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Sample records for affect methane production

  1. Factors affecting methane production and mitigation in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masaki; Terada, Fuminori

    2010-02-01

    Methane (CH(4)) is the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) and that emitted from enteric fermentation in livestock is the single largest source of emissions in Japan. Many factors influence ruminant CH(4) production, including level of intake, type and quality of feeds and environmental temperature. The objectives of this review are to identify the factors affecting CH(4) production in ruminants, to examine technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants, and to identify areas requiring further research. The following equation for CH(4) prediction was formulated using only dry matter intake (DMI) and has been adopted in Japan to estimate emissions from ruminant livestock for the National GHG Inventory Report: Y = -17.766 + 42.793X - 0.849X(2), where Y is CH(4) production (L/day) and X is DMI (kg/day). Technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants include increasing productivity by improving nutritional management, the manipulation of ruminal fermentation by changing feed composition, the addition of CH(4) inhibitors, and defaunation. Considering the importance of ruminant livestock, it is essential to establish economically feasible ways of reducing ruminant CH(4) production while improving productivity; it is therefore critical to conduct a full system analysis to select the best combination of approaches or new technologies to be applied under long-term field conditions.

  2. Does Dietary Mitigation of Enteric Methane Production Affect Rumen Function and Animal Productivity in Dairy Cows?

    PubMed Central

    Veneman, Jolien B.; Muetzel, Stefan; Hart, Kenton J.; Faulkner, Catherine L.; Moorby, Jon M.; Perdok, Hink B.; Newbold, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the rumen microbiome and rumen function might be disrupted if methane production in the rumen is decreased. Furthermore concerns have been voiced that geography and management might influence the underlying microbial population and hence the response of the rumen to mitigation strategies. Here we report the effect of the dietary additives: linseed oil and nitrate on methane emissions, rumen fermentation, and the rumen microbiome in two experiments from New Zealand (Dairy 1) and the UK (Dairy 2). Dairy 1 was a randomized block design with 18 multiparous lactating cows. Dairy 2 was a complete replicated 3 x 3 Latin Square using 6 rumen cannulated, lactating dairy cows. Treatments consisted of a control total mixed ration (TMR), supplementation with linseed oil (4% of feed DM) and supplementation with nitrate (2% of feed DM) in both experiments. Methane emissions were measured in open circuit respiration chambers and rumen samples were analyzed for rumen fermentation parameters and microbial population structure using qPCR and next generation sequencing (NGS). Supplementation with nitrate, but not linseed oil, decreased methane yield (g/kg DMI; P<0.02) and increased hydrogen (P<0.03) emissions in both experiments. Furthermore, the effect of nitrate on gaseous emissions was accompanied by an increased rumen acetate to propionate ratio and consistent changes in the rumen microbial populations including a decreased abundance of the main genus Prevotella and a decrease in archaeal mcrA (log10 copies/ g rumen DM content). These results demonstrate that methane emissions can be significantly decreased with nitrate supplementation with only minor, but consistent, effects on the rumen microbial population and its function, with no evidence that the response to dietary additives differed due to geography and different underlying microbial populations. PMID:26509835

  3. How Does Poly(hydroxyalkanoate) Affect Methane Production from the Anaerobic Digestion of Waste-Activated Sludge?

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongbo; Zhao, Jianwei; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Yinguang; Bond, Philip L; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-10-20

    Recent studies demonstrate that, besides being used for production of biodegradable plastics, poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) that is accumulated in heterotrophic microorganisms during wastewater treatment has another novel application direction, i.e., being utilized for enhancing methane yield during the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge (WAS). To date, however, the underlying mechanism of how PHA affects methane production remains largely unknown, and this limits optimization and application of the strategy. This study therefore aims to fill this knowledge gap. Experimental results showed that with the increase of sludge PHA levels from 21 to 184 mg/g of volatile suspended solids (VSS) the methane yield linearly increased from 168.0 to 246.1 mL/g of VSS (R(2) = 0.9834). Compared with protein and carbohydrate (the main components of a cell), PHA exhibited a higher biochemical methane potential on a unit VSS basis. It was also found that the increased PHA not only enhanced cell disruption of PHA cells but also benefited the soluble protein conversion of both PHA- and non-PHA cells. Moreover, the reactor fed with higher PHA sludge showed greater sludge hydrolysis and acidification than those fed with the lower PHA sludges. Further investigations using fluorescence in situ hybridization and enzyme analysis revealed that the increased PHA enhanced the abundance of methanogenic Archaea and increased the activities of protease, acetate kinase, and coenzyme F420, which were consistent with the observed methane yield. This work provides insights into PHA-involved WAS digestion systems and may have important implications for future operation of wastewater treatment plants.

  4. Methane production in Minnesota peatlands

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.; Crawford, R.L.

    1984-06-01

    Rates of methane production in Minnesota peats were studied. Surface (10- to 25-cm) peats produced an average of 228 nmol of CH/sub 4/ per g (dry weight) per h at 25/sup 0/C and ambient pH. Methanogenesis rates generally decreased with depth in ombrotrophic peats, but on occasion were observed to rise within deeper layers of certain fen peats. Methane production was temperature dependent, increasing with increasing temperature (4 to 30/sup 0/C), except in peats from deeper layers. Maximal methanogenesis from these deeper regions occurred at 12/sup 0/C. Methane production rates were also pH dependent. Two peats with pHs of 3.8 and 4.3 had an optimum rate of methane production at pH 6.0. The addition to peat of glucose and H/sub 2/-CO/sub 2/ stimulated methanogenesis, whereas the addition of acetate inhibited methanogenesis. Cysteine-sulfide, nitrogen-phosphorus-trace metals, and vitamins-yeast extract affected methane production very little. Various gases were found to be trapped or dissolved (or both) within peatland waters. Dissolved methane increased linearly to a depth of 210 cm. The accumulation of metabolic end products produced within peat bogs appears to be an important mechanism limiting turnover in peatland environments.

  5. Dietary inclusion of diallyl disulfide, yucca powder, calcium fumarate, an extruded linseed product, or medium-chain fatty acids does not affect methane production in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    van Zijderveld, S M; Dijkstra, J; Perdok, H B; Newbold, J R; Gerrits, W J J

    2011-06-01

    Two similar experiments were conducted to assess the effect of diallyl disulfide (DADS), yucca powder (YP), calcium fumarate (CAFU), an extruded linseed product (UNSAT), or a mixture of capric and caprylic acid (MCFA) on methane production, energy balance, and dairy cow performance. In experiment 1, a control diet (CON1) and diets supplemented with 56 mg of DADS/kg of dry matter (DM), 3g of YP/kg of DM, or 25 g of CAFU/kg of DM were evaluated. In experiment 2, an inert saturated fat source in the control diet (CON2) was exchanged isolipidically for an extruded linseed source (100g/kg of DM; UNSAT) or a mixture of C8:0 and C10:0 (MCFA; 20.3g/kg of DM). In experiment 2, a higher inclusion level of DADS (200mg/kg of DM) was also tested. Both experiments were conducted using 40 lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Cows were adapted to the diet for 12 d and were subsequently kept in respiration chambers for 5 d to evaluate methane production, diet digestibility, energy balance, and animal performance. Feed intake was restricted to avoid confounding effects of possible differences in ad libitum feed intake on methane production. Feed intake was, on average, 17.5 and 16.6 kg of DM/d in experiments 1 and 2, respectively. None of the additives reduced methane production in vivo. Methane production in experiment 1 was 450, 453, 446, and 423 g/d for CON1 and the diets supplemented with DADS, YP, and CAFU, respectively. In experiment 2, methane production was 371, 394, 388, and 386 g/d for CON2 and the diets supplemented with UNSAT, MCFA, and DADS, respectively. No effects of the additives on energy balance or neutral detergent fiber digestibility were observed. The addition of MCFA increased milk fat content (5.38% vs. 4.82% for control) and fat digestibility (78.5% vs. 59.8% for control), but did not affect milk yield or other milk components. The other products did not affect milk yield or composition. Results from these experiments emphasize the need to confirm methane

  6. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  7. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, P.N.; Atreya, S.K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus. 65 references.

  8. Methane photochemistry and methane production on Neptune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, P. N.; Atreya, S. K.

    1988-06-01

    The Neptune stratosphere's methane photochemistry is presently studied by means of a numerical model in which the observed mixing ratio of methane prompts photolysis near the CH4 homopause. Haze generation by methane photochemistry has its basis in the formation of hydrocarbon ices and polyacetylenes; the hazes can furnish the requisite aerosol haze at the appropriate pressure levels required by observations of Neptune in the visible and near-IR. Comparisons of model predictions with Uranus data indicate a lower ratio of polyacetylene production to hydrocarbon ice, as well as a lower likelihood of UV postprocessing of the acetylene ice to polymers on Neptune, compared to Uranus.

  9. Coalbed methane production case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The production of methane gas from coal and coal-bearing rocks is one of the prime objectives of the Department of Energy's Methane Recovery from Coalbeds Project. This report contains brief description of wells that are presently producing gas from coal or coal-bearing rocks. Data from three gob gas production areas in Illinois, an in-mine horizontal borehole degasification, and eleven vertical boreholes are presented. Production charts and electric logs of the producing zones are included for some of the wells. Additional information on dry gas production from the San Juan Basin, Colorado/New Mexico and the Greater Green River Coal Region, Colorado/Wyoming is also included.

  10. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods.

    PubMed Central

    Hackstein, J H; Stumm, C K

    1994-01-01

    We have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. We show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane. Images PMID:8202505

  11. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods

    SciTech Connect

    Hackstein, J.H.P.; Stumm, C.K. )

    1994-06-07

    The authors have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. The authors show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.

  12. Archaebacterial Fuel Production: Methane from Biomass.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennox, John E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Discusses microbial production of methane from biomass. Topics include methogens (bacteria producing methane), ecology of methanogenesis, methanogenesis in ruminant/nonruminant and other environments, role of methanogenesis in nature, and methane production in sewage treatment plants. Also discusses construction of methane digesters (and related…

  13. Feeding nitrate and docosahexaenoic acid affects enteric methane production and milk fatty acid composition in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Klop, G; Hatew, B; Bannink, A; Dijkstra, J

    2016-02-01

    An experiment was conducted to study potential interaction between the effects of feeding nitrate and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22:6 n-3) on enteric CH4 production and performance of lactating dairy cows. Twenty-eight lactating Holstein dairy cows were grouped into 7 blocks of 4 cows. Within blocks, cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments: control (CON; urea as alternative nonprotein N source to nitrate), NO3 [21 g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM)], DHA (3 g of DHA/kg of DM and urea as alternative nonprotein N source to nitrate), or NO3 + DHA (21 g of nitrate/kg of DM and 3 g of DHA/kg of DM, respectively). Cows were fed a total mixed ration consisting of 21% grass silage, 49% corn silage, and 30% concentrates on a DM basis. Feed additives were included in the concentrates. Cows assigned to a treatment including nitrate were gradually adapted to the treatment dose of nitrate over a period of 21 d during which no DHA was fed. The experimental period lasted 17 d, and CH4 production was measured during the last 5d in climate respiration chambers. Cows produced on average 363, 263, 369, and 298 g of CH4/d on CON, NO3, DHA, and NO3 + DHA treatments, respectively, and a tendency for a nitrate × DHA interaction effect was found where the CH4-mitigating effect of nitrate decreased when combined with DHA. This tendency was not obtained for CH4 production relative to dry matter intake (DMI) or to fat- and protein corrected milk (FPCM). The NO3 treatment decreased CH4 production irrespective of the unit in which it was expressed, whereas DHA did not affect CH4 production per kilogram of DMI, but resulted in a higher CH4 production per kilogram of fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM) production. The FPCM production (27.9, 24.7, 24.2, and 23. 8 kg/d for CON, NO3, DHA, and NO3 + DHA, respectively) was lower for DHA-fed cows because of decreased milk fat concentration. The proportion of saturated fatty acids in milk fat was decreased by DHA, and the proportion of

  14. Influence of headspace pressure on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    PubMed

    Valero, David; Montes, Jesús A; Rico, José Luis; Rico, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    The biochemical methane potential test is the most commonly applied method to determine methane production from organic wastes. One of the parameters measured is the volume of biogas produced which can be determined manometrically by keeping the volume constant and measuring increases in pressure. In the present study, the effect of pressure accumulation in the headspace of the reactors has been studied. Triplicate batch trials employing cocoa shell, waste coffee grounds and dairy manure as substrates have been performed under two headspace pressure conditions. The results obtained in the study showed that headspace overpressures higher than 600mbar affected methane production for waste coffee grounds. On the contrary, headspace overpressures within a range of 600-1000mbar did not affect methane production for cocoa shell and dairy manure. With the analyses performed in the present work it has not been possible to determine the reasons for the lower methane yield value obtained for the waste coffee grounds under high headspace pressures.

  15. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  16. Measuring Methane Production from Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hill, Julian; McSweeney, Chris; Wright, André-Denis G; Bishop-Hurley, Greg; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Radiative forcing of methane (CH4) is significantly higher than carbon dioxide (CO2) and its enteric production by ruminant livestock is one of the major sources of greenhouse gas emissions. CH4 is also an important marker of farming productivity, because it is associated with the conversion of feed to product in livestock. Consequently, measurement of enteric CH4 is emerging as an important research topic. In this review, we briefly describe the conversion of carbohydrate to CH4 by the bacterial community within gut, and highlight some of the key host-microbiome interactions. We then provide a picture of current progress in techniques for measuring enteric CH4, the context in which these technologies are used, and the challenges faced. We also discuss solutions to existing problems and new approaches currently in development.

  17. Methodological factors affecting gas and methane production during in vitro rumen fermentation evaluated by meta-analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Maccarana, Laura; Cattani, Mirko; Tagliapietra, Franco; Schiavon, Stefano; Bailoni, Lucia; Mantovani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Effects of some methodological factors on in vitro measures of gas production (GP, mL/g DM), CH4 production (mL/g DM) and proportion (% CH4 on total GP) were investigated by meta-analysis. These factors were considered: pressure in the GP equipment (0 = constant; 1 = increasing), incubation time (0 = 24; 1 = ≥ 48 h), time of rumen fluid collection (0 = before feeding; 1 = after feeding of donor animals), donor species of rumen fluid (0 = sheep; 1 = bovine), presence of N in the buffer solution (0 = presence; 1 = absence), and ratio between amount of buffered rumen fluid and feed sample (BRF/FS; 0 = ≤ 130 mL/g DM; 1 = 130-140 mL/g DM; 2 = ≥ 140 mL/g DM). The NDF content of feed sample incubated (NDF) was considered as a continuous variable. From an initial database of 105 papers, 58 were discarded because one of the above-mentioned factors was not stated. After discarding 17 papers, the final dataset comprised 30 papers (339 observations). A preliminary mixed model analysis was carried out on experimental data considering the study as random factor. Variables adjusted for study effect were analyzed using a backward stepwise analysis including the above-mentioned variables. The analysis showed that the extension of incubation time and reduction of NDF increased GP and CH4 values. Values of GP and CH4 also increased when rumen fluid was collected after feeding compared to before feeding (+26.4 and +9.0 mL/g DM, for GP and CH4), from bovine compared to sheep (+32.8 and +5.2 mL/g DM, for GP and CH4), and when the buffer solution did not contain N (+24.7 and +6.7 mL/g DM for GP and CH4). The increase of BRF/FS ratio enhanced GP and CH4 production (+7.7 and +3.3 mL/g DM per each class of increase, respectively). In vitro techniques for measuring GP and CH4 production are mostly used as screening methods, thus a full standardization of such techniques is not feasible. However, a greater harmonization

  18. Abiotic production of methane in terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Segura, Antígona; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-06-01

    On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×10(8) and 1.3×10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life.

  19. Structural control of coalbed methane production in Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.; Groshong, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to be detachment folds formed above decollements at different stratigraphic levels. Patterns of gas and water production reflect the structural style of each field and further indicate that folding and faulting have affected the distribution of permeability and the overall success of coalbed methane operations. Area balancing can be an effective way to characterize coalbed methane reservoirs in structurally complex regions because it constrains structural geometry and can be used to determine the distribution of layer-parallel strain. Comparison of calculated requisite strain and borehole expansion data from calliper logs suggests that strain in coalbed methane reservoirs is predictable and can be expressed as fracturing and small-scale faulting. However, refined methodology is needed to analyze heterogeneous strain distributions in discrete bed segments. Understanding temporal variation of production patterns in areas where gas and water production are influenced by map-scale structure will further facilitate effective management of coalbed methane fields.Thin-skinned structures are distributed throughout the Alabama coalbed methane fields, and these structures affect the production of gas and water from coal-bearing strata. Extensional structures in Deerlick Creek and Cedar Cove fields include normal faults and hanging-wall rollovers, and area balancing indicates that these structures are detached in the Pottsville Formation. Compressional folds in Gurnee and Oak Grove fields, by comparison, are interpreted to

  20. Optimization of microwave pretreatment conditions to maximize methane production and methane yield in mesophilic anaerobic sludge digestion.

    PubMed

    Park, W J; Ahn, J H

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to find optimum microwave pretreatment conditions for methane production and methane yield in anaerobic sludge digestion. The sludge was pretreated using a laboratory-scale industrial microwave unit (2450 MHz frequency). Microwave temperature increase rate (TIR) (2.9-17.1 degrees C/min) and final temperature (FT) (52-108 degrees C) significantly affected solubilization, methane production, and methane yield. Solubilization degree (soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD)/total COD) in the pretreated sludge (3.3-14.7%) was clearly higher than that in the raw sludge (2.6%). Within the design boundaries, the optimum conditions for maximum methane production (2.02 L/L) were TIR = 9.1 degrees C/min and FT = 90 degrees C, and the optimum conditions for maximum methane yield (809 mL/g VS(removed)) were TIR 7.1 degrees C/min and FT = 92 degrees C.

  1. Biochemically enhanced methane production from coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, Aleksandra

    For many years, biogas was connected mostly with the organic matter decomposition in shallow sediments (e.g., wetlands, landfill gas, etc.). Recently, it has been realized that biogenic methane production is ongoing in many hydrocarbon reservoirs. This research examined microbial methane and carbon dioxide generation from coal. As original contributions methane production from various coal materials was examined in classical and electro-biochemical bench-scale reactors using unique, developed facultative microbial consortia that generate methane under anaerobic conditions. Facultative methanogenic populations are important as all known methanogens are strict anaerobes and their application outside laboratory would be problematic. Additional testing examined the influence of environmental conditions, such as pH, salinity, and nutrient amendments on methane and carbon dioxide generation. In 44-day ex-situ bench-scale batch bioreactor tests, up to 300,000 and 250,000 ppm methane was generated from bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste respectively, a significant improvement over 20-40 ppm methane generated from control samples. Chemical degradation of complex hydrocarbons using environmentally benign reagents, prior to microbial biodegradation and methanogenesis, resulted in dissolution of up to 5% bituminous coal and bituminous coal waste and up to 25% lignite in samples tested. Research results confirm that coal waste may be a significant underutilized resource that could be converted to useful fuel. Rapid acidification of lignite samples resulted in low pH (below 4.0), regardless of chemical pretreatment applied, and did not generate significant methane amounts. These results confirmed the importance of monitoring and adjusting in situ and ex situ environmental conditions during methane production. A patented Electro-Biochemical Reactor technology was used to supply electrons and electron acceptor environments, but appeared to influence methane generation in a

  2. Environmental factors affecting methane distribution and bacterial methane oxidation in the German Bight (North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osudar, Roman; Matoušů, Anna; Alawi, Mashal; Wagner, Dirk; Bussmann, Ingeborg

    2015-07-01

    River estuaries are responsible for high rates of methane emissions to the atmosphere. The complexity and diversity of estuaries require detailed investigation of methane sources and sinks, as well as of their spatial and seasonal variations. The Elbe river estuary and the adjacent North Sea were chosen as the study site for this survey, which was conducted from October 2010 to June 2012. Using gas chromatography and radiotracer techniques, we measured methane concentrations and methane oxidation (MOX) rates along a 60 km long transect from Cuxhaven to Helgoland. Methane distribution was influenced by input from the methane-rich mouth of the Elbe and gradual dilution by methane-depleted sea water. Methane concentrations near the coast were on average 30 ± 13 nmol L-1, while in the open sea, they were 14 ± 6 nmol L-1. Interestingly, the highest methane concentrations were repeatedly detected near Cuxhaven, not in the Elbe River freshwater end-member as previously reported. Though, we did not find clear seasonality we observed temporal methane variations, which depended on temperature and presumably on water discharge from the Elbe River. The highest MOX rates generally coincided with the highest methane concentrations, and varied from 2.6 ± 2.7 near the coast to 0.417 ± 0.529 nmol L-1 d-1 in the open sea. Turnover times varied from 3 to >1000 days. MOX rates were strongly affected by methane concentration, temperature and salinity. We ruled out the supposition that MOX is not an important methane sink in most of the Elbe estuary and adjacent German Bight.

  3. Methane production by attached film

    DOEpatents

    Jewell, William J.

    1981-01-01

    A method for purifying wastewater of biodegradable organics by converting the organics to methane and carbon dioxide gases is disclosed, characterized by the use of an anaerobic attached film expanded bed reactor for the reaction process. Dilute organic waste material is initially seeded with a heterogeneous anaerobic bacteria population including a methane-producing bacteria. The seeded organic waste material is introduced into the bottom of the expanded bed reactor which includes a particulate support media coated with a polysaccharide film. A low-velocity upward flow of the organic waste material is established through the bed during which the attached bacterial film reacts with the organic material to produce methane and carbon dioxide gases, purified water, and a small amount of residual effluent material. The residual effluent material is filtered by the film as it flows upwardly through the reactor bed. In a preferred embodiment, partially treated effluent material is recycled from the top of the bed to the bottom of the bed for further treatment. The methane and carbon dioxide gases are then separated from the residual effluent material and purified water.

  4. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here we present a mesocosm experiment comparing eight plant species for their effects on internal transport and overall emissions of methane under contrasting hydrological conditions. To quantify how much methane was transported internally through plants (the chimney effect), we blocked diffusion from the soil surface with an agar seal. Results We found that graminoids caused higher methane emissions than forbs, although the emissions from mesocosms with different species were either lower than or comparable to those from control mesocosms with no plant (i.e. bare soil). Species with a relatively greater root volume and a larger biomass exhibited a larger chimney effect, though overall methane emissions were negatively related to plant biomass. Emissions were also reduced by lowering the water table. Conclusions We conclude that plant species (and functional groups) vary in the degree to which they transport methane to the atmosphere. However, a plant with a high capacity to transport methane does not necessarily emit more methane, as it may also cause more rhizosphere oxidation of methane. A shift in plant species composition from graminoids to forbs and/or from low to high productive species may lead to reduction of methane emissions. PMID:24010540

  5. Abiotic Production of Methane in Terrestrial Planets

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-01-01

    Abstract On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×108 and 1.3×109 molecules cm−2 s−1 for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life. Key Words: Serpentinization—Exoplanets—Biosignatures—Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 13, 550–559. PMID:23742231

  6. Production of Methane and Water from Crew Plastic Waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine; Santiago, Eddie; Parrish, Clyde; Strayer, Richard F.; Garland, Jay L.

    2008-01-01

    Recycling is a technology that will be key to creating a self sustaining lunar outpost. The plastics used for food packaging provide a source of material that could be recycled to produce water and methane. The recycling of these plastics will require some additional resources that will affect the initial estimate of starting materials that will have to be transported from earth, mainly oxygen, energy and mass. These requirements will vary depending on the recycling conditions. The degredation products of these plastics will vary under different atmospheric conditions. An estimate of the the production rate of methane and water using typical ISRU processes along with the plastic recycling will be presented.

  7. Biogas crops grown in energy crop rotations: Linking chemical composition and methane production characteristics.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Christiane; Idler, Christine; Heiermann, Monika

    2016-04-01

    Methane production characteristics and chemical composition of 405 silages from 43 different crop species were examined using uniform laboratory methods, with the aim to characterise a wide range of crop feedstocks from energy crop rotations and to identify main parameters that influence biomass quality for biogas production. Methane formation was analysed from chopped and over 90 days ensiled crop biomass in batch anaerobic digestion tests without further pre-treatment. Lignin content of crop biomass was found to be the most significant explanatory variable for specific methane yields while the methane content and methane production rates were mainly affected by the content of nitrogen-free extracts and neutral detergent fibre, respectively. The accumulation of butyric acid and alcohols during the ensiling process had significant impact on specific methane yields and methane contents of crop silages. It is proposed that products of silage fermentation should be considered when evaluating crop silages for biogas production.

  8. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Ni, Bing-Jie; Ganigué, Ramon; Werner, Ursula; Sharma, Keshab R; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated significant sulfide and methane production by sewer biofilms, particularly in rising mains. Sewer sediments in gravity sewers are also biologically active; however, their contribution to biological transformations in sewers is poorly understood at present. In this study, sediments collected from a gravity sewer were cultivated in a laboratory reactor fed with real wastewater for more than one year to obtain intact sediments. Batch test results show significant sulfide production with an average rate of 9.20 ± 0.39 g S/m(2)·d from the sediments, which is significantly higher than the areal rate of sewer biofilms. In contrast, the average methane production rate is 1.56 ± 0.14 g CH4/m(2)·d at 20 °C, which is comparable to the areal rate of sewer biofilms. These results clearly show that the contributions of sewer sediments to sulfide and methane production cannot be ignored when evaluating sewer emissions. Microsensor and pore water measurements of sulfide, sulfate and methane in the sediments, microbial profiling along the depth of the sediments and mathematical modelling reveal that sulfide production takes place near the sediment surface due to the limited penetration of sulfate. In comparison, methane production occurs in a much deeper zone below the surface likely due to the better penetration of soluble organic carbon. Modelling results illustrate the dependency of sulfide and methane productions on the bulk sulfate and soluble organic carbon concentrations can be well described with half-order kinetics.

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d‑1) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery.

  10. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-21

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d(-1)) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery.

  11. Polyhydroxyalkanoates in waste activated sludge enhances anaerobic methane production through improving biochemical methane potential instead of hydrolysis rate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilin; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Chang; Xie, Guo-Jun; Zhou, Xu; Qian, Jin; Yang, Guojing; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yiqi; Wang, Dongbo

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic sludge digestion is the main technology for sludge reduction and stabilization prior to sludge disposal. Nevertheless, methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is often restricted by the poor biochemical methane potential and slow hydrolysis rate of WAS. This work systematically investigated the effect of PHA levels of WAS on anaerobic methane production, using both experimental and mathematical modeling approaches. Biochemical methane potential tests showed that methane production increased with increased PHA levels in WAS. Model-based analysis suggested that the PHA-based method enhanced methane production by improving biochemical methane potential of WAS, with the highest enhancement being around 40% (from 192 to 274 L CH4/kg VS added; VS: volatile solid) when the PHA levels increased from 21 to 143 mg/g VS. In contrast, the hydrolysis rate (approximately 0.10 d−1) was not significantly affected by the PHA levels. Economic analysis suggested that the PHA-based method could save $1.2/PE/y (PE: population equivalent) in a typical wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). The PHA-based method can be easily integrated into the current WWTP to enhance methane production, thereby providing a strong support to the on-going paradigm shift in wastewater management from pollutant removal to resource recovery. PMID:26791952

  12. Temperature and hydrology affect methane emissions from Prairie Pothole Wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bansal, Sheel; Tangen, Brian; Finocchiaro, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) in central North America consists of millions of depressional wetlands that each have considerable potential to emit methane (CH4). Changes in temperature and hydrology in the PPR from climate change may affect methane fluxes from these wetlands. To assess the potential effects of changes in climate on methane emissions, we examined the relationships between flux rates and temperature or water depth using six years of bi-weekly flux measurements during the snow-free period from six temporarily ponded and six permanently ponded wetlands in North Dakota, USA. Methane flux rates were among the highest reported for freshwater wetlands, and had considerable spatial and temporal variation. Methane flux rates increased with increasing temperature and water depth, and were especially high when conditions were warmer and wetter than average (163 ± 28 mg CH4 m−2 h−1) compared to warmer and drier (37 ± 7 mg CH4 m−2 h−1). Methane emission rates from permanent wetlands were less sensitive to changes in temperature and water depth compared to temporary wetlands, likely due to higher sulfate concentrations in permanent wetlands. While the predicted increase in temperature with climate change will likely increase methane emission rates from PPR wetlands, drier conditions could moderate these increases.

  13. Investigations of Methane Production in Hypersaline Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.

    2015-01-01

    The recent reports of methane in the atmosphere of Mars, as well as the findings of hypersaline paleo-environments on that planet, have underscored the need to evaluate the importance of biological (as opposed to geological) trace gas production and consumption. Methane in the atmosphere of Mars may be an indication of life but might also be a consequence of geologic activity and/or the thermal alteration of ancient organic matter. Hypersaline environments have now been reported to be extremely likely in several locations in our solar system, including: Mars, Europa, and Enceladus. Modern hypersaline microbial mat communities, (thought to be analogous to those present on the early Earth at a period of time when Mars was experiencing very similar environmental conditions), have been shown to produce methane. However, very little is known about the physical and/or biological controls imposed upon the rates at which methane, and other important trace gases, are produced and consumed in these environments. We describe here the results of our investigations of methane production in hypersaline environments, including field sites in Chile, Baja California Mexico, California, USA and the United Arab Emirates. We have measured high concentrations of methane in bubbles of gas produced both in the sediments underlying microbial mats, as well as in areas not colonized by microbial mats in the Guerrero Negro hypersaline ecosystem, Baja California Mexico, in Chile, and in salt ponds on the San Francisco Bay. The carbon isotopic (d13C) composition of the methane in the bubbles exhibited an extremely wide range of values, (ca. -75 per mille ca. -25 per mille). The hydrogen isotopic composition of the methane (d2H) ranged from -60 to -30per mille and -450 to -350per mille. These isotopic values are outside of the range of values normally considered to be biogenic, however incubations of the sediments in contact with these gas bubbles reveals that the methane is indeed being

  14. Methane production from ozonated pulp mill effluent

    SciTech Connect

    Bremmon, C.E.; Jurgensen, M.F.; Patton, J.T.

    1980-07-01

    A study was made of the production of methane from desugared spent sulfite liquor (SSL) reacted with ozone. The ozonated SSL was fed continuously to three anaerobic fermenters for three months as the sole source of carbon and energy. The fermenters were inoculated with anaerobic bacteria obtained from sewage sludge and acclimated for 1 month in ozonated SSL prior to continuous fermentation. Chemical and biological parameters such as COD, BOD, total sulfur content, redox potential, pH, fatty acid composition, and methane bacteria populations were monitored to determine changes in the SSL during fermentation. Methane production from ozone-treated SSL averaged 1.7 liters/ liter or 17 ml of CH/sub 4/ produced/gram of volatile solids fed. Fatty acis analysis of fermenter effluent indicated a net production of 58 mM/ liter of acetate during ozonated SSL fermentation. This acetic acid production shows future potential for further fermentation by protein-producing yeast. Although the rate of conversion of volatile solids to CH/sub 4/ in this process was not competitive with domestic or agricultural waste digesters, this study did indicate the potential benefits of ozonating organic wastes for increased methane fermentation yields.

  15. Potential methane production and methane oxidation rates in peatland ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Yavitt, J.B.; Lang, G.E.; Downey, D.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Potential rates of methane production and carbon dioxide production were measured on 11 dates in 1986 in peat from six plant communities typical of moss-dominated peatlands in the Appalachian Mountains. Annual methane production ranged from 2.7 to 17.5 mol/sq m, and annual carbon dioxide production ranged from 30.6 to 79.0 mol/sq m. The wide range in methane production values among the communities found within a single peatland indicates that obtaining one production value for a peatland may not be appropriate. Low temperature constrained the potential for methane production in winter, while the chemical quality of the peat substrate appears to control methane production in the summer. Methane oxidation was measured throughout the peat profile to a depth of 30 cm. Values for methane oxidation ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 microM/hr among the six plant communities. Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria probably mediated most of the activity. On a daily basis during the summer, between 11 and 100% of the methane produced is susceptible to oxidation within the peat column. Pools of dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide in pore waters were less than 0.2 and less than 1.0 mol/sq m, respectively, indicating that methane does not accumulate in the pore waters. Peatlands have been considered as an important source of biologically produced methane. Despite the high rates of methane production, the high rates of methane oxidation dampen the potential emission of methane to the atmosphere. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. ANALYSIS OF FACTORS AFFECTING METHANE GAS RECOVERY FROM SIX LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical mod...

  17. Methane production by sheep and cattle in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minson, D. J.

    1993-02-01

    Using methane production rates from Australian feeds and local estimates of the quantity of feed eaten by different classes of animal, it was estimated that sheep and cattle in Australia produce 2.66 Tg methane in 1990. This value is 43% higher than previous estimates and indicates a need to reassess the methane production of ruminants in other countries.

  18. Methane production from ethanol co-products in anaerobic SBRs.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, D P; Hirl, P J; Belia, E

    2008-01-01

    Methane production from condensed distillers' solubles (CDS, or syrup), a co-product of ethanol production, was studied in 2-l anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) under 10 different operating conditions. Methane production and COD removal were quantified under steady state conditions for a wide range of operating parameters. COD removals of 62-96% were achieved at OLRs ranging from 1.5-22.2 g COD l(-1) d(-1), SRTs from 8-40 d, and F/M ranging from 0.37-1.95 g COD g(-1) VSS d(-1). The methane content of the biogas varied from 57-71% with 0.27 l CH(4) produced per g of COD removed. Approximately 54% of the COD fed to the ASBRs, and 83% of the COD removed in the ASBRs was converted to methane. Microbial yield (Y) and decay (b) constants were determined to be approximately Y = 0.127 g VSS g(-1) COD removed and b = 0.031 d(-1), respectively. Methane recovery from ethanol co-products can reduce the cost and the fossil fuel consumption of ethanol production.

  19. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  20. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in th e Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has be en known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the most importan t class of microorganisms which form the Archaea reign. Methane can be produced also from incomplete combustion of organic material. The generation of CH4 in an oxygenated environment under near-ambient conditions is a new discovery made in 2006 by Keppler et. al where surprisingly they measured emissions of this green house gas from plants incubated in chambers with air containing 20% of oxygen. A lthough the estimates on a global scale are still object of an intensive debate, the results presented in this thesis clearly show the existence of methane prod uction under oxic conditions for non living plant material. Temperature and UV l ight are key factors that drive the generation of CH4 from plant matter in a wel l oxygenated environment.

  1. Methane production by anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Klass, D.L.; Ghosh, S.

    1980-01-01

    Water hyacinth under conventional high-rate digestion conditions exhibited higher methane yields and energy recovery efficiencies when grown in sewage-fed lagoons as compared to the corresponding values obtained with water hyacinth grown in a fresh-water pond. Mesophilic digestion provided the highest feed energy recovered in the product gas as methane while thermophilic digestion, when operated at sufficiently high loading rates and reduced detention times, gave the highest specific methane production rates. Methane yields, volatile solids reduction, and energy recovery as methane for the sewage-grown water hyacinth were in the same range as those observed for other biomass substrates when digested under similar conditions.

  2. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes

  3. A model for methane production in sewers.

    PubMed

    Chaosakul, Thitirat; Koottatep, Thammarat; Polprasert, Chongrak

    2014-09-19

    Most sewers in developing countries are combined sewers which receive stormwater and effluent from septic tanks or cesspools of households and buildings. Although the wastewater strength in these sewers is usually lower than those in developed countries, due to improper construction and maintenance, the hydraulic retention time (HRT) could be relatively long and resulting considerable greenhouse gas (GHG) production. This study proposed an empirical model to predict the quantity of methane production in gravity-flow sewers based on relevant parameters such as surface area to volume ratio (A/V) of sewer, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and wastewater temperature. The model was developed from field survey data of gravity-flow sewers located in a peri-urban area, central Thailand and validated with field data of a sewer system of the Gold Coast area, Queensland, Australia. Application of this model to improve construction and maintenance of gravity-flow sewers to minimize GHG production and reduce global warming is presented.

  4. Global Change Simulations Affect Potential Methane Oxidation in Upland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blankinship, J. C.; Hungate, B. A.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4) are higher now than they have ever been during the past 420,000 years. However, concentrations have remained stable since 1999. Emissions associated with livestock husbandry are unlikely to have changed, so some combination of reduced production in wetlands, more efficient capture by landfills, or increased consumption by biological CH4 oxidation in upland soils may be responsible. Methane oxidizing bacteria are ubiquitous in upland soils and little is known about how these bacteria respond to anthropogenic global change, and how they will influence - or already are influencing - the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Might ongoing and future global changes increase biological CH4 oxidation? Soils were sampled from two field experiments to assess changes in rates of CH4 oxidation in response to global change simulations. Potential activities of CH4 oxidizing bacterial communities were measured through laboratory incubations under optimal temperature, soil moisture, and atmospheric CH4 concentrations (~18 ppm, or 10x ambient). The ongoing 6-year multifactorial Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, elevated atmospheric CO2, elevated atmospheric N deposition, and increased wildfire frequency in an annual grassland in a Mediterranean-type climate in central California. The ongoing 1-year multifactorial Merriam Climate Change Experiment (MCCE) simulates warming, elevated precipitation, and reduced precipitation in four different types of ecosystems along an elevational gradient in a semi-arid climate in northern Arizona. The high desert grassland, pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine forest, and mixed conifer forest ecosystems range in annual precipitation from 100 to 1000 mm yr-1, and from productivity being strongly water limited to strongly temperature limited. Among JRGCE soils, elevated atmospheric CO2 increased potential CH4 oxidation rates (p=0.052) and wildfire

  5. Factors affecting the catalytic oligomerization of methane via microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Luis Daniel

    Catalytic microwave heating has been used as a method for the oligomerization of methane to higher hydrocarbons. Many catalysts were tested in this reaction. Nickel powder, raney nickel, iron powder and activated carbon were the most active and efficient catalysts for the production of higher hydrocarbons. When helium was used as a diluent gas and the applied power was optimized, the selectivities were controlled to the most desired products. In general, the most abundant products for all the experiments were C2s. Iron powder was active only at high power (1130 W). At these conditions acetylene was avoided and ethylene and ethane were produced in the same proportion. Activated carbon catalysts with helium as diluent led to a selectivity towards benzene up to 33%. Some manganese oxides such as OMS-1, OMS-2 and MnO2 (dielectric constant, epsilon ≈ 104) were not active in these reactions. These data suggest that the dielectric constant is not the most important factor in the oligomerization of methane via microwave heating. Conversion and activities of these materials are not proportionally related to the surface area of the catalysts. Higher catalytic activity was observed for Raney nickel than for regular nickel powder. The maximum conversion obtained was 24% at 400 W and 10 min of irradiation time. For regular nickel powder that conversion can be achieved only after 700 W of power and more than 20 min of reaction. BET surface area, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Temperature-Programmed Desorption and Reduction analysis were performed to characterize the catalyst before and after reaction. Deactivation of Raney nickel by fouling and sintering was observed after 500 W and/or 15 min of reaction. The effect of microwave radiation frequency on activity and product distribution for methane oligomerization has been studied. Nickel, iron, and activated carbon catalysts were used in these studies. Experiments were done with pure methane

  6. Development of Sand Production Evaluation Apparatus for Methane Hydrate Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakumoto, M.; Yoneda, J.; Tenma, N.; Katagiri, J.; Noda, S.

    2015-12-01

    As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on sand production mechanism during methane gas production. In 2013, the first methane hydrate offshore production test was conducted in Japan, and it was recognized in the production of about 20000m3/day of methane gas from methane hydrate bearing sand sediment in deep marine sediment. In methane hydrate development, depressurization method has been proposed for gas extraction. This method is a method to reduce the bottom hole pressure by submersible pump lowering water level in the production well, and gas and water is recovered by methane hydrate dissociation at the in situ. At that time, a phenomenon that sand flows into the wells is feared. In actually, sand production phenomenon occurred after 6 days from production start in offshore production test. A mechanism of sand production has not yet been resolved in case of methane hydrate development. Therefore, we developed large scale laboratory test apparatus for the purpose of elucidation of the mechanism of sand production phenomenon. In this presentation, we introduce basic performance of this apparatus, and usefulness is made mention by representative test results.

  7. Enhanced Microbial Pathways for Methane Production from Oil Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Fallgren

    2009-02-15

    Methane from oil shale can potentially provide a significant contribution to natural gas industry, and it may be possible to increase and continue methane production by artificially enhancing methanogenic activity through the addition of various substrate and nutrient treatments. Western Research Institute in conjunction with Pick & Shovel Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted microcosm and scaled-up reactor studies to investigate the feasibility and optimization of biogenic methane production from oil shale. The microcosm study involving crushed oil shale showed the highest yield of methane was produced from oil shale pretreated with a basic solution and treated with nutrients. Incubation at 30 C, which is the estimated temperature in the subsurface where the oil shale originated, caused and increase in methane production. The methane production eventually decreased when pH of the system was above 9.00. In the scaled-up reactor study, pretreatment of the oil shale with a basic solution, nutrient enhancements, incubation at 30 C, and maintaining pH at circumneutral levels yielded the highest rate of biogenic methane production. From this study, the annual biogenic methane production rate was determined to be as high as 6042 cu. ft/ton oil shale.

  8. Ecosystem and physiological controls over methane production in northern wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, D.W.; Holland, E.A.; Schimel, D.S.

    1994-01-20

    Peat chemistry appears to exert primary control over methane production rates in the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) area. We determined laboratory methane production rate potentials in anaerobic slurries of samples collected from a transect of sites through the NOWES study area. We related methane production rates to indicators of resistance to microbial decay (peat C:N and lignin:N ratios) and experimentally manipulated substrate availability for methanogenesis using ethanol (EtOH) and plant litter. We also determined responses of methane production to pH and temperature. Methane production potentials declined along the gradient of sites from high rates in the coastal fens to low rates in the interior bogs and were generally highest in surface layers. Strong relationships between CH{sub 4} production potentials and peat chemistry suggested that methanogenesis was limited by fermentation rates. Methane production at ambient pH responded strongly to substrate additions in the circumneutral fens with narrow lignin:N and C:N ratios ({partial_derivative}CH{sub 4}/{partial_derivative}EtOH = 0.9-2.3 mg g{sup {minus}1}) and weakly in the acidic bogs with wide C:N and lignin:N ratios ({partial_derivative}CH{sub 4}/{partial_derivative}EtOH = -0.4-0.02 mg g{sup {minus}1}). Observed Q{sub 10} values ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and generally increased with increasing substrate availability, suggesting that fermentation rates were limiting. Titration experiments generally demonstrated inhibition of methanogenesis by low pH. Our results suggest that the low rates of methane emission observed in interior bogs during NOWES likely resulted from pH and substrate quality limitation of the fermentation step in methane production and thus reflect intrinsically low methane production potentials. Low methane emission rates observed during NOWES will likely be observed in other northern wetland regions with similar vegetation chemistry. 57 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Ecosystem and physiological controls over methane production in northern wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentine, David W.; Holland, Elisabeth A.; Schimel, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Peat chemistry appears to exert primary control over methane production rates in the Canadian Northern Wetlands Study (NOWES) area. We determined laboratory methane production rate potentials in anaerobic slurries of samples collected from a transect of sites through the NOWES study area. We related methane production rates to indicators of resistance to microbial decay (peat C: N and lignin: N ratios) and experimentally manipulated substrate availability for methanogenesis using ethanol (EtOH) and plant litter. We also determined responses of methane production to pH and temperature. Methane production potentials declined along the gradient of sites from high rates in the coastal fens to low rates in the interior bogs and were generally highest in surface layers. Strong relationships between CH4 production potentials and peat chemistry suggested that methanogenesis was limited by fermentation rates. Methane production at ambient pH responded strongly to substrate additions in the circumneutral fens with narrow lignin: N and C: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = 0.9-2.3 mg/g) and weakly in the acidic bogs with wide C: N and lignin: N ratios (delta CH4/delta EtOH = -0.04-0.02 mg/g). Observed Q(sub 10) values ranged from 1.7 to 4.7 and generally increased with increasing substrate availability, suggesting that fermentation rates were limiting. Titration experiments generally demonstrated inhibition of methanogenesis by low pH. Our results suggest that the low rates of methane emission observed in interior bogs during NOWES likely resulted from pH and substrate quality limitation of the fermentation step in methane production and thus reflect intrinsically low methane production potentials. Low methane emission rates observed during NOWES will likely be observed in other northern wetland regions with similar vegetation chemistry.

  10. Enhancement of Biogenic Coalbed Methane Production and Back Injection of Coalbed Methane Co-Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jin

    2007-05-31

    Biogenic methane is a common constituent in deep subsurface environments such as coalbeds and oil shale beds. Coalbed methane (CBM) makes significant contributions to world natural gas industry and CBM production continues to increase. With increasing CBM production, the production of CBM co-produced water increases, which is an environmental concern. This study investigated the feasibility in re-using CBM co-produced water and other high sodic/saline water to enhance biogenic methane production from coal and other unconventional sources, such as oil shale. Microcosms were established with the selected carbon sources which included coal, oil shale, lignite, peat, and diesel-contaminated soil. Each microcosm contained either CBM coproduced water or groundwater with various enhancement and inhibitor combinations. Results indicated that the addition of nutrients and nutrients with additional carbon can enhance biogenic methane production from coal and oil shale. Methane production from oil shale was much greater than that from coal, which is possibly due to the greater amount of available Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) from oil shale. Inconclusive results were observed from the other sources since the incubation period was too low. WRI is continuing studies with biogenic methane production from oil shale.

  11. Transcriptomic evidence for net methane oxidation and net methane production in putative ANaerobic MEthanotrophic (ANME) archaea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, K. G.; Alperin, M. J.; Teske, A.

    2010-12-01

    Anaerobic methane oxidation regulates methane emissions in marine sediments and is thought to be mediated by uncultured methanogen-like archaea collectively labeled ANME (for ANaerobic MEthanotrophs). ANME archaea are often assumed to be obligate methanotrophs that are incapable of net methanogenesis, and are therefore used as proxies for anaerobic methane oxidation in many environments in spite of uncertainty regarding their metabolic capabilities. We tested this assumption by detecting and quantifying methanogenic gene transcription of ANME archaea across clearly differentiated zones of methane oxidation vs. methane production in sediments from the White Oak River estuary, NC. ANME-1 archaea (a group of putative obligate methanotrophs) consistently transcribe 16S rRNA and mRNA of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcrA) the key gene for methanogenesis, up to 45 cm into methanogenic sediments. CARD-FISH shows that ANME-1 archaea exist as single rod-shaped cells or pairs of cells, and in very low numbers. Integrating normalized depth-distributions of 16S rDNA and rRNA (measured with qPCR and RT-qPCR, respectively) shows that 26-77 % of the rDNA proxy for ANME-1 cell numbers, and 18-74 % of the rRNA proxy for ANME-1 activity occurs within methane-producing sediments. mRNA transcripts of dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsrAB) from sulfate reducing bacteria, the putative syntrophic partners of sulfate-dependent methane oxidation, were amplified consistently from methane-oxidizing sediments, and inconsistently from methane-producing sediments. These results change the perspective from ANME-1 archaea as obligate methane oxidizers to methanogens that are also capable of methane oxidation.

  12. Methane production from grape skins. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yunghans, W.N.

    1981-10-09

    Methane production from grape pomace was measured for a 50-day digestion period. Gas production was calculated to be 2400 ft/sup 3//10 d/ton at 53% methane content. Microorganisms particularly a fungus which grows on grape pomace and lignin was isolated. Lignin content of pomace was measured at approximately 60%. Lignin is slowly digested and may represent a residue which requires long term digestion. Research is continuing on isolation of anaerobic methane bacteria and codigestion of pomace with enzymes as cellulase and pectinase. The sewage sludge functioned adequately as a mixed source of organisms capable of digesting grape pomace. A sediment from stored grape juice produced significant amounts of methane and represents a nutrient substrate for additional studies on continuous flow methane production. 3 figs.

  13. Relationship between selection for feed efficiency and methane production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enteric methane is a product of fermentation in the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants. A group of archaea bacteria collectively called “methanogens” are responsible for the synthesis of methane. In ruminants, the methanogens grow in the reticulum-rumen complex and in the cecum. Most of the met...

  14. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  15. Forest cockchafer larvae as methane production hotspots in soils and their importance for net soil methane fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Murphy, Paul; Müller, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Certain groups of soil invertebrates, namely scarab beetles and millipedes, are capable of emitting considerable amounts of methane due to methanogens inhabiting their gut system. It was already pointed out in the early 1990's, that these groups of invertebrates may represent a globally important source of methane. However, apart from termites, the importance of invertebrates for the soil methane budget is still unknown. Here, we present preliminary results of a laboratory soil incubation experiment elucidating the influence of forest cockchafer larvae (Melolontha hippocastani FABRICIUS) on soil methane cycling. In January/February 2016, two soils from two different management systems - one from a pine forest (extensive use) and one from a vegetable field (intensive use) - were incubated for 56 days either with or without beetle larvae. Net soil methane fluxes and larvae methane emissions together with their stable carbon isotope signatures were quantified at regular intervals to estimate gross methane production and gross methane oxidation in the soils. The results of this experiment will contribute to testing the hypothesis of whether methane production hotspots can significantly enhance the methane oxidation capacity of soils. Forest cockchafer larvae are only found in well-aerated sandy soils where one would usually not suspect relevant gross methane production. Thus, besides quantifying their contribution to net soil methane fluxes, they are also ideal organisms to study the effect of methane production hotspots on overall soil methane cycling. Funding support: Reintegration grant of the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) (#57185798).

  16. Influence of headspace flushing on methane production in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests.

    PubMed

    Koch, Konrad; Fernández, Yadira Bajón; Drewes, Jörg E

    2015-06-01

    The influence of headspace flushing on the specific methane (CH4) production of blank samples with just inoculum in Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests was studied. The three most common ways were applied: flushing with nitrogen (N2) gas, flushing with a mixture of N2 and CO2 (80/20 v/v), and no flushing. The results revealed that removing the oxygen is crucial to avoid aerobic respiration, which caused both hindered activity of methanogens and loss of methane potential. Furthermore it was demonstrated that 20% of CO2 in the flush gas increased significantly the methane production by over 20% compared to the flushing with pure N2. In order to mimic the same headspace conditions as in full-scale treatment plants, using a flush gas with a similar CO2 concentration as the expected biogas is suggested.

  17. Methane dynamics in a montane fen: Factors controlling production, accumulation and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwakanyamale, K. E.; Yeung, H.; Strack, M.

    2014-12-01

    Characterization of methane dynamics in peatlands is essential to improve understanding of peatlands contribution to carbon balance and interaction with climate. Of the two peatland types, natural fens are known to be a larger contributor of methane emissions to the atmosphere than natural bogs. This study uses geophysical methods integrated with in-situ direct measurements and chamber fluxes to improve understanding of temporal and spatial variation in methane production, accumulation and emissions from natural montane fen in Alberta Canada. Meteorological data and peat cores (~150 cm) were collected to study factors affecting methane production, accumulation and emissions from the Sibbald Research Wetland, a montane fen in the Rocky Mountains in southern Alberta. Our results show a direct correlation between methane accumulation and degree of peat humification, substrate quality and porosity. Changes in temperature, pressure and water table position were shown to relate to ebullition events, with the highest number of ebullition events occurring from late August to early November. The geophysical results indicate a small spatial variation in free phase biogenic gas accumulation within the studied area. Diffusive methane fluxes were correlated to plant productivity on both daily and seasonal time scales with patterns varying between plots dominated by Juncus sp. and Carex spp. These results highlight the interacting ecological and physical controls on peatland methane dynamics.

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  2. Methane production from global biomass burning

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Min Hao; Ward, D.E.

    1993-11-20

    Emissions of methane from various sources of biomass burning are determined quantitatively for tropical, temperate, and boreal regions. About 85% of the total CH{sub 4} is emitted in the tropical area, which is mainly the result of shifting cultivation, fuelwood use, and deforestation. Methane emissions from biomass burning may have increased by at least 9% during the last decade because of increases in tropical deforestation and the use of fuelwood. Changes in land use practices and population growth in the tropics are possible causes of the increase of atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentration. 31 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Energy from anaerobic methane production. [Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    Since 1970 Swedish researchers have been testing the ANAMET (anaerobic-aerobic-methane) process, which involves converting industrial wastewaters via an initial anaerobic microbiological step followed by an aerobic one. Recycling the biomass material in each step allows shorter hydraulic retention times without decreasing stability or solids reduction. Since the first ANAMET plants began operating at a Swedish sugar factory in 1972, 17 more plants have started up or are under construction. Moreover, the ANAMET process has engendered to offshoot BIOMET (biomass-methane) process, a thermophilic anaerobic scheme that can handle sugar-beet pulp as well as grass and other soft, fast-growing biomasses.

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  5. Methane production from acid hydrolysates of Agave tequilana bagasse: evaluation of hydrolysis conditions and methane yield.

    PubMed

    Arreola-Vargas, Jorge; Ojeda-Castillo, Valeria; Snell-Castro, Raúl; Corona-González, Rosa Isela; Alatriste-Mondragón, Felipe; Méndez-Acosta, Hugo O

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of diluted acid hydrolysis for sugar extraction from cooked and uncooked Agave tequilana bagasse and feasibility of using the hydrolysates as substrate for methane production, with and without nutrient addition, in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (AnSBR) were studied. Results showed that the hydrolysis over the cooked bagasse was more effective for sugar extraction at the studied conditions. Total sugars concentration in the cooked and uncooked bagasse hydrolysates were 27.9 g/L and 18.7 g/L, respectively. However, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural was detected in the cooked bagasse hydrolysate, and therefore, the uncooked bagasse hydrolysate was selected as substrate for methane production. Interestingly, results showed that the AnSBR operated without nutrient addition obtained a constant methane production (0.26 L CH4/g COD), whereas the AnSBR operated with nutrient addition presented a gradual methane suppression. Molecular analyses suggested that methane suppression in the experiment with nutrient addition was due to a negative effect over the archaeal/bacterial ratio.

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  9. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  10. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Osman A; Mulbry, Walter; Lansing, Stephanie

    2015-09-01

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion. In temperate climates, digesters require a considerable amount of additional heat energy to maintain temperatures at these levels. In this study, the effects of lower digestion temperatures (22 and 28°C), on the methane production from dairy digesters were evaluated and compared with 35°C using duplicate replicates of field-scale (FS) digesters with a 17-day hydraulic retention time. After acclimation, the FS digesters were operated for 12weeks using solids-separated manure at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.4kgVSm(-3)d(-1) and then for 8weeks using separated manure amended with manure solids at an OLR of 2.6kgVSm(-3)d(-1). Methane production values of the FS digesters at 22 and 28°C were about 70% and 87%, respectively, of the values from FS digesters at 35°C. The results suggest that anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure at 28°C were nearly as efficient as digesters operated at 35°C, with 70% of total methane achievable at 22°C. These results are relevant to small farms interested in anaerobic digestion for methane reduction without heat recovery from generators or for methane recovery from covered lagoon digesters.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  12. Topographic Variation and Methane Production in Siberian Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eason, J.; Kuhn, M. A.; Dunn, S.; Spawn, S.; Schade, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the fate of soil carbon when permafrost soils begin to thaw is critical for predicting the impact of permafrost thaw on global climate change. Microbial metabolism of soil carbon can produce carbon dioxide or methane, depending on soil conditions, and which pathway dominates has great significance for the strength of climate feedbacks since methane is a much more powerful greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. In Arctic ecosystems, methane production from upland environments is not well understood and generally assumed to be low because conditions there are generally not favorable for methanogenesis. Small changes in topography, however, can lead to great heterogeneity in soil conditions at small scales that may lead to higher methane flux than generally recognized. In this study, we investigated patterns in methane, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in in surface waters of 15 small ponds in the Kolyma River watershed in Northeast Siberia. The ponds were distributed across a topographic gradient from upland tundra high in the landscape to low-lying ponds in the floodplain of the Kolyma River. In addition, we used chambers to measured methane fluxes from a variety of topographic depressions that ranged from pools to moss-dominated saturated soils lacking surface water, to dry soils dominated by sedges. Dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations in ponds showed no trend down the topographic gradient while methane concentrations decreased downslope. The decrease in methane production may be the result of a switch from green moss to brown moss, which may act as a host for methanotrophic bacteria. Ponds with green moss had significantly higher concentrations of methane than the ponds with brown moss. In addition, we found significantly higher methane fluxes from pools and saturated soils then from drier soils, which showed very low fluxes. These results suggest that upland tundra may be a significant source of methane, and that methane fluxes are driven

  13. Effect of temperature on methane production from field-scale anaerobic digesters treating dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature is a critical factor affecting anaerobic digestion because it influences both system heating requirements and methane production. Temperatures of 35-37°C are typically suggested for manure digestion, yet in temperate climate digesters, require a considerable amount of additional heat en...

  14. Up with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Barlaz, M.A.; Milke, M.W.; Ham, R.K.

    1986-12-01

    Methane production from municipal refuse represents a rapidly developing source of energy which remains underutilized. Part of the problem is the small amount of methane which is typically collected relative to the refuse's methane generation potential. This study was undertaken to define the parameters which affect the onset of methane production and methane yields in sanitary landfills. Ultimately, we need to develop refuse disposal methods which enhance its methane production potential. Included in the study were tests of how introduction of old refuse, use of sterile cover soil, addition of acetate to refuse, and use of leachate, recycling and neutralization affect methane generation. A more thorough understanding of how the microbes present in refuse react to different variables is the first step in the development of techniques for stimulating methane production in sanitary landfills.

  15. Methane Production by Microbial Mats Under Low Sulfate Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, Brad M.; Hoehler, Tori M.; Thamdrup, Bo; Albert, Dan; Carpenter, Steven P.; Hogan, Mary; Turk, Kendra; DesMarais, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyanobacterial mats collected in hypersaline salterns were incubated in a greenhouse under low sulfate concentrations ([SO4]) and examined for their primary productivity and emissions of methane and other major carbon species. Atmospheric greenhouse warming by gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been greater during the Archean than today in order to account for a record of moderate to warm paleoclemates, despite a less luminous early sun. It has been suggested that decreased levels of oxygen and sulfate in Archean oceans could have significantly stimulated microbial methanogenesis relative to present marine rates, with a resultant increase in the relative importance of methane in maintaining the early greenhouse. We maintained modern microbial mats, models of ancient coastal marine communities, in artificial brine mixtures containing both modern [SO4=] (ca. 70 mM) and "Archean" [SO4] (less than 0.2 mM). At low [SO4], primary production in the mats was essentially unaffected, while rates of sulfate reduction decreased by a factor of three, and methane fluxes increased by up to ten-fold. However, remineralization by methanogenesis still amounted to less than 0.4 % of the total carbon released by the mats. The relatively low efficiency of conversion of photosynthate to methane is suggested to reflect the particular geometry and chemical microenvironment of hypersaline cyanobacterial mats. Therefore, such mats w-ere probably relatively weak net sources of methane throughout their 3.5 Ga history, even during periods of low- environmental levels oxygen and sulfate.

  16. Hydrogen production from methane using oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    CO and CO2 showed a higher CO and CO2 adsorption (for temperatures ranging from room temperature to 600°C) on BSCF compared to the SFC membrane. CO2 reforming reactions on BSCF and SFC dense membranes in a membrane reactor showed higher methane conversion and H2/CO ratio on BSCF than SFC in the presence of the Pt/CeZrO2 catalyst. This high conversion and H2/CO ratio could be ascribed to higher CO, CO2, and H2 adsorption on BSCF than SFC, resulting in higher steam and CO2 reforming on the BSCF. The Pt-Ni/CeZrO2 catalyst exhibits promising performance for hydrogen production. Platinum enhances the reducibility of Ni/Al2O 3 and Ni/CeZrO2 catalysts resulting in improved catalysts for H2 production at moderate temperatures. TPR and Raman studies show an alloy formation in the Pt-Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Further work is required to study the interaction between Pt and Ni in the bimetallic Pt-Ni/CeZrO2 and Pt-Ni/Al2O3 catalysts. Although the Pt-Ni/Al2O3 catalyst shows high methane conversion in the presence of the BSCF membrane at 800°C, the activity of this catalyst is low at 600°C. Pt-Ni/CeZrO2 bimetallic catalyst demonstrates superior performance compared to Pt-Ni/Al2O3 catalyst at 600°C. The thinner BSCF membrane (2.2 mm) demonstrates a higher methane conversion and H2:CO ratio than the thicker BSCF membrane (2.6 mm) because membrane oxygen flux is inversely proportional to thickness. Varying the pH of the precursor solution during membrane preparation has no significant effect on the oxygen flux or the reaction. The CH 4:CO2 feed ratio significantly affects the hydrogen production over the BSCF membrane. Altering the CH4:CO2 ratio has a direct impact on the oxygen flux, which in turn can influence the reaction pathway. These studies suggest that the Pt-Ni/CeZrO2 catalyst might be suitable for low-temperature hydrocarbon conversion reactions over thin BSCF ceramic membranes. Most importantly, the BSCF membrane can reduce the apparent activation energy of the CO2 reforming

  17. Evidence for methane production by the marine algae Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, Katharina; Klintzsch, Thomas; Langer, Gerald; Nehrke, Gernot; Bunge, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Keppler, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas that affects radiation balance and consequently the earth's climate, still has uncertainties in its sinks and sources. The world's oceans are considered to be a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, although the biogeochemical processes involved in its formation are not fully understood. Several recent studies provided strong evidence of CH4 production in oxic marine and freshwaters, but its source is still a topic of debate. Studies of CH4 dynamics in surface waters of oceans and large lakes have concluded that pelagic CH4 supersaturation cannot be sustained either by lateral inputs from littoral or benthic inputs alone. However, regional and temporal oversaturation of surface waters occurs frequently. This comprises the observation of a CH4 oversaturating state within the surface mixed layer, sometimes also termed the "oceanic methane paradox". In this study we considered marine algae as a possible direct source of CH4. Therefore, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was grown under controlled laboratory conditions and supplemented with two 13C-labeled carbon substrates, namely bicarbonate and a position-specific 13C-labeled methionine (R-S-13CH3). The CH4 production was 0.7 µg particular organic carbon (POC) g-1 d-1, or 30 ng g-1 POC h-1. After supplementation of the cultures with the 13C-labeled substrate, the isotope label was observed in headspace CH4. Moreover, the absence of methanogenic archaea within the algal culture and the oxic conditions during CH4 formation suggest that the widespread marine algae Emiliania huxleyi might contribute to the observed spatially and temporally restricted CH4 oversaturation in ocean surface waters.

  18. Microbial production and oxidation of methane in deep subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotelnikova, Svetlana

    2002-10-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize present studies on microbial production and oxidation of methane in the deep subterranean environments. Methane is a long-living gas causing the "greenhouse" effect in the planet's atmosphere. Earlier, the deep "organic carbon poor" subsurface was not considered as a source of "biogenic" methane. Evidence of active methanogenesis and presence of viable methanogens including autotrophic organisms were obtained for some subsurface environments including water-flooded oil-fields, deep sandy aquifers, deep sea hydrothermal vents, the deep sediments and granitic groundwater at depths of 10 to 2000 m below sea level. As a rule, the deep subterranean microbial populations dwell at more or less oligotrophic conditions. Molecular hydrogen has been found in a variety of subsurface environments, where its concentrations were significantly higher than in the tested surface aquatic environments. Chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms from deep aquifers that could grow on hydrogen and carbon dioxide can act as primary producers of organic carbon, initiating heterotrophic food chains in the deep subterranean environments independent of photosynthesis. "Biogenic" methane has been found all over the world. On the basis of documented occurrences, gases in reservoirs and older sediments are similar and have the isotopic character of methane derived from CO 2 reduction. Groundwater representing the methanogenic end member are characterized by a relative depletion of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in combination with an enrichment in 13C in inorganic carbon, which is consistent with the preferential reduction of 12CO 2 by autotrophic methanogens or acetogens. The isotopic composition of methane formed via CO 2 reduction is controlled by the δ13C of the original CO 2 substrate. Literature data shows that CH 4 as heavy as -40‰ or -50‰ can be produced by the microbial reduction of isotopically heavy CO 2. Produced methane may be oxidized

  19. Seasonal Production and Emission of Methane from Rice Fields, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M. Aslam K.; Rasmussen,Reinhold A.

    2002-12-03

    B 139 - Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas regarded second only to carbon dioxide in its ability to cause global warming. Methane is important because of its relatively fast increase, and also because it is, per molecule, some 60 times more effective than carbon dioxide in causing global warming. The largest present anthropogenic sources of methane are rice fields, cattle and biomass burning. The global emissions from these sources are still not well known. In the middle 1980s there were few available data on methane emissions from rice fields leading to estimates of a global source between 100-280 Tg/yr. Extensive worldwide research during the last decade has shown that the global emissions from rice fields are more likely to be in the range of 30-80Tg/yr. While this work has led to a substantial reduction in the estimated emissions, the uncertainty is still quite large, and seriously affects our ability to include methane in integrated assessments for future climate change and environmental management.China dominated estimates of methane emissions from rice fields because it was, and is, the largest producer of rice, and major increases in rice production had taken place in the country over the last several decades. This report summarizes the work in Sichuan Province, China, in each of the following areas: the design of the experiment; the main results on methane emissions from rice fields, delineating the factors controlling emissions; production of methane in the soil; a survey of water management practices in sample of counties in Sichuan province; and results of ambient measurements including data from the background continental site. B139

  20. Changes in Methane Production Pathway as a Function of Nutrient Input in the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M.; Chanton, J.; Bae, H.; Ogram, A.

    2011-12-01

    The relative importance of acetotrophic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenic pathways was evaluated at a study site along a nutrient gradient in the Florida Everglades. A better understanding of the impact of nutrient loading on methanogenesis in wetlands is critical because methane production in wetlands is an important part of the global methane budget. The isotopic composition of biogenic CH4 is affected by the relative contribution of each methanogenic pathway because a larger isotope effect is associated with hydrogenotrophic methane production than acetoclastic methanogenesis. δ13C of CH4 and CO2 in porewater from three sites in the northern Everglades indicated that a higher proportion of methane was produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis at the nutrient-impacted site than at the oligotrophic site. δ13C- CH4 was -64%, on average, at the eutrophic site and was around -50% at the oligotrophic site. Likewise, the apparent fractionation factors between CH4 and CO2 were higher at the nutrient impacted sites than at the oligotrophic site, indicating that more of the CH4 produced at the eutrophic site came from hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Soils from the same sites were incubated with methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and δ13C- CH4 and δ13C- CO2 in these soils was compared with soil incubated without the inhibitor. Apparent fractionation factors in soils where only the hydrogenotrophic pathway was active were higher and less CH4 was produced than in soils in which both pathways proceeded. Blocking the production of methane via acetate fermentation allowed us to estimate that about 70% of the methane produced in soils from the oligotrophic site was from acetate fermentation and 70 to 80% was from CO2 reduction in the most nutrient impacted soil. These results demonstrate the effect that nutrient levels can have on methane production in natural wetlands.

  1. Bacterial bioaugmentation for improving methane and hydrogen production from microalgae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The recalcitrant cell walls of microalgae may limit their digestibility for bioenergy production. Considering that cellulose contributes to the cell wall recalcitrance of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, this study investigated bioaugmentation with a cellulolytic and hydrogenogenic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, at different inoculum ratios as a possible method to improve CH4 and H2 production of microalgae. Results Methane production was found to increase by 17?~?24% with the addition of C. thermocellum, as a result of enhanced cell disruption and excess hydrogen production. Furthermore, addition of C. thermocellum enhanced the bacterial diversity and quantities, leading to higher fermentation efficiency. A two-step process of addition of C. thermocellum first and methanogenic sludge subsequently could recover both hydrogen and methane, with a 9.4% increase in bioenergy yield, when compared with the one-step process of simultaneous addition of C. thermocellum and methanogenic sludge. The fluorescence peaks of excitation-emission matrix spectra associated with chlorophyll can serve as biomarkers for algal cell degradation. Conclusions Bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum improved the degradation of C. vulgaris biomass, producing higher levels of methane and hydrogen. The two-step process, with methanogenic inoculum added after the hydrogen production reached saturation, was found to be an energy-efficiency method for hydrogen and methane production. PMID:23815806

  2. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Dapeng; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H(2)/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH(4)/g VS added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. pH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary. Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase.

  3. Evaluating biochemical methane production from brewer's spent yeast.

    PubMed

    Sosa-Hernández, Ornella; Parameswaran, Prathap; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán Sidney; Torres, César I; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion treatment of brewer's spent yeast (SY) is a viable option for bioenergy capture. The biochemical methane potential (BMP) assay was performed with three different samples (SY1, SY2, and SY3) and SY1 dilutions (75, 50, and 25 % on a v/v basis). Gompertz-equation parameters denoted slow degradability of SY1 with methane production rates of 14.59-4.63 mL/day and lag phases of 10.72-19.7 days. Performance and kinetic parameters were obtained with the Gompertz equation and the first-order hydrolysis model with SY2 and SY3 diluted 25 % and SY1 50 %. A SY2 25 % gave a 17 % of TCOD conversion to methane as well as shorter lag phase (<1 day). Average estimated hydrolysis constant for SY was 0.0141 (±0.003) day(-1), and SY2 25 % was more appropriate for faster methane production. Methane capture and biogas composition were dependent upon the SY source, and co-digestion (or dilution) can be advantageous.

  4. An inhibitor persistently decreased enteric methane emission from dairy cows with no negative effect on milk production

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Alexander N.; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler W.; Harper, Michael T.; Weeks, Holley L.; Branco, Antonio F.; Moate, Peter J.; Deighton, Matthew H.; Williams, S. Richard O.; Kindermann, Maik; Duval, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    A quarter of all anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States are from enteric fermentation, primarily from ruminant livestock. This study was undertaken to test the effect of a methane inhibitor, 3-nitrooxypropanol (3NOP), on enteric methane emission in lactating Holstein cows. An experiment was conducted using 48 cows in a randomized block design with a 2-wk covariate period and a 12-wk data collection period. Feed intake, milk production, and fiber digestibility were not affected by the inhibitor. Milk protein and lactose yields were increased by 3NOP. Rumen methane emission was linearly decreased by 3NOP, averaging about 30% lower than the control. Methane emission per unit of feed dry matter intake or per unit of energy-corrected milk were also about 30% less for the 3NOP-treated cows. On average, the body weight gain of 3NOP-treated cows was 80% greater than control cows during the 12-wk experiment. The experiment demonstrated that the methane inhibitor 3NOP, applied at 40 to 80 mg/kg feed dry matter, decreased methane emissions from high-producing dairy cows by 30% and increased body weight gain without negatively affecting feed intake or milk production and composition. The inhibitory effect persisted over 12 wk of treatment, thus offering an effective methane mitigation practice for the livestock industries. PMID:26229078

  5. An inhibitor persistently decreased enteric methane emission from dairy cows with no negative effect on milk production.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Alexander N; Oh, Joonpyo; Giallongo, Fabio; Frederick, Tyler W; Harper, Michael T; Weeks, Holley L; Branco, Antonio F; Moate, Peter J; Deighton, Matthew H; Williams, S Richard O; Kindermann, Maik; Duval, Stephane

    2015-08-25

    A quarter of all anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States are from enteric fermentation, primarily from ruminant livestock. This study was undertaken to test the effect of a methane inhibitor, 3-nitrooxypropanol (3NOP), on enteric methane emission in lactating Holstein cows. An experiment was conducted using 48 cows in a randomized block design with a 2-wk covariate period and a 12-wk data collection period. Feed intake, milk production, and fiber digestibility were not affected by the inhibitor. Milk protein and lactose yields were increased by 3NOP. Rumen methane emission was linearly decreased by 3NOP, averaging about 30% lower than the control. Methane emission per unit of feed dry matter intake or per unit of energy-corrected milk were also about 30% less for the 3NOP-treated cows. On average, the body weight gain of 3NOP-treated cows was 80% greater than control cows during the 12-wk experiment. The experiment demonstrated that the methane inhibitor 3NOP, applied at 40 to 80 mg/kg feed dry matter, decreased methane emissions from high-producing dairy cows by 30% and increased body weight gain without negatively affecting feed intake or milk production and composition. The inhibitory effect persisted over 12 wk of treatment, thus offering an effective methane mitigation practice for the livestock industries.

  6. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Link, D.D.; English, N.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.

  7. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  8. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42− ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation. PMID:27731395

  9. High rate of methane leakage from natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Natural gas production is growing as the United States seeks domestic sources of relatively clean energy. Natural gas combustion produces less carbon dioxide emissions than coal or oil for the amount of energy produced. However, one source of concern is that some natural gas leaks to the atmosphere from the extraction point, releasing methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  10. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  11. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system. PMID:25652244

  12. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-05

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  13. Effects of rutin and buckwheat seeds on energy metabolism and methane production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Stoldt, Ann-Kathrin; Derno, Michael; Das, Gürbüz; Weitzel, Joachim M; Wolffram, Siegfried; Metges, Cornelia C

    2016-03-01

    Flavonoids are secondary plant metabolites with several health promoting effects. As dairy cows often suffer from metabolic imbalance and health problems, interest is growing in health improvements by plant substances such as flavonoids. Our group has recently shown that the flavonoids quercetin and rutin (a glucorhamnoside of quercetin) are bioavailable in cows when given via a duodenal fistula or orally, respectively, affect glucose metabolism, and have beneficial effects on liver health. Furthermore, flavonoids may reduce rumen methane production in vitro through their antibacterial properties. To test the hypothesis that rutin has effects on energy metabolism, methane production, and production performance in dairy cows, we fed rutin trihydrate at a dose of 100mg/kg of body weight to a group of 7 lactating dairy cows for 2 wk in a crossover design. In a second experiment, 2 cows were fed the same ration but were supplemented with buckwheat seeds (Fagopyrum tartaricum), providing rutin at a dose comparable to the first experiment. Two other cows receiving barley supplements were used as controls in a change-over mode. Blood samples were taken weekly and respiration measurements were performed at the end of each treatment. Supplementation of pure rutin, but not of rutin contained in buckwheat seeds, increased the plasma quercetin content. Methane production and milk yield and composition were not affected by rutin treatment in either form. Plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate, and albumin were increased by pure rutin treatment, indicating a possible metabolic effect of rutin on energy metabolism of dairy cows. In addition, we did not show that in vivo ruminal methane production was reduced by rutin. In conclusion, we could not confirm earlier reports on in vitro methane reduction by rutin supplementation in dairy cows in established lactation.

  14. Methane production and consumption in grassland and boreal ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimel, David S.; Burke, Ingrid C.; Johnston, Carol; Pastor, John

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the this project were to develop a mechanistic understanding of methane production and oxidation suitable for incorporation into spatially explicit models for spatial extrapolation. Field studies were undertaken in Minnesota, Canada, and Colorado to explore the process controls over the two microbial mediated methane transformations in a range of environments. Field measurements were done in conjunction with ongoing studies in Canada (the Canadian Northern Wetlands Projects: NOWES) and in Colorado (The Shortgrass Steppe Long Term Ecological Research Project: LTER). One of the central hypotheses of the proposal was that methane production should be substrate limited, as well as being controlled by physical variables influencing microbial activity (temperature, oxidation status, and pH). Laboratory studies of peats from Canada and Minnesota (Northern and Southern Boreal) were conducted with amendments of a methanogenic substrate at multiple temperatures and at multiple pHs (the latter by titrating samples). The studies showed control by substrate, pH, and temperature in order in anaerobic samples. Field and laboratory manipulations of natural plant litter, rather than an acetogenic substrate, showed similarly large effects. The studies concluded that substrate is an important control over methanogenesis, that substrate availability in the field is closely coupled to the chemistry of the dominant vegetation influencing its decomposition rate, that most methane is produced from recent plant litter, and that landscape changes in pH are an important control, highly correlated with vegetation.

  15. Methane production from agricultural residues - A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-R.; Varel, V. H.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper summarizes the methanogenesis process, the environmental requirement, kinetics, energy requirements, and methane production cost of methane fermentation systems. Available data of biodegradability of the residue and kinetic equations can be used to predict the methane production under different operating conditions. The optimum condition for fermenting beef cattle residue is operating at a thermophilic temperature (55 C) with an influent concentration of 80 g of VS/L. This produces yields of 3.96 L of CH4/L fermenter-day at 5 days retention time. It is apparent that the anaerobic fermentation process is technically feasible. However, only at plant sizes larger than 300 Mg TS/day will the anerobic fermentation system produce methane gas comparable to the current natural gas price. If the effluent can be used as a feed supplement for livestock, the anaerobic fermentation system for livestock residue will be economically feasible at a plant size between 3 and 6 Mg TS/day. This corresponds to beef cattle feedlots between 1000 and 2000 head.

  16. Methane production from agricultural residues - A short review

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.R.; Varel, V.H.; Hashimoto, A.G.

    1980-12-01

    This paper summarizes the methanogenesis process, the environmental requirement, kinetics, energy requirements, and methane production cost of methane fermentation systems. Available data of biodegradability of the residue and kinetic equations can be used to predict the methane production under different operating conditions. The optimum condition for fermenting beef cattle residue is operating at a thermophilic temperature (55/sup 0/C) with an influent concentration of 80 g of VS/L. This produces yields of 3.96 L of CH4/L fermenter-day at 5 days retention time. It is apparent that the anaerobic fermentation process is technically feasible. However, only at plant sizes larger than 300 Mg TS/day will the anerobic fermentation system produce methane gas comparable to the current natural gas price. If the effluent can be used as a feed supplement for livestock, the anaerobic fermentation system for livestock residue will be economically feasible at a plant size between 3 and 6 Mg TS/day. This corresponds to beef cattle feedlots between 1000 and 2000 head.

  17. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  18. Fungal secondary metabolites from Monascus spp. reduce rumen methane production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morgavi, D P; Martin, C; Boudra, H

    2013-02-01

    Decreasing methanogenesis without affecting fermentation and digestion of feeds in the rumen can reduce the environmental impact of ruminant production and have a beneficial effect on feed conversion efficiency. In this work, metabolites produced by Monascus spp. molds were assayed for their antimethanogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. The capacity of 7 strains of Monascus to produce secondary metabolites was assessed in solid media. Monitored metabolites included the statins monacolin K, pravastatin, and mevastatin, and the mycotoxin citrinin. Ethanolic extracts from 5 different solid media from 2 selected strains were tested in vitro. Fermentation was not negatively affected by any treatment, but one extract decreased methane production (P < 0.05). This extract was further assayed in 3 consecutive batch incubations where a marked decrease in methane was observed in the third batch (P < 0.05). In contrast, methane produced in flasks with pure monacolin K was not different from controls (P > 0.05). Rice on which the selected Monascus sp. was grown also decreased methane production when used as substrate for in vitro incubations (P < 0.05). The effect of Monascus-fermented rice on methane production was then assayed in vivo. Six wethers were adapted to a diet containing rice grain and hay (1:1 ratio). Rice was then replaced by fermented rice and given to animals for nearly 2 wk. Animals were monitored for a further 2 wk after the treatment. Daily methane emissions decreased (P < 0.05) by 30% after 2 to 3 d into the treatment and remained low throughout the administration period. This change was associated with reduced ruminal acetate to propionate ratio and decreased numbers of methanogens as detected by quantitative PCR (P < 0.05). In contrast, no changes in the methanogenic community were observed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Total bacteria numbers increased (P < 0.05) with changes in the DGGE profile community, whereas protozoa were not

  19. Seafloor Deformation Monitoring for Methane Hydrate Production Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, T.; Matsuda, S.; Takeshima, J.; Sano, K.; Nakatsuka, Y.

    2014-12-01

    In order to observe the seafloor deformation during methane hydrate production test, we have developed a monitoring system for seafloor subsidence and inclination. According to simulation of seafloor deformation around the production well, the range of subsidence will be from 10cm to 30 cm with the continuous production of methane hydrate in a month. This monitoring system has been examined in the offshore of Suruga Bay which has water depth more than 1000m. All the features of this system were confirmed by the examination at the deep sea area. Subsidence is measured with change of water pressure on the seafloor. A pressure gauge we selected is applied a quartz crystal resonator. The range of the pressure gauge is 0 to 1,400m, the resolution is 0.014mm, and actual accuracy is around 10mm in conversion to water level. An inclinometer we selected is applied liquid electrolyte. The range of the inclinometer is from +30 to -30 degreee, resolution is 0.001degree, and actual accuracy is around 0.03-0.3degree depending on measuring condition. We have monitored by using this system during the production test of methane hydrate at East Nankai trough in the beginning of 2013.This work was carried out by OYO corporation with the support of JOGMEC which is a member of MH21 consortium sponsored by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry in Japan.

  20. Methanogens rapidly transition from methane production to iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Sivan, O; Shusta, S S; Valentine, D L

    2016-03-01

    Methanogenesis, the microbial methane (CH4 ) production, is traditionally thought to anchor the mineralization of organic matter as the ultimate respiratory process in deep sediments, despite the presence of oxidized mineral phases, such as iron oxides. This process is carried out by archaea that have also been shown to be capable of reducing iron in high levels of electron donors such as hydrogen. The current pure culture study demonstrates that methanogenic archaea (Methanosarcina barkeri) rapidly switch from methanogenesis to iron-oxide reduction close to natural conditions, with nitrogen atmosphere, even when faced with substrate limitations. Intensive, biotic iron reduction was observed following the addition of poorly crystalline ferrihydrite and complex organic matter and was accompanied by inhibition of methane production. The reaction rate of this process was of the first order and was dependent only on the initial iron concentrations. Ferrous iron production did not accelerate significantly with the addition of 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) but increased by 11-28% with the addition of phenazine-1-carboxylate (PCA), suggesting the possible role of methanophenazines in the electron transport. The coupling between ferrous iron and methane production has important global implications. The rapid transition from methanogenesis to reduction of iron-oxides close to the natural conditions in sediments may help to explain the globally-distributed phenomena of increasing ferrous concentrations below the traditional iron reduction zone in the deep 'methanogenic' sediment horizon, with implications for metabolic networking in these subsurface ecosystems and in past geological settings.

  1. Estimates of Biogenic Methane Production Rates in Deep Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, F. S.; Boyd, S.; Delwiche, M. E.; Reed, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Much of the methane in natural gas hydrates in marine sediments is made by methanogens. Current models used to predict hydrate distribution and concentration in these sediments require estimates of microbial methane production rates. However, accurate estimates are difficult to achieve because of the bias introduced by sampling and because methanogen activities in these sediments are low and not easily detected. To derive useful methane production rates for marine sediments we have measured the methanogen biomass in samples taken from different depths in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments off the coast of Oregon and, separately, the minimal rates of activity for a methanogen in a laboratory reactor. For methanogen biomass, we used a polymerase chain reaction assay in real time to target the methanogen-specific mcr gene. Using this method we found that a majority of the samples collected from boreholes at HR show no evidence of methanogens (detection limit: less than 100 methanogens per g of sediment). Most of the samples with detectable numbers of methanogens were from shallow sediments (less than 10 meters below seafloor [mbsf]) although a few samples with apparently high numbers of methanogens (greater than 10,000 methanogens per g) were from as deep as 230 mbsf and were associated with notable geological features (e.g., the bottom-simulating reflector and an ash-bearing zone with high fluid movement). Laboratory studies with Methanoculleus submarinus (isolated from a hydrate zone at the Nankai Trough) maintained in a biomass recycle reactor showed that when this methanogen is merely surviving, as is likely the case in deep marine sediments, it produces approximately 0.06 fmol methane per cell per day. This is far lower than rates reported for methanogens in other environments. By combining this estimate of specific methanogenic rates and an extrapolation from the numbers of methanogens at selected depths in the sediment column at HR sites we have derived a maximum

  2. Methyl chloride production from methane over lanthanum-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Podkolzin, Simon G; Stangland, Eric E; Jones, Mark E; Peringer, Elvira; Lercher, Johannes A

    2007-03-07

    The mechanism of selective production of methyl chloride by a reaction of methane, hydrogen chloride, and oxygen over lanthanum-based catalysts was studied. The results suggest that methane activation proceeds through oxidation-reduction reactions on the surface of catalysts with an irreducible metal-lanthanum, which is significantly different from known mechanisms for oxidative chlorination. Activity and spectroscopic measurements show that lanthanum oxychloride (LaOCl), lanthanum trichloride (LaCl3), and lanthanum phases with an intermediate extent of chlorination are all active for this reaction. The catalyst is stable with no noticeable deactivation after three weeks of testing. Kinetic measurements suggest that methane activation proceeds on the surface of the catalyst. Flow and pulse experiments indicate that the presence of hydrogen chloride is not required for activity, and its role appears to be limited to maintaining the extent of catalyst chlorination. In contrast, the presence of gas-phase oxygen is essential for catalytic activity. Density-functional theory calculations suggest that oxygen can activate surface chlorine species by adsorbing dissociatively and forming OCl surface species, which can serve as an active site for methane activation. The proposed mechanism, thus, involves changing of the formal oxidation state of surface chlorine from -1 to +1 without any changes in the oxidation state of the underlying metal.

  3. Methane production from bicarbonate and acetate in an anoxic marine sediment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, P. M.; Martens, C. S.

    1986-01-01

    Methane production from C-14 labeled bicarbonate and acetate was measured over the top 28 cm of anoxic Cape Lookout Bight sediments during the summer of 1983. The depth distribution and magnitude of summed radioisotopically determined rates compare well with previous measurements of total methane production and the sediment-water methane flux. Methane production from CO2 reduction and acetate fermentation accounts for greater than 80 percent of the total production rate and sediment-water flux. Methane production from bicarbonate was found to occur in all depth intervals sampled except those in the top 2 cm, whereas significant methane production from acetate only occurred at depths below 10 cm where sulfate was exhausted. Acetate provided 20 to 29 percent of the measured methane production integrated over the top 30 cm of the sediments.

  4. Mitigation of methane production from cattle by feeding cashew nut shell liquid.

    PubMed

    Shinkai, T; Enishi, O; Mitsumori, M; Higuchi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Takenaka, A; Nagashima, K; Mochizuki, M; Kobayashi, Y

    2012-09-01

    The effects of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) feeding on methane production and rumen fermentation were investigated by repeatedly using 3 Holstein nonlactating cows with rumen fistulas. The cows were fed a concentrate and hay diet (6:4 ratio) for 4 wk (control period) followed by the same diet with a CNSL-containing pellet for the next 3 wk (CNSL period). Two trials were conducted using CNSL pellets blended with only silica (trial 1) or with several other ingredients (trial 2). Each pellet type was fed to cows to allow CNSL intake at 4 g/100 kg of body weight per day. Methane production was measured in a respiration chamber system, and energy balance, nutrient digestibility, and rumen microbial changes were monitored. Methane production per unit of dry matter intake decreased by 38.3 and 19.3% in CNSL feeding trials 1 and 2, respectively. Energy loss as methane emission decreased from 9.7 to 6.1% (trial 1) and from 8.4 to 7.0% (trial 2) with CNSL feeding, whereas the loss to feces (trial 1) and heat production (trial 2) increased. Retained energy did not differ between the control and CNSL periods. Digestibility of dry matter and gross energy decreased with CNSL feeding in trial 1, but did not differ in trial 2. Feeding CNSL caused a decrease in acetate and total short-chain fatty acid levels and an increase in propionate proportion in both trials. Relative copy number of methyl coenzyme-M reductase subunit A gene and its expression decreased with CNSL feeding. The relative abundance of fibrolytic or formate-producing species such as Ruminococcus flavefaciens, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Treponema bryantii decreased, but species related to propionate production, including Prevotella ruminicolla, Selenomonas ruminantium, Anaerovibrio lipolytica, and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens, increased. If used in a suitable formulation, CNSL acts as a potent methane-inhibiting and propionate-enhancing agent through the alteration of rumen microbiota without adversely

  5. Dynamics of methane production, sulfate reduction, and denitrification in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Westermann, P.; Ahring, B.K.

    1987-10-01

    The dynamics of sulfate reduction, methane production, and denitrification were investigated in a permanently waterlogged alder swamp. Molybdate, an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, stimulated methane production in soil slurries, thus suggesting competition for common substrates between sulfate-reducing and methane-producing bacteria. Acetate, hydrogen, and methanol were found to stimulate both sulfate reduction and methane production, while trimethylamine mainly stimulated methane production. Nitrate addition reduced both methane production and sulfate reduction, either as a consequence of competition of poisoning of the bacteria. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were only slightly limited by the availability of electron acceptors, while denitrifying bacteria were seriously limited by low nitrate concentrations. Arrhenius plots of the three processes revealed different responses to temperature changes in the slurries. Methane production was most sensitive to temperature changes, followed by denitrification and sulfate reduction. No significant differences between slope patterns were observed when comparing summer and winter measurements, indicating similar populations regarding temperature responses.

  6. Short communication: Genetic study of methane production predicted from milk fat composition in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    van Engelen, S; Bovenhuis, H; Dijkstra, J; van Arendonk, J A M; Visker, M H P W

    2015-11-01

    Dairy cows produce enteric methane, a greenhouse gas with 25 times the global warming potential of CO2. Breeding could make a permanent, cumulative, and long-term contribution to methane reduction. Due to a lack of accurate, repeatable, individual methane measurements needed for breeding, indicators of methane production based on milk fatty acids have been proposed. The aim of the present study was to quantify the genetic variation for predicted methane yields. The milk fat composition of 1,905 first-lactation Dutch Holstein-Friesian cows was used to investigate 3 different predicted methane yields (g/kg of DMI): Methane1, Methane2, and Methane3. Methane1 was based on the milk fat proportions of C17:0anteiso, C18:1 rans-10+11, C18:1 cis-11, and C18:1 cis-13 (R(2)=0.73). Methane2 was based on C4:0, C18:0, C18:1 trans-10+11, and C18:1 cis-11 (R(2)=0.70). Methane3 was based on C4:0, C6:0, and C18:1 trans-10+11 (R(2)=0.63). Predicted methane yields were demonstrated to be heritable traits, with heritabilities between 0.12 and 0.44. Breeding can, thus, be used to decrease methane production predicted based on milk fatty acids.

  7. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Catlett, Jennie L.; Ortiz, Alicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells. PMID:26162885

  8. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Catlett, Jennie L; Ortiz, Alicia M; Buan, Nicole R

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells.

  9. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen from Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H for the photodissociation of CH4 by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. Comparison between our Lyα relative cross section and that previously reported [1] show different peak height ratios. This also occurs in the Hα cross section when compared to previous data [2]. We do not observe as significant a drop in either cross section above 35 eV. Our measurements were taken with pressures two orders of magnitude lower than those used in ref. [1]. We present comparisons between data sets and a discussion of possible systematic effects. [1] H. Fukuzawa et al., J. Phys. B. 38, 565 (2005). [2] M. Kato et al., J. Phys. B. 35, 4383 (2002). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2003-12-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  12. The influence of petroleum products on the methane fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Choromański, Paweł; Karwowska, Ewa; Łebkowska, Maria

    2016-01-15

    In this study the influence of the petroleum products: diesel fuel and spent engine oil on the sewage sludge digestion process and biogas production efficiency was investigated. Microbiological, chemical and enzymatic analyses were applied in the survey. It was revealed that the influence of the petroleum derivatives on the effectiveness of the methane fermentation of sewage sludge depends on the type of the petroleum product. Diesel fuel did not limit the biogas production and the methane concentration in the biogas, while spent engine oil significantly reduced the process efficacy. The changes in physical-chemical parameters, excluding COD, did not reflect the effect of the tested substances. The negative influence of petroleum products on individual bacterial groups was observed after 7 days of the process, while after 14 days probably some adaptive mechanisms appeared. The dehydrogenase activity assessment was the most relevant parameter to evaluate the effect of petroleum products contamination. Diesel fuel was probably used as a source of carbon and energy in the process, while the toxic influence was observed in case of spent engine oil.

  13. Methane production and methanogen levels in steers that differ in residual gain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane gas released by cattle is a product of fermentation in the digestive tract. The two primary sites of methane fermentation in ruminants are the reticulum-rumen complex, and the cecum. Methane release from cattle represents a 2 to 12% loss of the energy intake. Reducing the proportion of fe...

  14. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  15. Control of Methane Production and Exchange in Northern Peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    This proposal has successfully supported studies that have developed unique long ten-n datasets of methane (CH4) emissions and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange in order to quantify the controls on CH4 production and exchange especially the linkages to the carbon cycle in northern peatlands. The primary research site has been a small fen in southeastern New Hampshire where a unique multi-year data baseline of CH4 flux measurements was begun (with NASA funding) in 1989. The fen has also been instrumented for continuous hydrological and meteorological observations and year-round porewater sampling. Multiyear datasets of methane flux are very valuable and very rare. Datasets using the same sampling techniques at the same sites are the only way to assess the effect of the integrated ecosystem response to climatological variability. The research has had two basic objectives: 1. To quantify the effect of seasonal and interannual variability on CH4flux. 2. To examine process level controls on methane dynamics.

  16. Simulations of Carbon Dioxide Storage and Methane Production from Guest Molecule Exchange of Hydrates Using Reactive Transport Modeling and Gibbs Energy Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate guest molecule exchange of hydrates as a method for simultaneous carbon dioxide storage and methane production. We simulate N2/CO2 binary gas mixture injection into marine and terrestrial methane hydrate bearing sediments. Different compositions of the injected gas can lead to four possible outcomes: 1) Injected gas flows downstream past methane hydrate and does not alter the methane hydrate, 2) Injected gas causes complete dissociation of methane hydrate, which creates a gas mixture of methane and injected gas that flows downstream, 3) Injected gas causes complete dissociation of methane hydrate with flow of methane gas downstream and all injected gas replaces methane in the hydrate cage, 4) Injected gas causes partial dissociation of methane hydrate with some replacement of methane in the hydrate cage and downstream flow of a methane and injected gas mixture. We focus on how composition of injected gas affects the outcome of the injection process, and then determine the optimal injection mixture of N2/CO2 for carbon dioxide storage and methane production. Our simulations combine dynamic flash calculations using the Gibbs energy minimization of Ballard and Sloan (2004) with 1-d reactive transport modeling. This work provides insight into the efficiency of the guest molecule exchange process in methane hydrate systems. Our results can be directly incorporated into simulations of more complex geometries and field settings such as the Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial. ReferencesBallard, A. L., and Sloan, E. D. (2004). The next generation of hydrate prediction: Part III. Gibbs energy minimization formalism. Fluid phase equilibria, 218(1), 15-31.

  17. Enhancing methane production from waste activated sludge using a novel indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment process.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xu; Wang, Qilin; Jiang, Guangming

    2015-04-01

    Methane production from anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) is limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor methane potential of WAS. This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy based on indigenous iron (in WAS) activated peroxidation to enhance methane production from WAS. Pre-treatment of WAS for 30 min at 50mg H2O2/g total solids (dry weight) and pH 2.0 (iron concentration in WAS was 7 mg/g TS) substantially enhanced WAS solubilization. Biochemical methane potential tests demonstrated that methane production was improved by 10% at a digestion time of 16d after incorporating the indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment. Model-based analysis indicated that indigenous iron activated peroxidation pre-treatment improved the methane potential by 13%, whereas the hydrolysis rate was not significantly affected. The economic analysis showed that the proposed pre-treatment method can save the cost by $112,000 per year in a treatment plant with a population equivalent of 300,000.

  18. Sorghums for methane production. Annual report, April 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hiler, E.A.; Miller, F.R.; Monk, R.L.; McBee, G.G.; Creelman, R.A.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an integrated system for methane production utilizing high-energy sorghum as the feedstock. This report provides specifics of 2nd year research activities in the sorghums-for-methane production sponsored by Gas Research Institute and co-funded by Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. Researchers in the program include plant geneticists, sorghum physiologists, chemists, agronomists, ruminant physiologists, agricultural and systems engineers and agricultural economists. Major research emphases are genetic manipulation, physiology and production systems, harvesting, storage, processing and conversion systems, inhibitors, and economic and systems analyses. During the 2nd year, increased emphasis was placed on the storage, processing, and conversion aspects of the program. Because of the criticality of high efficiency conversion to the economic implementation of the system, considerable progress has been made in evaluating necessary parameters for harvesting, storage, and conversion. Emphasis has been placed on obtaining definitive data for a 2-stage leaching-bed, packed-bed digestion system. In the breeding and production program, much progress has been made in identifying and characterizing sorghums that will produce maximum biomass yields; for the high energy sorghums (designed for producing both food and energy) selections have been made for improved lodging resistance and height uniformity.

  19. Seawater-based methane production from blue-green algae biomass by marine bacteria coculture

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Izumida, H.

    1984-01-01

    Marine-enriched culture NKM 004 produced methane from various carbohydrates, but methane production was inhibited by sulfate and acetate accumulated in the medium. On the other hand, marine methanogenic bacterium NKM 006 produced methane from acetate and methyltrophic substrates, and methane production was not inhibited by sulfate. The mixture of NKM 004 and NKM 006 continuously produced methane from marine blue-green algae Dermocarpa species NKBG 102B at 54 ..mu..mol/L medium/h for 200 h and the dry weight of the algal biomass was decreased to 25% of the initial weight in the natural seawater. Conversion of algal carbohydrate (glucose equivalent) to methane was 65%. Results indicate that this system is promising for methane production based on seawater and solar energy.

  20. [Influence of substrate COD on methane production in single-chambered microbial electrolysis cell].

    PubMed

    Teng, Wen-Kai; Liu, Guang-Li; Luo, Hai-Ping; Zhang, Ren-Duo; Fu, Shi-Yu

    2015-03-01

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of substrate can affect the microbial activity of both anode and cathode biofilm in the single-chamber methanogenic microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In order to investigate the effect of COD on the performance of MEC, a single chamber MEC was constructed with biocathode. With the change of initial concentration of COD (700, 1 000 and 1 350 mg x L(-1)), the methane production rate, COD removal and energy efficiency in the MEC were examined under different applied voltages. The results showed that the methane production rate and COD removal increased with the increasing COD. With the applied voltage changing from 0.3 to 0.7 V, the methane production rate increased at the COD of 700 mg x L(-1), while it increased at first and then decreased at the COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and 1350 mg x L(-1). A similar trend was observed for the COD removal. The cathode potential reached the minimum (- 0.694 ± 0.001) V as the applied voltage was 0.5 V, which therefore facilitated the growth of methanogenic bacteria and improved the methane production rate and energy efficiency of the MEC. The maximum energy income was 0.44 kJ ± 0.09 kJ (1450 kJ x m(-3)) in the MEC, which was obtained at the initial COD of 1000 mg x L(-1) and the applied voltage of 0.5 V. Methanogenic MECs could be used for the treatment of wastewaters containing low organic concentrations to achieve positive energy production, which might provide a new method to recover energy from low-strength domestic wastewater.

  1. Biogasification of water hyacinth and sludge for methane production

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Biljetina, R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Hayes, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    Research is in progress to determine the technical and economic feasibility of treatment of domestic sewage using primary settling and water hyacinth ponds and conversion of the organic products of this treatment (primary sludge and hyacinth) to substitute natural gas. This paper describes the status of the conversion component of this program which is centered on anaerobic digestion of hyacinth/sludge blends to methane. The results of several experiments conducted successfully in a large-scale experimental test unit located at the hyacinth treatment facility at Walt Disney are presented. 11 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Enhanced methane production via repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of enriched microbial consortia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Xu, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng

    2016-09-01

    Using batch and repeated batch cultivations, this study investigated the effects of bioaugmentation with enriched microbial consortia (named as EMC) on methane production from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage of potato slurry, as well as on the indigenous bacterial community. The results demonstrated that the improved methane production and shift of the indigenous bacterial community structure were dependent on the EMC/sludge ratio and bioaugmentation patterns. The methane yield and production rate in repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC were, respectively, average 15% and 10% higher than in one-time bioaugmentation pattern of EMC. DNA-sequencing approach showed that the enhanced methane production in the repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC mainly resulted from the enriched iron-reducing bacteria and the persistence of the introduced Syntrophomonas, which led to a rapid degradation of individual VFAs to methane. The findings contributed to understanding the correlation between the bioaugmentation of microbial consortia, community shift, and methane production.

  3. Modeling methane emissions by cattle production systems in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku Vera, J.; Molina, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Methane emissions from livestock is one of the largest sources of methane in Mexico. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a realistic estimate of the national inventory of methane produced by the enteric fermentation of cattle, based on an integrated simulation model, and to provide estimates of CH4 produced by cattle fed typical diets from the tropical and temperate climates of Mexico. The Mexican cattle population of 23.3 million heads was divided in two groups. The first group (7.8 million heads), represents cattle of the tropical climate regions. The second group (15.5 million heads), are the cattle in the temperate climate regions. This approach allows incorporating the effect of diet on CH4 production into the analysis because the quality of forages is lower in the tropics than in temperate regions. Cattle population in every group was subdivided into two categories: cows (COW) and other type of cattle (OTHE), which included calves, heifers, steers and bulls. The daily CH4 production by each category of animal along an average production cycle of 365 days was simulated, instead of using a default emission factor as in Tier 1 approach. Daily milk yield, live weight changes associated with the lactation, and dry matter intake, were simulated for the entire production cycle. The Moe and Tyrrell (1979) model was used to simulate CH4 production for the COW category, the linear model of Mills et al. (2003) for the OTHE category in temperate regions and the Kurihara et al. (1999) model for the OTHE category in the tropical regions as it has been developed for cattle fed tropical diets. All models were integrated with a cow submodel to form an Integrated Simulation Model (ISM). The AFRC (1993) equations and the lactation curve model of Morant and Gnanasakthy (1989) were used to construct the cow submodel. The ISM simulates on a daily basis the CH4 production, milk yield, live weight changes associated with lactation and dry matter intake. The total daily CH

  4. Effects of gas composition in headspace and bicarbonate concentrations in media on gas and methane production, degradability, and rumen fermentation using in vitro gas production techniques.

    PubMed

    Patra, Amlan Kumar; Yu, Zhongtang

    2013-07-01

    Headspace gas composition and bicarbonate concentrations in media can affect methane production and other characteristics of rumen fermentation in in vitro gas production systems, but these 2 important factors have not been evaluated systematically. In this study, these 2 factors were investigated with respect to gas and methane production, in vitro digestibility of feed substrate, and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile using in vitro gas production techniques. Three headspace gas compositions (N2+ CO2+ H2 in the ratio of 90:5:5, CO2, and N2) with 2 substrate types (alfalfa hay only, and alfalfa hay and a concentrate mixture in a 50:50 ratio) in a 3×2 factorial design (experiment 1) and 3 headspace compositions (N2, N2 + CO2 in a 50:50 ratio, and CO2) with 3 bicarbonate concentrations (80, 100, and 120 mM) in a 3×3 factorial design (experiment 2) were evaluated. In experiment 1, total gas production (TGP) and net gas production (NGP) was the lowest for CO2, followed by N2, and then the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas after fermentation was greater for CO2 than for N2 and the gas mixture, whereas total methane production (TMP) and net methane production (NMP) were the greatest for CO2, followed by the gas mixture, and then N2. Headspace composition did not affect in vitro digestibility or the VFA profile, except molar percentages of propionate, which were greater for CO2 and N2 than for the gas mixture. Methane concentration in headspace gas, TGP, and NGP were affected by the interaction of headspace gas composition and substrate type. In experiment 2, increasing concentrations of CO2 in the headspace decreased TGP and NGP quadratically, but increased the concentrations of methane, NMP, and in vitro fiber digestibility linearly, and TMP quadratically. Fiber digestibility, TGP, and NGP increased linearly with increasing bicarbonate concentrations in the medium. Concentrations of methane and NMP were unaffected by bicarbonate concentration, but

  5. Evidence for methane production by marine algae (Emiliana huxleyi) and its implication for the methane paradox in oxic waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhart, K.; Klintzsch, T.; Langer, G.; Nehrke, G.; Bunge, M.; Schnell, S.; Keppler, F.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4), an important greenhouse gas that affects radiation balance and consequently the earth's climate, still has uncertainties in its sinks and sources. The world's oceans are considered to be a source of CH4 to the atmosphere, although the biogeochemical processes involved in its formation are not fully understood. Several recent studies provided strong evidence of CH4 production in oxic marine and freshwaters but its source is still a topic of debate. Studies of CH4 dynamics in surface waters of oceans and large lakes have concluded that pelagic CH4 supersaturation cannot be sustained either by lateral inputs from littoral or benthic inputs alone. However, frequently regional and temporal oversaturation of surface waters occurs. This comprises the observation of a CH4 oversaturating state within the surface mixed layer, sometimes also termed the "oceanic methane paradox". In this study we considered marine algae as a possible direct source of CH4. Therefore, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi was grown under controlled laboratory conditions and supplemented with two 13C-labelled carbon substrates, namely bicarbonate and a position-specific 13C-labelled methionine (R-S-13CH3). The CH4 production was 0.7 μg POC g-1 d-1, or 30 ng g-1 POC h-1. After supplementation of the cultures with the 13C labelled substrate, the isotope label was observed in headspace-CH4. Moreover, the absence of methanogenic archaea within the algal culture and the oxic conditions during CH4 formation suggest that marine algae such as Emiliania huxleyi contribute to the observed spatial and temporal restricted CH4 oversaturation in ocean surface waters.

  6. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  7. Methane production by large iron meteorite impacts on early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasuhito; Sugita, Seiji; Kadono, Toshihiko; Matsui, Takafumi

    2003-07-01

    The continuous existence of life on the Earth is thought to have begun around 4 Ga, which is near the end of the heavy bombardment period. Impacts of asteroids and comets may have produced and delivered organic matter on the Hadean Earth. However, the nature of those processes has not been understood well yet. In this paper, we propose a new process of organic synthesis induced by asteroid impacts. We consider the effect of impact vapor condensates reentering the Earth's early atmosphere. Vapor condensates produced by a large-scale impact are dispersed around the globe and reenter the atmosphere at very high speed. The reentering condensates are heated and decelerated by the friction with the atmosphere and form a ``hot condensate layer'' around the globe. We calculate the temperature and atmospheric pressure of the hot condensate layer as a function of time. A Fischer-Tropsch reaction on the surface of the reentering iron and nickel condensates will lead to efficient methane production. The reaction rate of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis is estimated based on a kinetic model. Calculation results indicate that the amount of methane produced by the impact of an iron meteorite with a diameter of 10 km at 15 km sec-1 of velocity reaches ~1012-1013 kg. Some of the methane formed by this process is photodissociated to HCN and organic aerosols. The amount of the resulting HCN is estimated to be ~1010-1012 kg. This is 103-104 times the preimpact inventory of HCN on the Earth, which is maintained by UV radiation and electric discharge in a mildly reducing (i.e., CO-CO2 dominant) atmosphere. Such an episodic increase in the organic inventory on the surface of the early Earth may have played an important role in the origin of life.

  8. Exponential model describing methane production kinetics in batch anaerobic digestion: a tool for evaluation of biochemical methane potential assays.

    PubMed

    Brulé, Mathieu; Oechsner, Hans; Jungbluth, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Biochemical methane potential assays, usually run in batch mode, are performed by numerous laboratories to characterize the anaerobic degradability of biogas substrates such as energy crops, agricultural residues, and organic wastes. Unfortunately, the data obtained from these assays lacks common, universal bases for comparison, because standard protocols did not diffuse to the entire scientific community. Results are usually provided as final values of the methane yields of substrates. However, methane production curves generated in these assays also provide useful information about substrate degradation kinetics, which is rarely exploited. A basic understanding of the kinetics of the biogas process may be a first step towards a convergence of the assay methodologies on an international level. Following this assumption, a modeling toolbox containing an exponential model adjusted with a simple data-fitting method has been developed. This model should allow (a) quality control of the assays according to the goodness of fit of the model onto data series generated from the digestion of standard substrates, (b) interpretation of substrate degradation kinetics, and (c) estimate of the ultimate methane yield at infinite time. The exponential model is based on two assumptions: (a) the biogas process is a two-step reaction yielding VFA as intermediate products, and methane as the final product, and (b) the digestible substrate can be divided into a rapidly degradable and a slowly degradable fraction.

  9. Impact of reduced water consumption on sulfide and methane production in rising main sewers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Hu, Shihu; Sharma, Keshab Raj; Bustamante, Heriberto; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-05-01

    Reduced water consumption (RWC), for water conservation purposes, is expected to change the wastewater composition and flow conditions in sewer networks and affect the in-sewer transformation processes. In this study, the impact of reduced water consumption on sulfide and methane production in rising main sewers was investigated. Two lab-scale rising main sewer systems fed with wastewater of different strength and flow rates were operated to mimic sewers under normal and RWC conditions (water consumption reduced by 40%). Sulfide concentration under the RWC condition increased by 0.7-8.0 mg-S/L, depending on the time of a day. Batch test results showed that the RWC did not change the sulfate-reducing activity of sewer biofilms, the increased sulfide production being mainly due to longer hydraulic retention time (HRT). pH in the RWC system was about 0.2 units lower than that in the normal system, indicating that more sulfide would be in molecular form under the RWC condition, which would result in increased sulfide emission to the atmosphere as confirmed by the model simulation. Model based analysis showed that the cost for chemical dosage for sulfide mitigation would increase significantly per unit volume of sewage, although the total cost would decrease due to a lower sewage flow. The dissolved methane concentration under the RWC condition was over two times higher than that under the normal flow condition and the total methane discharge was about 1.5 times higher, which would potentially result in higher greenhouse gas emissions. Batch tests showed that the methanogenic activity of sewer biofilms increased under the RWC condition, which along with the longer HRT, led to increased methane production.

  10. Basic Study on Production Well Integrity for Methane Hydrate Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakumoto, M.; Yoneda, J.; Katagiri, J.; Tenma, N.; Aoki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane Hydrate (MH) exist as an ice-like crystal under low-temperature and high-pressure condition, and it has gathering attention as a non-conventional natural gas resource. Depressurization method is a method to reduce the bottom hole pressure by submersible pump lowering water level in the production well, and gas and water is recovered by MH dissociation at the in situ. During the depressurization operation, consolidation and deformation of sediment occurs because of increase of effective stress by depressurization and changes in the soil structure by MH dissociation. Then consolidation and deformation of sediment makes negative friction between the production well and sediment, and large stress is occur in casing. Therefore there is concern that it may cause compression failure and shear failure of the production well. For safe MH development, it is necessary to grasp the deformation and stress vicinity of the production well. At first, we conducted push-out test to get friction strength between the different materials simulated the well and sediment. And we have done numerical analysis for integrity using by these data. The results of numerical analysis showed that the large deformation of sediment occur around the depressurization zone, and for the well, the large tensile stress in the vertical direction occur the upper vicinity of the depressurization zone.This study was financially supported by the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). The authors thank the entire personnel related to MH21 Research Consortium.

  11. Effects of Methanogenic Inhibitors on Methane Production and Abundances of Methanogens and Cellulolytic Bacteria in In Vitro Ruminal Cultures ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenming; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of select antimethanogen compounds on methane production, feed digestion and fermentation, and populations of ruminal bacteria and methanogens using in vitro cultures. Seven compounds, including 2-bromoethanesulphonate (BES), propynoic acid (PA), nitroethane (NE), ethyl trans-2-butenoate (ETB), 2-nitroethanol (2NEOH), sodium nitrate (SN), and ethyl-2-butynote (EB), were tested at a final concentration of 12 mM. Ground alfalfa hay was included as the only substrate to simulate daily forage intake. Compared to no-inhibitor controls, PA, 2NEOH, and SN greatly reduced the production of methane (70 to 99%), volatile fatty acids (VFAs; 46 to 66%), acetate (30 to 60%), and propionate (79 to 82%), with 2NEOH reducing the most. EB reduced methane production by 23% without a significant effect on total VFAs, acetate, or propionate. BES significantly reduced the propionate concentration but not the production of methane, total VFAs, or acetate. ETB or NE had no significant effect on any of the above-mentioned measurements. Specific quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays showed that none of the inhibitors significantly affected total bacterial populations but that they did reduce the Fibrobacter succinogenes population. SN reduced the Ruminococcus albus population, while PA and 2NEOH increased the populations of both R. albus and Ruminococcus flavefaciens. Archaeon-specific PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that all the inhibitors affected the methanogen population structure, while archaeon-specific qPCR revealed a significant decrease in methanogen population in all treatments. These results showed that EB, ETB, NE, and BES can effectively reduce the total population of methanogens but that they reduce methane production to a lesser extent. The results may guide future in vivo studies to develop effective mitigation of methane emission from ruminants. PMID:21357427

  12. Effect of natural zeolite on methane production for anaerobic digestion of ammonium rich organic sludge.

    PubMed

    Tada, Chika; Yang, Yingnan; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Sonoda, Akinari; Ooi, Kenta; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2005-03-01

    The effect of an inorganic additive on the methane production from NH(4+)-rich organic sludge during anaerobic digestion was investigated using different kinds of inorganic adsorbent zeolites (mordenite, clinoptilolite, zeolite 3A, zeolite 4A), clay mineral (vermiculite), and manganese oxides (hollandite, birnessite). The additions of inorganic materials resulted in significant NH4+ removals from the natural organic sludge ([NH4+]=1, 150 mg N/l), except for the H-type zeolite 3A and birnessite. However, an enhanced methane production was only achieved using natural mordenite. Natural mordenite also enhanced the methane production from the sludge with a markedly high NH4+ concentration (4500 mg N/l) during anaerobic digestion. Chemical analyses of the sludge after the digestion showed considerable increases in the Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations in the presence of natural mordenite, but not with synthetic zeolite 3A. The effect of Ca2+ or Mg2+ addition on the methane production was studied using Na(+)-exchanges mordenite and Ca2+ or Mg(2+)-enriched sludge. The simultaneous addition of Ca2+ ions and Na(+)-exchanged mordenite enhanced the methane production; the amount of produced methane was about three times greater than that using only the Na(+)-exchanged mordenite. In addition, comparing the methane production by the addition of natural mordenite or Ca2+ ions, the methane production with natural mordenite was about 1.7 times higher than that with only Ca2+ ions. The addition of 5% and 10% natural mordenite were suitable condition for obtaining a high methane production. These results indicated that the Ca2+ ions, which are released from natural mordenite by a Ca2+/NH4+ exchange, enhanced the methane production of the organic waste at a high NH4+ concentration. Natural mordenite has a synergistic effect on the Ca2+ supply as well on the NH4+ removal during anaerobic digestion, which is effective for the mitigation of NH4+ inhibition against methane production.

  13. Stimulation of commercial coal seam methane production aimed at improving mining technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubina, E. A.; Lukyanov, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The relevance of the current research is due to the urgent need to revise the existing normative bases and procedures involved in intensive development of coal-methane deposits and commercial production of coal seam methane. The article presents the analysis of data on coal production volume and amount of methane emitted into the atmosphere in Kuzbass. There is a need to develop the exploration techniques that would allow implementing pre-mining gas drainage of coal seams and provide the companies with the guidance on coal seam methane drainage in very gassy coal mines. Commercial production of methane should become an integral part of economy and energy balance of the Russian Federation, which, in its turn, would enhance environmental protection due to reducing methane emissions, the largest source of greenhouse effect.

  14. Impact of different antibiotics on methane production using waste-activated sludge: mechanisms and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nurul Asyifah; Sakai, Kenji; Shirai, Yoshihito; Maeda, Toshinari

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an effective method for reducing the by-product of waste-activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants and for producing bioenergy from WAS. However, only a limited number of studies have attempted to improve anaerobic digestion by targeting the microbial interactions in WAS. In this study, we examined whether different antibiotics positively, negatively, or neutrally influence methane fermentation by evaluating changes in the microbial community and functions in WAS. Addition of azithromycin promoted the microbial communities related to the acidogenic and acetogenic stages, and a high concentration of soluble proteins and a high activity of methanogens were detected. Chloramphenicol inhibited methane production but did not affect the bacteria that contribute to the hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and acetogenesis digestion stages. The addition of kanamycin, which exhibits the same methane productivity as a control (antibiotic-free WAS), did not affect all of the microbial communities during anaerobic digestion. This study demonstrates the simultaneous functions and interactions of diverse bacteria and methanogenic Archaea in different stages of the anaerobic digestion of WAS. The ratio of Caldilinea, Methanosarcina, and Clostridium may correspond closely to the trend of methane production in each antibiotic. The changes in microbial activities and function by antibiotics facilitate a better understanding of bioenergy production.

  15. Methane production from glycolate excreting algae as a new concept in the production of biofuels.

    PubMed

    Günther, Anja; Jakob, Torsten; Goss, Reimund; König, Swetlana; Spindler, Daniel; Räbiger, Norbert; John, Saskia; Heithoff, Susanne; Fresewinkel, Mark; Posten, Clemens; Wilhelm, Christian

    2012-10-01

    It is the aim of the present work to introduce a new concept for methane production by the interaction of a glycolate-excreting alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and methanogenic microbes operating in separate compartments within one photobioreactor. This approach requires a minimum number of metabolic steps to convert light energy to methane thereby reducing the energetic and financial costs of biomass formation, harvest and refinement. In this feasibility study it is shown that the physiological limitations for sustained glycolate production can be circumvented by the use of C. reinhardtii mutants whose carbon concentrating mechanisms or glycolate dehydrogenase are suppressed. The results also demonstrate that methanogenic microbes are able to thrive on glycolate as single carbon source for a long time period, delivering biogas composed of CO(2)/methane with only very minor contamination.

  16. Methane production, emission and possible control measures in the rice agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingxing; Shangguan, Xingjian; Shen, Renxing; Reiner, Wassmann; Wolfgang, Seiler

    1993-09-01

    In the rice field methane is produced in the soil layer with depths of 2 25 cm. The vertical profile of methane production rate in the paddy soil during the water covering period differs from that in the paddy soil in dry phase. Only a small part, about 30%, of the produced methane is emitted to the atmosphere through rice plant, air bubbles, and molecular diffusion. Therefore, the methane emission rate from the rice field depends not only on the methane production rate in the soil, but also on the transport efficiency of the rice plant, air bubble formation that in turn depends on the production rate, and molecular diffusion. Field measurements show that methane emission rates from a particular rice field have very large diurnal, seasonal and interannual variations, which are related to soil characteristics, water regime, farming procedure, local climate, and rice growing activities. The relationship between the methane emission rate and the above mentioned factors is very complicated. The emission rates from different rice fields differ greatly not only in the absolute value, but also in the temporal variation patterns. Methane emission rate from the rice field may be significantly reduced by scientific management of fertilizer and irrigation. While the use of SO{4/2-} containing fertilizer and fermented organic fertilizer may reduce the methane emission significantly, the most promising measure for reducing methane emission from rice field is the frequent drainage irrigation procedure.

  17. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning.

  18. Production of Methanol from Methane by Encapsulated Methylosinus sporium.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Mehariya, Sanjeet; Otari, Sachin V; Madan, Bharat; Haw, Jung Rim; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhang, Liaoyuan; Kim, In-Won

    2016-12-28

    Massive reserves of methane (CH₄) remain unexplored as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals, mainly because of the lack of economically suitable and sustainable strategies for selective oxidation of CH₄ to methanol. The present study demonstrates the bioconversion of CH₄ to methanol mediated by Type I methanotrophs, such as Methylomicrobium album and Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum. Furthermore, immobilization of a Type II methanotroph, Methylosinus sporium, was carried out using different encapsulation methods, employing sodium-alginate (Na-alginate) and silica gel. The encapsulated cells demonstrated higher stability for methanol production. The optimal pH, temperature, and agitation rate were determined to be pH 7.0, 30°C, and 175 rpm, respectively, using inoculum (1.5 mg of dry cell mass/ml) and 20% of CH₄ as a feed. Under these conditions, maximum methanol production (3.43 and 3.73 mM) by the encapsulated cells was recorded. Even after six cycles of reuse, the Na-alginate and silica gel encapsulated cells retained 61.8% and 51.6% of their initial efficiency for methanol production, respectively, in comparison with the efficiency of 11.5% observed in the case of free cells. These results suggest that encapsulation of methanotrophs is a promising approach to improve the stability of methanol production.

  19. Methods for Detecting Microbial Methane Production and Consumption by Gas Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Jared T.; Catlett, Jennie L.; Smith, Megan L.; Buan, Nicole R.

    2016-01-01

    Methane is an energy-dense fuel but is also a greenhouse gas 25 times more detrimental to the environment than CO2. Methane can be produced abiotically by serpentinization, chemically by Sabatier or Fisher-Tropsh chemistry, or biotically by microbes (Berndt et al., 1996; Horita and Berndt, 1999; Dry, 2002; Wolfe, 1982; Thauer, 1998; Metcalf et al., 2002). Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane gas as a metabolic byproduct (Wolfe, 1982; Thauer, 1998). Our lab has developed and optimized three different gas chromatograph-utilizing assays to characterize methanogen metabolism (Catlett et al., 2015). Here we describe the end point and kinetic assays that can be used to measure methane production by methanogens or methane consumption by methanotrophic microbes. The protocols can be used for measuring methane production or consumption by microbial pure cultures or by enrichment cultures. PMID:27559541

  20. Predicted growth of world urban food waste and methane production.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Bijaya K; Barrington, Suzelle; Martinez, José

    2006-10-01

    Landfill gas emissions are one of the largest anthropogenic sources of methane especially because of food waste (FW). To prevent these emissions growing with world population, future FW best management practices need to be evaluated. The objective of this paper was therefore to predict FW production for 2025 if present management practices are maintained, and then, to compare the impact of scenario 1: encouraging people to stay in rural areas and composting 75% of their FW, and; of scenario 2, where in addition to scenario 1, composting or anaerobically digesting 75% of urban FW (UFW). A relationship was established between per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and the population percentage living in urban areas (%UP), as well as production of municipal solid waste (MSW) and UFW. With estimated GDP and population growth per country, %UP and production of MSW and UFW could be predicted for 2025. A relatively accurate (R(2) > 0.85) correlation was found between GDP and %UP, and between GDP and mass of MSW and FW produced. On a global scale, MSW and UFW productions were predicted to increase by 51 and 44%, respectively, from 2005 to 2025. During the same period, and because of its expected economic development, Asia was predicted to experience the largest increase in UFW production, of 278 to 416 Gkg. If present MSW management trends are maintained, landfilled UFW was predicted to increase world CH4 emissions from 34 to 48 Gkg and the landfill share of global anthropogenic emissions from 8 to 10%. In comparison with maintaining present FW management practices, scenario 1 can lower UFW production by 30% and maintain the landfill share of the global anthropogenic emissions at 8%. With scenario 2, the landfill share of global anthropogenic emissions could be further reduced from 8 to 6% and leachate production could be reduced by 40%.

  1. Affective Productions of Mathematical Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshaw, Margaret; Brown, Tony

    2012-01-01

    In underscoring the affective elements of mathematics experience, we work with contemporary readings of the work of Spinoza on the politics of affect, to understand what is included in the cognitive repertoire of the Subject. We draw on those resources to tell a pedagogical tale about the relation between cognition and affect in settings of…

  2. Improved methane production from brown algae under high salinity by fed-batch acclimation.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Here, a methanogenic microbial community was developed from marine sediments to have improved methane productivity from brown algae under high salinity. Fed-batch cultivation was conducted by adding dry seaweed at 1wt% total solid (TS) based on the liquid weight of the NaCl-containing sediment per round of cultivation. The methane production rate and level of salinity increased 8-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively, at the 10th round of cultivation. Moreover, the rate of methane production remained high, even at the 10th round of cultivation, with accumulation of salts derived from 10wt% TS of seaweed. The salinity of the 10th-round culture was equivalent to 5% NaCl. The improved methane production was attributed to enhanced acetoclastic methanogenesis because acetate became rapidly converted to methane during cultivation. The family Fusobacteriaceae and the genus Methanosaeta, the acetoclastic methanogen, predominated in bacteria and archaea, respectively, after the cultivation.

  3. Methane and Hydrogen Production from Anaerobic Fermentation of Municipal Solid Wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Xu, Kaiqin; Li, Yu-You; Inamori, Yuhei

    Methane and hydrogen production was investigated in batch experiments of thermophilic methane and hydrogen fermentation, using domestic garbage and food processing waste classified by fat/carbohydrate balance as a base material. Methane production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with fat content and negatively correlated with carbohydrate content in the substrate, and the average value of the methane production per unit of VS added from fat-rich materials was twice as large as that from carbohydrate-rich materials. By contrast, hydrogen production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with carbohydrate content and negatively correlated with fat content. Principal component analysis using the results obtained in this study enable an evaluation of substrates for methane and hydrogen fermentation based on nutrient composition.

  4. Methane production in sediments of small tundra ponds during winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrae, M. L.; Fishback, L.; Bourbonniere, R. A.; Duguay, C. R.; Soliman, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Shallow tundra ponds in the Churchill region of the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) store large quantities of organic material in the form of sediments. Organic sediments in ponds and wetlands have been identified as a source of atmospheric methane (CH4) during the summer season in many landscapes. However, less is known about CH4 production and emission during the winter months, following the formation of an ice layer on the water surface. Unfrozen sediments may continue to produce methane (CH4) during this time, which may become trapped in the ponds beneath the ice layer. This occurrence has been identified in some regions through the sampling and analysis of CH4 bubbles frozen in lake ice. The goal of this project is to examine the potential for the production and trapping of CH4 in ponds beneath the pond ice (water/ice and sediment profiles) in the Churchill region of the HBL. Thermistor and gas sampling arrays were installed in the water and sediments of two ponds. Gas samples were collected at 1-4 week intervals at the sediment-water interface and at 0-15cm and 20-35 cm depth. Results show that sediments are indeed thawed for 3-4 months of the winter season, and deeper sediments remain within the range of 0 to -5 C whereas shallow sediment temperatures ranged between 10 and -10 C over an annual cycle. Laboratory experiments showed that little difference in CH4 production was observed at sediment temperatures between -2 and 5 C, whereas production was very low at -10 C. No significant differences in CH4 production rates were observed for different sediment depths in the laboratory. Field data collected between August 2010 and June 2011 showed consistent accumulation of CH4 in sediments following the formation of an ice layer on pond surfaces. However, CH4 concentrations in gas samplers decreased in February through April after sediments were frozen, but began to increase again (May-June) as sediments thawed and began to warm. Future work will include the examination

  5. Comparative methane emission by ratites: Differences in food intake and digesta retention level out methane production.

    PubMed

    Frei, Samuel; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Ortmann, Sylvia; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-10-01

    Ratites differ in the anatomy of their digestive organs and their digesta excretion patterns. Ostriches (Struthio camelus) have large fermentation chambers and long digesta retention, emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae) have a short gut and short retention times, and rheas (Rhea americana) are intermediate. A recent study showed that ostriches produce as much methane (CH4) as expected for a similar-sized, non-ruminant mammalian herbivore. We hypothesized that emus and rheas produce less CH4 than ostriches. We individually measured, by chamber respirometry, the amount of O2 consumed as well as CO2 and CH4 emitted from six adult rheas (body mass 23.4±8.3 kg) and two adult emus (33.5 and 32.0 kg) during 23-hour periods on a pelleted lucerne diet. In contrast to previous studies, which classified emus as non-producers, we measured CH4 emissions at 7.39 and 6.25 L/day for emus and 2.87±0.82 L/day for rheas, which is close to values expected for similar-sized non-ruminant mammals for both species. O2 consumption was of a similar magnitude as reported previously. Across ratites, CH4 yield (L/kg dry matter intake) was positively correlated with mean retention time of food particles in the gut, similar to findings within ruminant species. In ratites, this relationship leads to similar body mass-specific CH4 production for a high intake/short retention and a low intake/long retention strategy. Therefore, when investigating CH4 production in herbivorous birds, it is advisable to consider various CH4 measures, not only yield or absolute daily amount alone.

  6. Influence of process parameters on the extraction of soluble substances from OFMSW and methane production.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2017-02-19

    Microorganisms involved in anaerobic digestion require dissolved substrates to transport them through the cell wall to different processing units and finally to be disposed as waste, such as methane and carbon dioxide. In order to increase methane production, this work proposes to separate the soluble substances from OFMSW and analyse methane production from extracts and OFMSW. Using water as solvent, four extraction parameters were proposed: (1) Number of consecutive extractions, (2) Duration of mixing for every consecutive extraction, (3) OFMSW to water mass ratios 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 and, (4) The influence of temperature on the extraction process. Results indicated that is possible to separate 40% of VS from OFMSW with only three consecutive extraction with mixing of 30min in every extraction using ambient temperature water. For every OFMSW to water combination, the first three consecutive extracts were analysed for biochemical methane potential test during 21days at 35°C; OFMSW was also tested as reference. Methane production from all substrates is highest during the first day and then it slowly decreases to increase again during a second stage. This was identified as diauxic behaviour. Specific methane production at day 21 increased with increasing water content of the extracts where OFMSW methane production was the lowest of all with 535NL/kgVS. These results indicate that it is feasible to rapidly produce methane from extracted substances.

  7. Methane production by phosphate-starved SAR11 chemoheterotrophic marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carini, Paul; White, Angelicque E; Campbell, Emily O; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2014-07-07

    The oxygenated surface waters of the world's oceans are supersaturated with methane relative to the atmosphere, a phenomenon termed the 'marine methane paradox'. The production of methylphosphonic acid (MPn) by marine archaea related to Nitrosopumilus maritimus and subsequent decomposition of MPn by phosphate-starved bacterioplankton may partially explain the excess methane in surface waters. Here we show that Pelagibacterales sp. strain HTCC7211, an isolate of the SAR11 clade of marine α-proteobacteria, produces methane from MPn, stoichiometric to phosphorus consumption, when starved for phosphate. Gene transcripts encoding phosphonate transport and hydrolysis proteins are upregulated under phosphate limitation, suggesting a genetic basis for the methanogenic phenotype. Strain HTCC7211 can also use 2-aminoethylphosphonate and assorted phosphate esters for phosphorus nutrition. Despite strain-specific differences in phosphorus utilization, these findings identify Pelagibacterales bacteria as a source of biogenic methane and further implicate phosphate starvation of chemoheterotrophic bacteria in the long-observed methane supersaturation in oxygenated waters.

  8. Factors affecting the process of CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate in sediments - Constrained from experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Hu, G.; Vanderveen, J.; Liu, C.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2011-12-01

    CO2 replacement of CH4 from methane hydrate has been proposed as a method to produce gas from natural gas hydrate by taking advantage of both the production of natural gas and the sequestration of CO2. To examine the validity of this method DOE/Conoco-Philips is considering having a field test in Alaska. The reaction of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate has been confirmed to be thermodynamically feasible, but concern is always raised about the reaction kinetics. Some kinetic studies in the system of methane hydrate and liquid or gaseous CO2 have found that the reaction proceeds at a very low rate. Natural gas hydrate occurs in sediments with multi-components and complex structure, so matters will be even more complicated. Up to now, few investigations have been carried out concerning the factors affecting the reaction process of CO2 replacing CH4 from methane hydrate. Experiments were implemented with sands, which were recovered from Mallik 5L-38 well, Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territory, Canada, sediment that previously contained hydrate although it had been dried completely before our experiments. The water-saturated sands were tightly charged into a plastic bottle (90 mm deep and 60 mm wide), and then this test specimen was sealed in a pressure cell. After methane hydrate was synthesized in the test specimen for 108 days under a pressure of 11 to 8 MPa and a temperature of 3 degrees Celsius, liquid CO2 was introduced into the pressure cell. The conditions under which CO2 was reacted with methane hydrate were ~5.3 MPa and 5 degrees Celsius. After reacting for 15 days, the test specimen was recovered. The test specimen was cut into ~10 mm thick discs, and sub-samples were further taken from each of the discs. In addition to the determination of hydrate saturation and the gas composition, Raman spectroscopic studies were carried out for the sub-samples obtained. The results revealed: 1) less CO2 replacement in the bottom disc of the test specimen as compared

  9. Comparison of methane production potential, biodegradability, and kinetics of different organic substrates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yeqing; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Guangqing; Chen, Chang; He, Yanfeng; Liu, Xiaoying

    2013-12-01

    The methane production potential, biodegradability, and kinetics of a wide range of organic substrates were determined using a unified and simple method. Results showed that feedstocks that contained high energy density and easily degradable substrates exhibited high methane production potential and biodegradability. Lignocellulosic biomass with high content of fibrous compositions had low methane yield and biodegradability. Feedstocks with high lignin content (≥ 15%, on a TS basis) had low first-order rate constant (0.05-0.06 1/d) compared to others. A negative linear correlation between lignin content and experimental methane yield (or biodegradability) was found for lignocellulosic and manure wastes. This could be used as a fast method to predict the methane production potential and biodegradability of fiber-rich substrates. The findings of this study provided a database for the conversion efficiency of different organic substrates and might be useful for applications of biomethane potential assay and anaerobic digestion in the future.

  10. Soil redox and pH effects on methane production in a flooded rice soil

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.P.; DeLaune, R.D.; Masscheleyn, P.H.; Patrick, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    Methane formation in soil is a microbiological process controlled by many factors. Of them soil redox potential (Eh) and soil pH are considered as critical controls. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to study the critical initiation soil Eh, the optimum soil pH, and the interaction of Eh and pH on methane production. A small decrease in pH resulting from the introduction of acidic materials significantly decreased methane production. However, a slight increase in soil pH (about 0.2 unit higher than the natural soil suspension pH) resulted in an enhancement of methane production by 11-20 percent and 24-25 percent at controlled Eh of -250 mV and -200 mV, respectively. Results suggest that decrease in methane emission could be obtained by a small reduction in soil pH in Crowley soil.

  11. Sire and liveweight affect feed intake and methane emissions of sheep confined in respiration chambers.

    PubMed

    Robinson, D L; Goopy, J P; Donaldson, A J; Woodgate, R T; Oddy, V H; Hegarty, R S

    2014-12-01

    Daily methane production and feed intake were measured on 160 adult ewes, which were the progeny of 20 sires and 3 sire types (Merino, dual-purpose and terminal) from a genetically diverse flock. All animals were housed in individual pens and fed a 50/50 mix of chaffed lucerne and oaten hays at 20 g/kg liveweight (LW), with feed refusals measured for at least 10 days before the first of three 22-h measurements in respiration chambers (RC). Feed was withdrawn at 1600 h on the day before each RC test to encourage the ewes to eat the entire ration provided for them in the RC. After the first 1-day RC test, the sheep were returned to their pens for a day, then given a second 1-day RC test, followed by another day in their pens, then a third RC test. After all animals had been tested, they were ranked according to methane emissions adjusted for feed intake in the RC and on the previous day, enabling 10 low and 10 high methane animals to be chosen for repeat measurement. No variation between sires nor consistent effects of LW on feed eaten (%FE, expressed as per cent of feed offered) was evident in the 10 days before the first RC measurement. However, significant differences between sires (equivalent to an estimated heritability of 41%) were identified for %FE during the 2(nd) and 3(rd) days of RC testing (2 and 4 days after the initial RC test). The analysis of all data showed that methane emissions in the RC were related to feed intake on the day of testing and the two previous days (all P<0.0005). Before correcting for feed intake on previous days, there was some variation between sires in methane yield, equivalent to an estimated heritability of 9%. Correction for feed intake on the 2 previous days halved the residual variation, allowing other effects to be detected, including effects of LW, twins reared as singles, test batch, RC and test-day effects, but estimated sire variation fell to zero. In order to avoid potential biases, statistical models of methane

  12. Effects of exogenous aerobic bacteria on methane production and biodegradation of municipal solid waste in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Ge, Sai; Liu, Lei; Xue, Qiang; Yuan, Zhiming

    2016-09-01

    Landfill is the most common and efficient ways of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal and the landfill biogas, mostly methane, is currently utilized to generate electricity and heat. The aim of this work is to study the effects and the role of exogenous aerobic bacteria mixture (EABM) on methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors. The results showed that the addition of EABM could effectively enhance hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes of MSW degradation, resulting in 63.95% reduction of volatile solid (VS), the highest methane production rate (89.83Lkg(-1) organic matter) ever recorded and a threefold increase in accumulative methane production (362.9L) than the control (127.1L). In addition, it is demonstrated that white-rot fungi (WRF) might further promote the methane production through highly decomposing lignin, but the lower pH value in leachate and longer acidogenesis duration may cause methane production reduced. The data demonstrated that methane production and biodegradation of MSW in bioreactors could be significantly enhanced by EABM via enhanced hydrolysis and acidogenesis processes, and the results are of great economic importance for the future design and management of landfill.

  13. Methane Production of Different Forages in In vitro Ruminal Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Meale, S. J.; Chaves, A. V.; Baah, J.; McAllister, T. A.

    2012-01-01

    An in vitro rumen batch culture study was completed to compare effects of common grasses, leguminous shrubs and non-leguminous shrubs used for livestock grazing in Australia and Ghana on CH4 production and fermentation characteristics. Grass species included Andropodon gayanus, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Pennisetum purpureum. Leguminous shrub species included Cajanus cajan, Cratylia argentea, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Stylosanthes guianensis and non-leguminous shrub species included Annona senegalensis, Moringa oleifera, Securinega virosa and Vitellaria paradoxa. Leaves were harvested, dried at 55°C and ground through a 1 mm screen. Serum bottles containing 500 mg of forage, modified McDougall’s buffer and rumen fluid were incubated under anaerobic conditions at 39°C for 24 h. Samples of each forage type were removed after 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h of incubation for determination of cumulative gas production. Methane production, ammonia concentration and proportions of VFA were measured at 24 h. Concentration of aNDF (g/kg DM) ranged from 671 to 713 (grasses), 377 to 590 (leguminous shrubs) and 288 to 517 (non-leguminous shrubs). After 24 h of in vitro incubation, cumulative gas, CH4 production, ammonia concentration, proportion of propionate in VFA and IVDMD differed (p<0.05) within each forage type. B. ruziziensis and G. sepium produced the highest cumulative gas, IVDMD, total VFA, proportion of propionate in VFA and the lowest A:P ratios within their forage types. Consequently, these two species produced moderate CH4 emissions without compromising digestion. Grazing of these two species may be a strategy to reduce CH4 emissions however further assessment in in vivo trials and at different stages of maturity is recommended. PMID:25049482

  14. A modeling perspective on wetland methane production and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas after H2O and CO2. The effects of global warming on wetland hydrology have a strong impact on wetland CH4 production and emission, via both hydrologic and biogeochemical processes, presenting a challenge to accurate projection of CH4 responses to climate change. We are working on the development of CH4 module—including CH4 production, consumption and transport processes— in the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) in order to estimate CH4 fluxes in a regional and global scale. However, high uncertainties are still present in sensitivity of CH4 production to soil temperature, hydrology, pH and redox potential, rough treatment to vertical soil resolution and fractional inundation, and simplified parameterizing of CH4 transport and emissions. Our research aims to (1) use tower eddy covariance and aircraft measurements of CH4 concentration and surface flux to test the CH4 processes in CLM model; (2) obtain a better understanding and parameterization of the biogeochemical and biogeophysical processes of high latitude wetland CH4 production and emission; (3) assess impact of climate variability on wetland CH4 emission. Our analysis of CLM shows that the modeled predictions of the seasonal cycle of CH4 in high latitude wetlands is very sensitive to active layer hydrological cycle. The abrupt soil water increase in the period of soil thawing and snow melting leads to unrealistically large emissions of CH4 during the spring season. We present improvements required to generate realistic seasonal cycles of high latitude CH4 fluxes in the model.

  15. Biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge: effect of fly ash and modeling.

    PubMed

    Huiliñir, César; Montalvo, Silvio; Guerrero, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    The effect of fly ash on biodegradability and methane production from secondary paper and pulp sludge, including its modeling, was evaluated. Three tests with fly ash concentrations of 0, 10 and 20 mg/L were evaluated at 32 °C. Methane production was modeled using the modified Gompertz equation. The results show that the doses used produce a statistically significant increase of accumulated methane, giving values greater than 225 mL of CH4 per gram of volatile solids (VS) added, and 135% greater than that obtained in the control assay. Biodegradability of VS increased 143% with respect to the control assays, giving values around 43%. The modified Gompertz model can describe well methane generation from residual sludge of the paper industry water treatment, with parameter values between those reported in the literature. Thus, the addition of fly ash to the process causes a significant increase of accumulated methane and VS removal, improving the biodegradability of paper and pulp sludge.

  16. NREL Advancements in Methane Conversion Lead to Cleaner Air, Useful Products

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    Researchers at NREL leveraged the recent on-site development of gas fermentation capabilities and novel genetic tools to directly convert methane to lactic acid using an engineered methanotrophic bacterium. The results provide proof-of-concept data for a gas-to-liquids bioprocess that concurrently produces fuels and chemicals from methane. NREL researchers developed genetic tools to express heterologous genes in methanotrophic organisms, which have historically been difficult to genetically engineer. Using these tools, researchers demonstrated microbial conversion of methane to lactate, a high-volume biochemical precursor predominantly utilized for the production of bioplastics. Methane biocatalysis offers a means to concurrently liquefy and upgrade natural gas and renewable biogas, enabling their utilization in conventional transportation and industrial manufacturing infrastructure. Producing chemicals and fuels from methane expands the suite of products currently generated from biorefineries, municipalities, and agricultural operations, with the potential to increase revenue and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  17. Subsurface characterization of methane production and oxidation from a New Hampshire wetland.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, J K; Schrag, D P

    2010-06-01

    We measured the carbon isotopic composition of pore water carbon dioxide from Sallie's Fen, a New Hampshire poor fen. The isotope profiles are used in combination with a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model to calculate rates of methane production, oxidation and transport over an annual cycle. We show how the rates vary with depth over a seasonal cycle, with methane produced deeper during the winter months and at progressively shallower depths into the summer season. The rates of methane production, constrained by the measured delta(13)C(dic) profiles, cannot explain high methane emission during the summer. We suggest that much of the methane produced during this time comes either from the unsaturated peat, or from the top 1-3 cm of saturated peat where episodic exchange with the atmosphere makes it invisible to our method.

  18. Methane Production and Transport within the Marsh Biome of Biosphere 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Jennifer; Goodridge, Kelven

    1997-01-01

    In recent decades, the concentration of methane in the earth's atmosphere increased 1-2% annually. It's rate of increases, combined with methane's effectiveness as a greenhouse gas, has led to an intensive research effort to determine the sources and sinks of the gas in the environment. Biosphere 2 offers a unique opportunity to contribute to the effort because it lacks a major photochemical sink present in the Earth's atmosphere. Researchers can therefore concentrate on biological processes involved in methane cycles. Wetlands are a large source of atmospheric methane, due to anoxic conditions in the sediments and the abundance of organic materials. In order to determine if these conditions in Biosphere 2 also promote methane production, this study looked for the fluxes of methane and methods of transport of the gas from from the water and sediments to the atmosphere in the Marsh Biome. Fluxes of methane from the sediments and waters were measured using static chambers, peepers, and leaf bags. Fluxes and vertical profiles of methane in the sediments show that substantial amounts of methane are being produced in the marsh and are being transported into the Biosphere 2 environment.

  19. Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

  20. Methane production and recovery using potato waste solubles and solids

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    The production and recovery of methane gas utilizing various potato conversion wastes in either soluble or solid form is discussed in this chapter. Such wastes may occur at temperatures ranging from 25 C to as high as 55 C. The form and concentration of the waste and the temperature may dictate the choice of one of several possible treatment processes which are variously designated as conventional (holding tanks), contact (recycle of cell solids), and filter (packed bed) reactors. To this may be added a recent concept of an expanded bed reactor. A first design approach was employed to approximate capital and operating costs with an evaluation of the internal rates of return on investment and payout times. The fraction of the energy required by a processing plant which could be provided by the gas produced was of interest as a potential supplemental source of energy in the event that natural gas supplies are reduced or that prices of this fuel continue to escalate rapidly.

  1. Experimental research on the characteristics of methane/air explosion affected by ultrafine water mist.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Bi, Mingshu; Zhou, Yihui; Li, Yiming

    2017-02-15

    The inhibition effects of ultrafine water mists on 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% methane explosions were experimentally studied in a sealed visual vessel. The mist (10μm) produced by a mist generation system in the vessel was measured by a phase doppler particle analyzer. A high-speed camera was used to record the explosion flame affected by spraying concentration and a high frequency pressure sensor was used to acquire the explosion pressure. Meanwhile, the relationship between flame propagation and pressure rising with time was analyzed. The appearance height of "tulip" flame was increased and appearance moment was delayed obviously with the mist amount increased. The variation trend was illustrated from the viewpoint of the interactions among the flame front, the flame-induced reverse flow and the vortices. Moreover, cellular structure appeared in the burned zone and experienced four developing stages, and its formation indicates that water vapor can cause the intrinsic flame instability and absorb heat on the burned zone further. The pressure underwent two accelerating rises, which was affected by mist amount. The accelerating rise processes were related to the accelerating propagation of combustion wave. Furthermore, methane explosion can be absolutely suppressed by the mist.

  2. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface-derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this “methoxydotrophic” mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  3. Methane Production by Methanogens in Perchlorate-supplemented Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, K. L.; Gavin, P.; Goodhart, T.; Kral, T. A.

    2009-03-01

    Perchlorates, found on the martian surface, create a harsh environment. Methanogens are familiar with harsh environments and their growth was tested in perchlorate salt media. All four species of methanogens produced methane at all concentrations of each salt tested.

  4. Methane production from coal by a single methanogen.

    PubMed

    Mayumi, Daisuke; Mochimaru, Hanako; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Kyosuke; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2016-10-14

    Coal-bed methane is one of the largest unconventional natural gas resources. Although microbial activity may greatly contribute to coal-bed methane formation, it is unclear whether the complex aromatic organic compounds present in coal can be used for methanogenesis. We show that deep subsurface-derived Methermicoccus methanogens can produce methane from more than 30 types of methoxylated aromatic compounds (MACs) as well as from coals containing MACs. In contrast to known methanogenesis pathways involving one- and two-carbon compounds, this "methoxydotrophic" mode of methanogenesis couples O-demethylation, CO2 reduction, and possibly acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Because MACs derived from lignin may occur widely in subsurface sediments, methoxydotrophic methanogenesis would play an important role in the formation of natural gas not limited to coal-bed methane and in the global carbon cycle.

  5. Characteristics of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and methane production: A review.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Rosalinda; González-Martínez, Simón

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is a viable alternative for waste stabilization and energy recovery. Biogas production mainly depends on the type and amount of organic macromolecules. Based on results from different authors analysing OFMSW from different cities, this paper presents the importance of knowing the OFMSW composition to understand how anaerobic digestion can be used to produce methane. This analysis describes and discusses physical, chemical and bromatological characteristics of OFMSW reported by several authors from different countries and cities and their relationship to methane production. The main conclusion is that the differences are country and not city dependant. Cultural habits and OFMSW management systems do not allow a generalisation but the individual analysis for specific cities allow understanding the general characteristics for a better methane production. Not only are the OFMSW characteristics important but also the conditions under which the methane production tests were performed.

  6. Economic tools for realization of methane production project on Kuzbass coal deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, I.; Sokolova, M.; Kochetkova, O.; Dmitrieva, N.

    2016-09-01

    Environmental issues and, above all, issues related to the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, such as coal bed methane, actualize the challenge of searching a variety of options for its disposal. The difference in the macroeconomic, industrial, geological and infrastructural features determine the need to choose the most cost-effective option for using of methane emitted from the coal deposits. Various economic ways to improve the profitability of production are viewed on the basis of the analysis of methane production project from Kuzbass coal deposits, Kemerovo region, Russia.

  7. The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii

    SciTech Connect

    DeMoll, E.

    1990-10-22

    Research continues on the role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. This report summarizes current progress of the research. Topics include: A survey of other methanogens for the purine degradation pathway; isolate and characterize the enzyme and products of formiminoglycine cleavage; ascertain the fate of glycine from the formiminoglycine cleavage; elucidate the route of incorporation of the formyl moiety of formiminoglycine into methane biosynthesis; determine the percent methane and amino acid synthesis from purine degradation; and related studies on xanthine dehydrogenase and pyrimidine degradation of M. Vannielii. (SM)

  8. Glycoproteins as substrates for production of hydrogen and methane by colonic bacterial flora.

    PubMed

    Perman, J A; Modler, S

    1982-08-01

    Hydrogen and methane in human breath derive entirely from bacterial fermentation in the intestinal lumen. The sources of substrates utilized for these reactions have not been completely determined. Basal excretion of both gases occurs in the fasted state, while malabsorbed carbohydrate commonly results in increased hydrogen but not methane production. Using an in vitro fecal incubation system, we have studied hydrogen and methane production from glycoproteins of endogenous as well as dietary origin. All glycoproteins tested yielded hydrogen when incubated with fecal homogenates. Mean hydrogen production from substrates containing less than 3% sugar (human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and alpha-casein) averaged 2.2 +/- 0.9% of hydrogen production from equivalent amounts of glucose, while carbohydrate-rich mucin yielded 46.0 +/- 6.7% of hydrogen production from glucose. Glycoproteins of intermediate carbohydrate content, including transferrin and egg white, yielded intermediate values. Methane production from glycoproteins was optimal from carbohydrate-poor protein substrates in fecal homogenates which accumulated hydrogen and became rapidly acidic when incubated with pure carbohydrate. In contrast, methane production was comparable for essentially sugar-free proteins, glycoproteins, and glucose when hydrogen did not accumulate and neutral pH was maintained. We conclude that glycoproteins are substrates for hydrogen and methane production by colonic bacteria from healthy adults. In individuals with bacterial overgrowth syndromes and in protein-losing enteropathy, bacterial catabolism of endogenous glycoproteins may cause increased basal hydrogen and methane excretion. These findings also raise the possibility that measurement of hydrogen or methane after oral administration of dietary glycoproteins may be useful in detection of protein malabsorption.

  9. Microbial diversity and dynamics during methane production from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bareither, Christopher A.; Wolfe, Georgia L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Benson, Craig H.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Similar bacterial communities developed following different start-up operation. ► Total methanogens in leachate during the decelerated methane phase reflected overall methane yield. ► Created correlations between methanogens, methane yield, and available substrate. ► Predominant bacteria identified with syntrophic polysaccharide degraders. ► Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were dominant in the methane generation process. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to characterize development of bacterial and archaeal populations during biodegradation of municipal solid waste (MSW) and to link specific methanogens to methane generation. Experiments were conducted in three 0.61-m-diameter by 0.90-m-tall laboratory reactors to simulate MSW bioreactor landfills. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was used to characterize microbial communities in both leachate and solid waste. Microbial assemblages in effluent leachate were similar between reactors during peak methane generation. Specific groups within the Bacteroidetes and Thermatogae phyla were present in all samples and were particularly abundant during peak methane generation. Microbial communities were not similar in leachate and solid fractions assayed at the end of reactor operation; solid waste contained a more abundant bacterial community of cellulose-degrading organisms (e.g., Firmicutes). Specific methanogen populations were assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinaceae, and Methanobacteriales were the predominant methanogens in all reactors, with Methanomicrobiales consistently the most abundant. Methanogen growth phases coincided with accelerated methane production, and cumulative methane yield increased with increasing total methanogen abundance. The difference in methanogen populations and corresponding methane yield is attributed to different initial cellulose and hemicellulose contents of the MSW. Higher initial cellulose and

  10. Methane Detection for Oil and Gas Production Sites Using Portable Dual-Comb Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Sean; Wright, Robert; Cossel, Kevin C.; Truong, Gar-Wing; Baumann, Esther; Coddington, Ian; Newbury, Nathan R.; Alden, Caroline; Ghosh, Subhomoy; Prasad, Kuldeep; Rieker, Greg B.

    2016-06-01

    Considerable uncertainty exists regarding the contribution of oil and gas operations to anthropogenic emissions of atmospheric methane. Additionally, new proposed EPA regulations on volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from oil and gas production facilities have been expanded to include methane, making this a topic of growing importance to the oil and gas industry as well as regulators. In order to gain a better understanding of emissions, reliable techniques that enable long-term monitoring of entire production facilities are needed. Recent advances in the development of compact and robust fiber frequency combs are enabling the use of this powerful spectroscopic tool outside of the laboratory. Here we characterize and demonstrate a dual comb spectrometer (DCS) system with the potential to locate and size methane leaks from oil and gas production sites over extended periods of time. The DCS operates over kilometer scale open paths, and the path integrated methane measurements will ultimately be coupled with an atmospheric inversion utilizing local meteorology and a high resolution fluid dynamics simulation to determine leak location and also derive a leak rate. High instrument precision is needed in order to accurately perform the measurement inversion on the highly varying methane background, thus the DCS system has been fully optimized for the detection of atmospheric methane in the methane absorption region around 180-184 THz.

  11. Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In methanogenic microbial electrolysis cells (MMCs), CO2 is reduced to methane using a methanogenic biofilm on the cathode by either direct electron transfer or evolved hydrogen. To optimize methane generation, we examined several cathode materials: plain graphite blocks, graphite blocks coated with carbon black or carbon black containing metals (platinum, stainless steel or nickel) or insoluble minerals (ferrihydrite, magnetite, iron sulfide, or molybdenum disulfide), and carbon fiber brushes. Assuming a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production rates were insufficient to explain methane production. At −600 mV, platinum on carbon black had the highest abiotic hydrogen gas formation rate (1600 ± 200 nmol cm–3 d–1) and the highest biotic methane production rate (250 ± 90 nmol cm–3 d–1). At −550 mV, plain graphite (76 nmol cm–3 d–1) performed similarly to platinum (73 nmol cm–3 d–1). Coulombic recoveries, based on the measured current and evolved gas, were initially greater than 100% for all materials except platinum, suggesting that cathodic corrosion also contributed to electromethanogenic gas production. PMID:24741468

  12. Sulfide and methane production in sewer sediments: Field survey and model evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Tugtas, A Evren; Sharma, Keshab R; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    Sewer sediment processes have been reported to significantly contribute to overall sulfide and methane production in sewers, at a scale comparable to that of sewer biofilms. The physiochemical and biological characteristics of sewer sediments are heterogeneous; however, the variability of in-sediments sulfide and methane production rates among sewers has not been assessed to date. In this study, five sewer sediment samples were collected from two cities in Australia with different climatic conditions. Batch assays were conducted to determine the rates of sulfate reduction and methane production under different flow velocity (shear stress) conditions as well as under completely mixed conditions. The tests showed substantial and variable sulfate reduction and methane production activities among different sediments. Sulfate reduction and methane production from sewer sediments were confirmed to be areal processes, and were dependent on flow velocity/shear stress. Despite of the varying characteristics and reactions kinetics, the sulfate reduction and methane production processes in all sediments could be well described by a one-dimensional sewer sediment model recently developed based on results obtained from a laboratory sewer sediment reactor. Model simulations indicated that the in-situ contribution of sewer sediment emissions could be estimated without the requirement of measuring the specific sediment characteristics or the sediment depths.

  13. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase A as an indicator to estimate methane production from dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga Casañas, M A; Rangkasenee, N; Krattenmacher, N; Thaller, G; Metges, C C; Kuhla, B

    2015-06-01

    The evaluation of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies requires the quantitative assessment of individual methane production. Because methane measurement in respiration chambers is highly accurate, but also comprises various disadvantages such as limited capacity and high costs, the establishment of an indicator for estimating methane production of individual ruminants would provide an alternative to direct methane measurement. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase is involved in methanogenesis and the subunit α of methyl-coenzyme M reductase is encoded by the mcrA gene of rumen archaea. We therefore examined the relationship between methane emissions of Holstein dairy cows measured in respiration chambers with 2 different diets (high- and medium-concentrate diet) and the mcrA DNA and mcrA cDNA abundance determined from corresponding rumen fluid samples. Whole-body methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake and mcrA DNA normalized to the abundance of the rrs gene coding for 16S rRNA correlated significantly when using qmcrA primers. Use of qmcrA primers also revealed linear correlation between mcrA DNA copy number and methane yield. Regression analyses based on normalized mcrA cDNA abundances revealed no significant linear correlation with methane production per kilogram of dry matter intake. Furthermore, the correlations between normalized mcrA DNA abundance and the rumen fluid concentration of acetic and isobutyric acid were positive, whereas the correlations with propionic and lactic acid were negative. These data suggest that the mcrA DNA approach based on qmcrA primers could potentially be a molecular proxy for methane yield after further refinement.

  14. Temperature response of methane production in liquid manures and co-digestates.

    PubMed

    Elsgaard, Lars; Olsen, Anne B; Petersen, Søren O

    2016-01-01

    Intensification of livestock production makes correct estimation of methanogenesis in liquid manure increasingly important for inventories of CH4 emissions. Such inventories currently rely on fixed methane conversion factors as knowledge gaps remain with respect to detailed temperature responses of CH4 emissions from liquid manure. Here, we describe the temperature response of CH4 production in liquid cattle slurry, pig slurry, and fresh and stored co-digested slurry from a thermophilic biogas plant. Subsamples of slurry were anoxically incubated at 20 temperatures from 5-52°C in a temperature gradient incubator and CH4 production was measured by gas chromatographic analysis of headspace gas after a 17-h incubation period. Methane production potentials at 5-37°C were described by the Arrhenius equation (modelling efficiencies, 79.2-98.1%), and the four materials showed a consistent activation energy (Ea) which averaged 81.0kJmol(-1) (95% confidence interval, 74.9-87.1kJmol(-1)) corresponding to a temperature sensitivity (Q10) of 3.4. In contrast, the frequency factor (A) differed among the slurry materials (30.1affect this parameter. The Ea estimate, based on individual slurry materials, was intermediate when compared to published values of 63 and 112.7kJmol(-1) derived from composite data, but was similar to Ea estimated for CH4 production at microbial community level across aquatic ecosystems, wetlands and rice paddies (89.3kJmol(-1)). This supports that the derived temperature sensitivity parameters may be applicable to dynamic modelling of CH4 emissions from livestock manure.

  15. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  16. Methane production and digestion of different physical forms of rapeseed as fat supplements in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Brask, M; Lund, P; Weisbjerg, M R; Hellwing, A L F; Poulsen, M; Larsen, M K; Hvelplund, T

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to study the effect of the physical form of rapeseed fat on methane (CH4) mitigation properties, feed digestion, and rumen fermentation. Four lactating ruminal-, duodenal-, and ileal-cannulated Danish Holstein dairy cows (143 d in milk, milk yield of 34.3 kg) were submitted to a 4×4 Latin square design with 4 rations: 1 control with rapeseed meal (low-fat, CON) and 3 fat-supplemented rations with either rapeseed cake (RSC), whole cracked rapeseed (WCR), or rapeseed oil (RSO). Dietary fat concentrations were 3.5 in CON, 5.5 in RSC, 6.2 in WCR, and 6.5% in RSO. The amount of fat-free rapeseed was kept constant for all rations. The forage consisted of corn silage and grass silage and the forage to concentrate ratio was 50:50 on a dry matter basis. Diurnal samples of duodenal and ileal digesta and feces were compiled. The methane production was measured for 4 d in open-circuit respiration chambers. Additional fat reduced the CH4 production per kilogram of dry matter intake and as a proportion of the gross energy intake by 11 and 14%, respectively. Neither the total tract nor the rumen digestibility of organic matter (OM) or neutral detergent fiber were significantly affected by the treatment. Relating the CH4 production to the total-tract digested OM showed a tendency to decrease CH4 per kilogram of digested OM for fat-supplemented rations versus CON. The acetate to propionate ratio was not affected for RSC and WCR but was increased for RSO compared with CON. The rumen ammonia concentration was not affected by the ration. The milk and energy-corrected milk yields were unaffected by the fat supplementation. In conclusion, rapeseed is an appropriate fat source to reduce the enteric CH4 production without affecting neutral detergent fiber digestion or milk production. The physical form of fat did not influence the CH4-reducing effect of rapeseed fat. However, differences in the volatile fatty acid pattern indicate that different

  17. Semi-continuous methane production from undiluted brown algae using a halophilic marine microbial community.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Acclimated marine sediment-derived culture was used for semi-continuous methane production from materials equivalent to raw brown algae, without dilution of salinity and without nutrient supply, under 3 consecutive conditions of varying organic loading rates (OLRs) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). Methane production was stable at 2.0gVS/kg/day (39-day HRT); however, it became unstable at 2.9gVS/kg/day (28-day HRT) due to acetate and propionate accumulation. OLR subsequently decreased to 1.7gVS/kg/day (46-day HRT), stabilizing methane production beyond steady state. Methane yield was above 300mL/g VS at all OLRs. These results indicated that the acclimated marine sediment culture was able to produce methane semi-continuously from raw brown algae without dilution and nutrient supply under steady state. Microbial community analysis suggested that hydrogenotrophic methanogens predominated among archaea during unstable methane production, implying a partial shift of the methanogenic pathway from acetoclastic methanogenesis to acetate oxidation.

  18. Evaluation of marine sediments as microbial sources for methane production from brown algae under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Miura, Toyokazu; Kita, Akihisa; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Various marine sediments were evaluated as promising microbial sources for methane fermentation of Saccharina japonica, a brown alga, at seawater salinity. All marine sediments tested produced mainly acetate among volatile fatty acids. One marine sediment completely converted the produced volatile fatty acids to methane in a short period. Archaeal community analysis revealed that acetoclastic methanogens belonging to the Methanosarcina genus dominated after cultivation. Measurement of the specific conversion rate at each step of methane production under saline conditions demonstrated that the marine sediments had higher conversion rates of butyrate and acetate than mesophilic methanogenic granules. These results clearly show that marine sediments can be used as microbial sources for methane production from algae under high-salt conditions without dilution.

  19. Comparison between ensilage and fungal pretreatment for storage of giant reed and subsequent methane production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Xu, Fuqing; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2016-06-01

    Ensilage and fungal pretreatment of giant reed harvested from August through December were compared based on their effects on feedstock preservation, glucose yield, and subsequent methane production via anaerobic digestion (AD). Compared to fungal pretreatment, ensilage obtained lower total solids (<1.2%) and cellulose (<3.5%) losses, and comparable hemicellulose degradation, except for giant reed harvested in August. Ensilage increased glucose and methane yields by 7-15% and 4-14%, respectively, for giant reed harvested from August through December. Fungal pretreatment failed for giant reed harvested in August and October with reduced glucose yields, and was effective for that harvested in November and December, with about 20% increases in glucose yield. However, hydrocarbon losses during fungal pretreatment offset the increased glucose yield, resulting in decreased methane yields by AD. In summary, ensilage was found to be more suitable than fungal pretreatment for giant reed storage and its methane production via AD.

  20. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-01-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions. PMID:27572486

  1. The Potential Role of Seaweeds in the Natural Manipulation of Rumen Fermentation and Methane Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maia, Margarida R. G.; Fonseca, António J. M.; Oliveira, Hugo M.; Mendonça, Carla; Cabrita, Ana R. J.

    2016-08-01

    This study is the first to evaluate the effects of five seaweeds (Ulva sp., Laminaria ochroleuca, Saccharina latissima, Gigartina sp., and Gracilaria vermiculophylla) on gas and methane production and ruminal fermentation parameters when incubated in vitro with two substrates (meadow hay and corn silage) for 24 h. Seaweeds led to lower gas production, with Gigartina sp. presenting the lowest value. When incubated with meadow hay, Ulva sp., Gigartina sp. and G. vermiculophylla decreased methane production, but with corn silage, methane production was only decreased by G. vermiculophylla. With meadow hay, L. ochroleuca and S. latissima promoted similar methane production as the control, but with corn silage, L. ochroleuca increased it. With the exception of S. latissima, all seaweeds promoted similar levels of total volatile fatty acid production. The highest proportion of acetic acid was produced with Ulva sp., G. vermiculophylla, and S. latissima; the highest proportion of butyric acid with the control and L. ochroleuca; and the highest proportion of iso-valeric acid with Gigartina sp. These results reveal the potential of seaweeds to mitigate ruminal methane production and the importance of the basal diet. To efficiently use seaweeds as feed ingredients with nutritional and environmental benefits, more research is required to determine the mechanisms underlying seaweed and substrate interactions.

  2. Methane production through anaerobic digestion of various energy crops grown in sustainable crop rotations.

    PubMed

    Amon, Thomas; Amon, Barbara; Kryvoruchko, Vitaliy; Machmüller, Andrea; Hopfner-Sixt, Katharina; Bodiroza, Vitomir; Hrbek, Regina; Friedel, Jürgen; Pötsch, Erich; Wagentristl, Helmut; Schreiner, Matthias; Zollitsch, Werner

    2007-12-01

    Biogas production is of major importance for the sustainable use of agrarian biomass as renewable energy source. Economic biogas production depends on high biogas yields. The project aimed at optimising anaerobic digestion of energy crops. The following aspects were investigated: suitability of different crop species and varieties, optimum time of harvesting, specific methane yield and methane yield per hectare. The experiments covered 7 maize, 2 winter wheat, 2 triticale varieties, 1 winter rye, and 2 sunflower varieties and 6 variants with permanent grassland. In the course of the vegetation period, biomass yield and biomass composition were measured. Anaerobic digestion was carried out in eudiometer batch digesters. The highest methane yields of 7500-10200 m(N)(3)ha(-1) were achieved from maize varieties with FAO numbers (value for the maturity of the maize) of 300 to 600 harvested at "wax ripeness". Methane yields of cereals ranged from 3200 to 4500 m(N)(3)ha(-1). Cereals should be harvested at "grain in the milk stage" to "grain in the dough stage". With sunflowers, methane yields between 2600 and 4550 m(N)(3)ha(-1) were achieved. There were distinct differences between the investigated sunflower varieties. Alpine grassland can yield 2700-3500 m(N)(3)CH(4)ha(-1). The methane energy value model (MEVM) was developed for the different energy crops. It estimates the specific methane yield from the nutrient composition of the energy crops. Energy crops for biogas production need to be grown in sustainable crop rotations. The paper outlines possibilities for optimising methane yield from versatile crop rotations that integrate the production of food, feed, raw materials and energy. These integrated crop rotations are highly efficient and can provide up to 320 million t COE which is 96% of the total energy demand of the road traffic of the EU-25 (the 25 Member States of the European Union).

  3. Determination of in Situ Rates of Methane Production and Oxidation From Terrestrial Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Schrag, D. P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands are responsible for over 70% of non-anthropogenic methane emissions. We present a method, using the δ13C of CO2 in pore water, to obtain the in situ rates of methanogenesis occurring beneath the wetland surface. This method allows us to distinguish methanogenesis from methane oxidation during escape, both of which contribute to the net methane flux. The δ13C of CO2(aq) - the dominant form of DIC in acidic natural waters - reflects the processes occurring at that location modified by transport of gas from surrounding depths. Methane production and oxidation are imprinted in the δ13C signature of the aqueous CO2 with heaviest values at depth resulting from the fractionation associated with methane production. We measured δ13C profiles with depth along with CO2 and CH4 concentrations from Sallie's Fen in Barrington, NH. Although the δ13C profiles varied considerably between locations and seasons, the logarithmic shape of the curves showed that methane production was restricted below a certain depth in the sediment - sometimes as shallow as 30 cm. Using a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model, we are able to estimate rates of methane oxidation and successfully reproduce features present in the data's seasonal cycle. Features of the data not reproducible by the model indicate the importance of alternate gas transport routes such as ebullition and plant-mediated transport. The model also provides evidence for low-level oxygen availability during the winter-spring transition and narrow zones of very high productivity at depths of 60-70cm during the winter. We suggest that this method provides insight directly into the processes that determine methane fluxes from natural wetlands and has great potential for improving our understanding of the biogeochemistry of these systems.

  4. Microbial community structure in a thermophilic aerobic digester used as a sludge pretreatment process for the mesophilic anaerobic digestion and the enhancement of methane production.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun Min; Park, Sang Kyu; Ha, Jeong Hyub; Park, Jong Moon

    2013-10-01

    An effective two-stage sewage sludge digestion process, consisting of thermophilic aerobic digestion (TAD) followed by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), was developed for efficient sludge reduction and methane production. Using TAD as a biological pretreatment, the total volatile suspended solid reduction (VSSR) and methane production rate (MPR) in the MAD reactor were significantly improved. According to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, the results indicated that the dominant bacteria species such as Ureibacillus thermophiles and Bacterium thermus in TAD were major routes for enhancing soluble organic matter. TAD pretreatment using a relatively short SRT of 1 day showed highly increased soluble organic products and positively affected an increment of bacteria populations which performed interrelated microbial metabolisms with methanogenic species in the MAD; consequently, a quantitative real-time PCR indicated greatly increased Methanosarcinales (acetate-utilizing methanogens) in the MAD, resulting in enhanced methane production.

  5. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance. PMID:27992585

  6. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens.

    PubMed

    Neubeck, Anna; Sjöberg, Susanne; Price, Alex; Callac, Nolwenn; Schnürer, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance.

  7. Production of uracil from methane by a newly isolated Methylomonas sp. SW1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Lee, Wangjun; Song, Insu; Kwon, Yuhyun; Yun, Seokhun; Park, Soohyun; Cho, Sukhyeong; Oh, Byung-Keun; Oh, Han Bin; Lee, Jinwon

    2016-12-20

    Methane is an abundant, inexpensive one-carbon feedstock and one of the most powerful greenhouse gases. Because it does not compete with food demand, it is considered a promising carbon feedstock for the production of valuable products using methanotrophic bacteria. Here, we isolated a novel methanotrophic bacterium, Methylomonas sp. SW1, from a sewage sample obtained from Wonju City Water Supply Drainage Center, Republic of Korea. The conditions for uracil production by Methylomonas sp. SW1, such as Cu(2+) concentration and temperature were investigated and optimized. As a result, Methylomonas sp. SW1 produced uracil from methane as a sole carbon source with a titer of 2.1mg/L in 84h without genetic engineering under the optimized condition. The results in this study demonstrate the feasibility of using Methylomonas sp. SW1 for the production of uracil from methane. This is the first report of uracil production from gas feedstock by methanotrophic bacteria.

  8. Methane production from mixed tropical savanna and forest vegetation in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crutzen, P. J.; Sanhueza, E.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2006-04-01

    Measurements of methane concentrations in the boundary layer in the northern part of the Guayana shield, Venezuela, during the wet season (October 1988), showed the presence of substantial methane surface emissions. The measuring site is within the savanna climate region, but is affected by emissions from savanna and forest vegetation. From day versus night concentration measurements, with higher concentrations during night, a methane source strength near the site of 3-7×1011 molecules/cm2/s can be estimated, which includes emissions from small tracts of flooded soils, termites and especially tropical vegetation. Extrapolated to the entire savanna, this may imply a methane source of ~30-60 Tg yr-1 similar to the one calculated for tropical vegetation on the basis of recently published in vitro plant emission experiments by Keppler et al. (2006), which indicate emissions of ~30 Tg yr-1 for tropical savannas and grasslands and ~78 Tg yr-1 for tropical forests.

  9. Physiology and Genetics of Biogenic Methane-Production from Acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Sowers, Kevin R

    2013-04-04

    Biomass conversion catalyzed by methanogenic consortia is a widely available, renewable resource for both energy production and waste treatment. The efficiency of this process is directly dependent upon the interaction of three metabolically distinct groups of microorganisms; the fermentative and acetogenic Bacteria and the methanogenic Archaea. One of the rate limiting steps in the degradation of soluble organic matter is the dismutation of acetate, a predominant intermediate in the process, which accounts for 70 % or more of the methane produced by the methanogens. Acetate utilization is controlled by regulation of expression of carbon monoxide dehydrogensase (COdh), which catalyzes the dismutation of acetate. However, physiological and molecular factors that control differential substrate utilization have not been identified in these Archaea. Our laboratory has identified sequence elements near the promoter of the gene (cdh) encoding for COdh and we have confirmed that these sequences have a role in the in vivo expression of cdh. The current proposal focuses on identifying the regulatory components that interact with DNA and RNA elements, and identifying the mechanisms used to control cdh expression. We will determine whether expression is controlled at the level of transcription or if it is mediated by coordinate interaction of transcription initiation with other processes such as transcription elongation rate and differential mRNA stability. Utilizing recently sequenced methanosarcinal genomes and a DNA microarray currently under development genes that encode regulatory proteins and transcription factors will be identified and function confirmed by gene disruption and subsequent screening on different substrates. Functional interactions will be determined in vivo by assaying the effects of gene dosage and site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory gene on the expression of a cdh::lacZ operon fusion. Results of this study will reveal whether this critical

  10. Methane sources and production in the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohlman, J.W.; Kaneko, M.; Heuer, V.B.; Coffin, R.B.; Whiticar, M.

    2009-01-01

    -enrichment. The magnitude of the 13C-enrichment of CO2 correlates with decreasing sedimentation rates and a diminishing occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate. We suggest the decreasing sedimentation rates increase the exposure time of sedimentary organic matter to aerobic and anaerobic degradation, during burial, thereby reducing the availability of metabolizable organic matter available for methane production. This process is reflected in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate within the northern Cascadia margin accretionary prism. Our observations are relevant for evaluating methane production and the occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate within other convergent margins.

  11. Explicit Microbial Processes to Simulate Methane Production and Oxidation in Wetlands in the GFDL Land Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, S.; Sulman, B. N.; Shevliakova, E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observational studies highlighted the need to include explicit treatment of the soil microbial processes into the next generation of Earth System Models (ESMs). These processes shape most soil biogeochemical cycles and control releases of the most potent greenhouses gases carbon dioxide and methane. Currently global ecosystem models usually parameterize methane production as a fraction of soil heterotrophic respiration. This lumps the pathways of several different functional groups of microbes into one production rate, possibly modified by a number of environmental factor multipliers. Methane oxidation is usually more explicitly modeled by Michaelis-Menten kinetics, but if the maximum rate, before environmental multipliers, is a constant parameter, this essentially implies a constant methanotrophic microbe population size. We present an explicit model for wetland soil microbial processes in an ESM context. We introduce a growth and decomposition model for four functional groups of microbes involved in methane production and oxidation, so microbial populations can grow when conditions are favorable and substrate is available. When soil conditions are anoxic, fermenting microbes transform available soil carbon into intermediate substrates, and two different kinds of methanogenic microbes live on their preferred substrates producing methane. Methane is transported through aerobic layers of the soil column, where methanotrophic microbes oxidize part of the methane, and the rest escapes to the atmosphere. We present initial simulations using the new model in the context of existing measurements of methane emissions and microbial populations at the site level, and discuss the implications of including these processes in an ESM. This explicit process model establishes a foundation for improving dynamic ecosystem-climate feedbacks in ESM simulations, and facilitates more detailed experimental verification of wetland biogeochemical processes.

  12. Analysis of methane potentials of steam-exploded wheat straw and estimation of energy yields of combined ethanol and methane production.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Alexander; Bösch, Peter; Friedl, Anton; Amon, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Agrarian biomass as a renewable energy source can contribute to a considerable CO(2) reduction. The overriding goal of the European Union is to cut energy consumption related greenhouse gas emission in the EU by 20% until the year 2020. This publication aims at optimising the methane production from steam-exploded wheat straw and presents a theoretical estimation of the ethanol and methane potential of straw. For this purpose, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different time/temperature combinations. Specific methane yields were analyzed according to VDI 4630. Pretreatment of wheat straw by steam explosion significantly increased the methane yield from anaerobic digestion by up to 20% or a maximum of 331 l(N)kg(-1) VS compared to untreated wheat straw. Furthermore, the residual anaerobic digestion potential of methane after ethanol fermentation was determined by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw using cellulase. Based on the resulting glucose concentration the ethanol yield and the residual sugar available for methane production were calculated. The theoretical maximum ethanol yield of wheat straw was estimated to be 0.249 kg kg(-1) dry matter. The achievable maximum ethanol yield per kg wheat straw dry matter pretreated by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis was estimated to be 0.200 kg under pretreatment conditions of 200 degrees C and 10 min corresponding to 80% of the theoretical maximum. The residual methane yield from straw stillage was estimated to be 183 l(N)kg(-1) wheat straw dry matter. Based on the presented experimental data, a concept is proposed that processes wheat straw for ethanol and methane production. The concept of an energy supply system that provides more than two forms of energy is met by (1) upgrading obtained ethanol to fuel-grade quality and providing methane to CHP plants for the production of (2) electric energy and (3) utility steam that in turn can be used to operate distillation columns in the

  13. Microbial and chemical factors influencing methane production in laboratory incubations of low-rank subsurface coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Stephen H.; Smith, Richard L.; Barker, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Lignite and subbituminous coals were investigated for their ability to support microbial methane production in laboratory incubations. Results show that naturally-occurring microorganisms associated with the coals produced substantial quantities of methane, although the factors influencing this process were variable among different samples tested. Methanogenic microbes in two coals from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA, produced 140.5-374.6 mL CH4/kg ((4.5-12.0 standard cubic feet (scf)/ton) in response to an amendment of H2/CO2. The addition of high concentrations (5-10 mM) of acetate did not support substantive methane production under the laboratory conditions. However, acetate accumulated in control incubations where methanogenesis was inhibited, indicating that acetate was produced and consumed during the course of methane production. Acetogenesis from H2/CO2 was evident in these incubations and may serve as a competing metabolic mode influencing the cumulative amount of methane produced in coal. Two low-rank (lignite A) coals from Fort Yukon, Alaska, USA, demonstrated a comparable level of methane production (131.1-284.0 mL CH4/kg (4.2-9.1 scf/ton)) in the presence of an inorganic nutrient amendment, indicating that the source of energy and organic carbon was derived from the coal. The concentration of chloroform-extractable organic matter varied by almost three orders of magnitude among all the coals tested, and appeared to be related to methane production potential. These results indicate that substrate availability within the coal matrix and competition between different groups of microorganisms are two factors that may exert a profound influence on methanogenesis in subsurface coal beds.

  14. Effect of pretreatment by a microbial consortium on methane production of waste paper and cardboard.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xufeng; Cao, Yanzhuan; Li, Jiajia; Wen, Boting; Zhu, Wanbin; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2012-08-01

    A microbial consortium MC1 was used to pretreat filter paper, office paper, newspaper, and cardboard to enhance methane production. The results of pretreatment indicated that sCOD of hydrolysates of the four substrates increased significantly in the early stage, and peaked on day 7. During pretreatment, ethanol, acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, and glycerol were the predominant volatile organic products in hydrolysates. MC1 had strong degradation ability on the four substrates, and the weight loss of filter paper, office paper, newspaper, and cardboard reached 78.3%, 80.5%, 39.7%, and 49.7%, respectively. The results of anaerobic digestion showed that methane production yields and rates of the four substrates significantly increased after pretreatment. This study is the first attempt to explore the microbial pretreatment method for anaerobic digestion of waste paper and cardboard. Microbial consortium pretreatment could be an effective method for enhancing methane production of waste paper and cardboard into bioenergy.

  15. Evaluation of Dried Sweet Sorghum Stalks as Raw Material for Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Matsakas, Leonidas; Rova, Ulrika; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The potential of utilizing dried sweet sorghum stalks as raw material for anaerobic digestion has been evaluated. Two different treatments were tested, a mild thermal and an enzymatic, alone or in combination. Thermal pretreatment was found to decrease the methane yields, whereas one-step enzymatic treatment resulted in a significant increase of 15.1% comparing to the untreated sweet sorghum. Subsequently, in order to increase the total methane production, the combined effect of enzyme load and I/S on methane yields from sweet sorghum was evaluated by employing response surface methodology. The obtained model showed that the maximum methane yield that could be achieved is 296 mL CH4/g VS at I/S ratio of 0.35 with the addition of 11.12 FPU/g sweet sorghum. PMID:25210715

  16. The carbon isotope biogeochemistry of methane production in anoxic sediments. 1: Field observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Neal E.; Boehme, Susan E.; Carter, W. Dale, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The natural abundance C-13/C-12 ratio of methane from anoxic marine and freshwater sediments in temperate climates varies seasonally. Carbon isotopic measurements of the methanogenic precursors, acetate and dissolved inorganic carbon, from the marine sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina were used to determine the sources of the seasonal variations at that site. Movement of the methanogenic zone over an isotopic gradient within the dissolved CO2 pool appears to be the dominant control of the methane C-13/C-12 ratio from February to June. The onset of acetoclastic methane-production is a second important controlling process during mid-summer. An apparent temperature dependence on the fractionation factor for CO2-reduction may have a significant influence on the isotopic composition of methane throughout the year.

  17. Effects of a combination of feed additives on methane production, diet digestibility, and animal performance in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    van Zijderveld, S M; Fonken, B; Dijkstra, J; Gerrits, W J J; Perdok, H B; Fokkink, W; Newbold, J R

    2011-03-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of a mixture of dietary additives on enteric methane production, rumen fermentation, diet digestibility, energy balance, and animal performance in lactating dairy cows. Identical diets were fed in both experiments. The mixture of feed additives investigated contained lauric acid, myristic acid, linseed oil, and calcium fumarate. These additives were included at 0.4, 1.2, 1.5, and 0.7% of dietary dry matter, respectively (treatment ADD). Experimental fat sources were exchanged for a rumen inert source of fat in the control diet (treatment CON) to maintain isolipidic rations. Cows (experiment 1, n=20; experiment 2, n=12) were fed restricted amounts of feed to avoid confounding effects of dry matter intake on methane production. In experiment 1, methane production and energy balance were studied using open-circuit indirect calorimetry. In experiment 2, 10 rumen-fistulated animals were used to measure rumen fermentation characteristics. In both experiments animal performance was monitored. The inclusion of dietary additives decreased methane emissions (g/d) by 10%. Milk yield and milk fat content tended to be lower for ADD in experiment 1. In experiment 2, milk production was not affected by ADD, but milk fat content was lower. Fat- and protein-corrected milk was lower for ADD in both experiments. Milk urea nitrogen content was lowered by ADD in experiment 1 and tended to be lower in experiment 2. Apparent total tract digestibility of fat, but not that of starch or neutral detergent fiber, was higher for ADD. Energy retention did not differ between treatments. The decrease in methane production (g/d) was not evident when methane emission was expressed per kilogram of milk produced. Feeding ADD resulted in increases of C12:0 and C14:0 and the intermediates of linseed oil biohydrogenation in milk in both experiments. In experiment 2, ADD-fed cows tended to have a decreased number of protozoa in rumen fluid when

  18. Microbial methane production in deep aquifer associated with the accretionary prism in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroyuki; Nashimoto, Hiroaki; Shimizu, Mikio; Hattori, Shohei; Yamada, Keita; Koba, Keisuke; Yoshida, Naohiro; Kato, Kenji

    2010-04-01

    To identify the methanogenic pathways present in a deep aquifer associated with an accretionary prism in Southwest Japan, a series of geochemical and microbiological studies of natural gas and groundwater derived from a deep aquifer were performed. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of methane in the natural gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (mainly bicarbonate) in groundwater suggested that the methane was derived from both thermogenic and biogenic processes. Archaeal 16S rRNA gene analysis revealed the dominance of H(2)-using methanogens in the groundwater. Furthermore, the high potential of methane production by H(2)-using methanogens was shown in enrichments using groundwater amended with H(2) and CO(2). Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that fermentative bacteria inhabited the deep aquifer. Anaerobic incubations using groundwater amended with organic substrates and bromoethanesulfonate (a methanogen inhibitor) suggested a high potential of H(2) and CO(2) generation by fermentative bacteria. To confirm whether or not methane is produced by a syntrophic consortium of H(2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H(2)-using methanogens, anaerobic incubations using the groundwater amended with organic substrates were performed. Consequently, H(2) accumulation and rapid methane production were observed in these enrichments incubated at 55 and 65 degrees C. Thus, our results suggested that past and ongoing syntrophic biodegradation of organic compounds by H(2)-producing fermentative bacteria and H(2)-using methanogens, as well as a thermogenic reaction, contributes to the significant methane reserves in the deep aquifer associated with the accretionary prism in Southwest Japan.

  19. Methane production and simultaneous sulphate reduction in anoxic, salt marsh sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Marsh, L.M.; Polcin, S.

    1982-01-01

    It has been generally believed that sulphate reduction precludes methane generation during diagenesis of anoxic sediments1,2. Because most biogenic methane formed in nature is thought to derive either from acetate cleavage or by hydrogen reduction of carbon dioxide3-6, the removal of these compounds by the energetically more efficient sulphate-reducing bacteria can impose a substrate limitation on methanogenic bacteria 7-9. However, two known species of methanogens, Methanosarcina barkeri and Methanococcus mazei, can grow on and produce methane from methanol and methylated amines10-13. In addition, these compounds stimulate methane production by bacterial enrichments from the rumen11,14 and aquatic muds13,14. Methanol can enter anaerobic food webs through bacterial degradation of lignins15 or pectin16, and methylated amines can be produced either from decomposition of substances like choline, creatine and betaine13,14 or by bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide17, a common metabolite and excretory product of marine animals. However, the relative importance of methanol and methylated amines as precursors of methane in sediments has not been previously examined. We now report that methanol and trimethylamine are important substrates for methanogenic bacteria in salt marsh sediments and that these compounds may account for the bulk of methane produced therein. Furthermore, because these compounds do not stimulate sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction can operate concurrently in sulphate-containing anoxic sediments. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Feeding saponin-containing Yucca schidigera and Quillaja saponaria to decrease enteric methane production in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Holtshausen, L; Chaves, A V; Beauchemin, K A; McGinn, S M; McAllister, T A; Odongo, N E; Cheeke, P R; Benchaar, C

    2009-06-01

    An experiment was conducted in vitro to determine whether the addition of saponin-containing Yucca schidigera or Quillaja saponaria reduces methane production without impairing ruminal fermentation or fiber digestion. A slightly lower dose of saponin was then fed to lactating dairy cows to evaluate effects on ruminal fermentation, methane production, total-tract nutrient digestibility, and milk production and composition. A 24-h batch culture in vitro incubation was conducted in a completely randomized design with a control (no additive, CON) and 3 doses of either saponin source [15, 30, and 45 g/kg of substrate dry matter (DM)] using buffered ruminal fluid from 3 dairy cows. The in vivo study was conducted as a crossover design with 2 groups of cows, 3 treatments, and three 28-d periods. Six ruminally cannulated cows were used in group 1 and 6 intact cows in group 2 (627 +/- 55 kg of body weight and 155 +/- 28 d in milk). The treatments were 1) early lactation total mixed ration, no additive (control; CON); 2) CON diet supplemented with whole-plant Y. schidigera powder at 10 g/kg of DM (YS); and 3) CON diet supplemented with whole-plant Q. saponaria powder at 10 g/kg of DM (QS). Methane production was measured in environmental chambers and with the sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) tracer technique. In vitro, increasing levels of both saponin sources decreased methane concentration in the headspace and increased the proportion of propionate in the buffered rumen fluid. Concentration of ammonia-N, acetate proportion, and the acetate:propionate ratio in the buffered rumen fluid as well as 24-h digestible neutral detergent fiber were reduced compared with the CON treatment. Medium and high saponin levels decreased DM digestibility compared with the CON treatment. A lower feeding rate of both saponin sources (10 g/kg of DM) was used in vivo in an attempt to avoid potentially negative effects of higher saponin levels on feed digestibility. Feeding saponin did not affect milk

  1. Particle-size effect of CuO and ZnO on biogas and methane production during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Luna-delRisco, Mario; Orupõld, Kaja; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles

    2011-05-15

    The effects of bulk- and nano-sized CuO and ZnO particles on biogas and methane production during anaerobic digestion of cattle manure were studied for a period of 14 days at 36 °C using the ISO 13641-2 guidelines. Biogas production was severely affected at concentrations of bulk and nanoparticles over 120 and 15 mg/L for CuO and 240 and 120 mg/L for ZnO, respectively. EC50 concentrations for methane inhibition were estimated to be 129 mg Cu/L for bulk CuO, 10.7 mg Cu/L for nano CuO, 101 mg Zn/L for bulk ZnO and 57.4 mg Zn/L for nano ZnO. The solubility of CuO nanoparticles in the reaction mixture was observed after 14 days of incubation and was significantly higher than the levels observed for ZnO. These results are of significant importance, as it is the first time that the effects of metal oxide particle size on biogas and methane production have been studied.

  2. Methane and fertilizer production from seaweed biomass. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Betzer, P.R.; Humm, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    It was demonstrated that several varieties of abundant benthic algae indigenous to Tampa Bay (Gracilaria, Hypnea, and Ulva) were readily degradable via anaerobic digestion to methane. The energy yield per unit weight biomass degraded was higher than any previously reported. Given the large masses of readily degradable plants which are annually produced in and around Tampa Bay, the resource is estimated to be at least equivalent to several million gallons of gasoline.

  3. Effects of Marine and Freshwater Macroalgae on In Vitro Total Gas and Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Lorenna; Magnusson, Marie; Paul, Nicholas A.; de Nys, Rocky; Tomkins, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of twenty species of tropical macroalgae on in vitro fermentation parameters, total gas production (TGP) and methane (CH4) production when incubated in rumen fluid from cattle fed a low quality roughage diet. Primary biochemical parameters of macroalgae were characterized and included proximate, elemental, and fatty acid (FAME) analysis. Macroalgae and the control, decorticated cottonseed meal (DCS), were incubated in vitro for 72 h, where gas production was continuously monitored. Post-fermentation parameters, including CH4 production, pH, ammonia, apparent organic matter degradability (OMd), and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were measured. All species of macroalgae had lower TGP and CH4 production than DCS. Dictyota and Asparagopsis had the strongest effects, inhibiting TGP by 53.2% and 61.8%, and CH4 production by 92.2% and 98.9% after 72 h, respectively. Both species also resulted in the lowest total VFA concentration, and the highest molar concentration of propionate among all species analysed, indicating that anaerobic fermentation was affected. Overall, there were no strong relationships between TGP or CH4 production and the >70 biochemical parameters analysed. However, zinc concentrations >0.10 g.kg−1 may potentially interact with other biochemical components to influence TGP and CH4 production. The lack of relationship between the primary biochemistry of species and gas parameters suggests that significant decreases in TGP and CH4 production are associated with secondary metabolites produced by effective macroalgae. The most effective species, Asparagopsis, offers the most promising alternative for mitigation of enteric CH4 emissions. PMID:24465524

  4. Effects of marine and freshwater macroalgae on in vitro total gas and methane production.

    PubMed

    Machado, Lorenna; Magnusson, Marie; Paul, Nicholas A; de Nys, Rocky; Tomkins, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of twenty species of tropical macroalgae on in vitro fermentation parameters, total gas production (TGP) and methane (CH4) production when incubated in rumen fluid from cattle fed a low quality roughage diet. Primary biochemical parameters of macroalgae were characterized and included proximate, elemental, and fatty acid (FAME) analysis. Macroalgae and the control, decorticated cottonseed meal (DCS), were incubated in vitro for 72 h, where gas production was continuously monitored. Post-fermentation parameters, including CH4 production, pH, ammonia, apparent organic matter degradability (OMd), and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were measured. All species of macroalgae had lower TGP and CH4 production than DCS. Dictyota and Asparagopsis had the strongest effects, inhibiting TGP by 53.2% and 61.8%, and CH4 production by 92.2% and 98.9% after 72 h, respectively. Both species also resulted in the lowest total VFA concentration, and the highest molar concentration of propionate among all species analysed, indicating that anaerobic fermentation was affected. Overall, there were no strong relationships between TGP or CH4 production and the >70 biochemical parameters analysed. However, zinc concentrations >0.10 g x kg(-1) may potentially interact with other biochemical components to influence TGP and CH4 production. The lack of relationship between the primary biochemistry of species and gas parameters suggests that significant decreases in TGP and CH4 production are associated with secondary metabolites produced by effective macroalgae. The most effective species, Asparagopsis, offers the most promising alternative for mitigation of enteric CH4 emissions.

  5. Coalbed methane production base established in Southeast Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckinger, W.T.

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that revenue from coalbed methane gas sales is growing and currently far exceeds that of what little conventional gas is produced in southeastern Kansas. And this only 2-1/2 years after Stroud Oil Properties, Wichita, brought in the first coalbed methane well in the Sycamore Valley in Montgomery County 6 miles north of Independence. Another operator contributing to the success is Conquest Oil, Greeley, Colo. Conquest acquired a lease with 20 old wells near Sycamore, recompleted five of them in Weir coal, and has installed a compressor. It hopes to being selling a combined 300 Mcfd soon. Great Eastern Energy, Denver, reportedly can move 2 MMcfd from its Sycamore Valley holdings. The fever is spreading into Northeast Kansas, where a venture headed by Duncan Energy Co. and Farleigh Oil Properties, also of Denver, plan 12 coalbed methane wildcats. The two companies received in October 1991 from the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) a 40 acre well spacing for seven counties and an exclusion from burdensome gas testing procedures. The test procedures are on the books but not applicable to coal gas wells.

  6. Methane emissions from the Amazon Floodplain: Characterization of production and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, R.; Thein, U. G.; Whiticar, M. J.; Rennenburg, H.; Seiler, W.; Junk, W. J.

    1992-03-01

    Methane production, transport and emission in a floodplain lake in central Amazonia were investigated by isotopic studies and gas exchange measurements. Samples of sediment free gas were depleted in δ13CCH4, δ13DCH4,and δ13CCO2 values. The isotopic composition of the sediment free methane clearly demonstrated a methane production by methyl fermentation. This finding was strengthened by the coexisting δ13CCO2 and δ13CCO2 values in the sediment free gas. The flux rates of methane ebullition and diffusion were measured during a complete annual cycle using the static chamber method. Significant differences were observed in the release of methane from individual vegetation types, i.e., phytoplankton, floating grass mats, and flooded forest. Each vegetation type showed a distinct seasonal pattern. The highest ebullition rates (mean value, 69 mg CH4 m-2d-1) were recorded in the flooded forest, covering the higher areas of the floodplains with a long subaerial period. Significantly lower averages of the gas bubble flux were recorded in the permanently aquatic areas of the lake (mean value, 29 mg CH4 m-2d-1) and in the intermediate area with floating grass mats (mean value, 23 mg CH44 m-2d-1. Ebullition was the predominant mechanism for the methane transport from the varzea sediment into the atmosphere with maximum values of up to 200 mg CH4 m-2d-1. The diffusive flux remained below 29 mg CH4 m-2d-1 at all sites throughout the entire annual cycle. The variation of the ebullutive flux was found to determine the spatial and temporal variation of the total methane flux in the varzea. We estimate that ebullition accounts for 80% of the total methane emission from the varzea.

  7. Revising Estimates of the Methane Production Pathway in Peatland Porewater Using Intramolecular Isotopic Analyses of Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, B.; Arthur, M. A.; Freeman, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotopic measurements of methane and carbon dioxide are routinely applied to environmental samples to assess the relative importance of methane production by either aceticlastic or hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. Such estimates rely upon assumptions about isotopic fractionation during methane production and oxidation. Rigorous isotope-based pathway estimates require knowledge of the carbon isotopic composition of both carbon dioxide and acetate. In practice, technical barriers have limited measurements of the isotopic composition of whole acetate in natural samples. Yet, the estimate of whole acetate isotopic values, even when available, may not represent accurately the composition of the methyl carbon, which is, in fact, the precursor to methane. It is exceedingly rare to find carbon isotopic measurements of acetate-methyl in the literature, and, to our knowledge, the d13C of the acetate-methyl precursor to methane has never before been reported from peatland porewater samples. Extremely 13C-depleted methane, -70 permil VPDB, and 13C-enriched carbon dioxide from acidic northern peat bogs are typically interpreted as signatures of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The hypothesized dominance of methane production from hydrogen in acidic bogs contrasts with the vast majority of freshwater wetlands in which aceticlastic methanogenesis dominates. Using a new technique for the online analysis of the intramolecular carbon isotopic composition of acetate in natural samples, we find the acetate-methyl in peat porewaters can be significantly depleted relative to bulk organic matter. In porewater profiles from both winter and summer, acetate is as much as 15 permil depleted relative to bulk carbon. We hypothesize that acetate- methyl isotopic depletion results from conditions that favor autotrophic acetogenesis and subsequent acetate consumption by aceticlastic methanogens. Porewater depth profiles during winter and summer illustrate depth- dependent increases in the

  8. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field

    PubMed Central

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S.; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P.; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  9. Decrease of ruminal methane production in Rusitec fermenters through the addition of plant material from rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus).

    PubMed

    García-González, R; González, J S; López, S

    2010-08-01

    Roots of rhubarb (Rheum spp.) and bark of alder buckthorn (Frangula alnus) were tested as feed additives for decreasing ruminal methane production released from anaerobic fermentation of a forage-based diet in a rumen-simulating fermenter (Rusitec). Sixteen fermentation units (vessels) were set up for the experiment lasting 19 d. Treated vessels were supplied with 1g/d of rhubarb or alder buckthorn (4 vessels per plant species); another 4 vessels received 12 microM sodium monensin (positive control), and the remaining 4 vessels were controls (no additive). Upon termination of the experimental period, batch cultures were inoculated with the liquid contents of the vessels for examining in vitro fermentation kinetics of cellulose, starch, barley straw, and the same substrate used in the Rusitec cultures. Monensin induced changes in fermentation in agreement with those reported in the literature, and inocula from those cultures decreased the fermentation rate and total gas produced in the gas kinetics study. Rhubarb decreased methane production, associated with limited changes in the profile of volatile fatty acids throughout the duration of the study, whereas digestibility and total volatile fatty acids production were not affected. Rhubarb inocula did not affect gas production kinetics except for cellulose. Alder buckthorn decreased only methane concentration in fermentation gas, and this effect was not always significant. The use of rhubarb (milled rhizomes of Rheum spp.) in the diets of ruminants may effectively modulate ruminal fermentation by abating methane production, thus potentially involving productive and environmental benefits.

  10. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Frison, A; Raga, R; Angelidaki, I

    2016-09-01

    Animal manure digestion is associated with limited methane production, due to the high content in fibers, which are hardly degradable lignocellulosic compounds. In this study, different mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment methods were applied to partially degradable fibers, separated from the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55°C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas plants can be increased by further exploiting the fraction of the digested manure fibers which are discarded in the post-storage tank.

  11. Pretreatment of food waste with high voltage pulse discharge towards methane production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zou, Lianpei; Ma, Chaonan; Liu, Jianyong; Li, Mingfei; Ye, Min; Qian, Guangren

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic batch tests were performed to investigate the methane production enhancement and solid transformation rates from food waste (FW) by high voltage pulse discharge (HVPD) pretreatment. The total cumulative methane production with HVPD pretreatment was 134% higher than that of the control. The final volatile solids transformation rates of FW with and without HVPD pretreatment were 54.3% and 32.3%, respectively. Comparison study on HVPD pretreatment with acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreatments showed that the methane production and COD removal rates of FW pretreated with HVPD were more than 100% higher than the control, but only about 50% higher can be obtained with other pretreatments. HVPD pretreatment could be a promising pretreatment method in the application of energy recovery from FW.

  12. Using Methane 14C to Determine the Origin of the Rapid Methane Rise at the End of the Younger Dryas 11,600 Years Ago: Increased Wetland Production or Methane Hydrates? A Progress Report.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Reeh, N.

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane concentration rose from about 500 parts per billion (ppb) to about 750 ppb over a period of just 150 years at the termination of the Younger Dryas cold period 11,600 years ago, as indicated by Greenland ice core records. The start of this rapid methane increase was synchronous with an even more rapid climate warming -- Greenland ice core nitrogen and argon isotope records indicate that temperatures rose 5 - 10 ?C over just a few decades. There has been considerable debate about the source of this methane rise. Currently, the two main hypotheses attribute the methane rise either to increased bacterial methane production in wetlands, or to the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor. Here we describe the progress of a project whose aim is to determine the origin of this methane rise. Our approach involves using 14C of ancient methane (derived from air bubbles in glacial ice) to determine its source. Methane hydrates are hundreds of thousands to millions of years old, and should contain virtually no 14C, whereas wetland-derived methane will have 14C content identical to that of atmospheric CO2 at the time of production. Obtaining enough ancient methane for a 14C measurement requires very large samples -- about 2 cubic meters. We have been able to locate a site on the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet where large amounts of uncontaminated ancient ice are available at the surface. Furthermore, our measurements of oxygen isotopes in the ice, as well as measurements of methane and oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in the air trapped in this ice have allowed us to date the ice and precisely locate the ice that contains the end-of-Younger-Dryas methane increase signal. Our data also demonstrate that the methane record in this ice is uncontaminated and suitable for methane 14C analysis. During the past year, we also constructed and are testing a device for melting and extracting air from large volumes of glacial ice.

  13. Comparison of Methane Data Products from the TES and AIRS Infrared Sounders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, T. J.; Pagano, T. S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is the second most powerful greenhouse gas with a highly positive radiative forcing of 0.48 W/m2 (IPCC 2013). Global concentrations of methane have been steadily increasing since 2007 (Bruhwiler 2014), raising concerns about methane's impact on the future global climate. For about the last decade, the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura spacecraft has been detecting several trace gas species in the troposphere including methane. The goal of this study is to compare TES methane retrievals to that of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS Aqua spacecraft so that scientific investigations may be transferred from TES to AIRS. The two instruments fly in the afternoon constellation (A-Train), providing numerous coincident measurements for comparison. In addition, they also have a similar spectral range, (3.3 to 15.4 µm) for TES (Beer, 2006) and (3.7 to 15.4 µm) for AIRS (Chahine, 2006), making both instruments sensitive to the mid and upper troposphere. This makes them ideal candidates to compare methane data products. However, because AIRS spectral resolution is lower than that of the TES, there may be a difference in vertical sensitivity. In addition, the retrieval techniques and error characteristics are different for the two data sets. The current state of validation for these data products will be presented. To identify conditions in which the data sets agree and dis agree, we present global maps of methane concentrations from monthly level 3 (L3) data products. We also investigate the temporal stability between the two datasets by comparing global zonal averages derived from L3 over the last decade. Finally, we compare L2 retrieval profiles from representative granules in the tropical, mid-latitude and northern latitudes.

  14. Impact of hydrology on methane flux patterns in a permafrost-affected floodplain in Northeast Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Min Jung; Beulig, Felix; Kuesel, Kirsten; Wildner, Marcus; Heimann, Martin; Zimov, Nikita; Zimov, Sergei; Goeckede, Mathias

    2015-04-01

    A large fraction of organic carbon stored in Arctic permafrost soil is at risk to be decomposed and released to the atmosphere under climate change. Thawing of ice-rich permafrost will re-structure the surface topography, with potentially significant effects on hydrology: water table depth (WTD) of depressed areas will increase, while that of the surrounding area will decrease. Changes in hydrology will trigger modifications in soil and vegetation, e.g. soil temperature, vegetation and microbial community structure. All of these secondary effects will alter carbon cycle processes, with the magnitude and even sign of the net effect yet unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate effects of drainage on methane fluxes in a floodplain of the Kolyma River near Cherskii, Northeast Siberia. The study site is separated into two areas, one that has been drained since 2004, and a nearby reference site. Methane flux was measured for ~16 weeks during summer and early winter of 2013, and summer of 2014. In addition, to separate different methane emission pathways, plant-mediated methane transport (through aerenchyma) as well as the proportion of ebullition were measured in 2014. Vegetation and microbial community structures were investigated and compared. After a decade of drainage history that lowered WTD by about 20cm in the drained area, Eriophorum (cotton grass) that previously dominated have to a large part been replaced by Carex (tussock-forming sedge) and shrub species. While WTD primarily influenced the methane flux rate, this vegetation change indirectly altered the flux as well in a way that sites with Eriophorum emitted more methane. Concerning the microbial community structure, the relative abundance of methanogen and ratio of methanotrophs to methanogens were well correlated with methane flux rates, implying that the methane flux is highly influenced by microorganisms. As a consequence of these changes, in the drained area less amount of methane was

  15. Effects of the incorporation of drinking water sludge on the anaerobic digestion of domestic wastewater sludge for methane production.

    PubMed

    Torres-Lozada, Patricia; Díaz-Granados, José Sánchez; Parra-Orobio, Brayan Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Water purification and wastewater treatment generate sludge, which must be adequately handled to prevent detrimental effects to the environment and public health. In this study, we examined the influence of the application of settled sludge from a drinking water treatment plant (S(DWTP)) on the anaerobic digestion (AD) of the thickened primary sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (S(WWTP)) which uses chemically assisted primary treatment (CAPT). On both plants the primary coagulant is ferric chloride. The study was performed at laboratory scale using specific methanogenic activity (SMA) tests, in which mixtures of S(WWTP)-S(DWTP) with the ratios 100:00, 80:20, 75:25, 70:30 and 00:100 were evaluated. Methane detection was also performed by gas chromatography for a period of 30 days. Our results show that all evaluated ratios that incorporate S(DWTP), produce an inhibitory effect on the production of methane. The reduction in methane production ranged from 26% for the smallest concentration of S(DWTP) (20%) to more than 70% for concentrations higher than 25%. The results indicated that the hydrolytic stage was significantly affected, with the hydrolysis constant Kh also reduced by approximately 70% (0.24-0.26 day(-1) for the different ratios compared with 0.34 day(-1) for the S(WWTP) alone). This finding demonstrates that the best mixtures to be considered for anaerobic co-digestion must contain a fraction of S(DWTP) below 20%.

  16. The marketing implications of affective product design.

    PubMed

    Seva, Rosemary R; Duh, Henry Been-Lirn; Helander, Martin G

    2007-11-01

    Emotions are compelling human experiences and product designers can take advantage of this by conceptualizing emotion-engendering products that sell well in the market. This study hypothesized that product attributes influence users' emotions and that the relationship is moderated by the adherence of these product attributes to purchase criteria. It was further hypothesized that the emotional experience of the user influences purchase intention. A laboratory study was conducted to validate the hypotheses using mobile phones as test products. Sixty-two participants were asked to assess eight phones from a display of 10 phones and indicate their emotional experiences after assessment. Results suggest that some product attributes can cause intense emotional experience. The attributes relate to the phone's dimensions and the relationship between these dimensions. The study validated the notion of integrating affect in designing products that convey users' personalities.

  17. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klapstein, Sara J.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer W.; Czimczik, C.I.; Xu, Xiaomei; Chanton, J.P.; Waddington, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw in peat plateaus leads to the flooding of surface soils and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface peat as well as deeper, previously frozen, permafrost carbon (C). We used a network of bubble traps, permanently installed 20 cm and 60 cm beneath the moss surface, to examine controls on ebullition from three collapse bogs in interior Alaska. Overall, ebullition was dominated by episodic events that were associated with changes in atmospheric pressure, and ebullition was mainly a surface process regulated by both seasonal ice dynamics and plant phenology. The majority (>90%) of ebullition occurred in surface peat layers, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate-derived CH4 dominated (>90%) by modern C fixed from the atmosphere following permafrost thaw. Post-senescence, the contribution of CH4 derived from thawing permafrost C was more variable and accounted for up to 22% (on average 7%), in the most recently thawed site. Thus, the formation of thermokarst features resulting from permafrost thaw in peatlands stimulates ebullition and CH4 release both by creating flooded surface conditions conducive to CH4 production and bubbling as well as by exposing thawing permafrost C to mineralization.

  18. Chamber-Based Estimates of Methane Production in Coastal Estuarine Systems in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigham, B.; Lipson, D.; Lai, C.

    2008-12-01

    Wetland systems are believed to produce between 100 - 231 Tg CH4 yr-1 which is roughly 20% of global methane emissions. The uncertainty in methane emissions models stem from the lack of detailed information about methane gas production within regional wetland systems. The aim of this study is to report the range of methane fluxes observed along salinity gradients at two San Diego coastal wetland systems, the Tijuana Estuary (Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve) and the Peñasquitos Lagoon (Torrey Pines State Park Reserve). Soil water samples are used to elucidate factors responsible for the observed variation in methane fluxes. Air samples were subsequently collected from the headspace of a static soil chamber and stored in pre- evacuated vials. Methane concentrations were analyzed within hours after collection by gas chromatography in the laboratory. The chemical and physical properties of the soil, including salinity, pH, redox potential and temperature are measured with a hand-held probe nearby soil collars. The biological properties of the soil, including dissolved organic carbon, nitrate, and ammonia levels are measured from soil water samples in the laboratory. We find that saline sites under direct tidal influence produced methane fluxes ranging from -3.10 to 9.10 (mean 2.18) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. We also find that brackish sites (0.6 to 3.2 ppt in salinity) with fresh water input from residential runoff at the Peñasquitos Lagoon produced methane fluxes ranging from 0.53 to 192.10 (mean 33.34) mg CH4 m-2 day-1. Sampling was done over the course of 5 weeks during August-September of 2008. We hypothesize that the contrasting methane fluxes found between the saline and the brackish sites is due primarily to the different salinity, and in turn sulfate levels found at the two sites. The reduction of sulfate to produce energy is more energetically favorable than the reduction of carbon dioxide to produce methane. Thus the presence of sulfate may act as

  19. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J.; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A.; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W.; Hyslop, Jimmy J.; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C.

    2016-01-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  20. Bovine Host Genetic Variation Influences Rumen Microbial Methane Production with Best Selection Criterion for Low Methane Emitting and Efficiently Feed Converting Hosts Based on Metagenomic Gene Abundance.

    PubMed

    Roehe, Rainer; Dewhurst, Richard J; Duthie, Carol-Anne; Rooke, John A; McKain, Nest; Ross, Dave W; Hyslop, Jimmy J; Waterhouse, Anthony; Freeman, Tom C; Watson, Mick; Wallace, R John

    2016-02-01

    Methane produced by methanogenic archaea in ruminants contributes significantly to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The host genetic link controlling microbial methane production is unknown and appropriate genetic selection strategies are not developed. We used sire progeny group differences to estimate the host genetic influence on rumen microbial methane production in a factorial experiment consisting of crossbred breed types and diets. Rumen metagenomic profiling was undertaken to investigate links between microbial genes and methane emissions or feed conversion efficiency. Sire progeny groups differed significantly in their methane emissions measured in respiration chambers. Ranking of the sire progeny groups based on methane emissions or relative archaeal abundance was consistent overall and within diet, suggesting that archaeal abundance in ruminal digesta is under host genetic control and can be used to genetically select animals without measuring methane directly. In the metagenomic analysis of rumen contents, we identified 3970 microbial genes of which 20 and 49 genes were significantly associated with methane emissions and feed conversion efficiency respectively. These explained 81% and 86% of the respective variation and were clustered in distinct functional gene networks. Methanogenesis genes (e.g. mcrA and fmdB) were associated with methane emissions, whilst host-microbiome cross talk genes (e.g. TSTA3 and FucI) were associated with feed conversion efficiency. These results strengthen the idea that the host animal controls its own microbiota to a significant extent and open up the implementation of effective breeding strategies using rumen microbial gene abundance as a predictor for difficult-to-measure traits on a large number of hosts. Generally, the results provide a proof of principle to use the relative abundance of microbial genes in the gastrointestinal tract of different species to predict their influence on traits e.g. human metabolism

  1. Estimating daily methane production in individual cattle with irregular feed intake patterns from short-term methane emission measurements.

    PubMed

    Cottle, D J; Velazco, J; Hegarty, R S; Mayer, D G

    2015-12-01

    Spot measurements of methane emission rate (n = 18 700) by 24 Angus steers fed mixed rations from GrowSafe feeders were made over 3- to 6-min periods by a GreenFeed emission monitoring (GEM) unit. The data were analysed to estimate daily methane production (DMP; g/day) and derived methane yield (MY; g/kg dry matter intake (DMI)). A one-compartment dose model of spot emission rate v. time since the preceding meal was compared with the models of Wood (1967) and Dijkstra et al. (1997) and the average of spot measures. Fitted values for DMP were calculated from the area under the curves. Two methods of relating methane and feed intakes were then studied: the classical calculation of MY as DMP/DMI (kg/day); and a novel method of estimating DMP from time and size of preceding meals using either the data for only the two meals preceding a spot measurement, or all meals for 3 days prior. Two approaches were also used to estimate DMP from spot measurements: fitting of splines on a 'per-animal per-day' basis and an alternate approach of modelling DMP after each feed event by least squares (using Solver), summing (for each animal) the contributions from each feed event by best-fitting a one-compartment model. Time since the preceding meal was of limited value in estimating DMP. Even when the meal sizes and time intervals between a spot measurement and all feeding events in the previous 72 h were assessed, only 16.9% of the variance in spot emission rate measured by GEM was explained by this feeding information. While using the preceding meal alone gave a biased (underestimate) of DMP, allowing for a longer feed history removed this bias. A power analysis taking into account the sources of variation in DMP indicated that to obtain an estimate of DMP with a 95% confidence interval within 5% of the observed 64 days mean of spot measures would require 40 animals measured over 45 days (two spot measurements per day) or 30 animals measured over 55 days. These numbers suggest that

  2. Production of Excess CO2 relative to methane in peatlands: a new H2 sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Varner, R. K.; Tyson, G. W.; Tfaily, M. M.; Sebestyen, S.; Saleska, S. R.; Rogers, K.; Rich, V. I.; McFarlane, K. J.; Kostka, J. E.; Kolka, R. K.; Keller, J.; Iversen, C. M.; Hodgkins, S. B.; Hanson, P. J.; Guilderson, T. P.; Griffiths, N.; de La Cruz, F.; Crill, P. M.; Chanton, J.; Bridgham, S. D.; Barlaz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is generated as the end product of anaerobic organic matter degradation following a series of reaction pathways including fermentation and syntrophy. Along with acetate and CO2, syntrophic reactions generate H2 and are only thermodynamically feasible when coupled to an exothermic reaction that consumes H2. The usual model of organic matter degradation in peatlands has assumed that methanogenesis is that exothermic H2-consuming reaction. If correct, this paradigm should ultimately result in equimolar production of CO2 and methane from the degradation of the model organic compound cellulose: i.e. C6H12O6 à 3CO2 + 3CH4. However, dissolved gas measurement and modeling results from field and incubation experiments spanning peatlands across the northern hemisphere have failed to demonstrate equimolar production of CO2 and methane. Instead, in a flagrant violation of thermodynamics, these studies show a large bias favoring CO2 production over methane generation. In this talk, we will use an array of complementary analytical techniques including FT-IR, cellulose and lignin measurements, 13C-NMR, fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to describe organic matter degradation within a peat column and identify the important degradation mechanisms. Hydrogenation was the most common transformation observed in the ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry data. From these results we propose a new mechanism for consuming H2 generated during CO2 production, without concomitant methane formation, consistent with observed high CO2/CH4 ratios. While homoacetogenesis is a known sink for H2 in these systems, this process also consumes CO2 and therefore does not explain the excess CO2 measured in field and incubation samples. Not only does the newly proposed mechanism consume H2 without generating methane, but it also yields enough energy to balance the coupled syntrophic reactions, thereby restoring thermodynamic order. Schematic of organic matter

  3. Sequential parametric optimization of methane production from different sources of forest raw material

    PubMed Central

    Matsakas, Leonidas; Rova, Ulrika; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The increase in environmental problems and the shortage of fossil fuels have led to the need for action in the development of sustainable and renewable fuels. Methane is produced through anaerobic digestion of organic materials and is a biofuel with very promising characteristics. The success in using methane as a biofuel has resulted in the operation of several commercial-scale plants and the need to exploit novel materials to be used. Forest biomass can serve as an excellent candidate for use as raw material for anaerobic digestion. During this work, both hardwood and softwood species—which are representative of the forests of Sweden—were used for the production of methane. Initially, when untreated forest materials were used for the anaerobic digestion, the yields obtained were very low, even with the addition of enzymes, reaching a maximum of only 40 mL CH4/g VS when birch was used. When hydrothermal pretreatment was applied, the enzymatic digestibility improved up to 6.7 times relative to that without pretreatment, and the yield of methane reached up to 254 mL CH4/g VS. Then the effect of chemical/enzymatic detoxification was examined, where laccase treatment improved the methane yield from the more harshly pretreated materials while it had no effect on the more mildly pretreated material. Finally, addition of cellulolytic enzymes during the digestion improved the methane yields from spruce and pine, whereas for birch separate saccharification was more beneficial. To achieve high yields in spruce 30 filter paper units (FPU)/g was necessary, whereas 15 FPU/g was enough when pine and birch were used. During this work, the highest methane yields obtained from pine and birch were 179.9 mL CH4/g VS and 304.8 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. For mildly and severely pretreated spruce, the methane yields reached 259.4 mL CH4/g VS and 276.3 mL CH4/g VS, respectively. We have shown that forest material can serve as raw material for efficient production of methane. The

  4. Fungal degradation of coal as a pretreatment for methane production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; SanFilipo, John R.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; Tatu, Calin A.; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Akhtar, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Coal conversion technologies can help in taking advantage of huge low rank coal reserves by converting those into alternative fuels like methane. In this regard, fungal degradation of coal can serve as a pretreatment step in order to make coal a suitable substrate for biological beneficiation. A fungal isolate MW1, identified as Penicillium chrysogenum on the basis of fungal ITS sequences, was isolated from a core sample of coal, taken from a well drilled by the US. Geological Survey in Montana, USA. The low rank coal samples, from major coal fields of Pakistan, were treated with MW1 for 7 days in the presence of 0.1% ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source and 0.1% glucose as a supplemental carbon source. Liquid extracts were analyzed through Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectroscopy (EEMS) to obtain qualitative estimates of solubilized coal; these analyses indicated the release of complex organic functionalities. In addition, GC–MS analysis of these extracts confirmed the presence of single ring aromatics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), aromatic nitrogen compounds and aliphatics. Subsequently, the released organics were subjected to a bioassay for the generation of methane which conferred the potential application of fungal degradation as pretreatment. Additionally, fungal-mediated degradation was also prospected for extracting some other chemical entities like humic acids from brown coals with high huminite content especially from Thar, the largest lignite reserve of Pakistan.

  5. Methane production from hydrothermal transformation of siderite to magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratbayev, T.; Schroeder, C.; Kappler, A.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    Mumma et al. (2009) observed a methane (CH4) plume above the Nili Fossae region on Mars, a region rich in carbonate minerals. Morris et al. (2010) suggest this to be (Mg,Fe)-carbonate. McCollom (2003) demonstrated that the hydrothermal transformation of siderite (FeCO3), to magnetite (Fe3O4) produces CH4. This reaction may thus contribute to the formation of methane on Mars, but is also relevant in the context of such diverse topics as diagenesis of Precambrian banded iron formations, sources of prebiotic organic compounds on early Earth, oil and gas accumulations in Earth's crust, or geological sequestration and storage of CO2. However, neither the thermodynamics of this reaction nor the conditions of maximum CH4 yield have been investigated to date. In order to estimate how pressure and temperature influence CH4 yield we derived a thermodynamic model with a numerical solution implemented in MATLAB. We used the equation 12FeCO3 + 2H2O → 4Fe3O4 + 11CO2 + CH4 (Frost et al. 2007) and thermodynamic calculations of the stability field of FeCO3 by Thoms-Keprta et al. (2009) as a template. At 1 bar pressure, the Gibbs energy turns negative (favorable reaction conditions) at a temperature of 200°C. Increasing pressure to 1000 bar changes that temperature to 250°C. An increase in temperature has a larger effect on shifting the Gibbs energy to more negative values. We therefore chose ambient pressure and temperatures of 300°C, 400°C, and 500°C as experimental conditions. We added 100 mg of either natural or synthetic FeCO3 and 25 μL of MilliQ water into long tip Pasteur pipettes inside an anoxic glove box to avoid contamination by free oxygen. The Pasteur pipettes were sealed with butyl stoppers and then melted shut outside of the glove box. The glass capsules were heated for 48 hours in a muffle furnace at 300°C, 400 0C or 5000C. The composition of the gas phase and the formation of methane in particular were analyzed using gas chromatography with a flame

  6. Microalgae to biofuels: life cycle impacts of methane production of anaerobically digested lipid extracted algae.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jason C; Hanif, Asma; Sharvelle, Sybil; Bradley, Thomas H

    2014-11-01

    This study presents experimental measurements of the biochemical methane production for whole and lipid extracted Nannochloropsis salina. Results show whole microalgae produced 430 cm(3)-CH4 g-volatile solids(-1) (g-VS) (σ=60), 3 times more methane than was produced by the LEA, 140 cm(3)-CH4 g-VS(-1) (σ=30). Results illustrate current anaerobic modeling efforts in microalgae to biofuel assessments are not reflecting the impact of lipid removal. On a systems level, the overestimation of methane production is shown to positively skew the environmental impact of the microalgae to biofuels process. Discussion focuses on a comparison results to those of previous anaerobic digestion studies and quantifies the corresponding change in greenhouse gas emissions of the microalgae to biofuels process based on results from this study.

  7. Methane production potentials, pathways, and communities of methanogens in vertical sediment profiles of river Sitka

    PubMed Central

    Mach, Václav; Blaser, Martin B.; Claus, Peter; Chaudhary, Prem P.; Rulík, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Biological methanogenesis is linked to permanent water logged systems, e.g., rice field soils or lake sediments. In these systems the methanogenic community as well as the pathway of methane formation are well-described. By contrast, the methanogenic potential of river sediments is so far not well-investigated. Therefore, we analyzed (a) the methanogenic potential (incubation experiments), (b) the pathway of methane production (stable carbon isotopes and inhibitor studies), and (c) the methanogenic community composition (terminal restriction length polymorphism of mcrA) in depth profiles of sediment cores of River Sitka, Czech Republic. We found two depth-related distinct maxima for the methanogenic potentials (a) The pathway of methane production was dominated by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis (b) The methanogenic community composition was similar in all depth layers (c) The main TRFs were representative for Methanosarcina, Methanosaeta, Methanobacterium, and Methanomicrobium species. The isotopic signals of acetate indicated a relative high contribution of chemolithotrophic acetogenesis to the acetate pool. PMID:26052322

  8. Enhancing methane production during the anaerobic digestion of crude glycerol using Japanese cedar charcoal.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryoya; Tada, Chika; Baba, Yasunori; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    The use of Japanese cedar charcoal as a support material for microbial attachment could enhance methane production during anaerobic digestion of crude glycerol and wastewater sludge. Methane yield from a charcoal-containing reactor was approximately 1.6 times higher than that from a reactor without charcoal, and methane production was stable over 50 days when the loading rate was 2.17 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1) d(-1). Examination of microbial communities on the charcoal revealed the presence of Uncultured Desulfovibrio sp. clone V29 and Pelobacter seleniigenes, known as 1,3-propandiol degraders. Hydrogenotrophic methanogens were also detected in the archaeal community on the charcoal. Methanosaeta, Methanoregula, and Methanocellus were present in the charcoal-containing reactor. The concentration of propionate in the charcoal-containing reactor was also lower than that in the control reactor. These results suggest that propionate degradation was enhanced by the consumption of hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic methanogens on the charcoal.

  9. Quantitative analysis of physical and geotechnical factors affecting methane emission in municipal solid waste landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecle, Dawit; Lee, Jejung; Hasan, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The amount of methane that vent from landfills is dependent on the physical, chemical and biological components of the soil cover. Especially moisture content and temperature of the soil are known as the major controlling factors. In situ moisture content measurement is very critical because the moisture content of the soil continuously changes within minutes to hours as a result of change in temperature. The presented study used time domain reflectometry to measure in situ moisture content and analyzed moisture content, temperature and methane data of the landfill soil cover in a quantitative manner. Geotechnical factors including soil grain size and uniformity coefficient of the soil were analyzed and their influence on moisture content and methane emission was examined. The authors used kriging and polynomial regression methods to characterize the spatial distribution of moisture content and methane emission. Methane emission showed good temporal correlation with soil temperature, however, no significant relationship between moisture content and methane emission was observed. Spatial distribution of soil attributes was also analyzed to examine its effect on those variables. The spatial pattern of moisture content was quite similar to that of uniformity coefficient, C u and that of clay content of the soil but strongly contrasted to that of methane emission.

  10. Studies on potential effects of fumaric acid on rumen microbial fermentation, methane production and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Riede, Susanne; Boguhn, Jeannette; Breves, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The greenhouse gas methane (CH4) contributes substantially to global climate change. As a potential approach to decrease ruminal methanogenesis, the effects of different dosages of fumaric acid (FA) on ruminal microbial metabolism and on the microbial community (archaea, bacteria) were studied using a rumen simulation technique (RUSITEC). FA acts as alternative hydrogen acceptor diverting 2H from methanogenesis of archaea towards propionate formation of bacteria. Three identical trials were conducted with 12 fermentation vessels over a period of 14 days. In each trial, four fermentation vessels were assigned to one of the three treatment groups differing in FA dosage: low fumaric acid (LFA), high fumaric acid (HFA) and without FA (control). FA was continuously infused with the buffer. Grass silage and concentrate served as substrate. FA led to decreases in pH and to higher production rates of total short chain fatty acids (SCFA) mediated by increases in propionate for LFA of 1.69 mmol d(-1) and in propionate and acetate production for HFA of 4.49 and 1.10 mmol d(-1), respectively. Concentrations of NH3-N, microbial crude protein synthesis, their efficiency, degradation of crude nutrients and detergent fibre fraction were unchanged. Total gas and CH4 production were not affected by FA. Effects of FA on structure of microbial community by means of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analyses could not be detected. Given the observed increase in propionate production and the unaffected CH4 production it can be supposed that the availability of reduction equivalents like 2H was not limited by the addition of FA in this study. It has to be concluded from the present study that the application of FA is not an appropriate approach to decrease the ruminal CH4 production.

  11. Methane production by treating vinasses from hydrous ethanol using a modified UASB reactor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A modified laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was used to obtain methane by treating hydrous ethanol vinasse. Vinasses or stillage are waste materials with high organic loads, and a complex composition resulting from the process of alcohol distillation. They must initially be treated with anaerobic processes due to their high organic loads. Vinasses can be considered multipurpose waste for energy recovery and once treated they can be used in agriculture without the risk of polluting soil, underground water or crops. In this sense, treatment of vinasse combines the elimination of organic waste with the formation of methane. Biogas is considered as a promising renewable energy source. The aim of this study was to determine the optimum organic loading rate for operating a modified UASB reactor to treat vinasse generated in the production of hydrous ethanol from sugar cane molasses. Results The study showed that chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency was 69% at an optimum organic loading rate (OLR) of 17.05 kg COD/m3-day, achieving a methane yield of 0.263 m3/kg CODadded and a biogas methane content of 84%. During this stage, effluent characterization presented lower values than the vinasse, except for potassium, sulfide and ammonia nitrogen. On the other hand, primers used to amplify the 16S-rDNA genes for the domains Archaea and Bacteria showed the presence of microorganisms which favor methane production at the optimum organic loading rate. Conclusions The modified UASB reactor proposed in this study provided a successful treatment of the vinasse obtained from hydrous ethanol production. Methanogen groups (Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales) detected by PCR during operational optimum OLR of the modified UASB reactor, favored methane production. PMID:23167984

  12. Effects of dietary starch content and rate of fermentation on methane production in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hatew, B; Podesta, S C; Van Laar, H; Pellikaan, W F; Ellis, J L; Dijkstra, J; Bannink, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of starch varying in rate of fermentation and level of inclusion in the diet in exchange for fiber on methane (CH4) production of dairy cows. Forty Holstein-Friesian lactating dairy cows of which 16 were rumen cannulated were grouped in 10 blocks of 4 cows each. Cows received diets consisting of 60% grass silage and 40% concentrate (dry matter basis). Cows within block were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 different diets composed of concentrates that varied in rate of starch fermentation [slowly (S) vs. rapidly (R) rumen fermentable; native vs. gelatinized corn grain] and level of starch (low vs. high; 270 vs. 530g/kg of concentrate dry matter). Results of rumen in situ incubations confirmed that the fractional rate of degradation of starch was higher for R than S starch. Effective rumen degradability of organic matter was higher for high than low starch and also higher for R than S starch. Increased level of starch, but not starch fermentability, decreased dry matter intake and daily CH4 production. Milk yield (mean 24.0±1.02kg/d), milk fat content (mean 5.05±0.16%), and milk protein content (mean 3.64±0.05%) did not differ between diets. Methane expressed per kilogram of fat- and protein-corrected milk, per kilogram of dry matter intake, or as a fraction of gross energy intake did not differ between diets. Methane expressed per kilogram of estimated rumen-fermentable organic matter (eRFOM) was higher for S than R starch-based diets (47.4 vs. 42.6g/kg of eRFOM) and for low than high starch-based diets (46.9 vs. 43.1g/kg of eRFOM). Apparent total-tract digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and crude protein were not affected by diets, but starch digestibility was higher for diets based on R starch (97.2%) compared with S starch (95.5%). Both total volatile fatty acid concentration (109.2 vs. 97.5mM) and propionate proportion (16.5 vs. 15.8mol/100mol) were higher for R starch- compared with S starch

  13. Optimization of process parameters for production of volatile fatty acid, biohydrogen and methane from anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Khan, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Liu, Y; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I; Deng, L J; Wang, J; Wu, Y

    2016-11-01

    The anaerobic digestion process has been primarily utilized for methane containing biogas production over the past few years. However, the digestion process could also be optimized for producing volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and biohydrogen. This is the first review article that combines the optimization approaches for all three possible products from the anaerobic digestion. In this review study, the types and configurations of the bioreactor are discussed for each type of product. This is followed by a review on optimization of common process parameters (e.g. temperature, pH, retention time and organic loading rate) separately for the production of VFA, biohydrogen and methane. This review also includes additional parameters, treatment methods or special additives that wield a significant and positive effect on production rate and these products' yield.

  14. Enhancement of methane production from co-digestion of chicken manure with agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Abouelenien, Fatma; Namba, Yuzaburo; Kosseva, Maria R; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2014-05-01

    The potential for methane production from semi-solid chicken manure (CM) and mixture of agricultural wastes (AWS) in a co-digestion process has been experimentally evaluated at thermophilic and mesophilic temperatures. To the best of author(')s knowledge, it is the first time that CM is co-digested with mixture of AWS consisting of coconut waste, cassava waste, and coffee grounds. Two types of anaerobic digestion processes (AD process) were used, process 1 (P1) using fresh CM (FCM) and process 2 (P2) using treated CM (TCM), ammonia stripped CM, were conducted. Methane production in P1 was increased by 93% and 50% compared to control (no AWS added) with maximum methane production of 502 and 506 mL g(-1)VS obtained at 55°C and 35°C, respectively. Additionally, 42% increase in methane production was observed with maximum volume of 695 mL g(-1)VS comparing P2 test with P2 control under 55°C. Ammonia accumulation was reduced by 39% and 32% in P1 and P2 tests.

  15. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we use molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  16. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  17. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    DOE PAGES

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-16

    In spite of the massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Here we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases, and we usemore » molecular simulations to demonstrate it. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Finally, our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.« less

  18. Hourly methane production in finishing steers fed at different levels of dry matter intake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methane (CH4) loss from finishing cattle is important as it represents an energy loss that could be used for maintenance and growth, and CH4 is a greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 21 to 25 times that of CO2. Our objectives were to determine hourly CH4 production from growing cattle fed...

  19. Estimating methane gas production in peat soils of the Florida Everglades using hydrogeophysical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, William; Comas, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability in production and release of greenhouse gases (such as methane) in peat soils remains uncertain, particularly for low-latitude peatlands like the Everglades. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a hydrogeophysical tool that has been successfully used in the last decade to noninvasively investigate carbon dynamics in peat soils; however, application in subtropical systems is almost non-existent. This study is based on four field sites in the Florida Everglades, where changes in gas content within the soil are monitored using time-lapse GPR measurements and gas releases are monitored using gas traps. A weekly methane gas production rate is estimated using a mass balance approach, considering gas content estimated from GPR, gas release from gas traps and incorporating rates of diffusion, and methanotrophic consumption from previous studies. Resulting production rates range between 0.02 and 0.47 g CH4 m-2 d-1, falling within the range reported in literature. This study shows the potential of combining GPR with gas traps to monitor gas dynamics in peat soils of the Everglades and estimate methane gas production. We also show the enhanced ability of certain peat soils to store gas when compared to others, suggesting that physical properties control biogenic gas storage in the Everglades peat soils. Better understanding biogenic methane gas dynamics in peat soils has implications regarding the role of wetlands in the global carbon cycle, particularly under a climate change scenario.

  20. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  1. Heat production, respiratory quotient, and methane loss subsequent to LPS challenge in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Respiration calorimetry was used to measure energy utilization during an acute phase response (APR) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Eight Angus heifers (208 +/- 29.2 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two calorimeters in four 2-day periods for measurement of heat production (HP), methane (CH4), and r...

  2. Short chain fatty acid production and glucose responses by methane producers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fermentation by gut microbiota has been linked to physiologic responses in the host. Methanogenic gut bacteria may remove more carbon from indigestible food matrices especially poorly digested carbohydrates. We sought to assess the effects of methane production on short chain fatty acid (SCFA) con...

  3. The presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens in the inoculum improves methane gas production in microbial electrolysis cells

    PubMed Central

    Siegert, Michael; Li, Xiu-Fen; Yates, Matthew D.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    High current densities in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) result from the predominance of various Geobacter species on the anode, but it is not known if archaeal communities similarly converge to one specific genus. MECs were examined here on the basis of maximum methane production and current density relative to the inoculum community structure. We used anaerobic digester (AD) sludge dominated by acetoclastic Methanosaeta, and an anaerobic bog sediment where hydrogenotrophic methanogens were detected. Inoculation using solids to medium ratio of 25% (w/v) resulted in the highest methane production rates (0.27 mL mL−1 cm−2, gas volume normalized by liquid volume and cathode projected area) and highest peak current densities (0.5 mA cm−2) for the bog sample. Methane production was independent of solid to medium ratio when AD sludge was used as the inoculum. 16S rRNA gene community analysis using pyrosequencing and quantitative PCR confirmed the convergence of Archaea to Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter, and of Bacteria to Geobacter, despite their absence in AD sludge. Combined with other studies, these findings suggest that Archaea of the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter are the most important microorganisms for methane production in MECs and that their presence in the inoculum improves the performance. PMID:25642216

  4. Assessment of Methane Emissions from Oil and Gas Production Pads using Mobile Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Journal Article Abstract --- "A mobile source inspection approach called OTM 33A was used to quantify short-term methane emission rates from 218 oil and gas production pads in Texas, Colorado, and Wyoming from 2010 to 2013. The emission rates were log-normally distributed with ...

  5. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix–a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30–47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3–35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. PMID:27306967

  6. Effect of the chlortetracycline addition method on methane production from the anaerobic digestion of swine wastewater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Wen, Xin; Wang, Yan; Zou, Yongde; Ma, Baohua; Liao, Xindi; Liang, Juanboo; Wu, Yinbao

    2014-10-01

    Effects of antibiotic residues on methane production in anaerobic digestion are commonly studied using the following two antibiotic addition methods: (1) adding manure from animals that consume a diet containing antibiotics, and (2) adding antibiotic-free animal manure spiked with antibiotics. This study used chlortetracycline (CTC) as a model antibiotic to examine the effects of the antibiotic addition method on methane production in anaerobic digestion under two different swine wastewater concentrations (0.55 and 0.22mg CTC/g dry manure). The results showed that CTC degradation rate in which manure was directly added at 0.55mg CTC/g (HSPIKE treatment) was lower than the control values and the rest of the treatment groups. Methane production from the HSPIKE treatment was reduced (p<0.05) by 12% during the whole experimental period and 15% during the first 7days. The treatments had no significant effect on the pH and chemical oxygen demand value of the digesters, and the total nitrogen of the 0.55mg CTC/kg manure collected from mediated swine was significantly higher than the other values. Therefore, different methane production under different antibiotic addition methods might be explained by the microbial activity and the concentrations of antibiotic intermediate products and metabolites. Because the primary entry route of veterinary antibiotics into an anaerobic digester is by contaminated animal manure, the most appropriate method for studying antibiotic residue effects on methane production may be using manure from animals that are given a particular antibiotic, rather than adding the antibiotic directly to the anaerobic digester.

  7. Methane emissions from drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice production on a silt-loam soil in arkansas.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Christopher W; Brye, Kristofor R; Norman, Richard J; Gbur, Edward E; Mattice, John D; Parkin, Timothy B; Roberts, Trenton L

    2013-07-01

    Rice ( L.) production is unique among staple food crops because the majority of the growing season typically occurs under flooded-soil conditions. Flooding the soil leads to anaerobic conditions, which are a precursor to methane (CH) production. However, no known research has investigated CH emissions from the drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice production system common in Arkansas, the leading rice-producing state in the United States. Therefore, research was conducted in 2011 to determine the effects of vegetation (rice and bare soil), chamber location (in- and between-rice rows), and nitrogen (N) fertilization (optimal and no N) on CH emissions from a silt-loam soil. Methane fluxes measured weekly from flooding until flood release were affected by vegetation, chamber location, and sample date ( < 0.05). In-row CH fluxes were <0.7 mg CH-C m h until 20 d after flooding (DAF) and <1.0 mg CH-C m h from between-row and bare soil until 41 DAF and were unaffected by fertilization over time. The largest weekly measured CH flux (31.9 mg CH-C m h) was observed from in-row rice at 41 DAF. Post-flood-release CH fluxes were affected by vegetation, fertilization, chamber placement, and sample date ( < 0.05) and accounted for approximately 3 to 7% of the season-long CH emissions. Methane emissions averaged 195 kg CH-C ha per growing season and were unaffected by fertilization. Direct measurement of CH emissions from drill-seeded, delayed-flood rice grown on a silt-loam soil will improve the accuracy of assessments of the carbon footprint and long-term sustainability of rice.

  8. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

    1996-11-12

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

  9. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dusek, Joseph T.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thadeus P.

    1996-01-01

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

  10. Methane production and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in children living in a slum

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Carolina Santos; Tahan, Soraia; Melli, Lígia Cristina FL; Rodrigues, Mirian Silva do Carmo; de Mello, Ricardo Martin Pereira; Scaletsky, Isabel Cristina Affonso; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in school-aged children and the relationship between hydrogen and methane production in breath tests. METHODS: This transversal study included 85 children residing in a slum and 43 children from a private school, all aged between 6 and 10 years, in Osasco, Brazil. For characterization of the groups, data regarding the socioeconomic status and basic housing sanitary conditions were collected. Anthropometric data was obtained in children from both groups. All children completed the hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) breath test in order to assess small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). SIBO was diagnosed when there was an increase in H2 ≥ 20 ppm or CH4 ≥ 10 ppm with regard to the fasting value until 60 min after lactulose ingestion. RESULTS: Children from the slum group had worse living conditions and lower nutritional indices than children from the private school. SIBO was found in 30.9% (26/84) of the children from the slum group and in 2.4% (1/41) from the private school group (P = 0.0007). Greater hydrogen production in the small intestine was observed in children from the slum group when compared to children from the private school (P = 0.007). A higher concentration of hydrogen in the small intestine (P < 0.001) and in the colon (P < 0.001) was observed among the children from the slum group with SIBO when compared to children from the slum group without SIBO. Methane production was observed in 63.1% (53/84) of the children from the slum group and in 19.5% (8/41) of the children from the private school group (P < 0.0001). Methane production was observed in 38/58 (65.5%) of the children without SIBO and in 15/26 (57.7%) of the children with SIBO from the slum. Colonic production of hydrogen was lower in methane-producing children (P = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Children who live in inadequate environmental conditions are at risk of bacterial overgrowth and methane production. Hydrogen is a substrate for

  11. Innovation in biological production and upgrading of methane and hydrogen for use as gaseous transport biofuel.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Murphy, Jerry D

    2016-01-01

    Biofuels derived from biomass will play a major role in future renewable energy supplies in transport. Gaseous biofuels have superior energy balances, offer greater greenhouse gas emission reductions and produce lower pollutant emissions than liquid biofuels. Biogas derived through fermentation of wet organic substrates will play a major role in future transport systems. Biogas (which is composed of approximately 60% methane/hydrogen and 40% carbon dioxide) requires an upgrading process to reduce the carbon dioxide content to less than 3% before it is used as compressed gas in transport. This paper reviews recent developments in fermentative biogas production and upgrading as a transport fuel. Third generation gaseous biofuels may be generated using marine-based algae via two-stage fermentation, cogenerating hydrogen and methane. Alternative biological upgrading techniques, such as biological methanation and microalgal biogas upgrading, have the potential to simultaneously upgrade biogas, increase gaseous biofuel yield and reduce carbon dioxide emission.

  12. Two-phase anaerobic digestion for production of hydrogen-methane mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Michael; Maynard, Nathan; Cannizzaro, Christopher; Benemann, John

    2007-10-01

    An anaerobic digestion process to produce hydrogen and methane in two sequential stages was investigated, using two bioreactors of 2 and 15 L working volume, respectively. This relative volume ratio (and shorter retention time in the second, CH(4)-producing reactor) was selected, in part, to test the assumption that separation of phase can enhance metabolism in the second methane producing reactor. The reactor system was seeded with conventional anaerobic digester sludge, fed with a glucose-yeast extract--peptone medium and operated under conditions of relatively low mixing, to simulate full scale operation. A total of nine steady states were investigated, spanning a range of feed concentrations, dilution rates, feed carbon to nitrogen ratios and degree of integration of the two stages. The performance of this two-stage process and potential practical applications for the production of clean-burning hydrogen-methane mixtures are discussed.

  13. WASTEWATER reclamation and methane production using water hyacinth and anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; DoLenc, D.A.; Reddy, K.R.; Schwegler, B.

    1983-06-01

    This paper describes the results of research in progress to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of utilizing water hyacinth ponds for treatment of domestic wastewater and the utilization of anaerobic digestion for conversion of the hyacinth crop and primary sludge to methane. The system concept illustrated in Figure I employs water hyacinth ponds for secondary and tertiary treatment of effluent from primary treatment (which removes settleable solids). Primary effluent supernatant is passed through water hyacinth ponds which effect organic and nutrient reduction. Collected primary sludge and harvested hyacinth are added as a blend to the anaerobic digestion process where a portion of the organic matter is converted to methane and carbon dioxide. The methane is separated from the carbon dioxide and used as an energy product.

  14. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Allen, David T.; Torres, Vincent M.; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W.; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C.; Kolb, Charles E.; Fraser, Matthew P.; Hill, A. Daniel; Lamb, Brian K.; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F.; Seinfeld, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67–3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ±200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ∼1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production). PMID:24043804

  15. Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m{sup 3}/kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

  16. Measurements of methane emissions at natural gas production sites in the United States.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Torres, Vincent M; Thomas, James; Sullivan, David W; Harrison, Matthew; Hendler, Al; Herndon, Scott C; Kolb, Charles E; Fraser, Matthew P; Hill, A Daniel; Lamb, Brian K; Miskimins, Jennifer; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2013-10-29

    Engineering estimates of methane emissions from natural gas production have led to varied projections of national emissions. This work reports direct measurements of methane emissions at 190 onshore natural gas sites in the United States (150 production sites, 27 well completion flowbacks, 9 well unloadings, and 4 workovers). For well completion flowbacks, which clear fractured wells of liquid to allow gas production, methane emissions ranged from 0.01 Mg to 17 Mg (mean = 1.7 Mg; 95% confidence bounds of 0.67-3.3 Mg), compared with an average of 81 Mg per event in the 2011 EPA national emission inventory from April 2013. Emission factors for pneumatic pumps and controllers as well as equipment leaks were both comparable to and higher than estimates in the national inventory. Overall, if emission factors from this work for completion flowbacks, equipment leaks, and pneumatic pumps and controllers are assumed to be representative of national populations and are used to estimate national emissions, total annual emissions from these source categories are calculated to be 957 Gg of methane (with sampling and measurement uncertainties estimated at ± 200 Gg). The estimate for comparable source categories in the EPA national inventory is ~1,200 Gg. Additional measurements of unloadings and workovers are needed to produce national emission estimates for these source categories. The 957 Gg in emissions for completion flowbacks, pneumatics, and equipment leaks, coupled with EPA national inventory estimates for other categories, leads to an estimated 2,300 Gg of methane emissions from natural gas production (0.42% of gross gas production).

  17. Methane production in microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cells (MRMCs) using thermolytic solutions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xi; Zhang, Fang; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of bioelectrochemical systems for methane production has attracted increasing attention, but producing methane in these systems requires additional voltage to overcome large cathode overpotentials. To eliminate the need for electrical grid energy, we constructed a microbial reverse-electrodialysis methanogenesis cell (MRMC) by placing a reverse electrodialysis (RED) stack between an anode with exoelectrogenic microorganisms and a methanogenic biocathode. In the MRMC, renewable salinity gradient energy was converted to electrical energy, thus providing the added potential needed for methane evolution from the cathode. The feasibility of the MRMC was examined using three different cathode materials (stainless steel mesh coated with platinum, SS/Pt; carbon cloth coated with carbon black, CC/CB; or a plain graphite fiber brush, GFB) and a thermolytic solution (ammonium bicarbonate) in the RED stack. A maximum methane yield of 0.60 ± 0.01 mol-CH4/mol-acetate was obtained using the SS/Pt biocathode, with a Coulombic recovery of 75 ± 2% and energy efficiency of 7.0 ± 0.3%. The CC/CB biocathode MRMC had a lower methane yield of 0.55 ± 0.02 mol-CH4/mol-acetate, which was twice that of the GFB biocathode MRMC. COD removals (89-91%) and Coulombic efficiencies (74-81%) were similar for all cathode materials. Linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests demonstrated that cathodic microorganisms enhanced electron transfer from the cathode compared to abiotic controls. These results show that the MRMC has significant potential for production of nearly pure methane using low-grade waste heat and a source of waste organic matter at the anode.

  18. Evidence for methane-subsidised secondary production in a groundwater-fed lowland river.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimmer, M.; Grey, J.; Hildrew, A.; Jackson, M.

    2009-04-01

    We are probably familiar with the chemosynthetic ecosystems of the deep Pacific, where life in the dark is coupled to the oxidation of sulphur from ‘black smokers' rather than the sun, but few, if any, would suspect such a mode of life in the classic chalk rivers of southern England. We measured the delta13C values of dominant primary consumers and their potential food sources in a groundwater-fed lowland river. The delta13C of most consumers, such as Gammarus and Simulium, reflected that of the dominant forms of photosynthetic production, whereas the cased larvae of two caddis flies (Agapetus and Silo) were consistently 13C-depleted throughout the year. The river water was supersaturated (50-60 times atmospheric) with methane, reflecting both supersaturation in the groundwater and local production in fine sediments. We measured significant rates of methane oxidation, which generates 13C-depleted organic carbon, in the biofilms on gravel, on the caddis fly cases, and on the bottom of larger rocks. In addition, there was a marked difference in the ratio of methane oxidising potential to chlorophyll a across those substrata. This ratio was below detection in the biofilm (i.e. no methane oxidation) on the tops of rocks, greater on the bottom of rocks, and maximal for the gravels and the caddis cases. If the caddis larvae acquire most of their carbon by grazing the tops of such rocks (where they are normally found), then they must acquire their depleted delta13C values by occasionally grazing biofilm where the ratio of methane oxidation to chlorophyll was much greater, and the most likely candidate is from their own cases. Grazing methane oxidising bacteria could provide the caddis larvae with up to 30 % of their carbon, which could represent a true subsidy from an ancient groundwater source.

  19. High rate production of hydrogen/methane from various substrates and wastes.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    To treat soluble and solid wastes and recover energy from them, high rate methane fermentation, especially using the UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactor, and hydrogen fermentation using various microorganisms and microbial consortia have been investigated intensively in Japan. In this chapter, recent works on high rate methane fermentation in Japan are reviewed, focusing on: 1) basic studies into the applicability of the UASB reactor for various substrates such as propionate, lactate, ethanol, glucose and phenol; 2) its applications to unfeasible conditions, such as lipid and protein containing wastes, low temperature and high salt-containing wastes; 3) progress made in the field of advanced UASB reactors, and; 4) research into methane fermentation from solid wastes, such as from cellulosic materials, municipal sewage sludge, and mud sediments. Following this, although hydrogen fermentation with photosynthetic microorganisms or anaerobic bacteria was researched, for this review we have focused on fermentative hydrogen production using strictly or facultative anaerobes and microbial consortia in Japan, since high rate production of hydrogen-methane via a two-stage process was judged to be more attractive for biological hydrogen production and wastewater treatments.

  20. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA)

    PubMed Central

    Alves, M. Madalena; Pereira, M. Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z.; Cavaleiro, Ana J.; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The position of high‐rate anaerobic technology (HR‐AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR‐AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long‐chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment. PMID:21255287

  1. Methane production enhancement by an independent cathode in integrated anaerobic reactor with microbial electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Han, Tingting; Guo, Zechong; Varrone, Cristiano; Wang, Aijie; Liu, Wenzong

    2016-05-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) represents a potential way to achieve energy recovery from waste organics. In this study, a novel bioelectrochemically-assisted anaerobic reactor is assembled by two AD systems separated by anion exchange membrane, with the cathode placing in the inside cylinder (cathodic AD) and the anode on the outside cylinder (anodic AD). In cathodic AD, average methane production rate goes up to 0.070 mL CH4/mL reactor/day, which is 2.59 times higher than AD control reactor (0.027 m(3) CH4/m(3)/d). And COD removal is increased ∼15% over AD control. When changing to sludge fermentation liquid, methane production rate has been further increased to 0.247 mL CH4/mL reactor/day (increased by 51.53% comparing with AD control). Energy recovery efficiency presents profitable gains, and economic revenue from increased methane totally self-cover the cost of input electricity. The study indicates that cathodic AD could cost-effectively enhance methane production rate and degradation of glucose and fermentative liquid.

  2. Methane Production and Methanogenic Archaea in the Digestive Tracts of Millipedes (Diplopoda)

    PubMed Central

    Šustr, Vladimír; Chroňáková, Alica; Semanová, Stanislava; Tajovský, Karel; Šimek, Miloslav

    2014-01-01

    Methane production by intestinal methanogenic Archaea and their community structure were compared among phylogenetic lineages of millipedes. Tropical and temperate millipedes of 35 species and 17 families were investigated. Species that emitted methane were mostly in the juliform orders Julida, Spirobolida, and Spirostreptida. The irregular phylogenetic distribution of methane production correlated with the presence of the methanogen-specific mcrA gene. The study brings the first detailed survey of methanogens’ diversity in the digestive tract of millipedes. Sequences related to Methanosarcinales, Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales and some unclassified Archaea were detected using molecular profiling (DGGE). The differences in substrate preferences of the main lineages of methanogenic Archaea found in different millipede orders indicate that the composition of methanogen communities may reflect the differences in available substrates for methanogenesis or the presence of symbiotic protozoa in the digestive tract. We conclude that differences in methane production in the millipede gut reflect differences in the activity and proliferation of intestinal methanogens rather than an absolute inability of some millipede taxa to host methanogens. This inference was supported by the general presence of methanogenic activity in millipede faecal pellets and the presence of the 16S rRNA gene of methanogens in all tested taxa in the two main groups of millipedes, the Helminthophora and the Pentazonia. PMID:25028969

  3. Waste lipids to energy: how to optimize methane production from long-chain fatty acids (LCFA).

    PubMed

    Alves, M Madalena; Pereira, M Alcina; Sousa, Diana Z; Cavaleiro, Ana J; Picavet, Merijn; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

    2009-09-01

    The position of high-rate anaerobic technology (HR-AnWT) in the wastewater treatment and bioenergy market can be enhanced if the range of suitable substrates is expanded. Analyzing existing technologies, applications and problems, it is clear that, until now, wastewaters with high lipids content are not effectively treated by HR-AnWT. Nevertheless, waste lipids are ideal potential substrates for biogas production, since theoretically more methane can be produced, when compared with proteins or carbohydrates. In this minireview, the classical problems of lipids methanization in anaerobic processes are discussed and new concepts to enhance lipids degradation are presented. Reactors operation, feeding strategies and prospects of technological developments for wastewater treatment are discussed. Long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) degradation is accomplished by syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and methanogenic archaea. For optimal performance these syntrophic communities need to be clustered in compact aggregates, which is often difficult to achieve with wastewaters that contain fats and lipids. Driving the methane production from lipids/LCFA at industrial scale without risk of overloading and inhibition is still a challenge that has the potential for filling a gap in the existing processes and technologies for biological methane production associated to waste and wastewater treatment.

  4. Assessment of methane emissions from oil and gas production pads using mobile measurements.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Halley L; Thoma, Eben D; Squier, William C; Guven, Birnur B; Lyon, David

    2014-12-16

    A new mobile methane emissions inspection approach, Other Test Method (OTM) 33A, was used to quantify short-term emission rates from 210 oil and gas production pads during eight two-week field studies in Texas, Colorado, and Wyoming from 2010 to 2013. Emission rates were log-normally distributed with geometric means and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of 0.33 (0.23, 0.48), 0.14 (0.11, 0.19), and 0.59 (0.47, 0.74) g/s in the Barnett, Denver-Julesburg, and Pinedale basins, respectively. This study focused on sites with emission rates above 0.01 g/s and included short-term (i.e., condensate tank flashing) and maintenance-related emissions. The results fell within the upper ranges of the distributions observed in recent onsite direct measurement studies. Considering data across all basins, a multivariate linear regression was used to assess the relationship of methane emissions to well age, gas production, and hydrocarbon liquids (oil or condensate) production. Methane emissions were positively correlated with gas production, but only approximately 10% of the variation in emission rates was explained by variation in production levels. The weak correlation between emission and production rates may indicate that maintenance-related stochastic variables and design of production and control equipment are factors determining emissions.

  5. Effects of heavy metals on methane production in tropical rice soils.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S R; Bharati, K; Sethunathan, N; Adhya, T K

    1999-09-01

    In a laboratory incubation study, the effect of select heavy metals on methane (CH(4)) production in three rice soils was investigated under flooded conditions. Heavy metals behaved differently in their effect on methanogenesis in different soils and methane-producing bacteria. Cd, Cu, and Pb inhibited CH(4) production in all the soils. Zn stimulated CH(4) production in the alluvial soil, but inhibited it in laterite and acid sulfate soils. Cr effectively inhibited CH(4) production in the alluvial soil, but stimulated it in laterite and acid sulfate soils. The stimulatory effect of Zn and the inhibitory effect of Cr on methanogenesis in alluvial soil were attributed to their stimulation or inhibition of methanogenic bacterial population.

  6. Potential methane production and oxidation in soil reclamation covers of an oil sands mining site in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pum, Lisa; Reichenauer, Thomas; Germida, Jim

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic activities create a number of significant greenhouse gases and thus potentially contribute to global warming. Methane production is significant in some agricultural production systems and from wetlands. In soil, methane can be oxidised by methanotrophic bacteria. However, little is known about methane production and oxidation in oil sand reclamation covers. The purpose of this study was to investigate methane production and oxidation potential of tailing sands and six different reclamation layers of oil sands mining sites in Alberta, Canada. Methane production and oxidation potential were investigated in laboratory scale microcosms through continuous headspace analysis using gas chromatography. Samples from a reclamation layer were collected at the Canadian Natural Resources Limited (CNRL) reclamation site at depths of 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm and 20-40 cm in October 2014. In addition, tailing sands provided by Suncor Energy Inc. and soil from a CNRL wetland were studied for methane production. Samples were dried, crushed and sieved to 4 mm, packed into serum bottle microcosms and monitored for eight weeks. Methane production potential was assessed by providing an anoxic environment and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 100 %. Methane oxidation potential was examined by an initial application of 2 vol % methane to the microcosms and by adjusting the samples to a moisture holding capacity of 50 %. Microcosm headspace gas was analysed for methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and oxygen. All experiments were carried out in triplicates, including controls. SF6 and Helium were used as internal standards to detect potential leaks. Our results show differences for methane production potential between the soil depths, tailing sands and wetlands. Moreover, there were differences in the methane oxidation potential of substrate from the three depths investigated and between the reclamation layers. In conclusion, the present study shows that

  7. Enhancing the use of methane as a feedstock for the biological production of chemicals. Annual report, January-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, V.J.; Kelley, R.L.; Conrad, J.R.; Hoefer, D.E.; Glover, B.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the work is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the microbial utilization of methane for biocatalytic co-oxidation processes. Identifying the specific chemicals that (1) have a significant market potential, (2) could be produced cost effectively from methane either as a synthesis product or as a co-oxidation product by methane-utilizing microorganisms, and (3) could be recovered in a relatively high concentration by a non-energy-intensive product-separation technique is the primary goal of the program. In the annual report, several physiological parameters such as temperature, pH, and micronutrients have been evaluated for the enhancement of propylene oxide production.

  8. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species.

  9. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    PubMed

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production.

  10. Methane-rich syngas production from hydrocarbon fuels using multi-functional catalyst/capture agent

    DOEpatents

    Siefert, Nicholas S.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Berry, David A.; Surdoval, Wayne A.

    2017-02-07

    The disclosure provides a gasification process for the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 400.degree. C. through the use of an alkali hydroxide MOH, using a gasification mixture comprised of at least 0.25 moles and less than 2 moles of water for each mole of carbon, and at least 0.15 moles and less than 2 moles of alkali hydroxide MOH for each mole of carbon. These relative amounts allow the production of a methane-rich syngas at temperatures exceeding 400.degree. C. by enabling a series of reactions which generate H.sub.2 and CH.sub.4, and mitigate the reforming of methane. The process provides a methane-rich syngas comprised of roughly 20% (dry molar percentage) CH.sub.4 at temperatures above 400.degree. C., and may effectively operate within an IGFC cycle at reactor temperatures between 400-900.degree. C. and pressures in excess of 10 atmospheres.

  11. Hydrogen and methane production through two-stage mesophilic anaerobic digestion of olive pulp.

    PubMed

    Koutrouli, Eleni C; Kalfas, Haralabos; Gavala, Hariklia N; Skiadas, Ioannis V; Stamatelatou, Katerina; Lyberatos, Gerasimos

    2009-08-01

    The present study focused on the anaerobic biohydrogen production from olive pulp (two phase olive mill wastes, TPOMW) and the subsequent anaerobic treatment of the effluent for methane production under mesophilic conditions in a two-stage process. Biohydrogen production from water-diluted (1:4) olive pulp was investigated at hydraulic retention times (HRT) of 30 h, 14.5 h and 7.5 h while methane production from the effluent of hydrogenogenic reactor was studied at 20 d, 15 d, 10d and 5d HRT. In comparison with previous studies, it has been shown that the thermophilic hydrogen production process was more efficient than the mesophilic one in both hydrogen production rate and yield. The methanogenic reactor was successfully operated at 20, 15 and 10 days HRT while it failed when an HRT of 5 days was applied. Methane productivity reached the maximum value of 1.13+/-0.08 L/L/d at 10 days HRT whereas the methane yield increased with the HRT. The Anaerobic Digestion Model no. 1 (ADM1) was applied to the obtained experimental data from the methanogenic reactor to simulate the digester response at all HRT tested. The ability of the model to predict the experimental results was evident even in the case of the process failure, thus implying that the ADM1 could be a valuable tool for process design even in the case of a complex feedstock. In general, the two-stage anaerobic digestion proved to be a stable, reliable and effective process for energy recovery and stabilization treatment of olive pulp.

  12. Geomechanical Behavior of Hydrate-Bearing Sediments in the Ulleung Basin during Methane Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, G. C.; Kim, A. R.; KIM, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The potential of methane hydrate deposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea was suggested by the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources between 2000 and 2004. In a few years, a pilot production project is planned as the world's second offshore methane production project. The basin has a water depth of 1500-2300 m; however, the depth of the hydrate occurrence zone is relatively shallow (about 100-200 mbsf) for gas hydrate production. There is high potential for geomechanical stability problems such as seafloor subsidence, differential settlement, effective stress concentrations, marine landslides, and wellbore instability. In this study, 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling is conducted to simulate the depressurization process in the Ulleung Basin for methane gas production. The coupled mechanical-flow-thermal model used for this purpose incorporates the physical processes of hydrate dissociation, the pore fluid flow, thermal advection, and the geomechanical response of hydrate-bearing sediments. Using the coupled model, two high-potential sites are compared with respect to the pore pressure, temperature change, production efficiency, and geomechanical stability. During depressurization, deformation of the sediments around the production well occurs due to the pore pressure difference and the increase in the effective stress in the depressurized region. This tendency becomes more pronounced due to the decrease in the stiffness of the hydrate-bearing sediments, which is caused by hydrate dissociation. In addition, the latent heat induced by methane hydrate dissociation and thermal advection due to the pore fluid flow have greater effects on the dissociation range and pace than do the geomechanical behaviors. Meanwhile, higher production efficiency, a larger latent heat effect and less settlement are induced in the site, which consists of thick sand layers with greater stiffness and permeability levels than mud layers.

  13. Conversion of crude oil to methane by a microbial consortium enriched from oil reservoir production waters

    PubMed Central

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls), corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase encoding gene (assA/masA) in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up to 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic vs. sessile) within a subsurface crude oil reservoir. PMID:24829563

  14. Conversion of crude oil to methane by a microbial consortium enriched from oil reservoir production waters.

    PubMed

    Berdugo-Clavijo, Carolina; Gieg, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic biodegradation of crude oil is an important process occurring in petroleum reservoirs and other oil-containing environments such as contaminated aquifers. In this process, syntrophic bacteria degrade hydrocarbon substrates to products such as acetate, and/or H2 and CO2 that are then used by methanogens to produce methane in a thermodynamically dependent manner. We enriched a methanogenic crude oil-degrading consortium from production waters sampled from a low temperature heavy oil reservoir. Alkylsuccinates indicative of fumarate addition to C5 and C6 n-alkanes were identified in the culture (above levels found in controls), corresponding to the detection of an alkyl succinate synthase encoding gene (assA/masA) in the culture. In addition, the enrichment culture was tested for its ability to produce methane from residual oil in a sandstone-packed column system simulating a mature field. Methane production rates of up to 5.8 μmol CH4/g of oil/day were measured in the column system. Amounts of produced methane were in relatively good agreement with hydrocarbon loss showing depletion of more than 50% of saturate and aromatic hydrocarbons. Microbial community analysis revealed that the enrichment culture was dominated by members of the genus Smithella, Methanosaeta, and Methanoculleus. However, a shift in microbial community occurred following incubation of the enrichment in the sandstone columns. Here, Methanobacterium sp. were most abundant, as were bacterial members of the genus Pseudomonas and other known biofilm forming organisms. Our findings show that microorganisms enriched from petroleum reservoir waters can bioconvert crude oil components to methane both planktonically and in sandstone-packed columns as test systems. Further, the results suggest that different organisms may contribute to oil biodegradation within different phases (e.g., planktonic vs. sessile) within a subsurface crude oil reservoir.

  15. Metabolic and trophic interactions modulate methane production by Arctic peat microbiota in response to warming

    PubMed Central

    Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Urich, Tim; Frenzel, Peter; Svenning, Mette Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) that could be released into the atmosphere as methane (CH4) in a future warmer climate. How warming affects the complex microbial network decomposing SOC is not understood. We studied CH4 production of Arctic peat soil microbiota in anoxic microcosms over a temperature gradient from 1 to 30 °C, combining metatranscriptomic, metagenomic, and targeted metabolic profiling. The CH4 production rate at 4 °C was 25% of that at 25 °C and increased rapidly with temperature, driven by fast adaptations of microbial community structure, metabolic network of SOC decomposition, and trophic interactions. Below 7 °C, syntrophic propionate oxidation was the rate-limiting step for CH4 production; above this threshold temperature, polysaccharide hydrolysis became rate limiting. This change was associated with a shift within the functional guild for syntrophic propionate oxidation, with Firmicutes being replaced by Bacteroidetes. Correspondingly, there was a shift from the formate- and H2-using Methanobacteriales to Methanomicrobiales and from the acetotrophic Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae. Methanogenesis from methylamines, probably stemming from degradation of bacterial cells, became more important with increasing temperature and corresponded with an increased relative abundance of predatory protists of the phylum Cercozoa. We concluded that Arctic peat microbiota responds rapidly to increased temperatures by modulating metabolic and trophic interactions so that CH4 is always highly produced: The microbial community adapts through taxonomic shifts, and cascade effects of substrate availability cause replacement of functional guilds and functional changes within taxa. PMID:25918393

  16. Metabolic and trophic interactions modulate methane production by Arctic peat microbiota in response to warming.

    PubMed

    Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Urich, Tim; Frenzel, Peter; Svenning, Mette Marianne

    2015-05-12

    Arctic permafrost soils store large amounts of soil organic carbon (SOC) that could be released into the atmosphere as methane (CH4) in a future warmer climate. How warming affects the complex microbial network decomposing SOC is not understood. We studied CH4 production of Arctic peat soil microbiota in anoxic microcosms over a temperature gradient from 1 to 30 °C, combining metatranscriptomic, metagenomic, and targeted metabolic profiling. The CH4 production rate at 4 °C was 25% of that at 25 °C and increased rapidly with temperature, driven by fast adaptations of microbial community structure, metabolic network of SOC decomposition, and trophic interactions. Below 7 °C, syntrophic propionate oxidation was the rate-limiting step for CH4 production; above this threshold temperature, polysaccharide hydrolysis became rate limiting. This change was associated with a shift within the functional guild for syntrophic propionate oxidation, with Firmicutes being replaced by Bacteroidetes. Correspondingly, there was a shift from the formate- and H2-using Methanobacteriales to Methanomicrobiales and from the acetotrophic Methanosarcinaceae to Methanosaetaceae. Methanogenesis from methylamines, probably stemming from degradation of bacterial cells, became more important with increasing temperature and corresponded with an increased relative abundance of predatory protists of the phylum Cercozoa. We concluded that Arctic peat microbiota responds rapidly to increased temperatures by modulating metabolic and trophic interactions so that CH4 is always highly produced: The microbial community adapts through taxonomic shifts, and cascade effects of substrate availability cause replacement of functional guilds and functional changes within taxa.

  17. Study on methane fermentation and production of vitamin B12 from alcohol waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenya; Quan, Taisheng; Li, Pomin; Zhang, Yansheng; Sugiura, Norio; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    We studied biogas fermentation from alcohol waste fluid to evaluate the anaerobic digestion process and the production of vitamin B12 as a byproduct. Anaerobic digestion using acclimated methanogens was performed using the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and fixed-bed reactor packed with rock wool as carrier material at 55 degrees C. We also studied the effects of metal ions added to the culture broth on methane and vitamin B12 formation. Vitamin B12 production was 2.92 mg/L in the broth of the fixed-bed reactor, twice that of the CSTR. The optimum concentrations of trace metal ions added to the culture liquid for methane and vitamin B12 production were 1.0 and 8 mL/L for the CSTR and fixed-bed reactor, respectively. Furthermore, an effective method for extracting and purifying vitamin B12 from digested fluid was developed.

  18. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  19. Primary production control of methane emission from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiting, G. J.; Chanton, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Based on simultaneous measurements of CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands extending from subarctic peatlands to subtropical marshes, a positive correlation between CH4 emission and net ecosystem production is reported. It is suggested that net ecosystem production is a master variable integrating many factors which control CH4 emission in vegetated wetlands. It is found that about 3 percent of the daily net ecosystem production is emitted back to the atmosphere as CH4. With projected stimulation of primary production and soil microbial activity in wetlands associated with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, the potential for increasing CH4 emission from inundated wetlands, further enhancing the greenhouse effect, is examined.

  20. High diversity of methanotrophic bacteria in geothermal soils affected by high methane fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Gagliano, Antonina Lisa; Quatrini, Paola; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas 25 times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils act as source, but also as biological filter for methane release to the atmosphere. For long time, volcanic/geothermal soils has been considered inhospitable for methanotrophic microorganisms, but new extremophile methanotrophs belonging to Verrucomicrobia were identified in three different areas (Pozzuoli, Italy; Hell's Gate, New Zealand; Kamchatka, Russia), explaining anomalous behaviours in methane leakages of several geothermal/volcanic sites. Our aim was to increase the knowledge of the relationship between methane emissions from volcanic/geothermal areas and biological methane oxidation, by investigating a geothermal site of Pantelleria island (Italy). Pantelleria Island hosts a high enthalpy geothermal system characterized by high temperature, high CH4 and very low H2S fluxes. Such characteristics are reflected in potentially great supply of methane for methanotrophs and scarce presence of inhibitors of their activity (H2S and NH3) in the Pantelleria soils. Potential methanotrophic activity within these soils was already evidenced by the CH4/CO2 ratio of the flux measurements which was lower than that of the respective fumarolic manifestations indicating a loss of CH4 during the gas travel towards the earth's surface. In this study laboratory incubation experiments using soils sampled at Favara Grande, the main hydrothermal area of Pantelleria, showed very high methane consumption rates (up to 9500 ng CH4 h-1 g-1). Furthermore, microbiological and culture-independent molecular analyses allowed to detect the presence of methanotrophs affiliated to Gamma- and Alpha-Proteobacteria and to the newly discovered acidothermophilic methanotrophs Verrucomicrobia. Culturable methanotrophic Alpha-proteobacteria of the genus Methylocystis were isolated by

  1. Zoonotic bacterial populations, gut fermentation characteristics and methane production in feedlot steers during oral nitroethane treatment and after the feeding of an experimental chlorate product.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Bañuelos, Hector; Anderson, Robin C; Carstens, Gordon E; Slay, Lisa J; Ramlachan, Nicole; Horrocks, Shane M; Callaway, Todd R; Edrington, Thomas S; Nisbet, David J

    2007-02-01

    Nitroethane inhibits the growth of certain zoonotic pathogens such as Campylobacter and Salmonella spp., foodborne pathogens estimated to cause millions of human infections each year, and enhances the Salmonella- and Escherichia coli-killing effect of an experimental chlorate product being developed as a feed additive to kill these bacteria immediately pre-harvest. Limited studies have shown that nitroethane inhibits ruminal methane production, which represents a loss of 2-12% of the host's gross energy intake and contributes to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. The present study was conducted to assess the effects of 14-day oral nitroethane administration, 0 (0X), 80 (1X) or 160 (2X)mg nitroethane/kg body weight per day on ruminal and fecal E. coli and Campylobacter, ruminal and fecal methane-producing and nitroethane-reducing activity, whole animal methane emissions, and ruminal and fecal fermentation balance in Holstein steers (n=6 per treatment) averaging 403+/-26 (SD) kg BW. An experimental chlorate product was fed the day following the last nitroethane administration to determine effects on E. coli and Campylobacter. The experimental chlorate product decreased (P<0.001) fecal, but not ruminal (P>0.05) E. coli concentrations by 1000- and 10-fold by 24 and 48 h, respectively, after chlorate feeding when compared to pre-treatment concentrations (>5.7 log(10) colony forming units/g). No effects (P>0.05) of nitroethane or the experimental chlorate product were observed on fecal Campylobacter concentrations; Campylobacter were not recovered from ruminal contents. Nitroethane treatment decreased (P<0.01) ruminal (8.46, 7.91 and 4.74+/-0.78 micromol/g/h) and fecal (3.90, 1.36 and 1.38+/-0.50 micromol/g/h) methane-producing activity for treatments 0X, 1X and 2X, respectively. Administration of nitroethane increased (P<0.001) nitroethane-reducing activity in ruminal, but not fecal samples. Day of study affected ruminal (P<0.0001) but not fecal (P>0

  2. Laboratory-scale bioaugmentation relieves acetate accumulation and stimulates methane production in stalled anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Town, Jennifer R; Dumonceaux, Tim J

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance between acidogenic and methanogenic organisms during anaerobic digestion can result in increased accumulation of volatile fatty acids, decreased reactor pH, and inhibition of methane-producing Archaea. Most commonly the result of organic input overload or poor inoculum selection, these microbiological and biochemical changes severely hamper reactor performance, and there are a few tools available to facilitate reactor recovery. A small, stable consortium capable of catabolizing acetate and producing methane was propagated in vitro and evaluated as a potential bioaugmentation tool for stimulating methanogenesis in acidified reactors. Replicate laboratory-scale batch digesters were seeded with a combination of bioethanol stillage waste and a dairy manure inoculum previously observed to result in high volatile fatty acid accumulation and reactor failure. Experimental reactors were then amended with the acetoclastic consortium, and control reactors were amended with sterile culture media. Within 7 days, bioaugmented reactors had significantly reduced acetate accumulation and the proportion of methane in the biogas increased from 0.2 ± 0 to 74.4 ± 9.9 % while control reactors showed no significant reduction in acetate accumulation or increase in methane production. Organisms from the consortium were enumerated using specific quantitative PCR assays to evaluate their growth in the experimental reactors. While the abundance of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms remained stable during the recovery period, an acetoclastic methanogen phylogenetically similar to Methanosarcina sp. increased more than 100-fold and is hypothesized to be the primary contributor to reactor recovery. Genomic sequencing of this organism revealed genes related to the production of methane from acetate, hydrogen, and methanol.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of grape pomace: Biochemical characterization of the fractions and methane production in batch and continuous digesters.

    PubMed

    El Achkar, Jean H; Lendormi, Thomas; Hobaika, Zeina; Salameh, Dominique; Louka, Nicolas; Maroun, Richard G; Lanoisellé, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have estimated the biogas and methane production from grape pomace (variety Cabernet Franc). The physical and chemical characteristics of the raw material were determined, and the structural polysaccharides were identified and analyzed by the Van Soest method. Batch anaerobic digestions were carried out to assess the methane production of the grape pomace, pulp and seeds. The obtained cumulative methane productions are 0.125, 0.165 and 0.052 Nm(3) kg COD(-1) for grape pomace, pulps and seeds, respectively. The effect of grinding on the methane potential of the substrates, as a mechanical pretreatment, was evaluated. We found that it increased the anaerobic biodegradability for grape pomace, pulp and seeds by 13.1%, 4.8% and 22.2%, respectively. On the other hand, the methane potential of the grape pomace was determined in a laboratory pilot plant (12L) continuously mixed with an organic loading rate of 2.5 kg COD m(3) d(-1) and a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The corresponding biogas production was 6.43 × 10(-3) Nm(3) d(-1), with a methane content of 62.3%. Thus, the pilot plant's efficiency compared to that achieved in the batch process was 81.2%. Finally, a significant correlation was found between the biochemical content and methane production.

  4. Effect of combined herbal feed additives on methane, total gas production and rumen fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Indu; Dutta, Tapas Kumar; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate effect of herbal feed additives on methane and total gas production during the rumen fermentation for environment and animal health concern. Different parts of the five medicinal plants were selected such as leaf and small stems of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi), roots of Curcuma longa (Haldi), fruits of Emblica officinalis (Amla), leaves of Azadirachta indica (Neem) and leaves and small stem of Clerodendrum phlomidis (Arni) for our study. Addition of different herbal additive combinations did not influence IVDMD and total gas production however methane production (mg/g of substrate DM) was significantly (P<0.05) reduced in Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni combinations. Total nitrogen significantly (P<0.01) increased in the combinations of Tulsi: Haldi and Amla: Neem. TCA–ppt-N is significantly (P<0.01) increased in Tulsi: Haldi, Haldi: Amla, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni however NH3-N (mg/dl) significantly decreased in all treatments. We conclude that the screening of plant combinations, Amla: Neem and Neem: Arni have potential to decrease methane production and our herbal feed supplements have no side-effects on the ruminant in small amount. PMID:26124571

  5. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  6. Methane production from formate, acetate and H2/CO2; focusing on kinetics and microbial characterization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaofang; Angelidaki, Irini; Alvarado-Morales, Merlin; Liu, Houguang; Liu, Yuhong; Huang, Xu; Zhu, Gefu

    2016-10-01

    For evaluating the methanogenesis from typical methanogenic precursors (formate, acetate and H2/CO2), CH4 production kinetics were investigated at 37±1°C in batch anaerobic digestion tests and stimulated by modified Gompertz model. The results showed that maximum methanation rate from formate, acetate and H2/CO2 were 19.58±0.49, 42.65±1.17 and 314.64±3.58NmL/gVS/d in digested manure system and 6.53±0.31, 132.04±3.96 and 640.16±19.92NmL/gVS/d in sewage sludge system during second generation incubation. Meanwhile the model could not fit well in granular sludge system, while the rate of formate methanation was faster than from H2/CO2 and acetate. Considering both the kinetic results and microbial assay we could conclude that H2/CO2 methanation was the fastest methanogenic step in digested manure and sewage sludge system with Methanomicrobiales as dominant methanogens, while granular sludge with Methanobacteriales as dominant methanogens contributed to the fastest formate methanation.

  7. AO13. High energy, low methane syngas from low-rank coals for coal-to-liquids production

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, Andrew; Goyal, Amit; McCabe, Kevin; Gangwal, Santosh

    2015-06-30

    An experimental program was undertaken to develop and demonstrate novel steam reforming catalysts for converting tars, C2+ hydrocarbons, and methane under high temperature and sulfur environments at lab scale. Several catalysts were developed and synthesized along with some catalysts based on recipes found in the literature. Of these, two had good resistance at 90 ppm H2S with one almost not affected at all. Higher concentrations of H2S did affect methane conversion across the catalyst, but performance was fairly stable for up to 200 hours. Based on the results of the experimental program, a techno-economic analysis was developed for IGCC and CTL applications and compared to DOE reference cases to examine the effects of the new technology. In the IGCC cases, the reformer/POX system produces nearly the same amount of electricity for nearly the same cost, however, the reformers/POX case sequesters a higher percentage of the carbon when compared to IGCC alone. For the CTL case the economics of the new process were nearly identical to the CTL case, but due to improved yields, the greenhouse gas emissions for a given production of fuels was approximately 50% less than the baseline case.

  8. Bromochloromethane, a Methane Analogue, Affects the Microbiota and Metabolic Profiles of the Rat Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Xiang; Mu, Chun-Long; Luo, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Bromochloromethane (BCM), an inhibitor of methanogenesis, has been used in animal production. However, little is known about its impact on the intestinal microbiota and metabolic patterns. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of BCM on the colonic bacterial community and metabolism by establishing a Wistar rat model. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups (control and treated with BCM) and raised for 6 weeks. Bacterial fermentation products in the cecum were determined, and colonic methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified. The colonic microbiota was analyzed by pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes, and metabolites were profiled by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results showed that BCM did not affect body weight and feed intake, but it did significantly change the intestinal metabolic profiles. Cecal protein fermentation was enhanced by BCM, as methylamine, putrescine, phenylethylamine, tyramine, and skatole were significantly increased. Colonic fatty acid and carbohydrate concentrations were significantly decreased, indicating the perturbation of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism by BCM. BCM treatment decreased the abundance of methanogen populations, while SRB were increased in the colon. BCM did not affect the total colonic bacterial counts but significantly altered the bacterial community composition by decreasing the abundance of actinobacteria, acidobacteria, and proteobacteria. The results demonstrated that BCM treatment significantly altered the microbiotic and metabolite profiles in the intestines, which may provide further information on the use of BCM in animal production. PMID:26567308

  9. Bioconversion of industrial hemp to ethanol and methane: the benefits of steam pretreatment and co-production.

    PubMed

    Kreuger, Emma; Sipos, Bálint; Zacchi, Guido; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2011-02-01

    Several scenarios for ethanol production, methane production (by anaerobic digestion) and co-production of these, using autumn harvested hemp as substrate, were investigated and compared in terms of gross energy output. Steam pretreatment improved the methane production rate compared with mechanical grinding. The methane yield of steam pretreated stems was similar both with and without pre-hydrolysis with cellulolytic enzymes. Co-production of ethanol and methane from steam pretreated stems gave a high yield of transportation fuel, 11.1-11.7 MJ/kg processed stem dry matter (DM); more than twice that of ethanol production alone from hexoses, 4.4-5.1 MJ/kg processed stem DM. Co-production from the whole hemp plant would give 2600-3000 L ethanol and 2800-2900 m(3) methane, in total 171-180 GJ per 10,000 m(2) of agricultural land, based on a biomass yield of 16 Mg DM. Of this, the yeast and enzymes from ethanol production were estimated to contribute 700 m(3) (27 GJ) of methane.

  10. Methane production from the red seaweed gracilaria tikvahiae

    SciTech Connect

    Hanisak, M.D.

    1981-01-01

    Stable continuous anaerobic digestion of the title seaweed was maintained in large (120 L) digesters for more than 20 months, with an average gas (60% CH4) production of 0.4 L/g volatile solids. The average bioconversion efficiency was approximately 48%. When the retention time, t, was increased (i.e., loading rate decreased) from 10 to 60 days the total production of biogas and CH4 (as well as the percent CH4 and the reduction of total volatile solids) increased to maximum at t = 30 days and decreased at t = 60 days. Biogas and CH4 production on the basis of volatile solids added increased to less than or equal to 60 days, as did the percent volatile solids reduction. The pH in the digesters increased with increasing t.

  11. Emerging topics in marine methane biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of physical, chemical, geological and biological processes affecting methane in the ocean and in underlying sediments is expanding at a rapid pace. On first inspection, marine methane biogeochemistry appears simple: Methane distribution in sediment is set by the deposition pattern of organic material, and the balance of sources and sinks keeps its concentration low in most waters. However, recent research reveals that methane is affected by complex biogeochemical processes whose interactions are understood only at a superficial level. Such processes span the deep-subsurface, near subsurface, and ocean waters, and relate primarily to the production, consumption, and transport of methane. The purpose of this synthesis is to examine select processes within the framework of methane biogeochemistry, to formulate hypotheses on how they might operate and interact with one another, and to consider their controls.

  12. Methanation of CO and CO/sub 2/ for heat production

    SciTech Connect

    Arcilla, N.T.; Plumlee, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    This study explores workable CO and CO/sub 2/ methanation systems for process heat as part of a Thermo-Chemical Heat Pipe (TCHP) based on methane reforming. Tested methanator designs and methanation catalyst materials were reviewed to identify those suitable in high temperature, high pressure methanation. 7 refs.

  13. Methane production by anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Klass, D.L.; Ghosh, S.

    1980-01-01

    Water hyacinth under conventional high-rate digestion conditions exhibited higher CH4 yields and energy recovery efficiencies when grown in sewage-fed lagoons than when grown in a fresh water pond. Mesophilic digestion provided the highest recovery of feed energy in the product gas as CH4, while thermophilic digestion, when operated at sufficiently high loading rates and reduced detention times, gave the highest specific CH4 production rates. CH4 yields, volatile solids reduction, and energy recovery as CH4 from the sewage-grown water hyacinth were in the same range as those observed for other biomass substrates when digested under similar conditions.

  14. Production and dispersion of dissolved methane in southeastern Bering Sea. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, J.D.; Kelly-Hansen, K.; Katz, C.N.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to use dissolved methane as a tracer of mean circulation and to define vertical and horizontal mixing scales in local regions of the southeastern Bering Sea. The subregions selected for study included St. George Basin, a fault basin located on the outer shelf of Bristol Bay, and the North Aleutian Shelf. Both regions were identified as potential off-shore leasing sites for gas and oil production.

  15. Temperature response of methane oxidation and production potentials in peatland ecosystems across Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, Nina; Korrensalo, Aino; Kerttula, Johanna; Maljanen, Marja; Uljas, Salli; Lohila, Annalea; Laine, Anna; Vesala, Timo; Elliott, David; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that the ecosystems located in the high latitudes are especially sensitive to warming. Therefore, we compared 14 peatland systems throughout Finland along a latitudinal gradient from 69°N to 61°N to examine the response of methane production and methane oxidation with warming climate. Peat samples were taken at the height of the growing season in 2015 from 0 - 10cm below the water table depth. The plant communities in sampling locations were described by estimating cover of each plant species and pH of water was measured. Upon return to the lab, we made two parallel treatments, under anoxic and oxic conditions in order to calculate the CH4 production and consumption potentials of the peat and used three temperatures, 4°C, 17.5°C, and 30°C to examine the temperature effect on the potentials. We hypothesized that there will be an observable response curve in CH4 production and oxidation relative to temperature with a greater response with increasing latitude. In general, increasing temperature increased the potential for CH4 production and oxidation, at some sites, the potential was highest at 17.5°C, indicating that there is an optimum temperature threshold for the in situ methane producing and oxidizing microbial communities. Above this threshold, the peat microbial communities are not able to cope with increasing temperature. This is especially noticeable for methane oxidation at sites above 62°N. As countries are being expected to adequately account for their greenhouse gas budgets with increasing temperature models, knowing where the temperature threshold exists is of critical importance.

  16. Effect of nickel ions on anaerobic methane production from water hyacinth.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xuan; Hong, Zi-Jian; Dai, Rui-Hua; Liu, Yan; Liu, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The effect of different concentrations of nickel ions (Ni(2+), 0, 10, 40 and 80 mg/L) on the anaerobic methane production of water hyacinth were investigated. Under these four concentrations, the methane production in 40 d was 2,275, 2,703, 3,210 and 2,481 mL, respectively. This situation illustrated that the Ni(2+) promoted the growth of hydrogen-producing acetic acid bacteria and methanogenic bacteria, even at high concentrations (i.e. 40-80 mg/L). The highest methane production per unit weight water hyacinth reached 206 mL/gTS with 40 mg/L Ni(2+). Meanwhile, the modified Gompertz and Logistic equations were applied to describe the effect on anaerobic culture of Ni(2+). According to these models, the values of methane production potential (mL) for four concentrations were in the following order: 40 mg/L (3,123.42 ± 60.08) > 10 mg/L (2,541.16 ± 46.94) > 80 mg/L (2,432.36 ± 40.18) > 0 mg/L (2,238.10 ± 31.90). According to the analysis of the digestate, the residual concentration of Ni(2+) was approximately 1.05-4.9 mg/L, which was relatively low compared with the Ni(2+) concentrations in the raw feedstock. The results would provide academic guidance and technical support for treatment of water hyacinth with an accumulation of heavy metals.

  17. Influence of different supplements and sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) cultivars on intake, digestible variables and methane production of dairy heifers under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Márcio dos Santos; Berchelli, Telma Teresinha; Primavesi, Odo; de Oliveira, Simone Gisele; Frighetto, Rosa; de Lima, Magda Aparecida

    2012-10-01

    The sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) gas tracer method was used to measure methane (CH(4)) production of crossbred (3/4 Holstein x Zebu) dairy heifers fed two types of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.; cultivar IAC-862480 (CC1) or cultivar IAC-873184 (CC2)) and supplemented with urea or concentrate. The study was performed at Embrapa Southeast Cattle, São Carlos, SP, Brazil, using a completely randomised design. Differences between treatments were significant for digestibility of dry matter, organic matter and energy. When animals were supplemented with urea differences between sugarcane cultivars did occur for NDF consumption, but not for daily methane production. This suggest that variation in chemical composition of sugarcane did not affect bovine ruminal CH(4) emissions. Concentrate inclusion in animal diet increased digestible organic matter intake, improving the nutrient intake by animals, but did not reduce CH(4) production expressed as a percentage of gross energy intake.

  18. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR METHANE PRODUCTION FROM LANDFILL BIOREACTOR - A DISCUSSION PAPER HTTP://OIPS.AIP.ORG/EEO/

    EPA Science Inventory

    This discussion explains the experimental results of a landfill bioreactor (LFBR) from a microbiological perspective and provides a feasible strategy to evaluate methane production performance, since suitable models are complicated and not sufficiently reliable for anaerobic-syst...

  19. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-12

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  20. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis. PMID:26559132

  1. Magnetite nanoparticles facilitate methane production from ethanol via acting as electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiman; Shi, Xiaoshuang; Wang, Chuanshui; Wang, Lin; Guo, Rongbo

    2015-11-01

    Potential for interspecies hydrogen transfer within paddy soil enrichments obtained via addition of magnetite nanoparticles and ethanol (named as PEM) was investigated. To do this, PEM derived from rice field of Hangzhou (named as PEM-HZ) was employed, because it offered the best methane production performance. Methane production and Fe (III) reduction proceeded in parallel in the presence of magnetite. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethane sulfonate (BES) or phosphate showed that interspecies hydrogen transfer and Fe (III) reduction also occurred in methane production from ethanol. 16S rRNA-based Illumina sequencing results showed that Dechloromonas, Thauera, Desulfovibrio and Clostridium were the dominant putative Fe (III) -reducers, and that hydrogenotrophic Methanobacterium accounted for about 88% of the total archaeal community. These results indicated that magnetite nanoparticles that acted as electron acceptor could facilitate rapid oxidation of ethanol by members of the Fe (III) -reducers in PEM-HZ and establishment of the syntrophic relationship of Fe (III) -reducers with Methanobacterium via interspecies hydrogen transfer. Our results could offer a model to understand the microbial interaction with magnetite from a novel angle during methanogenesis.

  2. Toward a Functional Definition of Methane Super-Emitters: Application to Natural Gas Production Sites.

    PubMed

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Lyon, David; Alvarez, Ramón A; Palacios, Virginia; Harriss, Robert; Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Hamburg, Steven P

    2015-07-07

    Emissions from natural gas production sites are characterized by skewed distributions, where a small percentage of sites-commonly labeled super-emitters-account for a majority of emissions. A better characterization of super-emitters is needed to operationalize ways to identify them and reduce emissions. We designed a conceptual framework that functionally defines superemitting sites as those with the highest proportional loss rates (methane emitted relative to methane produced). Using this concept, we estimated total methane emissions from natural gas production sites in the Barnett Shale; functionally superemitting sites accounted for roughly three-fourths of total emissions. We discuss the potential to reduce emissions from these sites, under the assumption that sites with high proportional loss rates have excess emissions resulting from abnormal or otherwise avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment. Because the population of functionally superemitting sites is not expected to be static over time, continuous monitoring will likely be necessary to identify them and improve their operation. This work suggests that achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of production sites will require mitigation steps at a large fraction of sites.

  3. Methane production from horse manure and stall waste with softwood bedding.

    PubMed

    Wartell, Brian A; Krumins, Valdis; Alt, Jeffrey; Kang, Kathleen; Schwab, Bryan J; Fennell, Donna E

    2012-05-01

    Substantial stall waste is generated from horses on softwood bedding. The methane potential (G(pot)) of horse manure and constructed mixtures of stall waste with softwood bedding was determined at 35°C. G(pot) of 68, 191 and 273 mL/g volatile solids (VS) were estimated for three separate batches of horse manure, indicating variability in the material. Cumulative energy production over 20-40 days ranged from 3.11 ± 0.92 to 8.45 ± 5.42 × 10(5)kJ/metric ton wet weight horse manure alone, and from 1.69 ± 0.39 to 3.91 ± 0.47 × 10(5)kJ/metric ton wet weight horse manure plus softwood stall bedding (mixed at a 1:1 ratio on a VS basis). Softwood bedding was barely degradable and diluted the energy production of the stall waste; however, it did not cause inhibition of methane production from manure. Manually separated used softwood bedding contained substantial methane potential.

  4. Methane dissociation process in inductively coupled Ar/H2/CH4 plasma for graphene nano-flakes production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, Antaryami; Lanfant, Briac; Asfaha, Mehari; Leparoux, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The role of hydrogen and methane dissociation process in induction plasma synthesis of graphene nano-flakes (GNF) is studied by the optical emission spectroscopy of Ar/H2/CH4 plasma. The condensation of C2 species formed due to methane decomposition produces GNF, which depends on pressure. Electron impact and dehydrogenation processes dissociate methane, which promotes and hinders the GNF production, respectively. The effect of hydrogen is insignificant on quality, size and morphology of the GNF. The CH4 flow rate has no influence on particle temperature but has effect on cooling rate at the point of nucleation and, therefore, on production rate and thickness of GNF.

  5. An ecosystem simulation model for methane production and emission from wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Christopher S.

    1997-12-01

    Previous experimental studies suggest that methane emission from wetlands is influenced by multiple interactive pathways of gas production and transport through soil and sediment layers to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to evaluate a new simulation model of methane production and emission in wetland soils that was developed initially to help identify key processes that regulate methanogenesis and net flux of CH4 to the air but which is designed ultimately for regional simulation using remotely sensed inputs for land cover characteristics. The foundation for these computer simulations is based on a well-documented model (Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach, CASA) of ecosystem production and carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere. Modifications to represent flooded wetland soils and anaerobic decomposition include three new submodels for (1) layered soil temperature and water table depth (WTD) as a function of daily climate drivers, (2) CH4 production within the anoxic soil layer as a function of WTD and CO2 production under poorly drained conditions, and (3) CH4 gaseous transport pathways (molecular diffusion, ebullition, and plant vascular transport) as a function of WTD and ecosystem type. The model was applied and tested using climate and ecological data to characterize tundra wetland sites near Fairbanks, Alaska, studied previously by Whalen and Reeburgh [1992]. Comparison of model predictions to measurements of soil temperature and thaw depth, water table depth, and CH4 emissions over a 2-year period suggest that intersite differences in soil physical conditions and methane fluxes could be reproduced accurately for selected periods. Day-to-day comparison of predicted emissions to measured CH4 flux rates reveals good agreement during the early part of the thaw season, but the model tends to underestimate production of CH4 during the months of July and August in both test years. Important seasonal effects, including that of falling WTD during

  6. An Ecosystem Simulation Model for Methane Production and Emission from Wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, C. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Previous experimental studies suggest that methane emission from wetland is influenced by multiple interactive pathways of gas production and transport through soil and sediment layers to the atmosphere. The objective of this study is to evaluate a new simulation model of methane production and emission in wetland soils that was developed initially to help identify key processes that regulate methanogenesis and net flux of CH4 to the air, but which is designed ultimately for regional simulation using remotely sensed inputs for land cover characteristics. The foundation for these computer simulations is based on a well-documented model (CASA) of ecosystem production and carbon cycling in the terrestrial blaspheme. Modifications to represent flooded wetland soils and anaerobic decomposition include three new sub-models for: (1) layered soil temperature and water table depth (WTD) as a function of daily climate drivers, (2) CH4 production within the anoxic soil layer as a function of WTD and CO2 production under poorly drained conditions, and (3) CH4 gaseous transport pathways (molecular diffusion, ebullition, and plant vascular transport) as a function of WTD and ecosystem type. The model was applied and tested using climate and ecological data to characterize tundra wetland sites near Fairbanks, Alaska studied previously by Whalen and Reeburgh. Comparison of model predictions to measurements of soil temperature and thaw depth, water-table depth, and CH4 emissions over a two year period suggest that inter-site differences in soil physical conditions and methane fluxes could be reproduced accurately for selected periods. Day-to-day comparison of predicted emissions to measured CH4 flux rates reveals good agreement during the early part of the thaw season, but the model tends to underestimate production of CH4 during the months of July and August in both test years. Important seasonal effects, including that of falling WTD during these periods, are apparently

  7. On the relationship between methane production and oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic communities from cold seeps of the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Beth; Samarkin, Vladimir; Boetius, Antje; Joye, Samantha

    2008-05-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in the marine subsurface is a significant sink for methane in the environment, yet our understanding of its regulation and dynamics is still incomplete. Relatively few groups of microorganisms consume methane in subsurface environments--namely the anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME clades 1, 2 and 3), which are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. Anaerobic oxidation of methane presumably proceeds via a 'reversed' methanogenic pathway. The ANME are generally associated with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate is the only documented final electron acceptor for AOM in marine sediments. Our comparative study explored the coupling of AOM with sulfate reduction (SR) and methane generation (MOG) in microbial communities from Gulf of Mexico cold seep sediments that were naturally enriched with methane and other hydrocarbons. These sediments harbour a variety of ANME clades and SRB. Following enrichment under an atmosphere of methane, AOM fuelled 50-100% of SR, even in sediment slurries containing petroleum-associated hydrocarbons and organic matter. In the presence of methane and sulfate, the investigated microbial communities produce methane at a small fraction ( approximately 10%) of the AOM rate. Anaerobic oxidation of methane, MOG and SR rates decreased significantly with decreasing concentration of methane, and in the presence of the SR inhibitor molybdate, but reacted differently to the MOG inhibitor 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES). The addition of acetate, a possible breakdown product of petroleum in situ and a potential intermediate in AOM/SR syntrophy, did not suppress AOM activity; rather acetate stimulated microbial activity in oily sediment slurries.

  8. Monitoring Production of Methane from Spills of Gasoline at UST Release Sites (Boston, MA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biodegradation of the BTEX compounds can produce substantial concentrations of methane in ground water at gasoline spill sites. This methane can escape the ground water, move through the unsaturated zone and potentially produce explosive concentrations of methane in c...

  9. Contribution of oil and natural gas production to renewed increase of atmospheric methane (2007-2014): top-down estimate from ethane and methane column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, P.; Sussmann, R.; Smale, D.

    2015-12-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio of 10-21 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated ranges of methane-to-ethane ratios (MER). Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with MER = 3.3-7.6, which results in a

  10. Use of 13C-Labeled Substrates to Determine Relative Methane Production Rates in Hypersaline Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, C. A.; Bebout, B.; Chanton, J.

    2015-12-01

    Rates and pathways of methane production were determined from photosynthetic soft microbial mats and gypsum-encrusted endoevaporites collected in hypersaline environments from California, Mexico and Chile, as well as an organic-rich mud from a pond in the El Tatio volcanic fields, Chile. Samples (mud, homogenized soft mats and endoevaporites) were incubated anaerobically with deoxygenated site water, and the increase in methane concentration through time in the headspaces of the incubation vials was used to determine methane production rates. To ascertain the substrates used by the methanogens, 13C-labeled methylamines, methanol, dimethylsulfide, acetate or bicarbonate were added to the incubations (one substrate per vial) and the stable isotopic composition of the resulting methane was measured. The vials amended with 13C-labeled methylamines produced the most 13C-enriched methane, generally followed by the 13C-labeled methanol-amended vials. The stable isotope data and the methane production rates were used to determine first order rate constants for each of the substrates at each of the sites. Estimates of individual substrate use revealed that the methylamines produced 55 to 92% of the methane generated, while methanol was responsible for another 8 to 40%.

  11. Diamond dissolution and the production of methane and other carbon-bearing species in hydrothermal diamond-anvil cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Anderson, Alan J.

    2009-01-01

    Raman analysis of the vapor phase formed after heating pure water to near critical (355-374 ??C) temperatures in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell (HDAC) reveals the synthesis of abiogenic methane. This unexpected result demonstrates the chemical reactivity of diamond at relatively low temperatures. The rate of methane production from the reaction between water and diamond increases with increasing temperature and is enhanced by the presence of a metal gasket (Re, Ir, or Inconel) which is compressed between the diamond anvils to seal the aqueous sample. The minimum detection limit for methane using Raman spectroscopy was determined to be ca. 0.047 MPa, indicating that more than 1.4 nanograms (or 8.6 ?? 10-11 mol) of methane were produced in the HDAC at 355 ??C and 30 MPa over a period of ten minutes. At temperatures of 650 ??C and greater, hydrogen and carbon dioxide were detected in addition to methane. The production of abiogenic methane, observed in all HDAC experiments where a gasket was used, necessitates a reexamination of the assumed chemical systems and intensive parameters reported in previous hydrothermal investigations employing diamonds. The results also demonstrate the need to minimize or eliminate the production of methane and other carbonic species in experiments by containing the sample within a HDAC without using a metal gasket.

  12. How liability law affects medical productivity.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Daniel P; McClellan, Mark B

    2002-11-01

    Previous research suggests that "direct" reforms to the liability system-reforms designed to reduce the level of compensation to potential claimants-reduce medical expenditures without important consequences for patient health outcomes. We extend this research by identifying the mechanisms through which reforms affect the behavior of health care providers. Although we find that direct reforms improve medical productivity primarily by reducing malpractice claims rates and compensation conditional on a claim, our results suggest that other policies that reduce the time spent and the amount of conflict involved in defending against a claim can also reduce defensive practices substantially. In addition, we find that "malpractice pressure" has a more significant impact on diagnostic rather than therapeutic treatment decisions. Our results provide an empirical foundation for simulating the effects of untried malpractice reforms on health care expenditures and outcomes, based on their predicted effects on the malpractice pressure facing medical providers.

  13. Methane as a product of chloroethene biodegradation under methanogenic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1999-01-01

    Radiometric detection headspace analyses of microcosms containing bed sediments from two geographically distinct sites indicated that 10-39% of the radiolabeled carbon transformed during anaerobic biodegradation of [1,2- 14C]trichloroethene (TCE) or [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) under methanogenic conditions was ultimately incorporated into 14CH4. The results demonstrate that, in addition to ethene, ethane, and CO2, CH4 can be a significant product of chloroethene biodegradation in some methanogenic sediments.Radiometric detection headspace analyses of microcosms containing bed sediments from two geographically distinct sites indicated that 10-39% of the radiolabeled carbon transformed during anaerobic biodegradation of [1,2-14C]trichloroethene (TCE) or [1,2-14C]vinyl chloride (VC) under methanogenic conditions was ultimately incorporated into 14CH4. The results demonstrate that, in addition to ethene, ethane, and CO2, CH4 can be a significant product of chloroethene biodegradation in some methanogenic sediments.

  14. Simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge and perennial ryegrass anaerobic co-digestion: The effects of pH and C/N ratio.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaohu; Li, Xiaoshuai; Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Dai, Lingling

    2016-09-01

    It is necessary to find an appropriate strategy to simultaneously enhance the methane production and methane content in biogas from waste activated sludge (WAS) and grass co-digestion. In this study an efficient strategy, i.e., adjusting the initial pH 12 and C/N ratio 17/1, for simultaneous enhancement of methane production and methane content in biogas from WAS and perennial ryegrass co-digestion was reported. Experimental results indicated that the maximal methane production was 310mL/gVSadd at the optimum conditions after 30-d anaerobic digestion, which was, respectively, about 1.5- and 3.8-fold of the sole WAS and sole perennial ryegrass anaerobic digestion. Meanwhile, the methane content in biogas was about 74%, which was much higher than that of sole WAS (64%) or sole perennial ryegrass (54%) anaerobic digestion.

  15. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps

    PubMed Central

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-01-01

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (≥0.5–1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ∼40 km depth to ∼15–20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs. PMID:28223715

  16. Biological hydrogen and methane production from bagasse bioethanol fermentation residues using a two-stage bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Hsuan; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chung, Man-Chien; Chan, Kun-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the recovery of H2 and CH4 from bagasse bioethanol fermentation residues (bagasse BEFR) using a two-stage bioprocess. In the hydrogen fermentation bioreactor (HFB), carbohydrate removal efficiency was maintained at 82-93% and the highest hydrogen yield was 8.24mL/gCOD at volumetric loading rate (VLR) of 80kgCOD/m(3)/day. The results indicated a positive correlation between hydrogen yield and butyrate-to-acetate ratio, which might be due to the mechanisms of lactate/acetate utilization for hydrogen production and acetogenesis occurring in the HFB. Remaining volatile fatty acids and alcohols in the HFB effluent were further utilized for methane production in methane fermentation bioreactor (MFB), in which the highest methane yield of 345.2mL/gCOD was attained at VLR of 2.5kgCOD/m(3)/day. Overall, the two-stage bioprocess achieved a maximum COD removal of 81% from bagasse BEFR, and converted 0.3% and 72.8% of COD in the forms of H2 and CH4, respectively.

  17. Estimating methane production rates in bogs and landfills by deuterium enrichment of pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.I.; Chanton, J.P.; Glaser, P.H.; Chasar, L.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Raised bogs and municipal waste landfills harbor large populations of methanogens within their domed deposits of anoxic organic matter. Although the methane emissions from these sites have been estimated by various methods, limited data exist on the activity of the methanogens at depth. We therefore analyzed the stable isotopic signature of the pore waters in two raised bogs from northern Minnesota to identify depth intervals in the peat profile where methanogenic metabolism occurs. Methanogenesis enriched the deuterium (2H) content of the deep peat pore waters by as much as +11% (Vienna Standard Mean Sea Water), which compares to a much greater enrichment factor of +70% in leachate from New York City's Fresh Kills landfill. The bog pore waters were isotopically dated by tritium (3H) to be about 35 years old at 1.5 m depth, whereas the landfill leachate was estimated as ~ 17 years old from Darcy flow calculations. According to an isotopic mass balance the observed deuterium enrichment indicates that about 1.2 g of CH4m-3 d-1 were produced within the deeper peat, compared to about 2.8 g CH4 m-3 d-1 in the landfill. The values for methane production in the bog peat are substantially higher than the flux rates measured at the surface of the bogs or at the landfill, indicating that deeper methane production may be much higher than was previously assumed.

  18. Hydrogen production by coupled catalytic partial oxidation and steam methane reforming at elevated pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luwei; Hong, Qi; Lin, Jianyi; Dautzenberg, F. M.

    Hydrogen production by coupled catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) and steam methane reforming of methane (OSMR) at industrial conditions (high temperatures and pressures) have been studied over supported 1 wt.% NiB catalysts. Mixture of air/CH 4/H 2O was applied as the feed. The effects of O 2:CH 4 ratio, H 2O:CH 4 ratio and the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) on oxy-steam reforming (OSRM) were also studied. Results indicate that CH 4 conversion increases significantly with increasing O 2:CH 4 or H 2O:CH 4 ratio. However, the hydrogen mole fraction goes through a maximum, depending on reaction conditions, e.g., pressure, temperature and the feed gases ratios. Carbon deposition on the catalysts has been greatly decreased after steam addition. The supported 1 wt.% NiB catalysts exhibit high stability with 85% methane conversion at 15 bar and 800 °C during 70 h time-on-stream reaction (CH 4:O 2:H 2O:N 2 = 1:0.5:1:1.887). The thermal efficiency was increased from 35.8% by CPO (without steam) to 55.6%. The presented data would be useful references for further design of enlarged scale hydrogen production system.

  19. Methane emissions from process equipment at natural gas production sites in the United States: liquid unloadings.

    PubMed

    Allen, David T; Sullivan, David W; Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Pacsi, Adam P; Harrison, Matthew; Keen, Kindal; Fraser, Matthew P; Daniel Hill, A; Lamb, Brian K; Sawyer, Robert F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-01-06

    Methane emissions from liquid unloadings were measured at 107 wells in natural gas production regions throughout the United States. Liquid unloadings clear wells of accumulated liquids to increase production, employing a variety of liquid lifting mechanisms. In this work, wells with and without plunger lifts were sampled. Most wells without plunger lifts unload less than 10 times per year with emissions averaging 21,000-35,000 scf methane (0.4-0.7 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 10,000-50,000 scf/event). For wells with plunger lifts, emissions averaged 1000-10,000 scf methane (0.02-0.2 Mg) per event (95% confidence limits of 500-12,000 scf/event). Some wells with plunger lifts are automatically triggered and unload thousands of times per year and these wells account for the majority of the emissions from all wells with liquid unloadings. If the data collected in this work are assumed to be representative of national populations, the data suggest that the central estimate of emissions from unloadings (270 Gg/yr, 95% confidence range of 190-400 Gg) are within a few percent of the emissions estimated in the EPA 2012 Greenhouse Gas National Emission Inventory (released in 2014), with emissions dominated by wells with high frequencies of unloadings.

  20. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-02-01

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (>=0.5-1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ~40 km depth to ~15-20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs.

  1. Massive production of abiotic methane during subduction evidenced in metamorphosed ophicarbonates from the Italian Alps.

    PubMed

    Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Martinez, Isabelle; Elmaleh, Agnès; Compagnoni, Roberto; Chaduteau, Carine; Ferraris, Cristiano; Esteve, Imène

    2017-02-22

    Alteration of ultramafic rocks plays a major role in the production of hydrocarbons and organic compounds via abiotic processes on Earth and beyond and contributes to the redistribution of C between solid and fluid reservoirs over geological cycles. Abiotic methanogenesis in ultramafic rocks is well documented at shallow conditions, whereas natural evidence at greater depths is scarce. Here we provide evidence for intense high-pressure abiotic methanogenesis by reduction of subducted ophicarbonates. Protracted (≥0.5-1 Ma), probably episodic infiltration of reduced fluids in the ophicarbonates and methanogenesis occurred from at least ∼40 km depth to ∼15-20 km depth. Textural, petrological and isotopic data indicate that methane reached saturation triggering the precipitation of graphitic C accompanied by dissolution of the precursor antigorite. Continuous infiltration of external reducing fluids caused additional methane production by interaction with the newly formed graphite. Alteration of high-pressure carbonate-bearing ultramafic rocks may represent an important source of abiotic methane, with strong implications for the mobility of deep C reservoirs.

  2. Variation in methane production pathways associated with permafrost decomposition in collapse scar bogs of Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, James L.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.; Whiting, Gary J.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis was used to determine the distribution of methanogenic pathways at permafrost collapse scar bogs to test the hypothesis that microbial respiration and methane production are stimulated by the input of organic matter associated with permafrost degradation and collapse. An alternative hypothesis is that recently assimilated carbon produced by the fen-like vegetation (Carex, Eriophorum) growing in open water moats formed by the collapsing edge of these features stimulates microbial respiration. We found that CO2 reduction was the dominant pathway for methanogenesis within the Sphagnum areas that dominate the surface cover of these features, but relatively more acetate fermentation occurred near collapse scar moats. Methane emission and net CO2 uptake were correlated. Both were elevated in collapse scar moats and then decreased along a transect from the moats toward the center Sphagnum-dominated areas. There also appeared to be a shift toward relatively more acetate fermentation in deeper samples associated with increasing cation (calcium and magnesium) concentrations. Our results indicate that organic inputs from permafrost degradation alone do not appear to stimulate acetate fermentation. Permafrost decomposition provides conditions along the collapsing edge that are conducive to colonization by fen-like vegetation that stimulates acetate fermentation and increases methane production and emission rates.

  3. Long-term effects of feeding monensin on methane production in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Odongo, N E; Bagg, R; Vessie, G; Dick, P; Or-Rashid, M M; Hook, S E; Gray, J T; Kebreab, E; France, J; McBride, B W

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the long-term effects of feeding monensin on methane (CH4) production in lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four lactating Holstein dairy cows (1.46 +/- 0.17 parity; 620 +/- 5.9 kg of live weight; 92.5 +/- 2.62 d in milk) housed in a tie-stall facility were used in the study. The study was conducted as paired comparisons in a completely randomized design with repeated measurements in a color-coded, double-blind experiment. The cows were paired by parity and days in milk and allocated to 1 of 2 treatments: 1) the regular milking cow total mixed ration (TMR) with a forage-to-concentrate ratio of 60:40 (control TMR; placebo premix) vs. a medicated TMR (monensin TMR; regular TMR + 24 mg of Rumensin Premix/kg of dry matter) fed ad libitum. The animals were fed and milked twice daily (feeding at 0830 and 1300 h; milking at 0500 and 1500 h) and CH4 production was measured prior to introducing the treatments and monthly thereafter for 6 mo using an open-circuit indirect calorimetry system. Monensin reduced CH4 production by 7% (expressed as grams per day) and by 9% (expressed as grams per kilogram of body weight), which were sustained for 6 mo (mean, 458.7 vs. 428.7 +/- 7.75 g/d and 0.738 vs. 0.675 +/- 0.0141, control vs. monensin, respectively). Monensin reduced milk fat percentage by 9% (3.90 vs. 3.53 +/- 0.098%, control vs. monensin, respectively) and reduced milk protein by 4% (3.37 vs. 3.23 +/- 0.031%, control vs. monensin, respectively). Monensin did not affect the dry matter intake or milk yield of the cows. These results suggest that medicating a 60:40 forage-to-concentrate TMR with 24 mg of Rumensin Premix/kg of dry matter is a viable strategy for reducing CH4 production in lactating Holstein dairy cows.

  4. Effect of catalytic cylinders on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production in a microchamber reactor.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  5. Production of the hydrogen by methane steam reforming over nickel catalysts prepared from hydrotalcite precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, Alessandra; Assaf, Elisabete M.

    Catalysts were prepared from hydrotalcite precursors, characterized and tested in the reaction of methane steam reforming to produce hydrogen. The precursors were synthesized by: the traditional technique, with co-precipitation of Ni, Mg and Al nitrates with carbonate; co-precipitation of Mg and Al nitrates with pre-synthesized nickel chelate and anion-exchange of NO 3- of hydrotalcite with nickel chelate. The oxides were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, specific surface area, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature programmed reduction (TPR) with H 2, catalytic tests and elemental analysis. The catalytic tests demonstrated high methane conversion, high activity for hydrogen production and high stability during the time of reaction for a molar ratio in the feed H 2O:CH 4 = 2:1.

  6. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors. PMID:25097877

  7. Prototype demonstration studies of production of methane from municipal solid waste at Pompano Beach, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Faroog, S.; Daly, E.; Dasgupta, A.; Gerrish, M.P.; Sengupta, S.; Wong, K.F.

    1980-12-01

    A prototype demonstration plant for the production of methane from anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in amounts up to 100 tons per day is built at Pompano Beach, Florida. The plant is capable of producing 6000 ft/sup 3/ of gas per ton of municipal waste. Approximately half of the gas is methane, the other half CO/sub 2/ along with some trace gases. In this plant the raw municipal solid waste is shredded, ferrous metals removed magnetically and air classified to obtain an organic-rich light weight fraction, which is periodically mixed with sewage sludge and fed into the anaerobic digester. The processed effluent is filtered in a vacuum filter and the emerging filter cake is disposed on the nearby existing sanitary landfill. The filtrate is recirculated into the digester. Various gas, solid and liquid streams coming out of the digester are analyzed for physical, chemical and biological pollution parameters.

  8. Carbon and nitrogen removal and enhanced methane production in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Scardala, Stefano; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2013-02-01

    The anode of a two-chamber methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was poised at +0.200V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) and continuously fed (1.08gCOD/Ld) with acetate in anaerobic mineral medium. A gas mixture (carbon dioxide 30vol.% in N(2)) was continuously added to the cathode for both pH control and carbonate supply. At the anode, 94% of the influent acetate was removed, mostly through anaerobic oxidation (91% coulombic efficiency); the resulting electric current was mainly recovered as methane (79% cathode capture efficiency). Low biomass growth was observed at the anode and ammonium was transferred through the cationic membrane and concentrated at the cathode. These findings suggest that the MEC can be used for the treatment of low-strength wastewater, with good energy efficiency and low sludge production.

  9. Microbially-Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Strategies for Increased Biogenic Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, K.; Barhart, E. P.; Schweitzer, H. D.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.; Hiebert, R.; Fields, M. W.

    2014-12-01

    Coal is the largest fossil fuel resource in the United States. Most of this coal is deep in the subsurface making it costly and potentially dangerous to extract. However, in many of these deep coal seams, methane, the main component of natural gas, has been discovered and successfully harvested. Coal bed methane (CBM) currently accounts for approximately 7.5% of the natural gas produced in the U.S. Combustion of natural gas produces substantially less CO2 and toxic emissions (e.g. heavy metals) than combustion of coal or oil thereby making it a cleaner energy source. In the large coal seams of the Powder River Basin (PRB) in southeast Montana and northeast Wyoming, CBM is produced almost entirely by biogenic processes. The in situ conversion of coal to CBM by the native microbial community is of particular interest for present and future natural gas sources as it provides the potential to harvest energy from coal seams with lesser environmental impacts than mining and burning coal. Research at Montana State University has shown the potential for enhancing the subsurface microbial processes that produce CBM. Long-term batch enrichments have investigated the methane enhancement potential of yeast extract as well as algal and cyanobacterial biomass additions with increased methane production observed with all three additions when compared to no addition. Future work includes quantification of CBM enhancement and normalization of additions. This presentation addresses the options thus far investigated for increasing CBM production and the next steps for developing the enhanced in situ conversion of coal to CBM.

  10. Straw application in paddy soil enhances methane production also from other carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Q.; Pump, J.; Conrad, R.

    2013-08-01

    Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is produced from rice straw (RS), soil organic matter (SOM), and rice root organic carbon (ROC). Addition of RS is widely used for ameliorating soil fertility. However, this practice provides additional substrate for CH4 production and results in increased CH4 emission. Here, we found that decomposing RS is not only a substrate of CH4 production, but in addition stimulates CH4 production from SOM and ROC. Apart from accelerating the creation of reduced conditions in the soil environment, RS decomposition exerted a positive priming effect on SOM-derived CH4 production. In particular, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from SOM-derived CO2 was stimulated, presumably by H2 released from RS decomposition. On the other hand, the positive priming effect of RS on ROC-derived CH4 production was probably caused by the significant increase of the abundance of methanogenic archaea in the RS treatment compared with the untreated control. Our results show that traditional management of rice residues exerts a positive feedback on CH4 production from rice fields, thus exacerbating its effect on the global CH4 budget.

  11. Straw application in paddy soil enhances methane production also from other carbon sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Q.; Pump, J.; Conrad, R.

    2014-01-01

    Flooded rice fields are an important source of the greenhouse gas methane. Methane is produced from rice straw (RS), soil organic matter (SOM), and rice root organic carbon (ROC). Addition of RS is widely used for ameliorating soil fertility. However, this practice provides additional substrate for CH4 production and results in increased CH4 emission. Here, we found that decomposing RS is not only a substrate of CH4 production, but in addition stimulates CH4 production from SOM and ROC. Apart from accelerating the creation of reduced conditions in the soil environment, RS decomposition resulted in enhancement of SOM-derived CH4 production. In particular, hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from SOM-derived CO2 was stimulated, presumably by H2 released from RS decomposition. On the other hand, the enhancement of ROC-derived CH4 production after RS application was probably caused by the significant increase of the abundance of methanogenic Archaea in the RS treatment compared with the untreated control. Our results show that traditional management of rice residues exerts a positive feedback on CH4 production from rice fields, thus exacerbating its effect on the global CH4 budget.

  12. Utilization of coal mine methane for methanol and SCP production. Topical report, May 5, 1995--March 4, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility of utilizing a biological process to reduce methane emissions from coal mines and to produce valuable single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol as a product has been demonstrated. The quantities of coal mine methane from vent gas, gob wells, premining wells and abandoned mines have been determined in order to define the potential for utilizing mine gases as a resource. It is estimated that 300 MMCFD of methane is produced in the United States at a typical concentration of 0.2-0.6 percent in ventilation air. Of this total, almost 20 percent is produced from the four Jim Walter Resources (JWR) mines, which are located in very gassy coal seams. Worldwide vent gas production is estimated at 1 BCFD. Gob gas methane production in the U.S. is estimated to be 38 MMCFD. Very little gob gas is produced outside the U.S. In addition, it is estimated that abandoned mines may generate as much as 90 MMCFD of methane. In order to make a significant impact on coal mine methane emissions, technology which is able to utilize dilute vent gases as a resource must be developed. Purification of the methane from the vent gases would be very expensive and impractical. Therefore, the process application must be able to use a dilute methane stream. Biological conversion of this dilute methane (as well as the more concentrated gob gases) to produce single cell protein (SCP) and/or methanol has been demonstrated in the Bioengineering Resources, Inc. (BRI) laboratories. SCP is used as an animal feed supplement, which commands a high price, about $0.11 per pound.

  13. Contribution of oil and natural gas production to renewed increase in atmospheric methane (2007-2014): top-down estimate from ethane and methane column observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Petra; Sussmann, Ralf; Smale, Dan

    2016-03-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 11° E; 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 170° E; 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 (parts-per-billion per year) at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as a tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio (EMR) of 12-19 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution (C) to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated EMR ranges. Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with EMR = 7

  14. Methane excess production in oxygen-rich polar water and a model of cellular conditions for this paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damm, E.; Thoms, S.; Beszczynska-Möller, A.; Nöthig, E. M.; Kattner, G.

    2015-09-01

    Summer sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has undergone a reduction in the last decade exposing the sea surface to unforeseen environmental changes. Melting sea ice increases water stratification and induces nutrient limitation, which is also known to play a crucial role in methane formation in oxygenated surface water. We report on an excess of methane in the marginal ice zone in the western Fram Strait. Our study is based on measurements of oxygen, methane, DMSP, nitrate and phosphate concentrations as well as on phytoplankton composition and light transmission, conducted along the 79°N oceanographic transect, in the western part of the Fram Strait and in Northeast Water Polynya region off Greenland. Between the eastern Fram Strait, where Atlantic water enters from the south and the western Fram Strait, where Polar water enters from the north, different nutrient limitations occurred and consequently different bloom conditions were established. Ongoing sea ice melting enhances the environmental differences between both water masses and initiates regenerated production in the western Fram Strait. We show that in this region methane is in situ produced while DMSP (dimethylsulfoniopropionate) released from sea ice may serve as a precursor for the methane formation. The methane production occured despite high oxygen concentrations in this water masses. As the metabolic activity (respiration) of unicellular organisms explains the presence of anaerobic conditions in the cellular environment we present a theoretical model which explains the maintenance of anaerobic conditions for methane formation inside bacterial cells, despite enhanced oxygen concentrations in the environment.

  15. Effects of lactic acid bacteria silage inoculation on methane emission and productivity of Holstein Friesian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J L; Hindrichsen, I K; Klop, G; Kinley, R D; Milora, N; Bannink, A; Dijkstra, J

    2016-09-01

    Inoculants of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used to improve silage quality and prevent spoilage via increased production of lactic acid and other organic acids and a rapid decline in silage pH. The addition of LAB inoculants to silage has been associated with increases in silage digestibility, dry matter intake (DMI), and milk yield. Given the potential change in silage and rumen fermentation conditions accompanying these silage additives, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of LAB silage inoculants on DMI, digestibility, milk yield, milk composition, and methane (CH4) production from dairy cows in vivo. Eight mid-lactation Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were grouped into 2 blocks of 4 cows (multiparous and primiparous) and used in a 4×4 double Latin square design with 21-d periods. Methane emissions were measured by indirect calorimetry. Treatments were grass silage (mainly ryegrass) with no inoculant (GS), with a long-term inoculant (applied at harvest; GS+L), with a short-term inoculant (applied 16h before feeding; GS+S), or with both long and short-term inoculants (GS+L+S). All diets consisted of grass silage and concentrate (75:25 on a dry matter basis). The long-term inoculant consisted of a 10:20:70 mixture of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactococcus lactis, and Lactobacillus buchneri, and the short-term inoculant was a preparation of Lc. lactis. Dry matter intake was not affected by long-term or short-term silage inoculation, nor was dietary neutral detergent fiber or fat digestibility, or N or energy balance. Milk composition (except milk urea) and fat and protein-corrected milk yield were not affected by long- or short-term silage inoculation, nor was milk microbial count. However, milk yield tended to be greater with long-term silage inoculation. Methane expressed in units of grams per day, grams per kilogram of DMI, grams per kilogram of milk, or grams per kilogram of fat and protein-corrected milk yield was not affected by long- or short

  16. Improving methane production and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of particulate saline sludge from a brackish aquaculture recirculation system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuedong; Ferreira, Rui B; Hu, Jianmei; Spanjers, Henri; van Lier, Jules B

    2014-06-01

    In this study, batch tests were conducted to examine the effects of trehalose and glycine betaine as well as potassium on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA), acid and alkaline phosphatase activity of anaerobic biomass and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion of saline sludge from a brackish recirculation aquaculture system. The results of ANOVA and Tukey's HSD (honestly significant difference) tests showed that glycine betaine and trehalose enhanced SMA of anaerobic biomass and reactive phosphorus release from the particulate waste. Moreover, SMA tests revealed that methanogenic sludge, which was long-term acclimatized to a salinity level of 17 g/L was severely affected by the increase in salinity to values exceeding 35 g/L. Addition of compatible solutes, such as glycine betaine and trehalose, could be used to enhance the specific methane production rate and phosphorus release in anaerobic digestion from particulate organic waste produced in marine or brackish aquaculture recirculation systems.

  17. The benefits of supplementary fat in feed rations for ruminants with particular focus on reducing levels of methane production.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, J; Harrison, A

    2011-01-01

    Methane (CH4), a highly potent greenhouse gas, has repeatedly been identified as a significant contributor to global warming. In this connection, ruminants, animals that produce large quantities of methane, have been singled out as an area for reduction with regard to their emissions to the atmosphere. In an analysis of recently published data, we identify the underlying mechanisms of methane production in ruminants and focus on the efficacy of different fat sources in terms of their ability to reduce methane production. Specific attention has been placed on in vivo studies involving cattle and sheep, as well as studies based on a large number of animals (>10), recorded over a longer period (>21 days), and employing reliable techniques for the quantification of methane production. Data clearly indicate that supplementary fat, given to ruminants inhibits methane production, with medium-chain fatty acids (laurin, myristic acid) as well as poly-unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic and especially linolenic acid) having a significant effect. It is also apparent that conflicting findings between individual published trials can largely be resolved when one takes into consideration differences in experimental design, the composition of the basic feeds, the fat sources used, and the number of animals involved.

  18. Biohydrogen and methane production via a two-step process using an acid pretreated native microalgae consortium.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Reyes, Julian; Buitrón, Germán

    2016-12-01

    A native microalgae consortium treated under thermal-acidic hydrolysis was used to produce hydrogen and methane in a two-step sequential process. Different acid concentrations were tested, generating hydrogen and methane yields of up to 45mLH2gVS(-1) and 432mLCH4gVS(-1), respectively. The hydrogen production step solubilized the particulate COD (chemical oxygen demand) up to 30%, creating considerable amounts of volatile fatty acids (up to 10gCODL(-1)). It was observed that lower acid concentration presented higher hydrogen and methane production potential. The results revealed that thermal acid hydrolysis of a native microalgae consortium is a simple but effective strategy for producing hydrogen and methane in the sequential process. In addition to COD removal (50-70%), this method resulted in an energy recovery of up to 15.9kJ per g of volatile solids of microalgae biomass, one of the highest reported.

  19. Enzymatic and metabolic activities of four anaerobic sludges and their impact on methane production from ensiled sorghum forage.

    PubMed

    Sambusiti, C; Rollini, M; Ficara, E; Musatti, A; Manzoni, M; Malpei, F

    2014-03-01

    Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were run on ensiled sorghum forage using four inocula (urban, agricultural, mixture of agricultural and urban, granular) and differences on their metabolic and enzymatic activities were also discussed. Results indicate that no significant differences were observed in terms of BMP values (258±14NmLCH4g(-1)VS) with a slightly higher value when agricultural sludge was used as inoculum. Significant differences can be observed among different inocula, in terms of methane production rate. In particular the fastest biomethanization occurred when using the urban sludge (hydrolytic kinetic constant kh=0.146d(-1)) while the slowest one was obtained from the agricultural sludge (kh=0.049d(-1)). Interestingly, positive correlations between the overall enzymatic activities and methane production rates were observed for all sludges, showing that a high enzymatic activity may favour the hydrolysis of complex substrate and accelerate the methanization process of sorghum.

  20. In vitro Fermentation, Digestion Kinetics and Methane Production of Oilseed Press Cakes from Biodiesel Production.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Palma, S M; Meale, S J; Pereira, L G R; Machado, F S; Carneiro, H; Lopes, F C F; Maurício, R M; Chaves, A V

    2013-08-01

    Following the extraction of oil for biodiesel production, oilseed press cakes are high in fat. As the dietary supplementation of fat is currently considered the most promising strategy of consistently depressing methanogenesis, it follows that oilseed press cakes may have a similar potential for CH4 abatement. As such, this study aimed to characterise the nutritive value of several oilseed press cakes, glycerine and soybean meal (SBM) and to examine their effects on in vitro ruminal fermentation, digestion kinetics and CH4 production. Moringa press oil seeds exhibited the greatest in sacco effective degradability (ED) of DM and CP (p<0.05). In vitro gas production (ml/g digested DM) was not affected (p = 0.70) by supplement at 48 h of incubation. In vitro DMD was increased with the supplementation of glycerine and SBM at all levels of inclusion. Moringa oilseed press cakes produced the lowest CH4 (mg/g digested DM) at 6 and 12 h of incubation (p<0.05). The findings suggest that moringa oilseed press cake at 400 g/kg DM has the greatest potential of the oilseed press cakes examined in this study, to reduce CH4 production, without adversely affecting nutrient degradability.

  1. In vitro Fermentation, Digestion Kinetics and Methane Production of Oilseed Press Cakes from Biodiesel Production

    PubMed Central

    Olivares-Palma, S. M.; Meale, S. J.; Pereira, L. G. R.; Machado, F. S.; Carneiro, H.; Lopes, F. C. F.; Maurício, R. M.; Chaves, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Following the extraction of oil for biodiesel production, oilseed press cakes are high in fat. As the dietary supplementation of fat is currently considered the most promising strategy of consistently depressing methanogenesis, it follows that oilseed press cakes may have a similar potential for CH4 abatement. As such, this study aimed to characterise the nutritive value of several oilseed press cakes, glycerine and soybean meal (SBM) and to examine their effects on in vitro ruminal fermentation, digestion kinetics and CH4 production. Moringa press oil seeds exhibited the greatest in sacco effective degradability (ED) of DM and CP (p<0.05). In vitro gas production (ml/g digested DM) was not affected (p = 0.70) by supplement at 48 h of incubation. In vitro DMD was increased with the supplementation of glycerine and SBM at all levels of inclusion. Moringa oilseed press cakes produced the lowest CH4 (mg/g digested DM) at 6 and 12 h of incubation (p<0.05). The findings suggest that moringa oilseed press cake at 400 g/kg DM has the greatest potential of the oilseed press cakes examined in this study, to reduce CH4 production, without adversely affecting nutrient degradability. PMID:25049890

  2. Methane assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis process for syngas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yao; Liu, Tong; Lei, Libin; Chen, Fanglin

    2017-03-01

    In this study, methane assisted high temperature steam/CO2 co-electrolysis process is performed on symmetrical cells with a configuration of SFM-SDC/LSGM/SFM-SDC to produce high-quality synthesis gas (syngas, a mixture of H2 and CO). The Nernst potential has been evaluated for solid oxide cells in the methane assisted mode, which is reduced by nearly one order of magnitude through substituting the anode atmosphere from air to methane. The open circuit voltage (OCV) is -0.06 V at 800 °C, and an electrolysis current density of -242 mAcm-2 has been obtained at 850 °C and 0.3 V. Effects of operating conditions on products composition have been revealed by using the chemical equilibrium co-electrolysis model and HSC software. High-quality syngas with high conversion rate of CO2 to CO as well as ideal H2/CO molar ratio of 2 could be achieved in both electrode sides by adjusting appropriate operating conditions. The short-term cell voltage is slightly fluctuant less than 0.05 V at 850 °C and -120 mAcm-2, in which condition carbon deposition has been observed in the SFM-SDC anode due to the low O2-/CH4 ratio.

  3. Methane production from protozoan endosymbionts following stimulation of microbial metabolism within subsurface sediments.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dawn E; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Orellana, Roberto; Williams, Kenneth H; Robbins, Mark J; Lovley, Derek R

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that protozoa prey on Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria that are enriched when acetate is added to uranium contaminated subsurface sediments to stimulate U(VI) reduction. In order to determine whether protozoa continue to impact subsurface biogeochemistry after these acetate amendments have stopped, 18S rRNA and ß-tubulin sequences from this phase of an in situ uranium bioremediation field experiment were analyzed. Sequences most similar to Metopus species predominated, with the majority of sequences most closely related to M. palaeformis, a cilitated protozoan known to harbor methanogenic symbionts. Quantification of mcrA mRNA transcripts in the groundwater suggested that methanogens closely related to Metopus endosymbionts were metabolically active at this time. There was a strong correlation between the number of mcrA transcripts from the putative endosymbiotic methanogen and Metopus ß-tubulin mRNA transcripts during the course of the field experiment, suggesting that the activity of the methanogens was dependent upon the activity of the Metopus species. Addition of the eukaryotic inhibitors cyclohexamide and colchicine to laboratory incubations of acetate-amended subsurface sediments significantly inhibited methane production and there was a direct correlation between methane concentration and Metopus ß-tubulin and putative symbiont mcrA gene copies. These results suggest that, following the stimulation of subsurface microbial growth with acetate, protozoa harboring methanogenic endosymbionts become important members of the microbial community, feeding on moribund biomass and producing methane.

  4. Pressure and Temperature Effects on Growth and Methane Production of the Extreme Thermophile Methanococcus jannaschii

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jay F.; Shah, Nilesh N.; Nelson, Chad M.; Ludlow, Jan M.; Clark, Douglas S.

    1988-01-01

    The marine archaebacterium Methanococcus jannaschii was studied at high temperatures and hyperbaric pressures of helium to investigate the effect of pressure on the behavior of a deep-sea thermophile. Methanogenesis and growth (as measured by protein production) at both 86 and 90°C were accelerated by pressure up to 750 atm (1 atm = 101.29kPa), but growth was not observed above 90°C at either 7.8 or 250 atm. However, growth and methanogenesis were uncoupled above 90°C, and the high-temperature limit for methanogenesis was increased by pressure. Substantial methane formation was evident at 98°C and 250 atm, whereas no methane formation was observed at 94°C and 7.8 atm. In contrast, when argon was substituted for helium as the pressurizing gas at 250 atm, no methane was produced at 86°C. Methanogenesis was also suppressed at 86°C and 250 atm when the culture was pressurized with a 4:1 mix of H2 and CO2, although limited methanogenesis did occur when the culture was pressurized with H2. PMID:16347794

  5. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these oxygenated compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing.

  6. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.; Miller, Lee A.

    2011-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these "oxygenated" compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing

  7. Effect of pH buffering capacity and sources of dietary sulfur on rumen fermentation, sulfide production, methane production, sulfate reducing bacteria, and total Archaea in in vitro rumen cultures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of three types of dietary sulfur on in vitro fermentation characteristics, sulfide production, methane production, and microbial populations at two different buffer capacities were examined using in vitro rumen cultures. Addition of dry distilled grain with soluble (DDGS) generally decreased total gas production, degradation of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, and concentration of total volatile fatty acids, while increasing ammonia concentration. High buffering capacity alleviated these adverse effects on fermentation. Increased sulfur content resulted in decreased methane emission, but total Archaea population was not changed significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was increased in a sulfur type-dependent manner. These results suggest that types of dietary sulfur and buffering capacity can affect rumen fermentation and sulfide production. Diet buffering capacity, and probably alkalinity, may be increased to alleviate some of the adverse effects associated with feeding DDGS at high levels.

  8. The cumulative methane production from dairy cattle slurry can be explained by its volatile solid, temperature and length of storage.

    PubMed

    Sawamoto, Takuji; Nakamura, Megumi; Nekomoto, Kenji; Hoshiba, Shinji; Minato, Keiko; Nakayama, Motoo; Osada, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    In order to refine the national estimate of methane emission from stored cattle slurry, it is important to comprehend the basic characteristics of methane production. Two dairy cattle slurries were obtained from livestock farms located in Hokkaido (a northern island) and Kyushu (a southern island). The slurries were diluted with water into three levels: undiluted, three times diluted, and 10 times diluted. Three hundred mL of the slurries were put into a bottle with a headspace volume of 2.0 L, which was filled with nitrogen gas and then sealed by butyl rubber. Four levels of temperature were used for incubation: 35, 25, 15 and 5 °C. The time course of the cumulative methane production per volatile solid (VS) was satisfactorily expressed by an asymptotic regression model. The effect of dilution on the methane production per VS was not distinctive, but that of temperature was of primary importance. In particular, higher temperature yields a higher potential production and a shorter time when the cumulative production reaches half of the potential production. The inclusive and simple models obtained in this study indicate that the cumulative methane production from stored cattle slurry can be explained by VS, temperature and length of storage.

  9. River methane hot-spots: Continuous methane ebullition measurements over an annual cycle linked to river sediment production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy; Maeck, Andreas; Ashboul, Zeyad; Lorke, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Hot spot methane ebullition from impounded river reaches matches high rates observed around the globe. Ebullition dominates total methane flux in the Saar River (Germany) and is largely determined by sediment deposition rate. Using automated bubble traps developed in-house, and deployed over a year at four sites, we collected high resolution data showing that hydrodynamic disturbances from shipping, lock operations and hydrograph events trigger ebullition episodes. Reverse smoothing was used to integrate the observed ebullition back in time, and helped in visualizing the data, and provides a time-series closer to methane accumulation in the sediments, whereas ebullition shows the triggering and release of the accumulated gas. One major hydrological disturbance of shallow-water sediment released around 13% of the total annual ebullition at that site, and ebullition generally followed the seasonal sediment temperature variations. The same event damped ebullition from deeper water sites. Total annual ebullition values ranged from 200 to 500 gCH4 m-2 yr-1. Ebullition from shallow water sediments in winter ceased for extended periods, but continued un-broken from deeper sites. With on-going measurements we believe these findings will help to improve estimates and the modelling of methane emissions from impounded river systems.

  10. Wood ant nests as hot spots of carbon dioxide production and cold spots of methane oxidation in temperate forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilkova, Veronika; Picek, Tomas; Cajthaml, Tomas; Frouz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Wood ant nests are known as hot spots of carbon dioxide (CO2) production and are also thought to affect methane (CH4) flux. Stable high temperatures are maintained in ant nests even in cold environments. Here we focused on quantification of CO2 and CH4 flux in wood ant nests, contribution of ants and microbes to CO2 production, properties of nest material that affect CO2 production and the role of ants and microbes in the maintenance of nest temperature. The research was conducted in temperate and boreal forests inhabited by wood ants (Formica s. str.). Gas fluxes were measured either by an infrared gas analyser or a static chamber technique. Ants and nest materials were also incubated in a laboratory. Material properties potentially influencing CO2 flux, such as moisture, nutrient content or temperature were determined. According to the results, CH4 oxidation was lower in wood ant nests than in the surrounding forest soil suggesting that some characteristics of ant nests hinder CH4 oxidation or promote CH4 production. These characteristics were mainly available carbon and nitrogen contents. Wood ant nests clearly are hot spots of CO2 production in temperate forests originating mainly from ant and also from microbial metabolism. Most important properties positively affecting CO2 production were found to be moisture, nutrient content and temperature. Nest temperature is maintained by ant and microbial metabolism; nests from colder environments produce more metabolic heat to maintain similar temperature as nests from warmer environments. In conclusion, as the abundance of wood ant nests in some forests can be very high, ant nests may largely increase heterogeneity in greenhouse gas fluxes in forest ecosystems.

  11. Production of hydrogen bromide by bromine-methane reactions at elevated temperature.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Larson, Richard S.

    2003-05-01

    Hydrogen bromide is a potentially useful intermediate for hydrogen production by electrolysis because it has a low cell potential and is extremely soluble in water. Processes have been proposed to exploit these properties, but among the important issues to be resolved is the efficiency of HBr production from hydrocarbon precursors. This investigation evaluated a fundamental facet of such a technology by studying the reaction of methane and bromine at elevated temperature to determine the yield and kinetics of HBr formation. Laboratory experimentation and computational chemistry were combined to provide a description of this reaction for possible application to reactor design at a larger scale. Experimental studies with a tubular flow reactor were used to survey a range of reactant ratios and reactor residence times at temperatures between 500 C and 800 C. At temperatures near 800 C with excess methane, conversions of bromine to HBr exceeded 90% and reaction products included solid carbon (soot) in stoichiometric amounts. At lower temperatures, HBr conversion was significantly reduced, the products included much less soot, and the formation of bromocarbon compounds was indicated qualitatively. Calculations of chemical equilibrium behavior and reaction kinetics for the experimental conditions were performed using the Sandia CHEMKIN package. An elementary multistep mechanism for the gas-phase chemistry was used together with a surface mechanism that assumed facile deposition of radical species at the reactor walls. Simulations with the laminar-flow boundary-layer code of the CHEMKIN package gave reasonable agreement with experimental data.

  12. Effects of Flavonoids on Rumen Fermentation Activity, Methane Production, and Microbial Population

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Norhani; Oskoueian, Armin

    2013-01-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the effects of flavone, myricetin, naringin, catechin, rutin, quercetin, and kaempferol at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis) on the rumen microbial activity in vitro. Mixture of guinea grass and concentrate (60 : 40) was used as the substrate. The results showed that all the flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the dry matter degradability. The gas production significantly (P < 0.05) decreased by flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol, whereas naringin, rutin, and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) increased the gas production. The flavonoids suppressed methane production significantly (P < 0.05). The total VFA concentration significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the presence of flavone, myricetin, and kaempferol. All flavonoids except naringin and quercetin significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the carboxymethyl cellulase, filter paperase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase activities, purine content, and the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis. Flavone, myricetin, catechin, rutin, and kaempferol significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the population of rumen microbes. Total populations of protozoa and methanogens were significantly (P < 0.05) suppressed by naringin and quercetin. The results of this research demonstrated that naringin and quercetin at the concentration of 4.5% of the substrate (dry matter basis) were potential metabolites to suppress methane production without any negative effects on rumen microbial fermentation. PMID:24175289

  13. Effects of rare earth element lanthanum on rumen methane and volatile fatty acid production and microbial flora in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T T; Zhao, G Y; Zheng, W S; Niu, W J; Wei, C; Lin, S X

    2015-06-01

    The objectives of the trial were to study the effects of rare earth element (REE) lanthanum (La) on the in vitro rumen methane (CH4 ) and volatile fatty acid (VFA) production and the microbial flora of feeds. Four feed mixtures with different levels of neutral detergent fibre (NDF), that is 20.0% (I), 31.0% (II), 41.9% (III) and 52.7% (IV), were formulated as substrates. Five levels of LaCl3 , that is 0, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 mmol/kg dry matter (DM), were added to the feed mixtures, respectively, as experimental treatments in a two-factor 5 × 4 randomized design. The in vitro incubation lasted for 24 h. The results showed that supplementing LaCl3 increased the total gas (p < 0.001) production and tended to increase the total VFA production (p = 0.072) and decreased the CH4 production (p = 0.001) and the ratios of acetate/propionate (p = 0.019) and CH4 /total VFA (p < 0.001). Interactions between LaCl3 and NDF were significant in total gas production (p = 0.030) and tended to be significant in CH4 production (p = 0.071). Supplementing LaCl3 at the level of 0.8 mmol/g DM decreased the relative abundance of methanogens and protozoa in the total bacterial 16S rDNA analysed using the real-time PCR (p < 0.0001), increased F. succinogenes (p = 0.0003) and decreased R. flavefaciens (p < 0.0001) whereas did not affect R. albus and anaerobic fungi (p > 0.05). It was concluded that LaCl3 decreased the CH4 production without negatively affecting feed digestion through manipulating rumen microbial flora when feed mixtures with different levels of NDF were used as substrates.

  14. Methane production potential of leachate generated from Korean food waste recycling facilities: a lab-scale study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Hee; Behera, Shishir Kumar; Kim, Ji Won; Park, Hung-Suck

    2009-02-01

    This paper examines the applicability of food waste leachate (FWL) in bioreactor landfills or anaerobic digesters to produce methane as a sustainable solution to the persisting leachate management problem in Korea. Taking into account the climatic conditions in Korea and FWL characteristics, the effect of key parameters, viz., temperature, alkalinity and salinity on methane yield was investigated. The monthly average moisture content and the ratio of volatile solids to total solids of the FWL were found to be 84% and 91%, respectively. The biochemical methane potential experiment under standard digestion conditions showed the methane yield of FWL to be 358 and 478 ml/g VS after 10 and 28 days of digestion, respectively, with an average methane content of 70%. Elemental analysis showed the chemical composition of FWL to be C(13.02)H(23.01)O(5.93)N(1). The highest methane yield of 403 ml/g VS was obtained at 35 degrees C due to the adaptation of seed microorganisms to mesophilic atmosphere, while methane yields at 25, 45 and 55 degrees C were 370, 351 and 275 ml/g VS, respectively, at the end of 20 days. Addition of alkalinity had a favorable effect on the methane yield. Dilution of FWL with salinity of 2g/l NaCl resulted in 561 ml CH(4)/g VS at the end of 30 days. Considering its high biodegradability (82.6%) and methane production potential, anaerobic digestion of FWL in bioreactor landfills or anaerobic digesters with a preferred control of alkalinity and salinity can be considered as a sustainable solution to the present emergent problem.

  15. Air-adapted Methanosarcina acetivorans shows high methane production and develops resistance against oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Santiago-Martínez, M Geovanni; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Zepeda-Rodríguez, Armando; Belmont-Díaz, Javier; Encalada, Rusely; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Methanosarcina acetivorans, considered a strict anaerobic archaeon, was cultured in the presence of 0.4-1% O2 (atmospheric) for at least 6 months to generate air-adapted cells; further, the biochemical mechanisms developed to deal with O2 were characterized. Methane production and protein content, as indicators of cell growth, did not change in air-adapted cells respect to cells cultured under anoxia (control cells). In contrast, growth and methane production significantly decreased in control cells exposed for the first time to O2. Production of reactive oxygen species was 50 times lower in air-adapted cells versus control cells, suggesting enhanced anti-oxidant mechanisms that attenuated the O2 toxicity. In this regard, (i) the transcripts and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase significantly increased; and (ii) the thiol-molecules (cysteine + coenzyme M-SH + sulfide) and polyphosphate contents were respectively 2 and 5 times higher in air-adapted cells versus anaerobic-control cells. Long-term cultures (18 days) of air-adapted cells exposed to 2% O2 exhibited the ability to form biofilms. These data indicate that M. acetivorans develops multiple mechanisms to contend with O2 and the associated oxidative stress, as also suggested by genome analyses for some methanogens.

  16. Influence of pretreatment with Fenton's reagent on biogas production and methane yield from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Karina; Miazek, Krystian; Krzystek, Liliana; Ledakowicz, Stanisław

    2012-09-01

    Biomass from Miscanthus giganteus, Sida hermaphrodita and Sorghum Moensch was treated with Fenton's reagent for 2 hours under optimal conditions (pH=3, mass ratio of [Fe(2+)]:[H(2)O(2)] equals 1:25 for Miscanthus and Sorghum and 1:15 for Sida). The degrees of delignification were 30.3%, 62.3% and 48.1% for the three plant species, respectively. The volatile fatty acids concentration after chemical pretreatment was high enough for production of biogas with a high methane content. Combined chemical oxidation and enzymatic hydrolysis with cellulase and cellobiase led to glucose contents of above 4 g/L. Among the tested plants, the highest biogas production (25.2 Ndm(3)/kg TS fed) with a 75% methane content was obtained with Sorghum Moensch. The results of the three-step process of biomass degradation show the necessity of applying a chemical pretreatment such as oxidation with Fenton's reagent. Moreover, the coagulation of residual Fe(3+) ions is not required for high biogas production.

  17. Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

    2013-10-31

    The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production

  18. Methane production from the soluble fraction of distillers' dried grains with solubles in anaerobic sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, D P; Hirl, P J; Belia, E

    2008-06-01

    Methane production from the soluble fraction of distillers' dried grains with solubles, a co-product of ethanol production, was studied in 2-L anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (ASBRs) under 10 different operating conditions. Methane production and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal were quantified for a wide range of operating parameters. Chemical oxygen demand removals of 64 to 95% were achieved at organic loading rates ranging from 1.5 to 22.2 g COD/L x d, solids retention times from 8 to 40 days, and food-to-microorganism ratios ranging from 0.4 to 1.9 g COD/g volatile suspended solids (VSS) x d. Biogas methane content varied from 61 to 74%, with 0.29 L CH4 produced/g COD removed. Roughly 56% of the influent COD and 84% of the COD removed in the ASBRs was converted to methane. Microbial yield (Y) and decay (b) constants were determined to be Y = 0.126 g VSS/g COD removed and b = 0.032 day(-1), respectively. Methane produced from co-products can reduce the costs and fossil-fuel consumption of ethanol manufacture.

  19. Evaluation of methane production and macronutrient degradation in the anaerobic co-digestion of algae biomass residue and lipid waste.

    PubMed

    Park, Stephen; Li, Yebo

    2012-05-01

    Algae biomass residue was co-digested with lipid-rich fat, oil, and grease waste (FOG) to evaluate the effect on methane yield and macronutrient degradation. Co-digestion of algae biomass residue and FOG, each at 50% of the organic loading, allowed for an increased loading rate up to 3g VS/Ld, resulting in a specific methane yield of 0.54 L CH(4)/g VSd and a volumetric reactor productivity of 1.62 L CH(4)/Ld. Lipids were the key contributor to methane yields, accounting for 68-83% of the total methane potential. Co-digestion with algae biomass residue fractions of 33%, 50%, and 67% all maintained lipid degradations of at least 60% when the organic loading rate was increased to 3g VS/Ld, while synergetic effects on carbohydrate and protein degradation were less evident with increased loading.

  20. Methane emissions and production potentials of forest swamp wetlands in the Eastern Great Xing'an Mountains, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Stott, Philip; Yu, Hongxian; Li, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of methane flux at a few inundated sites in China have been extrapolated to obtain estimates on a national scale. To enable those national estimates to be refined and to compare flux from geographically separated sites comprising the same wetland types, we used a closed chamber method to measure methane flux in uninundated Betula platyphylla-and Larix gmelinii-dominated peatlands in the Northeast China. Our measurements were taken from both vegetated and bare soil surfaces, and we compared flux with environmental measures including vegetation biomass, soil temperature and soil characteristics. We found that methane flux was low, and that there were no significant differences between wetland types, indicating that environmental influences were dominant. We found that flux was positively correlated to temperature in the surface layers of the soil, the above-ground biomass of the shrub and herb layers, total soil carbon and total soil nitrogen; and we suggest that emissions may be due to anaerobic microcosms in the surface layers. The methane production potentials of the soils were low and similar between both sites but inconsistent with the differences between fluxes, and inconsistent with production potentials and fluxes reported from the same wetland types elsewhere, indicating that there were subtle environmental differences between wetlands classed as being of the same type. Differences between fluxes in vegetated chambers with bare soil chambers were insignificant, indicating that no methane emission through aerenchyma occurred at our sites. We concluded that wetland type was not an accurate predictor of methane flux.

  1. Methane Emissions and Production Potentials of Forest Swamp Wetlands in the Eastern Great Xing'an Mountains, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bing; Stott, Philip; Yu, Hongxian; Li, Xiaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of methane flux at a few inundated sites in China have been extrapolated to obtain estimates on a national scale. To enable those national estimates to be refined and to compare flux from geographically separated sites comprising the same wetland types, we used a closed chamber method to measure methane flux in uninundated Betula platyphylla—and Larix gmelinii—dominated peatlands in the Northeast China. Our measurements were taken from both vegetated and bare soil surfaces, and we compared flux with environmental measures including vegetation biomass, soil temperature and soil characteristics. We found that methane flux was low, and that there were no significant differences between wetland types, indicating that environmental influences were dominant. We found that flux was positively correlated to temperature in the surface layers of the soil, the above-ground biomass of the shrub and herb layers, total soil carbon and total soil nitrogen; and we suggest that emissions may be due to anaerobic microcosms in the surface layers. The methane production potentials of the soils were low and similar between both sites but inconsistent with the differences between fluxes, and inconsistent with production potentials and fluxes reported from the same wetland types elsewhere, indicating that there were subtle environmental differences between wetlands classed as being of the same type. Differences between fluxes in vegetated chambers with bare soil chambers were insignificant, indicating that no methane emission through aerenchyma occurred at our sites. We concluded that wetland type was not an accurate predictor of methane flux.

  2. Temperature effect towards methane gas production and performances of anaerobic fixed bed reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiastuti, H.; Widyabudiningsih, D.; Kurnia, D. R. D.

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to observe the effect of temperature towards methane gas production and performances of Anaerobic Fixed Bed Reactors (AFBR) in degrading artificial wastewater. During seeding and acclimatization as well as operation at normal loading rates the reactor was controlled at 35 ± 1 °C. The reactor temperature was then switched to room temperature to compare its performance with performance of the temperature controlled reactor. Seeding was performed by wastewater feeding at concentration of 5,300 mgCOD/L. Seeding was continued to acclimatization after COD efficiency reached about 30% and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) in the reactor were in the range of 28 to 29 g/L. Acclimatization was conducted by step increased feeding while obtaining organic loading rates (OLR) of 530 mgCOD/L/day and 40 days HRT, and it was stopped when COD efficiencies almost constant at about 80% were achieved. Normal loads at OLR of 530 mgCOD/L/day and HRT of 40 days resulted in COD efficiencies in the range of 80 to 92%, produced methane gas ranged from 80 to 170 ml/day, at pH around 7 during controlled temperature. At room temperature, COD efficiencies decreased to the fluctuated range of 78 to 84%, methane gas dropped to the highest of 144 ml/day but pH range was still at around 7. At OLR 1.5 times normal OLR (795 mgCOD/L/day) and HRT of 40 days, the controlled temperature reactor shows superiority by producing efficiencies in the range of 84 to 94% and 260 mL/day of CH4 as the highest gas produced during observation. Efficiencies of COD obtained during uncontrolled temperature dropped to the range of 60 to 80%. The uncontrolled temperature reactor only produced the highest CH4 production of 48 mL/day. pH from both reactors still ranged in the normal pH range about 7. It shows that AFBR has to be controlled at around 35 °C to produce higher COD efficiencies and methane gas production.

  3. Effects of composition of labile organic matter on biogenic production of methane in the coastal sediments of the Arabian Sea.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Maria-Judith; Fernandes, Christabelle E G; Fernandes, Sheryl Oliveira; Kirchman, David L; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-11-01

    Coastal regions are potential zones for production of methane which could be governed by ecological/environmental differences or even sediment properties of a niche. In order to test the hypothesis that methanogenesis in most marine sediments could be driven more by proteins than by carbohydrates and lipid content of labile organic matter (LOM), incubation experiments were carried out with sediments from different environmental niches to measure methane production. The methane production rates were examined in relationship to the sediment biochemistry, i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. The gas production measured by head space method ranged from 216 ng g( -1) day( -1) in the mangrove sediments to 3.1 μg g( -1) day( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea. LOM ranged from 1.56 to 2.85 mg g( -1) in the shallow Arabian Sea, from 3.35 to 5.43 mg g( -1) in the mangrove estuary, and from 0.66 to 0.70 mg g( -1) in the sandy sediments with proteins contributing maximum to the LOM pool. Proteins influenced methane production in the clayey sediments of shallow depths of the Arabian Sea (r = 0.933, p < 0.001) and mangrove estuary (r = 0.981, p < 0.001) but in the sandy beach sediments, carbohydrates (r = 0.924, p < 0.001) governed the net methane production. The gas production was more pronounced in shallow and surface sediments and it decreased with depth apparently governed by the decrease in lability index. Thus, the lability index and protein content are important factors that determine methane production rates in these coastal ecosystems.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Live Cells Decreased In vitro Methane Production in Intestinal Content of Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Y. L.; Liao, X. D.; Liang, J. B.; Jahromi, M. F.; Wang, H.; Cao, Z.; Wu, Y. B.

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro gas production technique was used in this study to elucidate the effect of two strains of active live yeast on methane (CH4) production in the large intestinal content of pigs to provide an insight to whether active live yeast could suppress CH4 production in the hindgut of pigs. Treatments used in this study include blank (no substrate and no live yeast cells), control (no live yeast cells) and yeast (YST) supplementation groups (supplemented with live yeast cells, YST1 or YST2). The yeast cultures contained 1.8×1010 cells per g, which were added at the rates of 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg per ml of the fermented inoculum. Large intestinal contents were collected from 2 Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire pigs, mixed with a phosphate buffer (1:2), and incubated anaerobically at 39°C for 24 h using 500 mg substrate (dry matter (DM) basis). Total gas and CH4 production decreased (p<0.05) with supplementation of yeast. The methane production reduction potential (MRP) was calculated by assuming net methane concentration for the control as 100%. The MRP of yeast 2 was more than 25%. Compared with the control group, in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD) and total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration increased (p<0.05) in 0.4 mg/ml YST1 and 0.2 mg/ml YST2 supplementation groups. Proportion of propionate, butyrate and valerate increased (p<0.05), but that of acetate decreased (p<0.05), which led to a decreased (p<0.05) acetate: propionate (A: P) ratio in the both YST2 treatments and the 0.4 mg/ml YST 1 supplementation groups. Hydrogen recovery decreased (p<0.05) with yeast supplementation. Quantity of methanogenic archaea per milliliter of inoculum decreased (p<0.05) with yeast supplementation after 24 h of incubation. Our results suggest that live yeast cells suppressed in vitro CH4 production when inoculated into the large intestinal contents of pigs and shifted the fermentation pattern to favor propionate production together with an increased population of acetogenic

  5. Anaerobic digestion of pre-fermented potato peel wastes for methane production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of anaerobic digestion (AD) of potato peel waste (PPW) and its lactic acid fermentation residue (PPW-FR) for methane (CH4) production. The experimental results showed that about 60-70% CH4 content was obtained. The digester using PPW-FR as feedstock exhibited better performance and produced a highest cumulative CH4 production of 273 L/kg VS fed, followed by 239 L/kg VS fed using PPW under the same conditions. However, with increasing solid loadings of PPW-FR feedstock from 6.4% to 9.1%, the CH4 production was inhibited. The generation, accumulation, and degradation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in digesters were also investigated in this research.

  6. Use of short-term breath measures to estimate daily methane production by cattle.

    PubMed

    Velazco, J I; Mayer, D G; Zimmerman, S; Hegarty, R S

    2016-01-01

    Methods to measure enteric methane (CH4) emissions from individual ruminants in their production environment are required to validate emission inventories and verify mitigation claims. Estimates of daily methane production (DMP) based on consolidated short-term emission measurements are developing, but method verification is required. Two cattle experiments were undertaken to test the hypothesis that DMP estimated by averaging multiple short-term breath measures of methane emission rate did not differ from DMP measured in respiration chambers (RC). Short-term emission rates were obtained from a GreenFeed Emissions Monitoring (GEM) unit, which measured emission rate while cattle consumed a dispensed supplement. In experiment 1 (Expt. 1), four non-lactating cattle (LW=518 kg) were adapted for 18 days then measured for six consecutive periods. Each period consisted of 2 days of ad libitum intake and GEM emission measurement followed by 1 day in the RC. A prototype GEM unit releasing water as an attractant (GEM water) was also evaluated in Expt. 1. Experiment 2 (Expt. 2) was a larger study based on similar design with 10 cattle (LW=365 kg), adapted for 21 days and GEM measurement was extended to 3 days in each of the six periods. In Expt. 1, there was no difference in DMP estimated by the GEM unit relative to the RC (209.7 v. 215.1 g CH(4)/day) and no difference between these methods in methane yield (MY, 22.7 v. 23.7 g CH(4)/kg of dry matter intake, DMI). In Expt. 2, the correlation between GEM and RC measures of DMP and MY were assessed using 95% confidence intervals, with no difference in DMP or MY between methods and high correlations between GEM and RC measures for DMP (r=0.85; 215 v. 198 g CH(4)/day SEM=3.0) and for MY (r=0.60; 23.8 v. 22.1 g CH(4)/kg DMI SEM=0.42). When data from both experiments was combined neither DMP nor MY differed between GEM- and RC-based measures (P>0.05). GEM water-based estimates of DMP and MY were lower than RC and GEM (P<0

  7. Methane production in goats given diets based on lucerne hay and barley.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, J F; Prieto, C

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of data from 102 energy balance trials carried out with Granadina goats, 32 with castrated males and 70 with lactating females, was made with the aim of establishing relationships between methane production and some nutritive attributes of the diet. The diets were based on pelleted lucerne (Medicago sativa) hay and barley and differed widely in the amounts and proportions of their ingredients. Methane production was measured by open-circuit respirometry. The between-animal variation in CH4 production was found to be +/- 8%. In absolute terms, CH4 production increased on increasing the intake of energy. The CH4 loss was 6.56 or 9.75 kJ/100 kJ of gross energy or digestible energy intake, respectively. The prediction of the CH4 production was best described from knowledge of the amounts of the "in vitro" digestible fractions (g/d) of both the neutral-detergent solubles (DNDS) and the neutral-detergent fibre (DNDF), according to the equation CH4 = 2.24 + 0.0299 DNDS + 0.0889 DNDF. The regression was highly significant and the residual standard deviation +/- 6.63 or +/- 20% of the mean. It was also found that on increasing the feeding level by one multiple of maintenance there was a reduction in CH4 losses of 1.51 kJ or 2.19 kJ/100 kJ of gross energy or digestible energy intake, respectively. The CH4 production (kJ/100 kJ of gross energy intake) was also related to the apparent digestibility of energy (D, %) determined at the level of nutrition close to maintenance. The equation was CH4 = -2.58 + 0.151 D. The regression was highly significant statistically.

  8. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-01

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH(4)) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH(4) production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt(-1)), while observed CO(2) production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH(4) emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha(-1)) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha(-1) application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH(4) emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH(4) production rates as well as total seasonal CH(4) flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH(4) emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  9. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-10-15

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  10. Stereospecificity and physiology of co-oxidative production of chemicals by methanotrophic bacteria. [Methane monooxygenase:a2

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.L.; Hoefer, D.E.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Akin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as a sole source of carbon and energy. The enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane in these organisms, methane monooxygenase, is also able to biotransform a number of substrates into industrially important chemicals. One such example is the oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide. Several strains of mesophilic and thermophilic methanotrophs have been tested for their ability to produce propylene oxide with formate, methanol, and methane as the co-oxidative substrates. Cultures in the late stationary phase were found to be more productive than exponentially growing cultures. Methane did not inhibit propylene epoxidation on low-density cultures; in fact, the yields of propylene oxide were greater when both methane and propylene were present than when only propylene was present. In higher-density cultures, however, methane did appear to inhibit oxidation of propylene. The effects of several culture parameters such as pH, temperature, and concentration of micronutrients on propylene oxide production ad steroespecificity were determined. Propylene oxide production was proportional to the amount of cell loading up to 14 g/L. Unwashed cells produced more propylene oxide than washed cells. The long- and short-term inhibitory effects of propylene oxide on the methanotrophic strains were also investigated. A tolerance of up to 1 M propylene oxide was observed, and the maximum inhibitory effect was seen within 30 minute. The steroespecificity for propylene oxide production and oxidation of 3-methylcyclohexene was determined for several strains. Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b), particularly a cell-free extract of this strain, had the greatest steroespecificity. 13 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Nitrous oxide production and methane oxidation by different ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Q.Q.; Bakken, L.R.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are thought to contribute significantly to N{sub 2}O production and methane oxidation in soils. Most knowledge derives from experiments with Nitrosomonas europaea, which appears to be of minor importance in most soils compared to Nitrosospira spp. The authors have conducted a comparative study of levels of aerobic N{sub 2}O production in six phylogenetically different Nitrosospira strains newly isolated from soils and in two N. europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis type strains. The fraction of oxidized ammonium released as N{sub 2}O during aerobic growth was remarkably constant for all the Nitrosospira strains, irrespective of the substrate supply (urea versus ammonium), the pH, or substrate limitation. N. europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis released similar fractions of N{sub 2}O when they were supplied with ample amounts of substrates, but the fractions rose sharply when they were restricted by a low pH or substrate limitation. Phosphate buffer doubled the N{sub 2}O release for all types of AOB. No detectable oxidation of atmospheric methane was detected. Calculations based on detection limits as well as data in the literature on CH{sub 4} oxidation by AOB bacteria prove that none of the tested strains contribute significantly to the oxidation of atmospheric CH{sub 4} in soils.

  12. Anaerobic biodegradability of Category 2 animal by-products: methane potential and inoculum source.

    PubMed

    Pozdniakova, Tatiana A; Costa, José C; Santos, Ricardo J; Alves, M M; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2012-11-01

    Category 2 animal by-products that need to be sterilized with steam pressure according Regulation (EC) 1774/2002 are studied. In this work, 2 sets of experiments were performed in mesophilic conditions: (i) biomethane potential determination testing 0.5%, 2.0% and 5.0% total solids (TS), using sludge from the anaerobic digester of a wastewater treatment plant as inoculum; (ii) biodegradability tests at a constant TS concentration of 2.0% and different inoculum sources (digested sludge from a wastewater treatment plant; granular sludge from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor; leachate from a municipal solid waste landfill; and sludge from the slaughterhouse wastewater treatment anaerobic lagoon) to select the more adapted inoculum to the substrate in study. The higher specific methane production was of 317 mL CH(4)g(-1) VS(substrate) for 2.0% TS. The digested sludge from the wastewater treatment plant led to the lowest lag-phase period and higher methane potential rate.

  13. The effect of biofuel production on swine farm methane and ammonia emissions.

    PubMed

    Harper, Lowry A; Flesch, Thomas K; Weaver, Kim H; Wilson, John D

    2010-01-01

    Methane (CH) and ammonia (NH3) are emitted to the atmosphere during anaerobic processing of organic matter, and both gases have detrimental environmental effects. Methane conversion to biofuel production has been suggested to reduce CH4 emissions from animal manure processing systems. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the change in CH4 and NH3 emissions in an animal feeding operation due to biofuel production from the animal manure. Gas emissions were measured from swine farms differing only in their manure-management treatment systems (conventional vs. biofuel). By removing organic matter (i.e., carbon) from the biofuel farms' manure-processing lagoons, average annual CH4 emissions were decreased by 47% compared with the conventional farm. This represents a net 44% decrease in global warming potential (CO2 equivalent) by gases emitted from the biofuel farms compared with conventional farms. However, because of the reduction of methanogenesis and its reduced effect on the chemical conversion of ammonium (NH4+) to dinitrogen (N2) gas, NH3 emissions in the biofuel farms increased by 46% over the conventional farms. These studies show that what is considered an environmentally friendly technology had mixed results and that all components of a system should be studied when making changes to existing systems.

  14. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %).

  15. Optimization of sugarcane bagasse autohydrolysis for methane production from hemicellulose hydrolyzates in a biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Baêta, Bruno Eduardo Lôbo; Lima, Diego Roberto Sousa; Adarme, Oscar Fernando Herrera; Gurgel, Leandro Vinícius Alves; Aquino, Sérgio Francisco de

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize through design of experiments, the process variables (temperature - T, time - t and solid-to-liquid ratio - SLR) for sugarcane bagasse (SB) autohydrolysis (AH) to obtain hemicellulose hydrolyzates (HH) prone to anaerobic digestion (AD) and biochemical methane production (BMP). The results indicated that severe AH conditions, which lead to maximum hemicelluloses dissolution and sugar content in the HH, were not the best for BMP, probably due to the accumulation of toxic/recalcitrant compounds (furans and lignin). Mild AH conditions (170°C, 35min and SLR=0.33) led to the highest BMP (0.79Nm(3)kg TOC(-1)), which was confirmed by the desirability tool. HH produced by AH carried out at the desired condition DC2 (178.6°C, 43.6min and SLR=0.24) showed the lowest accumulation of inhibitory compounds and volatile fatty acids (VFA) and highest BMP (1.56Nm(3)kg TOC(-1)). The modified Gompertz model best fit the experimental data and led to a maximum methane production rate (R) of 2.6mmol CH4d(-1) in the best condition.

  16. Wastewater reclamation and methane production using water hyacinth and anaerobic digestion

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Schwegler, B.; Reddy, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    Research reported here supports the conclusion that water hyacinth ponds are effective in the secondary treatment of domestic wastewater and under these conditions exhibited an average growth yield of 60 dry tons/ha-yr. However, treatment efficiencies and growth yields vary significantly in response to factors which include: (1) of nutrients in the pond influent; (2) residence times and water depth; (3) cultural techniques such as plant density and harvest frequency; (4) environmental conditions such as temperature, frost, etc.; and (5) insect infestation. These variables are under more intense study using smaller scale experiments. The results of these studies will be employed to determine optimum conditions for operation of the larger ponds. Work thus far completed on the anaerobic digestion of hyacinth and sludge has provided information on feed properties, feed biodegradabilities, digestion efficiencies under conventional digestion, nutritional balance, and the effects of blend constituents on methane yield and production rate. It is known that these feeds can be digested without external nutrient addition or pH control. The kinetics and efficiencies are comparable to those of other biomass or waste feeds; in fact, the yield from primary sludge is the highest we have seen reported for particulate feeds. Two conventional digester designs are currently exhibiting a significant increase in feed conversion to methane. Future laboratory research will continue to focus on advanced digestion and pretreatment for improvement of conversion efficiencies and net energy production. This will be complemented by operation of a larger scale experimental test unit.

  17. New alternative energy pathway for chemical pulp mills: From traditional fibers to methane production.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Chiang, Lourdes; Vanhatalo, Kari; Llorca, Jordi; Dahl, Olli

    2017-03-25

    Chemical pulp mills have a need to diversify their end-product portfolio due to the current changing bio-economy. In this study, the methane potential of brown, oxygen delignified and bleached pulp were evaluated in order to assess the potential of converting traditional fibers; as well as microcrystalline cellulose and filtrates; to energy. Results showed that high yields (380mL CH4/gVS) were achieved with bleached fibers which correlates with the lower presence of lignin. Filtrates from the hydrolysis process on the other hand, had the lowest yields (253mL CH4/gVS) due to the high amount of acid and lignin compounds that cause inhibition. Overall, substrates had a biodegradability above 50% which demonstrates that they can be subjected to efficient anaerobic digestion. An energy and cost estimation showed that the energy produced can be translated into a significant profit and that methane production can be a promising new alternative option for chemical pulp mills.

  18. Enhanced methane production from microalgal biomass by anaerobic bio-pretreatment.

    PubMed

    He, Shuai; Fan, Xiaolei; Katukuri, Naveen Reddy; Yuan, Xianzheng; Wang, Fei; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2016-03-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) of microalgal biomass is one of the most energy efficient technologies to convert microalgae to biofuels. In order to improve the biogas productivity, breaking up the tough and rigid cell wall of microalgae by pretreatment is necessary. In this work, Bacillus licheniformis, a facultative anaerobic bacterial with hydrolytic and acidogenic activities, was adopted to pretreat Chlorella sp. In the established pretreatment process, pure bacterial culture (0%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 8%, v/v) were used to pretreat Chlorella sp. under anaerobic condition at 37°C for 60 h. The soluble chemical oxygen demands (SCOD) content was increased by 16.4-43.4%, while volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were improved by 17.3-44.2%. Furthermore, enhancement of methane production (9.2-22.7%) was also observed in subsequent AD. The results indicated that the more dosages of bacteria were used to pretreat the microalgal biomass in the range of 1-8%, the more methane was produced.

  19. Methane production from food waste leachate in laboratory-scale simulated landfill.

    PubMed

    Behera, Shishir Kumar; Park, Jun Mo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Park, Hung-Suck

    2010-01-01

    Due to the prohibition of food waste landfilling in Korea from 2005 and the subsequent ban on the marine disposal of organic sludge, including leachate generated from food waste recycling facilities from 2012, it is urgent to develop an innovative and sustainable disposal strategy that is eco-friendly, yet economically beneficial. In this study, methane production from food waste leachate (FWL) in landfill sites with landfill gas recovery facilities was evaluated in simulated landfill reactors (lysimeters) for a period of 90 d with four different inoculum-substrate ratios (ISRs) on volatile solid (VS) basis. Simultaneous biochemical methane potential batch experiments were also conducted at the same ISRs for 30 d to compare CH(4) yield obtained from lysimeter studies. Under the experimental conditions, a maximum CH(4) yield of 0.272 and 0.294 L/g VS was obtained in the batch and lysimeter studies, respectively, at ISR of 1:1. The biodegradability of FWL in batch and lysimeter experiments at ISR of 1:1 was 64% and 69%, respectively. The calculated data using the modified Gompertz equation for the cumulative CH(4) production showed good agreement with the experimental result obtained from lysimeter study. Based on the results obtained from this study, field-scale pilot test is required to re-evaluate the existing sanitary landfills with efficient leachate collection and gas recovery facilities as engineered bioreactors to treat non-hazardous liquid organic wastes for energy recovery with optimum utilization of facilities.

  20. Methane production and oxidation patterns along a hydrological gradient in Luther Bog, Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praetzel, Leandra; Berger, Sina; Blodau, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Methane emissions from natural peatlands contribute significantly to the global budget of atmospheric CH4. In the northern hemisphere, where climate models predict rising temperatures and precipitation rates, these emissions are likely to rise. So far, little is known about the change of processes of methane production and oxidation, which influence the total amount of methane emissions, in peatland soils under warmer and wetter climate conditions. Our work focuses on anaerobic CH4 production and aerobic CH4 oxidation processes along a hydrological gradient in an ombotrophic bog in Ontario, Canada that was induced by creation of a reservoir in 1952. Along this transect, four sites were established differing in hydrologic conditions and vegetation patterns. We examined depth profiles of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and delta 13C isotope ratios in the peat using silicon samplers, dialysis chambers and multi-level piezometers. Chamber flux measurements were used to determine carbon fluxes. Isotope mass balances were calculated based on 13C isotope ratios and concentration profiles. By this approach the contribution of anaerobic CH4 and CO2 production to the total ER flux and the amount of oxidised CH4 can be determined. In addition meteorological data, soil temperatures, moisture and water table levels were recorded. By raising data at different sites and dates and with the help of the additionally recorded parameters, we will be able to make predictions about changing CH4 production and oxidation processes due to changing climate conditions. Preliminary results show that CH4 concentrations in the soil profile are higher at the sites which are exposed to stronger water table fluctuations, whereas CO2 concentration levels are lower at these sites. At all sites, CO2 concentrations in the peat are increasing but CH4 profiles are fairly stable. Moreover, isotopic signatures of 13CH4 indicate that the importance of the production pathway changes with depth from acetoclastic

  1. Increased anaerobic production of methane by co-digestion of sludge with microalgal biomass and food waste leachate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungmin; Kang, Chang-Min

    2015-01-01

    The co-digestion of multiple substrates is a promising method to increase methane production during anaerobic digestion. However, limited reliable data are available on the anaerobic co-digestion of food waste leachate with microalgal biomass. This report evaluated methane production by the anaerobic co-digestion of different mixtures of food waste leachate, algal biomass, and raw sludge. Co-digestion of substrate mixture containing equal amounts of three substrates had higher methane production than anaerobic digestion of individual substrates. This was possibly due to a proliferation of methanogens over the entire digestion period induced by multistage digestion of different substrates with different degrees of degradability. Thus, the co-digestion of food waste, microalgal biomass, and raw sludge appears to be a feasible and efficient method for energy conversion from waste resources.

  2. Hydrogen and methane production from swine wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rachel C; Regan, John M; Oh, Sang-Eun; Zuo, Yi; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-01

    The production of a useful and valuable product during swine wastewater treatment, such as hydrogen gas, could help to lower treatment costs. Hydrogen can theoretically be produced from wastewater by electrohydrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) or by fermentation. Using a single-chamber MEC with a graphite-fiber brush anode, hydrogen gas was generated at 0.9-1.0 m(3) m(-3) day(-1) H2 using a full-strength or diluted swine wastewater. COD removals ranged from 8 to 29% in 20-h tests, and from 69 to 75% in longer tests (184 h) using full-strength wastewater. The gas produced was up to 77+/-11% hydrogen, with overall recoveries of up to 28+/-6% of the COD in the wastewater as hydrogen gas. Methane was also produced at a maximum of 13+/-4% of total gas volume. The efficiency of hydrogen production, based on the electrical energy needed (but excluding the energy in the wastewater) compared to the energy of the hydrogen gas produced, was as high as 190+/-39% in 42-h batch tests with undiluted wastewater, but was lower in longer batch tests of 184 h (91+/-6%). Hydrogen gas could not be recovered in fermentation tests using wastewater with a heat-treated inoculum. Hydrogen production was shown to be possible by fermentation when the wastewater was sterilized, but this process would not be practical or energy efficient. We therefore conclude from these tests that MECs are an effective method for hydrogen recovery from swine wastewater treatment, although the process needs to be further evaluated for reducing methane production, increasing the efficiency of converting the organic matter into current, and increasing recovery of hydrogen gas produced at the cathode.

  3. [Spectroscopy technique and ruminant methane emissions accurate inspecting].

    PubMed

    Shang, Zhan-Huan; Guo, Xu-Sheng; Long, Rui-Jun

    2009-03-01

    The increase in atmospheric CH4 concentration, on the one hand through the radiation process, will directly cause climate change, and on the other hand, cause a lot of changes in atmospheric chemical processes, indirectly causing climate change. The rapid growth of atmospheric methane has gained attention of governments and scientists. All countries in the world now deal with global climate change as an important task of reducing emissions of greenhouse gases, but the need for monitoring the concentration of methane gas, in particular precision monitoring, can be scientifically formulated to provide a scientific basis for emission reduction measures. So far, CH4 gas emissions of different animal production systems have received extensive research. The methane emission by ruminant reported in the literature is only estimation. This is due to the various factors that affect the methane production in ruminant, there are various variables associated with the techniques for measuring methane production, the techniques currently developed to measure methane are unable to accurately determine the dynamics of methane emission by ruminant, and therefore there is an urgent need to develop an accurate method for this purpose. Currently, spectroscopy technique has been used and is relatively a more accurate and reliable method. Various spectroscopy techniques such as modified infrared spectroscopy methane measuring system, laser and near-infrared sensory system are able to achieve the objective of determining the dynamic methane emission by both domestic and grazing ruminant. Therefore spectroscopy technique is an important methane measuring technique, and contributes to proposing reduction methods of methane.

  4. Methane production and methanogen levels in steers that differ in residual gain.

    PubMed

    Freetly, H C; Lindholm-Perry, A K; Hales, K E; Brown-Brandl, T M; Kim, M; Myer, P R; Wells, J E

    2015-05-01

    Methane (CH4) gas released by cattle isa product of fermentation in the digestive tract. The 2 primary sites of CH4 production in ruminants are the reticulum-rumen complex and the cecum. Methane release from cattle represents a 2% to 12% loss of the energy intake. Reducing the proportion of feed energy lost as CH4 has the potential of improving feed efficiency as well as decreasing the contribution of cattle to greenhouse gas production. Feed intake and growth were measured on 132 fall-born steers for 70 d. Seven steers with extreme positive residual gain (RG) and 7 steers with extreme negative RG whose DMI was within 0.32 SD of the mean intake were selected for subsequent measurements. Enteric CH4 production was measured via indirect calorimetry. Rumen, cecum, and rectal contents were obtained from steers at slaughter for measurement of in vitro CH4 production and methanogen 16S rRNA levels. Enteric CH4 production did not differ (P = 0.11) between the positive RG (112 ± 13 L/d)and the negative RG (74 ± 13 L/d) steers. In vitro rumen methane production did not differ between positive RG(64.26 × 10(-5) ± 10.85 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1)) and negative RG (61.49 × 10(-5) ± 10.85 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1)DM∙min(-1); P = 0.86). In vitro cecum methane production did not differ between positive RG (4.24 ×10(-5) ± 1.90 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1)) and negative RG (4.35 × 10(-5) ± 1.90 × 10(-5) mmol∙g(-1) DM∙min(-1); P = 0.97). Methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of the total bacteria16S rRNA did not differ between RG groups (P = 0.18). The methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of rumen fluid total bacteria 16S rRNA (5.3% ±3.1%) did not differ from the methanogen 16S rRNA asa percentage of cecum content total bacteria 16S rRNA(11.8% ± 3.1%; P = 0.14). The methanogen 16S rRNA as a percentage of the rectum content total bacteria 16SrRNA (0.7% ± 3.1%) was not different from the rumen content (P = 0.29) but was less than the cecum content(P = 0

  5. Towards H2-rich gas production from unmixed steam reforming of methane: Thermodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima da Silva, Aline; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the Gibbs energy minimization method is applied to investigate the unmixed steam reforming (USR) of methane to generate hydrogen for fuel cell application. The USR process is an advanced reforming technology that relies on the use of separate air and fuel/steam feeds to create a cyclic process. Under air flow (first half of the cycle), a bed of Ni-based material is oxidized, providing the heat necessary for the steam reforming that occurs subsequently during fuel/steam feed stage (second half of the cycle). In the presence of CaO sorbent, high purity hydrogen can be produced in a single reactor. In the first part of this work, it is demonstrated that thermodynamic predictions are consistent with experimental results from USR isothermal tests under fuel/steam feed. From this, it is also verified that the reacted NiO to CH4 (NiOreacted/CH4) molar ratio is a very important parameter that affects the product gas composition and decreases with time. At the end of fuel/steam flow, the reforming reaction is the most important chemical mechanism, with H2 production reaching ∼75 mol%. On the other hand, at the beginning of fuel/steam feed stage, NiO reduction reactions dominate the equilibrium system, resulting in high CO2 selectivity, negative steam conversion and low concentrations of H2. In the second part of this paper, the effect of NiOreacted/CH4 molar ratio on the product gas composition and enthalpy change during fuel flow is investigated at different temperatures for inlet H2O/CH4 molar ratios in the range of 1.2-4, considering the USR process operated with and without CaO sorbent. During fuel/steam feed stage, the energy demand increases as time passes, because endothermic reforming reaction becomes increasingly important as this stage nears its end. Thus, the duration of the second half of the cycle is limited by the conditions under which auto-thermal operation can be achieved. In absence of CaO, H2 at concentrations of approximately 73 mol% can

  6. A NOVEL CONCEPT FOR PREFERENTIAL PRODUCTION OF METHANE RICH SYNGAS FROM COAL GASIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Majed, Toqan; Prabhat, Naredi

    2011-11-04

    The overall objective of this multi-phase SBIR project is to develop a coal gasifier concept that yields higher methane (CH4) concentration in the syngas without compromising on the heating value of the syngas. Higher concentration of CH4 in syngas is desirable because it has higher calorific value (per unit mass) than any other hydrocarbon. In addition, utilization of the CH4 rich syngas in fuel cells facilitates better control of fuel cell stack temperature which improves power generation efficiency. However, existing commercial gasifiers predominantly produce CO and H2 rich syngas that contains minimal amount of CH4. In order to obtain high heating value syngas with preferential production of CH4, this proposal proposes to gasify coal in combination with a renewable, liquid, waste feedstock in a novel gasification process design. The proposed liquid feedstock is rich in oxygen which reduces amount of oxygen needed to carryout the gasification process and thus the cost. In addition, CPS conducted a 1-D kinetic and equilibrium calculation which showed that the renewable feedstock reduces tar formation, and helps in achieving higher heating value and CH4 in the syngas. In recent proof-of-concept experiments, we have determined that methanol (CH3OH) addition during steam gasification or coal pyrolysis enhances methane formation. We hypothesize that the tars released during coal devolatilization react with the methanol generated radicals to form low molecular weight hydrocarbons, primarily CH4 has been proved correct. It also appears that because the ratio of methanol to coal and steam to coal ratio was too high during the batch reactor experiments, significant fraction of tar was also converted to CO. Therefore, in order to achieve higher methane in a cost effective manner, experiments need to be done in a continuous flow reactor at isothermal temperatures where the ratio of the additive and steam needs to be carefully controlled.

  7. Parameters affecting solvent production by Clostridium pasteurianum

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrock, B.; Bahl, H.; Gottschalk, G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effect of pH, growth rate, phosphate and iron limitation, carbon monoxide, and carbon source on product formation by Clostridium pasteurianum was determined. Under phosphate limitation, glucose was fermented almost exclusively to acetate and butyrate independently of the pH and growth rate. Iron limitation caused lactate production (38 mol/100 mol) from glucose in batch and continuous culture. At 15% (vol/vol) carbon monoxide in the atmosphere, glucose was fermented to ethanol (24 mol/100 mol), lactate (32 mol/100 mol), and butanol (36 mol/100 mol) in addition to the usual products, acetate (38 mol/100 mol) and butyrate (17 mol/100 mol). During glycerol fermentation, a completely different product pattern was found. In continuous culture under phosphate limitation, acetate and butyrate were produced only in trace amounts, whereas ethanol (30 mol/10 mol), butanol (18 mol/100 mol), and 1,3-propanediol (18 mol/100 mol) were the major products. Under iron limitation, the ratio of these products could be changed in favor of 1,3-propanediol (34 mol/100 mol). In addition, lactate was produced in significant amounts (25 mol/100 mol). The tolerance of C. pasteurianum to glycerol was remarkably high; growth was not inhibited by glycerol concentrations up to 17% (wt/vol). Increasing glycerol concentrations favored the production of 1,3-propanediol.

  8. Co-production of hydrogen and methane from potato waste using a two-stage anaerobic digestion process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Heguang; Stadnyk, Aaron; Béland, Michel; Seto, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen and methane co-production from potato waste was examined using a two-stage process of anaerobic digestion. The hydrogen stage was operated in continuous flow under a pH of 5.5 and a HRT of 6h. The methane stage was operated in both continuous and semi-continuous flows under HRTs of 30 h and 90 h, respectively, with pH controlled at 7. A maximum gas production rate of 270 ml/h and an average of 119 ml/h were obtained from the hydrogen stage during the operation over 110 days. The hydrogen concentration contained in the gas was 45% (v/v), on average. The maximum and average gas production rates observed from methane reactor during the 74 days of semi-continuous flow operation were 187 and 141 ml/h, respectively, with an average methane concentration of 76%. Overall, 70% of VS, 64% of total COD in the feedstock were removed. The hydrogen and methane yields from the potato waste were 30 l/kg TS (with a maximum of 68 l/kg) and 183 l/kg TS (with a maximum of 225 l/kg), respectively. The total energy yield obtained was 2.14 kW h/kg TS, with a maximum of 2.74 kW h/kg TS.

  9. Effect of Natural Mineral on Methane Production and Process Stability During Semi-Continuous Mono-Digestion of Maize Straw.

    PubMed

    González-Suárez, A; Pereda-Reyes, I; Pozzi, E; da Silva, A José; Oliva-Merencio, D; Zaiat, M

    2016-04-01

    The effect of natural mineral on the mono-digestion of maize straw was evaluated in continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) at 38 °C. Different strategies of mineral addition were studied. The organic loading rate (OLR) was varied from 0.5 to 2.5 g volatile solid (VS) L(-1) d(-1). A daily addition of 1 g mineral L(-1) in reactor 2 (R2) diminished the methane production by about 11 % with respect to the initial phase. However, after a gradual addition of mineral, an average methane yield of 257 NmL CH4 g VS(-1) was reached and the methane production was enhanced by 30 % with regard to R1. An increase in the frequency of mineral addition did not enhance the methane production. The archaeal community was more sensitive to the mineral than the bacterial population whose similarity stayed high between R1 and R2. Significant difference in methane yield was found for both reactors throughout the operation.

  10. Biofuels from microalgae: lipid extraction and methane production from the residual biomass in a biorefinery approach.

    PubMed

    Hernández, D; Solana, M; Riaño, B; García-González, M C; Bertucco, A

    2014-10-01

    Renewable fuels and energy are of major concern worldwide and new raw materials and processes for its generation are being investigated. Among these raw materials, algae are a promising source of lipids and energy. Thus, in this work four different algae have been used for lipid extraction and biogas generation. Lipids were obtained by supercritical CO2 extraction (SCCO2), while anaerobic digestion of the lipid-exhausted algae biomass was used for biogas production. The extracted oil composition was analyzed (saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids) and quantified. The highest lipid yields were obtained from Tetraselmis sp. (11%) and Scenedesmus almeriensis (10%), while the highest methane production from the lipid-exhausted algae biomass corresponded to Tetraselmis sp. (236mLCH4/gVSadded).

  11. Genetic resources for methane production from biomass described with the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Purwantini, Endang; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Lomax, Jane; Setubal, João C.; Tyler, Brett M.; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is a valuable fuel, constituting 70–95% of natural gas, and a potent greenhouse gas. Release of CH4 into the atmosphere contributes to climate change. Biological CH4 production or methanogenesis is mostly performed by methanogens, a group of strictly anaerobic archaea. The direct substrates for methanogenesis are H2 plus CO2, acetate, formate, methylamines, methanol, methyl sulfides, and ethanol or a secondary alcohol plus CO2. In numerous anaerobic niches in nature, methanogenesis facilitates mineralization of complex biopolymers such as carbohydrates, lipids and proteins generated by primary producers. Thus, methanogens are critical players in the global carbon cycle. The same process is used in anaerobic treatment of municipal, industrial and agricultural wastes, reducing the biological pollutants in the wastes and generating methane. It also holds potential for commercial production of natural gas from renewable resources. This process operates in digestive systems of many animals, including cattle, and humans. In contrast, in deep-sea hydrothermal vents methanogenesis is a primary production process, allowing chemosynthesis of biomaterials from H2 plus CO2. In this report we present Gene Ontology (GO) terms that can be used to describe processes, functions and cellular components involved in methanogenic biodegradation and biosynthesis of specialized coenzymes that methanogens use. Some of these GO terms were previously available and the rest were generated in our Microbial Energy Gene Ontology (MENGO) project. A recently discovered non-canonical CH4 production process is also described. We have performed manual GO annotation of selected methanogenesis genes, based on experimental evidence, providing “gold standards” for machine annotation and automated discovery of methanogenesis genes or systems in diverse genomes. Most of the GO-related information presented in this report is available at the MENGO website (http

  12. Hydrogen production by thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane: Regeneration of active carbons using CO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, J. L.; Suelves, I.; Utrilla, R.; Gálvez, M. E.; Lázaro, M. J.; Moliner, R.

    Thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane using carbons as catalyst is a very attractive process for free CO 2-hydrogen production. One of the main drawbacks for the sustainability of the process is catalyst deactivation. In this work, regeneration of a deactivated active-carbon catalyst has been studied using CO 2 as activating agent under different regeneration conditions. It has been stated that during the regeneration stage, a compromise between the regeneration of the initial properties of the catalyst and the burn-off is needed in order to keep the sustainability of the process. Three deactivation-regeneration cycles have been performed for two sets of regeneration conditions. A progressive decreasing in the burn-off, surface area and surface oxygenated groups after each decomposition/regeneration cycle is observed. It can be explained considering that the carbon removed during the regeneration steps is not the carbon deposited from methane but the remaining initial catalyst, which is less resistant to gasification. The implication is that after three cycles of decomposition/regeneration, most of the carbon sample consists of carbon formed during the process since the initial catalyst has been gasified.

  13. The Role of Sedges in Methane Production and Emission From a Temperate Fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyce, G. L.; Szarkowski, E. R.; Bubier, J. L.; Varner, R. K.

    2008-12-01

    Northern peatlands are the largest single natural source of atmospheric methane (CH4) and thus any changes in these fluxes could have global consequences. Positive correlations have been observed between sedge biomass and high CH4 emissions from peatlands. We examined the effect that Carex rostrata has on methane production and transport in Sallie's Fen, Barrington, NH. During the summer of 2008, CH4 fluxes, pore-water CH4 concentrations, and C. rostrata biomass, along with temperature, net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), and water table depth, were measured from both clipped and unclipped plots. In clipped plots, all C. rostrata were clipped below the peat surface and then sealed with petroleum jelly and plastic bags. Unclipped plots were left undisturbed. We observed a strong positive correlation between C. rostrata biomass and CH4 fluxes. Initial findings suggest that sedges have a strong effect on gas transport. The average 18 cm (C. rostrata rooting depth) pore water CH4 concentrations in the clipped plots (6141 ppm CH4) were significantly higher (p<0.001) than in the unclipped plots (3912 ppm CH4). The past 20 years of data at Sallie's Fen also show that plots with more C. rostrata have higher mid-season CH4 fluxes, on average, than shrub-dominated plots. Depth to water table, however, may be a stronger control on CH4 fluxes than vegetation.

  14. Resource Assessment & Production Testing for Coal Bed Methane in the Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

    2005-11-01

    In order to assess the economic coal bed methane potential of the Illinois Basin, the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky performed a geological assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. A considerable effort went into generating cumulative coal thickness and bed structure maps to identify target areas for exploratory drilling. Following this, the first project well was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. Eight additional wells were subsequently drilled in Indiana (3) and Kentucky (5) during 2004 and 2005. In addition, a five spot pilot completion program was started with three wells being completed. Gas contents were found to be variable, but generally higher than indicated by historical data. Gas contents of more than 300 scf/ton were recovered from one of the bore holes in Kentucky. Collectively, our findings indicate that the Illinois Basin represents a potentially large source of economic coal bed methane. Additional exploration will be required to refine gas contents and the economics of potential production.

  15. Utilising biohydrogen to increase methane production, energy yields and process efficiency via two stage anaerobic digestion of grass.

    PubMed

    Massanet-Nicolau, Jaime; Dinsdale, Richard; Guwy, Alan; Shipley, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Real time measurement of gas production and composition were used to examine the benefits of two stage anaerobic digestion (AD) over a single stage AD, using pelletized grass as a feedstock. Controlled, parallel digestion experiments were performed in order to directly compare a two stage digestion system producing hydrogen and methane, with a single stage system producing just methane. The results indicated that as well as producing additional energy in the form of hydrogen, two stage digestion also resulted in significant increases to methane production, overall energy yields, and digester stability (as indicated by bicarbonate alkalinity and volatile fatty acid removal). Two stage AD resulted in an increase in energy yields from 10.36 MJ kg(-1) VS to 11.74 MJ kg(-1) VS, an increase of 13.4%. Using a two stage system also permitted a much shorter hydraulic retention time of 12 days whilst maintaining process stability.

  16. Assessment of methane production from shredder waste in landfills: The influence of temperature, moisture and metals.

    PubMed

    Fathi Aghdam, Ehsan; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2016-11-29

    In this study, methane (CH4) production rates from shredder waste (SW) were determined by incubation of waste samples over a period of 230days under different operating conditions, and first-order decay kinetic constants (k-values) were calculated. SW and sterilized SW were incubated under different temperatures (20-25°C, 37°C, and 55°C), moisture contents (35% and 75% w/w) and amounts of inoculum (5% and 30% of the samples wet weight). The biochemical methane potential (BMP) from different types of SW (fresh, old and sieved) was determined and compared. The ability of metals (iron, aluminum, zinc, and copper) contained in SW to provide electrons for methanogens resulting in gas compositions with high CH4 contents and very low CO2 contents was investigated. The BMP of SW was 1.5-6.2kg CH4/ton waste. The highest BMP was observed in fresh SW samples, while the lowest was observed in sieved samples (fine fraction of SW). Abiotic production of CH4 was not observed in laboratory incubations. The biotic experiments showed that when the moisture content was 35% w/w and the temperature was 20-25°C, CH4 production was extremely low. Increasing the temperature from 20-25°C to 37°C resulted in significantly higher CH4 production while increasing the temperature from 37°C to 55°C resulted in higher CH4 production, but to a lower extent. Increasing the moisture and inoculum content also increased CH4 production. The k-values were 0.033-0.075yr(-1) at room temperature, 0.220-0.429yr(-1) at 37°C and 0.235-0.488yr(-1) at 55°C, indicating that higher temperatures resulted in higher k-values. It was observed that H2 can be produced by biocorrosion of iron, aluminum, and zinc and it was shown that produced H2 can be utilized by hydrogenotrophic methanogens to convert CO2 to CH4. Addition of iron and copper to SW resulted in inhibition of CH4 production, while addition of aluminum and zinc resulted in higher CH4 production. This suggested that aluminum and zinc contribute to

  17. GRI methane chemistry program review meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

    1997-02-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

  18. Source attribution of methane emissions from global oil and gas production: results of bottom-up simulations over three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated gas flows which are converted into methane and ethane emissions. The associated gas flows are constructed from country-specific information on oil and gas production and associated gas generation and recovery, and coupled with generic assumptions to bridge regional information gaps on the fractions of unrecovered associated gas that is vented instead of flared. Summing up emissions from associated gas flows with global estimates of emissions from unintended leakage and natural gas transmission and distribution, the resulting global emissions of methane and ethane from oil and gas systems are reasonably consistent with corresponding estimates from top-down models. Also revealed is that the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990 had a significant impact on methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems.

  19. The effects of leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition on methane production and waste decomposition in a simulated tropical landfill.

    PubMed

    Sanphoti, N; Towprayoon, S; Chaiprasert, P; Nopharatana, A

    2006-10-01

    In order to increase methane production efficiency, leachate recirculation is applied in landfills to increase moisture content and circulate organic matter back into the landfill cell. In the case of tropical landfills, where high temperature and evaporation occurs, leachate recirculation may not be enough to maintain the moisture content, therefore supplemental water addition into the cell is an option that could help stabilize moisture levels as well as stimulate biological activity. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition on municipal solid waste decomposition and methane production in three anaerobic digestion reactors. Anaerobic digestion with leachate recirculation and supplemental water addition showed the highest performance in terms of cumulative methane production and the stabilization period time required. It produced an accumulated methane production of 54.87 l/kg dry weight of MSW at an average rate of 0.58 l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 180. The leachate recirculation reactor provided 17.04 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.14l/kg dry weight/d and reached the stabilization phase on day 290. The control reactor provided 9.02 l/kg dry weight at a rate of 0.10 l/kg dry weight/d, and reached the stabilization phase on day 270. Increasing the organic loading rate (OLR) after the waste had reached the stabilization phase made it possible to increase the methane content of the gas, the methane production rate, and the COD removal. Comparison of the reactors' efficiencies at maximum OLR (5 kgCOD/m(3)/d) in terms of the methane production rate showed that the reactor using leachate recirculation with supplemental water addition still gave the highest performance (1.56 l/kg dry weight/d), whereas the leachate recirculation reactor and the control reactor provided 0.69 l/kg dry weight/d and 0.43 l/kg dry weight/d, respectively. However, when considering

  20. Methane metabolism in a temperate swamp

    SciTech Connect

    Amaral, J.A.; Knowles, R.

    1994-11-01

    Methane production has received much attention due not only to its importance as a terminal step in anaerobic organic matter degradation but also to its potentially significant role in climatic change and atmospheric chemistry. Wetlands are an important source and potential reservoir of methane, but the factors controlling its production and emission are not fully understood. This study examined in situ availability of substrates and the distribution of electron acceptors in a temperate peat swamp to determine how the chemistry and microbiology of the site affects methane production. Measurements were obtained in summer, fall and spring at two sites. Laboratory incubations with slurried peat soil were carried out. From the results, the authors speculate that along with differences in hydrology and chemical characteristics, heterogeneity in microbial activity may also contribute to the spatial variability of methane production and emission in wetlands. 45 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Methane emission from flooded soils - from microorganisms to the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas that is affected by anthropogenic activity. The annual budget of atmospheric methane, which is about 600 million tons, is by more than 75% produced by methanogenic archaea. These archaea are the end-members of a microbial community that degrades organic matter under anaerobic conditions. Flooded rice fields constitute a major source (about 10%) of atmospheric methane. After flooding of soil, anaerobic processes are initiated, finally resulting in the disproportionation of organic matter to carbon dioxide and methane. This process occurs in the bulk soil, on decaying organic debris and in the rhizosphere. The produced methane is mostly ventilated through the plant vascular system into the atmosphere. This system also allows the diffusion of oxygen into the rizosphere, where part of the produced methane is oxidized by aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. More than 50% of the methane production is derived from plant photosynthetic products and is formed on the root surface. Methanocellales are an important group of methanogenic archaea colonizing rice roots. Soils lacking this group seem to result in reduced root colonization and methane production. In rice soil methane is produced by two major paths of methanogenesis, the hydrogenotrophic one reducing carbon dioxide to methane, and the aceticlastic one disproportionating acetate to methane and carbon dioxide. Theoretically, at least two third of the methane should be produced by aceticlastic and the rest by hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. In nature, however, the exact contribution of the two paths can vary from zero to 100%. Several environmental factors, such as temperature and quality of organic matter affect the path of methane production. The impact of these factors on the composition and activity of the environmental methanogenic microbial community will be discussed.

  2. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    PubMed

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  3. Mechanisms for the suppression of methane production in peatland soils by a humic substance analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, R.; Keller, J. K.; Jin, Q.; Bohannan, B. J. M.; Bridgham, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) production is often impeded in many northern peatland soils, although inorganic terminal electron acceptors (TEAs) are usually present in low concentrations in these soils. Recent studies suggest that humic substances in wetland soils can be utilized as organic TEAs for anaerobic respiration and may directly inhibit CH4 production. Here we utilize the humic analog anthraquinone-2, 6-disulfonate (AQDS) to explore the importance of humic substances, and their effects on the temperature sensitivity of anaerobic decomposition, in two peatland soils. In a bog peat, AQDS was not instantly utilized as a TEA, but greatly inhibited the fermentative production of acetate, carbon dioxide (CO2), and hydrogen (H2), as well as CH4 production. When added together with glucose, AQDS was partially reduced after a lag period of 5 to 10 days. In contrast, no inhibitory effect of AQDS on fermentation was found in a fen peat and AQDS was readily reduced as an organic TEA. The addition of glucose and AQDS to both bog and fen peats caused complicated temporal dynamics in the temperature sensitivity of CH4 production, reflecting temporal changes in the temperature responses of other carbon processes with effects on methanogenesis. Our results show that the humic analog AQDS can act both as an inhibitory agent and a TEA in peatland soils. The high concentrations of humic substances in northern peatlands may greatly influence the effect of climate change on soil carbon cycling in these ecosystems.

  4. Trimethylamine stimulated and dissolved organic matter inhibited methane production in sediment from the Poyang Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Liu, Chunying; Gong, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yuanmu; Chen, Chunli

    2016-10-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted from wetlands contributes significantly to the greenhouse effect. The Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, is fed by five rivers and connects to the Yangtze River. The area of the lake fluctuates dramatically between drawdown and flood periods with large areas of wetlands. In order to understand the CH4 production capacity and factors that influence CH4 production in the wetland, a static closed chamber combined with a gas chromatograph technique was used to investigate the influence of substrates and electron acceptors on methanogenesis. The results showed that CH4 production capacity of sediments from the Poyang Lake was [Formula: see text] and it was stimulated by trimethylamine (TMA) to a great extent. Incubation temperature played a vital role on CH4 production in sediments and the optimum temperature for methanogenesis was 35°C. Minimum CH4 production capacity occurred with the addition of FeCl3, and the inhibitory effects of electron acceptors decreased in the sequence: FeCl3 > MnO2 > DOM > Fe2O3. In this study, DOM was demonstrated as one of the inhibitors to methanogenesis and TMA was the main substrate of methanogens in the sediments of the Poyang Lake whose pH value is 7.83.

  5. Potential of Immobilized Whole-Cell Methylocella tundrae as a Biocatalyst for Methanol Production from Methane.

    PubMed

    Mardina, Primata; Li, Jinglin; Patel, Sanjay K S; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul; Selvaraj, Chandrabose

    2016-07-28

    Methanol is a versatile compound that can be biologically synthesized from methane (CH4) by methanotrophs using a low energy-consuming and environment-friendly process. Methylocella tundrae is a type II methanotroph that can utilize CH4 as a carbon and energy source. Methanol is produced in the first step of the metabolic pathway of methanotrophs and is further oxidized into formaldehyde. Several parameters must be optimized to achieve high methanol production. In this study, we optimized the production conditions and process parameters for methanol production. The optimum incubation time, substrate, pH, agitation rate, temperature, phosphate buffer and sodium formate concentration, and cell concentration were determined to be 24 h, 50% CH4, pH 7, 150 rpm, 30°C, 100 mM and 50 mM, and 18 mg/ml, respectively. The optimization of these parameters significantly improved methanol production from 0.66 to 5.18 mM. The use of alginate-encapsulated cells resulted in enhanced methanol production stability and reusability of cells after five cycles of reuse under batch culture conditions.

  6. Reducing methane production by supplementation of Terminalia chebula RETZ. containing tannins and saponins.

    PubMed

    Anantasook, Nirawan; Wanapat, Metha; Gunun, Pongsatorn; Cherdthong, Anusorn

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of Terminalia chebula Retz. meal supplementation on rumen fermentation and methane (CH4 ) production by using an in vitro gas technique. The experimental design was a completely randomized design (CRD) and the dietary treatments were T. chebula supplementation at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 mg with 0.5 g of roughage and concentrate ratio at 60:40. The results revealed that cumulative gas production (96 h of incubation) were higher (P < 0.01) with T. chebula supplementation at 12, 16 and 20 mg than other treatments. However, in vitro dry matter degradability (IVDMD) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) were not significantly different among treatments (P > 0.05). The NH3 -N concentrations tended to quadratically increase with increasing levels of T. chebula in the diet. In addition, total volatile fatty acids (VFA) and propionate concentrations were increased (P < 0.01), while acetate concentration, acetate-to-propionate ratio, CH4 production and protozoal populations were decreased (P < 0.01) when supplemented with T. chebula at 8, 12 and 16 mg, respectively. Based on this study, it could be concluded that supplementation of T. chebula at 12 mg could improve rumen fermentation by reducing CH4 production and protozoa populations, thus improving in vitro gas production and VFA profiles.

  7. Effects of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles on methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Wu, Lijuan; Chen, Yinguang; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Liu, Kun; Huang, Haining

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge is regarded as an efficient way to reuse sludge organic matter to produce methane. In this study, short-term and long-term exposure experiments were conducted to investigate the possible effects of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on methane production from anaerobic co-digestion of primary and excess sludge. The data showed that TiO2 NPs had no measurable impact on methane production, even at a high concentration (150 mg/g total suspended solids (TSS)). However, short-term (8 days) exposure to 30 or 150 mg/g-TSS of ZnO NPs significantly decreased methane production. More importantly, these negative effects of ZnO NPs on anaerobic sludge co-digestion were not alleviated by increasing the adaptation time to 105 days. Further studies indicated that the presence of ZnO NPs substantially decreased the abundance of methanogenic archaea, which reduced methane production. Meanwhile, the activities of some key enzymes involved in methane production, such as protease, acetate kinase, and coenzyme F420, were remarkably inhibited by the presence of ZnO NPs, which was also an important reason for the decreased methane production. These results provide a better understanding of the potential risks of TiO2 and ZnO NPs to methane production from anaerobic sludge co-digestion.

  8. Economic Analysis of Planting Forests on Rice Lands in Texas: Sequestering Carbon and Avoiding Methane Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronrad, G. D.; Huang, C.

    2005-12-01

    Global climate change is predicted due to increases in greenhouse gasses (i.e. CO2, CH4, CFCs, N2O, O3) in the atmosphere caused by human activities. The atmospheric concentration of methane (CH4), which absorbs and retains heat 21 times more effectively than CO2, has increased. Anaerobic bacterial activity in rice paddies constitutes one of major emission sources of CH4. The rice fields of Texas, for example, accounted for an annual CH4 emission of between 1.1 and 1.6 million tons of CO2 equivalent between 1990 and 2000. Converting marginal rice fields to forests plantations will remove CO2 from the atmosphere, sequester carbon in the forests and prevent the production of CH4. Therefore, carbon credits can be claimed for the carbon sequestered and the avoidance of CH4 production. Analyses were conducted to calculate the amount of carbon sequestered and methane avoided, and the profitability, measured in net present worth (NPW), of managing loblolly pine plantation for 1) timber production only, 2) the dual products of timber products and carbon credits in forests planted on marginal agricultural and unused pastureland and 3) the dual products of timber and carbon storage in forests planted on marginal rice lands. Calculations were performed using three discount rates, three site qualities and five prices for carbon credits. The results indicate that on average quality land, using a discount rate of 8 percent, forests planted on marginal agricultural and unused pastureland earn a NPW of 346 per acre from timber production only; a NPW of 438 per acre from timber and carbon credits (54.4 tons of carbon sequestered), assuming carbon is worth 10 per ton, during one rotation (32 years). The profitability of forest management increases due to the inclusion of carbon credits. The profitability of planting forests on marginal rice fields is even higher, earning a NPW of 566 per acre from timber and carbon credits (54.4 tons of C sequestered and 33.3 tons of C emission

  9. Examining Methane and Non-methane Hydrocarbons in an Oil and Gas Production Area using Low-cost Sensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, A. M.; Piedrahita, R.; Halliday, H.; Hannigan, M.; Masson, N.; Casey, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    During the 2014 FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ sampling campaigns a network of next-generation, low-cost air quality monitors were placed throughout the Colorado Front Range area. The network covered areas ranging from high saturation of oil and gas development to no development. We are leveraging the monitors' multiple 'off-the-shelf' sensors to collect and analyze continuous data on volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The monitors were developed at the University of Colorado Boulder and include different VOC sensor models, as well as sensors for other gas-phase pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide and ozone). Using high-quality methane and non-methane hydrocarbon data collected by the Penn State Native Trailer research team and Armin Wisthaler's research team (University of Oslo) as a reference we can calibrate data for one of our monitors. Additionally, through the use of various quantification models we can characterize sensor responses to specific VOCs and groups of VOCs. The primary monitor was located at the Native Trailer in Platteville throughout the study. By using this monitor for secondary field normalization, we can apply our quantification methods to the remaining monitors in the network. The sensor network data provides greater spatial resolution than would be possible with fewer, more expensive instruments. In addition to discussing the quantification of low-cost sensors, we will examine how the spatial and temporal variability of hydrocarbon concentrations throughout the area relates to sources, specifically oil and gas development and its impacts on air quality. Although more research is needed, low-cost sensor arrays have the potential to support reference-quality measurements and expand our capacity in future oil and gas related research.

  10. Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1993-06-24

    The role of freshwater peatlands in the global methane cycle remains uncertain. Field measurements of methane emissions tend to be highly variable across a peatland and exhibit sharp seasonal fluctuations. The process of extrapolating these variable measurements to regional estimates is further complicated by rudimentary knowledge of the environmental controls can the production and emissions of methane from peat. The distribution of methanogenesis within the peat profile will strongly influence the response of methane emissions to potential climatic changes. During the summers of 1990 and 1991 we conducted a study on the mechanisms for the production, transport, and storage of methane within the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatland region as the regional climate shifted from extreme drought to a period of normal rainfall. This natural experiment provided unexpected insights on the linkages among climate, hydrology, and the methane cycle in large peat basins. This report presents project progress for period July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

  11. A fuzzy-logic-based controller for methane production in anaerobic fixed-film reactors.

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Latrille, E; Ruano, M V; Steyer, J P

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to develop a controller for biogas production in continuous anaerobic fixed-bed reactors, which used effluent total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration as control input in order to prevent process acidification at closed loop. To this aim, a fuzzy-logic-based control system was developed, tuned and validated in an anaerobic fixed-bed reactor at pilot scale that treated industrial winery wastewater. The proposed controller varied the flow rate of wastewater entering the system as a function of the gaseous outflow rate of methane and VFA concentration. Simulation results show that the proposed controller is capable to achieve great process stability even when operating at high VFA concentrations. Pilot results showed the potential of this control approach to maintain the process working properly under similar conditions to the ones expected at full-scale plants.

  12. Energy-efficient methane production from macroalgal biomass through chemo disperser liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Tamilarasan, K; Kavitha, S; Rajesh Banu, J; Arulazhagan, P; Yeom, Ick Tae

    2017-03-01

    In this study, an effort has been made to reduce the energy cost of liquefaction by coupling a mechanical disperser with a chemical (sodium tripolyphosphate). In terms of the cost and specific energy demand of liquefaction, the algal biomass disintegrated at 12,000rpm for 30min, and an STPP dosage of about 0.04g/gCOD was chosen as an optimal parameter. Chemo disperser liquefaction (CDL) was found to be energetically and economically sustainable in terms of liquefaction, methane production, and net profit (15%, 0.14gCOD/gCOD, and 4 USD/Ton of algal biomass) and preferable to disperser liquefaction (DL) (10%, 0.11 gCOD/gCOD, and -475 USD/Ton of algal biomass).

  13. Stable hydrogen production by methane steam reforming in a two zone fluidized bed reactor: Experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Moreno, L.; Soler, J.; Herguido, J.; Menéndez, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Two Zone Fluidized Bed Reactor concept is proposed for hydrogen production via the steam reforming of methane (SRM) including integrated catalyst regeneration. In order to study the effect of the contact mode, the oxidative SRM has been carried out over a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst using a fixed bed reactor (fBR), a conventional fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) and the proposed two-zone fluidized bed reactor (TZFBR). The technical feasibility of these reactors has been studied experimentally, investigating their performance (CH4 conversion, CO and H2 selectivity, and H2 global yield) and stability under different operating conditions. Coke generation in the process has been verified by several techniques. A stable performance was obtained in the TZFBR, where coke formation was counteracted with continuous catalyst regeneration. The viability of the TZFBR for carrying out this process with a valuable global yield to hydrogen is demonstrated.

  14. Early prediction of Biochemical Methane Potential through statistical and kinetic modelling of initial gas production.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Sten; Nistor, Mihaela; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A major drawback of Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) tests is their long test duration, which could be reduced substantially if the final gas production could be predicted at an earlier stage. For this purpose, this study evaluates 61 different algorithms for their capability to predict the final BMP and required degradation time based on data from 138 BMP tests of various substrate types. By combining the best algorithms it was possible to predict the BMP with a relative root mean squared error (rRMSE) of less than 10% just 6days after initiation of the experiment. The results from this study indicate that there is a possibility to shorten the test length substantially by combining laboratory tests and intelligent prediction algorithms. Shorter test duration may widen the possible applications for BMP tests in full-scale biogas plants, allowing for a better selection and proper pricing of biomass.

  15. Development of Vanadium-Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane.

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

    1997-07-30

    This document is the seventeenth quarterly technical progress report under Contract No. DE-AC22-92PC92110 `Development of Vanadium- Phosphate Catalysts for Methanol Production by Selective Oxidation of Methane` and covers the period April-June, 1997. Vanadium phosphate, vanadyl pyrophosphate specifically, is used commercially to oxidize butane to maleic anhydride and is one of the few examples of an active and selective oxidation catalyst for alkanes. In this project we are examining this catalyst for the methane oxidation reaction. Initial process variable and kinetic studies indicated that vanadyl pyrophosphate is a reasonably active catalyst below 500{degrees}C but produces CO as the primary product, no formaldehyde or methanol were observed. A number of approaches for modification of the catalyst to improve selectivity have been tried. Results obtained earlier in this project are summarized under Project Description in the body of this report. Iron phosphate and iron phosphate supported on silica catalysts have been shown in our previous work to produce much higher yields of partial oxidation products from methane than VPO. During this quarter we have expanded these studies dramatically by detailed testing of a new silica support, by performance of detailed kinetic and product selectivity studies on the quartz form of FePO{sub 4}, both unsupported and supported on silica, by testing of a mixed valence iron phosphate Fe{sub 4}(P{sub 2}0{sub 7}), and by detailed characterization of and other materials by a number of methods including Moessbauer spectroscopy. The most selective catalyst examined to date is FePO{sub 4} supported on silica. This material has produced formaldehyde with space time yields of nearly 500 g/kg-h. Methanol yields are low but quantifiable at roughly 10 g/kg-h. Interestingly, addition of water to the feed gas produces large improvements in the formaldehyde yield by suppression of the parallel reaction to form carbon dioxide. Increasing

  16. Combination effects of nitrocompounds, pyromellitic diimide, and 2-bromoethanesulfonate on in vitro ruminal methane production and fermentation of a grain-rich feed.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan-Feng; Yang, Hong-Jian

    2012-01-11

    An L(16) (4(5)) orthogonal experimental design was used to evaluate combination effects of nitroethane (0-15 mM), 2-nitroethanol (0-15 mM), 2-nitro-1-propanol (0-15 mM), pyromellitic diimide (0-0.07 mM), and 2-bromoethanesulfonate (0-0.05 mM) on in vitro ruminal fermentation of a grain-rich feed. In vitro dry matter disappearance was adversely affected by these inhibitors, while cumulative gas production was not affected. Volatile fatty acid production was increased by nitroethane and 2-bromoethanesulfonate in a dose-dependent manner and was decreased by 2-nitroethanol and pyromellitic diimide. All inhibitor treatments increased the molar acetate proportion, while decreasing proportions of propionate and butyrate; hydrogen recovery was decreased by 36.9-45.2%; and methane production was reduced by 95.2-99.2%. The methanogenesis inhibition ranked: nitroethane > 2-nitroethanol > 2-nitro-1-propanol > 2-bromoethanesulfonate > pyromellitic diimide; combined concentrations of 5, 5, 5, 0.02, and 0.03 mM, respectively, gave the optimal inhibiting efficiency. These results may provide a reference to develop effective mitigation of methane emission from ruminants.

  17. Biological Production of Methane from Lunar Mission Solid Waste: An Initial Feasibility Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Richard; Garland, Jay; Janine, Captain

    A preliminary assessment was made of the potential for biological production of methane from solid waste generated during an early planetary base mission to the moon. This analysis includes: 1) estimation of the amount of biodegradable solid waste generated, 2) background on the potential biodegradability of plastics given their significance in solid wastes, and 3) calculation of potential methane production from the estimate of biodegradable waste. The completed analysis will also include the feasibility of biological methane production costs associated with the biological processing of the solid waste. NASA workshops and Advanced Life Support documentation have estimated the projected amount of solid wastes generated for specific space missions. From one workshop, waste estimates were made for a 180 day transit mission to Mars. The amount of plastic packaging material was not specified, but our visual examination of trash returned from stocktickerSTS missions indicated a large percentage would be plastic film. This plastic, which is not biodegradable, would amount to 1.526 kgdw crew-1 d-1 or 6.10 kgdw d-1 for a crew of 4. Over a mission of 10 days this would amount to 61 kgdw of plastics and for an 180 day lunar surface habitation it would be nearly 1100 kgdw . Approx. 24 % of this waste estimate would be biodegradable (human fecal waste, food waste, and paper), but if plastic packaging was replaced with biodegradable plastic, then 91% would be biodegradable. Plastics are man-made long chain polymeric molecules, and can be divided into two main groups; thermoplastics and thermoset plastics. Thermoplastics comprise over 90% of total plastic use in the placecountry-regionUnited States and are derived from polymerization of olefins via breakage of the double bond and subsequent formation of additional carbon to carbon bonds. The resulting sole-carbon chain polymers are highly resistant to biodegradation and hydrolytic cleavage. Common thermoplastics include low

  18. Comparative study of the methane production based on the chemical compositions of Mangifera Indica and Manihot Utilissima leaves.

    PubMed

    Mambanzulua Ngoma, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Sumbu Zola, Eric; Culot, Marc; Fievez, Thierry; Thonart, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Leaves of Mangifera Indica (MI, mango leaves) and Manihot Utilissima (MU, cassava leaves) are available in tropical regions and are the most accessible vegetal wastes of Kinshasa, capital of Democratic Republic of Congo. These wastes are not suitably managed and are not rationally valorized. They are abandoned in full air, on the soil and in the rivers. They thus pollute environment. By contrast, they can be recuperated and treated in order to produce methane (energy source), organic fertilizer and clean up the environment simultaneously. The main objective of this study was to investigate methane production from MI and MU leaves by BMP tests at 30°C. The yields achieved from the anaerobic digestion of up to 61.3 g raw matter in 1 l medium were 0.001 l/g and 0.100 l CH4/g volatile solids of MI and MU leaves, respectively. The yield of MU leaves was in the range mentioned in the literature for other leaves because of a poor presence of bioactive substrates, and low C/N ratio. This methane yield corresponded to 7% of calorific power of wood. By contrast, the methane yield from MI leaves was almost nil suggesting some metabolism inhibition because of their rich composition in carbon and bioactive substrates. Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded. Therefore, methane production from the sole MI leaves seems unfavorable by comparison to MU leaves at the ambient temperature in tropical regions. Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers. However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion.

  19. Vertical Distribution of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons During Winter Ozone Production Events in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, C. R.; Helmig, D.; Evans, J.; Hueber, J.; Park, J.; Boylan, P.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are primarily linked to anthropogenic fossil fuel activities, such as oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, and are important tropospheric ozone precursors. The Uintah Basin, Utah, is a region of heavy oil and natural gas development where high winter-time ozone production events have been observed during strong inversions when there is snow cover present. In the winters of 2012 and 2013, we conducted measurements of methane and NMHC during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study. NMHC were monitored along a vertical gradient up to 150 m using a flux tower and tethered balloon. In 2013, measurements of NMHC were also conducted from within the snowpack. In 2012, no high ozone events were observed. In contrast, during the 2013 study, several periods of high ozone occurred concurrently with strong increases in ambient NMHC. Here, we present vertical profile measurements of C2-C5 alkanes, benzene and toluene comparing 2012 and 2013. Data from 2013 show strong vertical gradients with build-up of NMHC and ozone near the surface during inversion events, with wash out of both ozone and ozone precursors during low pressure front passage from the west. The NOAA/INSTAAR global flask network provides a useful comparison for expected regional background values of NMHC, and we find up to a 570-fold enhancement in Uintah, providing evidence for the importance of local emissions sources. Investigation of NMHC ratios reveals distinctly different values in the ambient air and within the snowpack, suggesting active radical chemistry occurring in the snow. Analysis of butane and pentane isomer ratios points towards the presence of chlorine radicals, indicating that the snow may serve as a reactive chlorine reservoir that may enhance ozone production chemistry.

  20. Methane emission of Santa Inês sheep fed cottonseed by-products containing different levels of gossypol.

    PubMed

    Lima, Paulo de Mello Tavares; Oliveira, Pedro Batelli; Campeche, Aline; Moreira, Guilherme Dias; Paim, Tiago do Prado; McManus, Concepta; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz; Dantas, Angela Maria Morais; de Souza, Jurandir Rodrigues; Louvandini, Helder

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the methane (CH4) emission of Santa Inês sheep fed cottonseed by-products, verifying if the gossypol content of these feedstuffs affects CH4 emission. Twelve late-lactating Santa Inês sheep (44.8 ± 7.5 kg body weight (BW)) were allocated in metabolic cages for an experimental period of 19 days, 14 days for adaptation and 5 days for measuring CH4 emission and dry matter intake (DMI). The animals were divided into four treatments, established in accordance with the cottonseed by-product used in concentrate formulation: Control (CON - no cottonseed by-product), Whole cottonseed (WCS), Cottonseed cake (CSC), and Cottonseed meal (CSM). The free gossypol level of the concentrates were 0, 1,276, 350, and 190 ppm for CON, WCS, CSC, and CSM, respectively. Also, the animals received Cynodon dactylon cv. Coast Cross hay, water, and mineral salt ad libitum. The ether extract content of the diets was balanced between treatments by including soybean oil in concentrates. The technique used to measure the CH4 emission was the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique, and the gas samples collected were quantified by analysis in gas chromatography system. The CH4 emission was evaluated considering the daily emission (g CH4/day); DMI (g CH4/kg DMI); and BW (g CH4/kg BW). No statistical difference was found (P > 0.05) between treatments for DMI and CH4 parameters. In the regression analysis, no significant relation (P > 0.05) between gossypol content and CH4 emission was observed. These results suggest that gossypol does not affect rumen methanogenesis.

  1. Effects of a gradually increased load of fish waste silage in co-digestion with cow manure on methane production.

    PubMed

    Solli, Linn; Bergersen, Ove; Sørheim, Roald; Briseid, Tormod

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the effects of an increased load of nitrogen-rich organic material on anaerobic digestion and methane production. Co-digestion of fish waste silage (FWS) and cow manure (CM) was studied in two parallel laboratory-scale (8L effective volume) semi-continuous stirred tank reactors (designated R1 and R2). A reactor fed with CM only (R0) was used as control. The reactors were operated in the mesophilic range (37°C) with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days, and the entire experiment lasted for 450 days. The rate of organic loading was raised by increasing the content of FWS in the feed stock. During the experiment, the amount (volume%) of FWS was increased stepwise in the following order: 3% - 6% - 13% - 16%, and 19%. Measurements of methane production, and analysis of volatile fatty acids, ammonium and pH in the effluents were carried out. The highest methane production from co-digestion of FWS and CM was 0.400 L CH4 gVS(-1), obtained during the period with loading of 16% FWS in R2. Compared to anaerobic digestion of CM only, the methane production was increased by 100% at most, when FWS was added to the feed stock. The biogas processes failed in R1 and R2 during the periods, with loadings of 16% and 19% FWS, respectively. In both reactors, the biogas processes failed due to overloading and accumulation of ammonia and volatile fatty acids.

  2. Comparative performance of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on methane production from ensiled sorghum forage.

    PubMed

    Rollini, Manuela; Sambusiti, Cecilia; Musatti, Alida; Ficara, Elena; Retinò, Isabella; Malpei, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on chemical composition and methane production from ensiled sorghum forage. Four commercial enzymatic preparations were tested and the two yielding the highest sugars release were added to evaluate any hydrolytic effect on both untreated and alkaline pretreated samples. In the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment trials, the highest sugar release was found with Primafast and BGL preparations (added at a final concentration 0.12 and 0.20 mL/g TS, respectively), with a total monomeric content of 12 and 6.5 g/L. Fibre composition analysis confirmed that the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to cellulose (up to 32 %) and hemicelluloses (up to 56 %) solubilisation, compared to the enzymatic pretreatment alone. BMP tests were performed on both untreated and pretreated samples, and time courses of methane production were fitted. Both enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to a methane production increase (304 and 362 mL CH4/g VS), compared to that of untreated sorghum (265 mL CH4/g VS), as  +15 and  +37 %, respectively. Moreover, higher specific methane production rates, compared to that of untreated sorghum (20.31 mL CH4/g VS/d), were obtained by applying the enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment (33.94 and 31.65 mL CH4/g VS/d), respectively.

  3. Monitoring Production of Methane and Carbon Dioxide and Consumption of Oxygen at Spills of Gasoline at UST Release Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methane is rarely measured at fuel spill sites, and most commonly the measurements are made on samples of ground water. Many ground water monitoring wells are intentionally screened across the water table. This was done to allow them to sample free product. However, if there is s...

  4. Analysis of methane production by microorganisms indigenous to a depleted oil reservoir for application in Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hajime; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Endo, Keita; Mayumi, Daisuke; Sakata, Susumu; Ikarashi, Masayuki; Miyagawa, Yoshihiro; Maeda, Haruo; Sato, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    We examined methane production by microorganisms collected from a depleted oilfield. Our results indicated that microorganisms indigenous to the petroleum reservoir could effectively utilize yeast extract, suggesting that the indigenous microorganisms and proteinaceous nutrients could be recruitable for Microbially Enhanced Oil Recovery.

  5. Anaerobic co-digestion of Tunisian green macroalgae Ulva rigida with sugar industry wastewater for biogas and methane production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Karray, Raida; Karray, Fatma; Loukil, Slim; Mhiri, Najla; Sayadi, Sami

    2017-03-01

    Ulva rigida is a green macroalgae, abundantly available in the Mediterranean which offers a promising source for the production of valuable biomaterials, including methane. In this study, anaerobic digestion assays in a batch mode was performed to investigate the effects of various inocula as a mixture of fresh algae, bacteria, fungi and sediment collected from the coast of Sfax, on biogas production from Ulva rigida. The results revealed that the best inoculum to produce biogas and feed an anaerobic reactor is obtained through mixing decomposed macroalgae with anaerobic sludge and water, yielding into 408mL of biogas. The process was then investigated in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) which led to an overall biogas production of 375mL with 40% of methane. Further co-digestion studies were performed in an anaerobic up-flow bioreactor using sugar wastewater as a co-substrate. A high biogas production yield of 114mL g(-1) VSadded was obtained with 75% of methane. The co-digestion proposed in this work allowed the recovery of natural methane, providing a promising alternative to conventional anaerobic microbial fermentation using Tunisian green macroalgae. Finally, in order to identify the microbial diversity present in the reactor during anaerobic digestion of Ulva rigida, the prokaryotic diversity was investigated in this bioreactor by the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method targeting the 16S rRNA gene.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of selected Italian agricultural and industrial residues (grape seeds and leather dust): combined methane production and digestate characterization.

    PubMed

    Caramiello, C; Lancellotti, I; Righi, F; Tatàno, F; Taurino, R; Barbieri, L

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental evaluation of methane production (obtained by anaerobic digestion) and detailed digestate characterization (with physical-chemical, thermo-gravimetric and mineralogical approaches) was conducted on two organic substrates, which are specific to Italy (at regional and national levels). One of the substrates was grape seeds, which have an agricultural origin, whereas the other substrate was vegetable-tanned leather dust, which has an industrial origin. Under the assumed experimental conditions of the performed lab-scale test series, the grape seed substrate exhibited a resulting net methane production of 175.0 NmL g volatile solids (VS)(-1); hence, it can be considered as a potential energy source via anaerobic digestion. Conversely, the net methane production obtained from the anaerobic digestion of the vegetable-tanned leather dust substrate was limited to 16.1 NmL gVS(-1). A detailed characterization of the obtained digestates showed that there were both nitrogen-containing compounds and complex organic compounds present in the digestate that was obtained from the mixture of leather dust and inoculum. As a general perspective of this experimental study, the application of diversified characterization analyzes could facilitate (1) a better understanding of the main properties of the obtained digestates to evaluate their potential valorization, and (2) a combination of the digestate characteristics with the corresponding methane productions to comprehensively evaluate the bioconversion process.

  7. Evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during primary and enhanced coalbed methane production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespinasse Fung, Diane Jael

    In this thesis I present an evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during coalbed methane (CBM) production and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production by CO2 injection. This evaluation is based on a workflow previously developed for monitoring CO2 storage in the Big George coalbeds in the Powder River Basin. I study the changes in seismic and the AVO response associated with coalbeds during primary production using a data set from the Mannville coals, which represent one of the most important CBM resources in the Province of Alberta. Using published data, I perform a single well flow simulation to make an assessment of its production forecast in a 10 year period. The flow simulation provides information on methane saturation and reservoir pressure during production, while the changes in porosity and permeability due to depletion are estimated according to the Palmer and Mansoori permeability model. Using well log data of the Corbett Field and the results of the flow simulation, I complete a Gassmann fluid substitution to replace brine by a mixture of brine and methane in the pore space and estimate the variations in Vp, Vs and density due to changes in fluid saturation. I evaluate offset dependent synthetic seismograms before and after fluid substitution, and I use different coalbed thicknesses to establish resolution limits. To observe significant changes in the character and phase of the wavelet due to the replacement of brine by methane I find that coalbed thickness must be at least 10 m, also in terms of AVO I observe that there is a decrease in amplitude with offset caused by the presence of methane in the pore space. Using the same methodology and production data from the Fruitland Coals Fairway in the North of the San Juan Basin U.S.A, which is considered the most productive CBM reservoir in the world, I evaluate Elastic Impedance (EI) and Elastic Impedance Coefficient (EC) response during ECBM by CO2 injection. In this case, I

  8. Methane-cycling communities in a permafrost-affected soil on Herschel Island, Western Canadian Arctic: active layer profiling of mcrA and pmoA genes.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Béatrice A; Dziduch, Isabel; Liebner, Susanne; Ganzert, Lars; Lantuit, Hugues; Pollard, Wayne; Wagner, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    In Arctic wet tundra, microbial controls on organic matter decomposition are likely to be altered as a result of climatic disruption. Here, we present a study on the activity, diversity and vertical distribution of methane-cycling microbial communities in the active layer of wet polygonal tundra on Herschel Island. We recorded potential methane production rates from 5 to 40 nmol h(-1) g(-1) wet soil at 10 °C and significantly higher methane oxidation rates reaching values of 6-10 μmol h(-1) g(-1) wet soil. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and cloning analyses of mcrA and pmoA genes demonstrated that both communities were stratified along the active layer vertical profile. Similar to other wet Arctic tundra, the methanogenic community hosted hydrogenotrophic (Methanobacterium) as well as acetoclastic (Methanosarcina and Methanosaeta) members. A pronounced shift toward a dominance of acetoclastic methanogens was observed in deeper soil layers. In contrast to related circum-Arctic studies, the methane-oxidizing (methanotrophic) community on Herschel Island was dominated by members of the type II group (Methylocystis, Methylosinus, and a cluster related to Methylocapsa). The present study represents the first on methane-cycling communities in the Canadian Western Arctic, thus advancing our understanding of these communities in a changing Arctic.

  9. Body fat mobilization in early lactation influences methane production of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Bielak, A.; Derno, M.; Tuchscherer, A.; Hammon, H. M.; Susenbeth, A.; Kuhla, B.

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain fatty acids mobilized during early lactation of dairy cows are increasingly used as energy substrate at the expense of acetate. As the synthesis of acetate in the rumen is closely linked to methane (CH4) production, we hypothesized that decreased acetate utilization would result in lower ruminal acetate levels and thus CH4 production. Twenty heifers were sampled for blood, rumen fluid and milk, and CH4 production was measured in respiration chambers in week −4, +5, +13 and +42 relative to first parturition. Based on plasma non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentration determined in week +5, animals were grouped to the ten highest (HM; NEFA > 580 μmol) and ten lowest (LM; NEFA < 580 μmol) mobilizing cows. Dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield and ruminal short-chain fatty acids did not differ between groups, but CH4/DMI was lower in HM cows in week +5. There was a negative regression between plasma NEFA and plasma acetate, between plasma NEFA and CH4/DMI and between plasma cholecystokinin and CH4/DMI in week +5. Our data show for the first time that fat mobilization of the host in early lactation is inversely related with ruminal CH4 production and that this effect is not attributed to different DMI. PMID:27306038

  10. Spatially explicit methane emissions from petroleum production and the natural gas system in California.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seongeun; Millstein, Dev; Fischer, Marc L

    2014-05-20

    We present a new, spatially resolved inventory of methane (CH4) emissions based on US-EPA emission factors and publically available activity data for 2010 California petroleum production and natural gas production, processing, transmission, and distribution. Compared to official California bottom-up inventories, our initial estimates are 3 to 7 times higher for the petroleum and natural gas production sectors but similar for the natural gas transmission and distribution sectors. Evidence from published "top-down" atmospheric measurement campaigns within Southern California supports our initial emission estimates from production and processing but indicates emission estimates from transmission and distribution are low by a factor of approximately 2. To provide emission maps with more accurate total emissions we scale the spatially resolved inventory by sector-specific results from a Southern California aircraft measurement campaign to all of California. Assuming uncertainties are determined by the uncertainties estimated in the top-down study, our estimated state total CH4 emissions are 541 ± 144 Gg yr(-1) (as compared with 210.7 Gg yr(-1) in California's current official inventory), where the majority of our reported uncertainty is derived from transmission and distribution. We note uncertainties relative to the mean for a given region are likely larger than that for the State total, emphasizing the need for additional measurements in undersampled regions.

  11. Cultivation of a native alga for biomass and biofuel accumulation in coal bed methane production water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgskiss, Logan H.; Nagy, Justin; Barnhart, Elliott P.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Fields, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Coal bed methane (CBM) production has resulted in thousands of ponds in the Powder River Basin of low-quality water in a water-challenged region. A green alga isolate, PW95, was isolated from a CBM production pond, and analysis of a partial ribosomal gene sequence indicated the isolate belongs to the Chlorococcaceae family. Different combinations of macro- and micronutrients were evaluated for PW95 growth in CBM water compared to a defined medium. A small level of growth was observed in unamended CBM water (0.15 g/l), and biomass increased (2-fold) in amended CBM water or defined growth medium. The highest growth rate was observed in CBM water amended with both N and P, and the unamended CBM water displayed the lowest growth rate. The highest lipid content (27%) was observed in CBM water with nitrate, and a significant level of lipid accumulation was not observed in the defined growth medium. Growth analysis indicated that nitrate deprivation coincided with lipid accumulation in CBM production water, and lipid accumulation did not increase with additional phosphorus limitation. The presented results show that CBM production wastewater can be minimally amended and used for the cultivation of a native, lipid-accumulating alga.

  12. Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, D.I.

    1992-04-09

    Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

  13. Development of vanadium-phosphate catalysts for methanol production by selective oxidation of methane. Quarterly report, July - September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, R.L.; Alptekin, G.O.

    1996-12-01

    This document covers the period July-September, 1996. Activities included studies of the oxidation of dimethyl ether over vanadyl pyrophosphate and synthesis of all previously acquired kinetic data. This synthesis revealed the need for additional data on methane and methanol oxidation and these experiments were performed. A further series of methanol oxidation/dehydration experiments was conducted on samples with varying surface acidity that have been described in earlier reports. Oxidation of methane over Cr- promoted VPO was also reinvestigated. The kinetic studies performed to date allow us to determine optimum conditions for methanol and formaldehyde production from methane using VPO catalysts, and in particular determine the effect of lean conditions (excess oxygen), oxygen deficient conditions (used in most other methane oxidation studies), and the potential of using the catalyst as a stoichiometric oxidant or oxygen carrier. However, unpromoted VPO yields only CO as the primary oxidation product. Studies of promoters have shown improvements in the formaldehyde selectivity but no methanol has been observed. The best promoters tested have been Fe and Cr (results for Cr are described in this report). We have also examined the use of iron phosphate for the methane conversion reaction. FePO{sub 4}is a more selectivity catalyst than the promoted VPO materials. Support of this iron phosphate on silica results in further improvements in selectivity. Current work is directed at understanding the improved selectivity for promoted VPO and at obtaining a knowledge of the optimum conditions for methane conversion of iron phosphate. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Regulators of coastal wetland methane production and responses to simulated global change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizza, Carmella; West, William E.; Jones, Stuart E.; Hart, Julia A.; Lamberti, Gary A.

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane (CH4) emissions to the atmosphere, which vary along salinity and productivity gradients. Global change has the potential to reshape these gradients and therefore alter future contributions of wetlands to the global CH4 budget. Our study examined CH4 production along a natural salinity gradient in fully inundated coastal Alaska wetlands. In the laboratory, we incubated natural sediments to compare CH4 production rates between non-tidal freshwater and tidal brackish wetlands, and quantified the abundances of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in these ecosystems. We also simulated seawater intrusion and enhanced organic matter availability, which we predicted would have contrasting effects on coastal wetland CH4 production. Tidal brackish wetlands produced less CH4 than non-tidal freshwater wetlands probably due to high sulfate availability and generally higher abundances of sulfate-reducing bacteria, whereas non-tidal freshwater wetlands had significantly greater methanogen abundances. Seawater addition experiments with freshwater sediments, however, did not reduce CH4 production, perhaps because the 14-day incubation period was too short to elicit a shift in microbial communities. In contrast, increased organic matter enhanced CH4 production in 75 % of the incubations, but this response depended on the macrophyte species added, with half of the species treatments having no significant effect. Our study suggests that CH4 production in coastal wetlands, and therefore their overall contribution to the global CH4 cycle, will be sensitive to increased organic matter availability and potentially seawater intrusion. To better predict future wetland contributions to the global CH4 budget, future studies and modeling efforts should investigate how multiple global change mechanisms will interact to impact CH4 dynamics.

  15. Quantifying atmospheric methane emissions from the Haynesville, Fayetteville, and northeastern Marcellus shale gas production regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Aikin, K. C.; Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J. B.; Holloway, J. S.; Lerner, B. M.; Nadkarni, R.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.; Parrish, D. D.

    2015-03-01

    We present measurements of methane (CH4) taken aboard a NOAA WP-3D research aircraft in 2013 over the Haynesville shale region in eastern Texas/northwestern Louisiana, the Fayetteville shale region in Arkansas, and the northeastern Pennsylvania portion of the Marcellus shale region, which accounted for the majority of Marcellus shale gas production that year. We calculate emission rates from the horizontal CH4 flux in the planetary boundary layer downwind of each region after subtracting the CH4 flux entering the region upwind. We find 1 day CH4 emissions of (8.0 ± 2.7) × 107 g/h from the Haynesville region, (3.9 ± 1.8) × 107 g/h from the Fayetteville region, and (1.5 ± 0.6) × 107 g/h from the Marcellus region in northeastern Pennsylvania. Finally, we compare the CH4 emissions to the total volume of natural gas extracted from each region to derive a loss rate from production operations of 1.0-2.1% from the Haynesville region, 1.0-2.8% from the Fayetteville region, and 0.18-0.41% from the Marcellus region in northeastern Pennsylvania. The climate impact of CH4 loss from shale gas production depends upon the total leakage from all production regions. The regions investigated in this work represented over half of the U.S. shale gas production in 2013, and we find generally lower loss rates than those reported in earlier studies of regions that made smaller contributions to total production. Hence, the national average CH4 loss rate from shale gas production may be lower than values extrapolated from the earlier studies.

  16. Enrichment of specific electro-active microorganisms and enhancement of methane production by adding granular activated carbon in anaerobic reactors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Hee-Deung

    2016-04-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) via conductive materials can provide significant benefits to anaerobic methane formation in terms of production amount and rate. Although granular activated carbon (GAC) demonstrated its applicability in facilitating DIET in methanogenesis, DIET in continuous flow anaerobic reactors has not been verified. Here, evidences of DIET via GAC were explored. The reactor supplemented with GAC showed 1.8-fold higher methane production rate than that without GAC (35.7 versus 20.1±7.1mL-CH4/d). Around 34% of methane formation was attributed to the biomass attached to GAC. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the enrichment of exoelectrogens (e.g. Geobacter) and hydrogenotrophic methanogens (e.g. Methanospirillum and Methanolinea) from the biomass attached to GAC. Furthermore, anodic and cathodic currents generation was observed in an electrochemical cell containing GAC biomass. Taken together, GAC supplementation created an environment for enriching the microorganisms involved in DIET, which increased the methane production rate.

  17. Improved methane production from waste activated sludge with low organic content by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10.

    PubMed

    Feng, L Y; Yang, L Q; Zhang, L X; Chen, H L; Chen, J

    2013-01-01

    Sludge with low organic content always results in an unsatisfactory performance, even failure of anaerobic digestion. The alkaline pretreatment effect on anaerobic digestion of sludge with low organic content has seldom been studied although it gives many benefits for sludge with high organic content. In this study the influence of alkaline pretreatment (pH 10, an effective alkaline pH) on the solubilization and methane production from waste activated sludge (WAS) with low organic content was investigated. Results from biochemical methane potential (BMP) experiments showed that anaerobic biodegradability of WAS was greatly improved by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10. Methane production from the current WAS under conditions of pretreatment time 4 h and digestion time 15 d was 139.6 mL/g VS (volatile solids), much higher than that from the unpretreated WAS with digestion time of 20 d (75.2 mL/g VS). Also, the solubilization of WAS was significantly accelerated by alkaline pretreatment. Mechanism exploration indicated that the general activities of anaerobic microorganisms, specific activities of key enzymes and the amounts of methanogens were enhanced by alkaline pretreatment at pH 10, showing good agreement with methane production.

  18. Production of fuel ethanol and methane from garbage by high-efficiency two-stage fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Koike, Yoji; An, Ming-Zhe; Tang, Yue-Qin; Syo, Tomohiro; Osaka, Noriko; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2009-12-01

    A two-stage fermentation process, consisting of a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) stage and a dry methane fermentation stage, was developed to utilize garbage for the production of fuel ethanol and methane. Garbage from families, canteens and concessionaires was used for the study. Saccharification method was studied and the results indicated that the liquefaction pretreatment and the combination of cellulase and glucoamylase was effective for polysaccharide hydrolysis of family garbage with a high content of holocellulose and that SSF was suitable for ethanol fermentation of garbage. Ethanol productivity could be markedly increased from 1.7 to 7.0 g/l/h by repeated-batch SSF of family garbage. A high ethanol productivity of 17.7 g/l/h was achieved when canteen garbage was used. The stillage after distillation was treated by dry methane fermentation and the results indicated that the stillage was almost fully digested and that about 850 ml of biogas was recovered from 1 g of volatile total solid (VTS). Approximately 85% of the energy of the garbage was converted to fuels, ethanol and methane by this process.

  19. Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) Characterization of Methane Gas Hydrate-Bearing Pressure Cores Collected from the Methane Production Test Site in the Eastern Nankai Trough, Offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, W. F.; Santamarina, J. C.; Dai, S.; Winters, W. J.; Yoneda, J.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J.; Suzuki, K.; Fujii, T.; Mason, D. H.; Bergeron, E.

    2014-12-01

    Pressure cores obtained at the Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, the site of the methane hydrate production test completed by the