined computationally. Because a substantial fraction of the free energy of ligand binding comes from interacting with the residues in the energetically most important hot spot, a ligand moiety that sufficiently overlaps with this region will retain its location even when other parts of the ligand are removed. This hypothesis is supported by eight case studies. The condition helps identify whether a protein is suitable for FBDD, predicts the size of fragments required for screening, and determines whether a fragment hit can be extended into a higher affinity ligand. Our results show that ligand binding sites can usefully be thought of in terms of an anchor site, which is the top-ranked hot spot and dominates the free energy of binding, surrounded by a number of weaker satellite sites that confer improved affinity and selectivity for a particular ligand and that it is the intrinsic binding potential of the protein surface that determines whether it can serve as a robust binding site for a suitably optimized ligand.

  14. Fluorescence‐ and bioluminescence‐based approaches to study GPCR ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A; White, Carl W; Nguyen, Kim; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Ligand binding is a vital component of any pharmacologist's toolbox and allows the detailed investigation of how a molecule binds to its receptor. These studies enable the experimental determination of binding affinity of labelled and unlabelled compounds through kinetic, saturation (Kd) and competition (Ki) binding assays. Traditionally, these studies have used molecules labelled with radioisotopes; however, more recently, fluorescent ligands have been developed for this purpose. This review will briefly cover receptor ligand binding theory and then discuss the use of fluorescent ligands with some of the different technologies currently employed to examine ligand binding. Fluorescent ligands can be used for direct measurement of receptor‐associated fluorescence using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry as well as in assays such as fluorescence polarization, where ligand binding is monitored by changes in the free rotation when a fluorescent ligand is bound to a receptor. Additionally, fluorescent ligands can act as donors or acceptors for fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) with the development of assays based on FRET and time‐resolved FRET (TR‐FRET). Finally, we have recently developed a novel bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) ligand binding assay utilizing a small (19 kDa), super‐bright luciferase subunit (NanoLuc) from a deep sea shrimp. In combination with fluorescent ligands, measurement of RET now provides an array of methodologies to study ligand binding. While each method has its own advantages and drawbacks, binding studies using fluorescent ligands are now a viable alternative to the use of radioligands. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of G Protein‐Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v173.20/issuetoc PMID:26317175

  15. Control and pH dependence of ligand binding to heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Doster, W; Beece, D; Bowne, S F; DiIorio, E E; Eisenstein, L; Frauenfelder, H; Reinisch, L; Shyamsunder, E; Winterhalter, K H; Yue, K T

    1982-09-28

    The recombination after flash photolysis of dioxygen and carbon monoxide with sperm whale myoglobin (Mb), and separated beta chains of human hemoglobin (beta A) and hemoglobin Zürich (beta ZH), has been studied as a function of pH and temperature from 300 to 60 K. At physiological temperatures, a preequilibrium is established between the ligand molecules in the solvent and in the heme pocket. The ligand in the pocket binds to the heme iron by overcoming a barrier at the heme. The association rate is controlled by this final binding step. The association rate of CO to Mb and beta A is modulated by a single titratable group with a pK at 300 K of 5.7. The binding of CO to beta ZH, in which the distal histidine is replaced by arginine, does not depend on pH. Oxygen recombination is independent of pH in all three proteins. Comparison of the binding of CO at 300 K and at low temperatures shows that pH does not affect the preequilibrium but changes the barrier height at the heme. The pH dependence and the difference between O2 and CO binding can be explained by a charge-dipole interaction between the distal histidine and CO.

  16. Label-free microscale thermophoresis discriminates sites and affinity of protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Susanne A I; Wienken, Christoph J; Geissler, Sandra; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Reiter, Alwin; Trauner, Dirk; Braun, Dieter; Baaske, Philipp

    2012-10-15

    Look, no label! Microscale thermophoresis makes use of the intrinsic fluorescence of proteins to quantify the binding affinities of ligands and discriminate between binding sites. This method is suitable for studying binding interactions of very small amounts of protein in solution. The binding of ligands to iGluR membrane receptors, small-molecule inhibitorss to kinase p38, aptamers to thrombin, and Ca(2+) ions to synaptotagmin was quantified.

  17. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-05-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, /sup 3/H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion (/sup 3/H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that /sup 3/H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin.

  19. Conformational Response to Ligand Binding in Phosphomannomutase2

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Poziello, Angelita; Monti, Maria Chiara; Guallar, Victor; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    The most common glycosylation disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase2, producing a disease still without a cure. Phosphomannomutase2, a homodimer in which each chain is composed of two domains, requires a bisphosphate sugar (either mannose or glucose) as activator, opening a possible drug design path for therapeutic purposes. The crystal structure of human phosphomannomutase2, however, lacks bound substrate and a key active site loop. To speed up drug discovery, we present here the first structural model of a bisphosphate substrate bound to human phosphomannomutase2. Taking advantage of recent developments in all-atom simulation techniques in combination with limited and site-directed proteolysis, we demonstrated that α-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate can adopt two low energy orientations as required for catalysis. Upon ligand binding, the two domains come close, making the protein more compact, in analogy to the enzyme in the crystals from Leishmania mexicana. Moreover, proteolysis was also carried out on two common mutants, R141H and F119L. It was an unexpected finding that the mutant most frequently found in patients, R141H, although inactive, does bind α-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate and changes conformation. PMID:25324542

  20. Simple, intuitive calculations of free energy of binding for protein-ligand complexes. 1. Models without explicit constrained water.

    PubMed

    Cozzini, Pietro; Fornabaio, Micaela; Marabotti, Anna; Abraham, Donald J; Kellogg, Glen E; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2002-06-06

    The prediction of the binding affinity between a protein and ligands is one of the most challenging issues for computational biochemistry and drug discovery. While the enthalpic contribution to binding is routinely available with molecular mechanics methods, the entropic contribution is more difficult to estimate. We describe and apply a relatively simple and intuitive calculation procedure for estimating the free energy of binding for 53 protein-ligand complexes formed by 17 proteins of known three-dimensional structure and characterized by different active site polarity. HINT, a software model based on experimental LogP(o/w) values for small organic molecules, was used to evaluate and score all atom-atom hydropathic interactions between the protein and the ligands. These total scores (H(TOTAL)), which have been previously shown to correlate with DeltaG(interaction) for protein-protein interactions, correlate with DeltaG(binding) for protein-ligand complexes in the present study with a standard error of +/-2.6 kcal mol(-1) from the equation DeltaG(binding) = -0.001 95 H(TOTAL) - 5.543. A more sophisticated model, utilizing categorized (by interaction class) HINT scores, produces a superior standard error of +/-1.8 kcal mol(-1). It is shown that within families of ligands for the same protein binding site, better models can be obtained with standard errors approaching +/-1.0 kcal mol(-1). Standardized methods for preparing crystallographic models for hydropathic analysis are also described. Particular attention is paid to the relationship between the ionization state of the ligands and the pH conditions under which the binding measurements are made. Sources and potential remedies of experimental and modeling errors affecting prediction of DeltaG(binding) are discussed.

  1. Disulfide bridge regulates ligand-binding site selectivity in liver bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Cogliati, Clelia; Tomaselli, Simona; Assfalg, Michael; Pedò, Massimo; Ferranti, Pasquale; Zetta, Lucia; Molinari, Henriette; Ragona, Laura

    2009-10-01

    Bile acid-binding proteins (BABPs) are cytosolic lipid chaperones that play central roles in driving bile flow, as well as in the adaptation to various pathological conditions, contributing to the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis and functional distribution within the cell. Understanding the mode of binding of bile acids with their cytoplasmic transporters is a key issue in providing a model for the mechanism of their transfer from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, for delivery to nuclear receptors. A number of factors have been shown to modulate bile salt selectivity, stoichiometry, and affinity of binding to BABPs, e.g. chemistry of the ligand, protein plasticity and, possibly, the formation of disulfide bridges. Here, the effects of the presence of a naturally occurring disulfide bridge on liver BABP ligand-binding properties and backbone dynamics have been investigated by NMR. Interestingly, the disulfide bridge does not modify the protein-binding stoichiometry, but has a key role in modulating recognition at both sites, inducing site selectivity for glycocholic and glycochenodeoxycholic acid. Protein conformational changes following the introduction of a disulfide bridge are small and located around the inner binding site, whereas significant changes in backbone motions are observed for several residues distributed over the entire protein, both in the apo form and in the holo form. Site selectivity appears, therefore, to be dependent on protein mobility rather than being governed by steric factors. The detected properties further establish a parallelism with the behaviour of human ileal BABP, substantiating the proposal that BABPs have parallel functions in hepatocytes and enterocytes.

  2. Ligand Binding Mechanism in Steroid Receptors: From Conserved Plasticity to Differential Evolutionary Constraints.

    PubMed

    Edman, Karl; Hosseini, Ali; Bjursell, Magnus K; Aagaard, Anna; Wissler, Lisa; Gunnarsson, Anders; Kaminski, Tim; Köhler, Christian; Bäckström, Stefan; Jensen, Tina J; Cavallin, Anders; Karlsson, Ulla; Nilsson, Ewa; Lecina, Daniel; Takahashi, Ryoji; Grebner, Christoph; Geschwindner, Stefan; Lepistö, Matti; Hogner, Anders C; Guallar, Victor

    2015-12-01

    Steroid receptor drugs have been available for more than half a century, but details of the ligand binding mechanism have remained elusive. We solved X-ray structures of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors to identify a conserved plasticity at the helix 6-7 region that extends the ligand binding pocket toward the receptor surface. Since none of the endogenous ligands exploit this region, we hypothesized that it constitutes an integral part of the binding event. Extensive all-atom unbiased ligand exit and entrance simulations corroborate a ligand binding pathway that gives the observed structural plasticity a key functional role. Kinetic measurements reveal that the receptor residence time correlates with structural rearrangements observed in both structures and simulations. Ultimately, our findings reveal why nature has conserved the capacity to open up this region, and highlight how differences in the details of the ligand entry process result in differential evolutionary constraints across the steroid receptors.

  3. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  4. Spatial Analysis and Quantification of the Thermodynamic Driving Forces in Protein-Ligand Binding: Binding Site Variability

    PubMed Central

    Raman, E. Prabhu; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    The thermodynamic driving forces behind small molecule-protein binding are still not well understood, including the variability of those forces associated with different types of ligands in different binding pockets. To better understand these phenomena we calculate spatially resolved thermodynamic contributions of the different molecular degrees of freedom for the binding of propane and methanol to multiple pockets on the proteins Factor Xa and p38 MAP kinase. Binding thermodynamics are computed using a statistical thermodynamics based end-point method applied on a canonical ensemble comprising the protein-ligand complexes and the corresponding free states in an explicit solvent environment. Energetic and entropic contributions of water and ligand degrees of freedom computed from the configurational ensemble provides an unprecedented level of detail into the mechanisms of binding. Direct protein-ligand interaction energies play a significant role in both non-polar and polar binding, which is comparable to water reorganization energy. Loss of interactions with water upon binding strongly compensates these contributions leading to relatively small binding enthalpies. For both solutes, the entropy of water reorganization is found to favor binding in agreement with the classical view of the “hydrophobic effect”. Depending on the specifics of the binding pocket, both energy-entropy compensation and reinforcement mechanisms are observed. Notable is the ability to visualize the spatial distribution of the thermodynamic contributions to binding at atomic resolution showing significant differences in the thermodynamic contributions of water to the binding of propane versus methanol. PMID:25625202

  5. The intrinsically liganded cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain promotes KCNH channel activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaxian; Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Morais-Cabral, João H; Chanda, Baron; Robertson, Gail A

    2017-02-01

    Channels in the ether-à-go-go or KCNH family of potassium channels are characterized by a conserved, C-terminal domain with homology to cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domains (CNBhDs). Instead of cyclic nucleotides, two amino acid residues, Y699 and L701, occupy the binding pocket, forming an "intrinsic ligand." The role of the CNBhD in KCNH channel gating is still unclear, however, and a detailed characterization of the intrinsic ligand is lacking. In this study, we show that mutating both Y699 and L701 to alanine, serine, aspartate, or glycine impairs human EAG1 channel function. These mutants slow channel activation and shift the conductance-voltage (G-V) relation to more depolarized potentials. The mutations affect activation and the G-V relation progressively, indicating that the gating machinery is sensitive to multiple conformations of the CNBhD. Substitution with glycine at both sites (GG), which eliminates the side chains that interact with the binding pocket, also reduces the ability of voltage prepulses to populate more preactivated states along the activation pathway (i.e., the Cole-Moore effect), as if stabilizing the voltage sensor in deep resting states. Notably, deletion of the entire CNBhD (577-708, ΔCNBhD) phenocopies the GG mutant, suggesting that GG is a loss-of-function mutation and the CNBhD requires an intrinsic ligand to exert its functional effects. We developed a kinetic model for both wild-type and ΔCNBhD mutant channels that describes all our observations on activation kinetics, the Cole-Moore shift, and G-V relations. These findings support a model in which the CNBhD both promotes voltage sensor activation and stabilizes the open pore. The intrinsic ligand is critical for these functional effects.

  6. The Study of the Successive Metal-Ligand Binding Energies for Fe(sup +), Fe(sup -), V(sup +) and Co(sup +)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra; Maitre, Philippe; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The successive binding energies of CO and H2O to Fe(sup +), CO to Fe(sup -), and H2 to Co(sup +) and V(sup +) are presented. Overall the computed results are in good agreement with experiment. The trends in binding energies are analyzed in terms of metal to ligand donation, ligand to metal donation, ligand-ligand repulsion, and changes in the metal atom, such as hybridization, promotion, and spin multiplicity. The geometry and vibrational frequencies are also shown to be directly affected by these effects.

  7. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  8. Theory and simulation of diffusion-influenced, stochastically gated ligand binding to buried sites

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, Jorge L.; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2011-01-01

    We consider the diffusion-influenced rate coefficient of ligand binding to a site located in a deep pocket on a protein; the binding pocket is flexible and can reorganize in response to ligand entrance. We extend to this flexible protein-ligand system a formalism developed previously [A. M. Berezhkovskii, A, Szabo, and H.-X. Zhou, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 075103 (2011)10.1063/1.3609973] for breaking the ligand-binding problem into an exterior problem and an interior problem. Conformational fluctuations of a bottleneck or a lid and the binding site are modeled as stochastic gating. We present analytical and Brownian dynamics simulation results for the case of a cylindrical pocket containing a binding site at the bottom. Induced switch, whereby the conformation of the protein adapts to the incoming ligand, leads to considerable rate enhancement. PMID:22010732

  9. When Does Chemical Elaboration Induce a Ligand To Change Its Binding Mode?

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Shipra; Karanicolas, John

    2017-01-12

    Traditional hit-to-lead optimization assumes that upon elaboration of chemical structure, the ligand retains its binding mode relative to the receptor. Here, we build a large-scale collection of related ligand pairs solved in complex with the same protein partner: we find that for 41 of 297 pairs (14%), the binding mode changes upon elaboration of the smaller ligand. While certain ligand physiochemical properties predispose changes in binding mode, particularly those properties that define fragments, simple structure-based modeling proves far more effective for identifying substitutions that alter the binding mode. Some ligand pairs change binding mode because the added substituent would irreconcilably conflict with the receptor in the original pose, whereas others change because the added substituent enables new, stronger interactions that are available only in a different pose. Scaffolds that can engage their target using alternate poses may enable productive structure-based optimization along multiple divergent pathways.

  10. Ligand Binding to WW Tandem Domains of YAP2 Transcriptional Regulator Is Under Negative Cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Hoang, Lawrence M.; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B.; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-01-01

    YAP2 transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well-documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules. PMID:25283809

  11. Ligand binding to WW tandem domains of YAP2 transcriptional regulator is under negative cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Hoang, Lawrence M; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-12-01

    YES-associated protein 2 (YAP2) transcriptional regulator drives a multitude of cellular processes, including the newly discovered Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, by virtue of the ability of its WW domains to bind and recruit PPXY-containing ligands to specific subcellular compartments. Herein, we employ an array of biophysical tools to investigate allosteric communication between the WW tandem domains of YAP2. Our data show that the WW tandem domains of YAP2 negatively cooperate when binding to their cognate ligands. Moreover, the molecular origin of such negative cooperativity lies in an unfavorable entropic contribution to the overall free energy relative to ligand binding to isolated WW domains. Consistent with this notion, the WW tandem domains adopt a fixed spatial orientation such that the WW1 domain curves outwards and stacks onto the binding groove of the WW2 domain, thereby sterically hindering ligand binding to both itself and its tandem partner. Although ligand binding to both WW domains disrupts such interdomain stacking interaction, they reorient themselves and adopt an alternative fixed spatial orientation in the liganded state by virtue of their ability to engage laterally so as to allow their binding grooves to point outwards and away from each other. In short, while the ability of WW tandem domains to aid ligand binding is well documented, our demonstration that they may also be subject to negative binding cooperativity represents a paradigm shift in our understanding of the molecular action of this ubiquitous family of protein modules.

  12. The change of protein intradomain mobility on ligand binding: is it a commonly observed phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Kharkyanen, Valery N; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2006-10-15

    Analysis of changes in the dynamics of protein domains on ligand binding is important in several aspects: for the understanding of the hierarchical nature of protein folding and dynamics at equilibrium; for analysis of signal transduction mechanisms triggered by ligand binding, including allostery; for drug design; and for construction of biosensors reporting on the presence of target ligand in studied media. In this work we use the recently developed HCCP computational technique for the analysis of stabilities of dynamic domains in proteins, their intrinsic motions and of their changes on ligand binding. The work is based on comparative studies of 157 ligand binding proteins, for which several crystal structures (in ligand-free and ligand-bound forms) are available. We demonstrate that the domains of the proteins presented in the Protein DataBank are far more robust than it was thought before: in the majority of the studied proteins (152 out of 157), the ligand binding does not lead to significant change of domain stability. The exceptions from this rule are only four bacterial periplasmic transport proteins and calmodulin. Thus, as a rule, the pattern of correlated motions in dynamic domains, which determines their stability, is insensitive to ligand binding. This rule may be the general feature for a vast majority of proteins.

  13. Ligand-binding dynamics rewire cellular signaling via Estrogen Receptor-α

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sathish; Nwachukwu, Jerome C.; Parent, Alex A.; Cavett, Valerie; Nowak, Jason; Hughes, Travis S.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Nettles, Kendall W.

    2013-01-01

    Ligand-binding dynamics control allosteric signaling through the estrogen receptor-α (ERα), but the biological consequences of such dynamic binding orientations are unknown. Here, we compare a set of ER ligands having dynamic binding orientation (dynamic ligands) with a control set of isomers that are constrained to bind in a single orientation (constrained ligands). Proliferation of breast cancer cells directed by constrained ligands is associated with DNA binding, coactivator recruitment and activation of the estrogen-induced gene GREB1, reflecting a highly interconnected signaling network. In contrast, proliferation driven by dynamic ligands is associated with induction of ERα-mediated transcription in a DNA-binding domain (DBD)-dependent manner. Further, dynamic ligands displayed enhanced anti-inflammatory activity. The DBD-dependent profile was predictive of these signaling patterns in a larger diverse set of natural and synthetic ligands. Thus, ligand dynamics directs unique signaling pathways, and reveals a novel role of the DBD in allosteric control of ERα-mediated signaling. PMID:23524984

  14. Autocrine ligand binding to cell receptors. Mathematical analysis of competition by solution "decoys".

    PubMed Central

    Forsten, K E; Lauffenburger, D A

    1992-01-01

    Autocrine ligands have been demonstrated to regulate cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cell migration in a number of different systems and are believed to be one of the underlying causes of malignant cell transformation. Binding of these ligands to their cellular receptors can be compromised by diffusive transport of ligand away from the secreting cell. Exogenous addition of antibodies or solution receptors capable of competing with cellular receptors for these autocrine ligands has been proposed as a means of inhibiting autocrine-stimulated cell behavioral responses. Such "decoys" complicate cellular binding by offering alternative binding targets, which may also be capable of aiding or abating transport of the ligand away from the cell surface. We present a mathematical model incorporating autocrine ligand production and the presence of competing cellular and solution receptors. We elucidate effects of key system parameters including ligand diffusion rate, binding rate constants, cell density, and secretion rate on the ability of solution receptors to inhibit cellular receptor binding. Both plated and suspension cell systems are considered. An approximate analytical expression relating the key parameters to the critical concentration of solution "decoys" required for inhibition is derived and compared to the numerical calculations. We find that in order to achieve essentially complete inhibition of surface receptor binding, the concentration of decoys may need to be as much as four to eight orders of magnitude greater than the equilibrium disociation constant for ligand binding to surface receptors. PMID:1312367

  15. Ligand binding and thermodynamic stability of a multidomain protein, calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    Masino, L.; Martin, S. R.; Bayley, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation of calmodulin has been monitored spectroscopically to determine the stability for the intact protein and its two isolated domains as a function of binding of Ca2+ or Mg2+. The reversible urea unfolding of either isolated apo-domain follows a two-state mechanism with relatively low deltaG(o)20 values of approximately 2.7 (N-domain) and approximately 1.9 kcal/mol (C-domain). The apo-C-domain is significantly unfolded at normal temperatures (20-25 degrees C). The greater affinity of the C-domain for Ca2+ causes it to be more stable than the N-domain at [Ca2+] > or = 0.3 mM. By contrast, Mg2+ causes a greater stabilization of the N- rather than the C-domain, consistent with measured Mg2+ affinities. For the intact protein (+/-Ca2+), the bimodal denaturation profiles can be analyzed to give two deltaG(o)20 values, which differ significantly from those of the isolated domains, with one domain being less stable and one domain more stable. The observed stability of the domains is strongly dependent on solution conditions such as ionic strength, as well as specific effects due to metal ion binding. In the intact protein, different folding intermediates are observed, depending on the ionic composition. The results illustrate that a protein of low intrinsic stability is liable to major perturbation of its unfolding properties by environmental conditions and liganding processes and, by extension, mutation. Hence, the observed stability of an isolated domain may differ significantly from the stability of the same structure in a multidomain protein. These results address questions involved in manipulating the stability of a protein or its domains by site directed mutagenesis and protein engineering. PMID:10975573

  16. Anion binding by protonated forms of the tripodal ligand tren.

    PubMed

    Bazzicalupi, Carla; Bencini, Andrea; Bianchi, Antonio; Danesi, Andrea; Giorgi, Claudia; Valtancoli, Barbara

    2009-03-16

    The interaction of the protonated forms of tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (tren) with NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), TsO(-), PO(4)(3-), P(2)O(7)(4-), and P(3)O(10)(5-) was studied by means of potentiometric and microcalorimetric measurements in a 0.10 M NMe(4)Cl aqueous solution at 298.1 +/- 0.1 K, affording stability constants and the relevant energetic terms DeltaH degrees and TDeltaS degrees of complexation. Thermodynamic data show that these anion complexation processes are mainly controlled by electrostatic forces, although hydrogen-bond interactions and solvation effects also contribute to complex stability, leading, in some cases, to special DeltaH degrees and TDeltaS degrees contributions. The crystal structures of [H(3)L][NO(3)](3) and [H(3)L][TsO](3) evidence a preferred tridentate coordination mode of the triprotonated ligands in the solid state. Accordingly, the H(3)L(3+) receptor binds a single oxygen atom of both NO(3)(-) and TsO(-) by means of its three protonated fingers, although in the crystal structure of [H(3)L][TsO](3), one conformer displaying bidentate coordination was also found. Modeling studies performed on the [H(3)L(NO(3))](2+) complex suggested that the tridentate binding mode is the preferred one in aqueous solution, while in the gas phase, a different complex conformation in which the receptor interacts with all three oxygen atoms of NO(3)(-) is more stable.

  17. Multipurpose ligand, DAKLI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), with high affinity and selectivity for dynorphin (. kappa. opioid) binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, A.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.; Naidu, A.; Newman, S.R. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors describe a synthetic ligand, DALKI (Dynorphin A-analogue Kappa LIgand), related to the opioid peptide dynorphin A. A single reactive amino group at the extended carboxyl terminus permits various reporter groups to be attached, such as {sup 125}I-labeled Bolton-Hunter reagent, fluorescein isothiocyanate, or biotin. These derivatives have high affinity and selectivity for the dynorphin ({kappa} opioid) receptor. An incidental finding is that untreated guinea pig brain membranes have saturable avidin binding sites.

  18. Real-Time Ligand Binding Pocket Database Search Using Local Surface Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Chikhi, Rayan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of structures of unknown function accumulated by ongoing structural genomics projects, there is an urgent need for computational methods for characterizing protein tertiary structures. As functions of many of these proteins are not easily predicted by conventional sequence database searches, a legitimate strategy is to utilize structure information in function characterization. Of a particular interest is prediction of ligand binding to a protein, as ligand molecule recognition is a major part of molecular function of proteins. Predicting whether a ligand molecule binds a protein is a complex problem due to the physical nature of protein-ligand interactions and the flexibility of both binding sites and ligand molecules. However, geometric and physicochemical complementarity is observed between the ligand and its binding site in many cases. Therefore, ligand molecules which bind to a local surface site in a protein can be predicted by finding similar local pockets of known binding ligands in the structure database. Here, we present two representations of ligand binding pockets and utilize them for ligand binding prediction by pocket shape comparison. These representations are based on mapping of surface properties of binding pockets, which are compactly described either by the two dimensional pseudo-Zernike moments or the 3D Zernike descriptors. These compact representations allow a fast real-time pocket searching against a database. Thorough benchmark study employing two different datasets show that our representations are competitive with the other existing methods. Limitations and potentials of the shape-based methods as well as possible improvements are discussed. PMID:20455259

  19. Ligand preference and orientation in b- and c-type heme-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fufezan, Christian; Zhang, Jun; Gunner, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    Hemes are often incorporated into designed proteins. The importance of the heme ligand type and its orientation is still a matter of debate. Here, heme ligands and ligand orientation were investigated using a nonredundant (87 structures) and a redundant (1503 structures) set of structures to compare and contrast design features of natural b- and c-type heme-binding proteins. Histidine is the most common ligand. Marked differences in ligation motifs between b- and c-type hemes are higher occurrence of His-Met in c-type heme binding motifs (16.4% vs. 1.4%) and higher occurrence of exchangeable, small molecules in b-type heme binding motifs (67.6% vs. 9.9%). Histidine ligands that are part of the c-type CXXCH heme-binding motif show a distinct asymmetric distribution of orientation. They tend to point between either the heme propionates or between the NA and NB heme nitrogens. Molecular mechanics calculations show that this asymmetry is due to the bonded constraints of the covalent attachment between the heme and the protein. In contrast, the orientations of b-type hemes histidine ligands are found evenly distributed with no preference. Observed histidine heme ligand orientations show no dominating influence of electrostatic interactions between the heme propionates and the ligands. Furthermore, ligands in bis-His hemes are found more frequently perpendicular rather than parallel to each other. These correlations support energetic constraints on ligands that can be used in designing proteins. PMID:18491383

  20. Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Breiten, Benjamin; Lockett, Matthew R; Sherman, Woody; Fujita, Shuji; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Lange, Heiko; Bowers, Carleen M; Heroux, Annie; Krilov, Goran; Whitesides, George M

    2013-10-16

    The mechanism (or mechanisms) of enthalpy-entropy (H/S) compensation in protein-ligand binding remains controversial, and there are still no predictive models (theoretical or experimental) in which hypotheses of ligand binding can be readily tested. Here we describe a particularly well-defined system of protein and ligands--human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) and a series of benzothiazole sulfonamide ligands with different patterns of fluorination--that we use to define enthalpy/entropy (H/S) compensation in this system thermodynamically and structurally. The binding affinities of these ligands (with the exception of one ligand, in which the deviation is understood) to HCA are, despite differences in fluorination pattern, indistinguishable; they nonetheless reflect significant and compensating changes in enthalpy and entropy of binding. Analysis reveals that differences in the structure and thermodynamic properties of the waters surrounding the bound ligands are an important contributor to the observed H/S compensation. These results support the hypothesis that the molecules of water filling the active site of a protein, and surrounding the ligand, are as important as the contact interactions between the protein and the ligand for biomolecular recognition, and in determining the thermodynamics of binding.

  1. DNA-Based Nanostructures: Changes of Mechanical Properties of DNA upon Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, Yury; Grokhovsky, Sergey; Gursky, Georgy; Nechipurenko, Dmitry; Polozov, Robert

    The formation of DNA-based nanostructures involves the binding of different kinds of ligands to DNA as well as the interaction of DNA molecules with each other. Complex formation between ligand and DNA can alter physicochemical properties of the DNA molecule. In the present work, the accessibility of DNA-ligand complexes to cleavage by DNase I are considered, and the exact algorithms for analysis of diagrams of DNase I footprinting for ligand-DNA complexes are obtained. Changes of mechanical properties of the DNA upon ligand binding are also demonstrated by the cleavage patterns generated upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes. Propagation of the mechanical perturbations along DNA in the presence of bound ligands is considered in terms of a string model with a heterogeneity corresponding to the position of a bound ligand on DNA. This model can reproduce qualitatively the cleavage patterns obtained upon ultrasound irradiation of cis-platin-DNA complexes.

  2. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    PubMed

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-03-31

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  3. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  4. Dewetting-Controlled Binding of Ligands to Hydrophobic Pockets

    PubMed Central

    Setny, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, L.-T.; Li, B.; McCammon, J. A.; Dzubiella, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a combined atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and implicit solvent analysis of a generic hydrophobic pocket-ligand (host-guest) system. The approaching ligand induces complex wetting-dewetting transitions in the weakly solvated pocket. The transitions lead to bimodal solvent fluctuations which govern magnitude and range of the pocket-ligand attraction. A recently developed implicit water model, based on the minimization of a geometric functional, captures the sensitive aqueous interface response to the concave-convex pocket-ligand configuration semiquantitatively. PMID:19905832

  5. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  6. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  7. Improved Estimation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy by Using the Ligand-Entropy and Mobility of Water Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    We previously developed the direct interaction approximation (DIA) method to estimate the protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG). The DIA method estimates the ΔG value based on the direct van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between the protein and the ligand. In the current study, the effect of the entropy of the ligand was introduced with protein dynamic properties by molecular dynamics simulations, and the interaction between each residue of the protein and the ligand was also weighted considering the hydration of each residue. The molecular dynamics simulation of the apo target protein gave the hydration effect of each residue, under the assumption that the residues, which strongly bind the water molecules, are important in the protein-ligand binding. These two effects improved the reliability of the DIA method. In fact, the parameters used in the DIA became independent of the target protein. The averaged error of ΔG estimation was 1.3 kcal/mol and the correlation coefficient between the experimental ΔG value and the calculated ΔG value was 0.75. PMID:24276169

  8. Fringe-mediated extension of O-linked fucose in the ligand-binding region of Notch1 increases binding to mammalian Notch ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Sheppard, Devon; Chillakuri, Chandramouli; Lea, Susan M; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Handford, Penny A

    2014-05-20

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for many aspects of development, cell fate determination, and tissue homeostasis. Notch signaling can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to the Notch receptor, which are known to alter both ligand binding and receptor activation. We have modified the ligand-binding region (EGF domains 11-13) of human Notch1 (hN1) with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans and shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance that the Fringe-catalyzed addition of GlcNAc to the O-fucose at T466 in EGF12 substantially increases binding to Jagged1 and Delta-like 1 (DLL1) ligands. We have subsequently determined the crystal structures of EGF domains 11-13 of hN1 modified with either the O-fucose monosaccharide or the GlcNAc-fucose disaccharide at T466 of EGF12 and observed no change in backbone structure for each variant. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for GlcNAc in modulating the ligand-binding site in hN1 EGF12, resulting in an increased affinity of this region for ligands Jagged1 and DLL1. We propose that this finding explains the Fringe-catalyzed enhancement of Notch-Delta signaling observed in flies and humans, but suggest that the inhibitory effect of Fringe on Jagged/Serrate mediated signaling involves other regions of Notch.

  9. Rapid characterization of folding and binding interactions with thermolabile ligands by DSC.

    PubMed

    Harkness, R W; Slavkovic, S; Johnson, P E; Mittermaier, A K

    2016-11-10

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful technique for measuring tight biomolecular interactions. However, many pharmaceutically relevant ligands are chemically unstable at the high temperatures used in DSC analyses. Thus, measuring binding interactions is challenging because the concentrations of ligands and thermally-converted products are constantly changing within the calorimeter cell. Using experimental data for two DNA aptamers that bind to the thermolabile ligand cocaine, we present a new global fitting analysis that yields the complete set of folding and binding parameters for the initial and final forms of the ligand from a pair of DSC experiments, while accounting for the thermal conversion. Furthermore, we show that the rate constant for thermolabile ligand conversion may be obtained with only one additional DSC dataset.

  10. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  11. Electrostatic contributions to heat capacity changes of DNA-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, K; Sharp, K

    1998-01-01

    Significant heat capacity changes (DeltaCp) often accompany protein unfolding, protein binding, and specific DNA-ligand binding reactions. Such changes are widely used to analyze contributions arising from hydrophobic and polar hydration. Current models relate the magnitude of DeltaCp to the solvent accessible surface area (ASA) of the molecule. However, for many binding systems-particularly those involving non-peptide ligands-these models predict a DeltaCp that is significantly different from the experimentally measured value. Electrostatic interactions provide a potential source of heat capacity changes and do not scale with ASA. Using finite-difference Poisson-Boltzmann methods (FDPB), we have determined the contribution of electrostatics to the DeltaCp associated with binding for DNA binding reactions involving the ligands DAPI, netropsin, lexitropsin, and the lambda repressor binding domain. PMID:9675178

  12. Allosteric Regulation in the Ligand Binding Domain of Retinoic Acid Receptorγ

    PubMed Central

    Amal, Ismail; Lutzing, Régis; Stote, Roland H.; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Rochel, Natacha; Dejaegere, Annick

    2017-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays key roles in cell differentiation and growth arrest through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which are ligand-dependent transcription factors. While the main trigger of RAR activation is the binding of RA, phosphorylation of the receptors has also emerged as an important regulatory signal. Phosphorylation of the RARγ N-terminal domain (NTD) is known to play a functional role in neuronal differentiation. In this work, we investigated the phosphorylation of RARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), and present evidence that the phosphorylation status of the LBD affects the phosphorylation of the NTD region. We solved the X-ray structure of a phospho-mimetic mutant of the LBD (RARγ S371E), which we used in molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the consequences of the S371E mutation on the RARγ structural dynamics. Combined with simulations of the wild-type LBD, we show that the conformational equilibria of LBD salt bridges (notably R387-D340) are affected by the S371E mutation, which likely affects the recruitment of the kinase complex that phosphorylates the NTD. The molecular dynamics simulations also showed that a conservative mutation in this salt bridge (R387K) affects the dynamics of the LBD without inducing large conformational changes. Finally, cellular assays showed that the phosphorylation of the NTD of RARγ is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in RARγWT and in the S371N, S371E and R387K mutants. This multidisciplinary work highlights an allosteric coupling between phosphorylations of the LBD and the NTD of RARγ and supports the importance of structural dynamics involving electrostatic interactions in the regulation of RARs activity. PMID:28125680

  13. SERS Activity of Silver Nanoparticles Functionalized with A Desferrioxamine B Derived Ligand for FE(III) Binding and Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinetto, P.; Taglietti, A.; Pasotti, L.; Pallavicini, P.; Dacarro, G.; Giulotto, E.; Grandi, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report the SERS activity of colloidal silver nanoparticles functionalized with a ligand, derived from the siderophore desferrioxamine B (desferal, DFO), an iron chelator widely used in biological and medical applications. The ligand was equipped with a sulfur-containing moiety to ensure optimal binding with silver surfaces. By means of Raman and SERS effects we monitored the route of material preparation from the modified DFO-S molecule to the colloidal aggregates. The results indicate that the functionalization of the chelating agent does not affect its binding ability towards Fe(III). The resulting functionalized silver nanoparticles are a promising SERS tag for operation in biological environments. The Fe-O stretching signature, arising when DFO-S grafted to silver nanoparticles binds Fe(III), could provide a tool for cation sensing in solution.

  14. A library screening approach identifies naturally occurring RNA sequences for a G-quadruplex binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Mirihana Arachchilage, Gayan; Morris, Mark J; Basu, Soumitra

    2014-02-07

    An RNA G-quadruplex library was synthesised and screened against kanamycin A as the ligand. Naturally occurring G-quadruplex forming sequences that differentially bind to kanamycin A were identified and characterized. This provides a simple and effective strategy for identification of potential intracellular G-quadruplex targets for a ligand.

  15. CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder for absolute binding free energy calculations and its application.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Jiang, Wei; Lee, Hui Sun; Roux, Benoît; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-28

    Advanced free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulation methods are available to accurately calculate absolute binding free energies of protein-ligand complexes. However, these methods rely on several sophisticated command scripts implementing various biasing energy restraints to enhance the convergence of the FEP/MD calculations, which must all be handled properly to yield correct results. Here, we present a user-friendly Web interface, CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder ( http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/gbinding ), to provide standardized CHARMM input files for calculations of absolute binding free energies using the FEP/MD simulations. A number of features are implemented to conveniently set up the FEP/MD simulations in highly customizable manners, thereby permitting an accelerated throughput of this important class of computations while decreasing the possibility of human errors. The interface and a series of input files generated by the interface are tested with illustrative calculations of absolute binding free energies of three nonpolar aromatic ligands to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme and three FK506-related ligands to FKBP12. Statistical errors within individual calculations are found to be small (~1 kcal/mol), and the calculated binding free energies generally agree well with the experimental measurements and the previous computational studies (within ~2 kcal/mol). Therefore, CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder provides a convenient and reliable way to set up the ligand binding free energy calculations and can be applicable to pharmaceutically important protein-ligand systems.

  16. CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder for Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations and Its Application

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Jiang, Wei; Lee, Hui Sun; Roux, Benoît; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Advanced free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulation methods are available to accurately calculate absolute binding free energies of protein-ligand complexes. However, these methods rely on several sophisticated command scripts implementing various biasing energy restraints to enhance the convergence of the FEP/MD calculations, which must all be handled properly to yield correct results. Here, we present a user-friendly web interface, CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder (http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/gbinding), to provide standardized CHARMM input files for calculations of absolute binding free energies using the FEP/MD simulations. A number of features are implemented to conveniently setup the FEP/MD simulations in highly customizable manners, thereby permitting an accelerated throughput of this important class of computations while decreasing the possibility of human errors. The interface and a series of input files generated by the interface are tested with illustrative calculations of absolute binding free energies of three non-polar aromatic ligands to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme and three FK506-related ligands to FKBP12. Statistical errors within individual calculations are found to be small (~1 kcal/mol), and the calculated binding free energies generally agree well with the experimental measurements and the previous computational studies (within ~2 kcal/mol). CHARMM-GUI Ligand Binder provides a convenient and reliable way to setup the ligand binding free energy calculations and can be applicable to pharmaceutically important protein-ligand systems. PMID:23205773

  17. On the interaction of luminol with human serum albumin: Nature and thermodynamics of ligand binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2010-09-01

    The mechanism and thermodynamic parameters for the binding of luminol (LH 2) with human serum albumin was explored by steady state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that out of two possible LH 2 conformers present is solution, only one is accessible for binding with HSA. The thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) change corresponding to the ligand binding process were also estimated by performing the experiment at different temperatures. The ligand replacement experiment with bilirubin confirms that LH 2 binds into the sub-domain IIA of the protein.

  18. Molecular decoys: ligand-binding recombinant proteins protect mice from curarimimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, J M; Aronheim, A

    1988-01-01

    Mimic ligand-binding sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor bind d-tubocurarine and alpha-bungarotoxin in vitro. Injection of such binding sites into mice could act as molecular decoys in vivo, providing protection against toxic ligands. This hypothesis of molecular "decoyance" has been tested in greater than 250 mice. Bacterially produced cholinergic binding sites provided a 2-fold increase in the survival rate of animals challenged with curarimimetic neurotoxins. Possible considerations for decoy designs and their applications are discussed. Images PMID:3375254

  19. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  20. Ligand binding to telomeric G-quadruplex DNA investigated by funnel-metadynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Moraca, Federica; Amato, Jussara; Ortuso, Francesco; Artese, Anna; Novellino, Ettore; Alcaro, Stefano; Parrinello, Michele; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4s) are higher-order DNA structures typically present at promoter regions of genes and telomeres. Here, the G4 formation decreases the replicative DNA at each cell cycle, finally leading to apoptosis. The ability to control this mitotic clock, particularly in cancer cells, is fascinating and passes through a rational understanding of the ligand/G4 interaction. We demonstrate that an accurate description of the ligand/G4 binding mechanism is possible using an innovative free-energy method called funnel-metadynamics (FM), which we have recently developed to investigate ligand/protein interaction. Using FM simulations, we have elucidated the binding mechanism of the anticancer alkaloid berberine to the human telomeric G4 (d[AG3(T2AG3)3]), computing also the binding free-energy landscape. Two ligand binding modes have been identified as the lowest energy states. Furthermore, we have found prebinding sites, which are preparatory to reach the final binding mode. In our simulations, the ions and the water molecules have been explicitly represented and the energetic contribution of the solvent during ligand binding evaluated. Our theoretical results provide an accurate estimate of the absolute ligand/DNA binding free energy (ΔGb0 = −10.3 ± 0.5 kcal/mol) that we validated through steady-state fluorescence binding assays. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental value demonstrates that FM is a most powerful method to investigate ligand/DNA interaction and can be a useful tool for the rational design also of G4 ligands. PMID:28232513

  1. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important

  2. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP: effect of calcium ion binding.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H; Li, Rui; Liu, Min; Jiang, Longguang; Luo, Zhipu; Behrendt, Niels; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains. These LLRs undergo a Ca(2+)-dependent conformational change, and this is likely to be the key structural determinant affecting the overall conformation of uPARAP. Our results provide a molecular mechanism to support the structural flexibility of uPARAP, and shed light on the structural flexibility of other members of the MR family.

  3. Binding of flexible and constrained ligands to the Grb2 SH2 domain: structural effects of ligand preorganization

    PubMed Central

    Clements, John H.; DeLorbe, John E.; Benfield, Aaron P.; Martin, Stephen F.

    2010-01-01

    Structures of the Grb2 SH2 domain complexed with a series of pseudopeptides containing flexible (benzyl succinate) and constrained (aryl cyclopropanedicarboxylate) replacements of the phosphotyrosine (pY) residue in tripeptides derived from Ac-pYXN-NH2 (where X = V, I, E and Q) were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. Complexes of flexible/constrained pairs having the same pY + 1 amino acid were analyzed in order to ascertain what structural differences might be attributed to constraining the phosphotyrosine replacement. In this context, a given structural dissimilarity between complexes was considered to be significant if it was greater than the corresponding difference in complexes coexisting within the same asymmetric unit. The backbone atoms of the domain generally adopt a similar conformation and orientation relative to the ligands in the complexes of each flexible/constrained pair, although there are some significant differences in the relative orientations of several loop regions, most notably in the BC loop that forms part of the binding pocket for the phosphate group in the tyrosine replacements. These variations are greater in the set of complexes of constrained ligands than in the set of complexes of flexible ligands. The constrained ligands make more direct polar contacts to the domain than their flexible counterparts, whereas the more flexible ligand of each pair makes more single-water-mediated contacts to the domain; there was no correlation between the total number of protein–ligand contacts and whether the phosphotyrosine replacement of the ligand was preorganized. The observed differences in hydrophobic interactions between the complexes of each flexible/constrained ligand pair were generally similar to those observed upon comparing such contacts in coexisting complexes. The average adjusted B factors of the backbone atoms of the domain and loop regions are significantly greater in the complexes of constrained ligands than in the complexes of

  4. Identification and characterization of two distinct ligand binding regions of cubilin.

    PubMed

    Yammani, R R; Seetharam, S; Seetharam, B

    2001-11-30

    Using polymerase chain reaction-amplified fragments of cubilin, an endocytic receptor of molecular mass 460 kDa, we have identified two distinct ligand binding regions. Region 1 of molecular mass 71 kDa, which included the 113-residue N terminus along with the eight epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and CUB domains 1 and 2, and region 2 of molecular mass 37 kDa consisting of CUB domains 6-8 bound both intrinsic factor-cobalamin (vitamin B(12); Cbl) (IF-Cbl) and albumin. Within these two regions, the binding of both ligands was confined to a 110-115-residue stretch that encompassed either the 113-residue N terminus or CUB domain 7 and 8. Ca(2+) dependence of ligand binding or the ability of cubilin antiserum to inhibit ligand binding to the 113-residue N terminus was 60-65%. However, a combination of CUB domains 7 and 8 or 6-8 was needed to demonstrate significant Ca(2+) dependence or inhibition of ligand binding by cubilin antiserum. Antiserum to EGF inhibited albumin but not IF-Cbl binding to the N-terminal cubilin fragment that included the eight EGF-like repeats. While the presence of excess albumin had no effect on binding to IF-Cbl, IF-Cbl in excess was able to inhibit albumin binding to both regions of cubilin. Reductive alkylation of the 113-residue N terminus or CUB 6-8, CUB 7, or CUB 8 domain resulted in the abolishment of ligand binding. These results indicate that (a) cubilin contains two distinct regions that bind both IF-Cbl and albumin and that (b) binding of both IF-Cbl and albumin to each of these regions can be distinguished and is regulated by the nonassisted formation of local disulfide bonds.

  5. Principles of Ligand Binding within a Completely Buried Cavity in HIF2[alpha] PAS-B

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Jason; Scheuermann, Thomas H.; Anderson, Peter C.; Daggett, Valerie; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2010-04-19

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are heterodimeric transcription factors responsible for the metazoan hypoxia response and promote tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to cancer treatment. The C-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain of HIF2{alpha} (HIF2{alpha} PAS-B) contains a preformed solvent-inaccessible cavity that binds artificial ligands that allosterically perturb the formation of the HIF heterodimer. To better understand how small molecules bind within this domain, we examined the structures and equilibrium and transition-state thermodynamics of HIF2{alpha} PAS-B with several artificial ligands using isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR exchange spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography. Rapid association rates reveal that ligand binding is not dependent upon a slow conformational change in the protein to permit ligand access, despite the closed conformation observed in the NMR and crystal structures. Compensating enthalpic and entropic contributions to the thermodynamic barrier for ligand binding suggest a binding-competent transition state characterized by increased structural disorder. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations reveal conversion between open and closed conformations of the protein and pathways of ligand entry into the binding pocket.

  6. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energies from Explicit and Implicit Solvent Simulations with Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dian; Zhang, Jiajing; Duke, Robert E.; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the binding free energies of a series of benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin with a polarizable force field using both explicit and implicit solvent approaches. Free energy perturbation has been performed for the ligands in bulk water and in protein complex with molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated binding free energies are well within the accuracy of experimental measurement and the direction of change is predicted correctly in call cases. We analyzed the molecular dipole moments of the ligands in gas, water and protein environments. Neither binding affinity nor ligand solvation free energy in bulk water shows much dependence on the molecular dipole moments of the ligands. Substitution of the aromatic or the charged group in the ligand results in considerable change in the solvation energy in bulk water and protein whereas the binding affinity varies insignificantly due to cancellation. The effect of chemical modification on ligand charge distribution is mostly local. Replacing benzene with diazine has minimal impact on the atomic multipoles at the amidinium group. We have also utilized an implicit solvent based end-state approach to evaluate the binding free energies of these inhibitors. In this approach, the polarizable multipole model combined with Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (PMPB/SA) provides the electrostatic interaction energy and the polar solvation free energy. Overall the relative binding free energies obtained from the PMPB/SA model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19399779

  7. Kinetics of Ligand-Receptor Interaction Reveals an Induced-Fit Mode of Binding in a Cyclic Nucleotide-Activated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peuker, Sebastian; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Held, Martin; Noé, Frank; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Seifert, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Many receptors and ion channels are activated by ligands. One key question concerns the binding mechanism. Does the ligand induce conformational changes in the protein via the induced-fit mechanism? Or does the protein preexist as an ensemble of conformers and the ligand selects the most complementary one, via the conformational selection mechanism? Here, we study ligand binding of a tetrameric cyclic nucleotide-gated channel from Mesorhizobium loti and of its monomeric binding domain (CNBD) using rapid mixing, mutagenesis, and structure-based computational biology. Association rate constants of ∼107 M−1 s−1 are compatible with diffusion-limited binding. Ligand binding to the full-length CNG channel and the isolated CNBD differ, revealing allosteric control of the CNBD by the effector domain. Finally, mutagenesis of allosteric residues affects only the dissociation rate constant, suggesting that binding follows the induced-fit mechanism. This study illustrates the strength of combining mutational, kinetic, and computational approaches to unravel important mechanistic features of ligand binding. PMID:23332059

  8. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  9. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  10. Protein conformational plasticity and complex ligand-binding kinetics explored by atomistic simulations and Markov models

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, Nuria; Noé, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the structural mechanisms of protein–ligand binding and their dependence on protein sequence and conformation is of fundamental importance for biomedical research. Here we investigate the interplay of conformational change and ligand-binding kinetics for the serine protease Trypsin and its competitive inhibitor Benzamidine with an extensive set of 150 μs molecular dynamics simulation data, analysed using a Markov state model. Seven metastable conformations with different binding pocket structures are found that interconvert at timescales of tens of microseconds. These conformations differ in their substrate-binding affinities and binding/dissociation rates. For each metastable state, corresponding solved structures of Trypsin mutants or similar serine proteases are contained in the protein data bank. Thus, our wild-type simulations explore a space of conformations that can be individually stabilized by adding ligands or making suitable changes in protein sequence. These findings provide direct evidence of conformational plasticity in receptors. PMID:26134632

  11. Discovery of pan-VEGF inhibitory peptides directed to the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the VEGF receptors

    PubMed Central

    Michaloski, Jussara S.; Redondo, Alexandre R.; Magalhães, Leila S.; Cambui, Caio C.; Giordano, Ricardo J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key molecules in numerous cellular processes, the inhibitors of which play an important role in the clinic. Among them are the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family members and their receptors (VEGFR), which are essential in the formation of new blood vessels by angiogenesis. Anti-VEGF therapy has already shown promising results in oncology and ophthalmology, but one of the challenges in the field is the design of specific small-molecule inhibitors for these receptors. We show the identification and characterization of small 6-mer peptides that target the extracellular ligand-binding domain of all three VEGF receptors. These peptides specifically prevent the binding of VEGF family members to all three receptors and downstream signaling but do not affect other angiogenic RTKs and their ligands. One of the selected peptides was also very effective at preventing pathological angiogenesis in a mouse model of retinopathy, normalizing the vasculature to levels similar to those of a normal developing retina. Collectively, our results suggest that these peptides are pan-VEGF inhibitors directed at a common binding pocket shared by all three VEGFRs. These peptides and the druggable binding site they target might be important for the development of novel and selective small-molecule, extracellular ligand-binding inhibitors of RTKs (eTKIs) for angiogenic-dependent diseases. PMID:27819042

  12. Synthesis and binding properties of new selective ligands for the nucleobase opposite the AP site.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yukiko; Nakagawa, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Rie; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2012-06-01

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidative stress or DNA alkylating agents. These damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase and form apurinic/apyrimidinic sites (AP sites) as intermediates in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. AP sites are also representative DNA damages formed by spontaneous hydrolysis. The AP sites block DNA polymerase and a mismatch nucleobase is inserted opposite the AP sites by polymerization to cause acute toxicities and mutations. Thus, AP site specific compounds have attracted much attention for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. In this study, we have developed nucleobase-polyamine conjugates as the AP site binding ligand by expecting that the nucleobase part would play a role in the specific recognition of the nucleobase opposite the AP site by the Watson-Crick base pair formation and that the polyamine part should contribute to the access of the ligand to the AP site by a non-specific interaction to the DNA phosphate backbone. The nucleobase conjugated with 3,3'-diaminodipropylamine (A-ligand, G-ligand, C-ligand, T-ligand and U-ligand) showed a specific stabilization of the duplex containing the AP site depending on the complementary combination with the nucleobase opposite the AP site; that is A-ligand to T, G-ligand to C, C-ligand to G, T- and U-ligand to A. The thermodynamic binding parameters clearly indicated that the specific stabilization is due to specific binding of the ligands to the complementary AP site. These results have suggested that the complementary base pairs of the Watson-Crick type are formed at the AP site.

  13. Heterogeneous processes affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands: Reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantar, Cetin

    2007-04-01

    The development of models to accurately simulate metal ion transport through saturated systems under variable chemical conditions, e.g., in systems containing organic ligands (L) such as natural organic matter (NOM), has two essential aspects: (1) establishing the ability to simulate metal ion sorption to aquifer solids over a range of metal/ligand ratios; and (2) to incorporate this ability to simulate metal speciation over a range in chemical conditions (e.g., pH, ligand activity) into mass transport models. Modeling approaches to evaluate metal ion sorption and transport in the presence of NOM include: (1) isotherm-based transport models, and (2) multicomponent (MC) transport models. The accuracy of transport models depends on how well the chemical interactions affecting metal ion transport in the presence of organic ligands (e.g., metal/ligand complexation) are described in transport equations. The isotherm-based transport models often fail to accurately describe metal ion transport in the presence of NOM since these models treat NOM as a single solute despite the fact that NOM is a multicomponent mixture of subcomponents with different chemical and polyfunctional behavior. On the other hand, the calculations presented in this study suggest that a multicomponent reactive transport model, in conjunction with a mechanistic modeling approach for the description of metal ion binding by NOM in a manner conducive to the application of surface complexation modeling (SCM), can effectively be used as an important predictive tool in simulating metal ion sorption and transport under variable chemical conditions in the presence of NOM.

  14. The binding orientations of structurally-related ligands can differ; A cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Ruepp, Marc-David; Wei, Hao; Leuenberger, Michele; Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2017-01-27

    Crystal structures can identify ligand-receptor interactions and assist the development of novel therapeutics, but experimental challenges sometimes necessitate the use of homologous proteins. Tropisetron is an orthosteric ligand at both 5-HT3 and α7 nACh receptors and its binding orientation has been determined in the structural homologue AChBP (pdbid: 2WNC). Co-crystallisation with a structurally-related ligand, granisetron, reveals an almost identical orientation (pdbid; 2YME). However, there is a >1000-fold difference in the affinity of tropisetron at 5-HT3 versus α7 nACh receptors, and α7 nACh receptors do not bind granisetron. These striking pharmacological differences prompt questions about which receptor the crystal structures most closely represent and whether the ligand orientations are correct. Here we probe the binding orientation of tropisetron and granisetron at 5-HT3 receptors by in silico modelling and docking, radioligand binding on cysteine-substituted 5-HT3 receptor mutants transiently expressed in HEK 293 cells, and synthetic modification of the ligands. For 15 of the 23 cysteine substitutions, the effects on tropisetron and granisetron were different. Structure-activity relationships on synthesised derivatives of both ligands were also consistent with different orientations, revealing that contrary to the crystallographic evidence from AChBP, the two ligands adopt different orientations in the 5-HT3 receptor binding site. Our results show that even quite structurally similar molecules can adopt different orientations in the same binding site, and that caution may be needed when using homologous proteins to predict ligand binding.

  15. NMR studies reveal the role of biomembranes in modulating ligand binding and release by intracellular bile acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Pedò, Massimo; Löhr, Frank; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Assfalg, Michael; Dötsch, Volker; Molinari, Henriette

    2009-12-18

    Bile acid molecules are transferred vectorially between basolateral and apical membranes of hepatocytes and enterocytes in the context of the enterohepatic circulation, a process regulating whole body lipid homeostasis. This work addresses the role of the cytosolic lipid binding proteins in the intracellular transfer of bile acids between different membrane compartments. We present nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data describing the ternary system composed of the bile acid binding protein, bile acids, and membrane mimetic systems, such as anionic liposomes. This work provides evidence that the investigated liver bile acid binding protein undergoes association with the anionic membrane and binding-induced partial unfolding. The addition of the physiological ligand to the protein-liposome mixture is capable of modulating this interaction, shifting the equilibrium towards the free folded holo protein. An ensemble of NMR titration experiments, based on nitrogen-15 protein and ligand observation, confirm that the membrane and the ligand establish competing binding equilibria, modulating the cytoplasmic permeability of bile acids. These results support a mechanism of ligand binding and release controlled by the onset of a bile salt concentration gradient within the polarized cell. The location of a specific protein region interacting with liposomes is highlighted.

  16. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-03-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12.

  17. Enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation in a protein-ligand binding reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, P R; Aldape, R A; Bruzzese, F J; Chambers, S P; Fitzgibbon, M J; Fleming, M A; Itoh, S; Livingston, D J; Navia, M A; Thomson, J A

    1994-01-01

    Parallel measurements of the thermodynamics (free-energy, enthalpy, entropy and heat-capacity changes) of ligand binding to FK506 binding protein (FKBP-12) in H2O and D2O have been performed in an effort to probe the energetic contributions of single protein-ligand hydrogen bonds formed in the binding reactions. Changing tyrosine-82 to phenylalanine in FKBP-12 abolishes protein-ligand hydrogen bond interactions in the FKBP-12 complexes with tacrolimus or rapamycin and leads to a large apparent enthalpic stabilization of binding in both H2O and D2O. High-resolution crystallographic analysis reveals that two water molecules bound to the tyrosine-82 hydroxyl group in unliganded FKBP-12 are displaced upon formation of the protein-ligand complexes. A thermodynamic analysis is presented that suggests that the removal of polar atoms from water contributes a highly unfavorable enthalpy change to the formation of C=O...HO hydrogen bonds as they occur in the processes of protein folding and ligand binding. Despite the less favorable enthalpy change, the entropic advantage of displacing two water molecules upon binding leads to a slightly more favorable free-energy change of binding in the reactions with wild-type FKBP-12. Images PMID:7510408

  18. Structural rearrangement accompanying ligand binding in the GAF domain of CodY from Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Blagova, Elena; Colledge, Vicki L.; Lebedev, Andrey A.; Williamson, David C.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    The GAF domain is a simple module widespread in proteins of diverse function including cell signalling proteins and transcription factors. Its structure, typically spanning 150 residues, has three tiers; a basal layer of two or more α-helices, a middle layer of β-pleated sheet and a top layer formed by segments of the polypeptide that connect strands of the β-sheet. In structures of GAF domains in complex with their effectors, these polypeptide segments envelop the ligand enclosing it in a cavity whose base is formed by the β-sheet, so that ligand binding and release must be accompanied by conformational rearrangements of the distal portion of the structure. Descriptions of binding are presently limited by the absence of a GAF domain for which both liganded and unliganded structures are known. Earlier, we solved the crystal structure of the GAF domain of CodY, a branched chain amino acid and GTP responsive regulator of the transcription of stationary phase and virulence genes in Bacillus, in complexes with isoleucine and valine. Here, we report the structure of this domain in its unliganded form, allowing definition of the structural changes accompanying ligand binding. The core of the protein and its dimerisation interface are essentially unchanged in agreement with circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments that show that the secondary structure composition is unperturbed by ligand binding. There is however, extensive refolding of the binding site loops, with up to 15 Å movements of the coiled segment linking β3 and β4, such that in the absence of the ligand, the binding pocket is not formed. The implications of these structural rearrangements for ligand affinity and specificity are discussed. Finally, saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy showed binding of isoleucine, but not GTP, to the GAF domain suggesting that the two cofactors do not have a common binding site. PMID:19500589

  19. Quantitative Assessment of the Interplay Between DNA Elasticity and Cooperative Binding of Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siman, L.; Carrasco, I. S. S.; da Silva, J. K. L.; de Oliveira, M. C.; Rocha, M. S.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2012-12-01

    Binding of ligands to DNA can be studied by measuring the change of the persistence length of the complex formed, in single-molecule assays. We propose a methodology for persistence length data analysis based on a quenched disorder statistical model and describing the binding isotherm by a Hill-type equation. We obtain an expression for the effective persistence length as a function of the total ligand concentration, which we apply to our data of the DNA-cationic β-cyclodextrin and to the DNA-HU protein data available in the literature, determining the values of the local persistence lengths, the dissociation constant, and the degree of cooperativity for each set of data. In both cases the persistence length behaves nonmonotonically as a function of ligand concentration and based on the results obtained we discuss some physical aspects of the interplay between DNA elasticity and cooperative binding of ligands.

  20. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, J; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a synthetic promoter and from the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter is enhanced by recombinant GR in a ligand independent manner. Both transactivation domains contribute to the transcriptional activity, additively on a synthetic promoter and cooperatively on the MMTV promoter. We thus provide the first evidence that in vitro the hormone binding domain has a transcriptional activity even in the absence of ligand. Images PMID:8392705

  1. Ligand binding modulates the structural dynamics and compactness of the major birch pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Grutsch, Sarina; Fuchs, Julian E; Freier, Regina; Kofler, Stefan; Bibi, Marium; Asam, Claudia; Wallner, Michael; Ferreira, Fátima; Brandstetter, Hans; Liedl, Klaus R; Tollinger, Martin

    2014-12-16

    Pathogenesis-related plant proteins of class-10 (PR-10) are essential for storage and transport of small molecules. A prominent member of the PR-10 family, the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, is the main cause of spring pollinosis in the temperate climate zone of the northern hemisphere. Bet v 1 binds various ligand molecules to its internal cavity, and immunologic effects of the presence of ligand have been discussed. However, the mechanism of binding has remained elusive. In this study, we show that in solution Bet v 1.0101 is conformationally heterogeneous and cannot be represented by a single structure. NMR relaxation data suggest that structural dynamics are fundamental for ligand access to the protein interior. Complex formation then leads to significant rigidification of the protein along with a compaction of its 3D structure. The data presented herein provide a structural basis for understanding the immunogenic and allergenic potential of ligand binding to Bet v 1 allergens.

  2. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  3. Ligand-binding pocket bridges DNA-binding and dimerization domains of the urate-responsive MarR homologue MftR from Burkholderia thailandensis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ashish; Grove, Anne

    2014-07-15

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family often regulate gene activity by responding to a specific ligand. In the absence of ligand, most MarR proteins function as repressors, while ligand binding causes attenuated DNA binding and therefore increased gene expression. Previously, we have shown that urate is a ligand for MftR (major facilitator transport regulator), which is encoded by the soil bacterium Burkholderia thailandensis. We show here that both mftR and the divergently oriented gene mftP encoding a major facilitator transport protein are upregulated in the presence of urate. MftR binds two cognate sites in the mftR-mftP intergenic region with equivalent affinity and sensitivity to urate. Mutagenesis of four conserved residues previously reported to be involved in urate binding to Deinococcus radiodurans HucR and Rhizobium radiobacter PecS significantly reduced protein stability and DNA binding affinity but not ligand binding. These data suggest that residues equivalent to those implicated in ligand binding to HucR and PecS serve structural roles and that MftR relies on distinct residues for ligand binding. MftR exhibits a two-step melting transition suggesting independent unfolding of the dimerization and DNA-binding regions; urate binding or mutations in the predicted ligand-binding sites result in one-step unfolding transitions. We suggest that MftR binds the ligand in a cleft between the DNA-binding lobes and the dimer interface but that the mechanism of ligand-mediated attenuation of DNA binding differs from that proposed for other urate-responsive MarR homologues. Since DNA binding by MftR is attenuated at 37 °C, our data also suggest that MftR responds to both ligand and a thermal upshift by attenuated DNA binding and upregulation of the genes under its control.

  4. Development of a protein-ligand-binding site prediction method based on interaction energy and sequence conservation.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Hiroto; Sato, Kenta; Wei, Cao; Saad, Gul; Sumikoshi, Kazuya; Nakamura, Shugo; Terada, Tohru; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-09-01

    We present a new method for predicting protein-ligand-binding sites based on protein three-dimensional structure and amino acid conservation. This method involves calculation of the van der Waals interaction energy between a protein and many probes placed on the protein surface and subsequent clustering of the probes with low interaction energies to identify the most energetically favorable locus. In addition, it uses amino acid conservation among homologous proteins. Ligand-binding sites were predicted by combining the interaction energy and the amino acid conservation score. The performance of our prediction method was evaluated using a non-redundant dataset of 348 ligand-bound and ligand-unbound protein structure pairs, constructed by filtering entries in a ligand-binding site structure database, LigASite. Ligand-bound structure prediction (bound prediction) indicated that 74.0 % of predicted ligand-binding sites overlapped with real ligand-binding sites by over 25 % of their volume. Ligand-unbound structure prediction (unbound prediction) indicated that 73.9 % of predicted ligand-binding residues overlapped with real ligand-binding residues. The amino acid conservation score improved the average prediction accuracy by 17.0 and 17.6 points for the bound and unbound predictions, respectively. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the combined use of the interaction energy and amino acid conservation in the ligand-binding site prediction.

  5. Localized Control of Ligand Binding in Hemoglobin: Effect of Tertiary Structure on Picosecond Geminate Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, J. M.; Scott, T. W.; Fisanick, G. J.; Simon, S. R.; Findsen, E. W.; Ondrias, M. R.; MacDonald, V. W.

    1985-07-01

    The picosecond geminate rebinding of molecular oxygen was monitored in a variety of different human, reptilian, and fish hemoglobins. The fast (100 to 200 picoseconds) component of the rebinding is highly sensitive to protein structure. Both proximal and distal perturbations of the heme affect this rebinding process. The rebinding yield for the fast process correlates with the frequency of the stretching motion of the iron-proximal histidine mode (vFe-His) observed in the transient Raman spectra of photodissociated ligated hemoglobins. The high-affinity R-state species exhibit the highest values for vFe-His and the highest yields for fast rebinding, whereas low affinity R-state species and T-state species exhibit lower values of vFe-His and correspondingly reduced yields for this geminate process. These findings link protein control of ligand binding with events at the heme.

  6. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Protein-Ligand Binding Analysis in Multi-Component Protein Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeArmond, Patrick D.; West, Graham M.; Huang, Hai-Tsang; Fitzgerald, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    Described here is a stable isotope labeling protocol that can be used with a chemical modification- and mass spectrometry-based protein-ligand binding assay for detecting and quantifying both the direct and indirect binding events that result from protein-ligand binding interactions. The protocol utilizes an H{2/16}O2 and H{2/18}O2 labeling strategy to evaluate the chemical denaturant dependence of methionine oxidation in proteins both in the presence and absence of a target ligand. The differential denaturant dependence to the oxidation reactions performed in the presence and absence of ligand provides a measure of the protein stability changes that occur as a result of direct interactions of proteins with the target ligand and/or as a result of indirect interactions involving other protein-ligand interactions that are either induced or disrupted by the ligand. The described protocol utilizes the 18O/16O ratio in the oxidized protein samples to quantify the ligand-induced protein stability changes. The ratio is determined using the isotopic distributions observed for the methionine-containing peptides used for protein identification in the LC-MS-based proteomics readout. The strategy is applied to a multi-component protein mixture in this proof-of-principle experiment, which was designed to evaluate the technique's ability to detect and quantify the direct binding interaction between cyclosporin A and cyclophilin A and to detect the indirect binding interaction between cyclosporin A and calcineurin (i.e., the protein-protein interaction between cyclophilin A and calcineurin that is induced by cyclosporin A binding to cyclophilin A).

  7. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    SciTech Connect

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  8. The unique extracellular disulfide loop of the glycine receptor is a principal ligand binding element.

    PubMed Central

    Rajendra, S; Vandenberg, R J; Pierce, K D; Cunningham, A M; French, P W; Barry, P H; Schofield, P R

    1995-01-01

    A loop structure, formed by the putative disulfide bridging of Cys198 and Cys209, is a principal element of the ligand binding site in the glycine receptor (GlyR). Disruption of the loop's tertiary structure by Ser mutations of these Cys residues either prevented receptor assembly on the cell surface, or created receptors unable to be activated by agonists or to bind the competitive antagonist, strychnine. Mutation of residues Lys200, Tyr202 and Thr204 within this loop reduced agonist binding and channel activation sensitivities by up to 55-, 520- and 190-fold, respectively, without altering maximal current sizes, and mutations of Lys200 and Tyr202 abolished strychnine binding to the receptor. Removal of the hydroxyl moiety from Tyr202 by mutation to Phe profoundly reduced agonist sensitivity, whilst removal of the benzene ring abolished strychnine binding, thus demonstrating that Tyr202 is crucial for both agonist and antagonist binding to the GlyR. Tyr202 also influences receptor assembly on the cell surface, with only large chain substitutions (Phe, Leu and Arg, but not Thr, Ser and Ala) forming functional receptors. Our data demonstrate the presence of a second ligand binding site in the GlyR, consistent with the three-loop model of ligand binding to the ligand-gated ion channel superfamily. Images PMID:7621814

  9. VASP: A Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties Yields Insights into Protein-Ligand Binding Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian Y.; Honig, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Many algorithms that compare protein structures can reveal similarities that suggest related biological functions, even at great evolutionary distances. Proteins with related function often exhibit differences in binding specificity, but few algorithms identify structural variations that effect specificity. To address this problem, we describe the Volumetric Analysis of Surface Properties (VASP), a novel volumetric analysis tool for the comparison of binding sites in aligned protein structures. VASP uses solid volumes to represent protein shape and the shape of surface cavities, clefts and tunnels that are defined with other methods. Our approach, inspired by techniques from constructive solid geometry, enables the isolation of volumetrically conserved and variable regions within three dimensionally superposed volumes. We applied VASP to compute a comparative volumetric analysis of the ligand binding sites formed by members of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)-related lipid transfer (START) domains and the serine proteases. Within both families, VASP isolated individual amino acids that create structural differences between ligand binding cavities that are known to influence differences in binding specificity. Also, VASP isolated cavity subregions that differ between ligand binding cavities which are essential for differences in binding specificity. As such, VASP should prove a valuable tool in the study of protein-ligand binding specificity. PMID:20814581

  10. Direct Determination of Vibrational Density of States Change on Ligand Binding to a Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balog, Erika; Becker, Torsten; Oettl, Martin; Lechner, Ruep; Daniel, Roy; Finney, John; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2004-07-01

    The change in the vibrational density of states of a protein (dihydrofolate reductase) on binding a ligand (methotrexate) is determined using inelastic neutron scattering. The vibrations of the complex soften significantly relative to the unbound protein. The resulting free-energy change, which is directly determined by the density of states change, is found to contribute significantly to the binding equilibrium.

  11. Direct determination of vibrational density of states change on ligand binding to a protein.

    PubMed

    Balog, Erika; Becker, Torsten; Oettl, Martin; Lechner, Ruep; Daniel, Roy; Finney, John; Smith, Jeremy C

    2004-07-09

    The change in the vibrational density of states of a protein (dihydrofolate reductase) on binding a ligand (methotrexate) is determined using inelastic neutron scattering. The vibrations of the complex soften significantly relative to the unbound protein. The resulting free-energy change, which is directly determined by the density of states change, is found to contribute significantly to the binding equilibrium.

  12. Long distance effect on ligand-gated ion channels extracellular domain may affect interactions with the intracellular machinery.

    PubMed

    Garret, Maurice; Boué-Grabot, Eric; Taly, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of receptor trafficking is critical for controlling neurotransmission. A γ2(R43Q) point mutation on GABAA receptor subunit is linked to epilepsy in human. We recently analyzed the effect of this amino-acid substitution on GABAA receptor trafficking and showed that this mutation as well as agonist application, both affecting GABAA receptor extracellular domain, have an effect on receptor endocytosis. By comparing homology models based on ligand gated ion channels in their active and resting states, we reveal that the γ2R43 domain is located in a loop that is affected by motion resulting from receptor activation. Taken together, these results suggest that endocytosis of GABAA receptors is linked to agonist induced conformational changes. We propose that ligand or modulator binding is followed by a whole chain of interconnections, including the intracellular domain, that may influence ligand-gated channel trafficking.

  13. Long distance effect on ligand-gated ion channels extracellular domain may affect interactions with the intracellular machinery

    PubMed Central

    Garret, Maurice; Boué-Grabot, Eric; Taly, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of receptor trafficking is critical for controlling neurotransmission. A γ2(R43Q) point mutation on GABAA receptor subunit is linked to epilepsy in human. We recently analyzed the effect of this amino-acid substitution on GABAA receptor trafficking and showed that this mutation as well as agonist application, both affecting GABAA receptor extracellular domain, have an effect on receptor endocytosis. By comparing homology models based on ligand gated ion channels in their active and resting states, we reveal that the γ2R43 domain is located in a loop that is affected by motion resulting from receptor activation. Taken together, these results suggest that endocytosis of GABAA receptors is linked to agonist induced conformational changes. We propose that ligand or modulator binding is followed by a whole chain of interconnections, including the intracellular domain, that may influence ligand-gated channel trafficking. PMID:25254078

  14. Synthesis and tau RNA binding evaluation of ametantrone-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Gerard; Marchán, Vicente

    2015-02-20

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of ametantrone-containing RNA ligands based on the derivatization of this intercalator with two neamine moieties (Amt-Nea,Nea) or with one azaquinolone heterocycle and one neamine (Amt-Nea,Azq) as well as its combination with guanidinoneamine (Amt-NeaG4). Biophysical studies revealed that guanidinylation of the parent ligand (Amt-Nea) had a positive effect on the binding of the resulting compound for Tau pre-mRNA target as well as on the stabilization upon complexation of some of the mutated RNA sequences associated with the development of tauopathies. Further studies by NMR revealed the existence of a preferred binding site in the stem-loop structure, in which ametantrone intercalates in the characteristic bulged region. Regarding doubly-functionalized ligands, binding affinity and stabilizing ability of Amt-Nea,Nea were similar to those of the guanidinylated ligand, but the two aminoglycoside fragments seem to interfere with its accommodation in a single binding site. However, Amt-Nea,Azq binds at the bulged region in a similar way than Amt-NeaG4. Overall, these results provide new insights on fine-tuning RNA binding properties of ametantrone by single or double derivatization with other RNA recognition motifs, which could help in the future design of new ligands with improved selectivity for disease-causing RNA molecules.

  15. Folding and stability of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Jackson, Sophie E.

    2002-01-01

    A complex pathway involving many molecular chaperones has been proposed for the folding, assembly, and maintenance of a high-affinity ligand-binding form of steroid receptors in vivo, including the glucocorticoid receptor. To better understand this intricate folding and assembly process, we studied the folding of the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in vitro. We found that this domain can be refolded into a compact, highly structured state in vitro in the absence of chaperones. However, the presence of zwitterionic detergent is required to maintain the domain in a soluble form. In this state, the protein is dimeric and has considerable helical structure as shown by far-UV circular dichroism. Further investigation of the properties of this in vitro refolded state show that it is stable and resistant to denaturation by heat or low concentrations of chemical denaturants. A detailed analysis of the unfolding equilibria using three different structural probes demonstrated that this state unfolds via a highly populated dimeric intermediate state. Together, these data clearly show that the ligand-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor does not require chaperones for folding per se. However, this in vitro refolded state binds the ligand dexamethasone only weakly (Kd = 45 μM) compared to the in vivo assembled receptor (Kd = 3.4 nM). We suggest that the role of Hsp90 and associated chaperones is to bind to, and stabilize, a specific conformational state of the receptor which binds ligand with high affinity. PMID:12142447

  16. Spin-dependent mechanism for diatomic ligand binding to heme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, Stefan

    2002-12-01

    The nature of diatomic ligand recombination in heme proteins is elucidated by using a Landau-Zener model for the electronic coupling in the recombination rate constant. The model is developed by means of explicit potential energy surfaces calculated by using density functional theory (DFT). The interaction of all possible spin states of the three common diatomic ligands, CO, NO, and O2, and high-spin heme iron is compared. The electronic coupling, rebinding barrier, and Landau-Zener force terms can be obtained and used to demonstrate significant differences among the ligands. In particular the intermediate spin states of NO (S = 3/2) and O2 (S = 1) are shown to be bound states. Rapid recombination occurs from these bound states in agreement with experimental data. The slower phases of O2 recombination can be explained by the presence of two higher spin states, S = 2 and S = 3, which have a small and relatively large barrier to ligand recombination, respectively. By contrast, the intermediate spin state for CO is not a bound state, and the only recombination pathway for CO involves direct recombination from the S = 2 state. This process is significantly slower according to the Landau-Zener model. Quantitative estimates of the parameters used in the rate constants provide a complete description that explains rebinding rates that range from femtoseconds to milliseconds at ambient temperature.

  17. Improving the binding capacities of protein A chromatographic materials by means of ligand polymerization.

    PubMed

    Freiherr von Roman, Matthias; Berensmeier, Sonja

    2014-06-20

    Protein A chromatography is one of the most important techniques used in the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Due to the low dynamic binding capacity of protein A chromatographic materials compared to other stationary phases, protein A chromatography is often discussed to be the bottleneck among current purification processes. Several approaches were tested within this study in order to maximize IgG binding capacities of current acrylamido-based based resins. Genetic engineering techniques were used in order to polymerize one of the IgG binding domains (B-domain) of protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) to achieve ligands with an increased length. The solution-binding ratio and the total size of ligand-antibody complexes were used to characterize the interaction potential of novel ligands, revealing a relatively linear dependency between the number of binding domains upon the amount of bound antibody molecules. This relationship was also valid up to a ligand which was comprised of 8 B-domains after attaching them onto acrylamido-based based stationary phases using epoxy coupling techniques. Equilibrium binding capacities of more than 80mghIgGmL(-1) were achieved using the B8 ligand. Furthermore, static binding capacities, especially for smaller ligands comprised of fewer B-domains, were improved up to 87mghIgGmL(-1) using site-specific coupling chemistry, which is an improvement of more than 20% compared to commercially available materials. In order to evaluate pore exclusion effects due to the use of prolonged affinity ligands, prepared materials were characterized regarding their effective intraparticle porosity and breakthrough capacity.

  18. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands.

  19. Coupling of disulfide bond and distal histidine dissociation in human ferrous cytoglobin regulates ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Beckerson, Penny; Reeder, Brandon J; Wilson, Michael T

    2015-02-13

    Earlier kinetics studies on cytoglobin did not assign functional properties to specific structural forms. Here, we used defined monomeric and dimeric forms and cysteine mutants to show that an intramolecular disulfide bond (C38-C83) alters the dissociation rate constant of the intrinsic histidine (H81) (∼1000 fold), thus controlling binding of extrinsic ligands. Through time-resolved spectra we have unequivocally assigned CO binding to hexa- and penta-coordinate forms and have made direct measurement of histidine rebinding following photolysis. We present a model that describes how the cysteine redox state of the monomer controls histidine dissociation rate constants and hence extrinsic ligand binding.

  20. Protein-Ligand Binding from Distancefield Distances and Hamiltonian Replica Exchange Simulations.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Anita; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2013-02-12

    The calculation of protein-ligand binding free energies is an important goal in the field of computational chemistry. Applying path-sampling methods for this purpose involves calculating the associated potential of mean force (PMF) and gives insight into the binding free energy along the binding process. Without a priori knowledge about the binding path, sampling reversible binding can be difficult to achieve. To alleviate this problem, we introduce the distancefield (DF) as a reaction coordinate for such calculations. DF is a grid-based method in which the shortest distance between the binding site and a ligand is determined avoiding routes that pass through the protein. Combining this reaction coordinate with Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (HREMD) allows for the reversible binding of the ligand to the protein. A comparison is made between umbrella sampling using regular distance restraints and HREMD with DF restraints to study aspirin binding to the protein phospholipase A2. Although the free energies of binding are similar for both methods, the increased sampling with HREMD has a significant influence on the shape of the PMF. A remarkable agreement between the calculated binding free energies from the PMF and the experimental estimate is obtained.

  1. Entropy and Mg2+ control ligand affinity and specificity in the malachite green binding RNA aptamer.

    PubMed

    Bernard Da Costa, Jason; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The binding of small molecule targets by RNA aptamers provides an excellent model to study the versatility of RNA function. The malachite green aptamer binds and recognizes its ligand via stacking and electrostatic interactions. The binding of the aptamer to its original selection target and three related molecules was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis, and fluorescence titration. The results reveal that the entropy of complex formation plays a large role in determining binding affinity and ligand specificity. These data combined with previous structural studies show that metal ions are required to stabilize the complexes with non-native ligands whereas the complex with the original selection target is stable at low salt and in the absence of divalent metal ions.

  2. Water-Restructuring Mutations Can Reverse the Thermodynamic Signature of Ligand Binding to Human Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jerome M; Kang, Kyungtae; Sastry, Madhavi; Sherman, Woody; Sankaran, Banumathi; Zwart, Peter H; Whitesides, George M

    2017-03-27

    This study uses mutants of human carbonic anhydrase (HCAII) to examine how changes in the organization of water within a binding pocket can alter the thermodynamics of protein-ligand association. Results from calorimetric, crystallographic, and theoretical analyses suggest that most mutations strengthen networks of water-mediated hydrogen bonds and reduce binding affinity by increasing the enthalpic cost and, to a lesser extent, the entropic benefit of rearranging those networks during binding. The organization of water within a binding pocket can thus determine whether the hydrophobic interactions in which it engages are enthalpy-driven or entropy-driven. Our findings highlight a possible asymmetry in protein-ligand association by suggesting that, within the confines of the binding pocket of HCAII, binding events associated with enthalpically favorable rearrangements of water are stronger than those associated with entropically favorable ones.

  3. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to a Heterogeneous RNA Population in the Malachite Green Aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Dombrowski, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The malachite green aptamer binds two closely related ligands, malachite green (MG) and tetramethylrosamine (TMR), with near equal affinity. The MG ligand consists of three phenyl rings emanating from a central carbon, while TMR has two of the three rings connected by an ether linkage. The binding pockets for MG and TMR in the aptamer, known from high-resolution structure, differ only in the conformation of a few nucleotides. Herein, we applied isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to compare the thermodynamics for binding of MG and TMR to the aptamer. Binding heat capacities were obtained from ITC titrations over the temperature range of 15 to 60 °C. Two temperature regimes were found for MG binding: one from 15 to 45 °C where MG bound with a large negative heat capacity and an apparent stoichiometry (n) of ~0.4, and another from 50 to 60 °C where MG bound with positive heat capacity and n~1.1. The binding of TMR, on the other hand, revealed only one temperature regime for binding, with a more modest negative heat capacity and n~1.2. The large difference in heat capacity between the two ligands suggests that significantly more conformational rearrangement occurs upon the binding of MG than TMR, which is consistent with differences in solvent accessible surface area calculated for available ligand-bound structures. Lastly, we note that binding stoichiometry of MG was improved not only by raising the temperature, but also by lowering the concentration of Mg2+ or increasing the time between ITC injections. These studies suggest that binding of a dynamical ligand to a functional RNA requires the RNA itself to have significant dynamics. PMID:22192051

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ligand Dissociation from Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized “portal region” could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques. PMID:19564911

  5. Automatic generation of bioinformatics tools for predicting protein–ligand binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Masaki; Ueki, Kokoro; Saad, Gul; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Predictive tools that model protein–ligand binding on demand are needed to promote ligand research in an innovative drug-design environment. However, it takes considerable time and effort to develop predictive tools that can be applied to individual ligands. An automated production pipeline that can rapidly and efficiently develop user-friendly protein–ligand binding predictive tools would be useful. Results: We developed a system for automatically generating protein–ligand binding predictions. Implementation of this system in a pipeline of Semantic Web technique-based web tools will allow users to specify a ligand and receive the tool within 0.5–1 day. We demonstrated high prediction accuracy for three machine learning algorithms and eight ligands. Availability and implementation: The source code and web application are freely available for download at http://utprot.net. They are implemented in Python and supported on Linux. Contact: shimizu@bi.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26545824

  6. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    PubMed

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  7. Allostery Mediates Ligand Binding to WWOX Tumor Suppressor via a Conformational Switch

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B.; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2014-01-01

    While being devoid of the ability to recognize ligands itself, the WW2 domain is believed to aid ligand binding to WW1 domain in the context of WW1-WW2 tandem module of WWOX tumor suppressor. In an effort to test the generality of this hypothesis, we have undertaken here a detailed biophysical analysis of the binding of WW domains of WWOX alone and in the context of WW1-WW2 tandem module to an array of putative PPXY ligands. Our data show that while the WW1 domain of WWOX binds to all ligands in a physiologically-relevant manner, the WW2 domain does not. Moreover, ligand binding to WW1 domain in the context of WW1-WW2 tandem module is two-to-three-fold stronger than when treated alone. We also provide evidence that the WW domains within the WW1-WW2 tandem module physically associate so as to adopt a fixed spatial orientation relative to each other. Of particular note is the observation that the physical association of WW2 domain with WW1 blocks access to ligand. Consequently, ligand binding to WW1 domain not only results in the displacement of WW2 lid but also disrupts the physical association of WW domains in the liganded conformation. Taken together, our study underscores a key role of allosteric communication in the ability of WW2 orphan domain to chaperone physiological action of WW1 domain within the context of the WW1-WW2 tandem module of WWOX. PMID:25703206

  8. Allostery mediates ligand binding to WWOX tumor suppressor via a conformational switch.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, Brett J; Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; McDonald, Caleb B; Sudol, Marius; Farooq, Amjad

    2015-04-01

    While being devoid of the ability to recognize ligands itself, the WW2 domain is believed to aid ligand binding to the WW1 domain in the context of a WW1-WW2 tandem module of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) tumor suppressor. In an effort to test the generality of this hypothesis, we have undertaken here a detailed biophysical analysis of the binding of WW domains of WWOX alone and in the context of the WW1-WW2 tandem module to an array of putative proline-proline-x-tyrosine (PPXY) ligands. Our data show that while the WW1 domain of WWOX binds to all ligands in a physiologically relevant manner, the WW2 domain does not. Moreover, ligand binding to the WW1 domain in the context of the WW1-WW2 tandem module is two-to-three-fold stronger than when treated alone. We also provide evidence that the WW domains within the WW1-WW2 tandem module physically associate so as to adopt a fixed spatial orientation relative to each other. Of particular note is the observation that the physical association of the WW2 domain with WW1 blocks access to ligands. Consequently, ligand binding to the WW1 domain not only results in the displacement of the WW2 lid but also disrupts the physical association of WW domains in the liganded conformation. Taken together, our study underscores a key role of allosteric communication in the ability of the WW2 orphan domain to chaperone physiological action of the WW1 domain within the context of the WW1-WW2 tandem module of WWOX.

  9. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Patricia A.

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  10. Probing the structure of the ligand binding cavity of lipocalins by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Patel, R C; Lange, D; McConathy, W J; Patel, Y C; Patel, S C

    1997-06-01

    The lipocalin superfamily constitutes a phylogenetically conserved group of more than 40 proteins that function in the binding and transport of a variety of physiologically important ligands. Members of this family subserve diverse functions as carriers of retinoids (retinol binding protein), odorants (odorant binding proteins), chromophores (insecticyanin, INS), pheromones (aphrodisin) and sterols (apolipoprotein D, apoD). Despite the pivotal importance of the ligand binding function of these proteins, a suitable approach for characterizing the molecular determinants of such binding has not been available. In studies using three homogeneously purified lipocalins INS, beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) and human apoD, we find that the fluorescence reporter BIS (1,1'-bi(4-anilino) naphthalene-5,5'-disulfonic acid) is an ideal candidate for use in rapid kinetic experiments and in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). These methods require only small amounts of reagents and yield molecular coordinates of the ligand binding cavity of lipocalins in solution that are in remarkably close agreement to those obtained from crystallographic work with solids. Extremely fast ligand binding dynamics is indicated.

  11. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    PubMed

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations and molecular flooding studies of the retinoid X-receptor ligand binding domain.

    PubMed

    Gray, Geoffrey M; Ma, Ning; Wagner, Carl E; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2017-03-01

    Bexarotene is an FDA approved retinoid X-receptor (RXR) agonist for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and its use in other cancers and Alzheimer's disease is being investigated. The drug causes serious side effects, which might be reduced by chemical modifications of the molecule. To rationalize known agonists and to help identify sites for potential substitutions we present molecular simulations in which the RXR ligand-binding domain was flooded with a large number of drug-like molecules, and molecular dynamics simulations of a series of bexarotene-like ligands bound to the RXR ligand-binding domain. Based on the flooding simulations, two regions of interest for ligand modifications were identified: a hydrophobic area near the bridgehead and another near the fused ring. In addition, positional fluctuations of the phenyl ring were generally smaller than fluctuations of the fused ring of the ligands. Together, these observations suggest that the fused ring might be a good target for the design of higher affinity bexarotene-like ligands, while the phenyl ring is already optimized. In addition, notable differences in ligand position and interactions between the RXRα and RXRβ were observed, as well as differences in hydrogen bonding and solvation, which might be exploited in the development of subspecies-specific ligands.

  13. Ligand identification of carbohydrate-binding proteins employing a biotinylated glycan binding assay and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wuhrer, Manfred; van Remoortere, Alexandra; Balog, Crina I A; Deelder, André M; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2010-11-15

    Characterization of protein-carbohydrate interactions at the molecular level is important for understanding many glycan-mediated processes. Here we present a method for the identification of glycan ligands of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The glycans released from natural sources are labeled with biotinamidocaproyl hydrazide (BACH) and subsequently fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Glycan fractions are screened for binding to carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs) using a microtitration plate binding assay; CBPs are immobilized, BACH-glycan fractions are added, and bound BACH-glycans are detected using alkaline phosphatase-conjugated streptavidin. The glycan structures in binding fractions are studied by (tandem) mass spectrometry, exoglycosidase treatment, and rechromatography, thereby revealing the glycan motifs recognized by the CBPs. Subsequent surface plasmon resonance experiments using a reverse setup with immobilization of the BACH-glycan ligands on streptavidin-coated surfaces provide more information on glycan-CBP interactions via association and dissociation curves. The presented method is easy and fast, and the required instrumentation is available in many laboratories. The assay is very sensitive given that both the mass spectrometric analysis and the microtitration plate binding assay can be performed on femtomole amounts of BACH-glycans. This approach should be generally applicable to study and structurally identify carbohydrate ligands of anti-glycan antibodies and lectins.

  14. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Bončina, Matjaž; Podlipnik, Črtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-12-02

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolinium ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br) to the ht-DNA fragment (Tel22) AGGG(TTAGGG)3 using isothermal titration calorimetry, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and molecular modeling. By global thermodynamic analysis of experimental data we show that the driving forces characterized by contributions of specific interactions, changes in solvation and conformation differ significantly for binding of ligands with low quadruplex selectivity over duplexes (Net, DP77, DP78, TMPyP4; KTel22 ≈ ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br; KTel22 > KdsDNA). These contributions are in accordance with the observed structural features (changes) and suggest that upon binding Net, DP77, DP78 and TMPyP4 select hybrid-1 and/or hybrid-2 conformation while Phen-DC3 and 360A-Br induce the transition of hybrid-1 and hybrid-2 to the structure with characteristics of antiparallel or hybrid-3 type conformation.

  15. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-02-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  16. Exploring the stability of ligand binding modes to proteins by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Watanabe, Etsurou; Kokubo, Hironori

    2017-01-01

    The binding mode prediction is of great importance to structure-based drug design. The discrimination of various binding poses of ligand generated by docking is a great challenge not only to docking score functions but also to the relatively expensive free energy calculation methods. Here we systematically analyzed the stability of various ligand poses under molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. First, a data set of 120 complexes was built based on the typical physicochemical properties of drug-like ligands. Three potential binding poses (one correct pose and two decoys) were selected for each ligand from self-docking in addition to the experimental pose. Then, five independent MD simulations for each pose were performed with different initial velocities for the statistical analysis. Finally, the stabilities of ligand poses under MD were evaluated and compared with the native one from crystal structure. We found that about 94% of the native poses were maintained stable during the simulations, which suggests that MD simulations are accurate enough to judge most experimental binding poses as stable properly. Interestingly, incorrect decoy poses were maintained much less and 38-44% of decoys could be excluded just by performing equilibrium MD simulations, though 56-62% of decoys were stable. The computationally-heavy binding free energy calculation can be performed only for these survived poses.

  17. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes

    PubMed Central

    Bončina, Matjaž; Podlipnik, Črtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolinium ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br) to the ht-DNA fragment (Tel22) AGGG(TTAGGG)3 using isothermal titration calorimetry, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and molecular modeling. By global thermodynamic analysis of experimental data we show that the driving forces characterized by contributions of specific interactions, changes in solvation and conformation differ significantly for binding of ligands with low quadruplex selectivity over duplexes (Net, DP77, DP78, TMPyP4; KTel22 ≈ ligands (Phen-DC3, 360A-Br; KTel22 > KdsDNA). These contributions are in accordance with the observed structural features (changes) and suggest that upon binding Net, DP77, DP78 and TMPyP4 select hybrid-1 and/or hybrid-2 conformation while Phen-DC3 and 360A-Br induce the transition of hybrid-1 and hybrid-2 to the structure with characteristics of antiparallel or hybrid-3 type conformation. PMID:26546516

  18. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  19. A group of thermodynamic potentials applicable to ligand binding by a polyfunctional macromolecule.

    PubMed Central

    Wyman, J

    1975-01-01

    The binding of ligands by a macromolecule can be well described by a group of potentials derivable from the energy and of which the original binding potential is one. The group is Abelian and is isomorphic with a group of symmetries. Each member corresponds to a particular set of experimental conditions--system open to some, closed to others, of the ligand-and the group as a whole is an immediate source of all possible linkage relations applicable to the macromolecule. Seen in terms of information theory it can be interpreted as a program for the response of the macromolecule to its ligands according to the conditions with which it is faced. The group provides a ready formulation of the effect of a ligand on the equilibrium constant for a reaction involving a set of macromolecules, and it leads to a clear-cut distinction between true and pseudolinkage. PMID:1055419

  20. Binding of stereognostically designed ligands to trivalent, pentavalent, and hexavalent f-block elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

    2012-03-26

    Stability constants were determined for the complexes formed from two stereognostically designed ligands and the f-block elements Nd(III), Np(V), and Pu(VI). The ligands investigated were tris[3-(2-carboxyphenoxy)propyl]amine (NPB) and tris-N,N',N''-[2-(2-carboxy-4-ethyl-phenoxy)ethyl]-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (EETAC). A stereognostically blind ligand, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), was also investigated for comparison. The results suggest that there is no significant stereognostic effect for complexation of NPB or EETAC to Np(V). On the other hand, a modest stereognostic effect is seen for the NPB ligand when complexed to Pu(VI), leading to an approximately 8-fold increase in the binding strength. A more significant effect is observed for the EETAC system in which a 250-fold increase in binding is observed for Pu(VI) versus Nd(III).

  1. Development of purely structure-based pharmacophores for the topoisomerase I-DNA-ligand binding pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drwal, Malgorzata N.; Agama, Keli; Pommier, Yves; Griffith, Renate

    2013-12-01

    Purely structure-based pharmacophores (SBPs) are an alternative method to ligand-based approaches and have the advantage of describing the entire interaction capability of a binding pocket. Here, we present the development of SBPs for topoisomerase I, an anticancer target with an unusual ligand binding pocket consisting of protein and DNA atoms. Different approaches to cluster and select pharmacophore features are investigated, including hierarchical clustering and energy calculations. In addition, the performance of SBPs is evaluated retrospectively and compared to the performance of ligand- and complex-based pharmacophores. SBPs emerge as a valid method in virtual screening and a complementary approach to ligand-focussed methods. The study further reveals that the choice of pharmacophore feature clustering and selection methods has a large impact on the virtual screening hit lists. A prospective application of the SBPs in virtual screening reveals that they can be used successfully to identify novel topoisomerase inhibitors.

  2. Binding equilibrium and kinetics of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands in cell adhesion: Insights from computational model systems and theory.

    PubMed

    Weikl, Thomas R; Hu, Jinglei; Xu, Guang-Kui; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-09-02

    The adhesion of cell membranes is mediated by the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins. In this article, we review recent results from simulations and theory that lead to novel insights on how the binding equilibrium and kinetics of these proteins is affected by the membranes and by the membrane anchoring and molecular properties of the proteins. Simulations and theory both indicate that the binding equilibrium constant [Formula: see text] and the on- and off-rate constants of anchored receptors and ligands in their 2-dimensional (2D) membrane environment strongly depend on the membrane roughness from thermally excited shape fluctuations on nanoscales. Recent theory corroborated by simulations provides a general relation between [Formula: see text] and the binding constant [Formula: see text] of soluble variants of the receptors and ligands that lack the membrane anchors and are free to diffuse in 3 dimensions (3D).

  3. Detecting Local Ligand-Binding Site Similarity in Non-Homologous Proteins by Surface Patch Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2012-01-01

    Functional elucidation of proteins is one of the essential tasks in biology. Function of a protein, specifically, small ligand molecules that bind to a protein, can be predicted by finding similar local surface regions in binding sites of known proteins. Here, we developed an alignment free local surface comparison method for predicting a ligand molecule which binds to a query protein. The algorithm, named Patch-Surfer, represents a binding pocket as a combination of segmented surface patches, each of which is characterized by its geometrical shape, the electrostatic potential, the hydrophobicity, and the concaveness. Representing a pocket by a set of patches is effective to absorb difference of global pocket shape while capturing local similarity of pockets. The shape and the physicochemical properties of surface patches are represented using the 3D Zernike descriptor, which is a series expansion of mathematical 3D function. Two pockets are compared using a modified weighted bipartite matching algorithm, which matches similar patches from the two pockets. Patch-Surfer was benchmarked on three datasets, which consist in total of 390 proteins that bind to one of 21 ligands. Patch-Surfer showed superior performance to existing methods including a global pocket comparison method, Pocket-Surfer, which we have previously introduced. Particularly, as intended, the accuracy showed large improvement for flexible ligand molecules, which bind to pockets in different conformations. PMID:22275074

  4. Four-body atomic potential for modeling protein-ligand binding affinity: application to enzyme-inhibitor binding energy prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Models that are capable of reliably predicting binding affinities for protein-ligand complexes play an important role the field of structure-guided drug design. Methods Here, we begin by applying the computational geometry technique of Delaunay tessellation to each set of atomic coordinates for over 1400 diverse macromolecular structures, for the purpose of deriving a four-body statistical potential that serves as a topological scoring function. Next, we identify a second, independent set of three hundred protein-ligand complexes, having both high-resolution structures and known dissociation constants. Two-thirds of these complexes are randomly selected to train a predictive model of binding affinity as follows: two tessellations are generated in each case, one for the entire complex and another strictly for the isolated protein without its bound ligand, and a topological score is computed for each tessellation with the four-body potential. Predicted protein-ligand binding affinity is then based on an empirically derived linear function of the difference between both topological scores, one that appropriately scales the value of this difference. Results A comparison between experimental and calculated binding affinity values over the two hundred complexes reveals a Pearson's correlation coefficient of r = 0.79 with a standard error of SE = 1.98 kcal/mol. To validate the method, we similarly generated two tessellations for each of the remaining protein-ligand complexes, computed their topological scores and the difference between the two scores for each complex, and applied the previously derived linear transformation of this topological score difference to predict binding affinities. For these one hundred complexes, we again observe a correlation of r = 0.79 (SE = 1.93 kcal/mol) between known and calculated binding affinities. Applying our model to an independent test set of high-resolution structures for three hundred diverse enzyme-inhibitor complexes

  5. Synthesis and stereospecificity of 4,5-disubstituted oxazolidinone ligands binding to T-box riboswitch RNA

    PubMed Central

    Orac, Crina M.; Zhou, Shu; Means, John A.; Boehm, David; Bergmeier, Stephen C.; Hines, Jennifer V.

    2012-01-01

    The enantiomers and the cis isomers of two previously studied 4,5-disubstituted oxazolidinones have been synthesized and their binding to the T-box riboswitch antiterminator model RNA investigated in detail. Characterization of ligand affinities and binding site localization indicate that there is little stereospecific discrimination for binding antiterminator RNA alone. This binding similarity between enantiomers is likely due to surface binding, which accommodates ligand conformations that result in comparable ligand-antiterminator contacts. These results have significant implications for T-box antiterminator-targeted drug discovery and, in general, for targeting other medicinally relevant RNA that do not present deep binding pockets. PMID:21812425

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of ligand binding and ligand binding-induced tertiary structure formation by the thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Kulshina, Nadia; Edwards, Thomas E; Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2010-01-01

    The thi-box riboswitch regulates gene expression in response to the intracellular concentration of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) in archaea, bacteria, and eukarya. To complement previous biochemical, genetic, and structural studies of this phylogenetically widespread RNA domain, we have characterized its interaction with TPP by isothermal titration calorimetry. This shows that TPP binding is highly dependent on Mg(2+) concentration. The dissociation constant decreases from approximately 200 nM at 0.5 mM Mg(2+) concentration to approximately 9 nM at 2.5 mM Mg(2+) concentration. Binding is enthalpically driven, but the unfavorable entropy of binding decreases as Mg(2+) concentration rises, suggesting that divalent cations serve to pre-organize the RNA. Mutagenesis, biochemical analysis, and a new crystal structure of the riboswitch suggest that a critical element that participates in organizing the riboswitch structure is the tertiary interaction formed between the P3 and L5 regions. This tertiary contact is distant from the TPP binding site, but calorimetric analysis reveals that even subtle mutations in L5 can have readily detectable effects on TPP binding. The thermodynamic signatures of these mutations, namely decreased favorable enthalpy of binding and small effects on entropy of binding, are consistent with the P3-L5 association contributing allosterically to TPP-induced compaction of the RNA.

  7. Biophysical Basis of the Promiscuous Binding of Bcl2 Apoptotic Repressor to BH3 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Vikas; Olenick, Max B.; Schuchardt, Brett J.; Mikles, David C.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    Bcl2 apoptotic repressor carries out its function by virtue of its ability to bind to BH3 domains of various pro-apoptotic regulators in a highly promiscuous manner. Herein, we investigate the biophysical basis of such promiscuity of Bcl2 toward its cognate BH3 ligands. Our data show that while the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif bind to Bcl2 with submicromolar affinity, those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif afford weak interactions. This implies that the replacement of alanine at the fourth position (A+4)—relative to the N-terminal leucine (L0) within the LXXXAD motif—to glycine/serine results in the loss of free energy of binding. Consistent with this notion, the A+4 residue within the BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif engages in key intermolecular van der Waals contacts with A149 lining the ligand binding groove within Bcl2, while A+4G/S substitution results in the disruption of such favorable binding interactions. Of particular interest is the observation that while increasing ionic strength has little or negligible effect on the binding of high-affinity BH3 ligands harboring the LXXXAD motif, the binding of those with the LXXX[G/S]D motif in general experiences a varying degree of enhancement. This salient observation is indicative of the fact that hydrophobic forces not only play a dominant but also a universal role in driving the Bcl2-BH3 interactions. Taken together, our study sheds light on the molecular basis of the factors governing the promiscuous binding of Bcl2 to pro-apoptotic regulators and thus bears important consequences on the development of rational therapeutic approaches. PMID:23996493

  8. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-09-02

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand-RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region.

  9. Development of a quantitative fluorescence-based ligand-binding assay

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Conor J.; Raverdeau, Mathilde; Voorheis, H. Paul

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of biology is to develop a quantitative ligand-binding assay that does not involve the use of radioactivity. Existing fluorescence-based assays have a serious drawback due to fluorescence quenching that accompanies the binding of fluorescently-labeled ligands to their receptors. This limitation of existing fluorescence-based assays prevents the number of cellular receptors under investigation from being accurately measured. We have developed a method where FITC-labeled proteins bound to a cell surface are proteolyzed extensively to eliminate fluorescence quenching and then the fluorescence of the resulting sample is compared to that of a known concentration of the proteolyzed FITC-protein employed. This step enables the number of cellular receptors to be measured quantitatively. We expect that this method will provide researchers with a viable alternative to the use of radioactivity in ligand binding assays. PMID:27161290

  10. Computational Approaches to the Chemical Equilibrium Constant in Protein-ligand Binding.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Acosta, Joel José; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    The physiological role played by protein-ligand recognition has motivated the development of several computational approaches to the ligand binding affinity. Some of them, termed rigorous, have a strong theoretical foundation but involve too much computation to be generally useful. Some others alleviate the computational burden by introducing strong approximations and/or empirical calibrations, which also limit their general use. Most importantly, there is no straightforward correlation between the predictive power and the level of approximation introduced. Here, we present a general framework for the quantitative interpretation of protein-ligand binding based on statistical mechanics. Within this framework, we re-derive self-consistently the fundamental equations of some popular approaches to the binding constant and pinpoint the inherent approximations. Our analysis represents a first step towards the development of variants with optimum accuracy/efficiency ratio for each stage of the drug discovery pipeline.

  11. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; Mcdougal, Owen M.

    2017-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results. PMID:26537635

  12. Computational exploration of a protein receptor binding space with student proposed peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    King, Matthew D; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective in silico method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The DockoMatic tutorial described herein provides a framework by which instructors can guide students through a drug screening exercise. Using receptor models derived from readily available protein crystal structures, docking programs have the ability to predict ligand binding properties, such as preferential binding orientations and binding affinities. The use of computational studies can significantly enhance complimentary wet chemical experimentation by providing insight into the important molecular interactions within the system of interest, as well as guide the design of new candidate ligands based on observed binding motifs and energetics. In this laboratory tutorial, the graphical user interface, DockoMatic, facilitates docking job submissions to the docking engine, AutoDock 4.2. The purpose of this exercise is to successfully dock a 17-amino acid peptide, α-conotoxin TxIA, to the acetylcholine binding protein from Aplysia californica-AChBP to determine the most stable binding configuration. Each student will then propose two specific amino acid substitutions of α-conotoxin TxIA to enhance peptide binding affinity, create the mutant in DockoMatic, and perform docking calculations to compare their results with the class. Students will also compare intermolecular forces, binding energy, and geometric orientation of their prepared analog to their initial α-conotoxin TxIA docking results.

  13. A Hybrid Structural Approach to Analyze Ligand Binding by the Serotonin Type 4 Receptor (5-HT4)*

    PubMed Central

    Padayatti, Pius S.; Wang, Liwen; Gupta, Sayan; Orban, Tivadar; Sun, Wenyu; Salom, David; Jordan, Steven R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Chance, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid structural methods have been used in recent years to understand protein-protein or protein-ligand interactions where high resolution crystallography or NMR data on the protein of interest has been limited. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), high resolution structures of native structural forms other than rhodopsin have not yet been achieved; gaps in our knowledge have been filled by creative crystallography studies that have developed stable forms of receptors by multiple means. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is a key GPCR-based signaling molecule affecting many physiological manifestations in humans ranging from mood and anxiety to bowel function. However, a high resolution structure of any of the serotonin receptors has not yet been solved. Here, we used structural mass spectrometry along with theoretical computations, modeling, and other biochemical methods to develop a structured model for human serotonin receptor subtype 4(b) in the presence and absence of its antagonist GR125487. Our data confirmed the overall structure predicted by the model and revealed a highly conserved motif in the ligand-binding pocket of serotonin receptors as an important participant in ligand binding. In addition, identification of waters in the transmembrane region provided clues as to likely paths mediating intramolecular signaling. Overall, this study reveals the potential of hybrid structural methods, including mass spectrometry, to probe physiological and functional GPCR-ligand interactions with purified native protein. PMID:23378516

  14. Energetics of displacing water molecules from protein binding sites: consequences for ligand optimization.

    PubMed

    Michel, Julien; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2009-10-28

    A strategy in drug design is to consider enhancing the affinity of lead molecules with structural modifications that displace water molecules from a protein binding site. Because success of the approach is uncertain, clarification of the associated energetics was sought in cases where similar structural modifications yield qualitatively different outcomes. Specifically, free-energy perturbation calculations were carried out in the context of Monte Carlo statistical mechanics simulations to investigate ligand series that feature displacement of ordered water molecules in the binding sites of scytalone dehydratase, p38-alphaMAP kinase, and EGFR kinase. The change in affinity for a ligand modification is found to correlate with the ease of displacement of the ordered water molecule. However, as in the EGFR example, the binding affinity may diminish if the free-energy increase due to the removal of the bound water molecule is not more than compensated by the additional interactions of the water-displacing moiety. For accurate computation of the effects of ligand modifications, a complete thermodynamic analysis is shown to be needed. It requires identification of the location of water molecules in the protein-ligand interface and evaluation of the free-energy changes associated with their removal and with the introduction of the ligand modification. Direct modification of the ligand in free-energy calculations is likely to trap the ordered molecule and provide misleading guidance for lead optimization.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    PubMed Central

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1–30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F’ pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12556.001 PMID:26824387

  16. Molecular modeling of sigma 1 receptor ligands: a model of binding conformational and electrostatic considerations.

    PubMed

    Gund, Tamara M; Floyd, Jie; Jung, Dawoon

    2004-01-01

    We have performed molecular modeling studies on several sigma 1 specific ligands, including PD144418, spipethiane, haloperidol, pentazocine, and others to develop a pharmacophore for sigma 1 receptor-ligand binding, under the assumption that all the compounds interact at the same receptor binding site. The modeling studies have investigated the conformational and electrostatic properties of the ligands. Superposition of active molecules gave the coordinates of the hypothetical 5-point sigma 1 pharmacophore, as follows: R1 (0.85, 7.26, 0.30); R2 (5.47, 2.40, -1.51); R3 (-2.57, 4.82, -7.10); N (-0.71, 3.29, -6.40); carbon centroid (3.16, 4.83, -0.60), where R1, R2 were constructed onto the aromatic ring of each compound to represent hydrophobic interactions with the receptor; and R3 represents a hydrogen bond between the nitrogen atom and the receptor. Additional analyses were used to describe secondary binding sites to electronegative groups such as oxygen or sulfur atom. Those coordinates are (2.34, 5.08, -4.18). The model was verified by fitting other sigma 1 receptor ligands. This model may be used to search conformational databases for other possibly active ligands. In conjunction with rational drug design techniques the model may be useful in design and synthesis of novel sigma 1 ligands of high selectivity and potency. Calculations were performed using Sybyl 6.5.

  17. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove.

    PubMed

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-29

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions.

  18. A Simple Method for Improving Torsion Optimization of Ligand Molecules in Receptor Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Che, Jianwei

    2005-07-01

    A simple but effective method is introduced for optimizing ligand molecules in torsion space within receptor binding sites. The algorithm makes use of geometric constraints of ligand molecules to search for energetically favorable conformations. It is applied to a conjugate gradient (CG) method as an example. During conformational energy optimization, new line search directions are modified according to the spatial span of rotational groups in ligand molecules. Significant improvements were observed in terms of the abilities both to recover global optimal structures and to obtain lower energy ensembles. This simple algorithm allows rapid implementation and can be incorporated into other conformational energy optimization techniques.

  19. GATING OF HCN CHANNELS BY CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDES: RESIDUE CONTACTS THAT UNDERLIE LIGAND BINDING, SELECTIVITY AND EFFICACY

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lei; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cyclic nucleotides regulate the activity of various proteins by interacting with a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). Although X-ray crystallographic studies have revealed the structures of several CNBDs, the residues responsible for generating the high efficacy with which ligand binding leads to protein activation remain unknown. Here we combine molecular dynamics simulations with mutagenesis to identify ligand contacts important for the regulation of the hyperpolarization-activated HCN2 channel by cyclic nucleotides. Surprisingly, out of seven residues that make strong contacts with ligand, only R632 in the C-helix of the CNBD is essential for high ligand efficacy, due to its selective stabilization of cNMP binding to the open state of the channel. Principle component analysis suggests that a local movement of the C-helix upon ligand binding propagates through the CNBD of one subunit to the C-linker of a neighboring subunit to apply force to the gate of the channel. PMID:17562313

  20. Ligand binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor investigated by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Kröger, D; Hucho, F; Vogel, H

    1999-08-01

    Ligand binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is studied by surface plasmon resonance. Biotinylated bungarotoxin, immobilized on a streptavidin-coated gold film, binds nicotinic acetylcholine receptor both in detergent-solubilized and in lipid vesicle-reconstituted form with high specificity. In the latter case, nonspecific binding to the sensor surface is significantly reduced by reconstituting the receptor into poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid-containing sterically stabilized vesicles. By preincubation of a bulk nicotinic acetylcholine receptor sample with the competing ligands carbamoylcholine and decamethonium bromide, the subsequent specific binding of the receptor to the surface-immobilized bungarotoxin is reduced, depending on the concentration of competing ligand. This competition assay allows the determination of the dissociation constants of the acetylcholine receptor-carbamoylcholine complex. A K(D) = 3.5 × 10(-)(6) M for the detergent-solubilized receptor and a K(D) = 1.4 × 10(-)(5) M for the lipid vesicle-reconstituted receptor are obtained. For decamethonium bromide, a K(D) = 4.5 × 10(-)(5) M is determined for the detergent-solubilized receptor. This approach is of general importance for investigating ligand-receptor interactions in case of small ligand molecules by mass-sensitive techniques.

  1. Binding site on human immunoglobulin G for the affinity ligand HWRGWV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiou; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Williams, D. Keith; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Cavanagh, John; Muddiman, David C.; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Affinity ligand HWRGWV has demonstrated the ability to isolate human immunoglobulin G (hIgG) from mammalian cell culture media. The ligand specifically binds hIgG through its Fc portion. This work shows that deglycosylation of hIgG has no influence on its binding to the HWRGWV ligand and the ligand does not compete with Protein A or Protein G in binding hIgG. It is suggested by the mass spectrometry (MS) data and docking simulation that HWRGWV binds to the pFc portion of hIgG and interacts with the amino acids in the loop Ser383–Asn389 (SNGQPEN) located in the CH3 domain. Subsequent modeling has suggested a possible three-dimensional minimized solution structure for the interaction of hIgG and the HWRGWV ligand. The results support the fact that a peptide as small as a hexamer can have specific interactions with large proteins such as hIgG. PMID:20049844

  2. Quinine binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic analysis of high-affinity binding of an off-target ligand.

    PubMed

    Reinstein, Oren; Yoo, Mina; Han, Chris; Palmo, Tsering; Beckham, Simone A; Wilce, Matthew C J; Johnson, Philip E

    2013-12-03

    The cocaine-binding aptamer is unusual in that it tightly binds molecules other than the ligand it was selected for. Here, we study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer with one of these off-target ligands, quinine. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to quantify the quinine-binding affinity and thermodynamics of a set of sequence variants of the cocaine-binding aptamer. We find that the affinity of the cocaine-binding aptamer for quinine is 30-40 times stronger than it is for cocaine. Competitive-binding studies demonstrate that both quinine and cocaine bind at the same site on the aptamer. The ligand-induced structural-switching binding mechanism of an aptamer variant that contains three base pairs in stem 1 is retained with quinine as a ligand. The short stem 1 aptamer is unfolded or loosely folded in the free form and becomes folded when bound to quinine. This folding is confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and by the short stem 1 construct having a more negative change in heat capacity of quinine binding than is seen when stem 1 has six base pairs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the free aptamer and both the quinine- and the cocaine-bound forms show that, for the long stem 1 aptamers, the three forms display similar hydrodynamic properties, and the ab initio shape reconstruction structures are very similar. For the short stem 1 aptamer there is a greater variation among the SAXS-derived ab initio shape reconstruction structures, consistent with the changes expected with its structural-switching binding mechanism.

  3. Evaluating the binding efficiency of pheromone binding protein with its natural ligand using molecular docking and fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilayaraja, Renganathan; Rajkumar, Ramalingam; Rajesh, Durairaj; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2014-06-01

    Chemosignals play a crucial role in social and sexual communication among inter- and intra-species. Chemical cues are bound with protein that is present in the pheromones irrespective of sex are commonly called as pheromone binding protein (PBP). In rats, the pheromone compounds are bound with low molecular lipocalin protein α2u-globulin (α2u). We reported farnesol is a natural endogenous ligand (compound) present in rat preputial gland as a bound volatile compound. In the present study, an attempt has been made through computational method to evaluating the binding efficiency of α2u with the natural ligand (farnesol) and standard fluorescent molecule (2-naphthol). The docking analysis revealed that the binding energy of farnesol and 2-naphthol was almost equal and likely to share some binding pocket of protein. Further, to extrapolate the results generated through computational approach, the α2u protein was purified and subjected to fluorescence titration and binding assay. The results showed that the farnesol is replaced by 2-naphthol with high hydrophobicity of TYR120 in binding sites of α2u providing an acceptable dissociation constant indicating the binding efficiency of α2u. The obtained results are in corroboration with the data made through computational approach.

  4. Implicit ligand theory: Rigorous binding free energies and thermodynamic expectations from molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, David D. L.

    2012-09-01

    A rigorous formalism for estimating noncovalent binding free energies and thermodynamic expectations from calculations in which receptor configurations are sampled independently from the ligand is derived. Due to this separation, receptor configurations only need to be sampled once, facilitating the use of binding free energy calculations in virtual screening. Demonstrative calculations on a host-guest system yield good agreement with previous free energy calculations and isothermal titration calorimetry measurements. Implicit ligand theory provides guidance on how to improve existing molecular docking algorithms and insight into the concepts of induced fit and conformational selection in noncovalent macromolecular recognition.

  5. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    PubMed

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  6. Identification of common ligand binding determinants of the insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors. Insights into mechanisms of ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Mynarcik, D C; Williams, P F; Schaffer, L; Yu, G Q; Whittaker, J

    1997-07-25

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) are peptides that share nearly 50% sequence homology. However, although their cognate receptors also exhibit significant overall sequence homology, the affinity of each peptide for the non-cognate receptor is 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than for the cognate receptor. The molecular basis for this discrimination is unclear, as are the molecular mechanisms underlying ligand binding. We have recently identified a major ligand binding site of the insulin receptor by alanine scannning mutagenesis. These studies revealed that a number of amino acids critical for insulin binding are conserved in the IGF-1 receptor, suggesting that they may play a role in ligand binding. We therefore performed alanine mutagenesis of these amino acids to determine whether this is the case. cDNAs encoding alanine-substituted secreted recombinant IGF-1 receptors were expressed in 293 EBNA cells, and the ligand binding properties of the expressed proteins were evaluated. Mutation of Phe701 resulted in a receptor with undetectable IGF-1 binding; alanine substitution of the corresponding amino acid of the insulin receptor, Phe714, produces a 140-fold reduction in affinity for insulin. Mutation of Asp8, Asn11, Phe58, Phe692, Glu693, His697, and Asn698 produces a 3.5-6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1. In contrast, alanine mutation of the corresponding amino acids of the insulin receptor with the exception of Asp12 produces reductions in affinity that are 50-fold or greater. The affinity of insulin for these mutants relative to wild type receptor was similar to that of their relative affinity for IGF-1 with two exceptions; the IC50 values for insulin binding to the mutants of Arg10, which has normal affinity for IGF-1, and His697, which has a 6-fold reduction in affinity for IGF-1, were both at least 2 orders of magnitude greater than for wild type receptor. The Kd values for insulin of the corresponding alanine mutants of the insulin receptor

  7. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-07

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  8. Signal and binding. II. Converting physico-chemical responses to macromolecule-ligand interactions into thermodynamic binding isotherms.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J; Bujalowski, Paul J

    2017-03-01

    Physico-chemical titration techniques are the most commonly used methods in characterizing molecular interactions. These methods are mainly based on spectroscopic, calorimetric, hydrodynamic, etc., measurements. However, truly quantitative physico-chemical methods are absolutely based on the determination of the relationship between the measured signal and the total average degree of binding in order to obtain meaningful interaction parameters. The relationship between the observed physico-chemical signal of whatever nature and the degree of binding must be determined and not assumed, based on some ad hoc intuitive relationship/model, leading to determination of the true binding isotherm. The quantitative methods reviewed and discussed here allow an experimenter to rigorously determine the degree of binding and the free ligand concentration, i.e., they lead to the construction of the thermodynamic binding isotherm in a model-independent fashion from physico-chemical titration curves.

  9. A comprehensive ligand based mapping of the σ₂ receptor binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Rhoades, Derek J; Kinder, David H; Mahfouz, Tarek M

    2014-01-01

    The sigma (σ) receptor system consists of at least two major receptor subtypes: σ₁ and σ₂. Several potential therapeutic applications would benefit from structural knowledge of the σ₂ receptor but gaining this knowledge has been hampered by the difficulties associated with its isolation and, thus, characterization. Here, a ligand based approach has been adopted using the program PHASE® and a group of 41 potent and structurally diverse σ₂ ligands to develop several pharmacophore models for different families of σ₂ ligands. These pharmacophores were analyzed to identify the different binding modes to the receptor and were combined together to construct a comprehensive pharmacophore that was used to develop a structural model for the σ₂ binding pocket. A total of six binding modes were identified and could be classified as neutral or charged modes. The results presented here also indicate the significance of hydrophobic interactions to σ₂ binding and the requirement of hydrogen bonding interactions to increase the affinity for this receptor subtype. This work adds breadth to our knowledge of this receptor's binding site, and should contribute significantly to the development of novel selective σ₂ ligands.

  10. The water network in galectin-3 ligand binding site guides inhibitor design.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiyong; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Peiqi; Liu, Fengjian; Tai, Guihua; Zhou, Yifa

    2015-03-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) which shows affinity of β-galactosides is a cancer-related protein. Thus, it is important to understand its ligand binding mechanism and then design its specific inhibitor. It was suggested that the positions of water molecules in Gal-3 ligand-binding site could be replaced by appropriate chemical groups of ideal inhibitors. However, the reported structures of Gal-3 carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) complexed with lactose showed that the number of water molecules are different and the water positions are inconsistent in the ligand-binding site. This study reported four high-resolution (1.24-1.19 Å) structures of Gal-3 CRD complexed with lactose, and accurately located 12 conserved water molecules in the water network of Gal-3 CRD ligand-binding site by merging these structures. These water molecules either directly stabilize the binding of Gal-3 CRD and lactose, or hold the former water molecules at the right place. In particular, water molecule 4 (W4) which only coordinates with water molecule 5 (W5) and water molecule 6 (W6) plays a key role in stabilizing galactose residue. In addition, by three-dimensional alignment of the positions of all residues, 14 flexible parts of Gal-3 CRD were found to dynamically fluctuate in the crystalline environment.

  11. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  12. Affinity chromatography on immobilized "biomimetic" ligands. Synthesis, immobilization and chromatographic assessment of an immunoglobulin G-binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Teng, S F; Sproule, K; Husain, A; Lowe, C R

    2000-03-31

    A synthetic bifunctional ligand (22/8) comprising a triazine scaffold substituted with 3-aminophenol (22) and 4-amino-1-naphthol (8) has been designed, synthesised, characterised and immobilized on agarose beads to create a robust, highly selective affinity adsorbent for human immunoglobulin G (IgG). Scatchard analysis of the binding isotherm for IgG on immobilized 22/8 (90 micromol 22/8/g moist weight gel) indicated an affinity constant (Ka) of 1.4 x 10(5) M(-1) and a theoretical maximum capacity of 151.9 mg IgG/g moist weight gel. The adsorbent shows similar selectivity to immobilized protein A and binds IgG from a number of species. An apparent capacity of 51.9 mg human IgG/g moist weight gel was observed under the experimental conditions selected for adsorption. Human IgG was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer with a recovery of 67-69% and a purity of 97.3-99.2%, depending on the pH value of the buffer used for elution. Preparative chromatography of IgG from human plasma showed that under the specified conditions, 94.4% of plasma IgG was adsorbed and 60% subsequently eluted with a purity of 92.5%. The immobilized ligand was able to withstand incubation in 1 M NaOH for 7 days without loss of binding capacity for IgG.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of bivalent ligands for binding to the human melanocortin-4 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Steve M.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Gillies, Robert J.; Hruby, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane proteins, especially G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are interesting and important theragnostic targets since many of them serve in intracellular signaling critical for all aspects of health and disease. The potential utility of designed bivalent ligands as targeting agents for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy can be evaluated by determining their binding to the corresponding receptors. As proof of concept, GPCR cell surface proteins are shown to be targeted specifically using multivalent ligands. We designed, synthesized, and tested a series of bivalent ligands targeting the over-expressed human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Based on our data suggesting an optimal linker length of 25±10 Å inferred from the bivalent melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) agonist, the truncated heptapeptide, referred to as MSH(7): Ac-Ser-Nle-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-NH2 was used to construct a set of bivalent ligands incorporating a hMC4R antagonist, SHU9119: Ac-Nle-c[Asp-His-2′-D-Nal-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2 and another set of bivalent ligands containing the SHU9119 antagonist pharmacophore on both side of the optimized linkers. These two binding motifs within the bivalent constructs were conjoined by semi-rigid (Pro-Gly)3 units with or without the flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEGO) moieties. Lanthanide-based competitive binding assays showed bivalent ligands binds to the hMC4R with up to 240-fold higher affinity than the corresponding linked monovalent ligands. PMID:25438759

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of bivalent ligands for binding to the human melanocortin-4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Steve M; Lee, Yeon Sun; Gillies, Robert J; Hruby, Victor J

    2014-11-15

    Membrane proteins, especially G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), are interesting and important theragnostic targets since many of them serve in intracellular signaling critical for all aspects of health and disease. The potential utility of designed bivalent ligands as targeting agents for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy can be evaluated by determining their binding to the corresponding receptors. As proof of concept, GPCR cell surface proteins are shown to be targeted specifically using multivalent ligands. We designed, synthesized, and tested a series of bivalent ligands targeting the over-expressed human melanocortin 4 receptor (hMC4R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Based on our data suggesting an optimal linker length of 25±10Å inferred from the bivalent melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) agonist, the truncated heptapeptide, referred to as MSH(7): Ac-Ser-Nle-Glu-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-NH2 was used to construct a set of bivalent ligands incorporating a hMC4R antagonist, SHU9119: Ac-Nle-c[Asp-His-2'-D-Nal-Arg-Trp-Lys]-NH2 and another set of bivalent ligands containing the SHU9119 antagonist pharmacophore on both side of the optimized linkers. These two binding motifs within the bivalent constructs were conjoined by semi-rigid (Pro-Gly)3 units with or without the flexible poly(ethylene glycol) (PEGO) moieties. Lanthanide-based competitive binding assays showed bivalent ligands binds to the hMC4R with up to 240-fold higher affinity than the corresponding linked monovalent ligands.

  15. A Structural Switch between Agonist and Antagonist Bound Conformations for a Ligand-Optimized Model of the Human Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Arden; Phillips, Jessica L.; Kerkvliet, Nancy I.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Perdew, Gary H.; Kolluri, Siva K.; Bisson, William H.

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse group of genes. Exogenous AHR ligands include the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which is a potent agonist, and the synthetic AHR antagonist N-2-(1H-indol-3yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351). As no experimentally determined structure of the ligand binding domain exists, homology models have been utilized for virtual ligand screening (VLS) to search for novel ligands. Here, we have developed an “agonist-optimized” homology model of the human AHR ligand binding domain, and this model aided in the discovery of two human AHR agonists by VLS. In addition, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of an agonist TCDD-bound and antagonist GNF351-bound version of this model in order to gain insights into the mechanics of the AHR ligand-binding pocket. These simulations identified residues 307–329 as a flexible segment of the AHR ligand pocket that adopts discrete conformations upon agonist or antagonist binding. This flexible segment of the AHR may act as a structural switch that determines the agonist or antagonist activity of a given AHR ligand. PMID:25329374

  16. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  17. Characterization of Aluminum-Binding Ligands in Pisolithus tinctorius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Cumming, J.

    2009-12-01

    Highly abundant in soil, Al is found in non-toxic forms under neutral pH conditions. However, when the pH of the soil decreases, the presence of cationic Al increases, creating a toxic environment for plants and fungi. Certain plants and their ectomycorrhizal symbiotic fungi have higher tolerance for Al in the soil and surrounding media. A particular fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, has been found to produce Al-binding pigments which chelate and detoxify cationic Al in the environment. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine the resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi species to Al, 2) characterize the production of Al binding compounds by fungi, and 3) quantify Al partitioning between free and bound forms in the environment. Pisolithus tinctorius, Amanita muscaria, Lacaria bicolor, and Rhizopogon rubescens were grown under varying Al concentration in vitro (0 and 200 µM for all species; 0, 100, 200, and 400 µM for P. tinctorius). Biomass was measured and media was analyzed for Al speciation and organic acid profiles post experiment. The Al-binding exudates of P. tinctorius were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further separated with reverse phase HPLC (UV). All fungi were resistant to Al at the concentrations tested. Pisolithus was found to have a significantly higher mass than other ectomycorrhizae studied. Organic Al levels were found to increase with an increase in Al treatment for P. tinctorius. These techniques revealed at least eleven compounds active in the Al-binding IMAC fraction with seven peaks having brown pigmentation. These compounds may assist in Al detoxification by P. tinctorius.

  18. Two-photon excitation fluorescence cross-correlation assay for ligand-receptor binding: cell membrane nanopatches containing the human micro-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Swift, Jody L; Burger, Melanie C; Massotte, Dominique; Dahms, Tanya E S; Cramb, David T

    2007-09-01

    Current ligand-receptor binding assays for G-protein coupled receptors cannot directly measure the system's dissociation constant, Kd, without purification of the receptor protein. Accurately measured Kd's are essential in the development of a molecular level understanding of ligand-receptor interactions critical in rational drug design. Here we report the introduction of two-photon excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (TPE-FCCS) to the direct analysis of ligand-receptor interactions of the human micro opioid receptor (hMOR) for both agonists and antagonists. We have developed the use of fluorescently distinct, dye-labeled hMOR-containing cell membrane nanopatches ( approximately 100-nm radius) and ligands, respectively, for this assay. We show that the output from TPE-FCCS data sets can be converted to the conventional Hill format, which provides Kd and the number of active receptors per nanopatch. When ligands are labeled with quantum dots, this assay can detect binding with ligand concentrations in the subnanomolar regime. Interestingly, conjugation to a bulky quantum dot did not adversely affect the binding propensity of the hMOR pentapeptide ligand, Leu-enkephalin.

  19. Lack of Ligand-Selective Binding of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor to Putative DNA Binding Sites Regulating Expression of Bax and Paraoxonase 1 Genes

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA. PMID:24200861

  20. Structure and ligand-binding mechanism of a cysteinyl leukotriene-binding protein from a blood-feeding disease vector

    PubMed Central

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4) and D4 (LTD4) and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr 114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex leaving free glutathione, and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  1. Exact analysis of competition ligand binding by displacement isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sigurskjold, B W

    2000-01-15

    A rigorous method for the least-squares nonlinear regression analysis of displacement isothermal titration calorimetric data is presented. The method can fit the binding isotherm of a ligand which is competitively inhibited in its binding by another bound ligand to a molecule with n identical and independent binding sites. There are no other assumptions for the method and no approximations. Analysis of previously published data of the strong binding of acarbose to glucoamylase is presented as an example. The regression equations have been programmed for the Origin software supplied with the widely used titration calorimeters from Microcal, Inc., and an Origin Function Definition File with instructions is freely available from the author upon e-mail request.

  2. Physical factors affecting chloroquine binding to melanin.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, R L; Pendleton, P; Gerber, J P

    2015-10-01

    Chloroquine is an antimalarial drug but is also prescribed for conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Long-term users risk toxic side effects, including retinopathy, thought to be caused by chloroquine accumulation on ocular melanin. Although the binding potential of chloroquine to melanin has been investigated previously, our study is the first to demonstrate clear links between chloroquine adsorption by melanin and system factors including temperature, pH, melanin type, and particle size. In the current work, two Sepia melanins were compared with bovine eye as a representative mammalian melanin. Increasing the surface anionic character due to a pH change from 4.7 to 7.4 increased each melanin's affinity for chloroquine. Although the chloroquine isotherms exhibited an apparently strong interaction with each melanin, isosteric heat analysis indicated a competitive interaction. Buffer solution cations competed effectively at low surface coverage; chloroquine adsorption occurs via buffer cation displacement and is promoted by temperature-influenced secondary structure swelling.

  3. Discovery and Confirmation of Ligand Binding Specificities of the Schistosoma japonicum Polarity Protein Scribble

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Liu, Shuai; Gao, Youhe; Wang, Heng; Chen, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a chronic debilitating parasitic disease that afflicts more than 200 million individuals worldwide. Long-term administration of chemotherapy with the single available drug, praziquantel, has led to growing concerns about drug resistance. The PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain is an important module found in many scaffolding proteins, which has been recognized as promising targets for the development of novel drugs. However, the parasite-derived PDZ domains and their associated functions are still largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The gene encoding the Schistosoma japonicum Scribble protein (SjScrib) was identified by homologous search with the S. mansoni Scrib sequence. By screening an arbitrary peptide library in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays, we identified and confirmed the ligand binding specificity for each of the four PDZ domains of SjScrib. Both SjScrib-PDZ1 and SjScrib-PDZ3 recognize type I C-terminal PDZ-domain binding motifs (PBMs), which can be deduced as consensus sequences of -[Φ][x][E][TS][x][ILF] and -[x][RKx][ETS][T][WΦ][ILV], respectively. SjScrib-PDZ2 prefers stringent type II C-terminal PBMs, which significantly differs from that of its human ortholog. SjScrib-PDZ4 binds to typical II C-terminal PBMs with a consensus sequence -[x][FW][x][LI][x][LIV], in which the aromatic residue Phe is predominantly selected at position -4. The irregular and unconventional internal ligand binding specificities for the PDZ domains of SjScrib were confirmed by point mutations of the key amino acids within the ligand binding motifs. We also compared the differences in ligand specificities between SjScrib-PDZs and hScrib-PDZs, and explored the structural basis for the ligand binding properties of SjScrib-PDZs. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we characterized and confirmed the ligand binding specificities of all four PDZ domains of SjScrib for the first time. We denoted the differential ligand binding specificities

  4. Conformational Changes in Small Ligands Upon Tetanus Toxin Binding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    lectin-like N-terminal jelly -roll domain and a C-terminal P-trefoil domain;2’ see Figure 2. The ganglioside binding site has been found to occur along...C-terminal P-trefoil and N-terminal jelly -roll sub- domains.’ 0 The site has been identified as the most highly conserved pocket in the structures of...the TeNT and botulinum toxins.23 p-trefoil jelly -roll Figure 2: Crystal Structure of TetC Determined to 1.6 A Resolution. a-Helices are red, P-sheets

  5. Observation of long-range tertiary interactions during ligand binding by the TPP riboswitch aptamer

    PubMed Central

    Duesterberg, Van K; Fischer-Hwang, Irena T; Perez, Christian F; Hogan, Daniel W; Block, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitch is a cis-regulatory element in mRNA that modifies gene expression in response to TPP concentration. Its specificity is dependent upon conformational changes that take place within its aptamer domain. Here, the role of tertiary interactions in ligand binding was studied at the single-molecule level by combined force spectroscopy and Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), using an optical trap equipped for simultaneous smFRET. The ‘Force-FRET’ approach directly probes secondary and tertiary structural changes during folding, including events associated with binding. Concurrent transitions observed in smFRET signals and RNA extension revealed differences in helix-arm orientation between two previously-identified ligand-binding states that had been undetectable by spectroscopy alone. Our results show that the weaker binding state is able to bind to TPP, but is unable to form a tertiary docking interaction that completes the binding process. Long-range tertiary interactions stabilize global riboswitch structure and confer increased ligand specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12362.001 PMID:26709838

  6. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsteinson, Nels; Ban, Fuqiang; Santos-Filho, Osvaldo; Tabaei, Seyed M.H.; Miguel-Queralt, Solange; Underhill, Caroline; Cherkasov, Artem Hammond, Geoffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [{sup 3}H]5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 {mu}M concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost.

  7. Ligand migration and cavities within Scapharca dimeric HbI: Studies by time-resolved crystallography, Xe binding and computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, James E.; Pahl, Reinhard; Cohen, Jordi; Nichols, Jeffry C.; Schulten, Klaus; Gibson, Quentin H.; Šrajer, Vukica; Royer, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary As in many other hemoglobins, no direct route for migration of ligands between solvent and active site is evident from crystal structures of Scapharca inaequivalvis dimeric HbI. Xenon (Xe) and organic halide binding experiments along with computational analysis presented here reveal protein cavities as potential ligand migration routes. Time-resolved crystallographic experiments show that photodissociated carbon monoxide (CO) docks within 5ns at the distal pocket B-site and at more remote Xe4 and Xe2 cavities. CO rebinding is not affected by the presence of dichloroethane within the major Xe4 protein cavity, demonstrating that this cavity is not on the major exit pathway. The crystal lattice has a substantial influence on ligand migration, suggesting that significant conformational rearrangements may be required for ligand exit. Taken together, these results are consistent with a distal histidine gate as one important ligand entry and exit route, despite its participation in the dimeric interface. PMID:19913484

  8. Calculations of distance distributions and probabilities of binding by ligands between parallel plane membranes comprising receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-03-01

    Cell communication through biochemical signaling pathways is a key determinant of tissue responses to radiation. Several molecules, such as the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), are implicated in radiation-induced signaling between cells. Brownian Dynamics (BD) algorithms have recently been used to simulate the interaction of ligands with receptors and to elucidate signal transduction and autocrine loops in ligand-receptors systems. In this paper, we discuss the simulation of particle diffusion and binding kinetics in a space bounded by two parallel plane membranes, using an exact algorithm to sample the propagator (Green’s function) of a particle located between 2 membranes. We also show that the simulation results are independent of the number of time steps used, in accordance with time discretization equations. These simulations could be used to simulate the motion and binding of ligand molecules in a cell culture, and possibly in neuronal synapses.

  9. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; Lehoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6.

  10. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: a Monte Carlo analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Jacob; Raum, Matthew; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C.

    2016-12-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of spatio-temporal correlations in binary reaction kinetics in SPR cell geometries, and demonstrate the failure of a mean-field analysis of SPR cells in the regime of high Damköhler number {{Da}}\\gt 0.1, where the spatio-temporal correlations due to diffusive transport and ligand-receptor rebinding events dominate the dynamics of SPR systems.

  11. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  12. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celej, Maria Soledad; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical description of thermal protein unfolding coupled to ligand binding is presented. The thermodynamic concepts are independent of the method used to monitor protein unfolding but a differential scanning calorimetry is being used as a tool for examining the unfolding process.

  13. An Experiment Illustrating the Change in Ligand p"K"[subscript a] upon Protein Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of ligand p"K"[subscript a] due to its surrounding environment is a crucial feature that controls many biological phenomena. For example, the shift in the p"K"[subscript a] of substrates or catalytic residues at enzyme active sites upon substrate binding often triggers and controls enzymatic reactions. In this work, we developed an…

  14. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-07

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  15. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  16. Evidence indicating that the TM4, EL2, and TM5 of the melanocortin 3 receptor Do not participate in ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Schiöth, H B; Muceniece, R; Szardenings, M; Prusis, P; Wikberg, J E

    1996-12-24

    The TM4, EL2 and TM5 show low amino acid homology within the MC receptor family. Three mutants of the human MC3 receptor were created in order to investigate the participation of these regions in ligand binding. The TM4, EL2 and TM5 were separately changed by multiple mutagenesis so that their amino acid sequences became identical with the human MC1 receptor. The mutants were expressed in COS cells and they bound peptide ligands in the same fashion as the wild type MC3 receptor clone. Our results indicate that the amino acids that were mutated in the MC3 receptor do not affect the binding of MSH peptides. The data provide further evidence, that the mutated regions may not participate at all in ligand binding, as indicated by modelling experiments and homology comparison.

  17. Quantifying high-affinity binding of hydrophobic ligands by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Broecker, Jana; Vargas, Carolyn; Fanghänel, Jörg; Keller, Sandro

    2012-12-18

    A fast and reliable quantification of the binding thermodynamics of hydrophobic high-affinity ligands employing a new calorimetric competition experiment is described. Although isothermal titration calorimetry is the method of choice for a quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions in solution, a reliable determination of a dissociation constant (K(D)) is typically limited to the range 100 μM > K(D) > 1 nM. Interactions displaying higher or lower K(D) values can be assessed indirectly, provided that a suitable competing ligand is available whose K(D) falls within the directly accessible affinity window. This established displacement assay, however, requires the high-affinity ligand to be soluble at high concentrations in aqueous buffer and, consequently, poses serious problems in the study of protein binding involving small-molecule ligands dissolved in organic solvents--a familiar case in many drug-discovery projects relying on compound libraries. The calorimetric competition assay introduced here overcomes this limitation, thus allowing for a detailed thermodynamic description of high-affinity receptor-ligand interactions involving poorly water-soluble compounds. Based on a single titration of receptor into a dilute mixture of the two competing ligands, this competition assay provides accurate and precise values for the dissociation constants and binding enthalpies of both high- and moderate-affinity ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation and high-affinity protein-inhibitor interactions, and explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses.

  18. Replacement of the axial copper ligand methionine with lysine in amicyanin converts it to a zinc-binding protein that no longer binds copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumara, Narayanasami; Choib, Moonsung; Davidson, Victor L.

    2012-07-11

    The mutation of the axial ligand of the type I copper protein amicyanin from Met to Lys results in a protein that is spectroscopically invisible and redox inactive. M98K amicyanin acts as a competitive inhibitor in the reaction of native amicyanin with methylamine dehydrogenase indicating that the M98K mutation has not affected the affinity for its natural electron donor. The crystal structure of M98K amicyanin reveals that its overall structure is very similar to native amicyanin but that the type I binding site is occupied by zinc. Anomalous difference Fourier maps calculated using the data collected around the absorption edges of copper and zinc confirm the presence of Zn{sup 2+} at the type I site. The Lys98 NZ donates a hydrogen bond to a well-ordered water molecule at the type I site which enhances the ability of Lys98 to provide a ligand for Zn{sup 2+}. Attempts to reconstitute M98K apoamicyanin with copper resulted in precipitation of the protein. The fact that the M98K mutation generated such a selective zinc-binding protein was surprising as ligation of zinc by Lys is rare and this ligand set is unique for zinc.

  19. The ligand binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Immunological analysis.

    PubMed

    Kachalsky, S G; Aladjem, M; Barchan, D; Fuchs, S

    1993-03-08

    The interaction of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) binding site domain with specific antibodies and with alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) has been compared. The cloned and expressed ligand binding domain of the mouse AChR alpha-subunit binds alpha-BTX, whereas the mongoose-expressed domain is not recognized by alpha-BTX. On the other hand, both the mouse and mongoose domains bind to the site-specific monoclonal antibody 5.5. These results demonstrate that the structural requirements for binding of alpha-BTX and mcAb 5.5, both of which interact with the AChR binding site, are distinct from each other.

  20. Ligand binding energy and catalytic efficiency from improved packing within receptors and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dudley H; Stephens, Elaine; Zhou, Min

    2003-05-30

    Some small molecules bind to their receptors, and transition states to enzymes, so strongly as to defy current understanding. We show that in the binding of biotin to streptavidin, the streptavidin structure becomes better packed. We conclude that this contraction of the streptavidin structure promotes biotin binding. The improved packing is associated with positively cooperative binding, occurring with a benefit in enthalpy and a cost in entropy. Evidence indicating that catalytic efficiency can also originate via improved packing in some enzyme transition states, derived from the work of others, is presented. Negatively cooperative ligand binding is concluded to induce converse effects (less efficient packing, a cost in enthalpy, and a benefit in entropy). It applies to the binding of O(2) to haemoglobin, which indeed occurs with a hitherto unreported loosening of the amide backbones of the haemoglobin monomers.

  1. Modeling RNA-ligand interactions: the Rev-binding element RNA-aminoglycoside complex.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, F; Cedergren, R

    1998-01-15

    An approach to the modeling of ligand-RNA complexes has been developed by combining three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D-SAR) computations with a docking protocol. The ability of 3D-SAR to predict bound conformations of flexible ligands was first assessed by attempting to reconstruct the known, bound conformations of phenyloxazolines complexed with human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) RNA. Subsequently, the same 3D-SAR analysis was applied to the identification of bound conformations of aminoglycosides which associate with the Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA. Bound conformations were identified by parsing ligand conformational data sets with pharmacophores determined by the 3D-SAR analysis. These "bioactive" structures were docked to the receptor RNA, and optimization of the complex was undertaken by extensive searching of ligand conformational space coupled with molecular dynamics computations. The similarity between the bound conformations of the ligand from the 3D-SAR analysis and those found in the docking protocol suggests that this methodology is valid for the prediction of bound ligand conformations and the modeling of the structure of the ligand-RNA complexes.

  2. First Principles-Based Calculations of Free Energy of Binding: Application to Ligand Binding in a Self-Assembling Superstructure.

    PubMed

    Fox, Stephen; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Fox, Thomas; Tautermann, Christofer S; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-04-12

    The accurate prediction of ligand binding affinities to a protein remains a desirable goal of computational biochemistry. Many available methods use molecular mechanics (MM) to describe the system, however, MM force fields cannot fully describe the complex interactions involved in binding, specifically electron transfer and polarization. First principles approaches can fully account for these interactions, and with the development of linear-scaling first principles programs, it is now viable to apply first principles calculations to systems containing tens of thousands of atoms. In this paper, a quantum mechanical Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach is applied to a model of a protein-ligand binding cavity, the "tennis ball" dimer. Results obtained from this approach demonstrate considerable improvement over conventional molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area due to the more accurate description of the interactions in the system. For the first principles calculations in this study, the linear-scaling density functional theory program ONETEP is used, allowing the approach to be applied to receptor-ligand complexes of pharmaceutical interest that typically include thousands of atoms.

  3. Conformational constraint in protein ligand design and the inconsistency of binding entropy.

    PubMed

    Udugamasooriya, D Gomika; Spaller, Mark R

    2008-08-01

    It is an accepted practice in ligand design to introduce conformational constraint with the expectation of improving affinity, justified by the theoretical possibility that an unfavorable change in binding entropy will be reduced. This rationale of minimizing the entropic penalty through imposing structural constraints upon a ligand, however, has been voiced more often than verified. Here we examine three modified cyclic peptides, along with multiple versions of their linear control analogs, and determine their thermodynamic parameters when binding the same host, the third PDZ domain (PDZ3) of the mammalian postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) protein. To begin a two-stage investigation, the initial evaluation involved solution binding studies with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which provided the changes in Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), enthalpy (DeltaH), and entropy (TDeltaS) upon formation of the protein-ligand complex. In the second stage, a selected macrocycle along with two matched linear controls were subjected to more rigorous analysis by ITC, which included (1) change in heat of buffer ionization (DeltaH(ion)) titrations, to examine the role of proton transfer events; (2) change in heat capacity (DeltaC(p)) determinations, to indirectly probe the nature of the binding surface; and (3) osmotic stress experiments, to evaluate desolvation effects and quantitate water release. Together, these demonstrate that the entropic relationship between a macrocyclic ligand and a linear counterpart can be a complex one that is difficult to rationalize. Further, the addition of constraint can, counterintuitively, lead to a less favorable change in binding entropy. This underscores the need to use matched linear control ligands to assure that comparisons are made in a meaningful manner.

  4. Mass spectrometry-based monitoring of millisecond protein–ligand binding dynamics using an automated microfluidic platform

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin S.; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and developing new therapeutic agents. We have developed a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and on-chip electrospray ionization to perform label-free, solution-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages including automated processing, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption.

  5. [Features of binding of proflavine to DNA at different DNA-ligand concentration ratios].

    PubMed

    Berezniak, E G; gladkovskaia, N A; Khrebtova, A S; Dukhopel'nikov, E V; Zinchenko, A V

    2009-01-01

    The binding of proflavine to calf thymus DNA has been studied using the methods of differential scanning calorimetry and spectrophotometry. It was shown that proflavine can interact with DNA by at least 3 binding modes. At high DNA-ligand concentration ratios (P/D), proflavine intercalates into both GC- and AT-sites, with a preference to GC-rich sequences. At low P/D ratios proflavine interacts with DNA by the external binding mode. From spectrophotometric concentration dependences, the parameters of complexing of proflavine with DNA were calculated. Thermodynamic parameters of DNA melting were calculated from differential scanning calorimetry data.

  6. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  7. mutLBSgeneDB: mutated ligand binding site gene DataBase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pora; Zhao, Junfei; Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    Mutations at the ligand binding sites (LBSs) can influence protein structure stability, binding affinity with small molecules, and drug resistance in cancer patients. Our recent analysis revealed that ligand binding residues had a significantly higher mutation rate than other parts of the protein. Here, we built mutLBSgeneDB (mutated Ligand Binding Site gene DataBase) available at http://zhaobioinfo.org/mutLBSgeneDB. We collected and curated over 2300 genes (mutLBSgenes) having ∼12 000 somatic mutations at ∼10 000 LBSs across 16 cancer types and selected 744 drug targetable genes (targetable_mutLBSgenes) by incorporating kinases, transcription factors, pharmacological genes, and cancer driver genes. We analyzed LBS mutation information, differential gene expression network, drug response correlation with gene expression, and protein stability changes for all mutLBSgenes using integrated genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, network and functional information. We calculated and compared the binding affinities of 20 carefully selected genes with their drugs in wild type and mutant forms. mutLBSgeneDB provides a user-friendly web interface for searching and browsing through seven categories of annotations: Gene summary, Mutated information, Protein structure related information, Differential gene expression and gene-gene network, Phenotype information, Pharmacological information, and Conservation information. mutLBSgeneDB provides a useful resource for functional genomics, protein structure, drug and disease research communities. PMID:27907895

  8. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    PubMed

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry.

  9. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  10. Terahertz underdamped vibrational motion governs protein-ligand binding in solution.

    PubMed

    Turton, David A; Senn, Hans Martin; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J; Ellis, Elizabeth M; Wynne, Klaas

    2014-06-03

    Low-frequency collective vibrational modes in proteins have been proposed as being responsible for efficiently directing biochemical reactions and biological energy transport. However, evidence of the existence of delocalized vibrational modes is scarce and proof of their involvement in biological function absent. Here we apply extremely sensitive femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy to study the depolarized Raman spectra of lysozyme and its complex with the inhibitor triacetylchitotriose in solution. Underdamped delocalized vibrational modes in the terahertz frequency domain are identified and shown to blue-shift and strengthen upon inhibitor binding. This demonstrates that the ligand-binding coordinate in proteins is underdamped and not simply solvent-controlled as previously assumed. The presence of such underdamped delocalized modes in proteins may have significant implications for the understanding of the efficiency of ligand binding and protein-molecule interactions, and has wider implications for biochemical reactivity and biological function.

  11. Terahertz underdamped vibrational motion governs protein-ligand binding in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turton, David A.; Senn, Hans Martin; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J.; Ellis, Elizabeth M.; Wynne, Klaas

    2014-06-01

    Low-frequency collective vibrational modes in proteins have been proposed as being responsible for efficiently directing biochemical reactions and biological energy transport. However, evidence of the existence of delocalized vibrational modes is scarce and proof of their involvement in biological function absent. Here we apply extremely sensitive femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy to study the depolarized Raman spectra of lysozyme and its complex with the inhibitor triacetylchitotriose in solution. Underdamped delocalized vibrational modes in the terahertz frequency domain are identified and shown to blue-shift and strengthen upon inhibitor binding. This demonstrates that the ligand-binding coordinate in proteins is underdamped and not simply solvent-controlled as previously assumed. The presence of such underdamped delocalized modes in proteins may have significant implications for the understanding of the efficiency of ligand binding and protein-molecule interactions, and has wider implications for biochemical reactivity and biological function.

  12. Programmable calculator software for computation of the plasma binding of ligands.

    PubMed

    Conner, D P; Rocci, M L; Larijani, G E

    1986-01-01

    The computation of the extent of plasma binding of a ligand to plasma constituents using radiolabeled ligand and equilibrium dialysis is complex and tedious. A computer program for the HP-41C Handheld Computer Series (Hewlett-Packard) was developed to perform these calculations. The first segment of the program constructs a standard curve for quench correction of post-dialysis plasma and buffer samples, using either external standard ratio (ESR) or sample channels ratio (SCR) techniques. The remainder of the program uses the counts per minute, SCR or ESR, and post-dialysis volume of paired plasma and buffer samples generated from the dialysis procedure to compute the extent of binding after correction for background radiation, counting efficiency, and intradialytic shifts of fluid between plasma and buffer compartments during dialysis. This program greatly simplifies the analysis of equilibrium dialysis data and has been employed in the analysis of dexamethasone binding in normal and uremic sera.

  13. Characterizing the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPARγ) Ligand Binding Potential of Several Major Flame Retardants, Their Metabolites, and Chemical Mixtures in House Dust

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F.; Ferguson, P. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Objectives: Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. Methods: We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Results: Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3–16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Conclusion: Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects. Citation: Fang M, Webster TF, Ferguson PL, Stapleton HM. 2015. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding

  14. Ligand-modulated parallel mechanical unfolding pathways of maltose-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vasudha; Kulothungan, S Rajendra; Balamurali, M M; Saranya, S R; Varadarajan, Raghavan; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2011-08-12

    Protein folding and unfolding are complex phenomena, and it is accepted that multidomain proteins generally follow multiple pathways. Maltose-binding protein (MBP) is a large (a two-domain, 370-amino acid residue) bacterial periplasmic protein involved in maltose uptake. Despite the large size, it has been shown to exhibit an apparent two-state equilibrium unfolding in bulk experiments. Single-molecule studies can uncover rare events that are masked by averaging in bulk studies. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the mechanical unfolding pathways of MBP and its precursor protein (preMBP) in the presence and absence of ligands. Our results show that MBP exhibits kinetic partitioning on mechanical stretching and unfolds via two parallel pathways: one of them involves a mechanically stable intermediate (path I) whereas the other is devoid of it (path II). The apoMBP unfolds via path I in 62% of the mechanical unfolding events, and the remaining 38% follow path II. In the case of maltose-bound MBP, the protein unfolds via the intermediate in 79% of the cases, the remaining 21% via path II. Similarly, on binding to maltotriose, a ligand whose binding strength with the polyprotein is similar to that of maltose, the occurrence of the intermediate is comparable (82% via path I) with that of maltose. The precursor protein preMBP also shows a similar behavior upon mechanical unfolding. The percentages of molecules unfolding via path I are 53% in the apo form and 68% and 72% upon binding to maltose and maltotriose, respectively, for preMBP. These observations demonstrate that ligand binding can modulate the mechanical unfolding pathways of proteins by a kinetic partitioning mechanism. This could be a general mechanism in the unfolding of other large two-domain ligand-binding proteins of the bacterial periplasmic space.

  15. Nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains: reduction of helix H12 dynamics to favour crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Nahoum, Virginie; Lipski, Alexandra; Quillard, Fabien; Guichou, Jean-François; Boublik, Yvan; Pérez, Efrèn; Germain, Pierre; Lera, Angel R. de; Bourguet, William

    2008-07-01

    Attempts have been made to crystallize the ligand-binding domain of the human retinoid X receptor in complex with a variety of newly synthesized ligands. An inverse correlation was observed between the ‘crystallizability’ and the structural dynamics of the various receptor–ligand complexes. Crystallization trials of the human retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (RXRα LBD) in complex with various ligands have been carried out. Using fluorescence anisotropy, it has been found that when compared with agonists these small-molecule effectors enhance the dynamics of the RXRα LBD C-terminal helix H12. In some cases, the mobility of this helix could be dramatically reduced by the addition of a 13-residue co-activator fragment (CoA). In keeping with these observations, crystals have been obtained of the corresponding ternary RXRα LBD–ligand–CoA complexes. In contrast, attempts to crystallize complexes with a highly mobile H12 remained unsuccessful. These experimental observations substantiate the previously recognized role of co-regulator fragments in facilitating the crystallization of nuclear receptor LBDs.

  16. Copper, iron and the organic ligands that bind them - updates from San Francisco Bay and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, K. N.; Bundy, R.; Biller, D.; Bruland, K. W.; Barbeau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Building on more than 30 years of measurements in San Francisco Bay by Russ Flegal and others, the concentrations of dissolved manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead were determined from a suite of water quality monitoring program stations in North, Central and South Bay using inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry following preconcentration on a Nobias-chelate PA1 resin. Given the importance of organic ligands in governing iron solubility and copper bioavailability in natural waters, the organic complexation of dissolved iron and copper in these samples was determined from multiple analytical windows applied to competitive ligand exchange- adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. This study constitutes the first dataset of iron speciation in San Francisco Bay and expands upon prior work evaluating the potential for copper toxicity in this urbanized estuary. Recent advances in voltammetric techniques emerging from a Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) working group on metal-binding ligands in the marine environment, and insights gained from high-resolution ligand measurements from the U.S. GEOTRACES program, highlight how metal-binding ligands in San Francisco Bay compare with those of the coastal and open ocean.

  17. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  18. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L.; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1–ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  19. Impact of human galectin-1 binding to saccharide ligands on dimer dissociation kinetics and structure.

    PubMed

    Romero, Juan M; Trujillo, Madia; Estrin, Darío A; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Di Lella, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous lectins can control critical biological responses, including cell communication, signaling, angiogenesis and immunity by decoding glycan-containing information on a variety of cellular receptors and the extracellular matrix. Galectin-1 (Gal-1), a prototype member of the galectin family, displays only one carbohydrate recognition domain and occurs in a subtle homodimerization equilibrium at physiologic concentrations. Such equilibrium critically governs the function of this lectin signaling by allowing tunable interactions with a preferential set of glycosylated receptors. Here, we used a combination of experimental and computational approaches to analyze the kinetics and mechanisms connecting Gal-1 ligand unbinding and dimer dissociation processes. Kinetic constants of both processes were found to differ by an order of magnitude. By means of steered molecular dynamics simulations, the ligand unbinding process was followed monitoring water occupancy changes. By determining the water sites in a carbohydrate binding place during the unbinding process, we found that rupture of ligand-protein interactions induces an increase in energy barrier while ligand unbinding process takes place, whereas the entry of water molecules to the binding groove and further occupation of their corresponding water sites contributes to lowering of the energy barrier. Moreover, our findings suggested local asymmetries between the two subunits in the dimer structure detected at a nanosecond timescale. Thus, integration of experimental and computational data allowed a more complete understanding of lectin ligand binding and dimerization processes, suggesting new insights into the relationship between Gal-1 structure and function and renewing the discussion on the biophysics and biochemistry of lectin-ligand lattices.

  20. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A.; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R.; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication–degeneration–complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor–ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  1. Electrostatic coupling to pH-titrating sites as a source of cooperativity in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, V.; Bashford, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative mechanism for the cooperative binding of charged ligands to proteins. The ligand-binding sites are electrostatically coupled to protein side chains that can undergo protonation and deprotonation. The binding of one ligand alters the protein's protonation equilibrium in a manner that makes the the binding of the second ligand more favorable. This mechanism requires no conformational change to produce a cooperative effect, although it is not exclusive of conformational change. We present a theoretical description of the mechanism, and calculations on three kinds of systems: A model system containing one protonation site and two ligand-binding sites; a model system containing two protonation sites and two ligand-binding sites; and calbindin D9k, which contains two Ca2+-binding sites and 30 protonation sites. For the one-protonation-site model, it is shown that the influence of the protonation site can only be cooperative. The competition of this effect with the anticooperative effect of ligand-ligand repulsion is studied in detail. For the two-protonation site model, the effect can be either cooperative or, in special cases, anticooperative. For calbindin D9k, the calculations predict that six protonation sites in or near the ligand-binding sites make a cooperative contribution that approximately cancels the anticooperative effect of Ca2+-Ca2+ repulsion, accounting for more than half of the total cooperative effect that is needed to overcome repulsion and produce the net cooperativity observed experimentally. We argue that cooperative mechanisms of the kind described here are likely when there is more than one ligand-binding site in a protein domain. PMID:9761483

  2. Specific erythrocyte binding capacity and biological activity of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1)-derived peptides

    PubMed Central

    Curtidor, Hernando; Rodríguez, Luis E.; Ocampo, Marisol; López, Ramses; García, Javier E.; Valbuena, John; Vera, Ricardo; Puentes, Álvaro; Vanegas, Magnolia; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2005-01-01

    Erythrocyte binding ligand 1 (EBL-1) is a member of the ebl multigene family involved in Plasmodium falciparum invasion of erythrocytes. We found that five EBL-1 high-activity binding peptides (HABPs) bound specifically to erythrocytes: 29895 (41HKKKSGELNNNKSGILRSTY60), 29903 (201LYECGK-KIKEMKWICTDNQF220), 29923 (601CNAILGSYADIGDIVRGLDV620), 29924(621WRDINTNKLSEK-FQKIFMGGY640), and 30018 (2481LEDIINLSKKKKKSINDTSFY2500). We also show that binding was saturable, not sialic acid-dependent, and that all peptides specifically bound to a 36-kDa protein on the erythrocyte membrane. The five HABPs inhibited in vitro merozoite invasion depending on the peptide concentration used, suggesting their possible role in the invasion process. PMID:15659376

  3. Structural Conservation of Ligand Binding Reveals a Bile Acid-like Signaling Pathway in Nematodes*

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xiaoyong; Zhou, X. Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Motola, Daniel L.; Gelmedin, Verena; Hawdon, John; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Xu, H. Eric

    2012-01-01

    Bile acid-like molecules named dafachronic acids (DAs) control the dauer formation program in Caenorhabditis elegans through the nuclear receptor DAF-12. This mechanism is conserved in parasitic nematodes to regulate their dauer-like infective larval stage, and as such, the DAF-12 ligand binding domain has been identified as an important therapeutic target in human parasitic hookworm species that infect more than 600 million people worldwide. Here, we report two x-ray crystal structures of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum DAF-12 ligand binding domain in complex with DA and cholestenoic acid (a bile acid-like metabolite), respectively. Structure analysis and functional studies reveal key residues responsible for species-specific ligand responses of DAF-12. Furthermore, DA binds to DAF-12 mechanistically and is structurally similar to bile acids binding to the mammalian bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor. Activation of DAF-12 by cholestenoic acid and the cholestenoic acid complex structure suggest that bile acid-like signaling pathways have been conserved in nematodes and mammals. Together, these results reveal the molecular mechanism for the interplay between parasite and host, provide a structural framework for DAF-12 as a promising target in treating nematode parasitism, and provide insight into the evolution of gut parasite hormone-signaling pathways. PMID:22170062

  4. Computational design of an endo-1,4-[beta]-xylanase ligand binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-09-05

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein-ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-{beta}-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the 'thumb' region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 {beta}-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the {beta}-xylanase proteins.

  5. Computational design of an endo-1,4-β-xylanase ligand binding site

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein–ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-β-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the ‘thumb’ region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 β-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the β-xylanase proteins. PMID:21349882

  6. Path integral method for predicting relative binding affinities of protein-ligand complexes

    PubMed Central

    Mulakala, Chandrika; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel approach for computing biomolecular interaction binding affinities based on a simple path integral solution of the Fokker-Planck equation. Computing the free energy of protein-ligand interactions can expedite structure-based drug design. Traditionally, the problem is seen through the lens of statistical thermodynamics. The computations can become, however, prohibitively long for the change in the free energy upon binding to be determined accurately. In this work we present a different approach based on a stochastic kinetic formalism. Inspired by Feynman's path integral formulation, we extend the theory to classical interacting systems. The ligand is modeled as a Brownian particle subjected to the effective non-bonding interaction potential of the receptor. This allows the calculation of the relative binding affinities of interacting biomolecules in water to be computed as a function of the ligand's diffusivity and the curvature of the potential surface in the vicinity of the binding minimum. The calculation is thus exceedingly rapid. In test cases, the correlation coefficient between actual and computed free energies is >0.93 for accurate data-sets. PMID:19275144

  7. Characterization of the Ligand Binding Functionality of the Extracellular Domain of Activin Receptor Type IIB

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Dianne; Grinberg, Asya V.; Liu, June; Davies, Monique V.; Castonguay, Roselyne; Maniatis, Silas; Andreucci, Amy J.; Pobre, Eileen G.; Tomkinson, Kathleen N.; Monnell, Travis E.; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Pearsall, R. Scott; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The single transmembrane domain serine/threonine kinase activin receptor type IIB (ActRIIB) has been proposed to bind key regulators of skeletal muscle mass development, including the ligands GDF-8 (myostatin) and GDF-11 (BMP-11). Here we provide a detailed kinetic characterization of ActRIIB binding to several low and high affinity ligands using a soluble activin receptor type IIB-Fc chimera (ActRIIB.Fc). We show that both GDF-8 and GDF-11 bind the extracellular domain of ActRIIB with affinities comparable with those of activin A, a known high affinity ActRIIB ligand, whereas BMP-2 and BMP-7 affinities for ActRIIB are at least 100-fold lower. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that ActRIIB binds GDF-11 and activin A in different ways such as, for example, substitutions in ActRIIB Leu79 effectively abolish ActRIIB binding to activin A yet not to GDF-11. Native ActRIIB has four isoforms that differ in the length of the C-terminal portion of their extracellular domains. We demonstrate that the C terminus of the ActRIIB extracellular domain is crucial for maintaining biological activity of the ActRIIB.Fc receptor chimera. In addition, we show that glycosylation of ActRIIB is not required for binding to activin A or GDF-11. Together, our findings reveal binding specificity and activity determinants of the ActRIIB receptor that combine to effect specificity in the activation of distinct signaling pathways. PMID:20385559

  8. Assessment of free energy predictors for ligand binding to a methyllysine histone code reader.

    PubMed

    Gao, Cen; Herold, J Martin; Kireev, Dmitri

    2012-03-05

    Methyllysine histone code readers constitute a new promising group of potential drug targets. For instance, L3MBTL1, a malignant brain tumor (MBT) protein, selectively binds mono- and di-methyllysine epigenetic marks (KMe, KMe(2) ) that eventually results in the negative regulation of multiple genes through the E2F/Rb oncogenic pathway. There is a pressing need in potent and selective small-molecule probes that would enable further target validation and might become therapeutic leads. Such an endeavor would require efficient tools to assess the free energy of protein-ligand binding. However, due to an unparalleled function of the MBT binding pocket (i.e., selective binding to KMe/KMe(2) ) and because of its distinctive structure representing a small aromatic "cage," an accurate assessment of its binding affinity to a ligand appears to be a challenging task. Here, we report a comparative analysis of computationally affordable affinity predictors applied to a set of seven small-molecule ligands interacting with L3MBTL1. The analysis deals with novel ligands and targets, but applies widespread computational approaches and intuitive comparison metrics that makes this study compatible with and incremental to earlier large scale accounts on the efficiency of affinity predictors. Ultimately, this study has revealed three top performers, far ahead of the other techniques, including two scoring functions, PMF04 and PLP, along with a simulation-based method MM-PB/SA. We discuss why some methods may perform better than others on this target class, the limits of their application, as well as how the efficiency of the most CPU-demanding techniques could be optimized.

  9. Assessment of Free Energy Predictors for Ligand Binding to a Methyllysine Histone Code Reader

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Cen; Herold, J. Martin; Kireev, Dmitri

    2011-01-01

    Methyllysine histone code readers constitute a new promising group of potential drug targets. For instance, L3MBTL1, a Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) protein, selectively binds mono- and di-methyllysine epigenetic marks (KMe, KMe2) that eventually results in the negative regulation of multiple genes through the E2F/Rb oncogenic pathway. There is a pressing need in potent and selective small-molecule probes that would enable further target validation and might become therapeutic leads. Such an endeavor would require efficient tools to assess the free energy of protein-ligand binding. However, due to an unparalleled function of the MBT binding pocket (i.e. selective binding to KMe/KMe2) and because of its distinctive structure representing a small aromatic “cage”, an accurate assessment of its binding affinity to a ligand appears to be a challenging task. Here, we report a comparative analysis of computationally affordable affinity predictors applied to a set of seven small-molecule ligands interacting with L3MBTL1. The analysis deals with novel ligands and targets, but applies widespread computational approaches and intuitive comparison metrics that makes this study compatible with and incremental to earlier large scale accounts on the efficiency of affinity predictors. Ultimately, this study has revealed three top performers, far ahead of the other techniques, including two scoring functions, PMF04 and PLP, along with a simulation-based method Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann/Surface Area (MM-PB/SA). We discuss why some methods may perform better than others on this target class, the limits of their application, as well as how the efficiency of the most CPU-demanding techniques could be optimized. PMID:22183769

  10. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  11. Water network perturbation in ligand binding: adenosine A(2A) antagonists as a case study.

    PubMed

    Bortolato, Andrea; Tehan, Ben G; Bodnarchuk, Michael S; Essex, Jonathan W; Mason, Jonathan S

    2013-07-22

    Recent efforts in the computational evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of water molecules have resulted in the development of promising new in silico methods to evaluate the role of water in ligand binding. These methods include WaterMap, SZMAP, GRID/CRY probe, and Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations. They allow the prediction of the position and relative free energy of the water molecule in the protein active site and the analysis of the perturbation of an explicit water network (WNP) as a consequence of ligand binding. We have for the first time extended these approaches toward the prediction of kinetics for small molecules and of relative free energy of binding with a focus on the perturbation of the water network and application to large diverse data sets. Our results support a qualitative correlation between the residence time of 12 related triazine adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists and the number and position of high energy trapped solvent molecules. From a quantitative viewpoint, we successfully applied these computational techniques as an implicit solvent alternative, in linear combination with a molecular mechanics force field, to predict the relative ligand free energy of binding (WNP-MMSA). The applicability of this linear method, based on the thermodynamics additivity principle, did not extend to 375 diverse A(2A) receptor antagonists. However, a fast but effective method could be enabled by replacing the linear approach with a machine learning technique using probabilistic classification trees, which classified the binding affinity correctly for 90% of the ligands in the training set and 67% in the test set.

  12. A Prediction Method of Binding Free Energy of Protein and Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Xicheng

    2010-05-01

    Predicting the binding free energy is an important problem in bimolecular simulation. Such prediction would be great benefit in understanding protein functions, and may be useful for computational prediction of ligand binding strengths, e.g., in discovering pharmaceutical drugs. Free energy perturbation (FEP)/thermodynamics integration (TI) is a classical method to explicitly predict free energy. However, this method need plenty of time to collect datum, and that attempts to deal with some simple systems and small changes of molecular structures. Another one for estimating ligand binding affinities is linear interaction energy (LIE) method. This method employs averages of interaction potential energy terms from molecular dynamics simulations or other thermal conformational sampling techniques. Incorporation of systematic deviations from electrostatic linear response, derived from free energy perturbation studies, into the absolute binding free energy expression significantly enhances the accuracy of the approach. However, it also is time-consuming work. In this paper, a new prediction method based on steered molecular dynamics (SMD) with direction optimization is developed to compute binding free energy. Jarzynski's equality is used to derive the PMF or free-energy. The results for two numerical examples are presented, showing that the method has good accuracy and efficiency. The novel method can also simulate whole binding proceeding and give some important structural information about development of new drugs.

  13. Reversible sequential-binding probe receptor-ligand interactions in single cells.

    PubMed

    Schreiter, Christoph; Gjoni, Marinela; Hovius, Ruud; Martinez, Karen L; Segura, Jean-Manuel; Vogel, Horst

    2005-12-01

    With the reversible sequential (ReSeq) binding assay,we present a novel approach for the ultrasensitive profiling of receptor function in single living cells. This assay is based on the repetitive application of fluorescent ligands that have fast association-dissociation kinetics. We chose the nicotinic-acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) as a prototypical example and performed ReSeq equilibrium, kinetic, and competition-binding assays using fluorescent derivatives of the antagonist alpha-conotoxin GI (alpha-CnTx). Thereby, we determined the binding constants of unlabeled alpha-CnTx and d-tubocurarine. The high selectivity of alpha-CnTx for muscle-type nAChR made it possible to observe specific binding even in the presence of other nAChR subtypes. Imaging of individual nAChRs and ligand-binding cycles to single cells in microfluidic devices demonstrated the ultimate miniaturization and accuracy of ReSeq-binding assays even at low receptor-expression levels. We expect our approach to be of generic importance for functional screening of compounds or membrane receptors, and for the detailed characterization of rare primary cells.

  14. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  15. β-lactoglobulin's conformational requirements for ligand binding at the calyx and the dimer interphase: a flexible docking study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Del Moral-Ramírez, Elizabeth; Cortes-Hernández, Paulina; García-Garibay, Mariano; Jiménez-Guzmán, Judith

    2013-01-01

    β-lactoglobulin (BLG) is an abundant milk protein relevant for industry and biotechnology, due significantly to its ability to bind a wide range of polar and apolar ligands. While hydrophobic ligand sites are known, sites for hydrophilic ligands such as the prevalent milk sugar, lactose, remain undetermined. Through the use of molecular docking we first, analyzed the known fatty acid binding sites in order to dissect their atomistic determinants and second, predicted the interaction sites for lactose with monomeric and dimeric BLG. We validated our approach against BLG structures co-crystallized with ligands and report a computational setup with a reduced number of flexible residues that is able to reproduce experimental results with high precision. Blind dockings with and without flexible side chains on BLG showed that: i) 13 experimentally-determined ligands fit the calyx requiring minimal movement of up to 7 residues out of the 23 that constitute this binding site. ii) Lactose does not bind the calyx despite conformational flexibility, but binds the dimer interface and an alternate Site C. iii) Results point to a probable lactolation site in the BLG dimer interface, at K141, consistent with previous biochemical findings. In contrast, no accessible lysines are found near Site C. iv) lactose forms hydrogen bonds with residues from both monomers stabilizing the dimer through a claw-like structure. Overall, these results improve our understanding of BLG's binding sites, importantly narrowing down the calyx residues that control ligand binding. Moreover, our results emphasize the importance of the dimer interface as an insufficiently explored, biologically relevant binding site of particular importance for hydrophilic ligands. Furthermore our analyses suggest that BLG is a robust scaffold for multiple ligand-binding, suitable for protein design, and advance our molecular understanding of its ligand sites to a point that allows manipulation to control binding.

  16. eFindSite: Improved prediction of ligand binding sites in protein models using meta-threading, machine learning and auxiliary ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylinski, Michal; Feinstein, Wei P.

    2013-06-01

    Molecular structures and functions of the majority of proteins across different species are yet to be identified. Much needed functional annotation of these gene products often benefits from the knowledge of protein-ligand interactions. Towards this goal, we developed eFindSite, an improved version of FINDSITE, designed to more efficiently identify ligand binding sites and residues using only weakly homologous templates. It employs a collection of effective algorithms, including highly sensitive meta-threading approaches, improved clustering techniques, advanced machine learning methods and reliable confidence estimation systems. Depending on the quality of target protein structures, eFindSite outperforms geometric pocket detection algorithms by 15-40 % in binding site detection and by 5-35 % in binding residue prediction. Moreover, compared to FINDSITE, it identifies 14 % more binding residues in the most difficult cases. When multiple putative binding pockets are identified, the ranking accuracy is 75-78 %, which can be further improved by 3-4 % by including auxiliary information on binding ligands extracted from biomedical literature. As a first across-genome application, we describe structure modeling and binding site prediction for the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. Carefully calibrated confidence estimates strongly indicate that highly reliable ligand binding predictions are made for the majority of gene products, thus eFindSite holds a significant promise for large-scale genome annotation and drug development projects. eFindSite is freely available to the academic community at http://www.brylinski.org/efindsite.

  17. Impact of protein binding cavity volume (PCV) and ligand volume (LV) in rigid and flexible docking of protein-ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    Saranya, N; Jeyakanthan, J; Selvaraj, S

    2012-12-15

    The importance of protein binding cavity volume (PCV) and ligand volume (LV) in rigid and flexible docking has been studied in 48 protein-ligand complexes belonging to eight protein families. In continuation of our earlier study on protein flexibility in relationship to PCV and LV, this study analyzes the importance of PCV and LV in the scoring and ranking of ligands in docking experiments. Crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes with varied PCV were chosen for docking ligands of varied volume in each protein family. Docking and scoring accuracy have been evaluated by self and cross docking of ligands to the given protein conformation. Effect of PCV and LV in rigid and flexible docking has been studied both in apo and holo proteins. Rigid docking has performed well when appropriate protein conformation is used. Selecting the proteins with appropriate PCV based on the LV information is suggested for better results in ensemble docking.

  18. SKF 525-A and cytochrome P-450 ligands inhibit with high affinity the binding of ( sup 3 H)dextromethorphan and. sigma. ligands to guinea pig brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, M.; Canoll, P.D.; Musacchio, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The DM{sub 1}/{sigma}{sub 1} site binds dextromethorphan (DM) and {sigma} receptor ligands. The broad binding specificity of this site and its peculiar subcellular distribution prompted us to explore the possibility that this site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of enzymes. We tested the effects of the liver microsomal monooxygenase inhibitor SKF 525-A (Proadifen), and other P-450 substrates on the binding of ({sup 3}H)dextromethorphan, ({sup 3}H)3- (3-Hydroxyphenyl) -N- (1-propyl) piperidine and (+)-({sup 3}H)1,3-Di-o-tolyl-guanidine (({sup 3}H)DTG) to the guinea pig brain. SKF 525-A, l-lobeline and GBR-12909 inhibited the binding of the three labeled ligands with nM affinity. Each drug has identical nM K{sub i} values for the high-affinity site labeled by the three ligands. This indicated that they displaced the labeled ligands from the common DM{sub 1}{sigma}{sub 1} site. Debrisoquine and sparteine, prototypical substrates for liver debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase, displayed K{sub i} values of 9-13 and 3-4 {mu}M respectively against the three labeled ligands. These results, the broad specificity of the DM{sub 1}/{sigma}{sub 1} binding site, and its peculiar subcellular distribution, raises the possibility that this binding site is a member of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily of isozymes, rather than a neurotransmitter receptor.

  19. New insights from molecular dynamic simulation studies of the multiple binding modes of a ligand with G-quadruplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jin-Qiang; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Tan, Jia-Heng; Luo, Hai-Bin; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2012-12-01

    G-quadruplexes are higher-order DNA and RNA structures formed from guanine-rich sequences. These structures have recently emerged as a new class of potential molecular targets for anticancer drugs. An understanding of the three-dimensional interactions between small molecular ligands and their G-quadruplex targets in solution is crucial for rational drug design and the effective optimization of G-quadruplex ligands. Thus far, rational ligand design has been focused mainly on the G-quartet platform. It should be noted that small molecules can also bind to loop nucleotides, as observed in crystallography studies. Hence, it would be interesting to elucidate the mechanism underlying how ligands in distinct binding modes influence the flexibility of G-quadruplex. In the present study, based on a crystal structure analysis, the models of a tetra-substituted naphthalene diimide ligand bound to a telomeric G-quadruplex with different modes were built and simulated with a molecular dynamics simulation method. Based on a series of computational analyses, the structures, dynamics, and interactions of ligand-quadruplex complexes were studied. Our results suggest that the binding of the ligand to the loop is viable in aqueous solutions but dependent on the particular arrangement of the loop. The binding of the ligand to the loop enhances the flexibility of the G-quadruplex, while the binding of the ligand simultaneously to both the quartet and the loop diminishes its flexibility. These results add to our understanding of the effect of a ligand with different binding modes on G-quadruplex flexibility. Such an understanding will aid in the rational design of more selective and effective G-quadruplex binding ligands.

  20. CSAR scoring challenge reveals the need for new concepts in estimating protein-ligand binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Novikov, Fedor N; Zeifman, Alexey A; Stroganov, Oleg V; Stroylov, Viktor S; Kulkov, Val; Chilov, Ghermes G

    2011-09-26

    The dG prediction accuracy by the Lead Finder docking software on the CSAR test set was characterized by R(2)=0.62 and rmsd=1.93 kcal/mol, and the method of preparation of the full-atom structures of the test set did not significantly affect the resulting accuracy of predictions. The primary factors determining the correlation between the predicted and experimental values were the van der Waals interactions and solvation effects. Those two factors alone accounted for R(2)=0.50. The other factors that affected the accuracy of predictions, listed in the order of decreasing importance, were the change of ligand's internal energy upon binding with protein, the electrostatic interactions, and the hydrogen bonds. It appears that those latter factors contributed to the independence of the prediction results from the method of full-atom structure preparation. Then, we turned our attention to the other factors that could potentially improve the scoring function in order to raise the accuracy of the dG prediction. It turned out that the ligand-centric factors, including Mw, cLogP, PSA, etc. or protein-centric factors, such as the functional class of protein, did not improve the prediction accuracy. Following that, we explored if the weak molecular interactions such as X-H...Ar, X-H...Hal, CO...Hal, C-H...X, stacking and π-cationic interactions (where X is N or O), that are generally of interest to the medicinal chemists despite their lack of proper molecular mechanical parametrization, could improve dG prediction. Our analysis revealed that out of these new interactions only CO...Hal is statistically significant for dG predictions using Lead FInder scoring function. Accounting for the CO...Hal interaction resulted in the reduction of the rmsd from 2.19 to 0.69 kcal/mol for the corresponding structures. The other weak interaction factors were not statistically significant and therefore irrelevant to the accuracy of dG prediction. On the basis of our findings from our

  1. The crystal structure of the orphan nuclear receptor NR2E3/PNR ligand binding domain reveals a dimeric auto-repressed conformation.

    PubMed

    Tan, M H Eileen; Zhou, X Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Li, Xiaodan; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2013-01-01

    Photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor (PNR, NR2E3) is a key transcriptional regulator of human photoreceptor differentiation and maintenance. Mutations in the NR2E3-encoding gene cause various retinal degenerations, including Enhanced S-cone syndrome, retinitis pigmentosa, and Goldman-Favre disease. Although physiological ligands have not been identified, it is believed that binding of small molecule agonists, receptor desumoylation, and receptor heterodimerization may switch NR2E3 from a transcriptional repressor to an activator. While these features make NR2E3 a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of retinal diseases, there has been a clear lack of structural information for the receptor. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo NR2E3 ligand binding domain (LBD) at 2.8 Å resolution. Apo NR2E3 functions as transcriptional repressor in cells and the structure of its LBD is in a dimeric auto-repressed conformation. In this conformation, the putative ligand binding pocket is filled with bulky hydrophobic residues and the activation-function-2 (AF2) helix occupies the canonical cofactor binding site. Mutations designed to disrupt either the AF2/cofactor-binding site interface or the dimer interface compromised the transcriptional repressor activity of this receptor. Together, these results reveal several conserved structural features shared by related orphan nuclear receptors, suggest that most disease-causing mutations affect the receptor's structural integrity, and allowed us to model a putative active conformation that can accommodate small ligands in its pocket.

  2. A microscopic insight from conformational thermodynamics to functional ligand binding in proteins.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Samapan; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosh, Mahua

    2014-12-01

    We show that the thermodynamics of metal ion-induced conformational changes aid to understand the functions of protein complexes. This is illustrated in the case of a metalloprotein, alpha-lactalbumin (aLA), a divalent metal ion binding protein. We use the histograms of dihedral angles of the protein, generated from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, to calculate conformational thermodynamics. The thermodynamically destabilized and disordered residues in different conformational states of a protein are proposed to serve as binding sites for ligands. This is tested for β-1,4-galactosyltransferase (β4GalT) binding to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex, in which the binding residues are known. Among the binding residues, the C-terminal residues like aspartate (D) 116, glutamine (Q) 117, tryptophan (W) 118 and leucine (L) 119 are destabilized and disordered and can dock β4GalT onto Ca(2+)-aLA. No such thermodynamically favourable binding residues can be identified in the case of the Mg(2+)-aLA complex. We apply similar analysis to oleic acid binding and predict that the Ca(2+)-aLA complex can bind to oleic acid through the basic histidine (H) 32 of the A2 helix and the hydrophobic residues, namely, isoleucine (I) 59, W60 and I95, of the interfacial cleft. However, the number of destabilized and disordered residues in Mg(2+)-aLA are few, and hence, the oleic acid binding to Mg(2+)-bound aLA is less stable than that to the Ca(2+)-aLA complex. Our analysis can be generalized to understand the functionality of other ligand bound proteins.

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of small ligand binding to the Escherichia coli repressor of biotin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Johnson, C R; Beckett, D

    1996-04-30

    BirA is the transcriptional repressor of biotin biosynthesis and a biotin holoenzyme synthetase. It catalyzes synthesis of biotinyl-5'-AMP from the substrates biotin and ATP. The adenylate is the activated intermediate in the biotin transfer reaction as well as the positive allosteric effector for site-specific DNA binding. The affinity of BirA for the adenylate is considerably greater than its affinity for biotin, and both binding reactions are coupled to changes in the conformation of the protein. The temperature dependencies of the two binding interactions have been determined using kinetic techniques. Van't Hoff analysis of the equilibrium dissociation constants derived from the kinetic data indicate that while the two binding processes are characterized by large negative enthalpies, the entropic contributions are small for both. Binding enthalpies have also been determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Consistent with the results of the van't Hoff analyses, the calorimetric enthalpies are large and negative. The greater precision of the calorimetric measurements allowed more accurate estimation of the entropic contributions to the binding processes, which are of opposite sign for the two ligands. In addition, the heat capacity changes associated with the two binding reactions are small. The measured thermodynamic parameters for binding of biotin and bio-5'-AMP to BirA have been utilized to dissect out structural contributions to the binding energetics. Results of these calculations indicate equivalent contributions of burial of polar and apolar surface area to both binding processes. The total loss of solvent accessible surface area is, however, greater for biotin binding. The analysis indicates furthermore that although both binding reactions are coupled to losses in configurational entropy, the magnitude of the conformational change is significantly larger for biotin binding.

  4. High throughput screening of ligand binding to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Von Dreele, Robert B.; D'Amico, Kevin

    2006-10-31

    A process is provided for the high throughput screening of binding of ligands to macromolecules using high resolution powder diffraction data including producing a first sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and a solvent, producing a second sample slurry of a selected polycrystalline macromolecule material, one or more ligands and the solvent, obtaining a high resolution powder diffraction pattern on each of said first sample slurry and the second sample slurry, and, comparing the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the first sample slurry and the high resolution powder diffraction pattern of the second sample slurry whereby a difference in the high resolution powder diffraction patterns of the first sample slurry and the second sample slurry provides a positive indication for the formation of a complex between the selected polycrystalline macromolecule material and at least one of the one or more ligands.

  5. In Pursuit of Fully Flexible Protein-Ligand Docking: Modeling the Bilateral Mechanism of Binding.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Angela M; Rarey, Matthias

    2010-03-15

    Modern structure-based drug design aims at accounting for the intrinsic flexibility of therapeutic relevant targets. Over the last few years a considerable amount of docking approaches that encounter this challenging problem has emerged. Here we provide the readership with an overview of established methods for fully flexible protein-ligand docking and current developments in the field. All methods are based on one of two fundamental models which describe the dynamic behavior of proteins upon ligand binding. Methods for ensemble docking (ED) model the protein conformational change before the ligand is placed, whereas induced-fit docking (IFD) optimizes the protein structure afterwards. A third category of docking approaches is formed by recent approaches that follow both concepts. This categorization allows to comprehensively discover strengths and weaknesses of the individual processes and to extract information for their applicability in real world docking scenarios.

  6. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  7. Probing the mechanism of ligand recognition in family 29 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Nurizzo, Didier; Taylor, Edward J; Williamson, Michael P; Walters, Christopher; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J

    2005-06-24

    The recycling of photosynthetically fixed carbon, by the action of microbial plant cell wall hydrolases, is integral to one of the major geochemical cycles and is of considerable industrial importance. Non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play a key role in this degradative process by targeting hydrolytic enzymes to their cognate substrate within the complex milieu of polysaccharides that comprise the plant cell wall. Family 29 CBMs have, thus far, only been found in an extracellular multienzyme plant cell wall-degrading complex from the anaerobic fungus Piromyces equi, where they exist as a CBM29-1:CBM29-2 tandem. Here we present both the structure of the CBM29-1 partner, at 1.5 A resolution, and examine the importance of hydrophobic stacking interactions as well as direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the binding of CBM29-2 to different polysaccharides. CBM29 domains display unusual binding properties, exhibiting specificity for both beta-manno- and beta-gluco-configured ligands such as mannan, cellulose, and glucomannan. Mutagenesis reveals that "stacking" of tryptophan residues in the n and n+2 subsites plays a critical role in ligand binding, whereas the loss of tyrosine-mediated stacking in the n+4 subsite reduces, but does not abrogate, polysaccharide recognition. Direct hydrogen bonds to ligand, such as those provided by Arg-112 and Glu-78, play a pivotal role in the interaction with both mannan and cellulose, whereas removal of water-mediated interactions has comparatively little effect on carbohydrate binding. The interactions of CBM29-2 with the O2 of glucose or mannose contribute little to binding affinity, explaining why this CBM displays dual gluco/manno specificity.

  8. Importance of Many-Body Effects in the Kernel of Hemoglobin for Ligand Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Cédric; O'Regan, David D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Payne, Mike C.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a mechanism for binding of diatomic ligands to heme based on a dynamical orbital selection process. This scenario may be described as bonding determined by local valence fluctuations. We support this model using linear-scaling first-principles calculations, in combination with dynamical mean-field theory, applied to heme, the kernel of the hemoglobin metalloprotein central to human respiration. We find that variations in Hund’s exchange coupling induce a reduction of the iron 3d density, with a concomitant increase of valence fluctuations. We discuss the comparison between our computed optical absorption spectra and experimental data, our picture accounting for the observation of optical transitions in the infrared regime, and how the Hund’s coupling reduces, by a factor of 5, the strong imbalance in the binding energies of heme with CO and O2 ligands.

  9. Ligand binding strategies of human serum albumin: how can the cargo be utilized?

    PubMed

    Varshney, Ankita; Sen, Priyankar; Ahmad, Ejaz; Rehan, Mohd; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), being the most abundant carrier protein in blood and a modern day clinical tool for drug delivery, attracts high attention among biologists. Hence, its unfolding/refolding strategies and exogenous/endogenous ligand binding preference are of immense use in therapeutics and clinical biochemistry. Among its fellow proteins albumin is known to carry almost every small molecule. Thus, it is a potential contender for being a molecular cargo/or nanovehicle for clinical, biophysical and industrial purposes. Nonetheless, its structure and function are largely regulated by various chemical and physical factors to accommodate HSA to its functional purpose. This multifunctional protein also possesses enzymatic properties which may be used to convert prodrugs to active therapeutics. This review aims to highlight current overview on the binding strategies of protein to various ligands that may be expected to lead to significant clinical applications.

  10. Automate it: ligand-binding assay productivity in a discovery bioanalytical setting.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sheldon S; Dreher, Elizabeth A

    2013-07-01

    In multiple industries, including the biopharmaceutical industry, automation is synonymous with increased productivity. Environments with high-throughput needs commonly employ automation for efficiency. However, in a discovery bioanalytical ligand-binding assay laboratory setting where the focus is not necessarily on sample analysis throughput, but instead on assay development and characterization, is automation applicable? Can automation enhance productivity when tasks are more customized than routine? In this Perspective we review the different categories of automation with ligand-binding assays with these questions in mind. In considering whether automation technology has progressed far enough to result in a positive return in investment in the discovery setting, the resource investment required to operate in this space was contrasted with the gain in productivity. In our opinion, technology advancements in automated technology platforms, and especially personal automation, have allowed these categories to strike the right balance for investment in the discovery laboratory setting.

  11. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  12. Analysis of RNA folding and ligand binding by conventional and high-throughput calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Sokoloski, Joshua E; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs serve myriad functions in the cell, but their biophysical properties are not well understood. Calorimetry offers direct and label-free means for characterizing the ligand-binding and thermostability properties of these RNA. We apply two main types of calorimetry--isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)--to the characterization of these functional RNA molecules. ITC can describe ligand binding in terms of stoichiometry, affinity, and heat (enthalpy), while DSC can provide RNA stability in terms of heat capacity, melting temperature, and folding enthalpy. Here, we offer detailed experimental protocols for studying such RNA systems with commercially available conventional and high-throughput ITC and DSC instruments.

  13. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  14. Anthrax toxin lethal factor domain 3 is highly mobile and responsive to ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Maize, Kimberly M; Kurbanov, Elbek K; De La Mora-Rey, Teresa; Geders, Todd W; Hwang, Dong Jin; Walters, Michael A; Johnson, Rodney L; Amin, Elizabeth A; Finzel, Barry C

    2014-11-01

    The secreted anthrax toxin consists of three components: the protective antigen (PA), edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF). LF, a zinc metalloproteinase, compromises the host immune system primarily by targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases in macrophages. Peptide substrates and small-molecule inhibitors bind LF in the space between domains 3 and 4 of the hydrolase. Domain 3 is attached on a hinge to domain 2 via residues Ile300 and Pro385, and can move through an angular arc of greater than 35° in response to the binding of different ligands. Here, multiple LF structures including five new complexes with co-crystallized inhibitors are compared and three frequently populated LF conformational states termed `bioactive', `open' and `tight' are identified. The bioactive position is observed with large substrate peptides and leaves all peptide-recognition subsites open and accessible. The tight state is seen in unliganded and small-molecule complex structures. In this state, domain 3 is clamped over certain substrate subsites, blocking access. The open position appears to be an intermediate state between these extremes and is observed owing to steric constraints imposed by specific bound ligands. The tight conformation may be the lowest-energy conformation among the reported structures, as it is the position observed with no bound ligand, while the open and bioactive conformations are likely to be ligand-induced.

  15. Nucleotide binding database NBDB – a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand–protein interactions found in crystallized ligand–protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  16. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To enhance our understanding of LBSs, it is worth performing such comparisons among patches and classifying them based on similarities of their surface configurations and electrostatic potentials. In this study, we first developed a rapid method to compare two patches. We then clustered patches corresponding to the same PDB chemical component identifier for a ligand, and selected a representative patch from each cluster. We subsequently exhaustively as compared the representative patches and clustered them using similarity score, PatSim. Finally, the resultant PatSim scores were compared with similarities of atomic structures of the LBSs and those of the ligand-binding protein sequences and functions. Consequently, we classified the patches into ∼2000 well-characterized clusters. We found that about 63% of these clusters are used in identical protein folds, although about 25% of the clusters are conserved in distantly related proteins and even in proteins with cross-fold similarity. Furthermore, we showed that patches with higher PatSim score have potential to be involved in similar biological processes. PMID:23934772

  17. Peptide Ligand Structure and I-Aq Binding Avidity Influence T Cell Signaling Pathway Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Linda K; Cullins, David L; Park, Jeoung-Eun; Yi, Ae-Kyung; Brand, David D; Rosloniec, Edward F; Stuart, John M; Kang, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    Factors that drive T cells to signal through differing pathways remain unclear. We have shown that an altered peptide ligand (A9) activates T cells to utilize an alternate signaling pathway which is dependent upon FcRγ and Syk. However, it remains unknown whether the affinity of peptide binding to MHC drives this selection. To answer this question we developed a panel of peptides designed so that amino acids interacting with the p6 and p9 predicted MHC binding pockets were altered. Analogs were tested for binding to I-Aq using a competitive binding assay and selected analogs were administered to arthritic mice. Using the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, arthritis severity was correlated with T cell cytokine production and molecular T cell signaling responses. We establish that reduced affinity of interaction with the MHC correlates with T cell signaling through the alternative pathway, leading ultimately to secretion of suppressive cytokine and attenuation of arthritis. PMID:25982319

  18. Detection of the TCDD Binding-Fingerprint within the Ah Receptor Ligand Binding Domain by Structurally Driven Mutagenesis and Functional Analysis†

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Song, Yujuan; Zhao, Jing; Bonati, Laura; Denison, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent, basic helix–loop–helix Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-containing transcription factor that can bind and be activated by structurally diverse chemicals, including the toxic environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Our previous three-dimensional homology model of the mouse AhR (mAhR) PAS B ligand binding domain allowed identification of the binding site and its experimental validation. We have extended this analysis by conducting comparative structural modeling studies of the ligand binding domains of six additional high-affinity mammalian AhRs. These results, coupled with site-directed mutagenesis and AhR functional analysis, have allowed detection of the “TCDD binding-fingerprint” of conserved residues within the ligand binding cavity necessary for high-affinity TCDD binding and TCDD-dependent AhR transformation DNA binding. The essential role of selected residues was further evaluated using molecular docking simulations of TCDD with both wild-type and mutant mAhRs. Taken together, our results dramatically improve our understanding of the molecular determinants of TCDD binding and provide a basis for future studies directed toward rationalizing the observed species differences in AhR sensitivity to TCDD and understanding the mechanistic basis for the dramatic diversity in AhR ligand structure. PMID:19456125

  19. Disturbances of Ligand Potency and Enhanced Degradation of the Human Glycine Receptor at Affected Positions G160 and T162 Originally Identified in Patients Suffering from Hyperekplexia

    PubMed Central

    Atak, Sinem; Langlhofer, Georg; Schaefer, Natascha; Kessler, Denise; Meiselbach, Heike; Delto, Carolyn; Schindelin, Hermann; Villmann, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-binding of Cys-loop receptors is determined by N-terminal extracellular loop structures from the plus as well as from the minus side of two adjacent subunits in the pentameric receptor complex. An aromatic residue in loop B of the glycine receptor (GlyR) undergoes direct interaction with the incoming ligand via a cation-π interaction. Recently, we showed that mutated residues in loop B identified from human patients suffering from hyperekplexia disturb ligand-binding. Here, we exchanged the affected human residues by amino acids found in related members of the Cys-loop receptor family to determine the effects of side chain volume for ion channel properties. GlyR variants were characterized in vitro following transfection into cell lines in order to analyze protein expression, trafficking, degradation and ion channel function. GlyR α1 G160 mutations significantly decrease glycine potency arguing for a positional effect on neighboring aromatic residues and consequently glycine-binding within the ligand-binding pocket. Disturbed glycinergic inhibition due to T162 α1 mutations is an additive effect of affected biogenesis and structural changes within the ligand-binding site. Protein trafficking from the ER toward the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, the secretory Golgi pathways and finally the cell surface is largely diminished, but still sufficient to deliver ion channels that are functional at least at high glycine concentrations. The majority of T162 mutant protein accumulates in the ER and is delivered to ER-associated proteasomal degradation. Hence, G160 is an important determinant during glycine binding. In contrast, T162 affects primarily receptor biogenesis whereas exchanges in functionality are secondary effects thereof. PMID:26733802

  20. Regulation of protein-ligand binding affinity by hydrogen bond pairing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deliang; Oezguen, Numan; Urvil, Petri; Ferguson, Colin; Dann, Sara M.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H)-bonds potentiate diverse cellular functions by facilitating molecular interactions. The mechanism and the extent to which H-bonds regulate molecular interactions are a largely unresolved problem in biology because the H-bonding process continuously competes with bulk water. This interference may significantly alter our understanding of molecular function, for example, in the elucidation of the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. We advance this concept by showing that H-bonds regulate molecular interactions via a hitherto unappreciated donor-acceptor pairing mechanism that minimizes competition with water. On the basis of theoretical and experimental correlations between H-bond pairings and their effects on ligand binding affinity, we demonstrate that H-bonds enhance receptor-ligand interactions when both the donor and acceptor have either significantly stronger or significantly weaker H-bonding capabilities than the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in water. By contrast, mixed strong-weak H-bond pairings decrease ligand binding affinity due to interference with bulk water, offering mechanistic insight into why indiscriminate strengthening of receptor-ligand H-bonds correlates poorly with experimental binding affinity. Further support for the H-bond pairing principle is provided by the discovery and optimization of lead compounds targeting dietary melamine and Clostridium difficile toxins, which are not realized by traditional drug design methods. Synergistic H-bond pairings have therefore evolved in the natural design of high-affinity binding and provide a new conceptual framework to evaluate the H-bonding process in biological systems. Our findings may also guide wider applications of competing H-bond pairings in lead compound design and in determining the origin of enzymatic catalytic power. PMID:27051863

  1. In vitro expressed GPCR inserted in polymersome membranes for ligand-binding studies.

    PubMed

    May, Sylvia; Andreasson-Ochsner, Mirjam; Fu, Zhikang; Low, Ying Xiu; Tan, Darren; de Hoog, Hans-Peter M; Ritz, Sandra; Nallani, Madhavan; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2013-01-07

    The dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2), a G-protein coupled receptor is expressed into PBd(22)-PEO(13) and PMOXA(20)-PDMS(54)-PMOXA(20) block copolymer vesicles. The conformational integrity of the receptor is confirmed by antibody- and ligand-binding assays. Replacement of bound dopamine is demonstrated on surface-immobilized polymersomes, thus making this a promising platform for drug screening.

  2. Ligand binding to thromboxane receptors on human platelets: correlation with biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, R. A.; Jones, R. L.; Wilson, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    The preparation of enantiomerically pure [3H]-15 (S) 9, 11-epoxymethano PGH2 (a thromboxane A2-like agonist) has enabled the binding of ligands to the thromboxane receptor of the human platelet to be studied. The binding of the radio-ligand to washed human platelets has 3 components. One component is not displaceable by 'cold' 9, 11-epoxymethano PGH2 and its concentration-binding plot is roughly linear. The other 2 components are displaceable and saturable, and the larger of the two, which is sensitive to the stereochemistry of the C15 secondary alcohol, appears to represent the thromboxane receptor. About 1700 15(S)9, 11-epoxymethano PGH2 molecules are specifically bound to a single platelet and 50% of this binding is achieved with a concentration of 75 nM. Displacement of [3H]-15(S)9, 11-epoxymethano PGH2 is effected by (a) TXA2 and PGH2 and a number of bicyclic stable analogues (e.g. 9,11-azo PGH2), all of which produce irreversible aggregation of human platelets; (b) analogues of PGF2 alpha with potent thromboxane-like activity (e.g. ICI 79939); (c) compounds with partial agonist activity on the platelet thromboxane system (e.g. CTA2); (d) Thromboxane/endoperoxide analogues which specifically antagonize thromboxane-like actions on the human platelet (e.g. PTA2 and EP 045). Displacement is not achieved with the natural prostaglandins PGE2, PGD2 and PGF2 alpha. Neither the thromboxane-synthetase inhibitor dazoxiben nor R(+)-trimethoquinol have high displacing activity. The correlation of radio-ligand displacement with the biological activity of the competing ligands is discussed in relation to the nature of the thromboxane receptor on the human platelet. PMID:6317122

  3. Ligand heterogeneity of the cysteine protease binding protein family in the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marumo, Konomi; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Tomii, Kentaro; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Lysosomal soluble proteins are targeted to endosomes and lysosomes by specific receptors resident in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or the Golgi apparatus. The enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica has a novel class of lysosomal targeting receptors, named the cysteine protease binding protein family (CPBF). Among 11 CPBFs (CPBF1-11), ligands for three members, CPBF1, CPBF6 and CPBF8, were previously shown to be cysteine proteases, α- and γ- amylases, and β-hexosaminidase and lysozymes, respectively. To further understand the heterogeneity of the ligands of CPBFs, we attempted to isolate and identify the ligands for other members of CPBFs, namely CPBF2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 11, by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analysis. We found that CPBF2 and CPBF10 bound to α-amylases while CPBF7 bound to β-hexosaminidases. It is intriguing that cysteine protease are exclusively recognised by CPBF1, whereas three α-amylases and β-hexosaminidases are redundantly recognised by three and two CPBFs, respectively. It was shown by bioinformatics analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction that each CPBF contains six prepeptidase carboxyl-terminal domains, and the domain configuration is evolutionarily conserved among CPBFs. Taken together, CPBFs with unique and conserved domain organisation have a remarkable ligand heterogeneity toward cysteine protease and carbohydrate degradation enzymes. Further structural studies are needed to elucidate the structural basis of the ligand specificity.

  4. A molecular graphics study exploring a putative ligand binding site of the β-adrenoceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijzerman, Ad. P.; van Vlijmen, Herman W. Th.

    1988-04-01

    The recent elucidation of the primary structure of the cell membrane-bound β-adrenoceptor has prompted us to explore putative ligand binding sites on this physiologically important receptor. By minimizing the energies of the `prototype' ligand propranolol, (part of) the receptor and the proposed ligand-receptor complex with the aid of force field and quantum chemical calculations, we identified amino acid residue Trp313 as a highly probable candidate for interaction with the aromatic moiety of propranolol. The charge distribution on the indole nucleus of another β-blocker, pindolol, with higher affinity for the β-adrenoceptor, enables an even stronger interaction with the tryptophan residue. The carboxylic amino acid residue Glu306, located near the extracellular space of the cell membrane, interacts favorably with the positively charged nitrogen atom in the aliphatic side chain of the ligands. Finally, this putative model is discussed in the light of recent findings in mutagenesis studies, and compared to other ideas with respect to ligand-receptor interactions.

  5. Enhancing peptide ligand binding to vascular endothelial growth factor by covalent bond formation.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Bernadette V; Beck, Heather E; Aweda, Tolulope A; Phinney, Brett; Holsclaw, Cynthia; Jewell, William; Tran, Diana; Day, Jeffrey J; Peiris, Malalage N; Nwosu, Charles; Lebrilla, Carlito; Meares, Claude F

    2012-05-16

    Formation of a stable covalent bond between a synthetic probe molecule and a specific site on a target protein has many potential applications in biomedical science. For example, the properties of probes used as receptor-imaging ligands may be improved by increasing their residence time on the targeted receptor. Among the more interesting cases are peptide ligands, the strongest of which typically bind to receptors with micromolar dissociation constants, and which may depend on processes other than simple binding to provide images. The side chains of cysteine, histidine, or lysine are attractive for chemical attachment to improve binding to a receptor protein, and a system based on acryloyl probes attaching to engineered cysteine provides excellent positron emission tomographic images in animal models (Wei et al. (2008) J. Nucl. Med. 49, 1828-1835). In nature, lysine is a more common but less reactive residue than cysteine, making it an interesting challenge to modify. To seek practically useful cross-linking yields with naturally occurring lysine side chains, we have explored not only acryloyl but also other reactive linkers with different chemical properties. We employed a peptide-VEGF model system to discover that a 19mer peptide ligand, which carried a lysine-tagged dinitrofluorobenzene group, became attached stably and with good yield to a unique lysine residue on human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), even in the presence of 70% fetal bovine serum. The same peptide carrying acryloyl and related Michael acceptors gave low yields of attachment to VEGF, as did the chloroacetyl peptide.

  6. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  7. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    PubMed

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  8. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  9. Glutamate Binding and Conformational Flexibility of Ligand-binding Domains Are Critical Early Determinants of Efficient Kainate Receptor Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Martin B.; Vivithanaporn, Pornpun; Swanson, Geoffrey T.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular glutamate binding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is thought to be necessary for plasma membrane expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Here we determined the importance of glutamate binding to folding and assembly of soluble ligand-binding domains (LBDs), as well as full-length receptors, by comparing the secretion of a soluble GluR6-S1S2 protein versus the plasma membrane localization of GluR6 kainate receptors following mutagenesis of the LBD. The mutations were designed to either eliminate glutamate binding, thereby trapping the bilobate LBD in an “open” conformation, or “lock” the LBD in a closed conformation with an engineered interdomain disulfide bridge. Analysis of plasma membrane localization, medium secretion of soluble LBD proteins, and measures of folding efficiency suggested that loss of glutamate binding affinity significantly impacted subunit protein folding and assembly. In contrast, receptors with conformationally restricted LBDs also exhibited decreased PM expression and altered oligomeric receptor assembly but did not exhibit any deficits in subunit folding. Secretion of the closed LBD protein was enhanced compared with wild-type GluR6-S1S2. Our results suggest that glutamate acts as a chaperone molecule for appropriate folding of nascent receptors and that relaxation of LBDs from fully closed states during oligomerization represents a critical transition that necessarily engages other determinants within receptor dimers. Glutamate receptor LBDs therefore must access multiple conformations for efficient biogenesis. PMID:19342380

  10. A previously unobserved conformation for the human Pex5p receptor suggests roles for intrinsic flexibility and rigid domain motions in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Will A; Pursiainen, Niko V; Garman, Elspeth F; Juffer, André H; Wilmanns, Matthias; Kursula, Petri

    2007-01-01

    Background The C-terminal tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeat domain of Pex5p recognises proteins carrying a peroxisomal targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) tripeptide in their C-terminus. Previously, structural data have been obtained from the TPR domain of Pex5p in both the liganded and unliganded states, indicating a conformational change taking place upon cargo protein binding. Such a conformational change would be expected to play a major role both during PTS1 protein recognition as well as in cargo release into the peroxisomal lumen. However, little information is available on the factors that may regulate such structural changes. Results We have used a range of biophysical and computational methods to further analyse the conformational flexibility and ligand binding of Pex5p. A new crystal form for the human Pex5p C-terminal domain (Pex5p(C)) was obtained in the presence of Sr2+ ions, and the structure presents a novel conformation, distinct from all previous liganded and apo crystal structures for Pex5p(C). The difference relates to a near-rigid body movement of two halves of the molecule, and this movement is different from that required to reach a ring-like conformation upon PTS1 ligand binding. The bound Sr2+ ion changes the dynamic properties of Pex5p(C) affecting its conformation, possibly by making the Sr2+-binding loop – located near the hinge region for the observed domain motions – more rigid. Conclusion The current data indicate that Pex5p(C) is able to sample a range of conformational states in the absence of bound PTS1 ligand. The domain movements between various apo conformations are distinct from those involved in ligand binding, although the differences between all observed conformations so far can be characterised by the movement of the two halves of Pex5p(C) as near-rigid bodies with respect to each other. PMID:17428317

  11. Ligand-binding characteristics of feline insulin-binding immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, Takafumi; NISHII, Naohito; TAKASHIMA, Satoshi; MATSUBARA, Tatsuya; IWASAWA, Atsushi; TAKEUCHI, Hirofumi; TAHARA, Kohei; HACHISU, Tatsuyuki; KITAGAWA, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G autoantibodies against insulin have been identified in sera of healthy cats. We purified and fractionated insulin-binding IgGs from cat sera by affinity chromatography and analyzed affinity of insulin-binding IgGs for insulin and their epitopes. Following the passing of fraction A, which did not bind to insulin, insulin-binding IgGs were eluted into two fractions, B and C, by affinity chromatography using a column fixed with bovine insulin. Dissociation constant (KD) values between insulin-binding IgGs and insulin, determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis (Biacore™system), were 1.64e−4 M for fraction B (low affinity IgGs) and 2e−5 M for fraction C (high affinity IgGs). Epitope analysis was conducted using 16 peptide fragments synthesized in concord with the amino acid sequence of feline insulin by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fractions B and C showed higher absorbance (affinity) of the peptide fragment of 10 amino acid residues at the carboxyl-terminal of the B chain (peptide No. 19), followed by peptide fragments of 6 to 15 amino acid residues of the B chain (peptide No. 8). Fraction C showed a higher absorbance to 7 to 16 amino acid residues of the B chain (peptide No. 5) compared with the absorbance of fraction B. Polyclonal insulin-binding IgGs may form a macromolecule complex with insulin through the multiple affinity sites of IgG molecules. Feline insulin-binding IgGs are multifocal and may be composed of multiple IgG components and insulin. PMID:26062435

  12. The second-shell metal ligands of human arginase affect coordination of the nucleophile and substrate.

    PubMed

    Stone, Everett M; Chantranupong, Lynne; Georgiou, George

    2010-12-14

    The active sites of eukaryotic arginase enzymes are strictly conserved, especially the first- and second-shell ligands that coordinate the two divalent metal cations that generate a hydroxide molecule for nucleophilic attack on the guanidinium carbon of l-arginine and the subsequent production of urea and l-ornithine. Here by using comprehensive pairwise saturation mutagenesis of the first- and second-shell metal ligands in human arginase I, we demonstrate that several metal binding ligands are actually quite tolerant to amino acid substitutions. Of >2800 double mutants of first- and second-shell residues analyzed, we found more than 80 unique amino acid substitutions, of which four were in first-shell residues. Remarkably, certain second-shell mutations could modulate the binding of both the nucleophilic water/hydroxide molecule and substrate or product ligands, resulting in activity greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. The data presented here constitute the first comprehensive saturation mutagenesis analysis of a metallohydrolase active site and reveal that the strict conservation of the second-shell metal binding residues in eukaryotic arginases does not reflect kinetic optimization of the enzyme during the course of evolution.

  13. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  14. Conformational changes in tertiary structure near the ligand binding site of an integrin I domain

    PubMed Central

    Oxvig, Claus; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    For efficient ligand binding, integrins must be activated. Specifically, a conformational change has been proposed in a ligand binding domain present within some integrins, the inserted (I) domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340]. This proposal remains controversial, however, despite extensive crystal structure studies on the I domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340; Liddington, R. & Bankston, L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 937–938; Qu, A. & Leahy, D. J. (1996) Structure (London) 4, 931–942; and Baldwin, E. T., Sarver, R. W., Bryant, G. L., Jr., Curry, K. A., Fairbanks, M. B., Finzel, B. C., Garlick, R. L., Heinrikson, R. L., Horton, N. C. & Kelly, L. L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 923–935]. By defining the residues present in the epitope of a mAb against the human Mac-1 integrin (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) that binds only the active receptor, we provide biochemical evidence that the I domain itself undergoes a conformational change with activation. This mAb, CBRM1/5, binds the I domain very close to the ligand binding site in a region that is widely exposed regardless of activation as judged by reactivity with other antibodies. The conformation of the epitope differs in two crystal forms of the I domain, previously suggested to represent active and inactive receptor. Our data suggests that conformational differences in the I domain are physiologically relevant and not merely a consequence of different crystal lattice interactions. We also demonstrate that the transition between the two conformational states depends on species-specific residues at the bottom of the I domain, which are proposed to be in an interface with another integrin domain, and that this transition correlates with functional activity. PMID:10051621

  15. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in Escherichia coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Nathan W; Monroe, Lyman K; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-03-29

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding of an exceptional quality. The homodimeric Escherichia coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. We found that, in the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization.

  16. Energetic Coupling between Ligand Binding and Dimerization in E. coli Phosphoglycerate Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Nathan W.; Monroe, Lyman K.; Kihara, Daisuke; Park, Chiwook

    2016-01-01

    Energetic coupling of two molecular events in a protein molecule is ubiquitous in biochemical reactions mediated by proteins, such as catalysis and signal transduction. Here, we investigate energetic coupling between ligand binding and folding of a dimer using a model system that shows three-state equilibrium unfolding in an exceptional quality. The homodimeric E. coli cofactor-dependent phosphoglycerate mutase (dPGM) was found to be stabilized by ATP in a proteome-wide screen, although dPGM does not require or utilize ATP for enzymatic function. We investigated the effect of ATP on the thermodynamic stability of dPGM using equilibrium unfolding. In the absence of ATP, dPGM populates a partially unfolded, monomeric intermediate during equilibrium unfolding. However, addition of 1.0 mM ATP drastically reduces the population of the intermediate by selectively stabilizing the native dimer. Using a computational ligand docking method, we predicted ATP binds to the active site of the enzyme using the triphosphate group. By performing equilibrium unfolding and isothermal titration calorimetry with active-site variants of dPGM, we confirmed that active-site residues are involved in ATP binding. Our findings show that ATP promotes dimerization of the protein by binding to the active site, which is distal from the dimer interface. This cooperativity suggests an energetic coupling between the active-site and the dimer interface. We also propose a structural link to explain how ligand binding to the active site is energetically coupled with dimerization. PMID:26919584

  17. Tritium NMR spectroscopy of ligand binding to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, K.; Williams, P.G.; Pelton, J.G.; Morimoto, H.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1991-06-04

    Tritium-labeled {alpha}- and {beta}-maltodextrins have been used to study their complexes with maltose-binding protein (MBP), a 40-kDa bacterial protein. Five substrates, from maltose to maltohexaose, were labeled at their reducing ends and their binding studied. Tritium NMR specctroscopy of the labeled sugars showed large upfield chamical shift changes upon binding and strong anomeric specficity. At 10{degrees}C, MBP bound {alpha}-maltose with 2.7 {plus minus} 0.5-fold higher affinity than {beta}-maltose, and, for longer maltodextrins, the ratio of affinities was even larger. The maximum chemical shift change was 2.2 ppm, suggesting that the reducing end of bound {alpha}-maltodextrin makes close contact with an aromatic residue in the MBP-binding site. Experiments with maltotriose (and longer maltodextrins) also revealed the presence of two bound {beta}-maltotriose resonances in rapid exchange. The authors interpret these two resonances as arising from two distinct sugar-protein complexes. In one complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by its reducing end, and, in the other complex, the {beta}-maltodextrin is bound by the middle glucose residue(s). This interpretation also suggests how MBP is able to bind both linear and circular maltodextrins.

  18. Decoding of lipoprotein – receptor interactions; Properties of ligand binding modules governing interactions with ApoE

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Miklos; Prieto, J. Helena; Croy, Johnny E.; Komives, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Clusters of complement-type ligand binding repeats in the LDL receptor family are thought to mediate the interactions between these receptors and their various ligands. Apolipoprotein E, a key ligand for cholesterol homeostasis, has been shown to interact with LDLR, LRP and VLDLR, through these clusters. LDLR and VLDLR each contain a single ligand-binding repeat cluster, whereas LRP contains three large clusters of ligand binding repeats, each with ligand binding functions. We show that within sLRP3, the three-repeat subcluster CR16-18 recapitulated ligand binding to the isolated receptor binding portion of ApoE (residues 130-149). Binding experiments with LA3-5 of LDLR and CR16-18 showed that a conserved W25/D30 pair appears critical for high affinity binding to ApoE(130-149). The triple repeat LA3-5 showed the expected interaction with ApoE(1-191)•DMPC, but surprisingly CR16-18 did not interact with this form of ApoE. To understand these differences in ApoE binding affinity, we introduced mutations of conserved residues from LA5 into CR18, and produced a CR16-18 variant capable of binding ApoE(1-191)•DMPC. This change cannot fully be accounted for by the interaction with the proposed ApoE receptor binding region, therefore we speculate that LA5 is recognizing a distinct epitope on ApoE that may only exists in the lipid bound form. The combination of avidity effects with this distinct recognition process likely governs the ApoE-LDL receptor interaction. PMID:20030366

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of ligand binding to the purine riboswitch aptamer domain.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Sunny D; Stoddard, Colby D; Wise, Sarah J; Batey, Robert T

    2006-06-09

    Riboswitches are cis-acting genetic regulatory elements found commonly in bacterial mRNAs that consist of a metabolite-responsive aptamer domain coupled to a regulatory switch. Purine riboswitches respond to intracellular concentrations of either adenine or guanine/hypoxanthine to control gene expression. The aptamer domain of the purine riboswitch contains a pyrimidine residue (Y74) that forms a Watson-Crick base-pairing interaction with the bound purine nucleobase ligand that discriminates between adenine and guanine. We sought to understand the structural basis of this specificity and the mechanism of ligand recognition by the purine riboswitch. Here, we present the 2,6-diaminopurine-bound structure of a C74U mutant of the xpt-pbuX guanine riboswitch, along with a detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of nucleobase recognition by both the native and mutant riboswitches. These studies demonstrate clearly that the pyrimidine at position 74 is the sole determinant of purine riboswitch specificity. In addition, the mutant riboswitch binds adenine and adenine derivatives well compared with the guanine-responsive riboswitch. Under our experimental conditions, 2,6-diaminopurine binds the RNA with DeltaH=-40.3 kcal mol(-1), DeltaS=-97.6 cal mol(-1)K(-1), and DeltaG=-10.73 kcal mol(-1). A kinetic determination of the slow rate (0.15 x 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and 2.1 x 10(5)mM(-1)s(-1) for 2-aminopurine binding the adenine-responsive mutant riboswitch and 7-deazaguanine-binding guanine riboswitch, respectively) of association under varying experimental conditions allowed us to propose a mechanism for ligand recognition by the purine riboswitch. A conformationally dynamic unliganded state for the binding pocket is stabilized first by the Watson-Crick base pairing between the ligand and Y74, and by the subsequent ordering of the J2/3 loop, enclosing the ligand within the three-way junction.

  20. THz time scale structural rearrangements and binding modes in lysozyme-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Woods, K N

    2014-03-01

    Predicting the conformational changes in proteins that are relevant for substrate binding is an ongoing challenge in the aim of elucidating the functional states of proteins. The motions that are induced by protein-ligand interactions are governed by the protein global modes. Our measurements indicate that the detected changes in the global backbone motion of the enzyme upon binding reflect a shift from the large-scale collective dominant mode in the unbound state towards a functional twisting deformation that assists in closing the binding cleft. Correlated motion in lysozyme has been implicated in enzyme function in previous studies, but detailed characterization of the internal fluctuations that enable the protein to explore the ensemble of conformations that ultimately foster large-scale conformational change is yet unknown. For this reason, we use THz spectroscopy to investigate the picosecond time scale binding modes and collective structural rearrangements that take place in hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) when bound by the inhibitor (NAG)3. These protein thermal motions correspond to fluctuations that have a role in both selecting and sampling from the available protein intrinsic conformations that communicate function. Hence, investigation of these fast, collective modes may provide knowledge about the mechanism leading to the preferred binding process in HEWL-(NAG)3. Specifically, in this work we find that the picosecond time scale hydrogen-bonding rearrangements taking place in the protein hydration shell with binding modify the packing density within the hydrophobic core on a local level. These localized, intramolecular contact variations within the protein core appear to facilitate the large cooperative movements within the interfacial region separating the α- and β- domain that mediate binding. The THz time-scale fluctuations identified in the protein-ligand system may also reveal a molecular mechanism for substrate recognition.

  1. Interaction Entropy: A New Paradigm for Highly Efficient and Reliable Computation of Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lili; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-04

    Efficient and reliable calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy is a grand challenge in computational biology and is of critical importance in drug design and many other molecular recognition problems. The main challenge lies in the calculation of entropic contribution to protein-ligand binding or interaction systems. In this report, we present a new interaction entropy method which is theoretically rigorous, computationally efficient, and numerically reliable for calculating entropic contribution to free energy in protein-ligand binding and other interaction processes. Drastically different from the widely employed but extremely expensive normal mode method for calculating entropy change in protein-ligand binding, the new method calculates the entropic component (interaction entropy or -TΔS) of the binding free energy directly from molecular dynamics simulation without any extra computational cost. Extensive study of over a dozen randomly selected protein-ligand binding systems demonstrated that this interaction entropy method is both computationally efficient and numerically reliable and is vastly superior to the standard normal mode approach. This interaction entropy paradigm introduces a novel and intuitive conceptual understanding of the entropic effect in protein-ligand binding and other general interaction systems as well as a practical method for highly efficient calculation of this effect.

  2. Access Path to the Ligand Binding Pocket May Play a Role in Xenobiotics Selection by AhR

    PubMed Central

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Erdei, Áron; Gyimesi, Gergely; Magyar, Csaba; Hegedűs, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of multidrug binding at the atomic level would facilitate drug design and strategies to modulate drug metabolism, including drug transport, oxidation, and conjugation. Therefore we explored the mechanism of promiscuous binding of small molecules by studying the ligand binding domain, the PAS-B domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Because of the low sequence identities of PAS domains to be used for homology modeling, structural features of the widely employed HIF-2α and a more recent suitable template, CLOCK were compared. These structures were used to build AhR PAS-B homology models. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize dynamic properties of the PAS-B domain and the generated conformational ensembles were employed in in silico docking. In order to understand structural and ligand binding features we compared the stability and dynamics of the promiscuous AhR PAS-B to other PAS domains exhibiting specific interactions or no ligand binding function. Our exhaustive in silico binding studies, in which we dock a wide spectrum of ligand molecules to the conformational ensembles, suggest that ligand specificity and selection may be determined not only by the PAS-B domain itself, but also by other parts of AhR and its protein interacting partners. We propose that ligand binding pocket and access channels leading to the pocket play equally important roles in discrimination of endogenous molecules and xenobiotics. PMID:26727491

  3. Exploring Flexibility of Progesterone Receptor Ligand Binding Domain Using Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Liangzhen; Mu, Yuguang

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR), a member of nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily, plays a vital role for female reproductive tissue development, differentiation and maintenance. PR ligand, such as progesterone, induces conformation changes in PR ligand binding domain (LBD), thus mediates subsequent gene regulation cascades. PR LBD may adopt different conformations upon an agonist or an antagonist binding. These different conformations would trigger distinct transcription events. Therefore, the dynamics of PR LBD would be of general interest to biologists for a deep understanding of its structure-function relationship. However, no apo-form (non-ligand bound) of PR LBD model has been proposed either by experiments or computational methods so far. In this study, we explored the structural dynamics of PR LBD using molecular dynamics simulations and advanced sampling tools in both ligand-bound and the apo-forms. Resolved by the simulation study, helix 11, helix 12 and loop 895–908 (the loop between these two helices) are quite flexible in antagonistic conformation. Several residues, such as Arg899 and Glu723, could form salt-bridging interaction between helix 11 and helix 3, and are important for the PR LBD dynamics. And we also propose that helix 12 in apo-form PR LBD, not like other NR LBDs, such as human estrogen receptor α (ERα) LBD, may not adopt a totally extended conformation. With the aid of umbrella sampling and metadynamics simulations, several stable conformations of apo-form PR LBD have been sampled, which may work as critical structural models for further large scale virtual screening study to discover novel PR ligands for therapeutic application. PMID:27824891

  4. Ligand-binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains.

  5. Ligand binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains. PMID:21663441

  6. Structure and dynamics underlying elementary ligand binding events in human pacemaking channels

    PubMed Central

    Goldschen-Ohm, Marcel P; Klenchin, Vadim A; White, David S; Cowgill, John B; Cui, Qiang; Goldsmith, Randall H; Chanda, Baron

    2016-01-01

    Although molecular recognition is crucial for cellular signaling, mechanistic studies have relied primarily on ensemble measures that average over and thereby obscure underlying steps. Single-molecule observations that resolve these steps are lacking due to diffraction-limited resolution of single fluorophores at relevant concentrations. Here, we combined zero-mode waveguides with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to directly observe binding at individual cyclic nucleotide-binding domains (CNBDs) from human pacemaker ion channels critical for heart and brain function. Our observations resolve the dynamics of multiple distinct steps underlying cyclic nucleotide regulation: a slow initial binding step that must select a 'receptive' conformation followed by a ligand-induced isomerization of the CNBD. X-ray structure of the apo CNBD and atomistic simulations reveal that the isomerization involves both local and global transitions. Our approach reveals fundamental mechanisms underpinning ligand regulation of pacemaker channels, and is generally applicable to weak-binding interactions governing a broad spectrum of signaling processes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20797.001 PMID:27858593

  7. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations for protein–ligand binding and inhibitor design☆

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Daniel J.; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase are an important component of treatment against HIV infection. Novel inhibitors are sought that increase potency against variants that contain the Tyr181Cys mutation. Methods Molecular dynamics based free energy perturbation simulations have been run to study factors that contribute to protein–ligand binding, and the results are compared with those from previous Monte Carlo based simulations and activity data. Results Predictions of protein–ligand binding modes are very consistent for the two simulation methods, which are attributed to the use of an enhanced sampling protocol. The Tyr181Cys binding pocket supports large, hydrophobic substituents, which is in good agreement with experiment. Conclusions Although some discrepancies exist between the results of the two simulation methods and experiment, free energy perturbation simulations can be used to rapidly test small molecules for gains in binding affinity. General significance Free energy perturbation methods show promise in providing fast, reliable and accurate data that can be used to complement experiment in lead optimization projects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Recent developments of molecular dynamics”. PMID:25196360

  8. Manipulation and measurement of pH sensitive metal-ligand binding using electrochemical proton generation and metal detection.

    PubMed

    Read, Tania L; Joseph, Maxim B; Macpherson, Julie V

    2016-01-31

    Generator-detector electrodes can be used to both perturb and monitor pH dependant metal-ligand binding equilibria, in situ. In particular, protons generated at the generator locally influence the speciation of metal (Cu(2+)) in the presence of ligand (triethylenetetraamine), with the detector employed to monitor, in real time, free metal (Cu(2+)) concentrations.

  9. NMR spectroscopy of the ligand binding core of ionotropic glutamate receptor 2 bound to 5-substituted willardiine partial agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Oswald, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate receptors mediate neuronal intercommunication in the central nervous system by coupling extracellular neurotransmitter-receptor interactions to ion channel conductivity. To gain insight into structural and dynamical factors that underlie this coupling, solution NMR experiments were performed on the bi-lobed ligand-binding core of glutamate receptor 2 in complexes with a set of willardiine partial agonists. These agonists are valuable for studying structure-function relationships because their 5-position substituent size is correlated with ligand efficacy and extent of receptor desensitization whereas the substituent electronegativity is correlated with ligand potency. NMR results show that the protein backbone amide chemical shift deviations correlate mainly with efficacy and extent of desensitization. Pronounced deviations occur at specific residues in the ligand-binding site and in the two helical segments that join the lobes by a disulfide bond. Experiments detecting conformational exchange show that micro- to millisecond timescale motions also occur near the disulfide bond and vary largely with efficacy and extent of desensitization. These results thus identify regions displaying structural and dynamical dissimilarity arising from differences in ligand-protein interactions and lobe closure which may play a critical role in receptor response. Furthermore, measures of line broadening and conformational exchange for a portion of the ligand-binding site correlate with ligand EC50 data. These results do not have any correlate in the currently available crystal structures and thus provide a novel view of ligand-binding events that may be associated with agonist potency differences. PMID:18387631

  10. Quantitative lid dynamics of MDM2 reveals differential ligand binding modes of the p53-binding cleft.

    PubMed

    Showalter, Scott A; Bruschweiler-Li, Lei; Johnson, Eric; Zhang, Fengli; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2008-05-21

    The oncoprotein MDM2 regulates the activity and stability of the tumor suppressor p53 through protein-protein interaction involving their N-terminal domains. The N-terminal lid of MDM2 has been implicated in p53 regulation; however, due to its flexible nature, limited data are available concerning its role in ligand binding. The quantitative dynamics study using NMR reported here shows, for the first time, that the lid in apo-MDM2 slowly interconverts between a "closed" state that is associated with the p53-binding cleft and an "open" state that is highly flexible. Our results reveal that apo-MDM2 predominantly populates the closed state, whereas the p53-bound MDM2 exclusively populates the open state. Unlike p53 binding, the small molecule MDM2 antagonist nutlin-3 binds to the cleft essentially without perturbing the closed lid state. The lid dynamics thereby represents a signature for the experimental and virtual screening of therapeutic antagonists that target the p53-MDM2 interaction.

  11. Predictive binding geometry of ligands to DNA minor groove: isohelicity and hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    PubMed

    Stockert, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of drugs and dyes with nucleic acids, particularly when binding to DNA minor groove occurs, has increasing importance in biomedical sciences. This is due to the resulting biological activity and to the possibility of recognizing AT and GC base pairs. In such cases, DNA binding can be predicted if appropriate helical and hydrogen-bonding parameters are deduced from DNA models, and a simplified geometrical rule in the form of a stencil is then applied on computer-drawn molecules of interest. Relevant structure parameter values for minor groove binders are the length (4.6 < L < 5.4 Å) and angle (152 < σ < 156.5°) between three consecutive units, measured at the level of hydrogen donor or acceptor groups. Application of the stencil shows that predictive methods can aid in the design of new compounds, by checking the possible binding of isohelical sequence-specific ligands along the DNA minor groove.

  12. A comparison of myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity among selected teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Olsson, H I; Yee, N; Shiels, H A; Brauner, C; Farrell, A P

    2000-11-01

    This study quantified the cell surface beta-adrenoreceptor density and ligand binding affinity in the ventricular tissue of seven teleost species; skipjack tuna (Katsowonus pelamis), yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares), Pacific mackerel (Scomber japonicus), mahimahi (dolphin fish; Coryphaena hippurus), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and an Antarctic nototheniid (Trematomus bernacchii). Beta-Adrenoreceptor density varied by almost fourfold among these species, being highest for the athletic fish: sockeye salmon among the salmonids and skipjack tuna among the scombrids. Beta-Adrenoreceptor density was lowest for the Antarctic icefish. Beta-Adrenoreceptor binding affinity varied by almost threefold. We conclude that there is a significant species-specific variability in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density and binding affinity and these interspecific differences cannot be attributed to temperature even though intraspecifically cold temperature can stimulate an increase in myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density. Instead, we suggest that interspecifically myocardial beta-adrenoreceptor density is highest in fish that inhabit tropical water.

  13. High resolution structures of the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor in two crystal forms: Implications for ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Peter D.; Cutfield, John F.; Cutfield, Sue M. . E-mail: sue.cutfield@otago.ac.nz

    2006-12-29

    BMPRII is a type II TGF-{beta} serine threonine kinase receptor which is integral to the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling pathway. It is known to bind BMP and growth differentiation factor (GDF) ligands, and has overlapping ligand specificity with the activin type II receptor, ActRII. In contrast to activin and TGF-{beta} type ligands, BMPs bind to type II receptors with lower affinity than type I receptors. Crystals of the BMPRII ectodomain were grown in two different forms, both of which diffracted to high resolution. The tetragonal form exhibited some disorder, whereas the entire polypeptide was seen in the orthorhombic form. The two structures retain the basic three-finger toxin fold of other TGF-{beta} receptor ectodomains, and share the main hydrophobic patch used by ActRII to bind various ligands. However, they present different conformations of the A-loop at the periphery of the proposed ligand-binding interface, in conjunction with rearrangement of a disulfide bridge within the loop. This particular disulfide (Cys94-Cys117) is only present in BMPRII and activin receptors, suggesting that it is important for their likely shared mode of binding. Evidence is presented that the two crystal forms represent ligand-bound and free conformations of BMPRII. Comparison with the solved structure of ActRII bound to BMP2 suggests that His87, unique amongst TGF-{beta} receptors, may play a key role in ligand recognition.

  14. Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-17

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (K(d) values within the range from ~10 nM to 100 μM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 min-2 h). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater

  15. Detection and quantitative analysis of two independent binding modes of a small ligand responsible for DC-SIGN clustering.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, C; Alfarano, P; Sutkeviciute, I; Sattin, S; Ribeiro-Viana, R; Fieschi, F; Bernardi, A; Weiser, J; Rojo, J; Angulo, J; Nieto, P M

    2016-01-07

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3 grabbing non-integrin) is a C-type lectin receptor (CLR) present, mainly in dendritic cells (DCs), as one of the major pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). This receptor has a relevant role in viral infection processes. Recent approaches aiming to block DC-SIGN have been presented as attractive anti-HIV strategies. DC-SIGN binds mannose or fucose-containing carbohydrates from viral proteins such as the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120. We have previously demonstrated that multivalent dendrons bearing multiple copies of glycomimetic ligands were able to inhibit DC-SIGN-dependent HIV infection in cervical explant models. Optimization of glycomimetic ligands requires detailed characterization and analysis of their binding modes because they notably influence binding affinities. In a previous study we characterized the binding mode of DC-SIGN with ligand 1, which shows a single binding mode as demonstrated by NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this work we report the binding studies of DC-SIGN with pseudotrisaccharide 2, which has a larger affinity. Their binding was analysed by TR-NOESY and STD NMR experiments, combined with the CORCEMA-ST protocol and molecular modelling. These studies demonstrate that in solution the complex cannot be explained by a single binding mode. We describe the ensemble of ligand bound modes that best fit the experimental data and explain the higher inhibition values found for ligand 2.

  16. Allosteric binding site in a Cys-loop receptor ligand-binding domain unveiled in the crystal structure of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Nys, Mieke; Wijckmans, Eveline; Farinha, Ana; Yoluk, Özge; Andersson, Magnus; Brams, Marijke; Spurny, Radovan; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Lindahl, Erik; Ulens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels or Cys-loop receptors are responsible for fast inhibitory or excitatory synaptic transmission. The antipsychotic compound chlorpromazine is a widely used tool to probe the ion channel pore of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, which is a prototypical Cys-loop receptor. In this study, we determine the molecular determinants of chlorpromazine binding in the Erwinia ligand-gated ion channel (ELIC). We report the X-ray crystal structures of ELIC in complex with chlorpromazine or its brominated derivative bromopromazine. Unexpectedly, we do not find a chlorpromazine molecule in the channel pore of ELIC, but behind the β8–β9 loop in the extracellular ligand-binding domain. The β8–β9 loop is localized downstream from the neurotransmitter binding site and plays an important role in coupling of ligand binding to channel opening. In combination with electrophysiological recordings from ELIC cysteine mutants and a thiol-reactive derivative of chlorpromazine, we demonstrate that chlorpromazine binding at the β8–β9 loop is responsible for receptor inhibition. We further use molecular-dynamics simulations to support the X-ray data and mutagenesis experiments. Together, these data unveil an allosteric binding site in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of ELIC. Our results extend on previous observations and further substantiate our understanding of a multisite model for allosteric modulation of Cys-loop receptors. PMID:27791038

  17. AutoDockFR: Advances in Protein-Ligand Docking with Explicitly Specified Binding Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, Pradeep Anand; Forli, Stefano; Goodsell, David S.; Olson, Arthur J.; Sanner, Michel F.

    2015-01-01

    Automated docking of drug-like molecules into receptors is an essential tool in structure-based drug design. While modeling receptor flexibility is important for correctly predicting ligand binding, it still remains challenging. This work focuses on an approach in which receptor flexibility is modeled by explicitly specifying a set of receptor side-chains a-priori. The challenges of this approach include the: 1) exponential growth of the search space, demanding more efficient search methods; and 2) increased number of false positives, calling for scoring functions tailored for flexible receptor docking. We present AutoDockFR–AutoDock for Flexible Receptors (ADFR), a new docking engine based on the AutoDock4 scoring function, which addresses the aforementioned challenges with a new Genetic Algorithm (GA) and customized scoring function. We validate ADFR using the Astex Diverse Set, demonstrating an increase in efficiency and reliability of its GA over the one implemented in AutoDock4. We demonstrate greatly increased success rates when cross-docking ligands into apo receptors that require side-chain conformational changes for ligand binding. These cross-docking experiments are based on two datasets: 1) SEQ17 –a receptor diversity set containing 17 pairs of apo-holo structures; and 2) CDK2 –a ligand diversity set composed of one CDK2 apo structure and 52 known bound inhibitors. We show that, when cross-docking ligands into the apo conformation of the receptors with up to 14 flexible side-chains, ADFR reports more correctly cross-docked ligands than AutoDock Vina on both datasets with solutions found for 70.6% vs. 35.3% systems on SEQ17, and 76.9% vs. 61.5% on CDK2. ADFR also outperforms AutoDock Vina in number of top ranking solutions on both datasets. Furthermore, we show that correctly docked CDK2 complexes re-create on average 79.8% of all pairwise atomic interactions between the ligand and moving receptor atoms in the holo complexes. Finally, we show that

  18. Structural aspects of nucleotide ligand binding by a bacterial 2H phosphoesterase

    PubMed Central

    Myllykoski, Matti; Kursula, Petri

    2017-01-01

    The 2H phosphoesterase family contains enzymes with two His-X-Ser/Thr motifs in the active site. 2H enzymes are found in all kingdoms of life, sharing little sequence identity despite the conserved overall fold and active site. For many 2H enzymes, the physiological function is unknown. Here, we studied the structure of the 2H family member LigT from Escherichia coli both in the apo form and complexed with different active-site ligands, including ATP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, phosphate, and NADP+. Comparisons to the well-characterized vertebrate myelin enzyme 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) highlight specific features of the catalytic cycle and substrate recognition in both enzymes. The role played by the helix α7, unique to CNPases within the 2H family, is apparently taken over by Arg130 in the bacterial enzyme. Other residues and loops lining the active site groove are likely to be important for RNA substrate binding. We visualized conformational changes related to ligand binding, as well as the position of the nucleophilic water molecule. We also present a low-resolution model of E. coli LigT bound to tRNA in solution, and provide a model for RNA binding by LigT, involving flexible loops lining the active site cavity. Taken together, our results both aid in understanding the common features of 2H family enzymes and help highlight the distinct features in the 2H family members, which must result in different reaction mechanisms. Unique aspects in different 2H family members can be observed in ligand recognition and binding, and in the coordination of the nucleophilic water molecule and the reactive phosphate moiety. PMID:28141848

  19. CARF and WYL domains: ligand-binding regulators of prokaryotic defense systems

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Grishin, Nick V.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Aravind, L.

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems of bacteria and archaea insert fragments of virus or plasmid DNA as spacer sequences into CRISPR repeat loci. Processed transcripts encompassing these spacers guide the cleavage of the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. Most CRISPR-Cas loci, in addition to recognized cas genes, also include genes that are not directly implicated in spacer acquisition, CRISPR transcript processing or interference. Here we comprehensively analyze sequences, structures and genomic neighborhoods of one of the most widespread groups of such genes that encode proteins containing a predicted nucleotide-binding domain with a Rossmann-like fold, which we denote CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold). Several CARF protein structures have been determined but functional characterization of these proteins is lacking. The CARF domain is most frequently combined with a C-terminal winged helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and “effector” domains most of which are predicted to possess DNase or RNase activity. Divergent CARF domains are also found in RtcR proteins, sigma-54 dependent regulators of the rtc RNA repair operon. CARF genes frequently co-occur with those coding for proteins containing the WYL domain with the Sm-like SH3 β-barrel fold, which is also predicted to bind ligands. CRISPR-Cas and possibly other defense systems are predicted to be transcriptionally regulated by multiple ligand-binding proteins containing WYL and CARF domains which sense modified nucleotides and nucleotide derivatives generated during virus infection. We hypothesize that CARF domains also transmit the signal from the bound ligand to the fused effector domains which attack either alien or self nucleic acids, resulting, respectively, in immunity complementing the CRISPR-Cas action or in dormancy/programmed cell death. PMID:24817877

  20. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jiao; Choo, Young-Moo; Duan, Hongxia; Leal, Walter S.

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs), may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects' olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants. PMID:25774136

  1. Highly Dynamic Ligand Binding and Light Absorption Coefficient of Cesium Lead Bromide Perovskite Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Jonathan; Ibáñez, Maria; Geiregat, Pieter; Nedelcu, Georgian; Walravens, Willem; Maes, Jorick; Martins, Jose C; Van Driessche, Isabel; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hens, Zeger

    2016-02-23

    Lead halide perovskite materials have attracted significant attention in the context of photovoltaics and other optoelectronic applications, and recently, research efforts have been directed to nanostructured lead halide perovskites. Collodial nanocrystals (NCs) of cesium lead halides (CsPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) exhibit bright photoluminescence, with emission tunable over the entire visible spectral region. However, previous studies on CsPbX3 NCs did not address key aspects of their chemistry and photophysics such as surface chemistry and quantitative light absorption. Here, we elaborate on the synthesis of CsPbBr3 NCs and their surface chemistry. In addition, the intrinsic absorption coefficient was determined experimentally by combining elemental analysis with accurate optical absorption measurements. (1)H solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize sample purity, elucidate the surface chemistry, and evaluate the influence of purification methods on the surface composition. We find that ligand binding to the NC surface is highly dynamic, and therefore, ligands are easily lost during the isolation and purification procedures. However, when a small amount of both oleic acid and oleylamine is added, the NCs can be purified, maintaining optical, colloidal, and material integrity. In addition, we find that a high amine content in the ligand shell increases the quantum yield due to the improved binding of the carboxylic acid.

  2. Selection of phage-displayed peptides that bind to a particular ligand-bound antibody.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Fujie; Hu, Yunfeng; Sutton, Jori; Asawapornmongkol, Lily; Fuller, Roberta; Olson, Arthur J; Barbas, Carlos F; Lerner, Richard A

    2008-06-01

    Phage-displayed peptides that selectively bind to aldolase catalytic antibody 93F3 when bound to a particular 1,3-diketone hapten derivative have been developed using designed selection strategies with libraries containing 7-12 randomized amino acid residues. These phage-displayed peptides discriminated the particular 93F3-diketone complex from ligand-free 93F3 and from 93F3 bound to other 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives. By altering the selection procedures, phage-displayed peptides that bind to antibody 93F3 in the absence of 1,3-diketone hapten derivatives have also been developed. With using these phage-displayed peptides, ligand-bound states of the antibody were distinguished from each other. A docking model of one of the peptides bound to the antibody 93F3-diketone complex was created using a sequential divide-and-conquer peptide docking strategy; the model suggests that the peptide interacts with both the antibody and the ligand through a delicate hydrogen bonding network.

  3. Ligand Binding Site Detection by Local Structure Alignment and Its Performance Complementarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Im, Wonpil

    2013-01-01

    Accurate determination of potential ligand binding sites (BS) is a key step for protein function characterization and structure-based drug design. Despite promising results of template-based BS prediction methods using global structure alignment (GSA), there is a room to improve the performance by properly incorporating local structure alignment (LSA) because BS are local structures and often similar for proteins with dissimilar global folds. We present a template-based ligand BS prediction method using G-LoSA, our LSA tool. A large benchmark set validation shows that G-LoSA predicts drug-like ligands’ positions in single-chain protein targets more precisely than TM-align, a GSA-based method, while the overall success rate of TM-align is better. G-LoSA is particularly efficient for accurate detection of local structures conserved across proteins with diverse global topologies. Recognizing the performance complementarity of G-LoSA to TM-align and a non-template geometry-based method, fpocket, a robust consensus scoring method, CMCS-BSP (Complementary Methods and Consensus Scoring for ligand Binding Site Prediction), is developed and shows improvement on prediction accuracy. The G-LoSA source code is freely available at http://im.bioinformatics.ku.edu/GLoSA. PMID:23957286

  4. The molecular structure of the Toll-like receptor 3 ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jessica K.; Botos, Istvan; Hall, Pamela R.; Askins, Janine; Shiloach, Joseph; Segal, David M.; Davies, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as sentinels of the innate immune system, sensing a variety of ligands from lipopolysaccharide to flagellin to dsRNA through their ligand-binding domain that is composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Ligand binding initiates a signaling cascade that leads to the up-regulation of inflammation mediators. In this study, we have expressed and crystallized the ectodomain (ECD) of human TLR3, which recognizes dsRNA, a molecular signature of viruses, and have determined the molecular structure to 2.4-Å resolution. The overall horseshoe-shaped structure of the TLR3-ECD is formed by 23 repeating LRRs that are capped at each end by specialized non-LRR domains. The extensive β-sheet on the molecule's concave surface forms a platform for several modifications, including insertions in the LRRs and 11 N-linked glycans. The TLR3-ECD structure indicates how LRR loops can establish distinct pathogen recognition receptors. PMID:16043704

  5. Inhibiting Helicobacter pylori HtrA protease by addressing a computationally predicted allosteric ligand binding site

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Anna Maria; Reisen, Felix; Schmidt, Thomas P.; Geppert, Tim; Pillong, Max; Weisel, Martin; Hoy, Benjamin; Simister, Philip C.; Feller, Stephan M.; Wessler, Silja; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with inflammatory diseases and can cause gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoma. One of the bacterium’s key proteins is high temperature requirement A (HpHtrA) protein, an extracellular serine protease that cleaves E-cadherin of gastric epithelial cells, which leads to loss of cell-cell adhesion. Inhibition of HpHtrA may constitute an intervention strategy against H. pylori infection. Guided by the computational prediction of hypothetical ligand binding sites on the surface of HpHtrA, we performed residue mutation experiments that confirmed the functional relevance of an allosteric region. We virtually screened for potential ligands addressing this surface cleft located between the catalytic and PDZ1 domains. Our receptor-based computational method represents protein surface pockets in terms of graph frameworks and retrieves small molecules that satisfy the constraints given by the pocket framework. A new chemical entity was identified that blocked E-cadherin cleavage in vitro by direct binding to HpHtrA, and efficiently blocked pathogen transmigration across the gastric epithelial barrier. A preliminary crystal structure of HpHtrA confirms the validity of a comparative “homology” model of the enzyme, which we used for the computational study. The results of this study demonstrate that addressing orphan protein surface cavities of target macromolecules can lead to new bioactive ligands. PMID:26819700

  6. Measuring two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding kinetics by micropipette.

    PubMed Central

    Chesla, S E; Selvaraj, P; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    We report a novel method for measuring forward and reverse kinetic rate constants, kf0 and kr0, for the binding of individual receptors and ligands anchored to apposing surfaces in cell adhesion. Not only does the method examine adhesion between a single pair of cells; it also probes predominantly a single receptor-ligand bond. The idea is to quantify the dependence of adhesion probability on contact duration and densities of the receptors and ligands. The experiment was an extension of existing micropipette protocols. The analysis was based on analytical solutions to the probabilistic formulation of kinetics for small systems. This method was applied to examine the interaction between Fc gamma receptor IIIA (CD16A) expressed on Chinese hamster ovary cell transfectants and immunoglobulin G (IgG) of either human or rabbit origin coated on human erythrocytes, which were found to follow a monovalent biomolecular binding mechanism. The measured rate constants are Ackf0 = (2.6 +/- 0.32) x 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.37 +/- 0.055) s-1 for the CD16A-hIgG interaction and Ackf0 = (5.7 +/- 0.31) X 10(-7) micron 4 s-1 and kr0 = (0.20 +/- 0.042) s-1 for the CD16A-rIgG interaction, respectively, where Ac is the contact area, estimated to be a few percent of 3 micron 2. PMID:9726957

  7. The family 21 carbohydrate-binding module of glucoamylase from Rhizopus oryzae consists of two sites playing distinct roles in ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Wei-I; Pai, Tun-Wen; Liu, Shi-Hwei; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Chang, Margaret D.-T.

    2006-01-01

    The starch-hydrolysing enzyme GA (glucoamylase) from Rhizopus oryzae is a commonly used glycoside hydrolase in industry. It consists of a C-terminal catalytic domain and an N-terminal starch-binding domain, which belong to the CBM21 (carbohydrate-binding module, family 21). In the present study, a molecular model of CBM21 from R. oryzae GA (RoGACBM21) was constructed according to PSSC (progressive secondary structure correlation), modified structure-based sequence alignment, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to identify and characterize potential ligand-binding sites. Our model suggests that RoGACBM21 contains two ligand-binding sites, with Tyr32 and Tyr67 grouped into site I, and Trp47, Tyr83 and Tyr93 grouped into site II. The involvement of these aromatic residues has been validated using chemical modification, UV difference spectroscopy studies, and both qualitative and quantitative binding assays on a series of RoGACBM21 mutants. Our results further reveal that binding sites I and II play distinct roles in ligand binding, the former not only is involved in binding insoluble starch, but also facilitates the binding of RoGACBM21 to long-chain soluble polysaccharides, whereas the latter serves as the major binding site mediating the binding of both soluble polysaccharide and insoluble ligands. In the present study we have for the first time demonstrated that the key ligand-binding residues of RoGACBM21 can be identified and characterized by a combination of novel bioinformatics methodologies in the absence of resolved three-dimensional structural information. PMID:16509822

  8. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Diaz, Maria D.; Lampe, Jed N.; Shireman, Laura; Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Dabrowski, Michael J.; Pearson, Josh T.; Bowman, Michael K.; Atkins, William M.; Campbell, Ann P.

    2006-02-14

    Cytochrome P450’s (P450’s) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450’s demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS ) 4 and 200 íM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hillequation- derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands “contact” the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the lowaffinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is presented that combines the energetics and structural aspects of 9-AP and TST binding derived from these observations.

  9. NMR Studies of Ligand Binding to P450eryF Provides Insight into the Mechanism of Cooperativity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Arthur G.; Diaz, M. Delores; Lampe, Jed N.; Shireman, Laura M.; Grinstead, Jeffrey S.; Dabrowski, Michael J.; Pearson, Josh T.; Bowman, Michael K.; Atkins, William M.; Campbell, A. Patricia

    2006-02-01

    Cytochrome P450's (P450's) catalyze the oxidative metabolism of most drugs and toxins. Although extensive studies have proven that some P450's demonstrate both homotropic and heterotropic cooperativity toward a number of substrates, the mechanistic and molecular details of P450 allostery are still not well-established. Here, we use UV/vis and heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques to study the mechanism and thermodynamics of the binding of two 9-aminophenanthrene (9-AP) and testosterone (TST) molecules to the erythromycin-metabolizing bacterial P450eryF. UV/vis absorbance spectra of P450eryF demonstrated that binding occurs with apparent negative homotropic cooperativity for TST and positive homotropic cooperativity for 9-AP with Hill-equation-derived dissociation constants of KS = 4 and 200 μM, respectively. The broadening and shifting observed in the 2D-{1H,15N}-HSQC-monitored titrations of 15N-Phe-labeled P450eryF with 9-AP and TST indicated binding on intermediate and fast chemical exhange time scales, respectively, which was consistent with the Hill-equation-derived KS values for these two ligands. Regardless of the type of spectral perturbation observed (broadening for 9-AP and shifting for TST), the 15N-Phe NMR resonances most affected were the same in each titration, suggesting that the two ligands ''contact'' the same phenylalanines within the active site of P450eryF. This finding is in agreement with X-ray crystal structures of bound P450eryF showing different ligands occupying similar active-site niches. Complex spectral behavior was additionally observed for a small collection of resonances in the TST titration, interpreted as multiple binding modes for the low-affinity TST molecule or multiple TST-bound P450eryF conformational substates. A structural and energetic model is presented that combines the energetics

  10. The differences in binding 12-carbon aliphatic ligands by bovine β-lactoglobulin isoform A and B studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Loch, Joanna I; Bonarek, Piotr; Polit, Agnieszka; Swiątek, Śylwia; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta; Lewiński, Krzysztof

    2013-08-01

    Isoforms A (LGB-A) and B (LGB-B) of bovine lactoglobulin, the milk protein, differ in positions 64 (D↔G) and 118 (V↔A). Interactions of LGB-A and LGB-B with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and lauric acid (LA), 12-carbon ligands possessing differently charged polar groups, were investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography, to study the proton linkage phenomenon and to distinguish between effects related to different isoforms and different ligand properties. The determined values of ΔS and ΔH revealed that for all ligands, binding is entropically driven. The contribution from enthalpy change is lower and shows strong dependence on type of buffer that indicates proton release from the protein varying with protein isoform and ligand type and involvement of LA and Asp64 (in isoform A) in this process. The ligand affinities for both isoforms were arranged in the same order, DTAC < LA < SDS, and were systematically lower for variant B. The entropy change of the complexation process was always higher for isoform A, but these values were compensated by changes in enthalpy, resulting in almost identical ΔG for complexes of both isoforms. The determined crystal structures showed that substitution in positions 64 and 118 did not influence the overall structure of LGB complexes. The chemical character of the ligand polar group did not affect the position of its aliphatic chain in protein β-barrel, indicating a major role of hydrophobic interactions in ligand binding that prevailed even with the repulsion between positively charged DTAC and lysine residues located at binding site entrance.

  11. Structural transitions in ion coordination driven by changes in competition for ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sameer; Rempe, Susan B

    2008-11-19

    Transferring Na(+) and K(+) ions from their preferred coordination states in water to states having different coordination numbers incurs a free energy cost. In several examples in nature, however, these ions readily partition from aqueous-phase coordination states into spatial regions having much higher coordination numbers. Here we utilize statistical theory of solutions, quantum chemical simulations, classical mechanics simulations, and structural informatics to understand this aspect of ion partitioning. Our studies lead to the identification of a specific role of the solvation environment in driving transitions in ion coordination structures. Although ion solvation in liquid media is an exergonic reaction overall, we find it is also associated with considerable free energy penalties for extracting ligands from their solvation environments to form coordinated ion complexes. Reducing these penalties increases the stabilities of higher-order coordinations and brings down the energetic cost to partition ions from water into overcoordinated binding sites in biomolecules. These penalties can be lowered via a reduction in direct favorable interactions of the coordinating ligands with all atoms other than the ions themselves. A significant reduction in these penalties can, in fact, also drive up ion coordination preferences. Similarly, an increase in these penalties can lower ion coordination preferences, akin to a Hofmeister effect. Since such structural transitions are effected by the properties of the solvation phase, we anticipate that they will also occur for other ions. The influence of other factors, including ligand density, ligand chemistry, and temperature, on the stabilities of ion coordination structures are also explored.

  12. Enthused research on DNA-binding and DNA-cleavage aptitude of mixed ligand metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Raman, Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Five new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized using a Schiff base precursor (obtained by the condensation of N-(4-aminophenyl)acetamide and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde) as main ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand. They have been characterized by microanalytical data, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, conductivity and electrochemical measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The high electrical conductance of the complexes supports their electrolytic nature. The monomeric nature of the complexes has been assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. These complexes are better antimicrobial active agents than the free ligands. DNA (CT) binding properties of these complexes have been explored by UV-Vis., viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry measurements. The oxidative cleavage activity of the complexes has been studied using supercoiled pUC19 DNA by gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that the complexes are good intercalators.

  13. Enthused research on DNA-binding and DNA-cleavage aptitude of mixed ligand metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Raman, Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Five new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized using a Schiff base precursor (obtained by the condensation of N-(4-aminophenyl)acetamide and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde) as main ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand. They have been characterized by microanalytical data, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, conductivity and electrochemical measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The high electrical conductance of the complexes supports their electrolytic nature. The monomeric nature of the complexes has been assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. These complexes are better antimicrobial active agents than the free ligands. DNA (CT) binding properties of these complexes have been explored by UV-Vis., viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry measurements. The oxidative cleavage activity of the complexes has been studied using supercoiled pUC19 DNA by gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that the complexes are good intercalators.

  14. Unfolding pathway in red kidney bean acid phosphatase is dependent on ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Cashikar, A G; Rao, N M

    1996-03-01

    Structural basis for ligand-induced protein stabilization was investigated in the case of an acid phosphatase (red kidney bean purple acid phosphatase (KBPAP)) from red kidney bean. Phosphate, a physiological ligand, increases the stability against solvent denaturation by 3.5 kcal/mol. Generality of phosphate stabilization was shown by similar effects with other KBPAP ligands viz. adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate), a nonhydrolyzable ligand, and arsenate, an inhibitor. The dissociation constant of phosphate obtained from denaturation curves matches with the dissociation constant estimated by conventional methods. The guanidinium chloride-mediated denaturation of KBPAP was monitored by several structural and functional parameters viz. activity, tryptophan fluorescence, 8-anilinonaphthalene 1-sulfonic acid binding, circular dichroism, and size exclusion chromatography, in the presence and absence of 10 mm phosphate. In the presence of phosphate, profiles of all the parameters shift to a higher guanidinium chloride concentration. Noncoincidence of these profiles in the absence of phosphate indicates multistate unfolding pathway for KBPAP; however, in the presence of phosphate, KBPAP unfolds with a single intermediate. Based on the crystal structure, we propose that the Arg258 may have an important role to play in stabilization mediated by phosphate.

  15. Large-scale binding ligand prediction by improved patch-based method Patch-Surfer2.0

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Xiong, Yi; Kihara, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Ligand binding is a key aspect of the function of many proteins. Thus, binding ligand prediction provides important insight in understanding the biological function of proteins. Binding ligand prediction is also useful for drug design and examining potential drug side effects. Results: We present a computational method named Patch-Surfer2.0, which predicts binding ligands for a protein pocket. By representing and comparing pockets at the level of small local surface patches that characterize physicochemical properties of the local regions, the method can identify binding pockets of the same ligand even if they do not share globally similar shapes. Properties of local patches are represented by an efficient mathematical representation, 3D Zernike Descriptor. Patch-Surfer2.0 has significant technical improvements over our previous prototype, which includes a new feature that captures approximate patch position with a geodesic distance histogram. Moreover, we constructed a large comprehensive database of ligand binding pockets that will be searched against by a query. The benchmark shows better performance of Patch-Surfer2.0 over existing methods. Availability and implementation: http://kiharalab.org/patchsurfer2.0/ Contact: dkihara@purdue.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25359888

  16. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-01-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup. PMID:28256624

  17. Protein-ligand binding affinity determination by the waterLOGSY method: An optimised approach considering ligand rebinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Renjie; Bonnichon, Arnaud; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; Leung, Ivanhoe K. H.

    2017-03-01

    WaterLOGSY is a popular ligand-observed NMR technique to screen for protein-ligand interactions, yet when applied to measure dissociation constants (KD) through ligand titration, the results were found to be strongly dependent on sample conditions. Herein, we show that accurate KDs can be obtained by waterLOGSY with optimised experimental setup.

  18. CADASIL-associated Notch3 mutations have differential effects both on ligand binding and ligand-induced Notch3 receptor signaling through RBP-Jk.

    PubMed

    Peters, Nils; Opherk, Christian; Zacherle, Simone; Capell, Anja; Gempel, Petra; Dichgans, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Mutations in the NOTCH3 gene are the cause of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a hereditary angiopathy leading to strokes and dementia. Pathogenic mutations remove or insert cysteine residues within epidermal growth factor (EGF) repeats in the extracellular domain of the Notch3 receptor (N3ECD). Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are the predominant site of Notch3 expression in adults. In CADASIL patients, VSMC degenerate and N3ECD is deposited within the vasculature. However, the mechanisms underlying VSMC degeneration and N3ECD accumulation are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the consequences of three pathogenic Notch3 mutations on the biological activity of the receptor by analyzing ligand (Delta-/Jagged-)-induced signaling via RBP-Jk. Two mutations (R133C and C183R) that are located outside the putative ligand binding domain (LBD) of the receptor were found to result in normal Jagged1-induced signaling in A7r5 VSMC, whereas the third mutation (C455R located within the putative LBD) showed strongly reduced signaling activity. Ligand binding assays with soluble Delta1 and Jagged1 revealed that C455R interferes with ligand binding through disruption of the LBD which, as we show here, is located in EGF repeats 10/11 of Notch3. All mutant receptors including Notch3C455R were targeted to the cell surface but showed an elevated ratio between the unprocessed full-length 280-kDa receptor and S1-cleaved receptor fragments. Taken together, these data indicate that CADASIL-associated Notch3 mutations differ with respect to their consequences both on ligand binding and ligand-induced signaling through RBP-Jk, whereas they have similar effects on receptor maturation. Moreover, the data suggest that ligand-induced receptor shedding may not be required for N3ECD deposition in CADASIL.

  19. Base ionization and ligand binding: how small ribozymes and riboswitches gain a foothold in a protein world.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Joseph A; Wedekind, Joseph E

    2011-06-01

    Genome sequencing has produced thousands of nonprotein coding (nc)RNA sequences including new ribozymes and riboswitches. Such RNAs are notable for their extraordinary functionality, which entails exquisite folding that culminates in biocatalytic or ligand-binding capabilities. Here we discuss advances in relating ncRNA form to function with an emphasis on base pK(a) shifting by the hairpin and hepatitis delta virus ribozymes. We then describe ligand binding by the two smallest riboswitches, which target preQ(1) and S-adenosyl-(l)-homocysteine, followed by an analysis of a second-messenger riboswitch that binds cyclic-di-GMP. Each riboswitch is then compared to a protein that binds the same ligand to contrast binding properties. The results showcase the breadth of functionality attainable from ncRNAs, as well as molecular features notable for antibacterial design.

  20. Condensing position-specific scoring matrixs by the Kidera factors for ligand-binding site prediction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chun; Noguchi, Tamotsu; Yamana, Hayato

    2015-01-01

    Position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) has been widely used for identifying protein functional sites. However, it is 20-dimentional and contains many redundant features. The Kidera factors were reported to contain information relating almost all physical properties of amino acids, but it requires appropriate weighting coefficients to express their properties. We developed a novel method, named as KSPSSMpred, which integrated PSSM and the Kidera Factors into a 10-dimensional matrix (KSPSSM) for ligand-binding site prediction. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) was chosen as a representative ligand for this study. When compared with five other feature-based methods on a benchmark dataset, KSPSSMpred performed the best. This study demonstrates that, KSPSSM is an effective feature extraction method which can enrich PSSM with information relating 188 physical properties of residues, and reduce 50% feature dimensions without losing information included in the PSSM.

  1. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  2. Mutational Insights into the Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Ligand Binding for Two Closely Related Family 16 Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xiaoyun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K.O.

    2010-11-22

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) are specialized proteins that bind to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5ACBM16-1/CBM16-2 bind to glucose-, mannose-, and glucose/mannose-configured substrates. The crystal structures of the two proteins represent the only examples in CBM family 16, and studies that evaluate the roles of amino acid residues in ligand binding in this family are lacking. In this study, we probed the roles of amino acids (selected based on CBM16-1/ligand co-crystal structures) on substrate binding. Two tryptophan (Trp-20 and Trp-125) and two glutamine (Gln-81 and Gln-93) residues are shown to be critical in ligand binding. Additionally, several polar residues that flank the critical residues also contribute to ligand binding. The CBM16-1 Q121E mutation increased affinity for all substrates tested, whereas the Q21G and N97R mutants exhibited decreased substrate affinity. We solved CBM/substrate co-crystal structures to elucidate the molecular basis of the increased substrate binding by CBM16-1 Q121E. The Gln-121, Gln-21, and Asn-97 residues can be manipulated to fine-tune ligand binding by the Man5A CBMs. Surprisingly, none of the eight residues investigated was absolutely conserved in CBM family 16. Thus, the critical residues in the Man5A CBMs are either not essential for substrate binding in the other members of this family or the two CBMs are evolutionarily distinct from the members available in the current protein database. Man5A is dependent on its CBMs for robust activity, and insights from this study should serve to enhance our understanding of the interdependence of its catalytic and substrate binding modules.

  3. Dissection of RAP-LRP interactions: binding of RAP and RAP fragments to complement-like repeats 7 and 8 from ligand binding cluster II of LRP.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Ana; Dolmer, Klavs; Strickland, Dudley K; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-06-15

    The receptor associated protein (RAP) is a three domain 38kDa ER-resident chaperone that helps folding of LRP and other LDL receptor family members and prevents premature binding of protein ligands. It competes strongly with all known LRP ligands. To further understanding of the specificity of RAP-LRP interactions, the binding of RAP and RAP fragments to two domains (CR7-CR8) from one of the main ligand-binding regions of LRP has been examined by 2D HSQC NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that RAP contains two binding sites for CR7-CR8, with the higher affinity site (K(d) approximately 1microM) located in the C-terminal two-thirds and the weaker site (K(d) approximately 5microM) in the N-terminal third of RAP. Residues from both CR7 and CR8 are involved in binding at each RAP site. The presence of more than one binding site on RAP for CR domains from LRP, together with the previous demonstration by others that RAP can bind to CR5-CR6 with comparably low affinities suggest an explanation for the dual roles of RAP as a folding chaperone and a tight competitive inhibitor of ligand binding.

  4. Substituted benzamides as ligands for visualization of dopamine receptor binding in the human brain by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Farde, L.; Ehrin, E.; Eriksson, L.; Greitz, T.; Hall, H.; Hedstroem, C.G.; Litton, J.E.; Sedvall, G.

    1985-06-01

    Two substituted benzamides, FLB 524 and raclopride, were labeled with C and examined for their possible use as ligands for positron emission tomography (PET) scan studies on dopamine-2 (D-2) receptors in the brains of monkeys and healthy human subjects. Both ligands allowed the in vivo visualization of D-2 receptor binding in the corpus striatum caudate nucleus/putamen complex in PET-scan images. ( C)Raclopride showed a high ratio of specific striatal to nonspecific cerebellar binding, and the kinetics of binding of this ligand made it optimal for PET studies. The in vivo binding of ( C)raclopride in the striatum of cynomolgus monkeys was markedly reduced by displacement with haloperidol. In healthy human subjects, ( C)raclopride binding in the caudate nucleus/putamen was 4- to 5-fold greater than nonspecific binding in the cerebellum. In comparison with previously available ligands for PET-scan studies on central dopamine receptors in man, ( C)raclopride appears to be advantageous with regard to (i) specificity of binding to D-2 receptors, (ii) the high ratio between binding in dopamine-rich (caudate, putamen) and dopamine-poor (cerebellum) human brain regions, and (iii) rapid association and reversibility of specific binding.

  5. C-H…O hydrogen bonds in FK506-binding protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Sreekanth; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2013-11-01

    Hydrogen bonds are important interaction forces observed in protein structures. They can be classified as stronger or weaker depending on their energy, thereby reflecting on the type of donor. The contribution of weak hydrogen bonds is deemed as an important factor toward structure stability along with the stronger bonds. One such bond, the C-H…O type hydrogen bond, is shown to make a contribution in maintaining three dimensional structures of proteins. Apart from their presence within protein structures, the role of these bonds in protein-ligand interactions is also noteworthy. In this study, we present a statistical analysis on the presence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds observed between FKBPs and their cognate ligands. The FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) carry peptidyl cis-trans isomerase activity apart from the immunosuppressive property by binding to the immunosuppressive drugs FK506 or rapamycin. Because the active site of FKBPs is lined up by many hydrophobic residues, we speculated that the prevalence of C-H…O hydrogen bonds will be considerable. In a total of 25 structures analyzed, a higher frequency of C-H…O hydrogen bonds is observed in comparison with the stronger hydrogen bonds. These C-H…O hydrogen bonds are dominated by a highly conserved donor, the C(α/β) of Val55 and an acceptor, the backbone oxygen of Glu54. Both these residues are positioned in the β4-α1 loop, whereas the other residues Tyr26, Phe36 and Phe99 with higher frequencies are lined up at the opposite face of the active site. These preferences could be implicated in FKBP pharmacophore models toward enhancing the ligand affinity. This study could be a prelude to studying other proteins with hydrophobic pockets to gain better insights into ligand recognition.

  6. Unique motifs and hydrophobic interactions shape the binding of modified DNA ligands to protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Douglas R.; Gelinas, Amy D.; Zhang, Chi; Rohloff, John C.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; O’Connell, Daniel; Waugh, Sheela M.; Wolk, Steven K.; Mayfield, Wesley S.; Burgin, Alex B.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Stewart, Lance J.; Gold, Larry; Janjic, Nebojsa; Jarvis, Thale C.

    2012-01-01

    Selection of aptamers from nucleic acid libraries by in vitro evolution represents a powerful method of identifying high-affinity ligands for a broad range of molecular targets. Nevertheless, a sizeable fraction of proteins remain difficult targets due to inherently limited chemical diversity of nucleic acids. We have exploited synthetic nucleotide modifications that confer protein-like diversity on a nucleic acid scaffold, resulting in a new generation of binding reagents called SOMAmers (Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamers). Here we report a unique crystal structure of a SOMAmer bound to its target, platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-BB). The SOMAmer folds into a compact structure and exhibits a hydrophobic binding surface that mimics the interface between PDGF-BB and its receptor, contrasting sharply with mainly polar interactions seen in traditional protein-binding aptamers. The modified nucleotides circumvent the intrinsic diversity constraints of natural nucleic acids, thereby greatly expanding the structural vocabulary of nucleic acid ligands and considerably broadening the range of accessible protein targets. PMID:23139410

  7. Modeling the epidermal growth factor -- epidermal growth factor receptor l2 domain interaction: implications for the ligand binding process.

    PubMed

    Jorissen, Robert N; Treutlein, Herbert R; Epa, V Chandana; Burgess, Antony W

    2002-06-01

    Signaling from the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is triggered by the binding of ligands such as EGF or transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) and subsequent receptor dimerization. An understanding of these processes has been hindered by the lack of structural information about the ligand-bound, dimerized EGF receptor. Using an NMR-derived structure of EGF and a homology model of the major ligand binding domain of the EGF receptor and experimental data, we modeled the binding of EGF to this EGF receptor fragment. In this low resolution model of the complex, EGF sits across the second face of the EGF receptor L2 domain and EGF residues 10-16, 36-37, 40-47 bind to this face. The structural model is largely consistent with previously published NMR data describing the residues of TGF-alpha which interact strongly with the EGF receptor. Other EGF residues implicated in receptor binding are accounted by our proposal that the ligand binding is a two-step process with the EGF binding to at least one other site of the receptor. This three-dimensional model is expected to be useful in the design of ligand-based antagonists of the receptor.

  8. Structure of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the EphB2 Receptor of 2 Angstrom Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Goldgur, Y.; Paavilainen, S; Nikolov, D; Himanen, J

    2009-01-01

    Eph tyrosine kinase receptors, the largest group of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their ephrin ligands are important mediators of cell-cell communication regulating cell attachment, shape and mobility. Recently, several Eph receptors and ephrins have also been found to play important roles in the progression of cancer. Structural and biophysical studies have established detailed information on the binding and recognition of Eph receptors and ephrins. The initial high-affinity binding of Eph receptors to ephrin occurs through the penetration of an extended G-H loop of the ligand into a hydrophobic channel on the surface of the receptor. Consequently, the G-H loop-binding channel of Eph receptors is the main target in the search for Eph antagonists that could be used in the development of anticancer drugs and several peptides have been shown to specifically bind Eph receptors and compete with the cognate ephrin ligands. However, the molecular details of the conformational changes upon Eph/ephrin binding have remained speculative, since two of the loops were unstructured in the original model of the free EphB2 structure and their conformational changes upon ligand binding could consequently not be analyzed in detail. In this study, the X-ray structure of unbound EphB2 is reported at a considerably higher 2 A resolution, the conformational changes that the important receptor loops undergo upon ligand binding are described and the consequences that these findings have for the development of Eph antagonists are discussed.

  9. Protein-Binding RNA Aptamers Affect Molecular Interactions Distantly from Their Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Daniel M.; Thuesen, Cathrine K.; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A.; Behrens, Manja A.; Dam, Karen; Sørensen, Hans P.; Pedersen, Jan S.; Ploug, Michael; Jensen, Jan K.; Andreasen, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126) with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site. PMID:25793507

  10. Crystallographically mapped ligand binding differs in high and low IgE binding isoforms of birch pollen allergen bet v 1.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Stefan; Asam, Claudia; Eckhard, Ulrich; Wallner, Michael; Ferreira, Fátima; Brandstetter, Hans

    2012-09-07

    The ability of pathogenesis-related proteins of family 10 to bind a broad spectrum of ligands is considered to play a key role for their physiological and pathological functions. In particular, Bet v 1, an archetypical allergen from birch pollen, is described as a highly promiscuous ligand acceptor. However, the detailed recognition mechanisms, including specificity factors discriminating binding properties of naturally occurring Bet v 1 variants, are poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of Bet v 1 variants in complex with an array of ligands at a resolution of up to 1.2 Å. Residue 30 within the hydrophobic pocket not only discriminates in high and low IgE binding Bet v 1 isoforms but also induces a drastic change in the binding mode of the model ligand deoxycholate. Ternary crystal structure complexes of Bet v 1 with several ligands together with the fluorogenic reporter 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate explain anomalous fluorescence binding curves obtained from 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate displacement assays. The structures reveal key interaction residues such as Tyr83 and rationalize both the binding specificity and promiscuity of the so-called hydrophobic pocket in Bet v 1. The intermolecular interactions of Bet v 1 reveal an unexpected complexity that will be indispensable to fully understand its roles within the physiological and allergenic context.

  11. Biochemical characterization and ligand-binding properties of trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lina; Zhang, Haiping; Qiu, Yu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xueji; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Xuelian; Lin, Donghai

    2013-10-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) is an essential enzyme for growth of mycobacteria, which has been identified to be a potential anti-tuberculosis drug target. However, the biochemical and ligand-binding properties and the 3D structure of TPP remain unclear so far. In the present study, we expressed the recombinant TPP protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (otsB2/Rv3372). Results from the far-ultraviolet circular dichroism experiments indicated that the secondary structure of TPP was rich in α-helix with a lower structural stability (Cm = 2.099 ± 0.134 M). Ligand-binding assay by isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrated that the recombinant TPP protein could bind with trehalose-6-P in the presence of Mg(2+) (Kd = 39.52 ± 1.78 μM) with a molar ratio of 1 : 1. In addition, the 3D structure of TPP was modeled by I-TASSER, indicating that the TPP protein was composed of a hydrolase domain, a cap domain, and an N-terminal domain. Flexible docking was further conducted by using the Simulations/Dock module of the Molecular Operating Environment software. The binding pocket of TPP for both trehalose-6-P and Mg(2+) was determined, which was located on the interface between the hydrolase domain and the cap domain. Asp149, Gly186, Arg187, Arg291, and Glu295 were identified to be the key residues for TPP binding with trehalose-6-P. This work may lay the basis for further structural and functional studies of TPP and TPP-related novel drug development.

  12. Copper(II) binding by dissolved organic matter: importance of the copper-to-dissolved organic matter ratio and implications for the biotic ligand model.

    PubMed

    Craven, Alison M; Aiken, George R; Ryan, Joseph N

    2012-09-18

    The ratio of copper to dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to affect the strength of copper binding by DOM, but previous methods to determine the Cu(2+)-DOM binding strength have generally not measured binding constants over the same Cu:DOM ratios. In this study, we used a competitive ligand exchange-solid-phase extraction (CLE-SPE) method to determine conditional stability constants for Cu(2+)-DOM binding at pH 6.6 and 0.01 M ionic strength over a range of Cu:DOM ratios that bridge the detection windows of copper-ion-selective electrode and voltammetry measurements. As the Cu:DOM ratio increased from 0.0005 to 0.1 mg of Cu/mg of DOM, the measured conditional binding constant ((c)K(CuDOM)) decreased from 10(11.5) to 10(5.6) M(-1). A comparison of the binding constants measured by CLE-SPE with those measured by copper-ion-selective electrode and voltammetry demonstrates that the Cu:DOM ratio is an important factor controlling Cu(2+)-DOM binding strength even for DOM isolates of different types and different sources and for whole water samples. The results were modeled with Visual MINTEQ and compared to results from the biotic ligand model (BLM). The BLM was found to over-estimate Cu(2+) at low total copper concentrations and under-estimate Cu(2+) at high total copper concentrations.

  13. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}} and K{sup +} to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na{sup +}. Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na{sup +} binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl{sup {minus}}. Cl{sup {minus}} enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na{sup +}. At concentrations in the range of its K{sub M} for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na{sup +}-independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both ({sup 3}H)imipramine binding and ({sup 3}H)serotonin transport.

  14. Calculating protein-ligand binding affinities with MMPBSA: Method and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changhao; Nguyen, Peter H; Pham, Kevin; Huynh, Danielle; Le, Thanh-Binh Nancy; Wang, Hongli; Ren, Pengyu; Luo, Ray

    2016-10-15

    Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MMPBSA) methods have become widely adopted in estimating protein-ligand binding affinities due to their efficiency and high correlation with experiment. Here different computational alternatives were investigated to assess their impact to the agreement of MMPBSA calculations with experiment. Seven receptor families with both high-quality crystal structures and binding affinities were selected. First the performance of nonpolar solvation models was studied and it was found that the modern approach that separately models hydrophobic and dispersion interactions dramatically reduces RMSD's of computed relative binding affinities. The numerical setup of the Poisson-Boltzmann methods was analyzed next. The data shows that the impact of grid spacing to the quality of MMPBSA calculations is small: the numerical error at the grid spacing of 0.5 Å is already small enough to be negligible. The impact of different atomic radius sets and different molecular surface definitions was further analyzed and weak influences were found on the agreement with experiment. The influence of solute dielectric constant was also analyzed: a higher dielectric constant generally improves the overall agreement with experiment, especially for highly charged binding pockets. The data also showed that the converged simulations caused slight reduction in the agreement with experiment. Finally the direction of estimating absolute binding free energies was briefly explored. Upon correction of the binding-induced rearrangement free energy and the binding entropy lost, the errors in absolute binding affinities were also reduced dramatically when the modern nonpolar solvent model was used, although further developments were apparently necessary to further improve the MMPBSA methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Alternative binding proteins: anticalins - harnessing the structural plasticity of the lipocalin ligand pocket to engineer novel binding activities.

    PubMed

    Skerra, Arne

    2008-06-01

    Antibodies are the paradigm for binding proteins, with their hypervariable loop region supported by a structurally rigid framework, thus providing the vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites in the immune system. Lipocalins are another family of proteins that exhibit a binding site with high structural plasticity, which is composed of four peptide loops mounted on a stable beta-barrel scaffold. Using site-directed random mutagenesis and selection via phage display against prescribed molecular targets, it is possible to generate artificial lipocalins with novel ligand specificities, so-called anticalins. Anticalins have been successfully selected both against small hapten-like compounds and against large protein antigens and they usually possess high target affinity and specificity. Their structural analysis has yielded interesting insights into the phenomenon of molecular recognition. Compared with antibodies, they are much smaller, have a simpler molecular architecture (comprising just one polypeptide chain) and they do not require post-translational modification. In addition, anticalins exhibit robust biophysical properties and can easily be produced in microbial expression systems. As their structure-function relationships are well understood, rational engineering of additional features such as site-directed pegylation or fusion with functional effector domains, dimerization modules or even with another anticalin, can be readily achieved. Thus, anticalins offer many applications, not only as reagents for biochemical research but also as a new class of potential drugs for medical therapy.

  16. Proper modelling of ligand binding requires an ensemble of bound and unbound states

    PubMed Central

    Krojer, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Although noncovalent binding by small molecules cannot be assumed a priori to be stoichiometric in the crystal lattice, occupancy refinement of ligands is often avoided by convention. Occupancies tend to be set to unity, requiring the occupancy error to be modelled by the B factors, and residual weak density around the ligand is necessarily attributed to ‘disorder’. Where occupancy refinement is performed, the complementary, superposed unbound state is rarely modelled. Here, it is shown that superior accuracy is achieved by modelling the ligand as partially occupied and superposed on a ligand-free ‘ground-state’ model. Explicit incorporation of this model of the crystal, obtained from a reference data set, allows constrained occupancy refinement with minimal fear of overfitting. Better representation of the crystal also leads to more meaningful refined atomic parameters such as the B factor, allowing more insight into dynamics in the crystal. An outline of an approach for algorithmically generating ensemble models of crystals is presented, assuming that data sets representing the ground state are available. The applicability of various electron-density metrics to the validation of the resulting models is assessed, and it is concluded that ensemble models consistently score better than the corresponding single-state models. Furthermore, it appears that ignoring the superposed ground state becomes the dominant source of model error, locally, once the overall model is accurate enough; modelling the local ground state properly is then more meaningful than correcting all remaining model errors globally, especially for low-occupancy ligands. Implications for the simultaneous refinement of B factors and occupancies, and for future evaluation of the limits of the approach, in particular its behaviour at lower data resolution, are discussed. PMID:28291761

  17. Ligand binding and signalling pathways of PTH receptors in sea bream (Sparus auratus) enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Rotllant, J; Guerreiro, P M; Redruello, B; Fernandes, H; Apolónia, L; Anjos, L; Canario, A V M; Power, D M

    2006-02-01

    Whole animal studies have indicated that Ca(2+) uptake by the gastrointestinal tract is regulated by the action of parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) in teleost fish. We have characterised PTH receptors (PTHR) in piscine enterocytes and established, by using amino-terminal PTHrP peptides, the amino acid residues important for receptor activation and for stabilising the ligand/receptor complex. Ligand binding of (125)I-(1-35(tyr)) PTHrP to the membrane fraction of isolated sea bream enterocytes revealed the existence of a single saturable high-affinity receptor (K (D)=2.59 nM; B (max)=71 fmol/mg protein). Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction with specific primers for sea bream PTH1R and PTH3R confirmed the mRNA expression of only the later receptor. Fugu (1-34)PTHrP increased cAMP levels in enterocytes but had no effect on total inositol phosphate accumulation. The amino-terminal peptides (2-34)PTHrP, (3-34)PTHrP and (7-34)PTHrP bound efficiently to the receptor but were severely defective in stimulating cAMP in enterocyte cells indicating that the first six residues of piscine (1-34)PTHrP, although not important for receptor binding, are essential for activation of the adenylate cyclase/phosphokinase A (AC-PKA)-receptor-coupled intracellular signalling pathway. Therefore, PTHrP in teleosts acts on the gastrointestinal tract through PTH3R and the AC-PKA intracellular signalling pathway and might regulate Ca(2+) uptake at this site. Ligand-receptor binding and activity throughout the vertebrates appears to be allocated to the same amino acid residues of the amino-terminal domain of the PTHrP molecule.

  18. Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Mirica, Katherine A; Soh, Siowling; Phillips, Scott T; Taran, Olga; Mace, Charles R; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2012-03-28

    This paper describes the use of magnetic levitation (MagLev) to measure the association of proteins and ligands. The method starts with diamagnetic gel beads that are functionalized covalently with small molecules (putative ligands). Binding of protein to the ligands within the bead causes a change in the density of the bead. When these beads are suspended in a paramagnetic aqueous buffer and placed between the poles of two NbFeB magnets with like poles facing, the changes in the density of the bead on binding of protein result in changes in the levitation height of the bead that can be used to quantify the amount of protein bound. This paper uses a reaction-diffusion model to examine the physical principles that determine the values of rate and equilibrium constants measured by this system, using the well-defined model system of carbonic anhydrase and aryl sulfonamides. By tuning the experimental protocol, the method is capable of quantifying either the concentration of protein in a solution, or the binding affinities of a protein to several resin-bound small molecules simultaneously. Since this method requires no electricity and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it may find use in situations where portability and low cost are important, such as in bioanalysis in resource-limited settings, point-of-care diagnosis, veterinary medicine, and plant pathology. It still has several practical disadvantages. Most notably, the method requires relatively long assay times and cannot be applied to large proteins (>70 kDa), including antibodies. The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems.

  19. Dextran as a generally applicable multivalent scaffold for improving immunoglobulin-binding affinities of peptide and peptidomimetic ligands.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Jumpei; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kenrick, Sophia; Kodadek, Thomas

    2014-08-20

    Molecules able to bind the antigen-binding sites of antibodies are of interest in medicine and immunology. Since most antibodies are bivalent, higher affinity recognition can be achieved through avidity effects in which a construct containing two or more copies of the ligand engages both arms of the immunoglobulin simultaneously. This can be achieved routinely by immobilizing antibody ligands at high density on solid surfaces, such as ELISA plates, but there is surprisingly little literature on scaffolds that routinely support bivalent binding of antibody ligands in solution, particularly for the important case of human IgG antibodies. Here we show that the simple strategy of linking two antigens with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer long enough to span the two arms of an antibody results in higher affinity binding in some, but not all, cases. However, we found that the creation of multimeric constructs in which several antibody ligands are displayed on a dextran polymer reliably provides much higher affinity binding than is observed with the monomer in all cases tested. Since these dextran conjugates are simple to construct, they provide a general and convenient strategy to transform modest affinity antibody ligands into high affinity probes. An additional advantage is that the antibody ligands occupy only a small number of the reactive sites on the dextran, so that molecular cargo can be attached easily, creating molecules capable of delivering this cargo to cells displaying antigen-specific receptors.

  20. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  1. Rational design and asymmetric synthesis of potent and neurotrophic ligands for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs).

    PubMed

    Pomplun, Sebastian; Wang, Yansong; Kirschner, Alexander; Kozany, Christian; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-02

    To create highly efficient inhibitors for FK506-binding proteins, a new asymmetric synthesis for pro-(S)-C(5) -branched [4.3.1] aza-amide bicycles was developed. The key step of the synthesis is an HF-driven N-acyliminium cyclization. Functionalization of the C(5)  moiety resulted in novel protein contacts with the psychiatric risk factor FKBP51, which led to a more than 280-fold enhancement in affinity. The most potent ligands facilitated the differentiation of N2a neuroblastoma cells with low nanomolar potency.

  2. Partial androgen insensitivity and correlations with the predicted three dimensional structure of the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Yong, E L; Tut, T G; Ghadessy, F J; Prins, G; Ratnam, S S

    1998-02-01

    Genetic defects of the human androgen receptor (AR) can cause a wide spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) ranging from phenotypic females in those with complete AIS; ambiguous genitalia in partial AIS; to male infertility in minimal AIS. The majority of these defects are due to point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions. It is however unclear why certain mutations result in partial AIS, whereas others in the same exon cause the complete syndrome. We present a case of partial AIS due to a point mutation affecting codon 758 of the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) that changed the sense of the codon from asparagine to threonine (N758T). The mutant receptor displayed normal binding affinity to DHT but abnormal dissociation kinetics in both patient's fibroblasts and transfected COS-7 cells. The mutant AR was thermolabile, and resulted in approximately 50% reduction in receptor transactivation capacity when examined with a reporter gene incorporating an androgen-response-element. Although the 3-D structure of AR LBD is not known, the homologous region in a member of the steroid receptor superfamily, retinoid-X receptor (RXR-alpha), has been crystallized, allowing comparison of aligned amino-acid sequences of RXR-alpha and AR. The mutation, N758T, lies in a predicted linker region between the fifth alpha-helix (H5) and the first beta-strand (S1). Generally, mutations leading to partial AIS tend to cluster in the predicted linker regions located between the structural helices of the AR LBD. Most strikingly, the predicted linker regions contain over 70% of the mutant ARs associated with prostate cancer in the LBD. The occurrence of mutations associated with both partial AIS and prostate cancer in the same predicted linker regions, suggest that this clustering is not coincidental and that the predicted linker regions are likely to have important, but subtle, roles in defining androgen binding and ligand specificity.

  3. Biochemical and Cellular Analysis Reveals Ligand Binding Specificities, a Molecular Basis for Ligand Recognition, and Membrane Association-dependent Activities of Cripto-1 and Cryptic.

    PubMed

    Aykul, Senem; Parenti, Anthony; Chu, Kit Yee; Reske, Jake; Floer, Monique; Ralston, Amy; Martinez-Hackert, Erik

    2017-03-10

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathways are key determinants of cell fate in animals. Their basic mechanism of action is simple. However, to produce cell-specific responses, TGF-β pathways are heavily regulated by secondary factors, such as membrane-associated EGF-CFC family proteins. Cellular activities of EGF-CFC proteins have been described, but their molecular functions, including how the mammalian homologs Cripto-1 and Cryptic recognize and regulate TGF-β family ligands, are less clear. Here we use purified human Cripto-1 and mouse Cryptic produced in mammalian cells to show that these two EGF-CFC homologs have distinct, highly specific ligand binding activities. Cripto-1 interacts with BMP-4 in addition to its known partner Nodal, whereas Cryptic interacts only with Activin B. These interactions depend on the integrity of the protein, as truncated or deglycosylated Cripto-1 lacked BMP-4 binding activity. Significantly, Cripto-1 and Cryptic blocked binding of their cognate ligands to type I and type II TGF-β receptors, indicating that Cripto-1 and Cryptic contact ligands at their receptor interaction surfaces and, thus, that they could inhibit their ligands. Indeed, soluble Cripto-1 and Cryptic inhibited ligand signaling in various cell-based assays, including SMAD-mediated luciferase reporter gene expression, and differentiation of a multipotent stem cell line. But in agreement with previous work, the membrane bound form of Cripto-1 potentiated signaling, revealing a critical role of membrane association for its established cellular activity. Thus, our studies provide new insights into the mechanism of ligand recognition by this enigmatic family of membrane-anchored TGF-β family signaling regulators and link membrane association with their signal potentiating activities.

  4. The tryptophan switch: changing ligand-binding specificity from type I to type II in SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Blanes-Mira, Clara; Serrano, Luis

    2004-01-09

    The ability of certain Src homology 3 (SH3) domains to bind specifically both type I and type II polyproline ligands is perhaps the best characterized, but also the worst understood, example in the family of protein-interaction modules. A detailed analysis of the structural variations in SH3 domains, with respect to ligand-binding specificity, together with mutagenesis of SH3 Fyn tyrosine kinase, reveal the structural basis for types I and II binding specificity by SH3 domains. The conserved Trp in the SH3 binding pocket can adopt two different orientations that, in turn, determine the type of ligand (I or II) able to bind to the domain. The only exceptions are ligands with Leu at positions P(-1) and P(2), that deviate from standard poly-Pro angles. The motion of the conserved Trp depends on the presence of certain residues located in a key position (132 for Fyn), near the binding pocket. SH3 domains placing aromatic residues in this key position are promiscuous. By contrast, those presenting beta-branched or long aliphatic residues block the conserved Trp in one of the two possible orientations, preventing binding in a type I orientation. This is experimentally demonstrated by a single mutation in Fyn SH3 (Y132I) that abolishes type I ligand binding, while preserving binding to type II ligands. Thus, simple conformational changes, governed by simple rules, can have profound effects on protein-protein interactions, highlighting the importance of structural details to predict protein-protein interactions.

  5. Mechanism for attenuation of DNA binding by MarR family transcriptional regulators by small molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Perera, Inoka C; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Wilkinson, Steven P; Grove, Anne

    2009-07-31

    Members of the multiple antibiotic resistance regulator (MarR) family control gene expression in a variety of metabolic processes in bacteria and archaea. Hypothetical uricase regulator (HucR), which belongs to the ligand-responsive branch of the MarR family, regulates uricase expression in Deinococcus radiodurans by binding a shared promoter region between uricase and HucR genes. We show here that HucR responds only to urate and, to a lesser extent, to xanthine by attenuated DNA binding, compared to other intermediates of purine degradation. Using molecular-dynamics-guided mutational analysis, we identified the ligand-binding site in HucR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and intrinsic Trp fluorescence have identified W20 from the N-terminal helix and R80 from helix 3, which serves as a scaffold for the DNA recognition helix, as being essential for ligand binding. Using structural data combined with in silico and in vitro analyses, we propose a mechanism for the attenuation of DNA binding in which a conformational change initiated by charge repulsion due to a bound ligand propagates to DNA recognition helices. This mechanism may apply generally to MarR homologs that bind anionic phenolic ligands.

  6. Development of a Machine Learning Method to Predict Membrane Protein-Ligand Binding Residues Using Basic Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, M. Xavier; Gromiha, M. Michael; Suwa, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Locating ligand binding sites and finding the functionally important residues from protein sequences as well as structures became one of the challenges in understanding their function. Hence a Naïve Bayes classifier has been trained to predict whether a given amino acid residue in membrane protein sequence is a ligand binding residue or not using only sequence based information. The input to the classifier consists of the features of the target residue and two sequence neighbors on each side of the target residue. The classifier is trained and evaluated on a nonredundant set of 42 sequences (chains with at least one transmembrane domain) from 31 alpha-helical membrane proteins. The classifier achieves an overall accuracy of 70.7% with 72.5% specificity and 61.1% sensitivity in identifying ligand binding residues from sequence. The classifier performs better when the sequence is encoded by psi-blast generated PSSM profiles. Assessment of the predictions in the context of three-dimensional structures of proteins reveals the effectiveness of this method in identifying ligand binding sites from sequence information. In 83.3% (35 out of 42) of the proteins, the classifier identifies the ligand binding sites by correctly recognizing more than half of the binding residues. This will be useful to protein engineers in exploiting potential residues for functional assessment. PMID:25802517

  7. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  8. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  9. Distortion of flavin geometry is linked to ligand binding in cholesterol oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Heard, Kathryn; Tang, Hui; Sampson, Nicole S.; Vrielink, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors. PMID:18029419

  10. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site.

  11. Distortion of Flavin Geometry Is Linked to Ligand Binding in Cholesterol Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, A.Y.; Heard, K.; Tang, H.; Sampson, N.S.; Vrielink, A.

    2009-06-03

    Two high-resolution structures of a double mutant of bacterial cholesterol oxidase in the presence or absence of a ligand, glycerol, are presented, showing the trajectory of glycerol as it binds in a Michaelis complex-like position in the active site. A group of three aromatic residues forces the oxidized isoalloxazine moiety to bend along the N5-N10 axis as a response to the binding of glycerol in the active site. Movement of these aromatic residues is only observed in the glycerol-bound structure, indicating that some tuning of the FAD redox potential is caused by the formation of the Michaelis complex during regular catalysis. This structural study suggests a possible mechanism of substrate-assisted flavin activation, improves our understanding of the interplay between the enzyme, its flavin cofactor and its substrate, and is of use to the future design of effective cholesterol oxidase inhibitors.

  12. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gorfe, Alemayehu A.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation. PMID:26506102

  13. One Crystal, Two Temperatures: Cryocooling Penalties Alter Ligand Binding to Transient Protein Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Marcus; Shoichet, Brian K.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-05-28

    Interrogating fragment libraries by X-ray crystallography is a powerful strategy for discovering allosteric ligands for protein targets. Cryocooling of crystals should theoretically increase the fraction of occupied binding sites and decrease radiation damage. However, it might also perturb protein conformations that can be accessed at room temperature. Using data from crystals measured consecutively at room temperature and at cryogenic temperature, we found that transient binding sites could be abolished at the cryogenic temperatures employed by standard approaches. Finally, changing the temperature at which the crystallographic data was collected could provide a deliberate perturbation to the equilibrium of protein conformations and help to visualize hidden sites with great potential to allosterically modulate protein function.

  14. One Crystal, Two Temperatures: Cryocooling Penalties Alter Ligand Binding to Transient Protein Sites

    DOE PAGES

    Fischer, Marcus; Shoichet, Brian K.; Fraser, James S.

    2015-05-28

    Interrogating fragment libraries by X-ray crystallography is a powerful strategy for discovering allosteric ligands for protein targets. Cryocooling of crystals should theoretically increase the fraction of occupied binding sites and decrease radiation damage. However, it might also perturb protein conformations that can be accessed at room temperature. Using data from crystals measured consecutively at room temperature and at cryogenic temperature, we found that transient binding sites could be abolished at the cryogenic temperatures employed by standard approaches. Finally, changing the temperature at which the crystallographic data was collected could provide a deliberate perturbation to the equilibrium of protein conformations andmore » help to visualize hidden sites with great potential to allosterically modulate protein function.« less

  15. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F.; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R. S. K.; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  16. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  17. Specific Ligand Binding Domain Residues Confer Low Dioxin Responsiveness to AHR1β of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Odio, Camila; Holzman, Sarah A.; Denison, Michael S.; Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Bonati, Laura; Franks, Diana G.; Hahn, Mark E.; Powell, Wade H.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a PAS-family protein that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vertebrates. Frogs are remarkably insensitive to TCDD, and AHRs from Xenopus laevis bind TCDD with low affinity. We sought to identify structural features of X. laevis AHR1β associated with low TCDD sensitivity. Substitution of the entire ligand-binding domain (LBD) with the corresponding sequence from mouse AHRb-1 dramatically increased TCDD responsiveness in transactivation assays. To identify amino acid residues responsible, we constructed a comparative model of the AHR1β LBD using homologous domains of PAS proteins HIF2α and ARNT. The model revealed an internal cavity of similar dimensions to the putative binding cavity of mouse AHRb-1, suggesting the importance of side-chain interactions over cavity size. Of residues with side chains clearly pointing into the cavity, only two differed from the mouse sequence. When A354, located within a conserved β-strand, was changed to serine, the corresponding mouse residue, the EC50 for TCDD decreased more than 15-fold. When N325 was changed to serine, EC50 declined 3-fold. When the mutations were combined, the EC50 declined from 18.6 nM to 0.8 nM, nearly matching mouse AHR for TCDD sensitivity. Velocity sedimentation analysis confirmed that mutant frog AHRs exhibited correspondingly increased TCDD binding. We also assayed mutant AHRs for responsiveness to a candidate endogenous ligand, 6-formylindolo[3,2b]carbazole (FICZ). Mutations that increased TCDD sensitivity also increased sensitivity to FICZ. This comparative study represents a novel approach to discerning fundamental information about the structure of AHR and its interactions with biologically important agonists. PMID:23394719

  18. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  19. On the detection of multiple-binding modes of ligands to proteins, from biological, structural, and modeling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Paul J.; de Jonge, Marc; Daeyaert, Frits; Koymans, Luc; Vinkers, Maarten; Heeres, Jan; Janssen, Paul A. J.; Arnold, Eddy; Das, Kalyan; Clark, Art D., Jr.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boyer, Paul L.; de Béthune, Marie-Pierre; Pauwels, Rudi; Andries, Koen; Kukla, Mike; Ludovici, Donald; De Corte, Bart; Kavash, Robert; Ho, Chih

    2003-02-01

    There are several indications that a given compound or a set of related compounds can bind in different modes to a specific binding site of a protein. This is especially evident from X-ray crystallographic structures of ligand-protein complexes. The availability of multiple binding modes of a ligand in a binding site may present an advantage in drug design when simultaneously optimizing several criteria. In the case of the design of anti-HIV compounds we observed that the more active compounds that are also resilient against mutation of the non-nucleoside binding site of HIV1-reverse transcriptase make use of more binding modes than the less active and resilient compounds.

  20. Assessment and acceleration of binding energy calculations for protein-ligand complexes by the fragment molecular orbital method.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Takao; Okimoto, Noriaki; Taiji, Makoto

    2015-11-15

    In the field of drug discovery, it is important to accurately predict the binding affinities between target proteins and drug applicant molecules. Many of the computational methods available for evaluating binding affinities have adopted molecular mechanics-based force fields, although they cannot fully describe protein-ligand interactions. A noteworthy computational method in development involves large-scale electronic structure calculations. Fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method, which is one of such large-scale calculation techniques, is applied in this study for calculating the binding energies between proteins and ligands. By testing the effects of specific FMO calculation conditions (including fragmentation size, basis sets, electron correlation, exchange-correlation functionals, and solvation effects) on the binding energies of the FK506-binding protein and 10 ligand complex molecule, we have found that the standard FMO calculation condition, FMO2-MP2/6-31G(d), is suitable for evaluating the protein-ligand interactions. The correlation coefficient between the binding energies calculated with this FMO calculation condition and experimental values is determined to be R = 0.77. Based on these results, we also propose a practical scheme for predicting binding affinities by combining the FMO method with the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. The results of this combined method can be directly compared with experimental binding affinities. The FMO and QSAR combined scheme shows a higher correlation with experimental data (R = 0.91). Furthermore, we propose an acceleration scheme for the binding energy calculations using a multilayer FMO method focusing on the protein-ligand interaction distance. Our acceleration scheme, which uses FMO2-HF/STO-3G:MP2/6-31G(d) at R(int) = 7.0 Å, reduces computational costs, while maintaining accuracy in the evaluation of binding energy.

  1. Quartz crystal microbalance study of bovine serum albumin adsorption onto self-assembled monolayer-functionalized gold with subsequent ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Thourson, Scott B; Marsh, Caitlin A; Doyle, Brian J; Timpe, Shannon J

    2013-11-01

    Adsorption characteristics of the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto gold surfaces were examined using a 5 MHz quartz crystal microbalance. Protein immobilization was executed in the presence and absence of a homogenous self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of NHS-terminated alkanethiols. BSA concentrations in the range of 3.2 × 10(-6) to 1.0 × 10(-3)mol/L were found to saturate both SAM-functionalized and non-functionalized surfaces with similar densities of 450 ± 26 ng/cm(2). The lack of functionalization dependence is attributed to the large protein size relative to the density of available binding sites in either surface condition. The BSA ligand 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS) was subsequently introduced to the immobilized BSA to determine any effects of the protein immobilization conditions on ligand binding. The rate of ANS binding to BSA was found to increase with increasing BSA concentration used in the immobilization step. This suggests that protein concentration affects morphology and ligand binding affinity without significantly altering adsorption quantity.

  2. Analogs of JHU75528, a PET ligand for imaging of cerebral cannabinoid receptors (CB1): development of ligands with optimized lipophilicity and binding affinity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hong; Kotsikorou, Evangelia; Hoffman, Alexander F.; Ravert, Hayden T.; Holt, Daniel; Hurst, Dow P.; Lupica, Carl R.; Reggio, Patricia H.; Dannals, Robert F.; Horti, Andrew G.

    2009-01-01

    Cyano analogs of Rimonabant with high binding affinity for the cerebral cannabinoid receptor (CB1) and with optimized lipophilicity have been synthesized as potential positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. The best ligands of the series are optimal targets for the future radiolabeling with PET isotopes and in vivo evaluation as radioligands with enhanced properties for PET imaging of CB1 receptors in human subjects. Extracellular electrophysiological recordings in rodent brain slices demonstrated that JHU75528, 4, the lead compound of the new series, has functional CB antagonist properties that are consistent with its structural relationship to Rimonabant. Molecular modeling analysis revealed an important role of the binding of the cyano-group with the CB1 binding pocket. PMID:18511157

  3. FLUORINATED CANNABINOID CB2 RECEPTOR LIGANDS: SYNTHESIS AND IN VITRO BINDING CHARACTERISTICS OF 2-OXOQUINOLINE DERIVATIVES

    PubMed Central

    Turkman, Nashaat; Shavrin, Aleksander; Ivanov, Roman A.; Rabinovich, Brian; Volgin, Andrei; Gelovani, Juri G.; Alauddin, Mian M.

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) plays an important role in human physiology and the pathophysiology of different diseases, including neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Several classes of CB2 receptor ligands, including 2-oxoquinoline derivatives, have been previously reported. We report the synthesis and results of in vitro receptor binding of a focused library of new fluorinated 2-oxoquinoline CB2 ligands. Twelve compounds, 13-16 18, 19, 21-24, 27, and 28 were synthesized in good yields in multiple steps. Human U87 glioma cells expressing either hCB1 (control) or hCB2 were generated via lentiviral transduction. In vitro competitive binding assay was performed using [3H]CP-55,940 in U87hCB1 and U87hCB2 cells. Inhibition constant (Ki) values of compounds 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 27, and 28 for CB2 were >10000, 2.8, 5.0, 2.4, 22, 0.8, 1.4, >10000, 486, 58, 620, and 2400 nM, respectively, and those for CB1 were >10000 nM. Preliminary in vitro results suggest that six of these compounds may be useful for therapy of neuropathic pain, neuroinflammatory diseases and immune disorders. In addition, compound 19, with its subnanomolar Ki value, could be radiolabeled with 18F and explored for PET imaging of CB2 expression. PMID:21872477

  4. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, John

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  5. Dynamics of the Ligand Binding Domain Layer during AMPA Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Baranovic, Jelena; Chebli, Miriam; Salazar, Hector; Carbone, Anna L.; Faelber, Katja; Lau, Albert Y.; Daumke, Oliver; Plested, Andrew J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are postsynaptic tetrameric ligand-gated channels whose activity mediates fast excitatory transmission. Glutamate binding to clamshell-shaped ligand binding domains (LBDs) triggers opening of the integral ion channel, but how the four LBDs orchestrate receptor activation is unknown. Here, we present a high-resolution x-ray crystal structure displaying two tetrameric LBD arrangements fully bound to glutamate. Using a series of engineered metal ion trapping mutants, we showed that the more compact of the two assemblies corresponds to an arrangement populated during activation of full-length receptors. State-dependent cross-linking of the mutants identified zinc bridges between the canonical active LBD dimers that formed when the tetramer was either fully or partially bound by glutamate. These bridges also stabilized the resting state, consistent with the recently published full-length apo structure. Our results provide insight into the activation mechanism of glutamate receptors and the complex conformational space that the LBD layer can sample. PMID:26910426

  6. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  7. Binding profiles and physical dependence liabilities of selected benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Richards, J G; Martin, J R

    1998-01-01

    In vitro binding profiles were determined for selected benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) ligands by quantitative radioautography in rat brain. The ligands represent subtype-selective agonists (zolpidem) or nonselective BZR agonists (diazepam), as well as BZR partial agonists (bretazenil, Ro 43-9624, and Ro 19-8022). In addition, these compounds were evaluated in a precipitated withdrawal paradigm in monkeys. The physical dependence liability was not clearly related to the in vitro brain BZR binding profiles of these compounds. Therefore, diazepam, bretazenil, Ro 19-8022, and Ro 43-9624 had regional affinities for the 13 selected rat brain regions that were close to the mean values across regions, despite the clearly greater physical dependence potential of diazepam. Zolpidem, on the other hand, had regional affinities for the 13 rat brain regions that diverged significantly from the mean value across regions and exhibited a lower physical dependence potential than diazepam. These results raise the possibility that a combination of BZR subtype selectivity with partial agonism could yield a marked reduction of physical dependence liability.

  8. Accelerating Regulated Bioanalysis for Biotherapeutics: Case Examples Using a Microfluidic Ligand Binding Assay Platform.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Hoffpauir, Brian; Chilewski, Shannon D; Gamberdella, Janice; Kavita, Uma; Duo, Jia; Gleason, Carol; Zhang, Yan; Pillutla, Renuka; DeSilva, Binodh; Hamuro, Lora

    2017-01-01

    The Gyrolab™ xP is a microfluidic platform for conducting ligand binding assays (LBAs) and is recognized for its utility in discovery bioanalysis. However, few reports have focused on the technology for regulated bioanalysis. This technology has the advantage of low reagent consumption, low sample volume, and automated ligand binding methods. To improve bioanalysis testing timelines and increase the speed at which biotherapeutics are delivered to patients, we evaluated the technology for its potential to deliver high-quality data at reduced testing timelines for regulated bioanalysis. Six LBA methods were validated to support bioanalysis for GLP toxicokinetic or clinical pharmacokinetic studies. Validation, sample analysis, and method transfer are described. In total, approximately 4000 samples have been tested for regulated bioanalysis to support 6 GLP toxicology studies and approximately 1000 samples to support 2 clinical studies. Gyrolab™ xP had high run pass rates (≥83%) and high incurred sample reanalysis (ISR) pass rates (>94%). The maximum total error observed across all QC levels for a given assay was <30% for all six LBAs. High instrument response precision (CV ≤5%) was observed across compact discs (CDs), and methods were validated to use a single standard curve across multiple CDs within a Gyrolab™ xP run. Reduced bioanalysis timelines were achieved compared to standard manual plate-based methods, and methods were successfully transferred across testing labs, paving the way for this platform for use in late-stage clinical development.

  9. Ligand binding pocket of a novel Allatostatin receptor type C of stick insect, Carausius morosus

    PubMed Central

    Duan Sahbaz, Burcin; Sezerman, Osman Ugur; Torun, Hamdi; Birgül Iyison, Necla

    2017-01-01

    Allatostatins (AST) are neuropeptides with variable function ranging from regulation of developmental processes to the feeding behavior in insects. They exert their effects by binding to cognate GPCRs, called Allatostatin receptors (AlstR), which emerge as promising targets for pesticide design. However, AlstRs are rarely studied. This study is the first reported structural study on AlstR-AST interaction. In this work, the first C type AlstR from the stick insect Carausius morosus (CamAlstR-C) was identified and its interaction with type C AST peptide was shown to be physically consistent with the experimental results. The proposed structure of CamAlstR-C revealed a conserved motif within the third extracellular loop, which, together with the N-terminus is essential for ligand binding. In this work, computational studies were combined with molecular and nano-scale approaches in order to introduce an unknown GPCR-ligand system. Consequently, the data obtained provided a reliable target region for future agonist/inverse agonist studies on AlstRs. PMID:28117376

  10. Regulation of Neurexin 1[beta] Tertiary Structure and Ligand Binding through Alternative Splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Kaiser C.; Kuczynska, Dorota A.; Wu, Irene J.; Murray, Beverly H.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Rudenko, Gabby

    2008-08-04

    Neurexins and neuroligins play an essential role in synapse function, and their alterations are linked to autistic spectrum disorder. Interactions between neurexins and neuroligins regulate inhibitory and excitatory synaptogenesis in vitro through a splice-insert signaling code. In particular, neurexin 1{beta} carrying an alternative splice insert at site SS{number_sign}4 interacts with neuroligin 2 (found predominantly at inhibitory synapses) but much less so with other neuroligins (those carrying an insert at site B and prevalent at excitatory synapses). The structure of neurexin 1{beta}+SS{number_sign}4 reveals dramatic rearrangements to the 'hypervariable surface', the binding site for neuroligins. The splice insert protrudes as a long helix into space, triggers conversion of loop {beta}10-{beta}11 into a helix rearranging the binding site for neuroligins, and rearranges the Ca{sup 2+}-binding site required for ligand binding, increasing its affinity. Our structures reveal the mechanism by which neurexin 1{beta} isoforms acquire neuroligin splice isoform selectivity.

  11. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; ...

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  12. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  13. Studies on Photocleavage, DNA Binding, Cytotoxicity, and Docking Studies of Ruthenium(II) Mixed Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yata Praveen; Devi, C Shobha; Srishailam, A; Deepika, N; Kumar, V Ravi; Reddy, P Venkat; Nagasuryaprasad, K; Singh, Surya S; Nagababu, Penumaka; Satyanarayana, S

    2016-11-01

    This article describes the synthesis and characterization of three new Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes including [Ru(phen)2(dpphz)](2+) (1), [Ru(bpy)2(dpphz)](2+) (2) and [Ru(dmb)2(dpphz)](2+) (3) where dpphz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine-11-hydrazide, phen =1,10-phenanthroline, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl2,2'-bipyridine. The binding behaviors of these complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were explored by spectroscopic titrations, viscosity measurements. Results suggest that these complexes can bind to CT-DNA through intercalation. However, their binding strength differs from each other; this may be attributed to difference in the ancillary ligand. The cytotoxicity of 1-3 was evaluated by MTT assay; results indicated that all complexes have significant dose dependent cytotoxicity with HeLa tumor cell line. All complexes exhibited efficient photocleavage of pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. The DNA binding ability of 1-3 was also studied by docking the complexes into B-DNA using docking program.

  14. Plasmodium falciparum ligand binding to erythrocytes induce alterations in deformability essential for invasion

    PubMed Central

    Sisquella, Xavier; Nebl, Thomas; Thompson, Jennifer K; Whitehead, Lachlan; Malpede, Brian M; Salinas, Nichole D; Rogers, Kelly; Tolia, Niraj H; Fleig, Andrea; O’Neill, Joseph; Tham, Wai-Hong; David Horgen, F; Cowman, Alan F

    2017-01-01

    The most lethal form of malaria in humans is caused by Plasmodium falciparum. These parasites invade erythrocytes, a complex process involving multiple ligand-receptor interactions. The parasite makes initial contact with the erythrocyte followed by dramatic deformations linked to the function of the Erythrocyte binding antigen family and P. falciparum reticulocyte binding-like families. We show EBA-175 mediates substantial changes in the deformability of erythrocytes by binding to glycophorin A and activating a phosphorylation cascade that includes erythrocyte cytoskeletal proteins resulting in changes in the viscoelastic properties of the host cell. TRPM7 kinase inhibitors FTY720 and waixenicin A block the changes in the deformability of erythrocytes and inhibit merozoite invasion by directly inhibiting the phosphorylation cascade. Therefore, binding of P. falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte directly activate a signaling pathway through a phosphorylation cascade and this alters the viscoelastic properties of the host membrane conditioning it for successful invasion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21083.001 PMID:28226242

  15. Cyclic ferrocenylnaphthalene diimide derivative as a new class of G-quadruplex DNA binding ligand.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Monirul; Sato, Shinobu; Shinozaki, Shingo; Takenaka, Shigeori

    2017-01-15

    To identify an effective ligand that binds to a G-quadruplex structure but not a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), a set of biophysical and biochemical experiments were carried out using newly synthesized cyclic ferrocenylnaphthalene diimide (cFNDI, 1) or the non-cyclic derivative (2) with various structures of G-quadruplex DNAs and dsDNA. Compound 1 bound strongly to G-quadruplexes DNAs (10(6)M(-1) order) with diminished binding to dsDNA (10(4)M(-1) order) in 100mM AcOH-AcOK buffer (pH 5.5) containing 100mM KCl. Interestingly, 1 showed an approximately 50-fold higher selectivity to mixed hybrid-type telomeric G-quadruplex DNA (K=3.4×10(6)M(-1) and a 2:1 stoichiometry) than dsDNA (K=7.5×10(4)M(-1)) did. Furthermore, 1 showed higher thermal stability to G-quadruplex DNAs than it did to dsDNA with a preference for c-kit and c-myc G-quadruplex DNAs over telomeric and thrombin binding aptamers. Additionally, 1 exhibited telomerase inhibitory activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.4μM. Compound 2 showed a preference for G-quadruplex; however, the binding affinity magnitude and preference were improved in 1 because the former had a cyclic structure.

  16. Ligand Specificity of Bean Leaf Soluble Auxin-binding Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Wardrop, Alison J.; Polya, Gideon M.

    1980-01-01

    The soluble bean leaf auxin-binding protein (ABP) has a high affinity for a range of auxins including indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), α-napthaleneacetic acid, phenylacetic acid, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and structurally related auxins. A large number of nonauxin compounds that are nevertheless structurally related to auxins do not displace IAA from bean ABP. Bean ABP has a high affinity for auxin transport inhibitors and antiauxins. The specificity of pea ABP for representative auxins is similar to that found for bean ABP. The bean ABP auxin binding site is similar to the corn endoplasmic reticulum auxin-binding sites in specificity for auxins and sensitivity to thiol reagents and azide. Qualitative similarities between the ligand specificity of bean ABP and the specificity of auxin-induced bean leaf hyponasty provide further evidence, albeit circumstantial, that ABP (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase) can bind auxins in vivo. The high incidence of ABP in bean leaves and the high affinity of this protein for auxins and auxin transport inhibitors suggest possible functions for ABP in auxin transport and/or auxin sequestration. PMID:16661370

  17. Effect of polymorphisms on ligand binding by mouse major urinary proteins

    PubMed Central

    Darwish Marie, Amr; Veggerby, Christina; Robertson, Duncan H.L.; Gaskell, Simon J.; Hubbard, Simon J.; Martinsen, Line; Hurst, Jane L.; Beynon, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Mouse urine contains an abundance of major urinary proteins, lipocalins, whose roles include slow release of semiochemicals. These proteins are highly polymorphic, with small sequence differences between individual members. In this study, we purified to homogeneity four of these proteins from two strains of inbred mice and characterized them by mass spectrometry. This analysis has led to the discovery of another variant in this group of proteins. Three of the polymorphic variants that map to the surface have no effect on the binding of a fluorescent probe in the binding cavity, but the fourth, characterized by a Phe to Val substitution in the cavity, shows a substantially lower affinity and fluorescence yield for the probe. These results are interpreted in light of the known crystal structure of the protein and molecular modeling calculations, which rationalize the experimental findings. This work raises the possibility that the calyx-binding site can show specificity for different ligands, the implications of which on pheromone binding and chemical communication are discussed. PMID:11266626

  18. Structural and biochemical determinants of ligand binding by the c-di-GMP riboswitch†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathryn D.; Lipchock, Sarah V.; Livingston, Alison L.; Shanahan, Carly A.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP is used in many species to control essential processes that allow the organism to adapt to its environment. The c-di-GMP riboswitch (GEMM) is an important downstream target in this signaling pathway and alters gene expression in response to changing concentrations of c-di-GMP. The riboswitch selectively recognizes its second messenger ligand primarily through contacts with two critical nucleotides. However, these two nucleotides are not the most highly conserved residues within the riboswitch sequence. Instead, nucleotides that stack with c-di-GMP and that form tertiary RNA contacts are the most invariant. Biochemical and structural evidence reveals that the most common natural variants are able to make alternative pairing interactions with both guanine bases of the ligand. Additionally, a high resolution (2.3 Å) crystal structure of the native complex reveals that a single metal coordinates the c-di-GMP backbone. Evidence is also provided that after transcription of the first nucleotide on the 3′-side of the P1 helix, which is predicted to be the molecular switch, the aptamer is functional for ligand binding. Although large energetic effects occur when several residues in the RNA are altered, mutations at the most conserved positions, rather than at positions that base pair with c-di-GMP, have the most detrimental effects on binding. Many mutants retain sufficient c-di-GMP affinity for the RNA to remain biologically relevant, which suggests that this motif is quite resilient to mutation. PMID:20690679

  19. High-throughput identification of telomere-binding ligands based on the fluorescence regulation of DNA-copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Luzhu; Wang, Yanjun; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2017-01-15

    Formation of the G-quadruplex in the human telomeric DNA is an effective way to inhibit telomerase activity. Therefore, screening ligands of G-quadruplex has potential applications in the treatment of cancer by inhibit telomerase activity. Although several techniques have been explored for screening of telomeric G-quadruplexes ligands, high-throughput screening method for fast screening telomere-binding ligands from the large compound library is still urgently needed. Herein, a label-free fluorescence strategy has been proposed for high-throughput screening telomere-binding ligands by using DNA-copper nanoparticles (DNA-CuNPs) as a signal probe. In the absence of ligands, human telomeric DNA (GDNA) hybridized with its complementary DNA (cDNA) to form double stranded DNA (dsDNA) which can act as an efficient template for the formation of DNA-CuNPs, leading to the high fluorescence of DNA-CuNPs. In the presence of ligands, GDNA folded into G-quadruplex. Single-strdanded cDNA does not support the formation of DNA-CuNP, resulting in low fluorescence of DNA-CuNPs. Therefore, telomere-binding ligands can be high-throughput screened by monitoring the change in the fluorescence of DNA-CuNPs. Thirteen traditional chinese medicines were screened. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements demonstrated that the selected ligands could induce single-stranded telomeric DNA to form G-quadruplex. The telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay demonstrated that the selected ligands can effectively inhibit telomerase activity. Therefore, it offers a cost-effective, label-free and reliable high-throughput way to identify G-quadruplex ligands, which holds great potential in discovering telomerase-targeted anticancer drugs.

  20. Structural transitions in ion coordination driven by changes in competition for ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sameer; Rempe, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Transferring Na+ and K+ ions from their preferred coordination states in water to states having different coordination numbers incurs a free energy cost. In several examples in nature, however, these ions readily partition from aqueous-phase coordination states into spatial regions having much higher coordination numbers. Here we utilize statistical theory of solutions, quantum chemical simulations, classical mechanics simulations and structural informatics to understand this aspect of ion partitioning. Our studies lead to the identification of a specific role of the solvation environment in driving transitions in ion coordination structures. Although ion solvation in liquid media is an exergonic reaction overall, we find it is also associated with considerable free energy penalties for extracting ligands from their solvation environments to form coordinated ion complexes. Reducing these penalties increases the stabilities of higher-order coordinations and brings down the energetic cost to partition ions from water into over-coordinated binding sites in biomolecules. These penalties can be lowered via a reduction in direct favorable interactions of the coordinating ligands with all atoms other than the ions themselves. A significant reduction in these penalties can, in fact, also drive up ion coordination preferences. Similarly, an increase in these penalties can lower ion coordination preferences, akin to a Hofmeister effect. Since such structural transitions are effected by the properties of the solvation phase, we anticipate that they will also occur for other ions. The influence of other factors, including ligand density, ligand chemistry and temperature, on the stabilities of ion coordination structures are also explored. PMID:18954053

  1. A water-swap reaction coordinate for the calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energies.

    PubMed

    Woods, Christopher J; Malaisree, Maturos; Hannongbua, Supot; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2011-02-07

    The accurate prediction of absolute protein-ligand binding free energies is one of the grand challenge problems of computational science. Binding free energy measures the strength of binding between a ligand and a protein, and an algorithm that would allow its accurate prediction would be a powerful tool for rational drug design. Here we present the development of a new method that allows for the absolute binding free energy of a protein-ligand complex to be calculated from first principles, using a single simulation. Our method involves the use of a novel reaction coordinate that swaps a ligand bound to a protein with an equivalent volume of bulk water. This water-swap reaction coordinate is built using an identity constraint, which identifies a cluster of water molecules from bulk water that occupies the same volume as the ligand in the protein active site. A dual topology algorithm is then used to swap the ligand from the active site with the identified water cluster from bulk water. The free energy is then calculated using replica exchange thermodynamic integration. This returns the free energy change of simultaneously transferring the ligand to bulk water, as an equivalent volume of bulk water is transferred back to the protein active site. This, directly, is the absolute binding free energy. It should be noted that while this reaction coordinate models the binding process directly, an accurate force field and sufficient sampling are still required to allow for the binding free energy to be predicted correctly. In this paper we present the details and development of this method, and demonstrate how the potential of mean force along the water-swap coordinate can be improved by calibrating the soft-core Coulomb and Lennard-Jones parameters used for the dual topology calculation. The optimal parameters were applied to calculations of protein-ligand binding free energies of a neuraminidase inhibitor (oseltamivir), with these results compared to experiment. These

  2. Leptospiral Outer Membrane Protein Microarray, a Novel Approach to Identification of Host Ligand-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, James; Haake, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with worldwide distribution caused by pathogenic spirochetes belonging to the genus Leptospira. The leptospiral life cycle involves transmission via freshwater and colonization of the renal tubules of their reservoir hosts. Infection requires adherence to cell surfaces and extracellular matrix components of host tissues. These host-pathogen interactions involve outer membrane proteins (OMPs) expressed on the bacterial surface. In this study, we developed an Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 OMP microarray containing all predicted lipoproteins and transmembrane OMPs. A total of 401 leptospiral genes or their fragments were transcribed and translated in vitro and printed on nitrocellulose-coated glass slides. We investigated the potential of this protein microarray to screen for interactions between leptospiral OMPs and fibronectin (Fn). This approach resulted in the identification of the recently described fibronectin-binding protein, LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and 14 novel Fn-binding proteins, denoted Microarray Fn-binding proteins (MFns). We confirmed Fn binding of purified recombinant LIC11612 (MFn1), LIC10714 (MFn2), LIC11051 (MFn6), LIC11436 (MFn7), LIC10258 (MFn8, Lsa66), and LIC10537 (MFn9) by far-Western blot assays. Moreover, we obtained specific antibodies to MFn1, MFn7, MFn8 (Lsa66), and MFn9 and demonstrated that MFn1, MFn7, and MFn9 are expressed and surface exposed under in vitro growth conditions. Further, we demonstrated that MFn1, MFn4 (LIC12631, Sph2), and MFn7 enable leptospires to bind fibronectin when expressed in the saprophyte, Leptospira biflexa. Protein microarrays are valuable tools for high-throughput identification of novel host ligand-binding proteins that have the potential to play key roles in the virulence mechanisms of pathogens. PMID:22961849

  3. A Common Anesthetic Binding Site for Inhibition of Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kinde, Monica N.; Bu, Weiming; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Yan; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Tang, Pei

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying functionally relevant anesthetic binding sites in pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) is an important step toward understanding molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action. The anesthetic propofol is known to inhibit cation-conducting pLGICs, including a prokaryotic pLGIC ELIC, but the sites responsible for functional inhibition remain undetermined. Methods We photolabeled ELIC with a light-activated derivative of propofol (AziPm) and performed 19F NMR to support propofol binding to a transmembrane domain (TMD) intra-subunit pocket. To differentiate sites responsible for propofol inhibition fro