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Sample records for affect mrna splicing

  1. Interpretation, stratification and evidence for sequence variants affecting mRNA splicing in complete human genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Shirley, Ben C; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Whitehead, Tyson; Costea, Paul I; Akan, Pelin; Rogan, Peter K

    2013-04-01

    Information theory-based methods have been shown to be sensitive and specific for predicting and quantifying the effects of non-coding mutations in Mendelian diseases. We present the Shannon pipeline software for genome-scale mutation analysis and provide evidence that the software predicts variants affecting mRNA splicing. Individual information contents (in bits) of reference and variant splice sites are compared and significant differences are annotated and prioritized. The software has been implemented for CLC-Bio Genomics platform. Annotation indicates the context of novel mutations as well as common and rare SNPs with splicing effects. Potential natural and cryptic mRNA splicing variants are identified, and null mutations are distinguished from leaky mutations. Mutations and rare SNPs were predicted in genomes of three cancer cell lines (U2OS, U251 and A431), which were supported by expression analyses. After filtering, tractable numbers of potentially deleterious variants are predicted by the software, suitable for further laboratory investigation. In these cell lines, novel functional variants comprised 6-17 inactivating mutations, 1-5 leaky mutations and 6-13 cryptic splicing mutations. Predicted effects were validated by RNA-seq analysis of the three aforementioned cancer cell lines, and expression microarray analysis of SNPs in HapMap cell lines. PMID:23499923

  2. Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) polymorphisms affect mRNA splicing, HDL levels, and sex-dependent cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Papp, Audrey C; Pinsonneault, Julia K; Wang, Danxin; Newman, Leslie C; Gong, Yan; Johnson, Julie A; Pepine, Carl J; Kumari, Meena; Hingorani, Aroon D; Talmud, Philippa J; Shah, Sonia; Humphries, Steve E; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Polymorphisms in and around the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein (CETP) gene have been associated with HDL levels, risk for coronary artery disease (CAD), and response to therapy. The mechanism of action of these polymorphisms has yet to be defined. We used mRNA allelic expression and splice isoform measurements in human liver tissues to identify the genetic variants affecting CETP levels. Allelic CETP mRNA expression ratios in 56 human livers were strongly associated with several variants 2.5-7 kb upstream of the transcription start site (e.g., rs247616 p = 6.4 × 10(-5), allele frequency 33%). In addition, a common alternatively spliced CETP isoform lacking exon 9 (Δ9), has been shown to prevent CETP secretion in a dominant-negative manner. The Δ 9 expression ranged from 10 to 48% of total CETP mRNA in 94 livers. Increased formation of this isoform was exclusively associated with an exon 9 polymorphism rs5883-C>T (p = 6.8 × 10(-10)) and intron 8 polymorphism rs9930761-T>C (5.6 × 10(-8)) (in high linkage disequilibrium with allele frequencies 6-7%). rs9930761 changes a key splicing branch point nucleotide in intron 8, while rs5883 alters an exonic splicing enhancer sequence in exon 9.The effect of these polymorphisms was evaluated in two clinical studies. In the Whitehall II study of 4745 subjects, both rs247616 and rs5883T/rs9930761C were independently associated with increased HDL-C levels in males with similar effect size (rs247616 p = 9.6 × 10(-28) and rs5883 p = 8.6 × 10(-10), adjusted for rs247616). In an independent multiethnic US cohort of hypertensive subjects with CAD (INVEST-GENE), rs5883T/rs9930761C alone were significantly associated with increased incidence of MI, stroke, and all-cause mortality in males (rs5883: OR 2.36 (CI 1.29-4.30), p = 0.005, n = 866). These variants did not reach significance in females in either study. Similar to earlier results linking low CETP activity with poor outcomes in males, our results suggest genetic, sex

  3. Molecular analysis of mutations affecting hprt mRNA splicing in human T-lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, A.M. Pisa Univ. ); Tates, A.D.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Vrieling, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Molecular analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hprt) cDNA from 6-thioguanine-resistant T-lymphocytes cloned from smoking and non-smoking adult donors showed that 35% of these mutants were defective in splicing of hprt mRNA. Among a set of 42 hprt splice mutants, the authors observed (1) complete loss of one or more exons, (2) partial loss of one exon, or (3) inclusion of part of an intron sequence between adjacent exons. Loss of exon 4 was significantly more frequent than of the other exons, suggesting that the sequences that regulate splicing of this exon are either larger than those of the other exons or especially prone to mutation. In order to identify the molecular nature of DNA alterations causing aberrant splicing of hprt mRNA, 17 splice mutants were analyzed in more detail by sequencing the genomic regions flanking the mis-spliced exon. Base pair substitutions or small deletions causing defective splicing were either detected in exon sequences or in splice site consensus sequences of introns.

  4. Motifs within the CA-repeat-rich region of Surfactant Protein B (SFTPB) intron 4 differentially affect mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjun; Ni, Lan; Silveyra, Patricia; Wang, Guirong; Noutsios, Georgios T; Singh, Anamika; DiAngelo, Susan L; Sanusi, Olabisi; Raval, Manmeet; Floros, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The first half of the surfactant protein B (SP-B) gene intron 4 is a CA-repeat-rich region that contains 11 motifs. To study the role of this region on SP-B mRNA splicing, minigenes were generated by systematic removal of motifs from either the 5′ or 3′ end. These were transfected in CHO cells to study their splicing efficiency. The latter was determined as the ratio of completely to incompletely spliced SP-B RNA. Our results indicate that SP-B intron 4 motifs differentially affect splicing. Motifs 8 and 9 significantly enhanced and reduced splicing of intron 4, respectively. RNA mobility shift assays performed with a Motif 8 sequence that contains a CAUC cis-element and cell extracts resulted in a RNA:protein shift that was lost upon mutation of the element. Furthermore, in silico analysis of mRNA secondary structure stability for minigenes with and without motif 8 indicated a correlation between mRNA stability and splicing ratio. We conclude that differential loss of specific intron 4 motifs results in one or more of the following: a) altered splicing, b) differences in RNA stability and c) changes in secondary structure. These, in turn, may affect SP-B content in lung health or disease. PMID:23687636

  5. ADAR2 affects mRNA coding sequence edits with only modest effects on gene expression or splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Allissa A; Cookson, Mark R; Galter, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases bind double stranded RNA and convert adenosine to inosine. Editing creates multiple isoforms of neurotransmitter receptors, such as with Gria2. Adar2 KO mice die of seizures shortly after birth, but if the Gria2 Q/R editing site is mutated to mimic the edited version then the animals are viable. We performed RNA-Seq on frontal cortices of Adar2(-/-) Gria2(R/R) mice and littermates. We found 56 editing sites with significantly diminished editing levels in Adar2 deficient animals with the majority in coding regions. Only two genes and 3 exons showed statistically significant differences in expression levels. This work illustrates that ADAR2 is important in site-specific changes of protein coding sequences but has relatively modest effects on gene expression and splicing in the adult mouse frontal cortex. PMID:26669816

  6. Nuclear m(6)A Reader YTHDC1 Regulates mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Roundtree, Ian A; He, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    N(6)-Methyladenosine (m(6)A) is emerging as a chemical mark that broadly affects the flow of genetic information in various biological processes in eukaryotes. Recently, Xiao et al. reported that the nuclear m(6)A reader protein YTHDC1 impacts mRNA splicing, providing a transcriptome-wide glance of splicing changes affected by this mRNA methylation reader protein. PMID:27050931

  7. Re-splicing of mature mRNA in cancer cells promotes activation of distant weak alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Kameyama, Toshiki; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-01-01

    Transcripts of the human tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) are aberrantly spliced in many cancers. A major aberrant splicing event on the TSG101 pre-mRNA involves joining of distant alternative 5′ and 3′ splice sites within exon 2 and exon 9, respectively, resulting in the extensive elimination of the mRNA. The estimated strengths of the alternative splice sites are much lower than those of authentic splice sites. We observed that the equivalent aberrant mRNA could be generated from an intron-less TSG101 gene expressed ectopically in breast cancer cells. Remarkably, we identified a pathway-specific endogenous lariat RNA consisting solely of exonic sequences, predicted to be generated by a re-splicing between exon 2 and exon 9 on the spliced mRNA. Our results provide evidence for a two-step splicing pathway in which the initial constitutive splicing removes all 14 authentic splice sites, thereby bringing the weak alternative splice sites into close proximity. We also demonstrate that aberrant multiple-exon skipping of the fragile histidine triad (FHIT) pre-mRNA in cancer cells occurs via re-splicing of spliced FHIT mRNA. The re-splicing of mature mRNA can potentially generate mutation-independent diversity in cancer transcriptomes. Conversely, a mechanism may exist in normal cells to prevent potentially deleterious mRNA re-splicing events. PMID:22675076

  8. In vitro Splicing of Influenza Viral NS1 mRNA and NS1-β -globin Chimeras: Possible Mechanisms for the Control of Viral mRNA Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotch, Stephen J.; Krug, Robert M.

    1986-08-01

    In influenza virus-infected cells, the splicing of the viral NS1 mRNA catalyzed by host nuclear enzymes is controlled so that the steady-state amount of the spliced NS2 mRNA is only 5-10% of that of the unspliced NS1 mRNA. Here we examine the splicing of NS1 mRNA in vitro, using nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We show that in addition to its consensus 5' and 3' splice sites, NS1 mRNA has an intron branch-point adenosine residue that was functional in lariat formation. Nonetheless, this RNA was not detectably spliced in vitro under conditions in which a human β -globin precursor was efficiently spliced. Using chimeric RNA precursors containing both NS1 and β -globin sequences, we show that the NS1 5' splice site was effectively utilized by the β -globin branch-point sequence and 3' splice site to form a spliced RNA, whereas the NS1 3' splice site did not function in detectable splicing in vitro, even in the presence of the β -globin branch-point sequence or in the presence of both the branch-point sequence and 5' exon and splice site from β -globin With the chimeric precursors that were not detectably spliced, as with NS1 mRNA itself, a low level of a lariat structure containing only intron and not 3' exon sequences was formed. The inability of the consensus 3' splice site of NS1 mRNA to function effectively in in vitro splicing suggests that this site is structurally inaccessible to components of the splicing machinery. Based on these results, we propose two mechanisms whereby NS1 mRNA splicing in infected cells is controlled via the accessibility of its 3' splice site.

  9. A selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Toki, Yasumichi; Sasaki, Katsunori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masayo; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Shindo, Motohiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Sawada, Koji; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Ohtake, Takaaki; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Hepcidin is a main regulator of iron metabolism, of which abnormal expression affects intestinal absorption and reticuloendothelial sequestration of iron by interacting with ferroportin. It is also noted that abnormal iron accumulation is one of the key factors to facilitate promotion and progression of cancer including hepatoma. By RT-PCR/agarose gel electrophoresis of hepcidin mRNA in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HLF, a smaller mRNA band was shown in addition to the wild-type hepcidin mRNA. From sequencing analysis, this additional band was a selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene, producing the transcript that encodes truncated peptide lacking 20 amino acids at the middle of preprohepcidin. In the present study, we used the digital PCR, because such a small amount of variant mRNA was difficult to quantitate by the conventional RT-PCR amplification. Among seven hepatoma-derived cell lines, six cell lines have significant copy numbers of this variant mRNA, but not in one cell line. In the transient transfection analysis of variant-type hepcidin cDNA, truncated preprohepcidin has a different character comparing with native preprohepcidin: its product is insensitive to digestion, and secreted into the medium as a whole preprohepcidin form without maturation. Loss or reduction of function of HAMP gene by aberrantly splicing may be a suitable phenomenon to obtain the proliferating advantage of hepatoma cells. PMID:27264950

  10. Quantitative Imaging of Single mRNA Splice Variants in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation via the precise control of the post-transcriptional step that occurs before mRNA translation. Errors in RNA splicing have been known to correlate with different diseases; however, a key limitation is the lack of technologies for live cell monitoring and quantification to understand the process of alternative splicing. Here, we report a spectroscopic strategy for quantitative imaging of mRNA splice variants in living cells, using nanoplasmonic dimer antennas. The spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1 were monitored at single copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of nanoplasmonic antennas targeting complementary mRNA sequences in live cells. Our study provides valuable insights on RNA and its transport in living cells, which has the potential to enhance our understanding of cellular protein complex, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis, and gene therapies. PMID:24747838

  11. TCGASpliceSeq a compendium of alternative mRNA splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Wong, Wing Chung; Brown, Robert; Akbani, Rehan; Su, Xiaoping; Broom, Bradley; Melott, James; Weinstein, John

    2016-01-01

    TCGA's RNASeq data represent one of the largest collections of cancer transcriptomes ever assembled. RNASeq technology, combined with computational tools like our SpliceSeq package, provides a comprehensive, detailed view of alternative mRNA splicing. Aberrant splicing patterns in cancers have been implicated in such processes as carcinogenesis, de-differentiation and metastasis. TCGA SpliceSeq (http://bioinformatics.mdanderson.org/TCGASpliceSeq) is a web-based resource that provides a quick, user-friendly, highly visual interface for exploring the alternative splicing patterns of TCGA tumors. Percent Spliced In (PSI) values for splice events on samples from 33 different tumor types, including available adjacent normal samples, have been loaded into TCGA SpliceSeq. Investigators can interrogate genes of interest, search for the genes that show the strongest variation between or among selected tumor types, or explore splicing pattern changes between tumor and adjacent normal samples. The interface presents intuitive graphical representations of splicing patterns, read counts and various statistical summaries, including percent spliced in. Splicing data can also be downloaded for inclusion in integrative analyses. TCGA SpliceSeq is freely available for academic, government or commercial use. PMID:26602693

  12. Interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations in genetic disease: review of the literature and guidelines for information-theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Caminsky, Natasha; Mucaki, Eliseos J.; Rogan, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of genomic variants has become one of the paramount challenges in the post-genome sequencing era. In this review we summarize nearly 20 years of research on the applications of information theory (IT) to interpret coding and non-coding mutations that alter mRNA splicing in rare and common diseases. We compile and summarize the spectrum of published variants analyzed by IT, to provide a broad perspective of the distribution of deleterious natural and cryptic splice site variants detected, as well as those affecting splicing regulatory sequences. Results for natural splice site mutations can be interrogated dynamically with Splicing Mutation Calculator, a companion software program that computes changes in information content for any splice site substitution, linked to corresponding publications containing these mutations. The accuracy of IT-based analysis was assessed in the context of experimentally validated mutations. Because splice site information quantifies binding affinity, IT-based analyses can discern the differences between variants that account for the observed reduced (leaky) versus abolished mRNA splicing. We extend this principle by comparing predicted mutations in natural, cryptic, and regulatory splice sites with observed deleterious phenotypic and benign effects. Our analysis of 1727 variants revealed a number of general principles useful for ensuring portability of these analyses and accurate input and interpretation of mutations. We offer guidelines for optimal use of IT software for interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations. PMID:25717368

  13. Interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations in genetic disease: review of the literature and guidelines for information-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Rogan, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of genomic variants has become one of the paramount challenges in the post-genome sequencing era. In this review we summarize nearly 20 years of research on the applications of information theory (IT) to interpret coding and non-coding mutations that alter mRNA splicing in rare and common diseases. We compile and summarize the spectrum of published variants analyzed by IT, to provide a broad perspective of the distribution of deleterious natural and cryptic splice site variants detected, as well as those affecting splicing regulatory sequences. Results for natural splice site mutations can be interrogated dynamically with Splicing Mutation Calculator, a companion software program that computes changes in information content for any splice site substitution, linked to corresponding publications containing these mutations. The accuracy of IT-based analysis was assessed in the context of experimentally validated mutations. Because splice site information quantifies binding affinity, IT-based analyses can discern the differences between variants that account for the observed reduced (leaky) versus abolished mRNA splicing. We extend this principle by comparing predicted mutations in natural, cryptic, and regulatory splice sites with observed deleterious phenotypic and benign effects. Our analysis of 1727 variants revealed a number of general principles useful for ensuring portability of these analyses and accurate input and interpretation of mutations. We offer guidelines for optimal use of IT software for interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations. PMID:25717368

  14. Alternative splicing of parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA: expression and stability

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, R S; Luchin, A I; Richard, V; Brena, R M; Lima, D; Rosol, T J

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a multifunctional protein that is often dysregulated in cancer. The human PTHrP gene is alternatively spliced into three isoforms, each with a unique 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), encoding 139, 173 and 141 amino acid proteins. The regulation of PTHrP mRNA isoform expression has not been completely elucidated, but it may be affected by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In this study, we examined differences in the PTHrP mRNA isoform expression in two squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC2/88 and HARA), an immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), and spontaneous human lung cancer with adjacent normal tissue. In addition, the effect of TGF-β1 on PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability was examined. Cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms occurred between the various cell lines, normal human lung, and immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT). PTHrP isoform expression pattern was significantly altered between normal lung tissue and the adjacent lung cancer. In vitro studies revealed that TGF-β1 differentially altered the mRNA steady-state levels and mRNA stability of the PTHrP isoforms. Protein–RNA binding studies identified different proteins binding to the 3′-UTR of the PTHrP isoforms (139) and (141), which may be important in the differential mRNA stability and response to cytokines between the PTHrP isoforms. The data demonstrate that there is cell-type specific expression of PTHrP mRNA isoforms, and disruption of the normal regulation during cancer progression may in part be associated with TGF-β1-induced changes in PTHrP mRNA isoform expression and stability. PMID:15291755

  15. Estimation of the minimum mRNA splicing error rate in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Skandalis, A

    2016-01-01

    The majority of protein coding genes in vertebrates contain several introns that are removed by the mRNA splicing machinery. Errors during splicing can generate aberrant transcripts and degrade the transmission of genetic information thus contributing to genomic instability and disease. However, estimating the error rate of constitutive splicing is complicated by the process of alternative splicing which can generate multiple alternative transcripts per locus and is particularly active in humans. In order to estimate the error frequency of constitutive mRNA splicing and avoid bias by alternative splicing we have characterized the frequency of splice variants at three loci, HPRT, POLB, and TRPV1 in multiple tissues of six vertebrate species. Our analysis revealed that the frequency of splice variants varied widely among loci, tissues, and species. However, the lowest observed frequency is quite constant among loci and approximately 0.1% aberrant transcripts per intron. Arguably this reflects the "irreducible" error rate of splicing, which consists primarily of the combination of replication errors by RNA polymerase II in splice consensus sequences and spliceosome errors in correctly pairing exons. PMID:26811995

  16. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Jollet, Arnaud; Lorain, Stéphanie; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin 2 (DNM2) is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3'-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5'-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development. PMID:27623444

  17. Relationship between mRNA expression of splice forms of the zeta1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and spatial memory in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Siba R; Magnusson, Kathy R

    2008-05-01

    Age-related changes in the protein and mRNA expression of some of the splice forms of the zeta1 (NR1) subunit of the NMDA receptor have been seen in mice and rats. The present study was designed to determine whether individual splice forms of the zeta1 subunit of the NMDA receptor within prefrontal/frontal cortical regions contribute to memory deficits during aging and whether experience in learning tasks can influence the expression of the splice forms. mRNA expression of 4 splice forms (zeta1-1, zeta1-3, zeta1-a and zeta1-b) and mRNA for all known splice forms (zeta1-pan) were examined by in situ hybridization. mRNA for C-terminal splice forms, zeta1-1 (+ C1 and + C2 cassettes) and zeta1-3 (+ C1 and + C2'), showed significant declines during aging in several brain regions even though overall zeta1-pan mRNA expression was not significantly affected by aging. This suggests that these splice forms are more influenced by aging than the subunit as a whole. There was an increase in the expression of zeta1-a (-N1 cassette) splice form in the behaviorally-experienced old mice relative to the younger groups. Old mice with high levels of mRNA expression for the zeta1-a splice form in orbital cortex showed the best performances in the working memory task, but the poorest performances in the cued, associative learning task. These results suggest that there is a complex interaction between zeta1 splice form expression and performance of memory tasks during aging. PMID:18374315

  18. Exon size affects competition between splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation in the immunoglobulin mu gene.

    PubMed

    Peterson, M L; Bryman, M B; Peiter, M; Cowan, C

    1994-01-01

    The alternative RNA processing of microseconds and microns mRNAs from a single primary transcript depends on competition between a cleavage-polyadenylation reaction to produce microseconds mRNA and a splicing reaction to produce microns mRNA. The ratio of microseconds to microns mRNA is regulated during B-cell maturation; relatively more spliced microns mRNA is made in B cells than in plasma cells. The balance between the efficiencies of splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation is critical to the regulation. The mu gene can be modified to either reduce or improve the efficiency of each reaction and thus alter the ratio of the two RNAs produced. However, as long as neither reaction is so strong that it totally dominates, expression of the modified mu genes is regulated in B cells and plasma cells. The current experiments reveal a relationship between the C mu 4 exon size and the microseconds/microns expression ratio. The shorter the distance between the C mu 4 5' splice site and the nearest upstream 3' splice site, the more spliced microns mRNA was produced. Conversely, when this exon was expanded, more microseconds mRNA was produced. Expression from these mu genes with altered exon sizes were regulated between B cells and plasma cells. Since RNA processing in the mu gene can be considered a competition between defining the C mu 4 exon as an internal exon (in microns mRNA) versus a terminal exon (in microseconds mRNA), exon size may affect the competition among factors interacting with this exon. PMID:7903422

  19. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-Von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A

    2011-11-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex-associated protein/elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase WT IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine whether oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/d for 28 d. An increase in WT IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after 8 d in six of eight individuals; after 28 d, the mean increase compared with baseline was significant (p = 0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients but also that effect seems to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine whether kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  20. Arabidopsis thaliana LSM proteins function in mRNA splicing and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Golisz, Anna; Sikorski, Pawel J.; Kruszka, Katarzyna; Kufel, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Sm-like (Lsm) proteins have been identified in all organisms and are related to RNA metabolism. Here, we report that Arabidopsis nuclear AtLSM8 protein, as well as AtLSM5, which localizes to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, function in pre-mRNA splicing, while AtLSM5 and the exclusively cytoplasmic AtLSM1 contribute to 5′–3′ mRNA decay. In lsm8 and sad1/lsm5 mutants, U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) was reduced and unspliced mRNA precursors accumulated, whereas mRNA stability was mainly affected in plants lacking AtLSM1 and AtLSM5. Some of the mRNAs affected in lsm1a lsm1b and sad1/lsm5 plants were also substrates of the cytoplasmic 5′–3′ exonuclease AtXRN4 and of the decapping enzyme AtDCP2. Surprisingly, a subset of substrates was also stabilized in the mutant lacking AtLSM8, which supports the notion that plant mRNAs are actively degraded in the nucleus. Localization of LSM components, purification of LSM-interacting proteins as well as functional analyses strongly suggest that at least two LSM complexes with conserved activities in RNA metabolism, AtLSM1-7 and AtLSM2-8, exist also in plants. PMID:23620288

  1. A purine-rich intronic element enhances alternative splicing of thyroid hormone receptor mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, M L; Wilson, C M; Munroe, S H

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian thyroid hormone receptor gene c-erbAalpha gives rise to two mRNAs that code for distinct isoforms, TRalpha1 and TRalpha2, with antagonistic functions. Alternative processing of these mRNAs involves the mutually exclusive use of a TRalpha1-specific polyadenylation site or TRalpha2-specific 5' splice site. A previous investigation of TRalpha minigene expression defined a critical role for the TRalpha2 5' splice site in directing alternative processing. Mutational analysis reported here shows that purine residues within a highly conserved intronic element, SEa2, enhance splicing of TRalpha2 in vitro as well as in vivo. Although SEalpha2 is located within the intron of TRalpha2 mRNA, it activates splicing of a heterologous dsx pre-mRNA when located in the downstream exon. Competition with wild-type and mutant RNAs indicates that SEalpha2 functions by binding trans-acting factors in HeLa nuclear extract. Protein-RNA crosslinking identifies several proteins, including SF2/ASF and hnRNP H, that bind specifically to SEalpha2. SEalpha2 also includes an element resembling a 5' splice site consensus sequence that is critical for splicing enhancer activity. Mutations within this pseudo-5' splice site sequence have a dramatic effect on splicing and protein binding. Thus SEa2 and its associated factors are required for splicing of TRalpha2 pre-mRNA. PMID:11421362

  2. Quantitative imaging of single mRNA splice variants in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyuwan; Cui, Yi; Lee, Luke P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Alternative messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing is a fundamental process of gene regulation, and errors in RNA splicing are known to be associated with a variety of different diseases. However, there is currently a lack of quantitative technologies for monitoring mRNA splice variants in cells. Here, we show that a combination of plasmonic dimer probes and hyperspectral imaging can be used to detect and quantify mRNA splice variants in living cells. The probes are made from gold nanoparticles functionalized with oligonucleotides and can hybridize to specific mRNA sequences, forming nanoparticle dimers that exhibit distinct spectral shifts due to plasmonic coupling. With this approach, we show that the spatial and temporal distribution of three selected splice variants of the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1, can be monitored at single-copy resolution by measuring the hybridization dynamics of the nanoplasmonic dimers. Our study provides insights into RNA and its transport in living cells, which could improve our understanding of cellular protein complexes, pharmacogenomics, genetic diagnosis and gene therapies.

  3. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  4. Profiling alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms for prostate cancer classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaolin; Li, Hai-Ri; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Downs, Tracy; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Michael Q

    2006-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer illness and death among men in the United States and world wide. There is an urgent need to discover good biomarkers for early clinical diagnosis and treatment. Previously, we developed an exon-junction microarray-based assay and profiled 1532 mRNA splice isoforms from 364 potential prostate cancer related genes in 38 prostate tissues. Here, we investigate the advantage of using splice isoforms, which couple transcriptional and splicing regulation, for cancer classification. Results As many as 464 splice isoforms from more than 200 genes are differentially regulated in tumors at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05. Remarkably, about 30% of genes have isoforms that are called significant but do not exhibit differential expression at the overall mRNA level. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 128 signature isoforms can correctly predict 92% of the cases, which outperforms the classifier using overall mRNA abundance by about 5%. It is also observed that the classification performance can be improved using multivariate variable selection methods, which take correlation among variables into account. Conclusion These results demonstrate that profiling of splice isoforms is able to provide unique and important information which cannot be detected by conventional microarrays. PMID:16608523

  5. m(6)A: Signaling for mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Samir; Xiao, Wen; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-09-01

    Among myriads of distinct chemical modifications in RNAs, dynamic N6-methyladenosine (m(6)A) is one of the most prevalent modifications in eukaryotic mRNAs and non-coding RNAs. Similar to the critical role of chemical modifications in regulation of DNA and protein activities, RNA m(6)A modification is also observed to be involved in the regulation of diverse functions of RNAs including meiosis, fertility, development, cell reprogramming and circadian period. The RNA m(6)A modification is recognized by YTH domain containing family proteins comprising of YTHDC1-2 and YTHDF1-3. Here we focus on the nuclear m(6)A reader YTHDC1 and its regulatory role in alternative splicing and other RNA metabolic processes. PMID:27351695

  6. mRNA trans-splicing in gene therapy for genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Maire, Séverine; Gaillard, Marie-Claude; Sahel, José-Alain; Hantraye, Philippe; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing, or SMaRT, is a promising strategy to design innovative gene therapy solutions for currently intractable genetic diseases. SMaRT relies on the correction of mutations at the post-transcriptional level by modifying the mRNA sequence. To achieve this, an exogenous RNA is introduced into the target cell, usually by means of gene transfer, to induce a splice event in trans between the exogenous RNA and the target endogenous pre-mRNA. This produces a chimeric mRNA composed partly of exons of the latter, and partly of exons of the former, encoding a sequence free of mutations. The principal challenge of SMaRT technology is to achieve a reaction as complete as possible, i.e., resulting in 100% repairing of the endogenous mRNA target. The proof of concept of SMaRT feasibility has already been established in several models of genetic diseases caused by recessive mutations. In such cases, in fact, the repair of only a portion of the mutant mRNA pool may be sufficient to obtain a significant therapeutic effect. However in the case of dominant mutations, the target cell must be freed from the majority of mutant mRNA copies, requiring a highly efficient trans-splicing reaction. This likely explains why only a few examples of SMaRT approaches targeting dominant mutations are reported in the literature. In this review, we explain in details the mechanism of trans-splicing, review the different strategies that are under evaluation to lead to efficient trans-splicing, and discuss the advantages and limitations of SMaRT. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:487-498. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1347 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27018401

  7. Secondary structure of splice sites in adenovirus mRNA precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, S H

    1984-01-01

    In order to investigate the possible role of RNA secondary structure in determining the efficiency and specificity of mRNA splicing, the structures of sequences at three acceptor splice sites in adenovirus were studied. Transcripts spanning intron-exon junctions were synthesized using SP6 RNA polymerase and analyzed using single and double-strand specific nucleases. Distinctive patterns of nuclease cleavage were observed for each of the 3 sites examined. At both sites in the E2a region sequences adjacent to the splice sites were particularly susceptible to digestion with T1 and S1 nucleases. In contrast, a splice site for hexon mRNA was largely resistant to these nucleases. The results obtained suggest that the conformation of the RNA at some, but not all, acceptor sites may enhance the accessibility of these sites to factors involved in splicing nuclear RNA and confirm the presence of a large, previously predicted hairpin structure centered on the acceptor site at 67 map units. Images PMID:6095200

  8. Nuclear m(6)A Reader YTHDC1 Regulates mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wen; Adhikari, Samir; Dahal, Ujwal; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Hao, Ya-Juan; Sun, Bao-Fa; Sun, Hui-Ying; Li, Ang; Ping, Xiao-Li; Lai, Wei-Yi; Wang, Xing; Ma, Hai-Li; Huang, Chun-Min; Yang, Ying; Huang, Niu; Jiang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hai-Lin; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2016-02-18

    The regulatory role of N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) and its nuclear binding protein YTHDC1 in pre-mRNA splicing remains an enigma. Here we show that YTHDC1 promotes exon inclusion in targeted mRNAs through recruiting pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF3 (SRp20) while blocking SRSF10 (SRp38) mRNA binding. Transcriptome assay with PAR-CLIP-seq analysis revealed that YTHDC1-regulated exon-inclusion patterns were similar to those of SRSF3 but opposite of SRSF10. In vitro pull-down assay illustrated a competitive binding of SRSF3 and SRSF10 to YTHDC1. Moreover, YTHDC1 facilitates SRSF3 but represses SRSF10 in their nuclear speckle localization, RNA-binding affinity, and associated splicing events, dysregulation of which, as the result of YTHDC1 depletion, can be restored by reconstitution with wild-type, but not m(6)A-binding-defective, YTHDC1. Our findings provide the direct evidence that m(6)A reader YTHDC1 regulates mRNA splicing through recruiting and modulating pre-mRNA splicing factors for their access to the binding regions of targeted mRNAs. PMID:26876937

  9. The strength of the HIV-1 3' splice sites affects Rev function

    PubMed Central

    Kammler, Susanne; Otte, Marianne; Hauber, Ilona; Kjems, Jørgen; Hauber, Joachim; Schaal, Heiner

    2006-01-01

    Background The HIV-1 Rev protein is a key component in the early to late switch in HIV-1 splicing from early intronless (e.g. tat, rev) to late intron-containing Rev-dependent (e.g. gag, vif, env) transcripts. Previous results suggested that cis-acting sequences and inefficient 5' and 3' splice sites are a prerequisite for Rev function. However, we and other groups have shown that two of the HIV-1 5' splice sites, D1 and D4, are efficiently used in vitro and in vivo. Here, we focus on the efficiency of the HIV-1 3' splice sites taking into consideration to what extent their intrinsic efficiencies are modulated by their downstream cis-acting exonic sequences. Furthermore, we delineate their role in RNA stabilization and Rev function. Results In the presence of an efficient upstream 5' splice site the integrity of the 3' splice site is not essential for Rev function whereas an efficient 3' splice site impairs Rev function. The detrimental effect of a strong 3' splice site on the amount of Rev-dependent intron-containing HIV-1 glycoprotein coding (env) mRNA is not compensatable by weakening the strength of the upstream 5' splice site. Swapping the HIV-1 3' splice sites in an RRE-containing minigene, we found a 3' splice site usage which was variably dependent on the presence of the usual downstream exonic sequence. The most evident activation of 3' splice site usage by its usual downstream exonic sequence was observed for 3' splice site A1 which was turned from an intrinsic very weak 3' splice site into the most active 3' splice site, even abolishing Rev activity. Performing pull-down experiments with nuclear extracts of HeLa cells we identified a novel ASF/SF2-dependent exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within HIV-1 exon 2 consisting of a heptameric sequence motif occurring twice (M1 and M2) within this short non-coding leader exon. Single point mutation of M1 within an infectious molecular clone is detrimental for HIV-1 exon 2 recognition without affecting Rev

  10. The Consensus 5' Splice Site Motif Inhibits mRNA Nuclear Export

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eliza S.; Akef, Abdalla; Mahadevan, Kohila; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNAs are synthesized in the nucleus and then exported to the cytoplasm where they are translated into proteins. We have mapped an element, which when present in the 3’terminal exon or in an unspliced mRNA, inhibits mRNA nuclear export. This element has the same sequence as the consensus 5’splice site motif that is used to define the start of introns. Previously it was shown that when this motif is retained in the mRNA, it causes defects in 3’cleavage and polyadenylation and promotes mRNA decay. Our new data indicates that this motif also inhibits nuclear export and promotes the targeting of transcripts to nuclear speckles, foci within the nucleus which have been linked to splicing. The motif, however, does not disrupt splicing or the recruitment of UAP56 or TAP/Nxf1 to the RNA, which are normally required for nuclear export. Genome wide analysis of human mRNAs, lncRNA and eRNAs indicates that this motif is depleted from naturally intronless mRNAs and eRNAs, but less so in lncRNAs. This motif is also depleted from the beginning and ends of the 3’terminal exons of spliced mRNAs, but less so for lncRNAs. Our data suggests that the presence of the 5’splice site motif in mature RNAs promotes their nuclear retention and may help to distinguish mRNAs from misprocessed transcripts and transcriptional noise. PMID:25826302

  11. Activity-dependent mRNA splicing controls ER export and synaptic delivery of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yuanyue; Otsuka, Takeshi; Horton, April C; Scott, Derek B; Ehlers, Michael D

    2003-10-30

    Activity-dependent targeting of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) is a key feature of synapse formation and plasticity. Although mechanisms for rapid trafficking of glutamate receptors have been identified, the molecular events underlying chronic accumulation or loss of synaptic NMDARs have remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that activity controls NMDAR synaptic accumulation by regulating forward trafficking at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER export is accelerated by the alternatively spliced C2' domain of the NR1 subunit and slowed by the C2 splice cassette. This mRNA splicing event at the C2/C2' site is activity dependent, with C2' variants predominating upon activity blockade and C2 variants abundant with increased activity. The switch to C2' accelerates NMDAR forward trafficking by enhancing recruitment of nascent NMDARs to ER exit sites via binding of a divaline motif within C2' to COPII coats. These results define a novel pathway underlying activity-dependent targeting of glutamate receptors, providing an unexpected mechanistic link between activity, mRNA splicing, and membrane trafficking during excitatory synapse modification. PMID:14642281

  12. Control of adenovirus E1B mRNA synthesis by a shift in the activities of RNA splice sites.

    PubMed Central

    Montell, C; Fisher, E F; Caruthers, M H; Berk, A J

    1984-01-01

    The primary transcript from adenovirus 2 early region 1B (E1B) is processed by differential RNA splicing into two overlapping mRNAs, 13S and 22S. The 22S mRNA is the major E1B mRNA during the early phase of infection, whereas the 13S mRNA predominates during the late phase. In previous work, it has been shown that this shift in proportions of the E1B mRNAs is influenced by increased cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA at late times in infection. Two observations presented here demonstrate that the increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA at late times is also regulated by a change in the specificity of RNA splicing. First, the relative concentrations of the 13S to 22S nuclear RNAs were not constant throughout infection but increased at late times. Secondly, studies with the mutant, adenovirus 2 pm2250 , provided evidence that there was an increased propensity to utilize a 5' splice in the region of the 13S 5' splice site at late times in infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 has a G----C transversion in the first base of E1B 13S mRNA intron preventing splicing of the 13S mRNA but not of the 22S mRNA. During the early phase of a pm2250 infection, the E1B primary transcripts were processed into the 22S mRNA only. However, during the late phase, when the 13S mRNA normally predominates, E1B primary transcripts were also processed by RNA splicing at two formerly unused or cryptic 5' splice sites. Both cryptic splice sites were located much closer to the disrupted 13S 5' splice site than to the 22S 5' splice site. Thus, the temporal increase in proportion of the 13S mRNA to the 22S mRNA is regulated by two processes, an increase in cytoplasmic stability of the 13S mRNA and an increased propensity to utilize the 13S 5' splice site during the late phase of infection. Adenovirus 2 pm2250 was not defective for productive infection of HeLa cells or for transformation of rat cells. Images PMID:6727875

  13. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Köhler, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis BRR2a is ubiquitously expressed in all analyzed tissues and involved in the processing of flowering time gene transcripts, most notably FLC. A missense mutation of threonine 895 in BRR2a caused defects in FLC splicing and greatly reduced FLC transcript levels. Reduced FLC expression increased transcription of FT and SOC1 leading to early flowering in both short and long days. Genome-wide experiments established that only a small set of introns was not correctly spliced in the brr2a mutant. Compared to control introns, retained introns were often shorter and GC-poor, had low H3K4me1 and CG methylation levels, and were often derived from genes with a high-H3K27me3-low-H3K36me3 signature. We propose that BRR2a is specifically needed for efficient splicing of a subset of introns characterized by a combination of factors including intron size, sequence and chromatin, and that FLC is most sensitive to splicing defects. PMID:27100965

  14. BRR2a Affects Flowering Time via FLC Splicing.

    PubMed

    Mahrez, Walid; Shin, Juhyun; Muñoz-Viana, Rafael; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Trejo-Arellano, Minerva S; Exner, Vivien; Siretskiy, Alexey; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Köhler, Claudia; Hennig, Lars

    2016-04-01

    Several pathways control time to flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana through transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation. In recent years, mRNA processing has gained interest as a critical regulator of flowering time control in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms linking RNA splicing to flowering time are not well understood. In a screen for Arabidopsis early flowering mutants we identified an allele of BRR2a. BRR2 proteins are components of the spliceosome and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis BRR2a is ubiquitously expressed in all analyzed tissues and involved in the processing of flowering time gene transcripts, most notably FLC. A missense mutation of threonine 895 in BRR2a caused defects in FLC splicing and greatly reduced FLC transcript levels. Reduced FLC expression increased transcription of FT and SOC1 leading to early flowering in both short and long days. Genome-wide experiments established that only a small set of introns was not correctly spliced in the brr2a mutant. Compared to control introns, retained introns were often shorter and GC-poor, had low H3K4me1 and CG methylation levels, and were often derived from genes with a high-H3K27me3-low-H3K36me3 signature. We propose that BRR2a is specifically needed for efficient splicing of a subset of introns characterized by a combination of factors including intron size, sequence and chromatin, and that FLC is most sensitive to splicing defects. PMID:27100965

  15. Influenza virus NS1 protein inhibits pre-mRNA splicing and blocks mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, P; Beloso, A; Ortín, J

    1994-01-01

    The influenza virus RNA segment 8 encodes two proteins, NS1 and NS2, by differential splicing. The collinear transcript acts as mRNA for NS1 protein, while the spliced mRNA encodes NS2 protein. The splicing of NS1 mRNA was studied in cells transfected with a recombinant plasmid that has the cDNA of RNA segment 8 cloned under the SV40 late promoter and polyadenylation signals. As described for influenza virus-infected cells, NS1 mRNA was poorly spliced to yield NS2 mRNA. However, inactivation of the NS1 gene, but not the NS2 gene, led to a substantial increase in the splicing efficiency, as shown by the relative accumulations of NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. This effect was not specific for NS1 mRNA, since the splicing of the endogenous SV40 early transcript was altered in such a way that t-Ag mRNA was almost eliminated. These changes in the splicing pattern coincided with a strong inhibition of the mRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport. Both NS1 and NS2 mRNAs were retained in the nucleus of cells expressing NS1 protein, but no effect was observed when only NS2 protein was expressed. Furthermore, other mRNAs tested, such as T-Ag mRNA and the non-spliceable nucleoprotein transcript, were also retained in the nucleus upon expression of NS1 protein, suggesting that it induced a generalized block of mRNA export from the nucleus. Images PMID:8313914

  16. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  17. Alternative splicing of the mRNA encoding the human cholesteryl ester transfer protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inazu, Akihiro; Quinet, E.M.; Suke Wang; Brown, M.L.; Stevenson, S.; Barr, M.L.; Moulin, P.; Tall, A.R. )

    1992-03-03

    The plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is known to facilitate the transfer of lipids between plasma lipoproteins. The human CETP gene is a complex locus encompassing 16 exons. The CETP mRNA is found in liver and small intestine as well as in a variety of peripheral tissues. While the CETP cDNA from human adipose tissue was being cloned, a variant CETP cDNA was discovered which excluded the complete sequence encoded by exon 9, but which was otherwise identical to the full-length CETP cDNA, suggesting modification of the CETP gene transcript by an alternative RNA splicing mechanism. RNase protection analysis of tissue RNA confirmed the presence of exon 9 deleted transcripts and showed that they represented a variable proportion of the total CETP mRNA in various human tissues including adipose tissue (25%), liver (33%), and spleen (46%). Transient expression of the exon 9 deleted cDNA in COS cells or stable expression in CHO cells showed that the protein encoded by the alternatively spliced transcript was inactive in neutral lipid transfer, smaller, and poorly secreted compared to the protein derived from the full-length cDNA. Endo H digestion suggested that the inactive, cell-associated protein was present within the endoplasmic reticulum. The experiments show that the expression of the human CETP gene is modified by alternative splicing of the ninth exon, in a tissue-specific fashion. The function of alternative splicing is unknown but could serve to produce a protein with a function other than plasma neutral lipid transfer, or as an on-off switch to regulate the local concentration of biologically active protein.

  18. In Vivo Analysis of Disease-Associated Point Mutations Unveils Profound Differences in mRNA Splicing of Peripherin-2 in Rod and Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong Nam Phuong; Riedmayr, Lisa Maria; Koch, Mirja Annika; Schulze, Elisabeth; Kohl, Susanne; Borsch, Oliver; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Ader, Marius; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations in peripherin-2 (PRPH2) are associated with severe retinal degenerative disorders affecting rod and/or cone photoreceptors. Various disease-causing mutations have been identified, but the exact contribution of a given mutation to the clinical phenotype remains unclear. Exonic point mutations are usually assumed to alter single amino acids, thereby influencing specific protein characteristics; however, they can also affect mRNA splicing. To examine the effects of distinct PRPH2 point mutations on mRNA splicing and protein expression in vivo, we designed PRPH2 minigenes containing the three coding exons and relevant intronic regions of human PRPH2. Minigenes carrying wild type PRPH2 or PRPH2 exon 2 mutations associated with rod or cone disorders were expressed in murine photoreceptors using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors. We detect three PRPH2 splice isoforms in rods and cones: correctly spliced, intron 1 retention, and unspliced. In addition, we show that only the correctly spliced isoform results in detectable protein expression. Surprisingly, compared to rods, differential splicing leads to lower expression of correctly spliced and higher expression of unspliced PRPH2 in cones. These results were confirmed in qRT-PCR experiments from FAC-sorted murine rods and cones. Strikingly, three out of five cone disease-causing PRPH2 mutations profoundly enhanced correct splicing of PRPH2, which correlated with strong upregulation of mutant PRPH2 protein expression in cones. By contrast, four out of six PRPH2 mutants associated with rod disorders gave rise to a reduced PRPH2 protein expression via different mechanisms. These mechanisms include aberrant mRNA splicing, protein mislocalization, and protein degradation. Our data suggest that upregulation of PRPH2 levels in combination with defects in the PRPH2 function caused by the mutation might be an important mechanism leading to cone degeneration. By contrast, the pathology of rod

  19. In Vivo Analysis of Disease-Associated Point Mutations Unveils Profound Differences in mRNA Splicing of Peripherin-2 in Rod and Cone Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong Nam Phuong; Riedmayr, Lisa Maria; Koch, Mirja Annika; Schulze, Elisabeth; Kohl, Susanne; Borsch, Oliver; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Ader, Marius; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations in peripherin-2 (PRPH2) are associated with severe retinal degenerative disorders affecting rod and/or cone photoreceptors. Various disease-causing mutations have been identified, but the exact contribution of a given mutation to the clinical phenotype remains unclear. Exonic point mutations are usually assumed to alter single amino acids, thereby influencing specific protein characteristics; however, they can also affect mRNA splicing. To examine the effects of distinct PRPH2 point mutations on mRNA splicing and protein expression in vivo, we designed PRPH2 minigenes containing the three coding exons and relevant intronic regions of human PRPH2. Minigenes carrying wild type PRPH2 or PRPH2 exon 2 mutations associated with rod or cone disorders were expressed in murine photoreceptors using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors. We detect three PRPH2 splice isoforms in rods and cones: correctly spliced, intron 1 retention, and unspliced. In addition, we show that only the correctly spliced isoform results in detectable protein expression. Surprisingly, compared to rods, differential splicing leads to lower expression of correctly spliced and higher expression of unspliced PRPH2 in cones. These results were confirmed in qRT-PCR experiments from FAC-sorted murine rods and cones. Strikingly, three out of five cone disease-causing PRPH2 mutations profoundly enhanced correct splicing of PRPH2, which correlated with strong upregulation of mutant PRPH2 protein expression in cones. By contrast, four out of six PRPH2 mutants associated with rod disorders gave rise to a reduced PRPH2 protein expression via different mechanisms. These mechanisms include aberrant mRNA splicing, protein mislocalization, and protein degradation. Our data suggest that upregulation of PRPH2 levels in combination with defects in the PRPH2 function caused by the mutation might be an important mechanism leading to cone degeneration. By contrast, the pathology of rod

  20. Translational control of germ cell-expressed mRNA imposed by alternative splicing: opioid peptide gene expression in rat testis.

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, J E; Collard, M W; Douglass, J O

    1989-01-01

    The three genes encoding the opioid peptide precursors (prodynorphin, proenkephalin, and proopiomelanocortin) are expressed in the rat testis. The sizes of the three opioid mRNAs in the testis differ from the sizes of the corresponding mRNAs in other rat tissues in which these genes are expressed. The smaller testicular proopiomelanocortin mRNA has previously been demonstrated to arise from alternative transcriptional initiation. In the present study, we found that the smaller testicular prodynorphin mRNA, expressed in Sertoli cells, results from alternative mRNA processing. Exon 2, which makes up 5' untranslated sequence, is removed from the mature transcript. Polysome analysis of brain and testis RNA indicates that the alteration of the prodynorphin leader sequence in the testis-specific transcript does not affect the efficiency of translation of this mRNA. The larger testicular proenkephalin transcript, expressed in developing germ cells, also results from alternative mRNA processing. Alternative acceptor site usage in the splicing of intron A results in a germ cell-specific proenkephalin transcript with a 491-nucleotide 5' untranslated leader sequence preceding the preproenkephalin-coding sequence. Polysome analysis indicates that this germ cell-specific proenkephalin mRNA is not efficiently translated. Mechanisms by which alternative mRNA splicing may serve to confer translational regulation upon the testicular proenkephalin transcript are discussed. Images PMID:2573832

  1. FTO-dependent demethylation of N6-methyladenosine regulates mRNA splicing and is required for adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Yang, Ying; Sun, Bao-Fa; Shi, Yue; Yang, Xin; Xiao, Wen; Hao, Ya-Juan; Ping, Xiao-Li; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Wen-Jia; Jin, Kang-Xuan; Wang, Xing; Huang, Chun-Min; Fu, Yu; Ge, Xiao-Meng; Song, Shu-Hui; Jeong, Hyun Seok; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Niu, Yamei; Jia, Gui-Fang; Wu, Wei; Tong, Wei-Min; Okamoto, Akimitsu; He, Chuan; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2014-12-01

    The role of Fat Mass and Obesity-associated protein (FTO) and its substrate N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in mRNA processing and adipogenesis remains largely unknown. We show that FTO expression and m6A levels are inversely correlated during adipogenesis. FTO depletion blocks differentiation and only catalytically active FTO restores adipogenesis. Transcriptome analyses in combination with m6A-seq revealed that gene expression and mRNA splicing of grouped genes are regulated by FTO. M6A is enriched in exonic regions flanking 5'- and 3'-splice sites, spatially overlapping with mRNA splicing regulatory serine/arginine-rich (SR) protein exonic splicing enhancer binding regions. Enhanced levels of m6A in response to FTO depletion promotes the RNA binding ability of SRSF2 protein, leading to increased inclusion of target exons. FTO controls exonic splicing of adipogenic regulatory factor RUNX1T1 by regulating m6A levels around splice sites and thereby modulates differentiation. These findings provide compelling evidence that FTO-dependent m6A demethylation functions as a novel regulatory mechanism of RNA processing and plays a critical role in the regulation of adipogenesis. PMID:25412662

  2. FTO-dependent demethylation of N6-methyladenosine regulates mRNA splicing and is required for adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu; Yang, Ying; Sun, Bao-Fa; Shi, Yue; Yang, Xin; Xiao, Wen; Hao, Ya-Juan; Ping, Xiao-Li; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Wen-Jia; Jin, Kang-Xuan; Wang, Xing; Huang, Chun-Min; Fu, Yu; Ge, Xiao-Meng; Song, Shu-Hui; Jeong, Hyun Seok; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Niu, Yamei; Jia, Gui-Fang; Wu, Wei; Tong, Wei-Min; Okamoto, Akimitsu; He, Chuan; Danielsen, Jannie M Rendtlew; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Yang, Yun-Gui

    2014-01-01

    The role of Fat Mass and Obesity-associated protein (FTO) and its substrate N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in mRNA processing and adipogenesis remains largely unknown. We show that FTO expression and m6A levels are inversely correlated during adipogenesis. FTO depletion blocks differentiation and only catalytically active FTO restores adipogenesis. Transcriptome analyses in combination with m6A-seq revealed that gene expression and mRNA splicing of grouped genes are regulated by FTO. M6A is enriched in exonic regions flanking 5′- and 3′-splice sites, spatially overlapping with mRNA splicing regulatory serine/arginine-rich (SR) protein exonic splicing enhancer binding regions. Enhanced levels of m6A in response to FTO depletion promotes the RNA binding ability of SRSF2 protein, leading to increased inclusion of target exons. FTO controls exonic splicing of adipogenic regulatory factor RUNX1T1 by regulating m6A levels around splice sites and thereby modulates differentiation. These findings provide compelling evidence that FTO-dependent m6A demethylation functions as a novel regulatory mechanism of RNA processing and plays a critical role in the regulation of adipogenesis. PMID:25412662

  3. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina F.; Holm, Ida E.; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapα is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapδ isoform is expressed in proliferating neurogenic astrocytes of the developing human brain and in the adult human and mouse brain. Here we provide a characterization of mouse Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapδ protein. RT-qPCR analysis showed that Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapα mRNA expression is coordinately increased in the post-natal period. Immunohistochemical staining of developing mouse brain samples showed that Gfapδ is expressed in the sub-ventricular zones in accordance with the described localization in the developing and adult human brain. Immunofluorescence analysis verified incorporation of Gfapδ into the Gfap intermediate filament network and overlap in Gfapδ and Gfapα subcellular localization. Subcellular mRNA localization studies identified different localization patterns of Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA in mouse primary astrocytes. A larger fraction of Gfapα mRNA showed mRNA localization to astrocyte protrusions compared to Gfapδ mRNA. The differential mRNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 3′-exon sequences included in Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential to participate in subcellular region-specific intermediate filament dynamics during brain development, maintenance and in disease. PMID:23991052

  4. GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA: novel splice variants in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum and in human monocytes (THP-1) indicate conservation of mRNA processing.

    PubMed Central

    Golderer, G; Werner, E R; Heufler, C; Strohmaier, W; Gröbner, P; Werner-Felmayer, G

    2001-01-01

    GTP cyclohydrolase I (EC 3.5.4.16) is the first enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin [(6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin, H(4)-biopterin] in mammals and of folic acid in bacteria. Here we have characterized the GTP cyclohydrolase I gene structure and two mRNA species from Physarum polycephalum, an acellular slime mould that synthesizes H(4)-biopterin and metabolites of the folic acid biosynthetic pathway. Its GTP cyclohydrolase I gene consists of seven exons, and the two GTP cyclohydrolase I cDNA species isolated from Physarum encode for proteins with 228 (25.7 kDa) and 195 (22.1 kDa) amino acids. Furthermore, we identified two previously undescribed mRNA species in interferon-gamma-treated human myelomonocytoma cells (THP-1) in addition to the cDNA coding for the fully functional 250-residue (27.9 kDa) protein, which is identical with that in human phaeochromocytoma cells. One of the new splice variants codes for a 233-residue (25.7 kDa) protein, whereas the other codes for the full-length protein but is alternatively spliced within the 3'-untranslated region. In heterologous expression, the shorter proteins of Physarum as well as of THP-1 cells identified here are degraded by proteolysis. Accordingly, only the 27.9 kDa protein was detectable in Western blots from THP-1 cell extracts. Quantification of GTP cyclohydrolase I mRNA species in different human cell types with and without cytokine treatment showed that in addition to the correct mRNA the two splice variants isolated here, as well as the two splice variants known from human liver, are strongly induced by cytokines in cell types with inducible GTP cyclohydrolase I (THP-1, dermal fibroblasts), but not in cell types with constitutive GTP cyclohydrolase I expression (SK-N-SH, Hep-G2). As in human liver, splicing of the new mRNA variant found in THP-1 cells occurs at the boundary of exons 5 and 6. Strikingly, the 195-residue protein from Physarum is alternatively spliced at a homologous position

  5. Antagonistic regulation of mRNA expression and splicing by CELF and MBNL proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eric T.; Ward, Amanda J.; Cherone, Jennifer M.; Giudice, Jimena; Wang, Thomas T.; Treacy, Daniel J.; Lambert, Nicole J.; Freese, Peter; Saxena, Tanvi; Cooper, Thomas A.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins of the conserved CUGBP1, Elav-like factor (CELF) family contribute to heart and skeletal muscle development and are implicated in myotonic dystrophy (DM). To understand their genome-wide functions, we analyzed the transcriptome dynamics following induction of CELF1 or CELF2 in adult mouse heart and of CELF1 in muscle by RNA-seq, complemented by crosslinking/immunoprecipitation-sequencing (CLIP-seq) analysis of mouse cells and tissues to distinguish direct from indirect regulatory targets. We identified hundreds of mRNAs bound in their 3′ UTRs by both CELF1 and the developmentally induced MBNL1 protein, a threefold greater overlap in target messages than expected, including messages involved in development and cell differentiation. The extent of 3′ UTR binding by CELF1 and MBNL1 predicted the degree of mRNA repression or stabilization, respectively, following CELF1 induction. However, CELF1's RNA binding specificity in vitro was not detectably altered by coincubation with recombinant MBNL1. These findings support a model in which CELF and MBNL proteins bind independently to mRNAs but functionally compete to specify down-regulation or localization/stabilization, respectively, of hundreds of mRNA targets. Expression of many alternative 3′ UTR isoforms was altered following CELF1 induction, with 3′ UTR binding associated with down-regulation of isoforms and genes. The splicing of hundreds of alternative exons was oppositely regulated by these proteins, confirming an additional layer of regulatory antagonism previously observed in a handful of cases. The regulatory relationships between CELFs and MBNLs in control of both mRNA abundance and splicing appear to have evolved to enhance developmental transitions in major classes of heart and muscle genes. PMID:25883322

  6. The Choice of Alternative 5' Splice Sites in Influenza Virus M1 mRNA is Regulated by the Viral Polymerase Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Shin-Ru; Nemeroff, Martin E.; Krug, Robert M.

    1995-07-01

    The influenza virus M1 mRNA has two alternative 5' splice sites: a distal 5' splice site producing mRNA_3 that has the coding potential for 9 amino acids and a proximal 5' splice site producing M2 mRNA encoding the essential M2 ion-channel protein. Only mRNA_3 was made in uninfected cells transfected with DNA expressing M1 mRNA. Similarly, using nuclear extracts from uninfected cells, in vitro splicing of M1 mRNA yielded only mRNA_3. Only when the mRNA_3 5' splice site was inactivated by mutation was M2 mRNA made in uninfected cells and in uninfected cell extracts. In influenza virus-infected cells, M2 mRNA was made, but only after a delay, suggesting that newly synthesized viral gene product(s) were needed to activate the M2 5' splice site. We present strong evidence that these gene products are the complex of the three polymerase proteins, the same complex that functions in the transcription and replication of the viral genome. Gel shift experiments showed that the viral polymerase complex bound to the 5' end of the viral M1 mRNA in a sequence-specific and cap-dependent manner. During in vitro splicing catalyzed by uninfected cell extracts, the binding of the viral polymerase complex blocked the mRNA_3 5' splice site, resulting in the switch to the M2 mRNA 5' splice site and the production of M2 mRNA.

  7. The spfash mouse: a missense mutation in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene also causes aberrant mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, P E; Rosenberg, L E

    1989-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (ornithine carbamoyltransferase; carbamoyl-phosphate:L-ornithine carbamoyltransferase, EC 2.1.3.3) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme of the mammalian urea cycle. The X chromosome-linked spfash mutation in the mouse causes partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and has served as a model for the human disease. We show here that the spfash mutation is a guanine to adenine transition of the last nucleotide of the fourth exon of the ornithine transcarbamylase gene. This nucleotide change produces two remarkably different effects. First, this transition causes ornithine transcarbamylase mRNA deficiency because the involved exon nucleotide plays a part in the recognition of the adjacent splice donor site. As a result of the mutation, ornithine transcarbamylase pre-mRNA is spliced inefficiently both at this site and at a cryptic splice donor site 48 bases into the adjacent intron. Second, two mutant proteins are translated from these mRNAs. From the correctly spliced mRNA, the transition results in a change of amino acid 129 from arginine to histidine. This missense substitution has no discernable effect on mitochondrial import, subunit assembly, or enzyme activity. On the other hand, the elongated mRNA resulting from mis-splicing is translated into a dysfunctional ornithine transcarbamylase subunit elongated by the insertion of 16 amino acid residues. Images PMID:2471197

  8. Splicing promotes the nuclear export of β-globin mRNA by overcoming nuclear retention elements

    PubMed Central

    Akef, Abdalla; Lee, Eliza S.; Palazzo, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Most current models of mRNA nuclear export in vertebrate cells assume that an mRNA must have specialized signals in order to be exported from the nucleus. Under such a scenario, mRNAs that lack these specialized signals would be shunted into a default pathway where they are retained in the nucleus and eventually degraded. These ideas were based on the selective use of model mRNA reporters. For example, it has been shown that splicing promotes the nuclear export of certain model mRNAs, such as human β-globin, and that in the absence of splicing, the cDNA-derived mRNA is retained in the nucleus and degraded. Here we provide evidence that β-globin mRNA contains an element that actively retains it in the nucleus and degrades it. Interestingly, this nuclear retention activity can be overcome by increasing the length of the mRNA or by splicing. Our results suggest that contrary to many current models, the default pathway for most intronless RNAs is to be exported from the nucleus, unless the RNA contains elements that actively promote its nuclear retention. PMID:26362019

  9. Induced transcription and stability of CELF2 mRNA drives widespread alternative splicing during T-cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Michael J.; Allon, Samuel J.; Qiu, Jinsong; Gazzara, Matthew R.; Tapescu, Iulia; Martinez, Nicole M.; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in several cell types have highlighted dramatic and diverse changes in mRNA processing that occur upon cellular stimulation. However, the mechanisms and pathways that lead to regulated changes in mRNA processing remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that expression of the splicing factor CELF2 (CUGBP, Elav-like family member 2) is regulated in response to T-cell signaling through combined increases in transcription and mRNA stability. Transcriptional induction occurs within 6 h of stimulation and is dependent on activation of NF-κB. Subsequently, there is an increase in the stability of the CELF2 mRNA that correlates with a change in CELF2 3′UTR length and contributes to the total signal-induced enhancement of CELF2 expression. Importantly, we uncover dozens of splicing events in cultured T cells whose changes upon stimulation are dependent on CELF2 expression, and provide evidence that CELF2 controls a similar proportion of splicing events during human thymic T-cell development. Taken together, these findings expand the physiologic impact of CELF2 beyond that previously documented in developing neuronal and muscle cells to T-cell development and function, identify unappreciated instances of alternative splicing in the human thymus, and uncover novel mechanisms for CELF2 regulation that may broadly impact CELF2 expression across diverse cell types. PMID:25870297

  10. Splicing of goose parvovirus pre-mRNA influences cytoplasmic translation of the processed mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Long; Pintel, David J.

    2012-04-25

    Translation of goose parvovirus (GPV) 72 kDa Rep 1 is initiated from unspliced P9-generated mRNAs in ORF1 from the first in-frame AUG (537 AUG); however, this AUG is bypassed in spliced P9-generated RNA: translation of the 52 kDa Rep 2 protein from spliced RNA is initiated in ORF2 at the next AUG downstream (650 AUG). Usage of the 537 AUG was restored in spliced RNA when the GPV intron was replaced with a chimeric SV40 intron, or following specific mutations of the GPV intron which did not appear in the final spliced mRNA. Additionally, 650 AUG usage was gained in unspliced RNA when the GPV intron splice sites were debilitated. Splicing-dependent regulation of translation initiation was mediated in cis by GPV RNA surrounding the target AUGs. Thus, nuclear RNA processing of GPV P9-generated pre-mRNAs has a complex, but significant, effect on alternative translation initiation of the GPV Rep proteins.

  11. LDLR gene synonymous mutation c.1813C>T results in mRNA splicing variation in a kindred with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Clement K M; Musa, Fathel Rahman; Bell, Christine; Walker, Simon W

    2015-11-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia, one of the most common inherited diseases in the general population, is associated with mutations in at least three different genes including the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), apolipoprotein B (APOB) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes. In this report, we describe an unclassified DNA variant (c.1813C>T; p.Leu605Leu) within exon 12 of the LDLR gene in a kindred in which familial hypercholesterolaemia is associated with c.1813C>T heterozygosity. In silico analysis suggested that c.1813C>T might affect splicing of the LDLR gene by creating a cryptic donor splice site, which was confirmed by RT-PCR coupled with cDNA sequencing, to result in the loss of 34 base pairs in the coding sequence. The latter truncated mRNA is predicted to generate a frameshift leading to a premature stop at codon 652 and early termination of the low density lipoprotein receptor polypeptide chain, and thus provides a molecular basis for the hypercholesterolaemic phenotype. This case report highlights the emerging utility of RNA studies for the molecular diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia in patients with potential mRNA splicing variants. PMID:25624525

  12. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  13. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha.

    PubMed

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-06-20

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  14. Age-Dependent Decrease and Alternative Splicing of Methionine Synthase mRNA in Human Cerebral Cortex and an Accelerated Decrease in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Christina R.; Hodgson, Nathaniel W.; Trivedi, Malav S.; Abdolmaleky, Hamid M.; Persico, Antonio M.; Lintas, Carla; De La Monte, Suzanne; Deth, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    The folate and vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) is highly sensitive to cellular oxidative status, and lower MS activity increases production of the antioxidant glutathione, while simultaneously decreasing more than 200 methylation reactions, broadly affecting metabolic activity. MS mRNA levels in postmortem human cortex from subjects across the lifespan were measured and a dramatic progressive biphasic decrease of more than 400-fold from 28 weeks of gestation to 84 years was observed. Further analysis revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA, including deletion of folate-binding domain exons and age-dependent deletion of exons from the cap domain, which protects vitamin B12 (cobalamin) from oxidation. Although three species of MS were evident at the protein level, corresponding to full-length and alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts, decreasing mRNA levels across the lifespan were not associated with significant changes in MS protein or methionine levels. MS mRNA levels were significantly lower in autistic subjects, especially at younger ages, and this decrease was replicated in cultured human neuronal cells by treatment with TNF-α, whose CSF levels are elevated in autism. These novel findings suggest that rather than serving as a housekeeping enzyme, MS has a broad and dynamic role in coordinating metabolism in the brain during development and aging. Factors adversely affecting MS activity, such as oxidative stress, can be a source of risk for neurological disorders across the lifespan via their impact on methylation reactions, including epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:23437274

  15. Second-Generation HSP90 Inhibitor Onalespib Blocks mRNA Splicing of Androgen Receptor Variant 7 in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Welti, Jonathan; Powers, Marissa V; Yuan, Wei; Smyth, Tomoko; Seed, George; Riisnaes, Ruth; Hedayat, Somaieh; Wang, Hannah; Crespo, Mateus; Nava Rodrigues, Daniel; Figueiredo, Ines; Miranda, Susana; Carreira, Suzanne; Lyons, John F; Sharp, Swee; Plymate, Stephen R; Attard, Gerhardt; Wallis, Nicola; Workman, Paul; de Bono, Johann S

    2016-05-01

    Resistance to available hormone therapies in prostate cancer has been associated with alternative splicing of androgen receptor (AR) and specifically, the expression of truncated and constitutively active AR variant 7 (AR-V7). The transcriptional activity of steroid receptors, including AR, is dependent on interactions with the HSP90 chaperone machinery, but it is unclear whether HSP90 modulates the activity or expression of AR variants. Here, we investigated the effects of HSP90 inhibition on AR-V7 in prostate cancer cell lines endogenously expressing this variant. We demonstrate that AR-V7 and full-length AR (AR-FL) were depleted upon inhibition of HSP90. However, the mechanisms underlying AR-V7 depletion differed from those for AR-FL. Whereas HSP90 inhibition destabilized AR-FL and induced its proteasomal degradation, AR-V7 protein exhibited higher stability than AR-FL and did not require HSP90 chaperone activity. Instead, HSP90 inhibition resulted in the reduction of AR-V7 mRNA levels but did not affect total AR transcript levels, indicating that HSP90 inhibition disrupted AR-V7 splicing. Bioinformatic analyses of transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing data confirmed that the second-generation HSP90 inhibitor onalespib altered the splicing of at least 557 genes in prostate cancer cells, including AR. These findings indicate that the effects of HSP90 inhibition on mRNA splicing may prove beneficial in prostate cancers expressing AR-V7, supporting further clinical investigation of HSP90 inhibitors in malignancies no longer responsive to androgen deprivation. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2731-42. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197266

  16. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  17. Post-transcriptional Repair of a Split Heat Shock Protein 90 Gene by mRNA trans-Splicing*♦

    PubMed Central

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B.; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the “intron” regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  18. Post-transcriptional repair of a split heat shock protein 90 gene by mRNA trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    Nageshan, Rishi Kumar; Roy, Nainita; Hehl, Adrian B; Tatu, Utpal

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock protein 90 participates in diverse biological processes ranging from protein folding, cell cycle, signal transduction and development to evolution in all eukaryotes. It is also critically involved in regulating growth of protozoa such as Dictyostelium discoideum, Leishmania donovani, Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma evansi. Selective inhibition of Hsp90 has also been explored as an intervention strategy against important human diseases such as cancer, malaria, or trypanosomiasis. Giardia lamblia, a simple protozoan parasite of humans and animals, is an important cause of diarrheal disease with significant morbidity and some mortality in tropical countries. Here we show that the G. lamblia cytosolic hsp90 (glhsp90) is split in two similar sized fragments located 777 kb apart on the same scaffold. Intrigued by this unique arrangement, which appears to be specific for the Giardiinae, we have investigated the biosynthesis of GlHsp90. We used genome sequencing to confirm the split nature of the giardial hsp90. However, a specific antibody raised against the peptide detected a product with a mass of about 80 kDa, suggesting a post-transcriptional rescue of the genomic defect. We show evidence for the joining of the two independent Hsp90 transcripts in-trans to one long mature mRNA presumably by RNA splicing. The splicing junction carries hallmarks of classical cis-spliced introns, suggesting that the regular cis-splicing machinery may be sufficient for repair of the open reading frame. A complementary 26-nt sequence in the "intron" regions adjacent to the splice sites may assist in positioning the two pre-mRNAs for processing. This is the first example of post-transcriptional rescue of a split gene by trans-splicing. PMID:21209094

  19. Arabidopsis IRE1 catalyses unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Yukihiro; Mishiba, Kei-ichiro; Suzuki, Eiji; Shimada, Yukihisa; Iwata, Yuji; Koizumi, Nozomu

    2011-01-01

    IRE1 plays an essential role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast and mammals. We found that a double mutant of Arabidopsis IRE1A and IRE1B (ire1a/ire1b) is more sensitive to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin than the wild-type. Transcriptome analysis revealed that genes whose induction was reduced in ire1a/ire1b largely overlapped those in the bzip60 mutant. We observed that the active form of bZIP60 protein detected in the wild-type was missing in ire1a/ire1b. We further demonstrated that bZIP60 mRNA is spliced by ER stress, removing 23 ribonucleotides and therefore causing a frameshift that replaces the C-terminal region of bZIP60 including the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a shorter region without a TMD. This splicing was detected in ire1a and ire1b single mutants, but not in the ire1a/ire1b double mutant. We conclude that IRE1A and IRE1B catalyse unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor. PMID:22355548

  20. Versican gene expression in human articular cartilage and comparison of mRNA splicing variation with aggrecan.

    PubMed Central

    Grover, J; Roughley, P J

    1993-01-01

    The chondrocytes in human articular cartilage from subjects of all ages express mRNAs for both of the aggregating proteoglycans aggrecan and versican, although the level of expression of versican mRNA is much lower than that of aggrecan mRNA. Aggrecan shows alternative splicing of the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain within its C-terminal globular region, but there is no evidence for a major difference in situ in the relative expression of this domain with age. At all ages studied from birth to the mature adult, a greater proportion of transcripts lacked the EGF domain. The relative proportions of the two transcripts did not change upon culture and passage of isolated chondrocytes. In contrast, the neighbouring complement regulatory protein (CRP)-like domain was predominantly expressed irrespective of age, but cell culture did result in variation of the splicing of this domain. Versican possesses two EGF-like domains and one CRP-like domain, but at all ages the three domains were predominantly present in all transcripts. This situation persisted upon culture and passage of the chondrocytes. Thus, unlike aggrecan, the versican expressed by human articular cartilage does not appear to undergo alternative splicing of its C-terminal globular region, either in cartilage in situ or in chondrocytes in culture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8484718

  1. Identification of a third region of cell-specific alternative splicing in human fibronectin mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, A.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    1987-10-01

    The authors describe here a third region of variability in human fibronectin (FN) due to alternative RNA splicing. Two other positions of alternative splicing have been reported previously (ED and IIICS). The third region involves a 273-nucleotide exon encoding exactly one 91-amino acid repeat of type III homology, located between the DNA- and the cell-binding domains of FN, which is either included in or excluded from FN mRNA. The two mRNA variants arising by an exon-skipping mechanism are present in cells known to synthesize the cellular form of FN. However, liver cells, which are the source of plasma FN, produce only messengers without the extra type III sequence. Therefore, the region described here resembles, both structurally and functionally, the previously described ED (for extra domain) region, located toward the C terminus of the molecule between the cell- and heparin- (hep 2) binding domains. The authors conclude that both the extra type III repeat (names EDII) and ED represent sequences restricted to cellular FN. Combination of all the possible patterns of splicing in the three regions described to date may generate up to 20 distinct FN polypeptides from a single gene.

  2. Arginine methylation and citrullination of splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ/PSF) regulates its association with mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Bloom, Alex; Williamson, James C.; Minshull, Thomas C.; Phillips, Helen L.; Mihaylov, Simeon R.; Gjerde, Douglas T.; Hornby, David P.; Wilson, Stuart A.; Hurd, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factor proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ) also commonly known as polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated-splicing factor (PSF) and its binding partner non-POU domain-containing octamer-binding protein (NONO/p54nrb), are highly abundant, multifunctional nuclear proteins. However, the exact role of this complex is yet to be determined. Following purification of the endogeneous SFPQ/NONO complex, mass spectrometry analysis identified a wide range of interacting proteins, including those involved in RNA processing, RNA splicing, and transcriptional regulation, consistent with a multifunctional role for SFPQ/NONO. In addition, we have identified several sites of arginine methylation in SFPQ/PSF using mass spectrometry and found that several arginines in the N-terminal domain of SFPQ/PSF are asymmetrically dimethylated. Furthermore, we find that the protein arginine N-methyltransferase, PRMT1, catalyzes this methylation in vitro and that this is antagonized by citrullination of SFPQ. Arginine methylation and citrullination of SFPQ/PSF does not affect complex formation with NONO. However, arginine methylation was shown to increase the association with mRNA in mRNP complexes in mammalian cells. Finally we show that the biochemical properties of the endogenous complex from cell lysates are significantly influenced by the ionic strength during purification. At low ionic strength, the SFPQ/NONO complex forms large heterogeneous protein assemblies or aggregates, preventing the purification of the SFPQ/NONO complex. The ability of the SFPQ/NONO complex to form varying protein assemblies, in conjunction with the effect of post-translational modifications of SFPQ modulating mRNA binding, suggests key roles affecting mRNP dynamics within the cell. PMID:25605962

  3. A human RNA helicase-like protein, HRH1, facilitates nuclear export of spliced mRNA by releasing the RNA from the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Ohno, M; Shimura, Y

    1996-04-15

    Because the nuclear export of mRNA occurs only after the splicing reaction is completed, intron-containing pre-mRNA does not normally appear in the cytoplasm. As a mechanism to secure this, intron-containing RNA is retained in the nucleus via formation of the spliceosome. Therefore, the process of releasing spliced mRNA from the spliceosome after completion of splicing is an essential step for triggering the nuclear export of the spliced mRNA. In budding yeast, RNA helicase-like protein Prp22 is implicated in this process. Here we demonstrate the function of HRH1, a human protein homologous to Prp22, in mammalian cells using dominant-negative HRH1++ mutants (dn-HRH1). dn-HRH1 protein stalls on the spliceosome and prevents release of the spliced RNA from the spliceosome in vitro. Expression of dn-HRH1 in mammalian cells leads to inhibition of splicing and to extensive nuclear export of unspliced pre-mRNA, probably because of the incapability of recycling spliceosome components that normally retain the pre-mRNA in the nucleus. The arginine/serine-rich domain (RS domain) of HRH1, which is missing in Prp22, confers a nuclear localization signal, and appears to facilitate the interaction of HRH1 with the spliceosome. This is the first report on a bona fide mammalian homolog of yeast Prp splicing factor, and also on a mammalian RNA helicase-like splicing factor. PMID:8608946

  4. Characterization of a Disease-associated Mutation Affecting a Putative Splicing Regulatory Element in Intron 6b of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Faà, Valeria; Incani, Federica; Meloni, Alessandra; Corda, Denise; Masala, Maddalena; Baffico, A. Maria; Seia, Manuela; Cao, Antonio; Rosatelli, M. Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common recessive disorder caused by >1600 mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. About 13% of CFTR mutations are classified as “splicing mutations,” but for almost 40% of these, their role in affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of the gene is not yet defined. In this work, we describe a new splicing mutation detected in three unrelated Italian CF patients. By DNA analyses and mRNA studies, we identified the c.1002–1110_1113delTAAG mutation localized in intron 6b of the CFTR gene. At the mRNA level, this mutation creates an aberrant inclusion of a sequence of 101 nucleotides between exons 6b and 7. This sequence corresponds to a portion of intron 6b and resembles a cryptic exon because it is characterized by an upstream ag and a downstream gt sequence, which are most probably recognized as 5′- and 3′-splice sites by the spliceosome. Through functional analysis of this splicing defect, we show that this mutation abolishes the interaction of the splicing regulatory protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 with an intronic splicing regulatory element and creates a new recognition motif for the SRp75 splicing factor, causing activation of the cryptic exon. Our results show that the c.1002–1110_1113delTAAG mutation creates a new intronic splicing regulatory element in intron 6b of the CFTR gene exclusively recognized by SRp75. PMID:19759008

  5. An Intronic G Run within HIV-1 Intron 2 Is Critical for Splicing Regulation of vif mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Widera, Marek; Erkelenz, Steffen; Hillebrand, Frank; Krikoni, Aikaterini; Widera, Darius; Kaisers, Wolfgang; Deenen, René; Gombert, Michael; Dellen, Rafael; Pfeiffer, Tanya; Kaltschmidt, Barbara; Münk, Carsten; Bosch, Valerie; Köhrer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Within target T lymphocytes, human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) encounters the retroviral restriction factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G), which is counteracted by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vif. Vif is encoded by intron-containing viral RNAs that are generated by splicing at 3′ splice site (3′ss) A1 but lack splicing at 5′ss D2, which results in the retention of a large downstream intron. Hence, the extents of activation of 3′ss A1 and repression of D2, respectively, determine the levels of vif mRNA and thus the ability to evade A3G-mediated antiviral effects. The use of 3′ss A1 can be enhanced or repressed by splicing regulatory elements that control the recognition of downstream 5′ss D2. Here we show that an intronic G run (GI2-1) represses the use of a second 5′ss, termed D2b, that is embedded within intron 2 and, as determined by RNA deep-sequencing analysis, is normally inefficiently used. Mutations of GI2-1 and activation of D2b led to the generation of transcripts coding for Gp41 and Rev protein isoforms but primarily led to considerable upregulation of vif mRNA expression. We further demonstrate, however, that higher levels of Vif protein are actually detrimental to viral replication in A3G-expressing T cell lines but not in A3G-deficient cells. These observations suggest that an appropriate ratio of Vif-to-A3G protein levels is required for optimal virus replication and that part of Vif level regulation is effected by the novel G run identified here. PMID:23255806

  6. Unexpected CEP290 mRNA Splicing in a Humanized Knock-In Mouse Model for Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Garanto, Alejandro; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Peters, Theo A.; Roepman, Ronald; Cremers, Frans P. M.; Collin, Rob W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe form of retinal dystrophy with an onset in the first year of life. The most frequent genetic cause of LCA, accounting for up to 15% of all LCA cases in Europe and North-America, is a mutation (c.2991+1655AG) in intron 26 of CEP290. This mutation generates a cryptic splice donor site resulting in the insertion of an aberrant exon (exon X) containing a premature stop codon to CEP290 mRNA. In order to study the pathophysiology of the intronic CEP290 mutation, we generated two humanized knock-in mouse models each carrying ~6.3 kb of the human CEP290 gene, either with or without the intronic mutation. Transcriptional characterization of these mouse models revealed an unexpected splice pattern of CEP290 mRNA, especially in the retina. In both models, a new cryptic exon (coined exon Y) was identified in ~5 to 12% of all Cep290 transcripts. This exon Y was expressed in all murine tissues analyzed but not detected in human retina or fibroblasts of LCA patients. In addition, exon x that is characteristic of LCA in humans, was expressed at only very low levels in the retina of the LCA mouse model. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses did not reveal any differences between the two transgenic models and wild-type mice. Together, our results show clear differences in the recognition of splice sites between mice and humans, and emphasize that care is warranted when generating animal models for human genetic diseases caused by splice mutations. PMID:24223178

  7. RTCB-1 mediates neuroprotection via XBP-1 mRNA splicing in the unfolded protein response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arpita; Zhang, Siyuan; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A

    2014-11-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the degeneration of dopamine (DA) neurons and age-dependent formation of protein inclusions that contain the α-synuclein (α-syn) protein. RNA interference (RNAi) screening using Caenorhabditis elegans identified RTCB-1, an uncharacterized gene product, as one of several significant modifiers of α-syn protein misfolding. RTCB-1 is the worm ortholog of the human HSPC117 protein, a component of RNA trafficking granules in mammalian neurons. Here we show that RTCB-1 protects C. elegans DA neurons from age-dependent degeneration induced by human α-syn. Moreover, neuronal-specific RNAi depletion of rtcb-1 enhanced α-syn-induced degeneration. Similar results were obtained when worms were exposed to the DA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. HSPC117 has been characterized recently as an essential subunit of the human tRNA splicing ligase complex. tRNA ligases have alternative functions in RNA repair and nonconventional mRNA splicing events. For example, in yeast, unconventional splicing of HAC1, a transcription factor that controls the unfolded protein response (UPR), is mediated by a tRNA ligase. In C. elegans, we demonstrate that RTCB-1 is necessary for xbp-1 (worm homolog of HAC1) mRNA splicing. Moreover, using a RNA ligase-dead mutant, we determine that the ligase activity of worm RTCB-1 is required for its neuroprotective role, which, in turn, is mediated through XBP-1 in the UPR pathway. Collectively, these studies highlight the mechanistic intersection of RNA processing and proteostasis in mediating neuroprotection. PMID:25429148

  8. The Drosophila splicing regulator sex-lethal directly inhibits translation of male-specific-lethal 2 mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, F; Merendino, L; Hentze, M W; Valcárcel, J

    1998-01-01

    Male-specific expression of the protein male-specific-lethal 2 (MSL-2) controls dosage compensation in Drosophila. msl-2 gene expression is inhibited in females by Sex-lethal (SXL), an RNA binding protein known to regulate pre-mRNA splicing. An intron present at the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of msl-2 mRNA contains putative SXL binding sites and is retained in female flies. Here we show that SXL plays a dual role in the inhibition of msl-2 expression. Cotransfection of Drosophila Schneider cells with an SXL expression vector and a reporter containing the 5' UTR of msl-2 mRNA resulted in retention of the 5' UTR intron and efficient accumulation of the unspliced mRNA in the cytoplasm, where its translation was blocked by SXL, but not by the intron per se. Both splicing and translation inhibition by SXL were recapitulated in vitro and found to be dependent upon SXL binding to high-affinity sites within the intron, showing that SXL directly regulates these events. Our data reveal a coordinated mechanism for the regulation of msl-2 expression by the same regulatory factor: SXL enforces intron retention in the nucleus and subsequent translation inhibition in the cytoplasm. PMID:9570314

  9. Rbfox proteins regulate alternative mRNA splicing through evolutionarily conserved RNA bridges

    PubMed Central

    Lovci, Michael T; Ghanem, Dana; Marr, Henry; Arnold, Justin; Gee, Sherry; Parra, Marilyn; Liang, Tiffany Y; Stark, Thomas J; Gehman, Lauren T; Hoon, Shawn; Massirer, Katlin B; Pratt, Gabriel A; Black, Douglas L; Gray, Joe W; Conboy, John G; Yeo, Gene W

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) enables programmed diversity of gene expression across tissues and development. We show here that binding in distal intronic regions (>500 nucleotides (nt) from any exon) by Rbfox splicing factors important in development is extensive and is an active mode of splicing regulation. Similarly to exon-proximal sites, distal sites contain evolutionarily conserved GCATG sequences and are associated with AS activation and repression upon modulation of Rbfox abundance in human and mouse experimental systems. As a proof of principle, we validated the activity of two specific Rbfox enhancers in KIF21A and ENAH distal introns and showed that a conserved long-range RNA-RNA base-pairing interaction (an RNA bridge) is necessary for Rbfox-mediated exon inclusion in the ENAH gene. Thus we demonstrate a previously unknown RNA-mediated mechanism for AS control by distally bound RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24213538

  10. Rbfox proteins regulate alternative mRNA splicing through evolutionarily conserved RNA bridges.

    PubMed

    Lovci, Michael T; Ghanem, Dana; Marr, Henry; Arnold, Justin; Gee, Sherry; Parra, Marilyn; Liang, Tiffany Y; Stark, Thomas J; Gehman, Lauren T; Hoon, Shawn; Massirer, Katlin B; Pratt, Gabriel A; Black, Douglas L; Gray, Joe W; Conboy, John G; Yeo, Gene W

    2013-12-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) enables programmed diversity of gene expression across tissues and development. We show here that binding in distal intronic regions (>500 nucleotides (nt) from any exon) by Rbfox splicing factors important in development is extensive and is an active mode of splicing regulation. Similarly to exon-proximal sites, distal sites contain evolutionarily conserved GCATG sequences and are associated with AS activation and repression upon modulation of Rbfox abundance in human and mouse experimental systems. As a proof of principle, we validated the activity of two specific Rbfox enhancers in KIF21A and ENAH distal introns and showed that a conserved long-range RNA-RNA base-pairing interaction (an RNA bridge) is necessary for Rbfox-mediated exon inclusion in the ENAH gene. Thus we demonstrate a previously unknown RNA-mediated mechanism for AS control by distally bound RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24213538

  11. Early base-pair fluctuations and the activation of mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ariel

    1991-05-01

    By means of multiprocessed Monte Carlo simulations we study the amplification in time structural fluctuations in sequential RNA folding concomitant with transcription. The simulations allow for an exploration of configuration space subject to the realistic time-constraints of RNA synthesis. The treatment focuses on the splicing YC4 intron as a study case. We show how an early disruption in the folding may result in a terminal structure which is active for splicing, bringing together the two cleavage sites at both ends of the intron.

  12. Novel Approach for the Detection of the Vestiges of Testicular mRNA Splicing Errors in Mature Spermatozoa of Japanese Black Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Taichi; Sakase, Mitsuhiro; Fukushima, Moriyuki; Harayama, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    There is a serious problem with the reduction of male reproductive performance of the livestock in the world. We have a hypothesis that the splicing error-caused derivation of aberrant sperm motility-related proteins may be one of its causal factors. It is thought that fresh testicular tissues are necessary for the detection of splicing errors of the mRNA. However, it is difficult to obtain testicular tissues from a number of agriculturally important bulls by surgical methods, because such procedures may have deleterious effects on bulls’ reproductive performance. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of mRNA fragments collected from ejaculated spermatozoa as alternative analytical samples for detection of the splicing errors. In the first experiment, we characterized the alternative splicing and splicing error of bull testicular ADCY10 mRNA which coded the synthase of the regulatory molecule for sperm motility “cAMP”. In testes, the exon 11-lacking variant coding the truncated ADCY10 was derived by alternative splicing. However, splicing errors, which accompanied the frame shift in the second cyclase domain, were occasionally observed in the exon 11-lacking variant. This aberrant variant retained intronic nucleotides (4 bases, CCAG) connecting the initial part of exon 10 due to splicing errors and consequently yielded the cleavage site for a restriction enzyme (Cac8I) which recognized the nucleotide sequences (GCNNGC). In the second experiment, we recovered residual testicular mRNA fragments from ejaculated spermatozoa and observed the splicing error-caused derivation of the aberrant variant of ADCY 10. Ejaculated spermatozoa conserved mRNA fragments of the exon 11-lacking variant coding exons 9, 10, 12 and 13. Moreover, the above-mentioned aberrant variant of ADCY10 mRNA fragment was detectable by Cac8I digestion treatment using the sperm mRNAs. These results indicate the utility of sperm mRNA fragments for the detection of splicing errors in

  13. Human intronless genes: Functional groups, associated diseases, evolution, and mRNA processing in absence of splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Grzybowska, Ewa A.

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional characteristics of intronless genes (IGs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diseases associated with IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Origin and evolution of IGs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mRNA processing without splicing. -- Abstract: Intronless genes (IGs) constitute approximately 3% of the human genome. Human IGs are essentially different in evolution and functionality from the IGs of unicellular eukaryotes, which represent the majority in their genomes. Functional analysis of IGs has revealed a massive over-representation of signal transduction genes and genes encoding regulatory proteins important for growth, proliferation, and development. IGs also often display tissue-specific expression, usually in the nervous system and testis. These characteristics translate into IG-associated diseases, mainly neuropathies, developmental disorders, and cancer. IGs represent recent additions to the genome, created mostly by retroposition of processed mRNAs with retained functionality. Processing, nuclear export, and translation of these mRNAs should be hampered dramatically by the lack of splice factors, which normally tightly cover mature transcripts and govern their fate. However, natural IGs manage to maintain satisfactory expression levels. Different mechanisms by which IGs solve the problem of mRNA processing and nuclear export are discussed here, along with their possible impact on reporter studies.

  14. Gene structure, chromosomal location, and basis for alternative mRNA splicing of the human VCAM1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cybulsky, M.I.; Fries, J.W.U.; Williams, A.J.; Sultan, P.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Collins, T. ); Eddy, R.; Byers, M.; Shows, T. )

    1991-09-01

    Vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein adhesive for certain blood leukocytes and tumor cells, which is expressed by activated endothelium in a variety of pathologic conditions including atherosclerosis. Genomic clones encoding the VCAM1 gene were isolated and the organization of the gene was determined. The gene, which is present in a single copy in the human genome, contains 9 exons spanning {approx}25 kilobases of DNA. Exons 2-8 contain C2 or H-type immunoglobulin domains. At least two different VCAM-1 precursors can be generated from the human gene as a result of alternative mRNA splicing events, which include or exclude exon 5. A consensus TATAA element is located upstream of the transcriptional start site. The VCAM1 promoter contains consensus binding sites for NF-{kappa}B, the GATA family of transcription factors, as well as an AP1 site. The VCAM1 gene was assigned to the 1p31-32 region of chromosome 1 based on the analysis of human-mouse hybrid cell lines and in situ hybridization. Structural analysis of the human VCAM1 gene provides the basis for alternative mRNA splicing and an initial approach to elucidating the regulation of VCAM-1 expression.

  15. Regulation of alternative VEGF-A mRNA splicing is a therapeutic target for analgesia☆

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, R.P.; Beazley-Long, N.; Hua, J.; Kennedy, H.; Prager, J.; Bevan, H.; Qiu, Y.; Fernandes, E.S.; Gammons, M.V.; Ballmer-Hofer, K.; Gittenberger de Groot, A.C.; Churchill, A.J.; Harper, S.J.; Brain, S.D.; Bates, D.O.; Donaldson, L.F.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is best known as a key regulator of the formation of new blood vessels. Neutralization of VEGF-A with anti-VEGF therapy e.g. bevacizumab, can be painful, and this is hypothesized to result from a loss of VEGF-A-mediated neuroprotection. The multiple vegf-a gene products consist of two alternatively spliced families, typified by VEGF-A165a and VEGF-A165b (both contain 165 amino acids), both of which are neuroprotective. Under pathological conditions, such as in inflammation and cancer, the pro-angiogenic VEGF-A165a is upregulated and predominates over the VEGF-A165b isoform. We show here that in rats and mice VEGF-A165a and VEGF-A165b have opposing effects on pain, and that blocking the proximal splicing event – leading to the preferential expression of VEGF-A165b over VEGF165a – prevents pain in vivo. VEGF-A165a sensitizes peripheral nociceptive neurons through actions on VEGFR2 and a TRPV1-dependent mechanism, thus enhancing nociceptive signaling. VEGF-A165b blocks the effect of VEGF-A165a. After nerve injury, the endogenous balance of VEGF-A isoforms switches to greater expression of VEGF-Axxxa compared to VEGF-Axxxb, through an SRPK1-dependent pre-mRNA splicing mechanism. Pharmacological inhibition of SRPK1 after traumatic nerve injury selectively reduced VEGF-Axxxa expression and reversed associated neuropathic pain. Exogenous VEGF-A165b also ameliorated neuropathic pain. We conclude that the relative levels of alternatively spliced VEGF-A isoforms are critical for pain modulation under both normal conditions and in sensory neuropathy. Altering VEGF-Axxxa/VEGF-Axxxb balance by targeting alternative RNA splicing may be a new analgesic strategy. PMID:25151644

  16. Exon-Specific U1s Correct SPINK5 Exon 11 Skipping Caused by a Synonymous Substitution that Affects a Bifunctional Splicing Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Dal Mas, Andrea; Fortugno, Paola; Donadon, Irving; Levati, Lauretta; Castiglia, Daniele; Pagani, Franco

    2015-05-01

    The c.891C>T synonymous transition in SPINK5 induces exon 11 (E11) skipping and causes Netherton syndrome (NS). Using a specific RNA-protein interaction assay followed by mass spectrometry analysis along with silencing and overexpression of splicing factors, we showed that this mutation affects an exonic bifunctional splicing regulatory element composed by two partially overlapping silencer and enhancer sequences, recognized by hnRNPA1 and Tra2β splicing factors, respectively. The C-to-T substitution concomitantly increases hnRNPA1 and weakens Tra2β-binding sites, leading to pathological E11 skipping. In hybrid minigenes, exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNAs (ExSpe U1s) that target by complementarity intronic sequences downstream of the donor splice site rescued the E11 skipping defect caused by the c.891C>T mutation. ExSpe U1 lentiviral-mediated transduction of primary NS keratinocytes from a patient bearing the mutation recovered the correct full-length SPINK5 mRNA and the corresponding functional lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor protein in a dose-dependent manner. This study documents the reliability of a mutation-specific, ExSpe U1-based, splicing therapy for a relatively large subset of European NS patients. Usage of ExSpe U1 may represent a general approach for correction of splicing defects affecting skin disease genes. PMID:25665175

  17. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  18. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  19. Alteration of POLDIP3 Splicing Associated with Loss of Function of TDP-43 in Tissues Affected with ALS

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Atsushi; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwabara, Misaki; Kato, Taisuke; Watanabe, Norihiro; Yamahira, Akie; Kondo, Chigusa; Yokoseki, Akio; Takahashi, Masuhiro; Kuwano, Ryozo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease caused by selective loss of motor neurons. In the ALS motor neurons, TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) is dislocated from the nucleus to cytoplasm and forms inclusions, suggesting that loss of a nuclear function of TDP-43 may underlie the pathogenesis of ALS. TDP-43 functions in RNA metabolism include regulation of transcription, mRNA stability, and alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. However, a function of TDP-43 in tissue affected with ALS has not been elucidated. We sought to identify the molecular indicators reflecting on a TDP-43 function. Using exon array analysis, we observed a remarkable alteration of splicing in the polymerase delta interacting protein 3 (POLDIP3) as a result of the depletion of TDP-43 expression in two types of cultured cells. In the cells treated with TDP-43 siRNA, wild-type POLDIP3 (variant-1) decreased and POLDIP3 lacking exon 3 (variant-2) increased. The RNA binding ability of TDP-43 was necessary for inclusion of POLDIP3 exon 3. Moreover, we found an increment of POLDIP3 variant-2 mRNA in motor cortex, spinal cord and spinal motor neurons collected by laser capture microdissection with ALS. Our results suggest a loss of TDP-43 function in tissues affected with ALS, supporting the hypothesis that a loss of function of TDP-43 underlies the pathogenesis of ALS. PMID:22900096

  20. Aly and THO are required for assembly of the human TREX complex and association of TREX components with the spliced mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Binkai; Wang, Qingliang; Wu, Guifen; Tan, Ming; Wang, Lantian; Shi, Min; Chang, Xingya; Cheng, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The mRNA export complex TREX (TREX) is known to contain Aly, UAP56, Tex1 and the THO complex, among which UAP56 is required for TREX assembly. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each human TREX component in TREX assembly and its association with the mRNA. We found that Tex1 is essentially a subunit of the THO complex. Aly, THO and UAP56 are all required for assembly of TREX, in which Aly directly interacts with THO subunits Thoc2 and Thoc5. Both Aly and THO function in linking UAP56 to the cap-binding protein CBP80. Interestingly, association of UAP56 with the spliced mRNA, but not with the pre-mRNA, requires Aly and THO. Unexpectedly, we found that Aly and THO require each other to associate with the spliced mRNA. Consistent with these biochemical results, similar to Aly and UAP56, THO plays critical roles in mRNA export. Together, we propose that Aly, THO and UAP56 form a highly integrated unit to associate with the spliced mRNA and function in mRNA export. PMID:23222130

  1. Hfq affects mRNA levels independently of degradation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterial Lsm protein, Hfq, is an RNA chaperone involved in many reactions related to RNA metabolism, such as replication and stability, control of small RNA activity and polyadenylation. Despite this wide spectrum of known functions, the global role of Hfq is almost certainly undervalued; its capacity to bind DNA and to interact with many other proteins are only now beginning to be taken into account. Results The role of Hfq in the maturation and degradation of the rpsO mRNA of E. coli was investigated in vivo. The data revealed a decrease in rpsO mRNA abundance concomitant to an increase in its stability when Hfq is absent. This indicates that the change in mRNA levels in hfq mutants does not result from its modification of RNA stability. Moreover, a series of independent experiments have revealed that the decrease in mRNA level is not a consequence of a reduction of translation efficiency and that Hfq is not directly implicated in translational control of rpsO expression. Reduced steady-state mRNA levels in the absence of Hfq were also shown for rpsT, rpsB and rpsB-tsf, but not for lpp, pnp or tRNA transcripts. The abundance of chimeric transcripts rpsO-lacZ and rpsB-lacZ, whose expression was driven by rpsO and rpsB promoters, respectively, was also lower in the hfq null-mutants, while the β-galactosidase yield remained about the same as in the parent wild-type strain. Conclusions The data obtained suggest that alteration of rpsO, rpsT and rpsB-tsf transcript levels observed under conditions of Hfq deficiency is not caused by the post-transcriptional events, such as mRNA destabilization or changes in translation control, and may rather result from changes in transcriptional activity. So far, how Hfq affects transcription remains unclear. We propose that one of the likely mechanisms of Hfq-mediated modulation of transcription might operate early in the elongation step, when interaction of Hfq with a nascent transcript would help to overcome

  2. Polymorphisms in human dopamine D2 receptor gene affect gene expression, splicing, and neuronal activity during working memory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bertolino, Alessandro; Fazio, Leonardo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Rampino, Antonio; Romano, Raffaella; Lee, Mei-Ling T; Xiao, Tao; Papp, Audrey; Wang, Danxin; Sadée, Wolfgang

    2007-12-18

    Subcortical dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) signaling is implicated in cognitive processes and brain disorders, but the effect of DRD2 variants remains ambiguous. We measured allelic mRNA expression in postmortem human striatum and prefrontal cortex and then performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) scans of the DRD2 locus. A previously uncharacterized promoter SNP (rs12364283) located in a conserved suppressor region was associated with enhanced DRD2 expression, whereas previously studied DRD2 variants failed to affect expression. Moreover, two frequent intronic SNPs (rs2283265 and rs1076560) decreased expression of DRD2 short splice variant (expressed mainly presynaptically) relative to DRD2 long (postsynaptic), a finding reproduced in vitro by using minigene constructs. Being in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other, both intronic SNPs (but not rs12364283) were also associated with greater activity of striatum and prefrontal cortex measured with fMRI during working memory and with reduced performance in working memory and attentional control tasks in healthy humans. Our results identify regulatory DRD2 polymorphisms that modify mRNA expression and splicing and working memory pathways. PMID:18077373

  3. Comparison of mRNA Splicing Assay Protocols across Multiple Laboratories: Recommendations for Best Practice in Standardized Clinical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, Phillip J.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Thomassen, Mads; Becker, Alexandra; Brandão, Rita; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Montagna, Marco; Menéndez, Mireia; Quiles, Francisco; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; De Leeneer, Kim; Tenés, Anna; Montalban, Gemma; Tserpelis, Demis; Yoshimatsu, Toshio; Tirapo, Carole; Raponi, Michela; Caldes, Trinidad; Blanco, Ana; Santamariña, Marta; Guidugli, Lucia; de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Wong, Ming; Tancredi, Mariella; Fachal, Laura; Ding, Yuan Chun; Kruse, Torben; Lattimore, Vanessa; Kwong, Ava; Chan, Tsun Leung; Colombo, Mara; De Vecchi, Giovanni; Caligo, Maria; Baralle, Diana; Lázaro, Conxi; Couch, Fergus; Radice, Paolo; Southey, Melissa C.; Neuhausen, Susan; Houdayer, Claude; Fackenthal, Jim; Van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Vega, Ana; Diez, Orland; Blok, Rien; Claes, Kathleen; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Walker, Logan; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Brown, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of unclassified sequence variants in cancer predisposition genes is essential for clinical management and depends on a multifactorial analysis of clinical, genetic, pathologic, and bioinformatic variables and assays of transcript length and abundance. The integrity of assay data in turn relies on appropriate assay design, interpretation, and reporting. Methods We conducted a multicenter investigation to compare mRNA splicing assay protocols used by members of the ENIGMA (Evidence-Based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles) consortium. We compared similarities and differences in results derived from analysis of a panel of breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene variants known to alter splicing (BRCA1: c.135-1G>T, c.591C>T, c.594-2A>C, c.671-2A>G, and c.5467+5G>C and BRCA2: c.426-12_8delGTTTT, c.7988A>T, c.8632+1G>A, and c.9501+3A>T). Differences in protocols were then assessed to determine which elements were critical in reliable assay design. Results PCR primer design strategies, PCR conditions, and product detection methods, combined with a prior knowledge of expected alternative transcripts, were the key factors for accurate splicing assay results. For example, because of the position of primers and PCR extension times, several isoforms associated with BRCA1, c.594-2A>C and c.671-2A>G, were not detected by many sites. Variation was most evident for the detection of low-abundance transcripts (e.g., BRCA2 c.8632+1G>A Δ19,20 and BRCA1 c.135-1g>t Δ5q and Δ3). Detection of low-abundance transcripts was sometimes addressed by using more analytically sensitive detection methods (e.g., BRCA2 c.426-12_8delGTTTT ins18bp). Conclusions We provide recommendations for best practice and raise key issues to consider when designing mRNA assays for evaluation of unclassified sequence variants. PMID:24212087

  4. Virus deletion mutants that affect a 3' splice site in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2.

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, B M; Brady, H A; Wold, W S

    1985-01-01

    Five viable virus mutants were constructed with deletions near a 3' splice site located at nucleotide 2157 in the E3 transcription unit of adenovirus 2. The mutants were examined for splicing activity at the 2157 3' splice site in vivo by nuclease-gel analysis of steady-state cytoplasmic mRNA. Splicing was not prevented by an exon deletion (dl719) that leaves 16 5'-proximal exon nucleotides intact or by intron deletions that leave 34 (dl717, dl712) or 18 (dl716) 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact. The sequences deleted in one of these intron mutants (dl716) include the putative branchpoint site used in lariat formation during splicing. Thus, a surrogate branchpoint site apparently can be used for splicing. Another intron mutant (dl714) has a deletion that leaves 15 3'-proximal intron nucleotides intact; remarkably, this deletion virtually abolished splicing, even though the deletion is only 3 nucleotides closer to the splice site than is the deletion in dl716 which splices normally. The three nucleotides deleted in dl714 that are retained by dl716 are the sequence TGT. The TGT sequence is located on the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region upstream of the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. Such pyrimidine-rich regions are ubiquitous at 3' splice sites. Most likely, the TGT is required for splicing at the nucleotide 2157 3' splice site. The TGT may be important because of its specific sequence or because it forms the 5' boundary of the pyrimidine-rich region. Images PMID:3879768

  5. Arabidopsis PTB1 and PTB2 proteins negatively regulate splicing of a mini-exon splicing reporter and affect alternative splicing of endogenous genes differentially.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Craig G; Lewandowska, Dominika; Liney, Michele; Davidson, Diane; Chapman, Sean; Fuller, John; McNicol, Jim; Shaw, Paul; Brown, John W S

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the function of Arabidopsis thaliana AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 as plant splicing factors. The effect on splicing of overexpression of AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 was analysed in an in vivo protoplast transient expression system with a novel mini-exon splicing reporter. A range of mutations in pyrimidine-rich sequences were compared with and without AtPTB and NpU2AF65 overexpression. Splicing analyses of constructs in protoplasts and RNA from overexpression lines used high-resolution reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 reduced inclusion/splicing of the potato invertase mini-exon splicing reporter, indicating that these proteins can repress plant intron splicing. Mutation of the polypyrimidine tract and closely associated Cytosine and Uracil-rich (CU-rich) sequences, upstream of the mini-exon, altered repression by AtPTB1 and AtPTB2. Coexpression of a plant orthologue of U2AF65 alleviated the splicing repression of AtPTB1. Mutation of a second CU-rich upstream of the mini-exon 3' splice site led to a decline in mini-exon splicing, indicating the presence of a splicing enhancer sequence. Finally, RT-PCR of AtPTB overexpression lines with c. 90 known alternative splicing (AS) events showed that AtPTBs significantly altered AS of over half the events. AtPTB1 and AtPTB2 are splicing factors that influence alternative splicing. This occurs in the potato invertase mini-exon via the polypyrimidine tract and associated pyrimidine-rich sequence. PMID:24749484

  6. Functional consequences of developmentally regulated alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kalsotra, Auinash; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide analyses of metazoan transcriptomes have revealed an unexpected level of mRNA diversity that is generated by alternative splicing. Recently, regulatory networks have been identified through which splicing promotes dynamic remodeling of the transcriptome to promote physiological changes, which involve robust and coordinated alternative splicing transitions. The regulation of splicing in yeast, worms, flies and vertebrates affects a variety of biological processes. The functional classes of genes that are regulated by alternative splicing include both those with widespread homeostatic activities and genes with cell-type-specific functions. Alternative splicing can drive determinative physiological change or can have a permissive role by providing mRNA variability that is utilized by other regulatory mechanisms. PMID:21921927

  7. Four novel cystic fibrosis mutations in splice junction sequences affecting the CFTR nucleotide binding folds

    SciTech Connect

    Doerk, T.; Wulbrand, U.; Tuemmler, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Single cases of the four novel splice site mutations 1525[minus]1 G [r arrow] A (intron 9), 3601[minus]2 A [r arrow] G (intron 18), 3850[minus]3 T [r arrow] G (intron 19), and 4374+1 G [r arrow] T (intron 23) were detected in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients of Indo-Iranian, Turkish, Polish, and Germany descent. The nucleotide substitutions at the +1, [minus]1, and [minus]2 positions all destroy splice sites and lead to severe disease alleles associated with features typical of gastrointestinal and pulmonary cystic fibrosis disease. The 3850[minus]3 T-to-G change was discovered in a very mildly affected 33-year-old [Delta]F508 compound heterozygote, suggesting that the T-to-G transversion at the less conserved [minus]3 position of the acceptor splice site may retain some wildtype function. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Regulation of Splicing Factors by Alternative Splicing and NMD Is Conserved between Kingdoms Yet Evolutionarily Flexible

    PubMed Central

    Lareau, Liana F.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraconserved elements, unusually long regions of perfect sequence identity, are found in genes encoding numerous RNA-binding proteins including arginine-serine rich (SR) splicing factors. Expression of these genes is regulated via alternative splicing of the ultraconserved regions to yield mRNAs that are degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a process termed unproductive splicing (Lareau et al. 2007; Ni et al. 2007). As all human SR genes are affected by alternative splicing and NMD, one might expect this regulation to have originated in an early SR gene and persisted as duplications expanded the SR family. But in fact, unproductive splicing of most human SR genes arose independently (Lareau et al. 2007). This paradox led us to investigate the origin and proliferation of unproductive splicing in SR genes. We demonstrate that unproductive splicing of the splicing factor SRSF5 (SRp40) is conserved among all animals and even observed in fungi; this is a rare example of alternative splicing conserved between kingdoms, yet its effect is to trigger mRNA degradation. As the gene duplicated, the ancient unproductive splicing was lost in paralogs, and distinct unproductive splicing evolved rapidly and repeatedly to take its place. SR genes have consistently employed unproductive splicing, and while it is exceptionally conserved in some of these genes, turnover in specific events among paralogs shows flexible means to the same regulatory end. PMID:25576366

  9. Defective splicing of mRNA from one COL1A1 allele of type I collagen in nondeforming (type I) osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed Central

    Stover, M L; Primorac, D; Liu, S C; McKinstry, M B; Rowe, D W

    1993-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I is the mildest form of heritable bone fragility resulting from mutations within the COL1A1 gene. We studied fibroblasts established from a child with OI type I and demonstrated underproduction of alpha 1 (I) collagen chains and alpha 1 (I) mRNA. Indirect RNase protection suggested two species of alpha 1 (I) mRNA, one of which was not collinear with fully spliced alpha 1 (I) mRNA. The noncollinear population was confined to the nuclear compartment of the cell, and contained the entire sequence of intron 26 and a G-->A transition in the first position of the intron donor site. The G-->A transition was also identified in the genomic DNA. The retained intron contained an in-frame stop codon and introduced an out-of-frame insertion within the collagen mRNA producing stop codons downstream of the insertion. These changes probably account for the failure of the mutant RNA to appear in the cytoplasm. Unlike other splice site mutations within collagen mRNA that resulted in exon skipping and a truncated but inframe RNA transcript, this mutation did not result in production of a defective collagen pro alpha 1 (I) chain. Instead, the mild nature of the disease in this case reflects failure to process the defective mRNA and thus the absence of a protein product from the mutant allele. Images PMID:8408653

  10. Identification of hnRNPs K, L and A2/B1 as candidate proteins involved in the nutritional regulation of mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Brian N.; Walsh, Callee M.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Timperman, Aaron T.; Salati, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Nutrient regulation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) expression occurs through changes in the rate of splicing of G6PD pre-mRNA. This posttranscriptional mechanism accounts for the 12- to 15-fold increase in G6PD expression in livers of mice that were starved and then refed a high-carbohydrate diet. Regulation of G6PD pre-mRNA splicing requires a cis-acting element in exon 12 of the pre-mRNA. Using RNA probes to exon 12 and nuclear extracts from livers of mice that were starved or refed, proteins of 60 kDa and 37 kDa were detected bound to nucleotides 65–79 of exon 12 and this binding was decreased by 50% with nuclear extracts from refed mice. The proteins were identified as hnRNP K, and L, and hnRNP A2/B1 by LC-MS/MS. The decrease in binding of these proteins to exon 12 during refeeding was not accompanied by a decrease in the total amount of these proteins in total nuclear extract. HnRNPs K, L and A2/B1 have known roles in the regulation of mRNA splicing. The decrease in binding of these proteins during treatments that increase G6PD expression is consistent with a role for these proteins in the inhibition of G6PD mRNA splicing. PMID:17095106

  11. Splicing in action: assessing disease causing sequence changes

    PubMed Central

    Baralle, D; Baralle, M

    2005-01-01

    Variations in new splicing regulatory elements are difficult to identify exclusively by sequence inspection and may result in deleterious effects on precursor (pre) mRNA splicing. These mutations can result in either complete skipping of the exon, retention of the intron, or the introduction of a new splice site within an exon or intron. Sometimes mutations that do not disrupt or create a splice site activate pre-existing pseudo splice sites, consistent with the proposal that introns contain splicing inhibitory sequences. These variants can also affect the fine balance of isoforms produced by alternatively spliced exons and in consequence cause disease. Available genomic pathology data reveal that we are still partly ignorant of the basic mechanisms that underlie the pre-mRNA splicing process. The fact that human pathology can provide pointers to new modulatory elements of splicing should be exploited. PMID:16199547

  12. Targeting the Splicing of mRNA in Autoimmune Diseases: BAFF Inhibition in Sjögren's Syndrome as a Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Roescher, N.; Vosters, J.L.; Alsaleh, G.; Dreyfus, P.; Jacques, S.; Chiocchia, G.; Sibilia, J.; Tak, P.P.; Chiorini, J.A.; Mariette, X.; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric

    2014-01-01

    BAFF (B-cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), a pivotal cytokine for B-cell activation, is overexpressed by salivary gland (SG) epithelial cells in primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS). ΔBAFF, a physiological inhibitor of BAFF, is a minor alternative splice variant of BAFF. A U7 RNA was reengineered to deliver antisense sequences targeting BAFF splice regions. A major decrease of BAFF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein secretion, concomitantly with the increase of ΔBAFF mRNA, was observed in vitro. In vivo, SG retrograd instillation of nonobese diabetic mice by the modified U7 cloned into an adeno-associated virus vector significantly decreased BAFF protein expression and lymphocytic infiltrates and improved salivary flow. This study offers a rationale for localized therapeutic BAFF inhibition in pSS and represents a proof of concept of the interest of exon skipping in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24304965

  13. Intronic mutations affecting splicing of MBTPS2 cause ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oeffner, Frank; Martinez, Francisco; Schaffer, Julie; Salhi, Aïcha; Monfort, Sandra; Oltra, Silvestre; Neidel, Ulrike; Bornholdt, Dorothea; van Bon, Bregje; König, Arne; Happle, Rudolf; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2011-05-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis, alopecia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome is an X-linked genodermatosis with congenital atrichia being the most prominent feature. Recently, we have shown that functional deficiency of MBTPS2 (membrane-bound transcription factor protease site 2) - a zinc metalloprotease essential for cholesterol homeostasis and endoplasmic reticulum stress response - causes the disease. Here, we present results obtained by analysing two intronic MBTPS2 mutations, c.671-9T>G and c.225-6T>A, using in silico and cell-based splicing assays. Accordingly, the c.225-6T>A transversion generated a new splice acceptor site, which caused extension of exon 3 by four bases and subsequently introduced a premature stop codon. Both, minigene experiments and RT-PCR analysis with patient-derived mRNA, demonstrated that the c.671-9T>G mutation resulted in skipping of exon 6, most likely because of disruption of the polypyrimidin tract or a putative intronic splicing enhancer (ISE). Our combined biocomputational and experimental analysis strongly suggested that both intronic alterations are disease-causing mutations. PMID:21426410

  14. IGF1 mRNA splicing variants in Liaoning cashmere goat: identification, characterization, and transcriptional patterns in skin and visceral organs.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen L; Yin, Rong H; Yin, Rong L; Wang, Jiao J; Jiang, Wu Q; Luo, Guang B; Zhao, Zhi H

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) is a member of the insulin superfamily. It performs important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of skin cell and control of hair cycles and is thought to be a potential candidate gene for goat cashmere traits. In this work, we isolated and characterized three kinds of IGF1 mRNA splicing variants from the liver of Liaoning Cashmere goat, and the expression characterization of the IGF1 mRNA splicing variants were investigated in skin and other tissues of Liaoning cashmere goat. The sequencing results indicated that the classes 1w, 1, and 2 of IGF1 cDNAs in Liaoning cashmere goat, each included an open reading frame encoding the IGF1 precursor protein. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three IGF1 precursor proteins differed only in their NH2-terminal leader peptides. Through removal of the signal peptide and extension peptide, the three IGF1 mRNA splicing variants (classes 1w, 1, and 2) resulted in the same mature IGF1 protein in Liaoning cashmere goat. In skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat, class 1 and class 2 were detected in all stages of hair follicle cycling, and they had the highest transcription level at anagen, and then early anagen; whereas at telogen both classes 1 and 2 had the lowest expression in mRNA level, but the class 1 appears to be relatively more abundant than class 2 in skin tissue of Liaoning cashmere goat. However, the class 1w transcript was not detected in the skin tissues. Three classes of IGF1 mRNA were transcribed in a variety of tissues, including heart, brain, spleen, lung, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle, but class 1 IGF1 mRNA was more abundant than classes 1w and 2 in the investigated tissues. PMID:23534956

  15. The MTL1 Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Is Required for Both Translation and Splicing of the Mitochondrial NADH DEHYDROGENASE SUBUNIT7 mRNA in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Haïli, Nawel; Planchard, Noelya; Arnal, Nadège; Quadrado, Martine; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Dahan, Jennifer; des Francs-Small, Catherine Colas; Mireau, Hakim

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial translation involves a complex interplay of ancient bacteria-like features and host-derived functionalities. Although the basic components of the mitochondrial translation apparatus have been recognized, very few protein factors aiding in recruiting ribosomes on mitochondria-encoded messenger RNA (mRNAs) have been identified in higher plants. In this study, we describe the identification of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MITOCHONDRIAL TRANSLATION FACTOR1 (MTL1) protein, a new member of the Pentatricopeptide Repeat family, and show that it is essential for the translation of the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit7 (nad7) mRNA. We demonstrate that mtl1 mutant plants fail to accumulate the Nad7 protein, even though the nad7 mature mRNA is produced and bears the same 5' and 3' extremities as in wild-type plants. We next observed that polysome association of nad7 mature mRNA is specifically disrupted in mtl1 mutants, indicating that the absence of Nad7 results from a lack of translation of nad7 mRNA. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial translation requires the intervention of gene-specific nucleus-encoded PPR trans-factors and that their action does not necessarily involve the 5' processing of their target mRNA, as observed previously. Interestingly, a partial decrease in nad7 intron 2 splicing was also detected in mtl1 mutants, suggesting that MTL1 is also involved in group II intron splicing. However, this second function appears to be less essential for nad7 expression than its role in translation. MTL1 will be instrumental to understand the multifunctionality of PPR proteins and the mechanisms governing mRNA translation and intron splicing in plant mitochondria. PMID:26537562

  16. Coupling pre-mRNA splicing and 3' end formation to mRNA export: alternative ways to punch the nuclear export clock.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Maquat, Lynne E

    2016-03-01

    How does a mammalian cell determine when newly synthesized mRNAs are fully processed and appropriate for nuclear export? Müller-McNicoll and colleagues (pp. 553-566) expand on mechanisms known to be mediated by nuclear export factor 1 (NXF1) by describing SR proteins as NXF1 adaptors that flag alternatively spliced and polyadenylated mRNA isoforms as cargo ready for the cytoplasm. PMID:26944675

  17. Alternatively spliced exons encode the tissue-specific 5{prime} termini of leukocyte pp52 and stromal cell S37 mRNA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.A.; May, W.; Denny, C.T.

    1996-03-05

    The pp52 gene encodes an intracellular, F-actin-binding phosphoprotein (also designated LSP1 and WP34) postulated to function in cytoskeleton dynamics and cell motility. We previously reported that different mRNA isoforms are expressed from this gene in cells of the leukocyte lineage versus mesodermally derived cells. These tissue-specific mRNA isoforms are identical except for 5{prime}-untranslated regions and sequences coding for unique N-termini of 23 and 21 amino acids, respectively. As this is a single-copy gene, we predicted that these tissue-specific mRNA isoforms would be generated by alternative RNA splicing. We report that the unique 5{prime} sequences in these mRNA isoforms are encoded in two separate exons containing ATG initiation codes. These features confirm that the pp52 and S37 mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative RNA splicing and establish that they are independently translated. Other results presented here indicate that the differential expression of these exons in leukocytes versus mesodermally derived cells is regulated at the level of transcription by tissue-specific promoters. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Stability and translation of TCR zeta mRNA are regulated by the adenosine-uridine-rich elements in splice-deleted 3' untranslated region of zeta-chain.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Krishnan, Sandeep; Tsokos, Christos G; Robertson, James W; Fisher, Carolyn U; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Tsokos, George C

    2006-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) T cells display reduced expression of TCR zeta protein. Recently, we reported that in SLE T cells, the residual TCR zeta protein is predominantly derived from an alternatively spliced form that undergoes splice deletion of 562 nt (from 672 to 1233 bases) within the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of TCR zeta mRNA. The stability and translation of the alternatively spliced form of TCR zeta mRNA are low compared with that of the wild-type TCR zeta mRNA. We report that two adenosine-uridine-rich sequence elements (AREs), defined by the splice-deleted 3' UTR region, but not an ARE located upstream are responsible for securing TCR zeta mRNA stability and translation. The stabilizing effect of the splice-deleted region-defined AREs extended to the luciferase mRNA and was not cell type-specific. The findings demonstrate distinct sequences within the splice-deleted region 672 to 1233 of the 3' UTR, which regulate the transcription, mRNA stability, and translation of TCR zeta mRNA. The absence of these sequences represents a molecular mechanism that contributes to altered TCR zeta-chain expression in lupus. PMID:17114503

  19. Differential Roles of Interleukin 15 mRNA Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing in Immune Responses in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Hitoshi; Yajima, Toshiki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Tsunobuchi, Hironaka; Umemura, Masayuki; Itano, Keiko; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Misao; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2000-01-01

    At least two types of interleukin (IL)-15 mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative splicing at the 5′ upstream of exon 5 in mice. To elucidate the potential roles of IL-15 isoforms in immune responses in vivo, we constructed two groups of transgenic mice using originally described IL-15 cDNA with a normal exon 5 (normal IL-15 transgenic [Tg] mice) and IL-15 cDNA with an alternative exon 5 (alternative IL-15 Tg mice) under the control of an MHC class I promoter. Normal IL-15 Tg mice constitutionally produced a significant level of IL-15 protein and had markedly increased numbers of memory type (CD44high Ly6C+) of CD8+ T cells in the LN. These mice showed resistance to Salmonella infection accompanied by the enhanced interferon (IFN)-γ production, but depletion of CD8+ T cells exaggerated the bacterial growth, suggesting that the IL-15–dependent CD8+ T cells with a memory phenotype may serve to protect against Salmonella infection in normal IL-15 Tg mice. On the other hand, a large amount of intracellular IL-15 protein was detected but hardly secreted extracellularly in alternative IL-15 Tg mice. Although most of the T cells developed normally in the alternative IL-15 Tg mice, they showed impaired IFN-γ production upon TCR engagement. The alternative IL-15 transgenic mice were susceptible to Salmonella accompanied by impaired production of endogenous IL-15 and IFN-γ. Thus, two groups of IL-15 Tg mice may provide information concerning the different roles of IL-15 isoforms in the immune system in vivo. PMID:10620614

  20. Augmented DNA-binding activity of p53 protein encoded by a carboxyl-terminal alternatively spliced mRNA is blocked by p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced form.

    PubMed Central

    Wolkowicz, R; Peled, A; Elkind, N B; Rotter, V

    1995-01-01

    DNA-binding activity of the wild-type p53 is central to its function in vivo. However, recombinant or in vitro translated wild-type p53 proteins, unless modified, are poor DNA binders. The fact that the in vitro produced protein gains DNA-binding activity upon modification at the C terminus raises the possibility that similar mechanisms may exist in the cell. Data presented here show that a C-terminal alternatively spliced wild-type p53 (ASp53) mRNA expressed by bacteria or transcribed in vitro codes for a p53 protein that efficiently binds DNA. Our results support the conclusion that the augmented DNA binding activity of an ASp53 protein is probably due to attenuation of the negative effect residing at the C terminus of the wild-type p53 protein encoded by the regularly spliced mRNA (RSp53) rather than acquisition of additional functionality by the alternatively spliced C' terminus. In addition, we found that ASp53 forms a complex with the non-DNA-binding RSp53, which in turn blocks the DNA-binding activity of ASp53. Interaction between these two wild-type p53 proteins may underline a mechanism that controls the activity of the wild-type p53 protein in the cell. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624329

  1. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. ); Schweikert, H.U. ); Zegers, N.D. ); Hodgins, M.B. )

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  2. A single nucleotide polymorphism in an exon dictates allele dependent differential splicing of episialin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, M J; Gennissen, A M; Vos, H L; Hilkens, J

    1991-01-01

    The episialin gene (MUC1) encodes an epithelial mucin containing a variable number of repeats with a length of twenty amino acids, resulting in many different alleles that can be subdivided into two size classes. The episialin pre-mRNA uses either one of two neighbouring splice acceptor sites for exon 2, which mainly encodes the repeats. Using the genetic polymorphism of the episialin gene to identify different alleles, we show here that the splice site recognition is allele dependent and is based on a single A/G nucleotide difference in exon 2 eight nucleotides downstream of the second splice acceptor site. Transfection experiments confirm that this polymorphic nucleotide regulates the splice site selection. The identity of this nucleotide is in most cases correlated with one of the size classes of the alleles, indicating that mutations altering the number of repeats seldom arise by unequal cross-over between the repeat regions. Images PMID:2014168

  3. The mammalian tRNA ligase complex mediates splicing of XBP1 mRNA and controls antibody secretion in plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Jurkin, Jennifer; Henkel, Theresa; Nielsen, Anne Færch; Minnich, Martina; Popow, Johannes; Kaufmann, Therese; Heindl, Katrin; Hoffmann, Thomas; Busslinger, Meinrad; Martinez, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved stress-signaling pathway activated after accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Active UPR signaling leads to unconventional, enzymatic splicing of XBP1 mRNA enabling expression of the transcription factor XBP1s to control ER homeostasis. While IRE1 has been identified as the endoribonuclease required for cleavage of this mRNA, the corresponding ligase in mammalian cells has remained elusive. Here, we report that RTCB, the catalytic subunit of the tRNA ligase complex, and its co-factor archease mediate XBP1 mRNA splicing both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of RTCB in plasma cells of Rtcbfl/fl Cd23-Cre mice prevents XBP1s expression, which normally is strongly induced during plasma cell development. RTCB-depleted plasma cells show reduced and disorganized ER structures as well as severe defects in antibody secretion. Targeting RTCB and/or archease thus represents a promising strategy for the treatment of a growing number of diseases associated with elevated expression of XBP1s. PMID:25378478

  4. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  5. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Stephen H.; Morales, Christopher H.; Duyck, Tessa H.; Waters, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3’ end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3’splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3’UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  6. Evolution of the Antisense Overlap between Genes for Thyroid Hormone Receptor and Rev-erbα and Characterization of an Exonic G-Rich Element That Regulates Splicing of TRα2 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Stephen H; Morales, Christopher H; Duyck, Tessa H; Waters, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The α-thyroid hormone receptor gene (TRα) codes for two functionally distinct proteins: TRα1, the α-thyroid hormone receptor; and TRα2, a non-hormone-binding variant. The final exon of TRα2 mRNA overlaps the 3' end of Rev-erbα mRNA, which encodes another nuclear receptor on the opposite strand of DNA. To understand the evolution of this antisense overlap, we sequenced these genes and mRNAs in the platypus Orthorhynchus anatinus. Despite its strong homology with other mammals, the platypus TRα/Rev-erbα locus lacks elements essential for expression of TRα2. Comparative analysis suggests that alternative splicing of TRα2 mRNA expression evolved in a stepwise fashion before the divergence of eutherian and marsupial mammals. A short G-rich element (G30) located downstream of the alternative 3'splice site of TRα2 mRNA and antisense to the 3'UTR of Rev-erbα plays an important role in regulating TRα2 splicing. G30 is tightly conserved in eutherian mammals, but is absent in marsupials and monotremes. Systematic deletions and substitutions within G30 have dramatically different effects on TRα2 splicing, leading to either its inhibition or its enhancement. Mutations that disrupt one or more clusters of G residues enhance splicing two- to three-fold. These results suggest the G30 sequence can adopt a highly structured conformation, possibly a G-quadruplex, and that it is part of a complex splicing regulatory element which exerts both positive and negative effects on TRα2 expression. Since mutations that strongly enhance splicing in vivo have no effect on splicing in vitro, it is likely that the regulatory role of G30 is mediated through linkage of transcription and splicing. PMID:26368571

  7. Simian virus 40 early mRNA's. I. Genomic localization of 3' and 5' termini and two major splices in mRNA from transformed and lytically infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V B; Ghosh, P K; Lebowitz, P; Piatak, M; Weissman, S M

    1979-01-01

    We have studied the structure of polyadenylated virus-specific cytoplasmic mRNA's in mouse and human cells transformed by simian virus 40 and in monkey cells infected with simian virus 40 in the presence of cytosine arabinoside by means of reverse transcriptase-catalyzed complementary DNA synthesis and complementary DNA sequencing. Abundant mRNA species containing splices from residues 4490 to 4557 (0.533 to 0.546 map units [m.u.]) and 4490 to 4837 (0.533 to 0.600 m.u.) were identified in both transformed and infected cells. Two principal reverse transcriptase stops were observed at the 5' termini of these mRNA's, both occurring with approximately equal frequency. The most distal of these stops was localized at residues 5152 to 5154 (0.660 m.u.), and the second was at residues 5147 to 5148 (0.659 m.u.). Several additional minor stops, between approximately 0.62 and 0.65 m.u., were also found on complementary DNA copied from transformed cell mRNA; in contrast, only one additional stop was present on complementary DNA copied from early lytic mRNA. These data suggest the presence of a prinicipal 5' terminus of early lytic and transformed cell mRNA's at residues 5152 to 5154 and raise the possibility of additional 5' termini at one or more locations in the 0.62 to 0.659 m.u. region of these mRNA's. Transformed cell mRNA was also found to contain a single 3' terminus at positions 2504 and 2505 (0.153 m.u.); termini lying beyond this site were not detected. Images PMID:90157

  8. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  9. Molecular Characterization, mRNA Expression and Alternative Splicing of Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Brown Citrus Aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Kirkaldy).

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Yi; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shang, Feng; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) play a critical role in regulating the release of intracellular calcium, which enables them to be effectively targeted by the two novel classes of insecticides, phthalic acid diamides and anthranilic diamides. However, less information is available about this target site in insects, although the sequence and structure information of target molecules are essential for designing new control agents of high selectivity and efficiency, as well as low non-target toxicity. Here, we provided sufficient information about the coding sequence and molecular structures of RyR in T. citricida (TciRyR), an economically important pest. The full-length TciRyR cDNA was characterized with an open reading frame of 15,306 nucleotides, encoding 5101 amino acid residues. TciRyR was predicted to embrace all the hallmarks of ryanodine receptor, typically as the conserved C-terminal domain with consensus calcium-biding EF-hands (calcium-binding motif) and six transmembrane domains, as well as a large N-terminal domain. qPCR analysis revealed that the highest mRNA expression levels of TciRyR were observed in the adults, especially in the heads. Alternative splicing in TciRyR was evidenced by an alternatively spliced exon, resulting from intron retention, which was different from the case of RyR in Myzus persicae characterized with no alternative splicing events. Diagnostic PCR analysis indicated that the splicing of this exon was not only regulated in a body-specific manner but also in a stage-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide useful information for new insecticide design and further insights into the molecular basis of insecticide action. PMID:26154764

  10. Alternative mRNA splicing of SMRT creates functional diversity by generating corepressor isoforms with different affinities for different nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Michael L; Jonas, Brian A; Privalsky, Martin L

    2005-03-01

    Many eukaryotic transcription factors are bimodal in their regulatory properties and can both repress and activate expression of their target genes. These divergent transcriptional properties are conferred through recruitment of auxiliary proteins, denoted coactivators and corepressors. Repression plays a particularly critical role in the functions of the nuclear receptors, a large family of ligand-regulated transcription factors involved in metazoan development, differentiation, reproduction, and homeostasis. The SMRT corepressor interacts directly with nuclear receptors and serves, in turn, as a platform for the assembly of a larger corepressor complex. We report here that SMRT is expressed in cells by alternative mRNA splicing to yield two distinct variants or isoforms. We designate these isoforms SMRTalpha and SMRTtau and demonstrate that these isoforms have significantly different affinities for different nuclear receptors. These isoforms are evolutionarily conserved and are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Our results suggest that differential mRNA splicing serves to customize corepressor function in different cells, allowing the transcriptional properties of nuclear receptors to be adapted to different contexts. PMID:15632172

  11. Mutations Affecting the Trna-Splicing Endonuclease Activity of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Winey, M.; Culbertson, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    Two unlinked mutations that alter the enzyme activity of tRNA-splicing endonuclease have been identified in yeast. The sen1-1 mutation, which maps on chromosome 12, causes temperature-sensitive growth, reduced in vitro endonuclease activity, and in vivo accumulation of unspliced pre-tRNAs. The sen2-1 mutation does not confer a detectable growth defect, but causes a temperature-dependent reduction of in vitro endonuclease activity. Pre-tRNAs do not accumulate in sen2-1 strains. The in vitro enzyme activities of sen1-1 and sen2-1 complement in extracts from a heterozygous diploid, but fail to complement in mixed extracts from separate sen1-1 and sen2-1 haploid strains. These results suggest a direct role for SEN gene products in the enzymatic removal of introns from tRNA that is distinct from the role of other products known to affect tRNA splicing. PMID:3284787

  12. Splicing Programs and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Germann, Sophie; Gratadou, Lise; Dutertre, Martin; Auboeuf, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies report splicing alterations in a multitude of cancers by using gene-by-gene analysis. However, understanding of the role of alternative splicing in cancer is now reaching a new level, thanks to the use of novel technologies allowing the analysis of splicing at a large-scale level. Genome-wide analyses of alternative splicing indicate that splicing alterations can affect the products of gene networks involved in key cellular programs. In addition, many splicing variants identified as being misregulated in cancer are expressed in normal tissues. These observations suggest that splicing programs contribute to specific cellular programs that are altered during cancer initiation and progression. Supporting this model, recent studies have identified splicing factors controlling cancer-associated splicing programs. The characterization of splicing programs and their regulation by splicing factors will allow a better understanding of the genetic mechanisms involved in cancer initiation and progression and the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:22132318

  13. The transcription factor c-Myb affects pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Orvain, Christophe; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd S.

    2008-07-25

    c-Myb is a transcription factor which plays a key role in haematopoietic proliferation and lineage commitment. We raised the question of whether c-Myb may have abilities beyond the extensively studied transcriptional activation function. In this report we show that c-Myb influences alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This was seen by its marked effect on the 5'-splice site selection during E1A alternative splicing, while no effect of c-Myb was observed when reporters for the 3'-splice site selection or for the constitutive splicing process were tested. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence for interactions between c-Myb and distinct components of the splicing apparatus, such as the general splicing factor U2AF{sup 65} and hnRNPA1 involved in the 5'-splice site selection. The effect on 5'-splice site selection was abolished in the oncogenic variant v-Myb. Altogether, these data provide evidence that c-Myb may serve a previously unappreciated role in the coupling between transcription and splicing.

  14. Multiple mRNA isoforms of the transcription activator protein CREB: generation by alternative splicing and specific expression in primary spermatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, S; Cole, T J; Boshart, M; Schmid, E; Schütz, G

    1992-01-01

    We have characterized cDNA clones representing mouse CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) mRNA isoforms. These include CREB delta and CREB alpha, of which the rat and human homologues have been previously identified. Both encode proteins with CRE-binding activity and identical transactivation potential. The additional CREB mRNA isoforms potentially encode CREB related proteins. From the structural organization of the mouse CREB gene we conclude that the multiple transcripts are generated by alternative splicing. Furthermore we show that specific CREB mRNA isoforms are expressed at a high level in the adult testis. Expression of these isoforms is induced after commencement of spermatogenesis. In situ hybridization suggests that this expression occurs predominantly in the primary spermatocytes. Comparison of the CREB gene with the recently isolated CREM (cAMP responsive element modulator) cDNAs illustrates that the two genes have arisen by gene duplication and have diverged to encode transcriptional activators and repressors of the cAMP signal transduction pathway. Images PMID:1532935

  15. Regulation of mRNA Abundance by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Controlled Alternate 5′ Splice Site Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5′ and 3′ splice site (5′ss and 3′ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5′ss (u5′ss and d5′ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5′ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5′ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5′ss and d5′ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5′ss is intrinsically weaker than d5′ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5′ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5′ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  16. Nonsense mutations in the human. beta. -globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr. )

    1988-04-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human {alpha}- and {beta}-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with {beta}{sup 0}-thalassemia have shown that for both the {beta}-17 and the {beta}-39 mutations less than normal levels of {beta}-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human {beta}-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned {beta}-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human {beta}-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation.

  17. Morpholino antisense oligo inhibits trans-splicing of pre-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor mRNA of Trypanosoma cruzi and suppresses parasite growth and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Muneaki; Nara, Takeshi; Mita, Toshihiro; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Morpholino antisense oligos (MAOs) are used to investigate physiological gene function by inhibiting gene translation or construction of specific alternative splicing variants by blocking cis-splicing. MAOs are attractive drug candidates for viral- and bacterial-infectious disease therapy because of properties such as in vivo stability and specificity to target genes. Recently, we showed that phosphorothioate antisense oligos against Trypanosoma cruzi inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (TcIP3R) mRNA inhibit the parasite host cell infection. In the present study, we identified the spliced leader (SL) acceptor of pre-TcIP3R mRNA and synthesized MAO, which inhibited trans-splicing of the transcript (MAO-1). MAO-1 was found to inhibit the addition of SL-RNA to pre-TcIP3R mRNA by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Treatment of the parasites with MAO-1 significantly impaired the growth and infectivity into host cells. These results indicate that MAO-1 is a potential novel drug for Chagas disease and that MAOs inhibiting trans-splicing can be used to investigate the physiology of trypanosomal genes leading to the development of novel drugs. PMID:26680159

  18. BRCA1 EXON 11, a CERES (composite regulatory element of splicing) element involved in splice regulation.

    PubMed

    Tammaro, Claudia; Raponi, Michela; Wilson, David I; Baralle, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Unclassified variants (UV) of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a "silent" change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES). PMID:25056543

  19. Abnormal mRNA splicing but normal auditory brainstem response (ABR) in mice with the prestin (SLC26A5) IVS2-2A>G mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Ziyi; Chang, Aoshuang; Fang, Jie; Men, Yuqin; Tian, Yong; Ouyang, Xiaomei; Yan, Denise; Zhang, Aizhen; Sun, Xiaoyang; Tang, Jie; Liu, Xuezhong; Zuo, Jian; Gao, Jiangang

    2016-08-01

    Prestin is critical to OHC somatic motility and hearing sensitivity in mammals. Several mutations of the human SLC26A5 gene have been associated with deafness. However, whether the IVS2-2A>G mutation in the human SLC26A5 gene causes deafness remains controversial. In this study, we created a mouse model in which the IVS2-2A>G mutation was introduced into the mouse Slc26a5 gene by gene targeting. The homozygous Slc26a5 mutant mice were viable and fertile and displayed normal hearing sensitivity by ABR threshold analysis. Whole-mount immunostaining using prestin antibody demonstrated that prestin was correctly targeted to the lateral wall of OHCs, and no obvious hair cell loss occurred in mutant mice. No significant difference in the amount of prestin protein was observed between mutants and controls using western blot analysis. In OHCs isolated from mutants, the NLC was also normal. However, we observed a splicing abnormality in the Slc26a5 mRNA of the mutant mice. Eleven nucleotides were missing from the 5' end of exon 3 in Slc26a5 mRNA, but the normal ATG start codon in exon 3 was still detected. Thus, the IVS2-2A>G mutation in the Slc26a5 gene is insufficient to cause hearing loss in mice. PMID:27232762

  20. Cancer-associated SF3B1 mutations affect alternative splicing by promoting alternative branchpoint usage

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Houy, Alexandre; Battistella, Aude; Popova, Tatiana; Wassef, Michel; Henry, Emilie; Tirode, Franck; Constantinou, Angelos; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Dutertre, Martin; Stern, Marc-Henri

    2016-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the spliceosome gene SF3B1 are reported in ∼20% of uveal melanomas. SF3B1 is involved in 3′-splice site (3′ss) recognition during RNA splicing; however, the molecular mechanisms of its mutation have remained unclear. Here we show, using RNA-Seq analyses of uveal melanoma, that the SF3B1R625/K666 mutation results in deregulated splicing at a subset of junctions, mostly by the use of alternative 3′ss. Modelling the differential junctions in SF3B1WT and SF3B1R625/K666 cell lines demonstrates that the deregulated splice pattern strictly depends on SF3B1 status and on the 3'ss-sequence context. SF3B1WT knockdown or overexpression do not reproduce the SF3B1R625/K666 splice pattern, qualifying SF3B1R625/K666 as change-of-function mutants. Mutagenesis of predicted branchpoints reveals that the SF3B1R625/K666-promoted splice pattern is a direct result of alternative branchpoint usage. Altogether, this study provides a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying splicing alterations induced by mutant SF3B1 in cancer, and reveals a role for alternative branchpoints in disease. PMID:26842708

  1. Spectrum of splicing errors caused by CHRNE mutations affecting introns and intron/exon boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, K; Tsujino, A; Shen, X; Milone, M; Engel, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mutations in CHRNE, the gene encoding the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ε subunit, cause congenital myasthenic syndromes. Only three of the eight intronic splice site mutations of CHRNE reported to date have had their splicing consequences characterised. Methods: We analysed four previously reported and five novel splicing mutations in CHRNE by introducing the entire normal and mutant genomic CHRNEs into COS cells. Results and conclusions: We found that short introns (82–109 nucleotides) favour intron retention, whereas medium to long introns (306–1210 nucleotides) flanking either or both sides of an exon favour exon skipping. Two mutations are of particular interest. Firstly, a G→T substitution at the 3' end of exon 8 predicts an R286M missense mutation, but instead results in skipping of exon 8. In human genes, a mismatch of the last exonic nucleotide to U1 snRNP is frequently compensated by a matching nucleotide at intron position +6. CHRNE intron 8 has a mismatch at position +6, and accordingly fails to compensate for the exonic mutation at position –1. Secondly, a 16 bp duplication, giving rise to two 3' splice sites (g.IVS10-9_c.1167dup16), results in silencing of the downstream 3' splice site. This conforms to the scanning model of recognition of the 3' splice site, which predicts that the first "ag" occurring after the branch point is selected for splicing. PMID:16061559

  2. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  3. Interplay between DMD Point Mutations and Splicing Signals in Dystrophinopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  4. Marek's Disease Virus Expresses Multiple UL44 (gC) Variants through mRNA Splicing That Are All Required for Efficient Horizontal Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a devastating oncogenic viral disease of chickens caused by Gallid herpesvirus 2, or MD virus (MDV). MDV glycoprotein C (gC) is encoded by the alphaherpesvirus UL44 homolog and is essential for the horizontal transmission of MDV (K. W. Jarosinski and N. Osterrieder, J. Virol. 84:7911-7916, 2010). Alphaherpesvirus gC proteins are type 1 membrane proteins and are generally anchored in cellular membranes and the virion envelope by a short transmembrane domain. However, the majority of MDV gC is secreted in vitro, although secondary-structure analyses predict a carboxy-terminal transmembrane domain. In this report, two alternative mRNA splice variants were identified by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analyses, and the encoded proteins were predicted to specify premature stop codons that would lead to gC proteins that lack the transmembrane domain. Based on the size of the intron removed for each UL44 (gC) transcript, they were termed gC104 and gC145. Recombinant MDV viruses were generated in which only full-length viral gC (vgCfull), gC104 (vgC104), or gC145 (vgC145) was expressed. Predictably, gCfull was expressed predominantly as a membrane-associated protein, while both gC104 and gC145 were secreted, suggesting that the dominant gC variants expressed in vitro are the spliced variants. In experimentally infected chickens, the expression of each of the gC variants individually did not alter replication or disease induction. However, horizontal transmission was reduced compared to that of wild-type or revertant viruses when the expression of only a single gC was allowed, indicating that all three forms of gC are required for the efficient transmission of MDV in chickens. PMID:22593168

  5. A Janus splicing regulatory element modulates HIV-1 tat and rev mRNA production by coordination of hnRNP A1 cooperative binding.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Virginie; Méreau, Agnès; Jacquenet, Sandrine; Thomas, Denise; Mougin, Annie; Gattoni, Renata; Stévenin, James; Branlant, Christiane

    2002-11-01

    Retroviral protein production depends upon alternative splicing of the viral transcript. The HIV-1 acceptor site A7 is required for tat and rev mRNA production. Production of the Tat transcriptional activator is highly controlled because of its apoptotic properties. Two silencer elements (ESS3 and ISS) and two enhancer elements (ESE2 and ESE3/(GAA)3) were previously identified at site A7. hnRNP A1 binds ISS and ESS3 and is involved in the inhibitory process, ASF/SF2 activates site A7 utilisation. Here, by using chemical and enzymatic probes we established the 2D structure of the HIV-1(BRU) RNA region containing site A7 and identified the RNA segments protected in nuclear extract and by purified hnRNP A1. ISS, ESE3/(GAA)3 and ESS3 are located in three distinct stem-loop structures (SLS1, 2 and 3). As expected, hnRNP A1 binds sites 1, 2 and 3 of ISS and ESS3b, and oligomerises on the polypurine sequence upstream of ESS3b. In addition, we discovered an unidentified hnRNP A1 binding site (AUAGAA), that overlaps ESE3/(GAA)3. On the basis of competition experiments, hnRNP A1 has a stronger affinity for this site than for ESS3b. By insertion of (GAA)3 alone or preceded by the AUA trinucleotide in a foreign context, the AUAGAA sequence was found to modulate strongly the (GAA)3 splicing enhancer activity. Cross-linking experiments on these heterologous RNAs and the SLS2-SLS3 HIV-1 RNA region, in nuclear extract and with recombinant proteins, showed that binding of hnRNP A1 to AUA(GAA)3 strongly competes the association of ASF/SF2 with (GAA)3. In addition, disruption of AUA(GAA)3 demonstrated a key role of this sequence in hnRNP A1 cooperative binding to the ISS and ESS3b inhibitors and hnRNP A1 oligomerisation on the polypurine sequence. Thus, depending on the cellular context ([ASF/SF2]/[hnRNP A1] ratio), AUA(GAA)3 will activate or repress site A7 utilisation and can thus be considered as a Janus splicing regulator. PMID:12419255

  6. SPL1-1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutation affecting tRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Kolman, C; Söll, D

    1993-01-01

    A genetic approach was used to isolate and characterize Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes affecting tRNA processing. Three mutants were isolated which were able to process and utilize splicing-deficient transcripts from inactivated Schizosaccharomyces pombe suppressor tRNA genes. Extragenic recovery of suppressibility was verified by the suppression of nonsense mutations in LEU2, HIS4, and ADE1. One mutant, SPL1-1, was chosen for detailed analysis on the basis of its increased synthesis of mature suppressor tRNA over wild-type cell levels as determined by Northern (RNA) analysis. This mutant exhibited strong suppression exclusively with the defective tRNA gene used in the mutant selection. Genetic analysis revealed that a single, dominant, haplo-lethal mutation was responsible for the suppression phenotype. The mutation mapped on chromosome III to an essential 1.5-kb open reading frame (L. S. Symington and T. D. Petes, Mol. Cell. Biol. 8:595-604, 1988), recently named NFS1 (S. G. Oliver et al., Nature [London] 357:38-46, 1992), located adjacent (centromere proximal) to LEU2. Images PMID:8444805

  7. The mammalian homolog of suppressor-of-white-apricot regulates alternative mRNA splicing of CD45 exon 4 and fibronectin IIICS.

    PubMed

    Sarkissian, M; Winne, A; Lafyatis, R

    1996-12-01

    We have previously described human (HsSWAP) and mouse (MmSWAP) homologs to the Drosophila alternative splicing regulator suppressor-of-white-apricot (su(wa) or DmSWAP). DmSWAP was formally defined as an alternative splicing regulator by studies showing that it autoregulates splicing of its own pre-mRNA. We report here that mammalian SWAP regulates its own splicing, and also the splicing of fibronectin and CD45. Using an in vivo system of cell transfection, mammalian SWAP regulated 5' splice site selection in splicing of its own second intron. SWAP enhanced splicing to the distal 5' splice site, whereas the SR protein ASF/SF2 enhanced splicing to the proximal site. SWAP also regulated alternative splicing of the fibronectin IIICS region by promoting exclusion of the entire IIICS region. In contrast, ASF/SF2 stimulated inclusion of the entire IIICS region. Finally, SWAP regulated splicing of CD45 exon 4, promoting exclusion of this exon, an effect also seen with ASF/SF2. Experiments using SWAP deletion mutants showed that splicing regulation of the fibronectin IIICS region and CD45 exon 4 requires a region including a carboxyl-terminal arginine/serine (R/S)-rich motif. Since R/S motifs of various splicing proteins have been shown to interact with each other, these results suggest that the R/S motif in SWAP may regulate splicing, at least in part, through interactions with other R/S containing splicing factors. PMID:8940107

  8. Identification of mRNA splicing factors as the endothelial receptor for carbohydrate-dependent lung colonization of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Shingo; Sugihara, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Jun; Akama, Tomoya O.; Wong, Shuk-Man Annie; Kawashima, Hiroto; Zhang, Jianing; Smith, David F.; Ohyama, Chikara; Fukuda, Minoru; Fukuda, Michiko N.

    2009-01-01

    Cell surfaces of epithelial cancer are covered by complex carbohydrates, whose structures function in malignancy and metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying carbohydrate-dependent cancer metastasis has not been defined. Previously, we identified a carbohydrate-mimicry peptide designated I-peptide, which inhibits carbohydrate-dependent lung colonization of sialyl Lewis X-expressing B16-FTIII-M cells in E/P-selectin doubly-deficient mice. We hypothesized that lung endothelial cells express an unknown carbohydrate receptor, designated as I-peptide receptor (IPR), responsible for lung colonization of B16-FTIII-M cells. Here, we visualized IPR by in vivo biotinylation, which revealed that the major IPR is a group of 35-kDa proteins. IPR proteins isolated by I-peptide affinity chromatography were identified by proteomics as Ser/Arg-rich alternative pre-mRNA splicing factors or Sfrs1, Sfrs2, Sfrs5, and Sfrs7 gene products. Bacterially expressed Sfrs1 protein bound to B16-FTIII-M cells but not to parental B16 cells. Recombinant Sfrs1 protein bound to a series of fucosylated oligosaccharides in glycan array and plate-binding assays. When anti-Sfrs antibodies were injected intravenously into mice, antibodies labeled a subset of lung capillaries. Anti-Sfrs antibodies inhibited homing of I-peptide-displaying phage to the lung colonization of B16-FTIII-M cells in vivo in the mouse. These results strongly suggest that Sfrs proteins are responsible for fucosylated carbohydrate-dependent lung metastasis of epithelial cancers. PMID:19218444

  9. Changes in exon–intron structure during vertebrate evolution affect the splicing pattern of exons

    PubMed Central

    Gelfman, Sahar; Burstein, David; Penn, Osnat; Savchenko, Anna; Amit, Maayan; Schwartz, Schraga; Pupko, Tal; Ast, Gil

    2012-01-01

    Exon–intron architecture is one of the major features directing the splicing machinery to the short exons that are located within long flanking introns. However, the evolutionary dynamics of exon–intron architecture and its impact on splicing is largely unknown. Using a comparative genomic approach, we analyzed 17 vertebrate genomes and reconstructed the ancestral motifs of both 3′ and 5′ splice sites, as also the ancestral length of exons and introns. Our analyses suggest that vertebrate introns increased in length from the shortest ancestral introns to the longest primate introns. An evolutionary analysis of splice sites revealed that weak splice sites act as a restrictive force keeping introns short. In contrast, strong splice sites allow recognition of exons flanked by long introns. Reconstruction of the ancestral state suggests these phenomena were not prevalent in the vertebrate ancestor, but appeared during vertebrate evolution. By calculating evolutionary rate shifts in exons, we identified cis-acting regulatory sequences that became fixed during the transition from early vertebrates to mammals. Experimental validations performed on a selection of these hexamers confirmed their regulatory function. We additionally revealed many features of exons that can discriminate alternative from constitutive exons. These features were integrated into a machine-learning approach to predict whether an exon is alternative. Our algorithm obtains very high predictive power (AUC of 0.91), and using these predictions we have identified and successfully validated novel alternatively spliced exons. Overall, we provide novel insights regarding the evolutionary constraints acting upon exons and their recognition by the splicing machinery. PMID:21974994

  10. RNA interference knockdown of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects gene alternative splicing in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Li, Yang; Stroud, Hume; Feng, Suhua; Newman, Thomas C.; Kaneda, Megan; Hou, Kirk K.; Worley, Kim C.; Elsik, Christine G.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Ma, Jian; Robinson, Gene E.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of DNA methylation from fungi, plants, and animals indicate that gene body methylation is ancient and highly conserved in eukaryotic genomes, but its role has not been clearly defined. It has been postulated that regulation of alternative splicing of transcripts was an original function of DNA methylation, but a direct experimental test of the effect of methylation on alternative slicing at the whole genome level has never been performed. To do this, we developed a unique method to administer RNA interference (RNAi) in a high-throughput and noninvasive manner and then used it to knock down the expression of DNA methyl-transferase 3 (dnmt3), which is required for de novo DNA methylation. We chose the honey bee (Apis mellifera) for this test because it has recently emerged as an important model organism for studying the effects of DNA methylation on development and social behavior, and DNA methylation in honey bees is predominantly on gene bodies. Here we show that dnmt3 RNAi decreased global genomic methylation level as expected and in addition caused widespread and diverse changes in alternative splicing in fat tissue. Four different types of splicing events were affected by dnmt3 gene knockdown, and change in two types, exon skipping and intron retention, was directly related to decreased methylation. These results demonstrate that one function of gene body DNA methylation is to regulate alternative splicing. PMID:23852726

  11. Activation of muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase and binding to dystroglycan are regulated by alternative mRNA splicing of agrin.

    PubMed

    Scotton, Patrick; Bleckmann, Dorothee; Stebler, Michael; Sciandra, Francesca; Brancaccio, Andrea; Meier, Thomas; Stetefeld, Jörg; Ruegg, Markus A

    2006-12-01

    Agrin induces the aggregation of postsynaptic proteins at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). This activity requires the receptor-tyrosine kinase MuSK. Agrin isoforms differ in short amino acid stretches at two sites, called A and B, that are localized in the two most C-terminal laminin G (LG) domains. Importantly, agrin isoforms greatly differ in their activities of inducing MuSK phosphorylation and of binding to alpha-dystroglycan. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we characterized the amino acids important for these activities of agrin. We find that the conserved tripeptide asparagineglutamate-isoleucine in the eight-amino acid long insert at the B-site is necessary and sufficient for full MuSK phosphorylation activity. However, even if all eight amino acids were replaced by alanines, this agrin mutant still has significantly higher MuSK phosphorylation activity than the splice version lacking any insert. We also show that binding to alpha-dystroglycan requires at least two LG domains and that amino acid inserts at the A and the B splice sites negatively affect binding. PMID:17012237

  12. Increased cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA in affected spinal motor neurons in ALS caused by abnormal autoregulation of TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Akihide; Sugai, Akihiro; Kato, Taisuke; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Shiga, Atsushi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Koyama, Misaki; Konno, Takuya; Hirokawa, Sachiko; Yokoseki, Akio; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder. In motor neurons of ALS, TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a nuclear protein encoded by TARDBP, is absent from the nucleus and forms cytoplasmic inclusions. TDP-43 auto-regulates the amount by regulating the TARDBP mRNA, which has three polyadenylation signals (PASs) and three additional alternative introns within the last exon. However, it is still unclear how the autoregulatory mechanism works and how the status of autoregulation in ALS motor neurons without nuclear TDP-43 is. Here we show that TDP-43 inhibits the selection of the most proximal PAS and induces splicing of multiple alternative introns in TARDBP mRNA to decrease the amount of cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. When TDP-43 is depleted, the TARDBP mRNA uses the most proximal PAS and is increased in the cytoplasm. Finally, we have demonstrated that in ALS motor neurons—especially neurons with mislocalized TDP-43—the amount of TARDBP mRNA is increased in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that nuclear TDP-43 contributes to the autoregulation and suggests that the absence of nuclear TDP-43 induces an abnormal autoregulation and increases the amount of TARDBP mRNA. The vicious cycle might accelerate the disease progression of ALS. PMID:27257061

  13. Increased cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA in affected spinal motor neurons in ALS caused by abnormal autoregulation of TDP-43.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Akihide; Sugai, Akihiro; Kato, Taisuke; Ishihara, Tomohiko; Shiga, Atsushi; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Koyama, Misaki; Konno, Takuya; Hirokawa, Sachiko; Yokoseki, Akio; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Onodera, Osamu

    2016-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disorder. In motor neurons of ALS, TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43), a nuclear protein encoded by TARDBP, is absent from the nucleus and forms cytoplasmic inclusions. TDP-43 auto-regulates the amount by regulating the TARDBP mRNA, which has three polyadenylation signals (PASs) and three additional alternative introns within the last exon. However, it is still unclear how the autoregulatory mechanism works and how the status of autoregulation in ALS motor neurons without nuclear TDP-43 is. Here we show that TDP-43 inhibits the selection of the most proximal PAS and induces splicing of multiple alternative introns in TARDBP mRNA to decrease the amount of cytoplasmic TARDBP mRNA by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. When TDP-43 is depleted, the TARDBP mRNA uses the most proximal PAS and is increased in the cytoplasm. Finally, we have demonstrated that in ALS motor neurons-especially neurons with mislocalized TDP-43-the amount of TARDBP mRNA is increased in the cytoplasm. Our observations indicate that nuclear TDP-43 contributes to the autoregulation and suggests that the absence of nuclear TDP-43 induces an abnormal autoregulation and increases the amount of TARDBP mRNA. The vicious cycle might accelerate the disease progression of ALS. PMID:27257061

  14. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  15. An Alu-derived intronic splicing enhancer facilitates intronic processing and modulates aberrant splicing in ATM

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Tibor; Talotti, Gabriele; Lewandowska, Marzena Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported a natural GTAA deletion within an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene that disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates the excision of the upstream portion of the intron. The resulting pre-mRNA splicing intermediate is then processed to a cryptic exon, whose aberrant inclusion in the final mRNA is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia. We show here that the last 40 bases of a downstream intronic antisense Alu repeat are required for the activation of the cryptic exon by the ISPE deletion. Evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediate by a hybrid minigene assay indicates that the identified intronic splicing enhancer represents a novel class of enhancers that facilitates processing of splicing intermediates possibly by recruiting U1 snRNP to defective donor sites. In the absence of this element, the splicing intermediate accumulates and is not further processed to generate the cryptic exon. Our results indicate that Alu-derived sequences can provide intronic splicing regulatory elements that facilitate pre-mRNA processing and potentially affect the severity of disease-causing splicing mutations. PMID:19773425

  16. Adenosine to Inosine editing frequency controlled by splicing efficiency.

    PubMed

    Licht, Konstantin; Kapoor, Utkarsh; Mayrhofer, Elisa; Jantsch, Michael F

    2016-07-27

    Alternative splicing and adenosine to inosine (A to I) RNA-editing are major factors leading to co- and post-transcriptional modification of genetic information. Both, A to I editing and splicing occur in the nucleus. As editing sites are frequently defined by exon-intron basepairing, mRNA splicing efficiency should affect editing levels. Moreover, splicing rates affect nuclear retention and will therefore also influence the exposure of pre-mRNAs to the editing-competent nuclear environment. Here, we systematically test the influence of splice rates on RNA-editing using reporter genes but also endogenous substrates. We demonstrate for the first time that the extent of editing is controlled by splicing kinetics when editing is guided by intronic elements. In contrast, editing sites that are exclusively defined by exonic structures are almost unaffected by the splicing efficiency of nearby introns. In addition, we show that editing levels in pre- and mature mRNAs do not match. This phenomenon can in part be explained by the editing state of an RNA influencing its splicing rate but also by the binding of the editing enzyme ADAR that interferes with splicing. PMID:27112566

  17. The Role of Canonical and Noncanonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plant Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovina, A. S.; Kiselev, K. V.; Zhuravlev, Yu. N.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms capable of adapting to various environmental constraints, such as high or low temperatures, drought, soil salinity, or pathogen attack. To survive the unfavorable conditions, plants actively employ pre-mRNA splicing as a mechanism to regulate expression of stress-responsive genes and reprogram intracellular regulatory networks. There is a growing evidence that various stresses strongly affect the frequency and diversity of alternative splicing events in the stress-responsive genes and lead to an increased accumulation of mRNAs containing premature stop codons, which in turn have an impact on plant stress response. A number of studies revealed that some mRNAs involved in plant stress response are spliced counter to the traditional conception of alternative splicing. Such noncanonical mRNA splicing events include trans-splicing, intraexonic deletions, or variations affecting multiple exons and often require short direct repeats to occur. The noncanonical alternative splicing, along with common splicing events, targets the spliced transcripts to degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay or leads to translation of truncated proteins. Investigation of the diversity, biological consequences, and mechanisms of the canonical and noncanonical alternative splicing events will help one to identify those transcripts which are promising for using in genetic engineering and selection of stress-tolerant plants. PMID:23509698

  18. Characterization of aberrant splicing of von Willebrand factor in von Willebrand disease: an underrecognized mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Lindsey; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Poon, Man-Chiu; Scully, Mary-Frances; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; James, Paula D

    2016-07-28

    Approximately 10% of von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene mutations are thought to alter messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing through disruption of consensus splice sites. This mechanism is likely underrecognized and affected by mutations outside consensus splice sites. During VWF synthesis, splicing abnormalities lead to qualitative defects or quantitative deficiencies in VWF. This study investigated the pathologic mechanism acting in 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) families with putative splicing mutations using patient-derived blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and a heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK 293(T)) cell model. The exonic mutation c.3538G>A causes 3 in-frame splicing variants (23del, 26del, and 23/26del) which cannot bind platelets, blood coagulation factor VIII, or collagen, causing VWD through dominant-negative intracellular retention of coexpressed wild-type (WT) VWF, and increased trafficking to lysosomes. Individuals heterozygous for the c.5842+1G>C mutation produce exon 33 skipping, exons 33-34 skipping, and WT VWF transcripts. Pathogenic intracellular retention of VWF lacking exons 33-34 causes their VWD. The branch site mutation c.6599-20A>T causes type 1 VWD through mRNA degradation of exon 38 skipping transcripts. Splicing ratios of aberrant transcripts and coexpressed WT were altered in the BOECs with exposure to shear stress. This study provides evidence of mutations outside consensus splice sites disrupting splicing and introduces the concept that VWF splicing is affected by shear stress on endothelial cells. PMID:27317792

  19. CDC2L5, a Cdk-like kinase with RS domain, interacts with the ASF/SF2-associated protein p32 and affects splicing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Even, Yasmine; Durieux, Sandrine; Escande, Marie-Line; Lozano, Jean Claude; Peaucellier, Gérard; Weil, Dominique; Genevière, Anne-Marie

    2006-10-15

    The human CDC2L5 gene encodes a protein of unknown physiological function. This protein is closely related to the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdks) family and contains an arginine/serine-rich (RS) domain. The Cdks were first identified as crucial regulators of cell-cycle progression, more recently they were found to be involved in transcription and mRNA processing. RS domains are mainly present in proteins regulating pre-mRNA splicing, suggesting CDC2L5 having a possible role in this process. In this study, we demonstrate that CDC2L5 is located in the nucleoplasm, at a higher concentration in speckles, the storage sites for splicing factors. Furthermore, this localization is dependent on the presence of the N-terminal sequence including the RS domain. Then, we report that CDC2L5 directly interacts with the ASF/SF2-associated protein p32, a protein involved in splicing regulation. Overexpression of CDC2L5 constructs disturbs constitutive splicing and switches alternative splice site selection in vivo. These results argue in favor of a functional role of the CDC2L5 kinase in splicing regulation. PMID:16721827

  20. Decreased stability and translation of T cell receptor zeta mRNA with an alternatively spliced 3'-untranslated region contribute to zeta chain down-regulation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Bhabadeb; Tsokos, Christos G; Krishnan, Sandeep; Robertson, James; Fisher, Carolyn U; Warke, Rahul G; Warke, Vishal G; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Tsokos, George C

    2005-05-13

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the aberrant expression of T cell receptor (TCR) zeta chain of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus are not known. Previously we demonstrated that although normal T cells express high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with wild-type (WT) 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), systemic lupus erythematosus T cells display significantly high levels of TCR zeta mRNA with the alternatively spliced (AS) 3' UTR form, which is derived by splice deletion of nucleotides 672-1233 of the TCR zeta transcript. Here we report that the stability of TCR zeta mRNA with an AS 3' UTR is low compared with TCR zeta mRNA with WT 3' UTR. AS 3' UTR, but not WT 3' UTR, conferred similar instability to the luciferase gene. Immunoblotting of cell lysates derived from transfected COS-7 cells demonstrated that TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR produced low amounts of 16-kDa protein. In vitro transcription and translation also produced low amounts of protein from TCR zeta with AS 3' UTR. Taken together our findings suggest that nucleotides 672-1233 bp of TCR zeta 3' UTR play a critical role in its stability and also have elements required for the translational regulation of TCR zeta chain expression in human T cells. PMID:15743765

  1. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  2. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  3. Abiotic stresses affect differently the intron splicing and expression of chloroplast genes in coffee plants (Coffea arabica) and rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Nguyen Dinh, Sy; Sai, Than Zaw Tun; Nawaz, Ghazala; Lee, Kwanuk; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-08-20

    Despite the increasing understanding of the regulation of chloroplast gene expression in plants, the importance of intron splicing and processing of chloroplast RNA transcripts under stress conditions is largely unknown. Here, to understand how abiotic stresses affect the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in dicots and monocots, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the intron splicing and expression patterns of chloroplast genes in the coffee plant (Coffea arabica) as a dicot and rice (Oryza sativa) as a monocot under abiotic stresses, including drought, cold, or combined drought and heat stresses. The photosynthetic activity of both coffee plants and rice seedlings was significantly reduced under all stress conditions tested. Analysis of the transcript levels of chloroplast genes revealed that the splicing of tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings were significantly affected by abiotic stresses. Notably, abiotic stresses affected differently the splicing of chloroplast tRNAs and mRNAs in coffee plants and rice seedlings. The transcript levels of most chloroplast genes were markedly downregulated in both coffee plants and rice seedlings upon stress treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that coffee and rice plants respond to abiotic stresses via regulating the intron splicing and expression of different sets of chloroplast genes. PMID:27448724

  4. Alternative RNA splicing and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sali; Cheng, Chonghui

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a fundamental mechanism by which a gene can give rise to multiple distinct mRNA transcripts, yielding protein isoforms with different, even opposing, functions. With the recognition that alternative splicing occurs in nearly all human genes, its relationship with cancer-associated pathways has emerged as a rapidly growing field. In this review, we summarize recent findings that have implicated the critical role of alternative splicing in cancer and discuss current understandings of the mechanisms underlying dysregulated alternative splicing in cancer cells. PMID:23765697

  5. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  6. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay. PMID:27081549

  7. Effects of Age and Hindlimb Immobilization and Remobilization on Fast Troponin T Precursor mRNA Alternative Splicing in Rat Gastrocnemius Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Suhana; Schilder, Rudolf J.; Berg, Arthur S.; Kimball, Scot R.

    2016-01-01

    Fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TNNT3) is an important component of the skeletal muscle contractile machinery. The pre-mRNA encoding TNNT3 is alternatively spliced and changes in the pattern of TNNT3 splice form expression are associated with alterations in thin filament calcium sensitivity and force production during muscle contraction, thereby regulating muscle function. Interestingly, during aging, muscle force/cross sectional area is reduced, suggesting that loss of mass does not completely account for the impaired muscle function that develops during the aging process. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that age- and changes in muscle loading are associated with alterations in TNNT3 alternative splicing in the rat gastrocnemius muscle. We found that the relative abundance of several TNNT3 splice forms varied significantly with age among 2, 9, and 18-month old rats, and the pattern correlated with changes in body weight rather than muscle mass. Hindlimb immobilization for 7 days resulted in dramatic alterations in splice form relative abundance such that the pattern was similar to that observed in lighter animals. Remobilization for 7 days restored the splicing pattern toward that observed in the non-immobilized limb, even though muscle mass had not yet begun to recover. In conclusion, the results suggest that TNNT3 pre-mRNA alternative splicing is rapidly (i.e. within days) modulated in response to changes in the load placed on the muscle. Moreover, the results show that restoration of TNNT3 alternative splicing to control patterns is initiated prior to an increase in muscle mass. PMID:26799695

  8. The UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A polymorphism c.2042C>G (rs8330) is associated with increased human liver acetaminophen glucuronidation, increased UGT1A exon 5a/5b splice variant mRNA ratio, and decreased risk of unintentional acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Court, Michael H; Freytsis, Marina; Wang, Xueding; Peter, Inga; Guillemette, Chantal; Hazarika, Suwagmani; Duan, Su X; Greenblatt, David J; Lee, William M

    2013-05-01

    Acetaminophen is cleared primarily by hepatic glucuronidation. Polymorphisms in genes encoding the acetaminophen UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes could explain interindividual variability in acetaminophen glucuronidation and variable risk for liver injury after acetaminophen overdose. In this study, human liver bank samples were phenotyped for acetaminophen glucuronidation activity and genotyped for the major acetaminophen-glucuronidating enzymes (UGTs 1A1, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B15). Of these, only three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the shared UGT1A-3'UTR region (rs10929303, rs1042640, rs8330) were associated with acetaminophen glucuronidation activity, with rs8330 consistently showing higher acetaminophen glucuronidation at all the tested concentrations of acetaminophen. Mechanistic studies using luciferase-UGT1A-3'UTR reporters indicated that these SNPs do not alter mRNA stability or translation efficiency. However, there was evidence for allelic imbalance and a gene-dose proportional increase in the amount of exon 5a versus exon 5b containing UGT1A mRNA spliced transcripts in livers with the rs8330 variant allele. Cotransfection studies demonstrated an inhibitory effect of exon 5b containing cDNAs on acetaminophen glucuronidation by UGT1A1 and UGT1A6 cDNAs containing exon 5a. In silico analysis predicted that rs8330 creates an exon splice enhancer site that could favor exon 5a (over exon 5b) utilization during splicing. Finally, the prevalence of rs8330 was significantly lower (P = 0.027, χ(2) test) in patients who had acute liver failure from unintentional acetaminophen overdose compared with patients with acute liver failure from other causes or a race- or ethnicity-matched population. Together, these findings suggest that rs8330 is an important determinant of acetaminophen glucuronidation and could affect an individual's risk for acetaminophen-induced liver injury. PMID:23408116

  9. Stability of mRNA/DNA and DNA/DNA Duplexes Affects mRNA Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kraeva, Rayna I.; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Roguev, Assen; Ivanova, Anna; Nedelcheva-Veleva, Marina N.; Stoynov, Stoyno S.

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acids, due to their structural and chemical properties, can form double-stranded secondary structures that assist the transfer of genetic information and can modulate gene expression. However, the nucleotide sequence alone is insufficient in explaining phenomena like intron-exon recognition during RNA processing. This raises the question whether nucleic acids are endowed with other attributes that can contribute to their biological functions. In this work, we present a calculation of thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes across the genomes of four species in the genus Saccharomyces by nearest-neighbor method. The results show that coding regions are more thermodynamically stable than introns, 3′-untranslated regions and intergenic sequences. Furthermore, open reading frames have more stable sense mRNA/DNA duplexes than the potential antisense duplexes, a property that can aid gene discovery. The lower stability of the DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes of 3′-untranslated regions and the higher stability of genes correlates with increased mRNA level. These results suggest that the thermodynamic stability of DNA/DNA and mRNA/DNA duplexes affects mRNA transcription. PMID:17356699

  10. Spliced leader trans-splicing in the nematode Trichinella spiralis uses highly polymorphic, noncanonical spliced leaders.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette

    2008-04-01

    The trans-splicing of short spliced leader (SL) RNAs onto the 5' ends of mRNAs occurs in a diverse range of taxa. In nematodes, all species so far characterized utilize a characteristic, conserved spliced leader, SL1, as well as variants that are employed in the resolution of operons. Here we report the identification of spliced leader trans-splicing in the basal nematode Trichinella spiralis, and show that this nematode does not possess a canonical SL1, but rather has at least 15 distinct spliced leaders, encoded by at least 19 SL RNA genes. The individual spliced leaders vary in both size and primary sequence, showing a much higher degree of diversity compared to other known trans-spliced leaders. In a survey of T. spiralis mRNAs, individual mRNAs were found to be trans-spliced to a number of different spliced leader sequences. These data provide the first indication that the last common ancestor of the phylum Nematoda utilized spliced leader trans-splicing and that the canonical spliced leader, SL1, found in Caenorhabditis elegans, evolved after the divergence of the major nematode clades. This discovery sheds important light on the nature and evolution of mRNA processing in the Nematoda. PMID:18256244

  11. Intravitreal Injection of Splice-switching Oligonucleotides to Manipulate Splicing in Retinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gérard, Xavier; Perrault, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Kaplan, Josseline; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis is a severe hereditary retinal dystrophy responsible for neonatal blindness. The most common disease-causing mutation (c.2991+1655A>G; 10–15%) creates a strong splice donor site that leads to insertion of a cryptic exon encoding a premature stop codon. Recently, we reported that splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSO) allow skipping of the mutant cryptic exon and the restoration of ciliation in fibroblasts of affected patients, supporting the feasibility of a SSO-mediated exon skipping strategy to correct the aberrant splicing. Here, we present data in the wild-type mouse, which demonstrate that intravitreal administration of 2'-OMePS-SSO allows selective alteration of Cep290 splicing in retinal cells, including photoreceptors as shown by successful alteration of Abca4 splicing using the same approach. We show that both SSOs and Cep290 skipped mRNA were detectable for at least 1 month and that intravitreal administration of oligonucleotides did not provoke any serious adverse event. These data suggest that intravitreal injections of SSO should be considered to bypass protein truncation resulting from the c.2991+1655A>G mutation as well as other truncating mutations in genes which like CEP290 or ABCA4 have a mRNA size that exceed cargo capacities of US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved adeno-associated virus (AAV)-vectors, thus hampering gene augmentation therapy. PMID:26325627

  12. Analysis of xanthine dehydrogenase mRNA levels in mutants affecting the expression of the rosy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Covington, M; Fleenor, D; Devlin, R B

    1984-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) mRNA levels were measured in a number of mutants and natural variants affecting XDH gene expression. Two variants, ry+4 and ry+10, contain cis-acting elements which map to a region flanking the 5' end of the XDH gene. Ry+4, which has 2-3 times more XDH protein than a wild type strain, has 3.2 times more XDH mRNA. Ry+10 has 50% of the wild type XDH level and 54% of the wild type XDH mRNA level. Three rosy mutants which map within the structural gene were also examined. Two of these had little if any XDH mRNA, but the third mutant had 1.3 times more XDH mRNA than wild type flies. Another mutant, ry2 , which contains no XDH protein and has a 9KB transposable element inserted into the XDH gene, has normal levels of XDH mRNA transcripts which are also the same size as those found in the wild type strain. Changes in XDH mRNA levels were measured during Drosophila development and found to parallel changes in the amount of XDH protein. In addition, there were no large changes in the size of XDH mRNA during development. Images PMID:6588363

  13. Staufen Recruitment into Stress Granules Does Not Affect Early mRNA Transport in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, María G.; Tosar, Leandro J. Martinez; Loschi, Mariela; Pasquini, Juana M.; Correale, Jorge; Kindler, Stefan; Boccaccio, Graciela L.

    2005-01-01

    Staufen is a conserved double-stranded RNA-binding protein required for mRNA localization in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. The mammalian homologues Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 have been implicated in dendritic RNA targeting in neurons. Here we show that in rodent oligodendrocytes, these two proteins are present in two independent sets of RNA granules located at the distal myelinating processes. A third kind of RNA granules lacks Staufen and contains major myelin mRNAs. Myelin Staufen granules associate with microfilaments and microtubules, and their subcellular distribution is affected by polysome-disrupting drugs. Under oxidative stress, both Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are recruited into stress granules (SGs), which are stress-induced organelles containing transiently silenced messengers. Staufen SGs contain the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), the RNA-binding proteins HuR and TIAR, and small but not large ribosomal subunits. Staufen recruitment into perinuclear SGs is paralleled by a similar change in the overall localization of polyadenylated RNA. Under the same conditions, the distribution of recently transcribed and exported mRNAs is not affected. Our results indicate that Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are novel and ubiquitous SG components and suggest that Staufen RNPs are involved in repositioning of most polysomal mRNAs, but not of recently synthesized transcripts, during the stress response. PMID:15525674

  14. Alternative mRNA splice variants of the rat ClC-2 chloride channel gene are expressed in lung: genomic sequence and organization of ClC-2.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Zeitlin, P L

    1997-01-01

    The ClC-2 epithelial cell chloride channel is a voltage-, tonicity- and pH-regulated member of the ClC super family. We have previously shown that rat lung ClC-2 (rClC-2) is down-regulated at birth, and molecular diversity is generated by alternative splicing [Murray et al. (1995) Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 12, 597-604; Murray et al. (1996) Am. J. Physiol. 271, L829-L837; Chu et al . (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3453-3457]. To investigate other possible mRNA splice variations, we sequenced the entire rClC-2 gene and found that ClC-2Sa (formerly ClC-2S) results from the deletion of exon 20. The preceding intron 19 has an unusually high CT content and a rare AAG acceptor site. Because both features were also found in intron 13, we next tested the hypothesis that intron 13 would be involved in alternative splicing. As predicted, a second splice product, ClC-2Sb, was found by RT-PCR, but only in lung. When we compared the genomic maps of rClC-2 and human ClC-1 (hClC-1), striking similarities were found in each exon except for rClC-2 exon 20, which is absent in hClC-1. These observations suggest that ClC-1 and ClC-2 may have evolved by gene duplication, mutation and DNA rearrangement. PMID:9321672

  15. Tafazzin splice variants and mutations in Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirwin, Susan M; Manolakos, Athena; Barnett, Sarah Swain; Gonzalez, Iris L

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome is caused by mutations in the TAZ (tafazzin) gene on human chromosome Xq28. The human tafazzin gene produces four major mRNA splice variants; two of which have been shown to be functional (TAZ lacking exon 5 and full-length) in complementation studies with yeast and Drosophila. This study characterizes the multiple alternative splice variants of TAZ mRNA and their proportions in blood samples from a cohort of individuals with Barth syndrome (BTHS). Because it has been reported that collection and processing methods can affect the expression of various genes, we tested and chose a stabilizing medium for collecting, shipping and processing of the blood samples of these individuals. In both healthy controls and in BTHS individuals, we found a greater variety of alternatively spliced forms than previously described, with a sizeable proportion of minor splice variants besides the four dominant isoforms. Individuals with certain exonic and intronic splice mutations produce additional mutant mRNAs that could be translated into two or more proteins with different amino acid substitutions in a single individual. A fraction of the minor splice variants is predicted to be non-productive. PMID:24342716

  16. Coupling of RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation with Pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Saldi, Tassa; Cortazar, Michael A; Sheridan, Ryan M; Bentley, David L

    2016-06-19

    Pre-mRNA maturation frequently occurs at the same time and place as transcription by RNA polymerase II. The co-transcriptionality of mRNA processing has permitted the evolution of mechanisms that functionally couple transcription elongation with diverse events that occur on the nascent RNA. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between transcriptional elongation through a chromatin template and co-transcriptional splicing including alternative splicing decisions that affect the expression of most human genes. PMID:27107644

  17. Neuroleptics Affect Neuropeptide S and NPSR mRNA Levels in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has a multidirectional regulatory activity, especially when considered as a potent endogenous anxiolytic factor. Accumulating data suggests that neuroleptics affect peptidergic signaling in various brain structures. However, there is no information regarding the influence of treatment with antipsychotics on brain NPS expression. In the current study, we assessed the NPS and NPS receptor (NPSR) mRNA levels in the brains of rats shortly and chronically treated with chlorpromazine and olanzapine using quantitative real-time PCR. Both single-dose and long-term (4 months) olanzapine treatment led to the upregulation of NPS expression in the rat hypothalamus. It supports the hypothesis that NPS is involved in the dopamine-dependent anxiolytic actions of selected neuroleptics and possibly also in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. On the other hand, NPSR expression decreased after single-dose and chronic chlorpromazine administration in the hypothalamus, as well as after chronic olanzapine and chlorpromazine administration in the striatum and hippocampus. These results cast a new light on the pharmacology of antipsychotics and contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for their action. Furthermore, our findings underline the complex nature of potential interactions between dopamine receptors and brain peptidergic pathways, which has potential clinical applications. PMID:26227793

  18. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  19. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes.

    PubMed

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), 5' leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3' LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5' LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3' LTR. There is a 5' splice site in the 5' leader sequence and a 3' splice site at the 3' end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  20. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  1. Expression proteomics of UPF1 knockdown in HeLa cells reveals autoregulation of hnRNP A2/B1 mediated by alternative splicing resulting in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In addition to acting as an RNA quality control pathway, nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) plays roles in regulating normal gene expression. In particular, the extent to which alternative splicing is coupled to NMD and the roles of NMD in regulating uORF containing transcripts have been a matter of debate. Results In order to achieve a greater understanding of NMD regulated gene expression we used 2D-DiGE proteomics technology to examine the changes in protein expression induced in HeLa cells by UPF1 knockdown. QPCR based validation of the corresponding mRNAs, in response to both UPF1 knockdown and cycloheximide treatment, identified 17 bona fide NMD targets. Most of these were associated with bioinformatically predicted NMD activating features, predominantly upstream open reading frames (uORFs). Strikingly, however, the majority of transcripts up-regulated by UPF1 knockdown were either insensitive to, or even down-regulated by, cycloheximide treatment. Furthermore, the mRNA abundance of several down-regulated proteins failed to change upon UPF1 knockdown, indicating that UPF1's role in regulating mRNA and protein abundance is more complex than previously appreciated. Among the bona fide NMD targets, we identified a highly conserved AS-NMD event within the 3' UTR of the HNRNPA2B1 gene. Overexpression of GFP tagged hnRNP A2 resulted in a decrease in endogenous hnRNP A2 and B1 mRNA with a concurrent increase in the NMD sensitive isoforms. Conclusions Despite the large number of changes in protein expression upon UPF1 knockdown, a relatively small fraction of them can be directly attributed to the action of NMD on the corresponding mRNA. From amongst these we have identified a conserved AS-NMD event within HNRNPA2B1 that appears to mediate autoregulation of HNRNPA2B1 expression levels. PMID:20946641

  2. SpliceVista, a Tool for Splice Variant Identification and Visualization in Shotgun Proteomics Data*

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yafeng; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Forshed, Jenny; Branca, Rui M. M.; Orre, Lukas M.; Lehtiö, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a pervasive process in eukaryotic organisms. More than 90% of human genes have alternatively spliced products, and aberrant splicing has been shown to be associated with many diseases. Current methods employed in the detection of splice variants include prediction by clustering of expressed sequence tags, exon microarray, and mRNA sequencing, all methods focusing on RNA-level information. There is a lack of tools for analyzing splice variants at the protein level. Here, we present SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization based on mass spectrometry proteomics data. SpliceVista retrieves gene structure and translated sequences from alternative splicing databases and maps MS-identified peptides to splice variants. The visualization module plots the exon composition of each splice variant and aligns identified peptides with transcript positions. If quantitative mass spectrometry data are used, SpliceVista plots the quantitative patterns for each peptide and provides users with the option to cluster peptides based on their quantitative patterns. SpliceVista can identify splice-variant-specific peptides, providing the possibility for variant-specific analysis. The tool was tested on two experimental datasets (PXD000065 and PXD000134). In A431 cells treated with gefitinib, 2983 splice-variant-specific peptides corresponding to 939 splice variants were identified. Through comparison of splice-variant-centric, protein-centric, and gene-centric quantification, several genes (e.g. EIF4H) were found to have differentially regulated splice variants after gefitinib treatment. The same discrepancy between protein-centric and splice-centric quantification was detected in the other dataset, in which induced pluripotent stem cells were compared with parental fibroblast and human embryotic stem cells. In addition, SpliceVista can be used to visualize novel splice variants inferred from peptide-level evidence. In summary, Splice

  3. SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization in shotgun proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yafeng; Hultin-Rosenberg, Lina; Forshed, Jenny; Branca, Rui M M; Orre, Lukas M; Lehtiö, Janne

    2014-06-01

    Alternative splicing is a pervasive process in eukaryotic organisms. More than 90% of human genes have alternatively spliced products, and aberrant splicing has been shown to be associated with many diseases. Current methods employed in the detection of splice variants include prediction by clustering of expressed sequence tags, exon microarray, and mRNA sequencing, all methods focusing on RNA-level information. There is a lack of tools for analyzing splice variants at the protein level. Here, we present SpliceVista, a tool for splice variant identification and visualization based on mass spectrometry proteomics data. SpliceVista retrieves gene structure and translated sequences from alternative splicing databases and maps MS-identified peptides to splice variants. The visualization module plots the exon composition of each splice variant and aligns identified peptides with transcript positions. If quantitative mass spectrometry data are used, SpliceVista plots the quantitative patterns for each peptide and provides users with the option to cluster peptides based on their quantitative patterns. SpliceVista can identify splice-variant-specific peptides, providing the possibility for variant-specific analysis. The tool was tested on two experimental datasets (PXD000065 and PXD000134). In A431 cells treated with gefitinib, 2983 splice-variant-specific peptides corresponding to 939 splice variants were identified. Through comparison of splice-variant-centric, protein-centric, and gene-centric quantification, several genes (e.g. EIF4H) were found to have differentially regulated splice variants after gefitinib treatment. The same discrepancy between protein-centric and splice-centric quantification was detected in the other dataset, in which induced pluripotent stem cells were compared with parental fibroblast and human embryotic stem cells. In addition, SpliceVista can be used to visualize novel splice variants inferred from peptide-level evidence. In summary, Splice

  4. Correlation of mRNA for oestrogen receptor beta splice variants ERbeta1, ERbeta2/ERbetacx and ERbeta5 with outcome in endocrine-treated breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Davies, M P A; O'Neill, P A; Innes, H; Sibson, D R; Prime, W; Holcombe, C; Foster, C S

    2004-12-01

    This study has been performed to test the hypothesis that different oestrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) splice variants may be important determinants of clinical parameters, including outcome, in post-menopausal women with breast cancer receiving adjuvant endocrine treatment but no chemotherapy. Splice variants ERbeta1, ERbeta2 and ERbeta5 have been analysed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR in a cohort of 105 patients with primary breast cancer. Clinical correlates included age, grade, size, nodal status, ERalpha, progesterone receptor, Ki67, relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Seventy per cent of cases were ERbeta1 positive, 69% ERbeta2 positive and 70% ERbeta5 positive. Within the cohort, 47% were positive for all three variants while 10% were negative for all three. ERbeta1 exhibited no discernible relationship with disease outcome. ERbeta2 and ERbeta5 expression was significantly associated with better RFS (P<0.005), and ERbeta2 with better OS (P=0.0002). In multivariate analysis, ERbeta2 (P=0.006), nodal status and the level of Ki67 expression were independent predictors for RFS while ERbeta2 (P=0.0008) and Ki67 status were independent predictors for OS. In the ERalpha-positive cases, or in the subset of those receiving adjuvant tamoxifen, ERbeta2 was significantly associated with good RFS (P<0.0005) and was the only independent marker of OS. We conclude that precise identification of splice variants of ERbeta are more important assessors than is ERbeta1 alone of the biological status of individual breast cancers, and hence in predicting their response to endocrine therapy. PMID:15591034

  5. Therapeutic targeting of splicing in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted that splicing patterns are frequently altered in cancer and that mutations in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins, as well as mutations affecting the splicing of key cancer-associated genes, are enriched in cancer. In parallel, there is also accumulating evidence that several molecular subtypes of cancer are highly dependent on splicing function for cell survival. These findings have resulted in a growing interest in targeting splicing catalysis, splicing regulatory proteins, and/or specific key altered splicing events in the treatment of cancer. Here we present strategies that exist and that are in development to target altered dependency on the spliceosome, as well as aberrant splicing, in cancer. These include drugs to target global splicing in cancer subtypes that are preferentially dependent on wild-type splicing for survival, methods to alter post-translational modifications of splicing-regulating proteins, and strategies to modulate pathologic splicing events and protein-RNA interactions in cancer. PMID:27603132

  6. Benchmark analysis of algorithms for determining and quantifying full-length mRNA splice forms from RNA-seq data

    PubMed Central

    Hayer, Katharina E.; Pizarro, Angel; Lahens, Nicholas F.; Hogenesch, John B.; Grant, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Because of the advantages of RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) over microarrays, it is gaining widespread popularity for highly parallel gene expression analysis. For example, RNA-Seq is expected to be able to provide accurate identification and quantification of full-length splice forms. A number of informatics packages have been developed for this purpose, but short reads make it a difficult problem in principle. Sequencing error and polymorphisms add further complications. It has become necessary to perform studies to determine which algorithms perform best and which if any algorithms perform adequately. However, there is a dearth of independent and unbiased benchmarking studies. Here we take an approach using both simulated and experimental benchmark data to evaluate their accuracy. Results: We conclude that most methods are inaccurate even using idealized data, and that no method is highly accurate once multiple splice forms, polymorphisms, intron signal, sequencing errors, alignment errors, annotation errors and other complicating factors are present. These results point to the pressing need for further algorithm development. Availability and implementation: Simulated datasets and other supporting information can be found at http://bioinf.itmat.upenn.edu/BEERS/bp2 Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Contact: hayer@upenn.edu PMID:26338770

  7. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  8. Splicing remodels messenger ribonucleoprotein architecture via eIF4A3-dependent and -independent recruitment of exon junction complex components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuo; Krainer, Adrian R

    2007-07-10

    Pre-mRNA splicing not only removes introns and joins exons to generate spliced mRNA but also results in remodeling of the spliced messenger ribonucleoprotein, influencing various downstream events. This remodeling includes the loading of an exon-exon junction complex (EJC). It is unclear how the spliceosome recruits the EJC onto the mRNA and whether EJC formation or EJC components are required for pre-mRNA splicing. Here we immunodepleted the EJC core component eIF4A3 from HeLa cell nuclear extract and found that eIF4A3 is dispensable for pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. However, eIF4A3 is required for the splicing-dependent loading of the Y14/Magoh heterodimer onto mRNA, and this activity of human eIF4A3 is also present in the Drosophila ortholog. Surprisingly, the loading of six other EJC components was not affected by eIF4A3 depletion, suggesting that their binding to mRNA involves different or redundant pathways. Finally, we found that the assembly of the EJC onto mRNA occurs at the late stages of the splicing reaction and requires the second-step splicing and mRNA-release factor HRH1/hPrp22. The EJC-dependent and -independent recruitment of RNA-binding proteins onto mRNA suggests a role for the EJC in messenger ribonucleoprotein remodeling involving interactions with other proteins already bound to the pre-mRNA, which has implications for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and other mRNA transactions. PMID:17606899

  9. Homozygous deletion of EPB41 genuine AUG-containing exons results in mRNA splicing defects, NMD activation and protein 4.1R complete deficiency in hereditary elliptocytosis.

    PubMed

    Baklouti, Faouzi; Morinière, Madeleine; Haj-Khélil, Amel; Fénéant-Thibault, Madeleine; Gruffat, Henri; Couté, Yohann; Ninot, Alain; Guitton, Corinne; Delaunay, Jean

    2011-10-15

    Complete loss of protein 4.1R in red blood cell membrane is a very rare condition in humans. We here explore the third case. The morphological and biochemical observations suggested that the proband suffers from homozygous hereditary elliptocytosis. Both parents, who are consanguineous, have an elliptocytosis with no cell fragmentation, typical of a heterozygous 4.1R deficiency with a silent allele. A genomic deletion was found; it encompasses about 50 kb of genomic DNA, and suppresses the two key exons 2 and 4, which contain the two functional AUG translation initiation sites in erythroid and nonerythroid cells. The alternative first exons are intact, hence preserving the transcription potential of the altered gene. Extensive analysis of 4.1R transcripts revealed multiple splicing defects upstream of the deleted sequences. Importantly, we found that most of the transcripts generated from the altered gene are intercepted by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay mechanism, suggesting that the massive degradation of the mRNA species jeopardizes the production of shortened but functional protein 4.1R from an alternative translation initiation site downstream of the deletion. PMID:21839655

  10. Alternative splicing of human T-cell-specific MAL mRNA and its correlation with the exon/intron organization of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Rancano, C.; Rubio, T.; Alonso, M.A. )

    1994-05-15

    Sequence analysis of the T-cell-specific MAL gene revealed four exons, each encoding a hydrophobic, presumably membrane-associated, segment and its adjacent hydrophilic sequence. Amplification by the polymerase chain reaction of cDNA from different T-cell samples indicated the existence of four different forms of MAL mRNA, termed MAL-a, -b, -c, and -d, that arise from differential usage of exons II and/or III. As the three introns were located between complete codons, the reading frame was maintained in all the transcripts. A model resembling the structures postulated for different proteolipid proteins is proposed for the protein encoded by each alternative mRNA species. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  11. A G{sub +3}-to-T donor splice site mutation leads to skipping of exon 50 in von Willebrand factor mRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Mertes, G.; Schwaab, R.; Brackmann, H.H.; Ludwig, M.

    1994-11-01

    Genomic DNA was prepared from leukocytes, and platelet-derived total mRNA was isolated by lysis of thrombocytes in 4 M guanidinium hydrochloride followed by precipitation in 2 M lithium chloride twice. PCR reactions were performed using either RT-PCR primers or genomic PCR-primers. Preferential signle-strand amplification for both PCR products was carried out with nested RT-PCR primers.

  12. Identification, mRNA expression, and functional analysis of chitin synthase 1 gene and its two alternative splicing variants in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  13. Identification, mRNA Expression, and Functional Analysis of Chitin Synthase 1 Gene and Its Two Alternative Splicing Variants in Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jia; Xu, Kang-Kang; Cong, Lin; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Two alternative splicing variants of chitin synthase 1 gene (BdCHS1) were cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). The cDNA of both variants (BdCHS1a and BdCHS1b) consisted of 5,552 nucleotides (nt), with an open reading frame (ORF) of 4,776 nt, encoding a protein of 1,592 amino acid residues, plus 685- and 88-nt of 5′- and 3′-noncoding regions, respectively. The alternative splicing site was located between positions 3,784-3,960 and formed a pair of mutually exclusive exons (a/b) that were same in size (177 nt), but showed only 65% identity at the nucleotide level. During B. dorsalis growth and development, BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a were both mainly expressed during the larval-pupal and pupal-adult transitions, while BdCHS1b was mainly expressed during pupal-adult metamorphosis and in the middle of the pupal stage. BdCHS1a was predominately expressed in the integument whereas BdCHS1b was mainly expressed in the trachea. The 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) induced the expression of BdCHS1 and its variants. Injection of dsRNA of BdCHS1, BdCHS1a, and BdCHS1b into third-instar larvae significantly reduced the expression levels of the corresponding variants, generated phenotypic defects, and killed most of the treated larvae. Furthermore, silencing of BdCHS1 and BdCHS1a had a similar result in that the larva was trapped in old cuticle and died without tanning completely, while silencing of BdCHS1b has no effect on insect morphology. These results demonstrated that BdCHS1 plays an important role in the larval-pupal transition and the expression of BdCHS1 in B. dorsalis is regulated by 20E. PMID:23569438

  14. Molecular Characteristics, mRNA Expression, and Alternative Splicing of a Ryanodine Receptor Gene in the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guo-Rui; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Yang, Wen-Jia; Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a distinct class of ligand-gated channels controlling the release of calcium from intracellular stores. The emergence of diamide insecticides, which selectively target insect RyRs, has promoted the study of insect RyRs. In the present study, the full-length RyR cDNA (BdRyR) was cloned and characterized from the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), a serious pest of fruits and vegetables throughout East Asia and the Pacific Rim. The cDNA of BdRyR contains a 15,420-bp open reading frame encoding 5,140 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 582.4 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.38. BdRyR shows a high level of amino acid sequence identity (78 to 97%) to other insect RyR isoforms. All common structural features of the RyRs are present in the BdRyR, including a well-conserved C-terminal domain containing consensus calcium-binding EF-hands and six transmembrane domains, and a large N-terminal domain. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that BdRyR was expressed at the lowest and highest levels in egg and adult, respectively, and that the BdRyR expression levels in the third instar larva, pupa and adult were 166.99-, 157.56- and 808.56-fold higher, respectively, than that in the egg. Among different adult body parts, the highest expression level was observed in the thorax compared with the head and abdomen. In addition, four alternative splice sites were identified in the BdRyR gene, with the first, ASI, being located in the central part of the predicted second spore lysis A/RyR domain. Diagnostic PCR analyses revealed that alternative splice variants were generated not only in a tissue-specific manner but also in a developmentally regulated manner. These results lay the foundation for further understanding the structural and functional properties of BdRyR, and the molecular mechanisms for target site resistance in B. dorsalis. PMID:24740254

  15. Changes in Cellular mRNA Stability, Splicing and Polyadenylation through HuR Protein Sequestration by a Cytoplasmic RNA Virus

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Michael D.; Moon, Stephanie L.; Emch, Alexander W.; Wilusz, Carol J.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Summary The impact of RNA viruses on the post-transcriptional regulation of cellular gene expression is unclear. Sindbis virus causes a dramatic relocalization of the cellular HuR protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in infected cells. This is due to the expression of large amounts of viral RNAs that contain high affinity HuR binding sites in their 3’ UTRs effectively serving as a sponge for the HuR protein. Sequestration of HuR by Sindbis virus is associated with destabilization of cellular mRNAs that normally bind HuR and rely on it to regulate their expression. Furthermore, significant changes can be observed in nuclear alternative polyadenylation and splicing events on cellular pre-mRNAs due to sequestration of HuR protein by the 3’ UTR of transcripts of this cytoplasmic RNA virus. These studies suggest a new molecular mechanism of virus-host interaction that likely has significant impact on virus replication, cytopathology and pathogenesis. PMID:24210824

  16. Diverse alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing landscape of circular RNAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ou; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jia-Lin; Luo, Zheng; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Ling-Ling; Yang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) derived from back-spliced exons have been widely identified as being co-expressed with their linear counterparts. A single gene locus can produce multiple circRNAs through alternative back-splice site selection and/or alternative splice site selection; however, a detailed map of alternative back-splicing/splicing in circRNAs is lacking. Here, with the upgraded CIRCexplorer2 pipeline, we systematically annotated different types of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing events in circRNAs from various cell lines. Compared with their linear cognate RNAs, circRNAs exhibited distinct patterns of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing. Alternative back-splice site selection was correlated with the competition of putative RNA pairs across introns that bracket alternative back-splice sites. In addition, all four basic types of alternative splicing that have been identified in the (linear) mRNA process were found within circRNAs, and many exons were predominantly spliced in circRNAs. Unexpectedly, thousands of previously unannotated exons were detected in circRNAs from the examined cell lines. Although these novel exons had similar splice site strength, they were much less conserved than known exons in sequences. Finally, both alternative back-splicing and circRNA-predominant alternative splicing were highly diverse among the examined cell lines. All of the identified alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs are available in the CIRCpedia database (http://www.picb.ac.cn/rnomics/circpedia). Collectively, the annotation of alternative back-splicing and alternative splicing in circRNAs provides a valuable resource for depicting the complexity of circRNA biogenesis and for studying the potential functions of circRNAs in different cells. PMID:27365365

  17. Genome-Wide Survey of Cold Stress Regulated Alternative Splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with Tiling Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression. PMID:23776682

  18. Mutations Designed by Ensemble Defect to Misfold Conserved RNA Structures of Influenza A Segments 7 and 8 Affect Splicing and Attenuate Viral Replication in Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tian; Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Turner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a significant public health threat, but little is understood about the viral RNA structure and function. Current vaccines and therapeutic options to control influenza A virus infections are mostly protein-centric and of limited effectiveness. Here, we report using an ensemble defect approach to design mutations to misfold regions of conserved mRNA structures in influenza A virus segments 7 and 8. Influenza A mutant viruses inhibit pre-mRNA splicing and attenuate viral replication in cell culture, thus providing evidence for functions of the targeted regions. Targeting these influenza A viral RNA regions provides new possibilities for designing vaccines and therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. The results also demonstrate that the ensemble defect approach is an efficient way to test for function of RNA sequences. PMID:27272307

  19. Mutations Designed by Ensemble Defect to Misfold Conserved RNA Structures of Influenza A Segments 7 and 8 Affect Splicing and Attenuate Viral Replication in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tian; Nogales, Aitor; Baker, Steven F; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Turner, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a significant public health threat, but little is understood about the viral RNA structure and function. Current vaccines and therapeutic options to control influenza A virus infections are mostly protein-centric and of limited effectiveness. Here, we report using an ensemble defect approach to design mutations to misfold regions of conserved mRNA structures in influenza A virus segments 7 and 8. Influenza A mutant viruses inhibit pre-mRNA splicing and attenuate viral replication in cell culture, thus providing evidence for functions of the targeted regions. Targeting these influenza A viral RNA regions provides new possibilities for designing vaccines and therapeutics against this important human respiratory pathogen. The results also demonstrate that the ensemble defect approach is an efficient way to test for function of RNA sequences. PMID:27272307

  20. Different forms of Go alpha mRNA arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene on human chromosome 16.

    PubMed Central

    Murtagh, J J; Eddy, R; Shows, T B; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-01-01

    Go alpha, (gene symbol GNA01), a member of the signal-transducing guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein family, has been implicated in ion channel regulation. Some tissues contain multiple Go alpha mRNAs of different sizes that differ in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs). Using sequence-specific 48-base oligonucleotides, two complementary to the different 3' UTRs and one complementary to the coding region, we investigated the origin of the multiple Go alpha transcripts, the organization of the Go alpha gene, the interspecies conservation of 3' UTRs, and the chromosomal localization of Go alpha. Oligonucleotides labeled to high specific activity by using terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase each hybridized with a single band of restriction enzyme-digested mouse and human DNAs. In three of four digests of human DNA, the two probes specific for the different 3' UTRs hybridized with the same restriction fragment. Thus, these nucleotide sequences are in close proximity in the human genome. The order of the UTRs in the bovine, human, and mouse genomes was confirmed directly by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing. Hybridization of bovine oligonucleotide sequence with mouse and human genomic DNA indicated a high degree of interspecies sequence conservation: conservation was confirmed by PCR amplification and sequencing. Bands detected by both UTR probes, as well as the predominant bands detected by a bovine Go alpha cDNA, segregated with human chromosome 16 on Southern blot analysis of human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. We conclude that Go alpha mRNAs with different 3' UTRs arise by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The UTRs, which exhibit a high degree of interspecies conservation, may play a role in regulation of Go alpha expression during differentiation or in specific tissues. The use of oligonucleotide probes of the type described here represents a new strategy, potentially widely applicable for mapping and elucidating

  1. Transposon insertions causing constitutive sex-lethal activity in Drosophila melanogaster affect Sxl sex-specific transcript splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Berstein, M.; Cline, T.W. |; Lersch, R.A.; Subrahmanyan, L.

    1995-02-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene products induce female development in Drosophila melanogaster and suppress the transcriptional hyperactivation of X-linked genes responsible for male X-chromosome dosage compensation. Control of Sxl functioning by the dose of X-chromosomes normally ensures that the female-specific functions of this developmental switch gene are only expressed in diplo-X individuals. Although the immediate effect of X-chromosome dose is on Sxl transcription, during most of the life cycle {open_quotes}on{close_quotes} vs. {open_quotes}off{close_quotes} reflects alternative Sxl RNA splicing, with the female (productive) splicing mode maintained by a positive feedback activity of SXL protein on Sxl pre-mRNA splicing. {open_quotes}Male-lethal{close_quotes} (Sxl{sup M}) gain-of-function alleles subvert Sxl control by X-chromosome dose, allowing female Sxl functions to be expressed independent of the positive regulators upstream of Sxl. As a consequence, Sxl{sup M} haplo-X animals (chromosomal males) die because of improper dosage compensation, and Sxl{sup m} chromosomal females survive the otherwise lethal effects of mutations in upstream positive regulators. Transcript analysis of double-mutant male-viable Sxl{sup M} derivatives in which the Sxl{sup M} insertion is cis to loss-of-function mutations, combined with other results reported here, indicates that the constitutive character of these Sxl{sup M} alleles is a consequence of an alteration of the structure of the pre-mRNA that allow some level of female splicing to occur even in the absence of functional SXL protein. Surprisingly, however, most of the constitutive character of Sxl{sup M} alleles appears to depend on the mutant alleles` responsiveness, perhaps greater than wild-type, to the autoregulatory splicing activity of the wild-type SXL proteins they produce. 47 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants differentially affects Rubisco activity during low temperature treatment in Lolium perenne.

    PubMed

    Jurczyk, Barbara; Pociecha, Ewa; Grzesiak, Maciej; Kalita, Katarzyna; Rapacz, Marcin

    2016-07-01

    Alternative splicing of the Rubisco activase gene was shown to be a point for optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. It can be expected to be a stress-regulated event that depends on plant freezing tolerance. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships among Rubisco activity, the expression of two Rubisco activase splicing variants and photoacclimation to low temperature. The experiment was performed on two Lolium perenne genotypes with contrasting levels of freezing tolerance. The study investigated the effect of pre-hardening (15°C) and cold acclimation (4°C) on net photosynthesis, photosystem II photochemical activity, Rubisco activity and the expression of two splicing variants of the Rubisco activase gene. The results showed an induction of Rubisco activity at both 15°C and 4°C only in a highly freezing-tolerant genotype. The enhanced Rubisco activity after pre-hardening corresponded to increased expression of the splicing variant representing the large isoform, while the increase in Rubisco activity during cold acclimation was due to the activation of both transcript variants. These boosts in Rubisco activity also corresponded to an activation of non-photochemical mechanism of photoacclimation induced at low temperature exclusively in the highly freezing-tolerant genotype. In conclusion, enhanced expression of Rubisco activase splicing variants caused an increase in Rubisco activity during pre-hardening and cold acclimation in the more freezing-tolerant Lolium perenne genotype. The induction of the transcript variant representing the large isoform may be an important element of increasing the carbon assimilation rate supporting the photochemical mechanism of photosynthetic acclimation to cold. PMID:27152456

  3. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Khoder, Mamdouh I.; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J.; and others

    2015-07-15

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5′ untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. - Highlights: • Airborne particulate matter (PM10) affects alternative splicing in colon cells. • PM10 upregulates one of the two mRNA variants of the growth factor BMP-4. • This variant has a longer 5′ unstranslated region and introduces an upstream AUG. • By regulating BMP-4 mRNA splicing PM10 inhibits total expression of BMP-4 protein. • BMP-4 downregulation was previously reported to be associated to colon cancer.

  4. Splicing fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Koodathingal, Prakash; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome discriminates against suboptimal substrates, both during assembly and catalysis, thereby enhancing specificity during pre-mRNA splicing. Central to such fidelity mechanisms are a conserved subset of the DEAD- and DEAH-box ATPases, which belong to a superfamily of proteins that mediate RNP rearrangements in almost all RNA-dependent processes in the cell. Through an investigation of the mechanisms contributing to the specificity of 5′ splice site cleavage, two related reports, one from our lab and the other from the Cheng lab, have provided insights into fidelity mechanisms utilized by the spliceosome. In our work, we found evidence for a kinetic proofreading mechanism in splicing in which the DEAH-box ATPase Prp16 discriminates against substrates undergoing slow 5′ splice site cleavage. Additionally, our study revealed that discriminated substrates are discarded through a general spliceosome disassembly pathway, mediated by another DEAH-box ATPase Prp43. In their work, Tseng et al. described the underlying molecular events through which Prp16 discriminates against a splicing substrate during 5′ splice site cleavage. Here, we present a synthesis of these two studies and, additionally, provide the first biochemical evidence for discrimination of a suboptimal splicing substrate just prior to 5′ splice site cleavage. Together, these findings support a general mechanism for a ubiquitous superfamily of ATPases in enhancing specificity during RNA-dependent processes in the cell. PMID:23770752

  5. A new view of transcriptome complexity and regulation through the lens of local splicing variations

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; Barrera, Alejandro; Gazzara, Matthew R; González-Vallinas, Juan; Lahens, Nicholas F; Hogenesch, John B; Lynch, Kristen W; Barash, Yoseph

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can critically affect gene function and disease, yet mapping splicing variations remains a challenge. Here, we propose a new approach to define and quantify mRNA splicing in units of local splicing variations (LSVs). LSVs capture previously defined types of alternative splicing as well as more complex transcript variations. Building the first genome wide map of LSVs from twelve mouse tissues, we find complex LSVs constitute over 30% of tissue dependent transcript variations and affect specific protein families. We show the prevalence of complex LSVs is conserved in humans and identify hundreds of LSVs that are specific to brain subregions or altered in Alzheimer's patients. Amongst those are novel isoforms in the Camk2 family and a novel poison exon in Ptbp1, a key splice factor in neurogenesis. We anticipate the approach presented here will advance the ability to relate tissue-specific splice variation to genetic variation, phenotype, and disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11752.001 PMID:26829591

  6. The genetics of splicing in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Justin; Hackett, Christopher S.; Zhang, Shile; Song, Young K.; Bell, Robert J.A.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Quigley, David A.; Balmain, Allan; Song, Jun S.; Costello, Joseph F.; Gustafson, W. Clay; Dyke, Terry Van; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Khan, Javed; Weiss, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA splicing, a critical and tightly regulated cellular function, underlies the majority of proteomic diversity, and is frequently disrupted in disease. Using an integrative genomics approach, we combined both genome and exon level transcriptome data in two somatic tissues (cerebella and peripheral ganglia) from a transgenic mouse model of neuroblastoma, a tumor that arises from peripheral neural crest. Here we describe splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) associated with differential splicing across the genome that we use to identify genes with previously unknown functions within the splicing pathway and to define de novo intronic splicing motifs that influence splicing from hundreds of bases away. Our results show that these splicing motifs represent sites for functional recurrent mutations and highlight novel candidate genes in human cancers, including childhood neuroblastoma. PMID:25637275

  7. Non-Secreted Clusterin Isoforms Are Translated in Rare Amounts from Distinct Human mRNA Variants and Do Not Affect Bax-Mediated Apoptosis or the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Prochnow, Hans; Gollan, Rene; Rohne, Philipp; Hassemer, Matthias; Koch-Brandt, Claudia; Baiersdörfer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Clusterin, also known as apolipoprotein J, is expressed from a variety of tissues and implicated in pathological disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia and cancer. In contrast to secretory clusterin (sCLU), which acts as an extracellular chaperone, the synthesis, subcellular localization and function(s) of intracellular CLU isoforms is currently a matter of intense discussion. By investigating human CLU mRNAs we here unravel mechanisms leading to the synthesis of distinct CLU protein isoforms and analyze their subcellular localization and their impact on apoptosis and on NF-κB-activity. Quantitative PCR-analyses revealed the expression of four different stress-inducible CLU mRNA variants in non-cancer and cancer cell lines. In all cell lines variant 1 represents the most abundant mRNA, whereas all other variants collectively account for no more than 0.34% of total CLU mRNA, even under stressed conditions. Overexpression of CLU cDNAs combined with in vitro mutagenesis revealed distinct translational start sites including a so far uncharacterized non-canonical CUG start codon. We show that all exon 2-containing mRNAs encode sCLU and at least three non-glycosylated intracellular isoforms, CLU1‑449, CLU21‑449 and CLU34‑449, which all reside in the cytosol of unstressed and stressed HEK‑293 cells. The latter is the only form expressed from an alternatively spliced mRNA variant lacking exon 2. Functional analysis revealed that none of these cytosolic CLU forms modulate caspase-mediated intrinsic apoptosis or significantly affects TNF-α-induced NF-κB-activity. Therefore our data challenge some of the current ideas regarding the physiological functions of CLU isoforms in pathologies. PMID:24073260

  8. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-01-01

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from pre-mRNA transcripts. However, some long D. melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, called a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing1,2. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis remain unclear. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of a “RS-exon” that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform due to competition with a reconstituted 5′ splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic exons or promoters that are prevalent in long introns, but which fail to reconstitute an efficient 5′ splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion may decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling inclusion of cryptic elements with RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  9. Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes.

    PubMed

    Sibley, Christopher R; Emmett, Warren; Blazquez, Lorea; Faro, Ana; Haberman, Nejc; Briese, Michael; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E; Hardy, John; Modic, Miha; Curk, Tomaž; Wilson, Stephen W; Plagnol, Vincent; Ule, Jernej

    2015-05-21

    It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an 'RS-exon' that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5' splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5' splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons. PMID:25970246

  10. Transposon Insertions Causing Constitutive Sex-Lethal Activity in Drosophila Melanogaster Affect Sxl Sex-Specific Transcript Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, M.; Lersch, R. A.; Subrahmanyan, L.; Cline, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene products induce female development in Drosophila melanogaster and suppress the transcriptional hyperactivation of X-linked genes responsible for male X-chromosome dosage compensation. Control of Sxl functioning by the dose of X-chromosomes normally ensures that the female-specific functions of this developmental switch gene are only expressed in diplo-X individuals. Although the immediate effect of X-chromosome dose is on Sxl transcription, during most of the life cycle ``on'' vs. ``off'' reflects alternative Sxl RNA splicing, with the female (productive) splicing mode maintained by a positive feedback activity of SXL protein on Sxl pre-mRNA splicing. ``Male-lethal'' (Sxl(M)) gain-of-function alleles subvert Sxl control by X-chromosome dose, allowing female Sxl functions to be expressed independent of the positive regulators upstream of Sxl. As a consequence, Sxl(M) haplo-X animals (chromosomal males) die because of improper dosage compensation, and Sxl(M) chromosomal females survive the otherwise lethal effects of mutations in upstream positive regulators. Five independent spontaneous Sxl(M) alleles were shown previously to be transposon insertions into what was subsequently found to be the region of regulated sex-specific Sxl RNA splicing. We show that these five alleles represent three different mutant types: Sxl(M1), Sxl(M3), and Sxl(M4). Sxl(M1) is an insertion of a roo element 674 bp downstream of the translation-terminating male-specific exon. Sxl(M3) is an insertion of a hobo transposon (not 297 as previously reported) into the 3' splice site of the male exon, and Sxl(M4) is an insertion of a novel transposon into the male-specific exon itself. We show that these three gain-of-function mutants differ considerably in their ability to bypass the sex determination signal, with Sxl(M4) being the strongest and Sxl(M1) the weakest. This difference is also reflected in effects of these mutations on sex-specific RNA splicing and on the rate of

  11. Transposon insertions causing constitutive Sex-lethal activity in Drosophila melanogaster affect Sxl sex-specific transcript splicing.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, M; Lersch, R A; Subrahmanyan, L; Cline, T W

    1995-02-01

    Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene products induce female development in Drosophila melanogaster and suppress the transcriptional hyperactivation of X-linked genes responsible for male X-chromosome dosage compensation. Control of Sxl functioning by the dose of X-chromosomes normally ensures that the female-specific functions of this developmental switch gene are only expressed in diplo-X individuals. Although the immediate effect of X-chromosome dose is on Sxl transcription, during most of the life cycle "on" vs. "off" reflects alternative Sxl RNA splicing, with the female (productive) splicing mode maintained by a positive feedback activity of SXL protein on Sxl pre-mRNA splicing. "Male-lethal" (SxlM) gain-of-function alleles subvert Sxl control by X-chromosome dose, allowing female Sxl functions to be expressed independent of the positive regulators upstream of Sxl. As a consequence, SxlM haplo-X animals (chromosomal males) die because of improper dosage compensation, and SxlM chromosomal females survive the otherwise lethal effects of mutations in upstream positive regulators. Five independent spontaneous SxlM alleles were shown previously to be transposon insertions into what was subsequently found to be the region of regulated sex-specific Sxl RNA splicing. We show that these five alleles represent three different mutant types: SxlM1, SxlM3, and SxlM4. SxlM1 is an insertion of a roo element 674 bp downstream of the translation-terminating male-specific exon. SxlM3 is an insertion of a hobo transposon (not 297 as previously reported) into the 3' splice site of the male exon, and SxlM4 is an insertion of a novel transposon into the male-specific exon itself. We show that these three gain-of-function mutants differ considerably in their ability to bypass the sex determination signal, with SxlM4 being the strongest and SxlM1 the weakest. This difference is also reflected in effects of these mutations on sex-specific RNA splicing and on the rate of appearance of SXL protein in

  12. De-regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing affects distinct cellular pathways in the aging hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Stilling, Roman M.; Benito, Eva; Gertig, Michael; Barth, Jonas; Capece, Vincenzo; Burkhardt, Susanne; Bonn, Stefan; Fischer, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Aging is accompanied by gradually increasing impairment of cognitive abilities and constitutes the main risk factor of neurodegenerative conditions like Alzheimer's disease (AD). The underlying mechanisms are however not well understood. Here we analyze the hippocampal transcriptome of young adult mice and two groups of mice at advanced age using RNA sequencing. This approach enabled us to test differential expression of coding and non-coding transcripts, as well as differential splicing and RNA editing. We report a specific age-associated gene expression signature that is associated with major genetic risk factors for late-onset AD (LOAD). This signature is dominated by neuroinflammatory processes, specifically activation of the complement system at the level of increased gene expression, while de-regulation of neuronal plasticity appears to be mediated by compromised RNA splicing. PMID:25431548

  13. An intronic RNA structure modulates expression of the mRNA biogenesis factor Sus1

    PubMed Central

    AbuQattam, Ali; Gallego, José; Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Sus1 is a conserved protein involved in chromatin remodeling and mRNA biogenesis. Unlike most yeast genes, the SUS1 pre-mRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two introns and is alternatively spliced, retaining one or both introns in response to changes in environmental conditions. SUS1 splicing may allow the cell to control Sus1 expression, but the mechanisms that regulate this process remain unknown. Using in silico analyses together with NMR spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and UV thermal denaturation experiments, we show that the downstream intron (I2) of SUS1 forms a weakly stable, 37-nucleotide stem–loop structure containing the branch site near its apical loop and the 3′ splice site after the stem terminus. A cellular assay revealed that two of four mutants containing altered I2 structures had significantly impaired SUS1 expression. Semiquantitative RT-PCR experiments indicated that all mutants accumulated unspliced SUS1 pre-mRNA and/or induced distorted levels of fully spliced mRNA relative to wild type. Concomitantly, Sus1 cellular functions in histone H2B deubiquitination and mRNA export were affected in I2 hairpin mutants that inhibited splicing. This work demonstrates that I2 structure is relevant for SUS1 expression, and that this effect is likely exerted through modulation of splicing. PMID:26546116

  14. TDP-43 affects splicing profiles and isoform production of genes involved in the apoptotic and mitotic cellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    De Conti, Laura; Akinyi, Maureen V.; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, high-throughput screening analyses have broadly defined the RNA cellular targets of TDP-43, a nuclear factor involved in neurodegeneration. A common outcome of all these studies is that changing the expression levels of this protein can alter the expression of several hundred RNAs within cells. What still remains to be clarified is which changes represent direct cellular targets of TDP-43 or just secondary variations due to the general role played by this protein in RNA metabolism. Using an HTS-based splicing junction analysis we identified at least six bona fide splicing events that are consistent with being controlled by TDP-43. Validation of the data, both in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines demonstrated that TDP-43 substantially alters the levels of isoform expression in four genes potentially important for neuropathology: MADD/IG20, STAG2, FNIP1 and BRD8. For MADD/IG20 and STAG2, these changes could also be confirmed at the protein level. These alterations were also observed in a cellular model that successfully mimics TDP-43 loss of function effects following its aggregation. Most importantly, our study demonstrates that cell cycle alterations induced by TDP-43 knockdown can be recovered by restoring the STAG2, an important component of the cohesin complex, normal splicing profile. PMID:26261209

  15. Als2 mRNA splicing variants detected in KO mice rescue severe motor dysfunction phenotype in Als2 knock-down zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Gros-Louis, Francois; Kriz, Jasna; Kabashi, Edor; McDearmid, Jonathan; Millecamps, Stéphanie; Urushitani, Makoto; Lin, Li; Dion, Patrick; Zhu, Qinzhang; Drapeau, Pierre; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Rouleau, Guy A

    2008-09-01

    Recessive ALS2 mutations are linked to three related but slightly different neurodegenerative disorders: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, hereditary spastic paraplegia and primary lateral sclerosis. To investigate the function of the ALS2 encoded protein, we generated Als2 knock-out (KO) mice and zAls2 knock-down zebrafish. The Als2(-/-) mice lacking exon 2 and part of exon 3 developed mild signs of neurodegeneration compatible with axonal transport deficiency. In contrast, zAls2 knock-down zebrafish had severe developmental abnormalities, swimming deficits and motor neuron perturbation. We identified, by RT-PCR, northern and western blotting novel Als2 transcripts in mouse central nervous system. These Als2 transcripts were present in Als2 null mice as well as in wild-type littermates and some rescued the zebrafish phenotype. Thus, we speculate that the newly identified Als2 mRNA species prevent the Als2 KO mice from developing severe neurodegenerative disease and might also regulate the severity of the motor neurons phenotype observed in ALS2 patients. PMID:18558633

  16. Mutations that alter RNA splicing of the human HPRT gene: a review of the spectrum.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, J P; Rogan, P K; Cariello, N; Nicklas, J A

    1998-11-01

    The human HPRT gene contains spans approximately 42,000 base pairs in genomic DNA, has a mRNA of approximately 900 bases and a protein coding sequence of 657 bases (initiation codon AUG to termination codon UAA). This coding sequence is distributed into 9 exons ranging from 18 (exon 5) to 184 (exon 3) base pairs. Intron sizes range from 170 (intron 7) to 13,075 (intron 1) base pairs. In a database of human HPRT mutations, 277 of 2224 (12.5%) mutations result in alterations in splicing of the mRNA as analyzed by both reverse transcriptase mediated production of a cDNA followed by PCR amplification and cDNA sequencing and by genomic DNA PCR amplification and sequencing. Mutations have been found in all eight 5' (donor) and 3' (acceptor) splice sequences. Mutations in the 5' splice sequences of introns 1 and 5 result in intron inclusion in the cDNA due to the use of cryptic donor splice sequences within the introns; mutations in the other six 5' sites result in simple exon exclusion. Mutations in the 3' splice sequences of introns 1, 3, 7 and 8 result in partial exon exclusion due to the use of cryptic acceptor splice sequences within the exons; mutations in the other four 3' sites result in simple exon exclusion. A base substitution in exon 3 (209G-->T) creates a new 5' (donor) splice site which results in the exclusion of 110 bases of exon 3 from the cDNA. Two base substitutions in intron 8 (IVS8-16G-->A and IVS8-3T-->G) result in the inclusion of intron 8 sequences in the cDNA due to the creation of new 3' (acceptor) splice sites. Base substitution within exons 1, 3, 4, 6 and 8 also result in splice alterations in cDNA. Those in exons 1 and 6 are at the 3' end of the exon and may directly affect splicing. Those within exons 3 and 4 may be the result of the creation of nonsense codons, while those in exon 8 cannot be explained by this mechanism. Lastly, many mutations that affect splicing of the HPRT mRNA have pleiotropic effects in that multiple cDNA products are

  17. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  18. Myocardial Expression Analysis of Osteopontin and Its Splice Variants in Patients Affected by End-Stage Idiopathic or Ischemic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cabiati, Manuela; Svezia, Benedetta; Matteucci, Marco; Botta, Luca; Pucci, Angela; Rinaldi, Mauro; Caselli, Chiara; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Del Ry, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphoglycoprotein of cardiac extracellular matrix and it is still poorly defined whether its expression changes in failing heart of different origin. The full-length OPN-a and its isoforms (OPN-b, OPN-c) transcriptomic profile were evaluated in myocardium of patients with dilated or ischemic cardiomyopathy (DCM n = 8; LVEF% = 17.5±3; ICM n = 8; LVEF% = 19.5±5.2) and in auricle of valvular patients (VLP n = 5; LVEF%≥50), by Real-time PCR analysis. OPN-a and thrombin mRNA levels resulted significantly higher in DCM compared to ICM patients (DCM:31.3±7.4, ICM:2.7±1.1, p = 0.0002; DCM:19.1±4.9, ICM:5.4±2.2, p = 0.007, respectively). Although both genes’ mRNA levels increased in patients with LVEF<50% (DCM+ICM) with respect to VLP with LVEF>50%, a significant increase in OPN (p = 0.0004) and thrombin (p = 0.001) expression was observed only in DCM. In addition, a correlation between OPN-a and thrombin was found in patients with LVEF<50% (r = 0.6; p = 0.003). The mRNA pattern was confirmed by OPN-a cardiac protein concentration (VLP:1.127±0.26; DCM:1.29±0.22; ICM:1.00±0.077 ng/ml). The OPN splice variants expression were detectable only in ICM (OPN-b: 0.357±0.273; OPN-c: 0.091±0.033) and not in DCM patients. A significant correlation was observed between collagen type I, evaluated by immunohistochemistry analysis, and both OPN-a mRNA expression (r = 0.87, p = 0.002) and OPN protein concentrations (r = 0.77, p = 0.016). Concluding, OPN-a and thrombin mRNA resulted dependent on the origin of heart failure while OPN-b and OPN-c highlighted a different expression for DCM and ICM patients, suggesting their correlation with different clinical-pathophysiological setting. PMID:27479215

  19. Alternative Splicing-Mediated Targeting of the Arabidopsis GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR3.5 to Mitochondria Affects Organelle Morphology1

    PubMed Central

    Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; De Bortoli, Sara; Costa, Alex; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Wagner, Richard; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Szabo, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of 20 genes encoding for putative ionotropic glutamate receptors in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, there has been considerable interest in uncovering their physiological functions. For many of these receptors, neither their channel formation and/or physiological roles nor their localization within the plant cells is known. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, new information about in vivo protein localization and give insight into the biological roles of the so-far uncharacterized Arabidopsis GLUTAMATE RECEPTOR3.5 (AtGLR3.5), a member of subfamily 3 of plant glutamate receptors. Using the pGREAT vector designed for the expression of fusion proteins in plants, we show that a splicing variant of AtGLR3.5 targets the inner mitochondrial membrane, while the other variant localizes to chloroplasts. Mitochondria of knockout or silenced plants showed a strikingly altered ultrastructure, lack of cristae, and swelling. Furthermore, using a genetically encoded mitochondria-targeted calcium probe, we measured a slightly reduced mitochondrial calcium uptake capacity in the knockout mutant. These observations indicate a functional expression of AtGLR3.5 in this organelle. Furthermore, AtGLR3.5-less mutant plants undergo anticipated senescence. Our data thus represent, to our knowledge, the first evidence of splicing-regulated organellar targeting of a plant ion channel and identify the first cation channel in plant mitochondria from a molecular point of view. PMID:25367859

  20. Investigating alternative RNA splicing in Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Mereau, Agnès; Hardy, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing, the process by which distinct mature mRNAs can be produced from a single primary transcript, is a key mechanism to increase the organism complexity. The generation of alternative splicing pattern is a means to expand the proteome diversity and also to control gene expression through the regulation of mRNA abundance. Alternative splicing is therefore particularly prevalent during development and accordingly numerous splicing events are regulated in a tissue or temporal manner. To study the roles of alternative splicing during developmental processes and decipher the molecular mechanisms that underlie temporal and spatial regulation, it is important to develop in vivo whole animal studies. In this chapter, we present the advantages of using the amphibian Xenopus as a fully in vivo model to study alternative splicing and we describe the experimental procedures that can be used with Xenopus laevis embryos and oocytes to define the cis-regulatory elements and identify the associated trans-acting factors. PMID:22956098

  1. ERISdb: a database of plant splice sites and splicing signals.

    PubMed

    Szcześniak, Michał Wojciech; Kabza, Michał; Pokrzywa, Rafał; Gudyś, Adam; Makałowska, Izabela

    2013-02-01

    Splicing is one of the major contributors to observed spatiotemporal diversification of transcripts and proteins in metazoans. There are numerous factors that affect the process, but splice sites themselves along with the adjacent splicing signals are critical here. Unfortunately, there is still little known about splicing in plants and, consequently, further research in some fields of plant molecular biology will encounter difficulties. Keeping this in mind, we performed a large-scale analysis of splice sites in eight plant species, using novel algorithms and tools developed by us. The analyses included identification of orthologous splice sites, polypyrimidine tracts and branch sites. Additionally we identified putative intronic and exonic cis-regulatory motifs, U12 introns as well as splice sites in 45 microRNA genes in five plant species. We also provide experimental evidence for plant splice sites in the form of expressed sequence tag and RNA-Seq data. All the data are stored in a novel database called ERISdb and are freely available at http://lemur.amu.edu.pl/share/ERISdb/. PMID:23299413

  2. ProtAnnot: an App for Integrated Genome Browser to display how alternative splicing and transcription affect proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Tarun; Eckstein, John; Norris, David; Vora, Hiral; Freese, Nowlan H.; Loraine, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: One gene can produce multiple transcript variants encoding proteins with different functions. To facilitate visual analysis of transcript variants, we developed ProtAnnot, which shows protein annotations in the context of genomic sequence. ProtAnnot searches InterPro and displays profile matches (protein annotations) alongside gene models, exposing how alternative promoters, splicing and 3′ end processing add, remove, or remodel functional motifs. To draw attention to these effects, ProtAnnot color-codes exons by frame and displays a cityscape graphic summarizing exonic sequence at each position. These techniques make visual analysis of alternative transcripts faster and more convenient for biologists. Availability and implementation: ProtAnnot is a plug-in App for Integrated Genome Browser, an open source desktop genome browser available from http://www.bioviz.org. Contact: aloraine@uncc.edu PMID:27153567

  3. MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Interaction between Leukemia/Lymphoma-related Factor (LRF) and Alternative Splicing Factor/Splicing Factor 2 (ASF/SF2) Affects Mouse Embryonic Fibroblast Senescence and Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Verduci, Lorena; Simili, Marcella; Rizzo, Milena; Mercatanti, Alberto; Evangelista, Monica; Mariani, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Pitto, Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma-related factor (LRF) is a transcriptional repressor, which by recruiting histone deacetylases specifically represses p19/ARF expression, thus behaving as an oncogene. Conversely, in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), LRF inhibition causes aberrant p19ARF up-regulation resulting in proliferative defects and premature senescence. We have recently shown that LRF is controlled by microRNAs. Here we show that LRF acts on MEF proliferation and senescence/apoptosis by repressing miR-28 and miR-505, revealing a regulatory circuit where microRNAs (miRNAs) work both upstream and downstream of LRF. By analyzing miRNA expression profiles of MEF transfected with LRF-specific short interfering RNAs, we found that miR-28 and miR-505 are modulated by LRF. Both miRNAs are predicted to target alternative splicing factor/splicing factor 2 (ASF/SF2), a serine/arginine protein essential for cell viability. In vertebrates, loss or inactivation of ASF/SF2 may result in genomic instability and induce G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We showed that miR-28 and miR-505 modulate ASF/SF2 by directly binding ASF/SF2 3′-UTR. Decrease in LRF causes a decrease in ASF/SF2, which depends on up-regulation of miR-28 and miR-505. Alteration of each of the members of the LRF/miR-28/miR-505/ASF/SF2 axis affects MEF proliferation and the number of senescent and apoptotic cells. Consistently, the axis is coordinately modulated as cell senescence increases with passages in MEF culture. In conclusion, we show that LRF-dependent miRNAs miR-28 and miR-505 control MEF proliferation and survival by targeting ASF/SF2 and suggest a central role of LRF-related miRNAs, in addition to the role of LRF-dependent p53 control, in cellular homeostasis. PMID:20923760

  4. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  5. A 5' splice site mutation affecting the pre-mRNA splicing of two upstream exons in the collagen COL1A1 gene. Exon 8 skipping and altered definition of exon 7 generates truncated pro alpha 1(I) chains with a non-collagenous insertion destabilizing the triple helix.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, J F; Chan, D; Moeller, I; Hannagan, M; Cole, W G

    1994-01-01

    A heterozygous de novo G to A point mutation in intron 8 at the +5 position of the splice donor site of the gene for the pro alpha 1(I) chain of type I procollagen, COL1A1, was defined in a patient with type IV osteogenesis imperfecta. The splice donor site mutation resulted not only in the skipping of the upstream exon 8 but also unexpectedly had the secondary effect of activating a cryptic splice site in the next upstream intron, intron 7, leading to re-definition of the 3' limit of exon 7. These pre-mRNA splicing aberrations cause the deletion of exon 8 sequences from the mature mRNA and the inclusion of 96 bp of intron 7 sequence. Since the mis-splicing of the mutant allele product resulted in the maintenance of the correct codon reading frame, the resultant pro alpha 1(I) chain contained a short non-collagenous 32-amino-acid sequence insertion within the repetitive Gly-Xaa-Yaa collagen sequence motif. At the protein level, the mutant alpha 1(I) chain was revealed by digestion with pepsin, which cleaved the mutant procollagen within the protease-sensitive non-collagenous insertion, producing a truncated alpha 1(I). This protease sensitivity demonstrated the structural distortion to the helical structure caused by the insertion. In long-term culture with ascorbic acid, which stimulates the formation of a mature crosslinked collagen matrix, and in tissues, there was no evidence of the mutant chain, suggesting that during matrix formation the mutant chain was unable to stably incorporated into the matrix and was degraded proteolytically. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7945197

  6. Detection of high mobility group A2 specific mRNA in the plasma of patients affected by epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pasquinelli, Rosa; Pignata, Sandro; Greggi, Stefano; Vuttariello, Emilia; Bello, Anna Maria; Calise, Celeste; Scaffa, Cono; Pisano, Carmela; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Fusco, Alfredo; Califano, Daniela; Chiappetta, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the high mortality rate is associated with advanced-stage disease at the time of the diagnosis. In order to find new tools to make diagnosis of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) at early stages we have analyzed the presence of specific HMGA2 mRNA in the plasma of patients affected by this neoplasm. HMGA2 overexpression represents a feature of several malignances including ovarian carcinomas. Notably, we detected HMGA2 specific mRNA in the plasma of 40 out 47 patients with EOC, but not in the plasma of healthy donors. All cases found positive for HMGA2 mRNA in the plasma showed HMGA2 protein expression in EOC tissues. Therefore, on the basis of these results, the analysis of circulating HMGA2 specific mRNA might be considered a very promising tool for the early diagnosis of EOC. PMID:25749380

  7. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  8. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  9. RNA-Binding Proteins: Splicing Factors and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, Alger M.; Cygan, Kamil J.; Brown, Brian A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is mediated by interactions of the Core Spliceosome and an array of accessory RNA binding proteins with cis-sequence elements. Splicing is a major regulatory component in higher eukaryotes. Disruptions in splicing are a major contributor to human disease. One in three hereditary disease alleles are believed to cause aberrant splicing. Hereditary disease alleles can alter splicing by disrupting a splicing element, creating a toxic RNA, or affecting splicing factors. One of the challenges of medical genetics is identifying causal variants from the thousands of possibilities discovered in a clinical sequencing experiment. Here we review the basic biochemistry of splicing, the mechanisms of splicing mutations, the methods for identifying splicing mutants, and the potential of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25985083

  10. Phosphoregulation of Ire1 RNase splicing activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R.; Carrara, Marta; Ali, Maruf M. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ire1 is activated in response to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is a unique enzyme, possessing both kinase and RNase activity that is required for specific splicing of Xbp1 mRNA leading to UPR activation. How phosphorylation impacts on the Ire1 splicing activity is unclear. In this study, we isolate distinct phosphorylated species of Ire1 and assess their effects on RNase splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We find that phosphorylation within the kinase activation loop significantly increases RNase splicing in vitro. Correspondingly, mutants of Ire1 that cannot be phosphorylated on the activation loop show decreased specific Xbp1 and promiscuous RNase splicing activity relative to wild-type Ire1 in cells. These data couple the kinase phosphorylation reaction to the activation state of the RNase, suggesting that phosphorylation of the activation loop is an important step in Ire1-mediated UPR activation.

  11. Effects of airborne particulate matter on alternative pre-mRNA splicing in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Buggiano, Valeria; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Alló, Mariano; Lafaille, Celina; Redal, María Ana; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Shamy, Magdy; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2015-07-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays key roles in determining tissue- and species-specific cell differentiation as well as in the onset of hereditary disease and cancer, being controlled by multiple post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. We report here that airborne particulate matter, resulting from industrial pollution, inhibits expression and specifically affects alternative splicing at the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the bone morphogenetic protein BMP4 in human colon cells in culture. These effects are consistent with a previously reported role for BMP4 in preventing colon cancer development, suggesting that ingestion of particulate matter could contribute to the onset of colon cell proliferation. We also show that the underlying mechanism might involve changes in transcriptional elongation. This is the first study to demonstrate that particulate matter causes non-pleiotropic changes in alternative splicing. PMID:25863591

  12. The herpes simplex virus regulatory protein ICP27 contributes to the decrease in cellular mRNA levels during infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hardwicke, M A; Sandri-Goldin, R M

    1994-01-01

    We have previously shown that the herpes simplex virus immediate-early regulatory protein ICP27 acts posttranscriptionally to affect mRNA processing (R. M. Sandri-Goldin and G. E. Mendoza, Genes Dev. 6:848-863, 1992). Specifically, in the presence of ICP27, spliced target mRNAs were decreased 5- to 10-fold in transfections with target genes containing a 5' or 3' intron. Here, we have investigated the effect of ICP27 during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection on accumulation of spliced cellular mRNAs. ICP27 viral mutants have been shown to be defective in host shutoff (W. R. Sacks, C. C. Greene, D. P. Aschman, and P. A. Schaffer, J. Virol. 55:796-805, 1985). Therefore, we examined whether ICP27 could contribute to this complex process by decreasing cellular mRNA levels through its effects on host cell splicing. It was found that in infections with viral mutants defective in ICP27, the accumulated levels of three spliced host mRNAs were higher than those seen with wild-type HSV-1. The differences occurred posttranscriptionally as shown by nuclear runoff transcription assays. The stabilities of the spliced products during infection with wild-type or ICP27 mutant viruses were similar, and unspliced precursor mRNA for a viral spliced gene was detected in infections with wild-type HSV-1 but not in infections in which ICP27 was not expressed. These results suggest that the reduction in cellular mRNA levels and the accumulation of pre-mRNA are related and may be caused by an impairment in host cell splicing. These data further show that ICP27 is required for these effects to occur. Images PMID:8035480

  13. Exon junction complex subunits are required to splice Drosophila MAP kinase, a large heterochromatic gene

    PubMed Central

    Roignant, Jean-Yves; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The exon junction complex (EJC) is assembled on spliced mRNAs upstream of exon-exon junctions, and can regulate their subsequent translation, localization, or degradation. We isolated mutations in Drosophila mago nashi (mago), which encodes a core EJC subunit, based on their unexpectedly specific effects on photoreceptor differentiation. Loss of Mago prevents Epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, due to a large reduction in MAPK mRNA levels. MAPK expression also requires the EJC subunits Y14 and eIF4AIII, and EJC-associated splicing factors. Mago depletion does not affect the transcription or stability of MAPK mRNA, but alters its splicing pattern. MAPK expression from an exogenous promoter requires Mago only when the template includes introns. MAPK is the primary functional target of mago in eye development; in cultured cells, Mago knockdown disproportionately affects other large genes located in heterochromatin. These data support a nuclear role for EJC components in splicing a specific subset of introns. PMID:20946982

  14. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S.; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein–protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting. PMID:26261309

  15. Mutations within the LINC-HELLP non-coding RNA differentially bind ribosomal and RNA splicing complexes and negatively affect trophoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Marie; Visser, Allerdien; Buabeng, Kwadwo M L; Poutsma, Ankie; van der Schors, Roel C; Oudejans, Cees B M

    2015-10-01

    LINC-HELLP, showing chromosomal linkage with the pregnancy-specific HELLP syndrome in Dutch families, reduces differentiation from a proliferative to an invasive phenotype of first-trimester extravillous trophoblasts. Here we show that mutations in LINC-HELLP identified in HELLP families negatively affect this trophoblast differentiation either by inducing proliferation rate or by causing cell cycle exit as shown by a decrease in both proliferation and invasion. As LincRNAs predominantly function through interactions with proteins, we identified the directly interacting proteins using chromatin isolation by RNA purification followed by protein mass spectrometry. We found 22 proteins predominantly clustering in two functional networks, i.e. RNA splicing and the ribosome. YBX1, PCBP1, PCBP2, RPS6 and RPL7 were validated, and binding to these proteins was influenced by the HELLP mutations carried. Finally, we show that the LINC-HELLP transcript levels are significantly upregulated in plasma of women in their first trimester of pregnancy compared with non-pregnant women, whereas this upregulation seems absent in a pilot set of patients later developing pregnancy complications, indicative of its functional significance in vivo. PMID:26173455

  16. Analysis of spliceosomal proteins in Trypanosomatids reveals novel functions in mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Itai Dov; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Volkov, Vadim; Romano, Mali; Haham, Tomer; Tulinski, Pawel; Lebenthal, Ilana; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2010-09-01

    In trypanosomatids, all mRNAs are processed via trans-splicing, although cis-splicing also occurs. In trans-splicing, a common small exon, the spliced leader (SL), which is derived from a small SL RNA species, is added to all mRNAs. Sm and Lsm proteins are core proteins that bind to U snRNAs and are essential for both these splicing processes. In this study, SmD3- and Lsm3-associated complexes were purified to homogeneity from Leishmania tarentolae. The purified complexes were analyzed by mass spectrometry, and 54 and 39 proteins were purified from SmD3 and Lsm complexes, respectively. Interestingly, among the proteins purified from Lsm3, no mRNA degradation factors were detected, as in Lsm complexes from other eukaryotes. The U1A complex was purified and mass spectrometry analysis identified, in addition to U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) proteins, additional co-purified proteins, including the polyadenylation factor CPSF73. Defects observed in cells silenced for U1 snRNP proteins suggest that the U1 snRNP functions exclusively in cis-splicing, although U1A also participates in polyadenylation and affects trans-splicing. The study characterized several trypanosome-specific nuclear factors involved in snRNP biogenesis, whose function was elucidated in Trypanosoma brucei. Conserved factors, such as PRP19, which functions at the heart of every cis-spliceosome, also affect SL RNA modification; GEMIN2, a protein associated with SMN (survival of motor neurons) and implicated in selective association of U snRNA with core Sm proteins in trypanosomes, is a master regulator of snRNP assembly. This study demonstrates the existence of trypanosomatid-specific splicing factors but also that conserved snRNP proteins possess trypanosome-specific functions. PMID:20592024

  17. IntSplice: prediction of the splicing consequences of intronic single-nucleotide variations in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Akihide; Okuno, Tatsuya; Rahman, Mohammad Alinoor; Azuma, Yoshiteru; Takeda, Jun-Ichi; Masuda, Akio; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-07-01

    Precise spatiotemporal regulation of splicing is mediated by splicing cis-elements on pre-mRNA. Single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) affecting intronic cis-elements possibly compromise splicing, but no efficient tool has been available to identify them. Following an effect-size analysis of each intronic nucleotide on annotated alternative splicing, we extracted 105 parameters that could affect the strength of the splicing signals. However, we could not generate reliable support vector regression models to predict the percent-splice-in (PSI) scores for normal human tissues. Next, we generated support vector machine (SVM) models using 110 parameters to directly differentiate pathogenic SNVs in the Human Gene Mutation Database and normal SNVs in the dbSNP database, and we obtained models with a sensitivity of 0.800±0.041 (mean and s.d.) and a specificity of 0.849±0.021. Our IntSplice models were more discriminating than SVM models that we generated with Shapiro-Senapathy score and MaxEntScan::score3ss. We applied IntSplice to a naturally occurring and nine artificial intronic mutations in RAPSN causing congenital myasthenic syndrome. IntSplice correctly predicted the splicing consequences for nine of the ten mutants. We created a web service program, IntSplice (http://www.med.nagoya-u.ac.jp/neurogenetics/IntSplice) to predict splicing-affecting SNVs at intronic positions from -50 to -3. PMID:27009626

  18. Hepatitis C virus genotype and HIV coinfection affect cytokine mRNA levels in unstimulated PBMC but do not shift the T1/T2 balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Silvia; Watson, Mark W; Clark, Ben; Flexman, James P; Cheng, Wendy; French, Martyn A H; Price, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Rapid progression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) disease in patients with HIV/HCV may reflect different cytokine responses and be influenced by HCV genotype. This is addressed by a study of patients with HIV/HCV coinfection and infection with HCV genotype 2 or 3 (2/3). They are compared with coinfected patients infected with genotype 1 and HCV monoinfected patients matched for HCV genotype. IFN-gamma, IL-10, IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA were quantified by real-time PCR in unstimulated PBMC and after in vitro stimulation with HCV core or nonstructural 3/4A antigen. In unstimulated PBMC, levels of IFN-gamma and IL-4 mRNA were lowest in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients, intermediate in HIV/HCV genotype 2/3 patients and highest in HCV genotype 2/3 patients. Neither HCV genotype nor HIV affected levels of IL-10 mRNA in unstimulated PBMC or IFN-gamma, IL-4 and IL-10 mRNA in PBMC stimulated with HCV antigens. Levels of IL-4 and IL-4delta2 mRNA correlated in mitogen-stimulated PBMC from all patient groups but both were low in HIV/HCV genotype 1 patients. Serum soluble CD30 levels (a putative marker of a T2 cytokine environment) did not differ between patient groups. The data do not suggest a shift in the T1/T2 balance driven by HIV coinfection or HCV genotype but either may affect IL-4 bioavailability. PMID:16834574

  19. Splice-correcting oligonucleotides restore BTK function in X-linked agammaglobulinemia model.

    PubMed

    Bestas, Burcu; Moreno, Pedro M D; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Mohammad, Dara K; Saleh, Amer F; Sutlu, Tolga; Nordin, Joel Z; Guterstam, Peter; Gustafsson, Manuela O; Kharazi, Shabnam; Piątosa, Barbara; Roberts, Thomas C; Behlke, Mark A; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J; Lundin, Karin E; El Andaloussi, Samir; Månsson, Robert; Berglöf, Anna; Wengel, Jesper; Smith, C I Edvard

    2014-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is an inherited immunodeficiency that results from mutations within the gene encoding Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Many XLA-associated mutations affect splicing of BTK pre-mRNA and severely impair B cell development. Here, we assessed the potential of antisense, splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) targeting mutated BTK transcripts for treating XLA. Both the SCO structural design and chemical properties were optimized using 2'-O-methyl, locked nucleic acid, or phosphorodiamidate morpholino backbones. In order to have access to an animal model of XLA, we engineered a transgenic mouse that harbors a BAC with an authentic, mutated, splice-defective human BTK gene. BTK transgenic mice were bred onto a Btk knockout background to avoid interference of the orthologous mouse protein. Using this model, we determined that BTK-specific SCOs are able to correct aberrantly spliced BTK in B lymphocytes, including pro-B cells. Correction of BTK mRNA restored expression of functional protein, as shown both by enhanced lymphocyte survival and reestablished BTK activation upon B cell receptor stimulation. Furthermore, SCO treatment corrected splicing and restored BTK expression in primary cells from patients with XLA. Together, our data demonstrate that SCOs can restore BTK function and that BTK-targeting SCOs have potential as personalized medicine in patients with XLA. PMID:25105368

  20. Estrogen Affects Levels of Bcl-2 Protein and mRNA in Medial Amygdala of Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lu; Pandey, Subhash C.; Cohen, Rochelle S.

    2013-01-01

    The survival factor Bcl-2 is a cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) gene product implicated in mediating some of estrogen’s effects on neuroprotection. Previously, we showed an effect of estradiol benzoate (E) on numbers of neuron-specific protein (NeuN)- and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB)-positive cells in medial (MeA), but not central (CeA), amygdala of ovariectomized rats. To determine whether these effects are accompanied by an E-induced increase in Bcl-2, we examined the effects of E on levels of Bcl-2 protein and mRNA in MeA and CeA of ovariectomized rats treated with E regimens resulting in moderate (2.5μg E for 4 or 14 days) or high (10μg E for 14 days) plasma estradiol levels. As a physiological control, we showed that all E treatments increased uterine wet weight relative to vehicle; 10μg E for 14 days also increased uterine weight compared to that seen with lower E levels. Western blot analysis revealed that all E groups displayed an increase in uterine Bcl-2 protein levels compared to vehicle. We found that 2.5μg and 10μg E for 14 days increased levels of Bcl-2 gold immunolabeling compared to vehicle and 2.5μg E for 4 days in MeA, but not CeA. We measured Bcl-2 mRNA levels in vehicle and 2.5μg E for 14 days groups. There was a significant increase in Bcl-2 mRNA levels in MeA, but not CeA, of E-treated ovariectomized rats compared with vehicle controls. The E-induced increase in protein and mRNA levels of Bcl-2 in MeA may be important for neuroprotection in this region. PMID:18655204

  1. Preterm birth affects GABAA receptor subunit mRNA levels during the foetal-to-neonatal transition in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Shaw, J C; Palliser, H K; Walker, D W; Hirst, J J

    2015-06-01

    Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor signalling by the neurosteroid allopregnanolone has a major role in late gestation neurodevelopment. The objective of this study was to characterize the mRNA levels of GABAA receptor subunits (α4, α5, α6 and δ) that are key to neurosteroid binding in the brain, following preterm birth. Myelination, measured by the myelin basic protein immunostaining, was used to assess maturity of the preterm brains. Foetal guinea pig brains were obtained at 62 days' gestational age (GA, preterm) or at term (69 days). Neonates were delivered by caesarean section, at 62 days GA and term, and maintained until tissue collection at 24 h of age. Subunit mRNA levels were quantified by RT-PCR in the hippocampus and cerebellum of foetal and neonatal brains. Levels of the α6 and δ subunits were markedly lower in the cerebellum of preterm guinea pigs compared with term animals. Importantly, there was an increase in mRNA levels of these subunits during the foetal-to-neonatal transition at term, which was not seen following preterm birth. Myelination was lower in preterm neonatal brains, consistent with marked immaturity. Salivary cortisol concentrations, measured by EIA, were also higher for the preterm neonates, suggesting greater stress. We conclude that there is an adaptive increase in the levels of mRNA of the key GABAA receptor subunits involved in neurosteroid action after term birth, which may compensate for declining allopregnanolone levels. The lower levels of these subunits in preterm neonates may heighten the adverse effect of the premature decline in neurosteroid exposure. PMID:25661827

  2. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein C Proteins Interact with the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) Early 3′-Untranslated Region and Alleviate Suppression of HPV16 Late L1 mRNA Splicing*

    PubMed Central

    Dhanjal, Soniya; Kajitani, Naoko; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Johansson, Cecilia; Schwartz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify cellular factors that regulate human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) gene expression, cervical cancer cells permissive for HPV16 late gene expression were identified and characterized. These cells either contained a novel spliced variant of the L1 mRNAs that bypassed the suppressed HPV16 late, 5′-splice site SD3632; produced elevated levels of RNA-binding proteins SRSF1 (ASF/SF2), SRSF9 (SRp30c), and HuR that are known to regulate HPV16 late gene expression; or were shown by a gene expression array analysis to overexpress the RALYL RNA-binding protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) family. Overexpression of RALYL or hnRNP C1 induced HPV16 late gene expression from HPV16 subgenomic plasmids and from episomal forms of the full-length HPV16 genome. This induction was dependent on the HPV16 early untranslated region. Binding of hnRNP C1 to the HPV16 early, untranslated region activated HPV16 late 5′-splice site SD3632 and resulted in production of HPV16 L1 mRNAs. Our results suggested that hnRNP C1 controls HPV16 late gene expression. PMID:25878250

  3. When proteome meets genome: the alpha helix and the beta strand of proteins are eschewed by mRNA splice junctions and may define the minimal indivisible modules of protein architecture

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Sailen

    2008-01-01

    The significance of the intron-exon structure of genes is a mystery. As eukaryotic proteins are made up of modular functional domains, each exon was suspected to encode some form of module; however, the definition of a module remained vague. Comparison of pre-mRNA splice junctions with the three-dimensional architecture of its protein product from different eukaryotes revealed that the junctions were far less likely to occur inside the α-helices and β-strands of proteins than within the more flexible linker regions (‘turns’ and ‘loops’) connecting them. The splice junctions were equally distributed in the different types of linkers and throughout the linker sequence, although a slight preference for the central region of the linker was observed. The avoidance of the α-helix and the β-strand by splice junctions suggests the existence of a selection pressure against their disruption, perhaps underscoring the investment made by nature in building these intricate secondary structures. A corollary is that the helix and the strand are the smallest integral architectural units of a protein and represent the minimal modules in the evolution of protein structure. These results should find use in comparative genomics, designing of cloning strategies, and in the mutual verification of genome sequences with protein structures. PMID:15381847

  4. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein C Proteins Interact with the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 (HPV16) Early 3'-Untranslated Region and Alleviate Suppression of HPV16 Late L1 mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Dhanjal, Soniya; Kajitani, Naoko; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Johansson, Cecilia; Schwartz, Stefan

    2015-05-22

    In order to identify cellular factors that regulate human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) gene expression, cervical cancer cells permissive for HPV16 late gene expression were identified and characterized. These cells either contained a novel spliced variant of the L1 mRNAs that bypassed the suppressed HPV16 late, 5'-splice site SD3632; produced elevated levels of RNA-binding proteins SRSF1 (ASF/SF2), SRSF9 (SRp30c), and HuR that are known to regulate HPV16 late gene expression; or were shown by a gene expression array analysis to overexpress the RALYL RNA-binding protein of the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) family. Overexpression of RALYL or hnRNP C1 induced HPV16 late gene expression from HPV16 subgenomic plasmids and from episomal forms of the full-length HPV16 genome. This induction was dependent on the HPV16 early untranslated region. Binding of hnRNP C1 to the HPV16 early, untranslated region activated HPV16 late 5'-splice site SD3632 and resulted in production of HPV16 L1 mRNAs. Our results suggested that hnRNP C1 controls HPV16 late gene expression. PMID:25878250

  5. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  6. Exon skipping through the creation of a putative exonic splicing silencer as a consequence of the cystic fibrosis mutation R553X.

    PubMed

    Aznarez, Isabel; Zielenski, Julian; Rommens, Johanna M; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2007-05-01

    Nonsense mutations that occur more than 50 bases upstream of terminal spliced junctions are generally thought to lead to degradation of the corresponding transcripts by the process of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. It has also been proposed that some nonsense mutations may affect splicing by the process of nonsense-associated altered splicing (NAS), or by the disruption of a splicing regulatory element. In this study, the effect of the R553X mutation on the splicing of exon 11 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene was investigated. Evidence that R553X causes exon 11 to skip through the creation of a putative exonic splicing silencer (ESS) was provided. The putative ESS appears to be active when located immediately upstream of a 5' splice site. These findings argue against the possibility that R553X-associated exon 11 skipping is caused by NAS. The study further suggests that aminoglycoside antibiotic treatment would not be effective for patients with the R553X mutation, owing to the skipping of exon 11, and further emphasises the need for detailed mechanistic characterisation of the consequences of nonsense disease mutations. PMID:17475917

  7. Global variability in gene expression and alternative splicing is modulated by mitochondrial content.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raul; Rastrojo, Alberto; Neves, Ricardo; Lima, Ana; Aguado, Begoña; Iborra, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Noise in gene expression is a main determinant of phenotypic variability. Increasing experimental evidence suggests that genome-wide cellular constraints largely contribute to the heterogeneity observed in gene products. It is still unclear, however, which global factors affect gene expression noise and to what extent. Since eukaryotic gene expression is an energy demanding process, differences in the energy budget of each cell could determine gene expression differences. Here, we quantify the contribution of mitochondrial variability (a natural source of ATP variation) to global variability in gene expression. We find that changes in mitochondrial content can account for ∼50% of the variability observed in protein levels. This is the combined result of the effect of mitochondria dosage on transcription and translation apparatus content and activities. Moreover, we find that mitochondrial levels have a large impact on alternative splicing, thus modulating both the abundance and type of mRNAs. A simple mathematical model in which mitochondrial content simultaneously affects transcription rate and splicing site choice can explain the alternative splicing data. The results of this study show that mitochondrial content (and/or probably function) influences mRNA abundance, translation, and alternative splicing, which ultimately affects cellular phenotype. PMID:25800673

  8. MicroRNA844-Guided Downregulation of Cytidinephosphate Diacylglycerol Synthase3 (CDS3) mRNA Affects the Response of Arabidopsis thaliana to Bacteria and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa Jung; Park, Young Ju; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Kim, Donghyun; Park, June Hyun; Lim, Jae Yun; Shin, Chanseok; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Kang, Hunseung

    2015-08-01

    Despite the fact that a large number of miRNA sequences have been determined in diverse plant species, reports demonstrating the functional roles of miRNAs in the plant response to pathogens are severely limited. Here, Arabidopsis thaliana miRNA844 (miR844) was investigated for its functional role in the defense response to diverse pathogens. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing miR844 (35S::miR844) displayed much more severe disease symptoms than the wild-type plants when challenged with the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 or the fungus Botrytis cinerea. By contrast, a loss-of-function mir844 mutant showed an enhanced resistance against the pathogens. Although no cleavage was observed at the predicted cleavage site of the putative target mRNA, cytidinephosphate diacylglycerol synthase3 (CDS3), cleavage was observed at 6, 12, 21, or 52 bases upstream of the predicted cleavage site of CDS3 mRNA, and the level of CDS3 mRNA was downregulated by the overexpression of miR844, implying that miR844 influences CDS3 transcript level. To further confirm that the miR844-mediated defense response was due to the decrease in CDS3 mRNA level, the disease response of a CDS3 loss-of-function mutant was analyzed upon pathogen challenge. Increased susceptibility of both cds3 mutant and 35S::miR844 plants to pathogens confirmed that miR844 affected the defense response by downregulating CDS3 mRNA. The expression of miR844 was decreased, and the CDS3 transcript level increased upon pathogen challenge. Taken together, these results provide evidence that downregulation of miR844 and a concomitant increase in CDS3 expression is a defensive response of Arabidopsis to bacteria and fungi. PMID:25775269

  9. ida4-1, ida4-2, and ida4-3 are intron splicing mutations affecting the locus encoding p28, a light chain of Chlamydomonas axonemal inner dynein arms.

    PubMed Central

    LeDizet, M; Piperno, G

    1995-01-01

    We recently determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding p28, a light chain of inner dynein arms of Chlamydomonas axonemes. Here, we show that p28 is the protein encoded by the IDA4 locus. p28, and the dynein heavy chains normally associated with it, are completely absent from the flagella and cell bodies of three allelic strains of ida4, named ida4-1, ida4-2, and ida4-3. We determined the nucleotide sequence of the three alleles of the p28 gene and found in each case a single nucleotide change, affecting the splice sites of the first, second, and fourth introns, respectively. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction amplification of RNAs prepared from ida4 cells confirmed that these mutations prevent the correct splicing of the affected introns, thereby blocking the synthesis of full-length p28. These are the first intron splicing mutations described in Chlamydomonas and the first inner dynein arm mutations characterized at the molecular level. The absence in ida4 axonemes of the dynein heavy chains normally found in association with p28 suggests that p28 is necessary for stable assembly of a subset of inner dynein arms or for the binding of these arms to the microtubule doublets. Images PMID:7579690

  10. Evolutionary Insights into RNA trans-Splicing in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Quan; Li, Cong; Zuo, Zhixiang; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2016-01-01

    Pre-RNA splicing is an essential step in generating mature mRNA. RNA trans-splicing combines two separate pre-mRNA molecules to form a chimeric non-co-linear RNA, which may exert a function distinct from its original molecules. Trans-spliced RNAs may encode novel proteins or serve as noncoding or regulatory RNAs. These novel RNAs not only increase the complexity of the proteome but also provide new regulatory mechanisms for gene expression. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that trans-splicing occurs frequently in both physiological and pathological processes. In addition, mRNA reprogramming based on trans-splicing has been successfully applied in RNA-based therapies for human genetic diseases. Nevertheless, clarifying the extent and evolution of trans-splicing in vertebrates and developing detection methods for trans-splicing remain challenging. In this review, we summarize previous research, highlight recent advances in trans-splicing, and discuss possible splicing mechanisms and functions from an evolutionary viewpoint. PMID:26966239

  11. Mapping of the UGT1A locus identifies an uncommon coding variant that affects mRNA expression and protects from bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wei; Fu, Yi-Ping; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Malats, Núria; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Kogevinas, Manolis; Baris, Dalsu; Thun, Michael; Hall, Jennifer L.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Albanes, Demetrius; Porter-Gill, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P.; Burdett, Laurie; Liu, Luyang; Hutchinson, Amy; Myers, Timothy; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Karagas, Margaret R.; Schned, Alan; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Eric J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Silverman, Debra T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study of bladder cancer identified the UGT1A gene cluster on chromosome 2q37.1 as a novel susceptibility locus. The UGT1A cluster encodes a family of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), which facilitate cellular detoxification and removal of aromatic amines. Bioactivated forms of aromatic amines found in tobacco smoke and industrial chemicals are the main risk factors for bladder cancer. The association within the UGT1A locus was detected by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs11892031. Now, we performed detailed resequencing, imputation and genotyping in this region. We clarified the original genetic association detected by rs11892031 and identified an uncommon SNP rs17863783 that explained and strengthened the association in this region (allele frequency 0.014 in 4035 cases and 0.025 in 5284 controls, OR = 0.55, 95%CI = 0.44–0.69, P = 3.3 × 10−7). Rs17863783 is a synonymous coding variant Val209Val within the functional UGT1A6.1 splicing form, strongly expressed in the liver, kidney and bladder. We found the protective T allele of rs17863783 to be associated with increased mRNA expression of UGT1A6.1 in in-vitro exontrap assays and in human liver tissue samples. We suggest that rs17863783 may protect from bladder cancer by increasing the removal of carcinogens from bladder epithelium by the UGT1A6.1 protein. Our study shows an example of genetic and functional role of an uncommon protective genetic variant in a complex human disease, such as bladder cancer. PMID:22228101

  12. Analysis of cellulose synthase genes from domesticated apple identifies collinear genes WDR53 and CesA8A: partial co-expression, bicistronic mRNA, and alternative splicing of CESA8A

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Spadiut, Oliver; Kerschbamer, Christine; Giorno, Filomena; Baric, Sanja; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes constitute a complex multigene family with six major phylogenetic clades in angiosperms. The recently sequenced genome of domestic apple, Malus×domestica, was mined for CesA genes, by blasting full-length cellulose synthase protein (CESA) sequences annotated in the apple genome against protein databases from the plant models Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Thirteen genes belonging to the six angiosperm CesA clades and coding for proteins with conserved residues typical of processive glycosyltransferases from family 2 were detected. Based on their phylogenetic relationship to Arabidopsis CESAs, as well as expression patterns, a nomenclature is proposed to facilitate further studies. Examination of their genomic organization revealed that MdCesA8-A is closely linked and co-oriented with WDR53, a gene coding for a WD40 repeat protein. The WDR53 and CesA8 genes display conserved collinearity in dicots and are partially co-expressed in the apple xylem. Interestingly, the presence of a bicistronic WDR53–CesA8A transcript was detected in phytoplasma-infected phloem tissues of apple. The bicistronic transcript contains a spliced intergenic sequence that is predicted to fold into hairpin structures typical of internal ribosome entry sites, suggesting its potential cap-independent translation. Surprisingly, the CesA8A cistron is alternatively spliced and lacks the zinc-binding domain. The possible roles of WDR53 and the alternatively spliced CESA8 variant during cellulose biosynthesis in M.×domestica are discussed. PMID:23048131

  13. Involvement of the nuclear cap-binding protein complex in alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Raczynska, Katarzyna Dorota; Simpson, Craig G.; Ciesiolka, Adam; Szewc, Lukasz; Lewandowska, Dominika; McNicol, Jim; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Brown, John W. S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear cap-binding protein complex (CBC) participates in 5′ splice site selection of introns that are proximal to the mRNA cap. However, it is not known whether CBC has a role in alternative splicing. Using an RT–PCR alternative splicing panel, we analysed 435 alternative splicing events in Arabidopsis thaliana genes, encoding mainly transcription factors, splicing factors and stress-related proteins. Splicing profiles were determined in wild type plants, the cbp20 and cbp80(abh1) single mutants and the cbp20/80 double mutant. The alternative splicing events included alternative 5′ and 3′ splice site selection, exon skipping and intron retention. Significant changes in the ratios of alternative splicing isoforms were found in 101 genes. Of these, 41% were common to all three CBC mutants and 15% were observed only in the double mutant. The cbp80(abh1) and cbp20/80 mutants had many more changes in alternative splicing in common than did cbp20 and cbp20/80 suggesting that CBP80 plays a more significant role in alternative splicing than CBP20, probably being a platform for interactions with other splicing factors. Cap-binding proteins and the CBC are therefore directly involved in alternative splicing of some Arabidopsis genes and in most cases influenced alternative splicing of the first intron, particularly at the 5′ splice site. PMID:19864257

  14. Gene and alternative splicing annotation with AIR

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Liliana; Di Francesco, Valentina; Miller, Jason; Turner, Russell; Yao, Alison; Harris, Michael; Walenz, Brian; Mobarry, Clark; Merkulov, Gennady V.; Charlab, Rosane; Dew, Ian; Deng, Zuoming; Istrail, Sorin; Li, Peter; Sutton, Granger

    2005-01-01

    Designing effective and accurate tools for identifying the functional and structural elements in a genome remains at the frontier of genome annotation owing to incompleteness and inaccuracy of the data, limitations in the computational models, and shifting paradigms in genomics, such as alternative splicing. We present a methodology for the automated annotation of genes and their alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts based on existing cDNA and protein sequence evidence from the same species or projected from a related species using syntenic mapping information. At the core of the method is the splice graph, a compact representation of a gene, its exons, introns, and alternatively spliced isoforms. The putative transcripts are enumerated from the graph and assigned confidence scores based on the strength of sequence evidence, and a subset of the high-scoring candidates are selected and promoted into the annotation. The method is highly selective, eliminating the unlikely candidates while retaining 98% of the high-quality mRNA evidence in well-formed transcripts, and produces annotation that is measurably more accurate than some evidence-based gene sets. The process is fast, accurate, and fully automated, and combines the traditionally distinct gene annotation and alternative splicing detection processes in a comprehensive and systematic way, thus considerably aiding in the ensuing manual curation efforts. PMID:15632090

  15. Splicing mutations in glycogen-storage disease type II: evaluation of the full spectrum of mutations and their relation to patients' phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Stefania; Buratti, Emanuele; Dominissini, Silvia; Montalvo, Anna Lisa; Pittis, Maria Gabriela; Bembi, Bruno; Dardis, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen-storage disease type II is an autosomal recessive-inherited disorder due to the deficiency of acid α-glucosidase. A large number of mutations in the acid α-glucosidase gene have been described to date. Among them, ∼15% are variations that may affect mRNA splicing process. In this study, we have for the first time comprehensively reviewed the available information on splicing mutations of the acid α-glucosidase gene and we have evaluated their possible impact on the splicing process using different in silico approaches. Out of the 39 different GAA-sequence variations described, an in silico analysis using seven different programs showed that 97% of them are predicted to have an impact on the splicing process. Moreover, this analysis showed a quite good correlation between the impact of the mutation on the splicing process and the clinical phenotype. In addition, we have performed the functional characterization of three novel sequence variants found in Italian patients and still uncharacterized. Using a minigene system, we have confirmed their pathogenic nature. In conclusion, this study has shown that in silico analysis represents a useful tool to select mutations that affect the splicing process of the acid α-glucosidase gene and provides an updated picture of all this kind of mutations reported till now. PMID:21179066

  16. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  17. Subgroup Specific Alternative Splicing in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kloosterhof, Nanne K; Northcott, Paul A; Yu, Emily PY; Shih, David; Peacock, John; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; van Meter, Timothy; Eberhart, Charles G; Pfister, Stefan; Marra, Marco A; Weiss, William A; Scherer, Stephen W; Rutka, James T; French, Pim J; Taylor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is comprised of four distinct molecular variants: WNT, SHH, Group 3, and Group 4. We analyzed alternative splicing usage in 14 normal cerebellar samples and 103 medulloblastomas of known subgroup. Medulloblastoma samples have a statistically significant increase in alternative splicing as compared to normal fetal cerebella (2.3-times; P<6.47E-8). Splicing patterns are distinct and specific between molecular subgroups. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of alternative splicing events accurately assigns medulloblastomas to their correct subgroup. Subgroup-specific splicing and alternative promoter usage was most prevalent in Group 3 (19.4%) and SHH (16.2%) medulloblastomas, while observed less frequently in WNT (3.2%), and Group 4 (9.3%) tumors. Functional annotation of alternatively spliced genes reveals over-representation of genes important for neuronal development. Alternative splicing events in medulloblastoma may be regulated in part by the correlative expression of antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism affecting subgroup specific alternative splicing. Our results identify additional candidate markers for medulloblastoma subgroup affiliation, further support the existence of distinct subgroups of the disease, and demonstrate an additional level of transcriptional heterogeneity between medulloblastoma subgroups. PMID:22358458

  18. Regulation of PMP22 mRNA by G3BP1 affects cell proliferation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of mRNAs is one way to control protein levels and thereby important cellular processes such as growth, invasion and apoptosis. G3BPs constitute a family of mRNA-binding proteins, shown to be overexpressed in several cancer types, including breast, colon and pancreas cancer. G3BP has been reported to both stabilize and induce degradation of specific mRNAs. Results Here, we show that G3BP1, but not G3BP2, supports proliferation of several breast cancer cell lines. Global gene expression analyses of G3BP1- and G3BP2-depleted cells indicate that primarily G3BP1, and much less G3BP2, influences mRNA expression levels. Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) was one gene that was significantly influenced by G3BP1 depletion which led to a 2–3 fold increased expression. Depletion of PMP22 resulted in increased proliferation and the G3BP1-mediated effect on proliferation was not seen upon PMP22-depletion. Conclusions This indicates a novel role for G3BP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in breast cancer cells, perhaps via a regulatory effect on PMP22 expression. PMID:24321297

  19. RNA splicing factors as oncoproteins and tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Dvinge, Heidi; Kim, Eunhee; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Bradley, Robert K

    2016-07-01

    The recent genomic characterization of cancers has revealed recurrent somatic point mutations and copy number changes affecting genes encoding RNA splicing factors. Initial studies of these 'spliceosomal mutations' suggest that the proteins bearing these mutations exhibit altered splice site and/or exon recognition preferences relative to their wild-type counterparts, resulting in cancer-specific mis-splicing. Such changes in the splicing machinery may create novel vulnerabilities in cancer cells that can be therapeutically exploited using compounds that can influence the splicing process. Further studies to dissect the biochemical, genomic and biological effects of spliceosomal mutations are crucial for the development of cancer therapies targeted at these mutations. PMID:27282250

  20. Enhancement of Transcription by a Splicing-Competent Intron Is Dependent on Promoter Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Neha; Ansari, Athar

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of transcription by a splicing-competent intron is an evolutionarily conserved feature among eukaryotes. The molecular mechanism underlying the phenomenon, however, is not entirely clear. Here we show that the intron is an important regulator of promoter directionality. Employing strand-specific transcription run-on (TRO) analysis, we show that the transcription of mRNA is favored over the upstream anti-sense transcripts (uaRNA) initiating from the promoter in the presence of an intron. Mutation of either the 5′ or 3′ splice site resulted in the reversal of promoter directionality, thereby suggesting that it is not merely the 5′ splice site but the entire splicing-competent intron that regulates transcription directionality. ChIP analysis revealed the recruitment of termination factors near the promoter region in the presence of an intron. Removal of intron or the mutation of splice sites adversely affected the promoter localization of termination factors. We have earlier demonstrated that the intron-mediated enhancement of transcription is dependent on gene looping. Here we show that gene looping is crucial for the recruitment of termination factors in the promoter-proximal region of an intron-containing gene. In a looping-defective mutant, despite normal splicing, the promoter occupancy of factors required for poly(A)-dependent termination of transcription was compromised. This was accompanied by a concomitant loss of transcription directionality. On the basis of these results, we propose that the intron-dependent gene looping places the terminator-bound factors in the vicinity of the promoter region for termination of the promoter-initiated upstream antisense transcription, thereby conferring promoter directionality. PMID:27152651

  1. Serine Arginine Splicing Factor 3 Is Involved in Enhanced Splicing of Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase RNA in Response to Nutrients and Hormones in Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Callee M.; Suchanek, Amanda L.; Cyphert, Travis J.; Kohan, Alison B.; Szeszel-Fedorowicz, Wioletta; Salati, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Expression of G6PD is controlled by changes in the degree of splicing of the G6PD mRNA in response to nutrients in the diet. This regulation involves an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 12 of the mRNA. Using the G6PD model, we demonstrate that nutrients and hormones control the activity of serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of splicing co-activators, and thereby regulate the splicing of G6PD mRNA. In primary rat hepatocyte cultures, insulin increased the amount of phosphorylated SR proteins, and this effect was counteracted by arachidonic acid. The results of RNA affinity analysis with nuclear extracts from intact liver demonstrated that the SR splicing factor proteins SRSF3 and SRSF4 bound to the G6PD ESE. Consequently, siRNA-mediated depletion of SRSF3, but not SRSF4, in liver cells inhibited accumulation of both mRNA expressed from a minigene containing exon 12 and the endogenous G6PD mRNA. Consistent with the functional role of SRSF3 in regulating splicing, SRSF3 was observed to bind to the ESE in both intact cells and in animals using RNA immunoprecipitation analysis. Furthermore, refeeding significantly increased the binding of SRSF3 coincident with increased splicing and expression of G6PD. Together, these data establish that nutritional regulation of SRSF3 activity is involved in the differential splicing of the G6PD transcript in response to nutrients. Nutritional regulation of other SR proteins presents a regulatory mechanism that could cause widespread changes in mRNA splicing. Nutrients are therefore novel regulators of mRNA splicing. PMID:23233666

  2. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis. PMID:26671123

  3. The evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, Jonathan; Harrison, Neale; Stansfield, Ian; Connolly, Bernadette; Müller, Berndt

    2010-08-01

    Spliced leader trans-splicing occurs in many primitive eukaryotes including nematodes. Most of our knowledge of trans-splicing in nematodes stems from the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans and relatives, and from work with Ascaris. Our investigation of spliced leader trans-splicing in distantly related Dorylaimia nematodes indicates that spliced-leader trans-splicing arose before the nematode phylum and suggests that the spliced leader RNA gene complements in extant nematodes have evolved from a common ancestor with a diverse set of spliced leader RNA genes. PMID:20659016

  4. A synonymous mutation in SPINK5 exon 11 causes Netherton syndrome by altering exonic splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Paola; Grosso, Fabiana; Zambruno, Giovanna; Pastore, Serena; Faletra, Flavio; Castiglia, Daniele

    2012-05-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a rare, life-threatening ichthyosiform syndrome caused by recessive loss-of-function mutations in SPINK5 gene encoding lymphoepithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor (LEKTI), a serine protease inhibitor expressed in the most differentiated epidermal layers and crucial for skin barrier function. We report the functional characterization of a previously unrecognized synonymous variant, c.891C>T (p.Cys297Cys), identified in the SPINK5 exon 11 of an NS patient. We demonstrated that the c.891C>T mutation is associated with abnormal pre-mRNA splicing and residual LEKTI expression in the patient's keratinocytes. Subsequent minigene splicing assays and in silico predictions confirmed the direct role of the synonymous mutation in inhibiting exon 11 inclusion by a mechanism that involves the activity of exonic regulatory sequences, namely splicing enhancer and silencer. However, this deleterious effect was not complete and a residual amount of normal mRNA and LEKTI protein could be detected, correlating with the relatively mild patient's phenotype. Our study represents the first identification of a disease-causing SPINK5 mutation that alters splicing without affecting canonical splice sites. PMID:22377713

  5. Identification of RNA splicing errors resulting in human ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Carstens, R P; Fenton, W A; Rosenberg, L R

    1991-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) is an X-linked, liver-specific enzyme that catalyzes the second step of the urea cycle. In humans, inherited deficiency of OTC in hemizygous affected males usually results in severe ammonia intoxication and early death. To characterize mutations responsible for OTC deficiency, we used the PCR to amplify cDNAs prepared from patient livers which demonstrated no OTC enzyme activity and no OTC cross-reacting material on western blots. In three of seven cases, smaller than normal products were observed. Sequencing of these cDNAs revealed that two were missing exon 7 of the OTC gene and that the other was missing the first 12 bp of exon 5. Sequencing of genomic DNA from these three patients revealed that one mutant missing exon 7 had a T-to-C substitution in the 5' splice donor site of intron 7. The other mutant missing exon 7 had an A-to-G change in the third position of intron 7. It is interesting that both of these mutations resulted in skipping the preceding exon rather than in inclusion of some or all of the affected intron. In the third mutant, an A-to-T substitution was found in the 3' splice acceptor site at the end of intron 4. Here, a cryptic splice acceptor site within exon 5 was used. Northern blotting of liver RNA from these patients demonstrated (a) reduced, but significant, amounts of OTC mRNA in one of the patients who had a deleted exon 7 but (b) very little OTC mRNA in the other two patients. We propose that these point mutations, which result in aberrant splicing of the OTC pre-mRNAs, lead to OTC deficiency through either decreased efficiency of mRNA export from the nucleus to the cytosol or synthesis of enzyme subunits that are unstable and rapidly degraded. We speculate that abnormal mRNA splicing may represent a relatively common mechanism in the pathogenesis of this disease. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2035531

  6. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M G; Pinto, Yigal M; Creemers, Esther E

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new functional protein (function) is likely to be retained, and this way, the genome has gradually evolved to encode for genes with multiple isoforms, thereby creating an enormously diverse transcriptome. Advances in technologies to characterize RNA populations have led to a better understanding of RNA processing in health and disease. In the heart, alternative splicing is increasingly being recognized as an important layer of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Moreover, the recent identification of several cardiac splice factors, such as RNA-binding motif protein 20 and SF3B1, not only provided important insight into the mechanisms underlying alternative splicing but also revealed how these splicing factors impact functional properties of the heart. Here, we review our current knowledge of alternative splicing in the heart, with a particular focus on the major and minor spliceosome, the factors controlling RNA splicing, and the role of alternative splicing in cardiac development and disease. PMID:26846640

  7. Viral interactions with components of the splicing machinery.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes are often interrupted by stretches of sequence with no protein coding potential or obvious function. After transcription, these interrupting sequences must be removed to give rise to the mature messenger RNA. This fundamental process is called RNA splicing and is achieved by complicated machinery made of protein and RNA that assembles around the RNA to be edited. Viruses also use RNA splicing to maximize their coding potential and economize on genetic space, and use clever strategies to manipulate the splicing machinery to their advantage. This article gives an overview of the splicing process and provides examples of viral strategies that make use of various components of the splicing system to promote their replicative cycle. Representative virus families have been selected to illustrate the interaction with various regulatory proteins and ribonucleoproteins. The unifying theme is fine regulation through protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions with the spliceosome components and associated factors to promote or prevent spliceosome assembly on given splice sites, in addition to a strong influence from cis-regulatory sequences on viral transcripts. Because there is an intimate coupling of splicing with the processes that direct mRNA biogenesis, a description of how these viruses couple the regulation of splicing with the retention or stability of mRNAs is also included. It seems that a unique balance of suppression and activation of splicing and nuclear export works optimally for each family of viruses. PMID:27571697

  8. A mutation in the Srrm4 gene causes alternative splicing defects and deafness in the Bronx waltzer mouse.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yoko; Jahan, Israt; Bonde, Gregory; Sun, Xingshen; Hildebrand, Michael S; Engelhardt, John F; Smith, Richard J H; Cornell, Robert A; Fritzsch, Bernd; Bánfi, Botond

    2012-01-01

    Sensory hair cells are essential for hearing and balance. Their development from epithelial precursors has been extensively characterized with respect to transcriptional regulation, but not in terms of posttranscriptional influences. Here we report on the identification and functional characterization of an alternative-splicing regulator whose inactivation is responsible for defective hair-cell development, deafness, and impaired balance in the spontaneous mutant Bronx waltzer (bv) mouse. We used positional cloning and transgenic rescue to locate the bv mutation to the splicing factor-encoding gene Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (Srrm4). Transcriptome-wide analysis of pre-mRNA splicing in the sensory patches of embryonic inner ears revealed that specific alternative exons were skipped at abnormally high rates in the bv mice. Minigene experiments in a heterologous expression system confirmed that these skipped exons require Srrm4 for inclusion into the mature mRNA. Sequence analysis and mutagenesis experiments showed that the affected transcripts share a novel motif that is necessary for the Srrm4-dependent alternative splicing. Functional annotations and protein-protein interaction data indicated that the encoded proteins cluster in the secretion and neurotransmission pathways. In addition, the splicing of a few transcriptional regulators was found to be Srrm4 dependent, and several of the genes known to be targeted by these regulators were expressed at reduced levels in the bv mice. Although Srrm4 expression was detected in neural tissues as well as hair cells, analyses of the bv mouse cerebellum and neocortex failed to detect splicing defects. Our data suggest that Srrm4 function is critical in the hearing and balance organs, but not in all neural tissues. Srrm4 is the first alternative-splicing regulator to be associated with hearing, and the analysis of bv mice provides exon-level insights into hair-cell development. PMID:23055939

  9. Designing oligo libraries taking alternative splicing into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoshan, Avi; Grebinskiy, Vladimir; Magen, Avner; Scolnicov, Ariel; Fink, Eyal; Lehavi, David; Wasserman, Alon

    2001-06-01

    We have designed sequences for DNA microarrays and oligo libraries, taking alternative splicing into account. Alternative splicing is a common phenomenon, occurring in more than 25% of the human genes. In many cases, different splice variants have different functions, are expressed in different tissues or may indicate different stages of disease. When designing sequences for DNA microarrays or oligo libraries, it is very important to take into account the sequence information of all the mRNA transcripts. Therefore, when a gene has more than one transcript (as a result of alternative splicing, alternative promoter sites or alternative poly-adenylation sites), it is very important to take all of them into account in the design. We have used the LEADS transcriptome prediction system to cluster and assemble the human sequences in GenBank and design optimal oligonucleotides for all the human genes with a known mRNA sequence based on the LEADS predictions.

  10. IRAS: High-Throughput Identification of Novel Alternative Splicing Regulators.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a fundamental regulatory process of gene expression. Defects in alternative splicing can lead to various diseases, and modification of disease-causing splicing events presents great therapeutic promise. Splicing outcome is commonly affected by extracellular stimuli and signaling cascades that converge on RNA-binding splicing regulators. These trans-acting factors recognize cis-elements in pre-mRNA transcripts to affect spliceosome assembly and splice site choices. Identification of these splicing regulators and/or upstream modulators has been difficult and traditionally done by piecemeal. High-throughput screening strategies to find multiple regulators of exon splicing have great potential to accelerate the discovery process, but typically confront low sensitivity and low specificity of screening assays. Here we describe a unique screening strategy, IRAS (identifying regulators of alternative splicing), using a pair of dual-output minigene reporters to allow for sensitive detection of exon splicing changes. Each dual-output reporter produces green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fluorescent signals to assay the two spliced isoforms exclusively. The two complementary minigene reporters alter GFP/RFP output ratios in the opposite direction in response to splicing change. Applying IRAS in cell-based high-throughput screens allows sensitive and specific identification of splicing regulators and modulators for any alternative exons of interest. In comparison to previous high-throughput screening methods, IRAS substantially enhances the specificity of the screening assay. This strategy significantly eliminates false positives without sacrificing sensitive identification of true regulators of splicing. PMID:27241759

  11. Ginkgo biloba extract and its flavonol and terpenelactone fractions do not affect beta-secretase mRNA and enzyme activity levels in cultured neurons and in mice.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Sabine; Huebbe, Patricia; Matzner, Nicole; Augustin, Kay; Schliebs, Reinhard; Cermak, Rainer; Wolffram, Siegfried; Rimbach, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Numerous clinical trials have reported beneficial effects of the Ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 in the prevention and therapy of cognitive disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although neuroprotective properties of EGb761 have been consistently reported, the molecular mechanisms of EGb761 and the specific role of its major constituents, the flavonols and terpenlactones, are largely unknown. One major hallmark of AD is the deposition of amyloid-beta (A beta) as amyloid plaques in the brain. A beta is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Certain proteases, called beta-secretases (BACE), are crucial in the formation of A beta. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of EGb761 and its flavonol and terpenelactone fraction to modulate BACE-1 enzyme activity and mRNA levels in vitro and in vivo. Neither EGb761 nor its fractions affected BACE-1 activity in vitro. Furthermore, also in Neuro-2a cells and wild-type as well as transgenic (Tg2576) laboratory mice, no significant effect of EGb761 on BACE-1 enzyme activity and mRNA levels were observed. Current findings suggest that BACE-1 may not be a major molecular target of EGb761 and its flavonol and terpenelactone fraction. PMID:18186016

  12. Anguillicola crassus Infection Significantly Affects the Silvering Related Modifications in Steady State mRNA Levels in Gas Gland Tissue of the European Eel.

    PubMed

    Pelster, Bernd; Schneebauer, Gabriel; Dirks, Ron P

    2016-01-01

    Using Illumina sequencing, transcriptional changes occurring during silvering in swimbladder tissue of the European eel have been analyzed by comparison of yellow and silver eel tissue samples. Functional annotation analysis based on GO terms revealed significant expression changes in a number of genes related to the extracellular matrix, important for the control of gas permeability of the swimbladder, and to reactive oxygen species (ROS) defense, important to cope with ROS generated under hyperbaric oxygen partial pressures. Focusing on swimbladder tissue metabolism, levels of several mRNA species encoding glucose transport proteins were several-fold higher in silver eels, while enzymes of the glycolytic pathway were not affected. The significantly higher steady state level of a transcript encoding for membrane bound carbonic anhydrase, however, suggested that CO2 production in the pentose phosphate shunt and diffusion of CO2 was of particular importance in silver eel swimbladder. In addition, the mRNA level of a large number of genes related to immune response and to sexual maturation was significantly modified in the silver eel swimbladder. The modification of several processes related to protein metabolism and transport, cell cycle, and apoptosis suggested that these changes in swimbladder metabolism and permeability were achieved by increasing cell turn-over. The impact of an infection of the swimbladder with the nematode Anguillicola crassus has been assessed by comparing these expression changes with expression changes observed between uninfected yellow eel swimbladder tissue and infected silver eel swimbladder tissue. In contrast to uninfected silver eel swimbladder tissue, in infected tissue the mRNA level of several glycolytic enzymes was significantly elevated, and with respect to extracellular matrix, several mucin genes were many-fold higher in their mRNA level. Modification of many immune related genes and of the functional categories "response to

  13. Anguillicola crassus Infection Significantly Affects the Silvering Related Modifications in Steady State mRNA Levels in Gas Gland Tissue of the European Eel

    PubMed Central

    Pelster, Bernd; Schneebauer, Gabriel; Dirks, Ron P.

    2016-01-01

    Using Illumina sequencing, transcriptional changes occurring during silvering in swimbladder tissue of the European eel have been analyzed by comparison of yellow and silver eel tissue samples. Functional annotation analysis based on GO terms revealed significant expression changes in a number of genes related to the extracellular matrix, important for the control of gas permeability of the swimbladder, and to reactive oxygen species (ROS) defense, important to cope with ROS generated under hyperbaric oxygen partial pressures. Focusing on swimbladder tissue metabolism, levels of several mRNA species encoding glucose transport proteins were several-fold higher in silver eels, while enzymes of the glycolytic pathway were not affected. The significantly higher steady state level of a transcript encoding for membrane bound carbonic anhydrase, however, suggested that CO2 production in the pentose phosphate shunt and diffusion of CO2 was of particular importance in silver eel swimbladder. In addition, the mRNA level of a large number of genes related to immune response and to sexual maturation was significantly modified in the silver eel swimbladder. The modification of several processes related to protein metabolism and transport, cell cycle, and apoptosis suggested that these changes in swimbladder metabolism and permeability were achieved by increasing cell turn-over. The impact of an infection of the swimbladder with the nematode Anguillicola crassus has been assessed by comparing these expression changes with expression changes observed between uninfected yellow eel swimbladder tissue and infected silver eel swimbladder tissue. In contrast to uninfected silver eel swimbladder tissue, in infected tissue the mRNA level of several glycolytic enzymes was significantly elevated, and with respect to extracellular matrix, several mucin genes were many-fold higher in their mRNA level. Modification of many immune related genes and of the functional categories “response to

  14. The PBDE metabolite 6-OH-BDE 47 affects melanin pigmentation and THRβ MRNA expression in the eye of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wu; Macaulay, Laura J; Kwok, Kevin WH; Hinton, David E; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers and their hydroxyl-metabolites (OH-BDEs) are commonly detected contaminants in human serum in the US population. They are also considered to be endocrine disruptors, and are specifically known to affect thyroid hormone regulation. In this study, we investigated and compared the effects of a PBDE and its OH-BDE metabolite on developmental pathways regulated by thyroid hormones using zebrafish as a model. Exposure to 6-OHBDE 47 (10–100 nM), but not BDE 47 (1–50 μM), led to decreased melanin pigmentation and increased apoptosis in the retina of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner in short-term exposures (4 – 30 hours). Six-OH-BDE 47 exposure also significantly decreased thyroid hormone receptor β (THRβ) mRNA expression, which was confirmed using both RT-PCR and in situ hybridization (whole mount and paraffin- section). Interestingly, exposure to the native thyroid hormone, triiodothyronine (T3) also led to similar responses: decreased THRβ mRNA expression, decreased melanin pigmentation and increased apoptosis, suggesting that 6-OH-BDE 47 may be acting as a T3 mimic. To further investigate short-term effects that may be regulated by THRβ, experiments using a morpholino gene knock down and THRβ mRNA over expression were conducted. Knock down of THRβ led to decreases in melanin pigmentation and increases in apoptotic cells in the eye of zebrafish embryos, similar to exposure to T3 and 6-OH-BDE 47, but THRβ mRNA overexpression rescued these effects. Histological analysis of eyes at 22 hpf from each group revealed that exposure to T3 or to 6-OH-BDE 47 was associated with a decrease of melanin and diminished proliferation of cells in layers of retina near the choroid. This study suggests that 6-OH-BDE 47 disrupts the activity of THRβ in early life stages of zebrafish, and warrants further studies on effects in developing humans. PMID:25767823

  15. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression. PMID:27572970

  16. Co-transcriptional commitment to alternative splice site selection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G C; Gooding, C; Mak, H Y; Proudfoot, N J; Smith, C W

    1998-12-15

    Production of mRNA in eukaryotic cells involves not only transcription but also various processing reactions such as splicing. Recent experiments have indicated that there are direct physical connections between components of the transcription and processing machinery, supporting previous suggestions that pre-mRNA splicing occurs co-transcriptionally. Here we have used a novel functional approach to demonstrate co-transcriptional regulation of alternative splicing. Exon 3 of the alpha-tropomyosin gene is specifically repressed in smooth muscle cells. By delaying synthesis of an essential downstream inhibitory element, we show that the decision to splice or repress exon 3 occurs during a limited window of opportunity following transcription, indicating that splice site selection proceeds rapidly after transcription. PMID:9837984

  17. RNA splicing. The human splicing code reveals new insights into the genetic determinants of disease.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Hui Y; Alipanahi, Babak; Lee, Leo J; Bretschneider, Hannes; Merico, Daniele; Yuen, Ryan K C; Hua, Yimin; Gueroussov, Serge; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Hughes, Timothy R; Morris, Quaid; Barash, Yoseph; Krainer, Adrian R; Jojic, Nebojsa; Scherer, Stephen W; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Frey, Brendan J

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate precision medicine and whole-genome annotation, we developed a machine-learning technique that scores how strongly genetic variants affect RNA splicing, whose alteration contributes to many diseases. Analysis of more than 650,000 intronic and exonic variants revealed widespread patterns of mutation-driven aberrant splicing. Intronic disease mutations that are more than 30 nucleotides from any splice site alter splicing nine times as often as common variants, and missense exonic disease mutations that have the least impact on protein function are five times as likely as others to alter splicing. We detected tens of thousands of disease-causing mutations, including those involved in cancers and spinal muscular atrophy. Examination of intronic and exonic variants found using whole-genome sequencing of individuals with autism revealed misspliced genes with neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our approach provides evidence for causal variants and should enable new discoveries in precision medicine. PMID:25525159

  18. Quantification of pre-mRNA escape rate and synergy in splicing

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Voegeli, Sylvia; Baudrimont, Antoine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Becskei, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Splicing reactions generally combine high speed with accuracy. However, some of the pre-mRNAs escape the nucleus with a retained intron. Intron retention can control gene expression and increase proteome diversity. We calculated the escape rate for the yeast PTC7 intron and pre-mRNA. This prediction was facilitated by the observation that splicing is a linear process and by deriving simple algebraic expressions from a model of co- and post-transcriptional splicing and RNA surveillance that determines the rate of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the pre-mRNAs with the retained intron. The escape rate was consistent with the observed threshold of splicing rate below which the mature mRNA level declined. When an mRNA contains multiple introns, the outcome of splicing becomes more difficult to predict since not only the escape rate of the pre-mRNA has to be considered, but also the possibility that the splicing of each intron is influenced by the others. We showed that the two adjacent introns in the SUS1 mRNA are spliced cooperatively, but this does not counteract the escape of the partially spliced mRNA. These findings will help to infer promoter activity and to predict the behavior of and to control splicing regulatory networks. PMID:25352554

  19. Quantification of pre-mRNA escape rate and synergy in splicing.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Voegeli, Sylvia; Baudrimont, Antoine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Becskei, Attila

    2014-11-10

    Splicing reactions generally combine high speed with accuracy. However, some of the pre-mRNAs escape the nucleus with a retained intron. Intron retention can control gene expression and increase proteome diversity. We calculated the escape rate for the yeast PTC7 intron and pre-mRNA. This prediction was facilitated by the observation that splicing is a linear process and by deriving simple algebraic expressions from a model of co- and post-transcriptional splicing and RNA surveillance that determines the rate of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the pre-mRNAs with the retained intron. The escape rate was consistent with the observed threshold of splicing rate below which the mature mRNA level declined. When an mRNA contains multiple introns, the outcome of splicing becomes more difficult to predict since not only the escape rate of the pre-mRNA has to be considered, but also the possibility that the splicing of each intron is influenced by the others. We showed that the two adjacent introns in the SUS1 mRNA are spliced cooperatively, but this does not counteract the escape of the partially spliced mRNA. These findings will help to infer promoter activity and to predict the behavior of and to control splicing regulatory networks. PMID:25352554

  20. Alternative Splicing in CKD.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Megan; Oltean, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) has emerged in the postgenomic era as one of the main drivers of proteome diversity, with ≥94% of multiexon genes alternatively spliced in humans. AS is therefore one of the main control mechanisms for cell phenotype, and is a process deregulated in disease. Numerous reports describe pathogenic mutations in splice factors, splice sites, or regulatory sequences. Additionally, compared with the physiologic state, disease often associates with an abnormal proportion of splice isoforms (or novel isoforms), without an apparent driver mutation. It is therefore essential to study how AS is regulated in physiology, how it contributes to pathogenesis, and whether we can manipulate faulty splicing for therapeutic advantage. Although the disease most commonly linked to deregulation of AS in several genes is cancer, many reports detail pathogenic splice variants in diseases ranging from neuromuscular disorders to diabetes or cardiomyopathies. A plethora of splice variants have been implicated in CKDs as well. In this review, we describe examples of these CKD-associated splice variants and ideas on how to manipulate them for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26763787

  1. Correlation of mRNA expression and protein abundance affected by multiple sequence features related to translational efficiency in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-12-01

    The modest correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance in large scale datasets is explained in part by experimental challenges, such as technological limitations, and in part by fundamental biological factors in the transcription and translation processes. Among various factors affecting the mRNA-protein correlation, the roles of biological factors related to translation are poorly understood. In this study, using experimental mRNA expression and protein abundance data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris by DNA microarray and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, we quantitatively examined the effects of several translational-efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Three classes of sequence features were investigated according to different translational stages: (1) initiation: Shine-Dalgarno sequences, start codon identity and start codon context; (2) elongation: codon usage and amino acid usage; and (3) termination: stop codon identity and stop codon context. Surprisingly, although it is widely accepted that translation initiation is a rate-limiting step for translation, our results showed that the mRNA-protein correlation was affected the most by the features at elongation stages, codon usage and amino acid composition (7.4-12.6% and 5.3-9.3% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation, respectively), followed by stop codon context and the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (2.5-4.2% and 2.3%, respectively). Taken together, all sequence features contributed to 18.4-21.8% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation. As the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the mRNA-protein correlation in bacterial D. vulgaris, our results suggest that the traditional view of the relative importance of various sequence features in prokaryotic protein translation might be questionable.

  2. Exon-Level Transcriptome Profiling in Murine Breast Cancer Reveals Splicing Changes Specific to Tumors with Different Metastatic Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Bemmo, Amandine; Dias, Christel; Rose, April A. N.; Russo, Caterina; Siegel, Peter; Majewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases. Methods and Findings To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs) that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07) and highly metastatic (4T1) mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4%) exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1%) intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16%) genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms—several of which are novel—that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1). These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers. Conclusion Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of metastasis

  3. Phosphoregulation of Ire1 RNase splicing activity

    PubMed Central

    Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R.; Carrara, Marta; Ali, Maruf M. U.

    2014-01-01

    Ire1 is activated in response to accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). It is a unique enzyme, possessing both kinase and RNase activity that is required for specific splicing of Xbp1 mRNA leading to UPR activation. How phosphorylation impacts on the Ire1 splicing activity is unclear. In this study, we isolate distinct phosphorylated species of Ire1 and assess their effects on RNase splicing both in vitro and in vivo. We find that phosphorylation within the kinase activation loop significantly increases RNase splicing in vitro. Correspondingly, mutants of Ire1 that cannot be phosphorylated on the activation loop show decreased specific Xbp1 and promiscuous RNase splicing activity relative to wild-type Ire1 in cells. These data couple the kinase phosphorylation reaction to the activation state of the RNase, suggesting that phosphorylation of the activation loop is an important step in Ire1-mediated UPR activation. PMID:24704861

  4. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  5. Abnormal muscle development in the heldup3 mutant of Drosophila melanogaster is caused by a splicing defect affecting selected troponin I isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, J A; Galceran, J; Torroja, L; Prado, A; Ferrús, A

    1993-01-01

    The troponin I (TnI) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a family of 10 isoforms resulting from the differential splicing of 13 exons. Four of these exons (6a1, 6a2, 6b1, and 6b2) are mutually exclusive and very similar in sequence. TnI isoforms show qualitative specificity whereby each muscle expresses a selected repertoire of them. In addition, TnI isoforms show quantitative specificity whereby each muscle expresses characteristic amounts of each isoform. In the mutant heldup3, the development of the thoracic muscles DLM, DVM, and TDT is aborted. The mutation consists of a one-nucleotide displacement of the 3' AG splice site at the intron preceding exon 6b1, resulting in the failure to produce all exon 6b1-containing TnI isoforms. These molecular changes in a constituent of the thin filaments cause the selective failure to develop the DLM, DVM, and TDT muscles while having no visible effect on other muscles wherein exon 6b1 expression is minor. Images PMID:7680094

  6. Studies on the role of NonA in mRNA biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, Natalia; Braga, Jose; Lundgren, Josefin; Rino, Jose; Young, Patrick; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Visa, Neus . E-mail: Neus.Visa@molbio.su.se

    2006-08-01

    The NonA protein of Drosophila melanogaster is an abundant nuclear protein that belongs to the DBHS (Drosophila behavior, human splicing) protein family. The DBHS proteins bind both DNA and RNA in vitro and have been involved in different aspects of gene expression, including pre-mRNA splicing, transcription regulation and nuclear retention of mRNA. We have used double-stranded RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells to silence the expression of NonA and to investigate its role in mRNA biogenesis. We show that knockdown of NonA does not affect transcription nor splicing. We demonstrate that NonA forms a complex with the essential nuclear export factor NXF1 in an RNA-dependent manner. We have constructed stable S2 cell lines that express full-length and truncated NXF1 fused to GFP in order to perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. We show that knockdown of NonA reduces the intranuclear mobility of NXF1-GFP associated with poly(A){sup +} RNA in vivo, while the mobility of the truncated NXF1-GFP that does not bind RNA is not affected. Our data suggest that NonA facilitates the intranuclear mobility of mRNP particles.

  7. Regulation of Telomerase Alternative Splicing: A New Target for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Mandy S.; Chen, Ling; Foster, Christopher; Kainthla, Radhika; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomerase is present in human cancer cells but absent in most somatic tissues. The mRNA of human telomerase (hTERT) is alternatively spliced into mostly non-functional products. We sought to understand splicing so we could decrease functional splice isoforms to reduce telomerase activity to complement direct enzyme inhibition. Unexpectedly, minigenes containing hTERT exons 5–10 flanked by 150–300bp intronic sequences did not produce alternative splicing. A 1.1kb region of 38bp repeats ~2kb from the exon 6/intron junction restored exclusion of exons 7/8. An element within intron 8, also >1kb from intron/exon junctions, modulated this effect. Transducing an oligonucleotide complementary to this second element increased non-functional hTERT mRNA from endogenous telomerase. These results demonstrate the potential of manipulating hTERT splicing for both chemotherapy and regenerative medicine, and provide the first specific sequences deep within introns that regulate alternative splicing in mammalian cells by mechanisms other than introducing cryptic splice sites. PMID:23562158

  8. The Silent Sway of Splicing by Synonymous Substitutions.

    PubMed

    Mueller, William F; Larsen, Liza S Z; Garibaldi, Angela; Hatfield, G Wesley; Hertel, Klemens J

    2015-11-13

    Alternative splicing diversifies mRNA transcripts in human cells. This sequence-driven process can be influenced greatly by mutations, even those that do not change the protein coding potential of the transcript. Synonymous mutations have been shown to alter gene expression through modulation of splicing, mRNA stability, and translation. Using a synonymous position mutation library in SMN1 exon 7, we show that 23% of synonymous mutations across the exon decrease exon inclusion, suggesting that nucleotide identity across the entire exon has been evolutionarily optimized to support a particular exon inclusion level. Although phylogenetic conservation scores are insufficient to identify synonymous positions important for exon inclusion, an alignment of organisms filtered based on similar exon/intron architecture is highly successful. Although many of the splicing neutral mutations are observed to occur, none of the exon inclusion reducing mutants was found in the filtered alignment. Using the modified phylogenetic comparison as an approach to evaluate the impact on pre-mRNA splicing suggests that up to 45% of synonymous SNPs are likely to alter pre-mRNA splicing. These results demonstrate that coding and pre-mRNA splicing pressures co-evolve and that a modified phylogenetic comparison based on the exon/intron architecture is a useful tool in identifying splice altering SNPs. PMID:26424794

  9. Splice site consensus sequences are preferentially accessible to nucleases in isolated adenovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, S H; Duthie, R S

    1986-01-01

    The conformation of RNA sequences spanning five 3' splice sites and two 5' splice sites in adenovirus mRNA was probed by partial digestion with single-strand specific nucleases. Although cleavage of nucleotides near both 3' and 5' splice sites was observed, most striking was the preferential digestion of sequences near the 3' splice site. At each 3' splice site a region of very strong cleavage is observed at low concentrations of enzyme near the splice site consensus sequence or the upstream branch point consensus sequence. Additional sites of moderately strong cutting near the branch point consensus sequence were observed in those sequences where the splice site was the preferred target. Since recognition of the 3' splice site and branch site appear to be early events in mRNA splicing these observations may indicate that the local conformation of the splice site sequences may play a direct or indirect role in enhancing the accessibility of sequences important for splicing. Images PMID:3024107

  10. Genomic features defining exonic variants that modulate splicing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Single point mutations at both synonymous and non-synonymous positions within exons can have severe effects on gene function through disruption of splicing. Predicting these mutations in silico purely from the genomic sequence is difficult due to an incomplete understanding of the multiple factors that may be responsible. In addition, little is known about which computational prediction approaches, such as those involving exonic splicing enhancers and exonic splicing silencers, are most informative. Results We assessed the features of single-nucleotide genomic variants verified to cause exon skipping and compared them to a large set of coding SNPs common in the human population, which are likely to have no effect on splicing. Our findings implicate a number of features important for their ability to discriminate splice-affecting variants, including the naturally occurring density of exonic splicing enhancers and exonic splicing silencers of the exon and intronic environment, extensive changes in the number of predicted exonic splicing enhancers and exonic splicing silencers, proximity to the splice junctions and evolutionary constraint of the region surrounding the variant. By extending this approach to additional datasets, we also identified relevant features of variants that cause increased exon inclusion and ectopic splice site activation. Conclusions We identified a number of features that have statistically significant representation among exonic variants that modulate splicing. These analyses highlight putative mechanisms responsible for splicing outcome and emphasize the role of features important for exon definition. We developed a web-tool, Skippy, to score coding variants for these relevant splice-modulating features. PMID:20158892

  11. Methylation Affects Transposition and Splicing of a Large CACTA Transposon from a MYB Transcription Factor Regulating Anthocyanin Synthase Genes in Soybean Seed Coats

    PubMed Central

    Zabala, Gracia; Vodkin, Lila O.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the molecular basis of three soybean lines that vary in seed coat color at the R locus which is thought to encode a MYB transcription factor. RM55-rm is homozygous for a mutable allele (rm) that specifies black and brown striped seeds; RM30-R* is a stable black revertant isoline derived from the mutable line; and RM38-r has brown seed coats due to a recessive r allele shown to translate a truncated MYB protein. Using long range PCR, 454 sequencing of amplicons, and whole genome re-sequencing, we determined that the variegated RM55-rm line had a 13 kb CACTA subfamily transposon insertion (designated TgmR*) at a position 110 bp from the beginning of Intron2 of the R locus, Glyma09g36983. Although the MYB encoded by R was expressed at only very low levels in older seed coats of the black revertant RM30-R* line, it upregulated expression of anthocyanidin synthase genes (ANS2, ANS3) to promote the synthesis of anthocyanins. Surprisingly, the RM30-R* revertant also carried the 13 kb TgmR* insertion in Intron2. Using RNA-Seq, we showed that intron splicing was accurate, albeit at lower levels, despite the presence of the 13 kb TgmR* element. As determined by whole genome methylation sequencing, we demonstrate that the TgmR* sequence was relatively more methylated in RM30-R* than in the mutable RM55-rm progenitor line. The stabilized and more methylated RM30-R* revertant line apparently lacks effective binding of a transposae to its subterminal repeats, thus allowing intron splicing to proceed resulting in sufficient MYB protein to stimulate anthocyanin production and thus black seed coats. In this regard, the TgmR* element in soybean resembles McClintock's Spm-suppressible and change-of-state alleles of maize. This comparison explains the opposite effects of the TgmR* element on intron splicing of the MYB gene in which it resides depending on the methylation state of the element. PMID:25369033

  12. From Cryptic Toward Canonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Pompe Disease: a Pipeline for the Development of Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bergsma, Atze J; In 't Groen, Stijn Lm; Verheijen, Frans W; van der Ploeg, Ans T; Pijnappel, Wwm Pim

    2016-01-01

    While 9% of human pathogenic variants have an established effect on pre-mRNA splicing, it is suspected that an additional 20% of otherwise classified variants also affect splicing. Aberrant splicing includes disruption of splice sites or regulatory elements, or creation or strengthening of cryptic splice sites. For the majority of variants, it is poorly understood to what extent and how these may affect splicing. We have identified cryptic splicing in an unbiased manner. Three types of cryptic splicing were analyzed in the context of pathogenic variants in the acid α-glucosidase gene causing Pompe disease. These involved newly formed deep intronic or exonic cryptic splice sites, and a natural cryptic splice that was utilized due to weakening of a canonical splice site. Antisense oligonucleotides that targeted the identified cryptic splice sites repressed cryptic splicing at the expense of canonical splicing in all three cases, as shown by reverse-transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and by enhancement of acid α-glucosidase enzymatic activity. This argues for a competition model for available splice sites, including intact or weakened canonical sites and natural or newly formed cryptic sites. The pipeline described here can detect cryptic splicing and correct canonical splicing using antisense oligonucleotides to restore the gene defect. PMID:27623443

  13. The mRNA expression and histological integrity in rat forebrain motor and sensory regions are minimally affected by acrylamide exposure through drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, John F.; Latendresse, John R.; Delongchamp, Robert R.; Warbritton, Alan R.; Thomas, Monzy; Divine, Becky; Doerge, Daniel R.

    2009-11-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether alterations in the gene expression or overt histological signs of neurotoxicity in selected regions of the forebrain might occur from acrylamide exposure via drinking water. Gene expression at the mRNA level was evaluated by cDNA array and/or RT-PCR analysis in the striatum, substantia nigra and parietal cortex of rat after a 2-week acrylamide exposure. The highest dose tested (maximally tolerated) of approximately 44 mg/kg/day resulted in a significant decreased body weight, sluggishness, and locomotor activity reduction. These physiological effects were not accompanied by prominent changes in gene expression in the forebrain. All the expression changes seen in the 1200 genes that were evaluated in the three brain regions were <= 1.5-fold, and most not significant. Very few, if any, statistically significant changes were seen in mRNA levels of the more than 50 genes directly related to the cholinergic, noradrenergic, GABAergic or glutamatergic neurotransmitter systems in the striatum, substantia nigra or parietal cortex. All the expression changes observed in genes related to dopaminergic function were less than 1.5-fold and not statistically significant and the 5HT1b receptor was the only serotonin-related gene affected. Therefore, gene expression changes were few and modest in basal ganglia and sensory cortex at a time when the behavioral manifestations of acrylamide toxicity had become prominent. No histological evidence of axonal, dendritic or neuronal cell body damage was found in the forebrain due to the acrylamide exposure. As well, microglial activation was not present. These findings are consistent with the absence of expression changes in genes related to changes in neuroinflammation or neurotoxicity. Over all, these data suggest that oral ingestion of acrylamide in drinking water or food, even at maximally tolerable levels, induced neither marked changes in gene expression nor neurotoxicity in the motor and

  14. Connecting the dots: chromatin and alternative splicing in EMT

    PubMed Central

    Warns, Jessica A.; Davie, James R.; Dhasarathy, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Nature has devised sophisticated cellular machinery to process mRNA transcripts produced by RNA Polymerase II, removing intronic regions and connecting exons together, to produce mature RNAs. This process, known as splicing, is very closely linked to transcription. Alternative splicing, or the ability to produce different combinations of exons that are spliced together from the same genomic template, is a fundamental means of regulating protein complexity. Similar to transcription, both constitutive and alternative splicing can be regulated by chromatin and its associated factors in response to various signal transduction pathways activated by external stimuli. This regulation can vary between different cell types, and interference with these pathways can lead to changes in splicing, often resulting in aberrant cellular states and disease. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which leads to cancer metastasis, is influenced by alternative splicing events of chromatin remodelers and epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of epigenetic factors including chromatin, chromatin remodelers, DNA methyltransferases and microRNAs in the context of alternative splicing, and discuss their potential involvement in alternative splicing during the EMT process. PMID:26291837

  15. Splicing defects in the COL3A1 gene: marked preference for 5' (donor) spice-site mutations in patients with exon-skipping mutations and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Goldstein, J A; Byers, P H

    1997-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV results from mutations in the COL3A1 gene, which encodes the constituent chains of type III procollagen. We have identified, in 33 unrelated individuals or families with EDS type IV, mutations that affect splicing, of which 30 are point mutations at splice junctions and 3 are small deletions that remove splice-junction sequences and partial exon sequences. Except for one point mutation at a donor site, which leads to partial intron inclusion, and a single base-pair substitution at an acceptor site, which gives rise to inclusion of the complete upstream intron into the mature mRNA, all mutations result in deletion of a single exon as the only splice alteration. Of the exon-skipping mutations that are due to single base substitutions, which we have identified in 28 separate individuals, only two affect the splice-acceptor site. The underrepresentation of splice acceptor-site mutations suggests that the favored consequence of 3' mutations is the use of an alternative acceptor site that creates a null allele with a premature-termination codon. The phenotypes of those mutations may differ, with respect to either their severity or their symptomatic range, from the usual presentation of EDS type IV and thus have been excluded from analysis. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:9399899

  16. An artificial riboswitch for controlling pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Suk; Gusti, Veronica; Pillai, Sailesh G; Gaur, Rajesh K

    2005-11-01

    Riboswitches, as previously reported, are natural RNA aptamers that regulate the expression of numerous bacterial metabolic genes in response to small molecule ligands. It has recently been shown that these RNA genetic elements are also present near the splice site junctions of plant and fungal introns, thus raising the possibility of their involvement in regulating mRNA splicing. Here it is shown for the first time that a riboswitch can be engineered to regulate pre-mRNA splicing in vitro. We show that insertion of a high-affinity theophylline binding aptamer into the 3' splice site (3' ss) region of a model pre-mRNA (AdML-Theo29AG) enables its splicing to be repressed by the addition theophylline. Our results indicate that the location of 3' ss AG within the aptamer plays a crucial role in conferring theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing. We also show that theophylline-mediated control of pre-mRNA splicing is highly specific by first demonstrating that a small molecule ligand similar in shape and size to theophylline had no effect on the splicing of AdML-Theo29AG pre-mRNA. Second, theophylline failed to exert any influence on the splicing of a pre-mRNA that does not contain its binding site. Third, theophylline specifically blocks the step II of the splicing reaction. Finally, we provide evidence that theophylline-dependent control of pre-mRNA splicing is functionally relevant. PMID:16244133

  17. A 3' splice site mutation in the thyroglobulin gene responsible for congenital goiter with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ieiri, T; Cochaux, P; Targovnik, H M; Suzuki, M; Shimoda, S; Perret, J; Vassart, G

    1991-12-01

    A case of congenital goiter with defective thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied in molecular terms. The patient is the fifth of a kindred of six, three of which have a goiter. The parents are first cousins. Segregation of thyroglobulin alleles in the family was studied by Southern blotting with a probe revealing a diallelic restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The results demonstrated that the three affected siblings were homozygous for the RFLP. Northern blotting analysis of the goiter RNA with a thyroglobulin probe suggested that thyroglobulin mRNA size was slightly reduced. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the 8.5-kb thyroglobulin mRNA as overlapping cDNA fragments demonstrated that a 200-bp segment was missing from the 5' region of the goiter mRNA. Subcloning and sequencing of the cDNA fragments, and of the patient genomic DNA amplified from this region, revealed that exon 4 is missing from the major thyroglobulin transcript in the goiter, and that this aberrant splicing is due to a C to G transversion at position minus 3 in the acceptor splice site of intron 3. The presence in exon 4 of a putative donor tyrosine residue (Tyrosine nr 130) involved in thyroid hormone formation provides a coherent explanation to the hypothyroid status of the patient. PMID:1752952

  18. mRNA imprinting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Following its synthesis in the nucleus, mRNA undergoes various stages that are critical for the proper synthesis, localization and possibly functionality of its encoded protein. Recently, we have shown that two RNA polymerase II (Pol II) subunits, Rpb4p and Rpb7p, associate with the nascent transcript co-transcriptionally. This “mRNA imprinting” lasts throughout the mRNA lifetime and is required for proper regulation of all major stages that the mRNA undergoes. Other possible cases of co-transcriptional imprinting are discussed. Since mRNAs can be transported from the synthesizing cell to other cells, we propose that mRNA imprinting can also affect the phenotype of the recipient cells. This can be viewed as “mRNA-based epigenetics.” PMID:21686103

  19. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Selvanathan, Saravana P; Graham, Garrett T; Erkizan, Hayriye V; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats E; Wu, Cathy H; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron-exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4-279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4-279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  20. Oncogenic fusion protein EWS-FLI1 is a network hub that regulates alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Selvanathan, Saravana P.; Erkizan, Hayriye V.; Dirksen, Uta; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Dakic, Aleksandra; Yu, Songtao; Liu, Xuefeng; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Ljungman, Mats E.; Wu, Cathy H.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and processing of mRNA, from transcription to translation initiation, often requires splicing of intragenic material. The final mRNA composition varies based on proteins that modulate splice site selection. EWS-FLI1 is an Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncoprotein with an interactome that we demonstrate to have multiple partners in spliceosomal complexes. We evaluate the effect of EWS-FLI1 on posttranscriptional gene regulation using both exon array and RNA-seq. Genes that potentially regulate oncogenesis, including CLK1, CASP3, PPFIBP1, and TERT, validate as alternatively spliced by EWS-FLI1. In a CLIP-seq experiment, we find that EWS-FLI1 RNA-binding motifs most frequently occur adjacent to intron–exon boundaries. EWS-FLI1 also alters splicing by directly binding to known splicing factors including DDX5, hnRNP K, and PRPF6. Reduction of EWS-FLI1 produces an isoform of γ-TERT that has increased telomerase activity compared with wild-type (WT) TERT. The small molecule YK-4–279 is an inhibitor of EWS-FLI1 oncogenic function that disrupts specific protein interactions, including helicases DDX5 and RNA helicase A (RHA) that alters RNA-splicing ratios. As such, YK-4–279 validates the splicing mechanism of EWS-FLI1, showing alternatively spliced gene patterns that significantly overlap with EWS-FLI1 reduction and WT human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Exon array analysis of 75 ES patient samples shows similar isoform expression patterns to cell line models expressing EWS-FLI1, supporting the clinical relevance of our findings. These experiments establish systemic alternative splicing as an oncogenic process modulated by EWS-FLI1. EWS-FLI1 modulation of mRNA splicing may provide insight into the contribution of splicing toward oncogenesis, and, reciprocally, EWS-FLI1 interactions with splicing proteins may inform the splicing code. PMID:25737553

  1. Complex tissue-specific patterns and distribution of multiple RAGE splice variants in different mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Díez, Raquel; Rastrojo, Alberto; Villate, Olatz; Aguado, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycosylation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor involved in diverse cell signaling pathways. Previous studies show that this gene expresses several splice variants in human, mouse, and dog. Alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in expanding transcriptomic and proteomic diversity, and it has been related to disease. AS is also one of the main evolutionary mechanisms in mammalian genomes. However, limited information is available regarding the AS of RAGE in a wide context of mammalian tissues. In this study, we examined in detail the different RAGE mRNAs generated by AS from six mammals, including two primates (human and monkey), two artiodactyla (cow and pig), and two rodentia (mouse and rat) in 6-18 different tissues including fetal, adult, and tumor. By nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) we identified a high number of splice variants including noncoding transcripts and predicted coding ones with different potential protein modifications affecting mainly the transmembrane and ligand-binding domains that could influence their biological function. However, analysis of RNA-seq data enabled detecting only the most abundant splice variants. More than 80% of the detected RT-PCR variants (87 of 101 transcripts) are novel (different exon/intron structure to the previously described ones), and interestingly, 20-60% of the total transcripts (depending on the species) are noncoding ones that present tissue specificity. Our results suggest that RAGE undergoes extensive AS in mammals, with different expression patterns among adult, fetal, and tumor tissues. Moreover, most splice variants seem to be species specific, especially the noncoding variants, with only two (canonical human Tv1-RAGE, and human N-truncated or Tv10-RAGE) conserved among the six different species. This could indicate a special evolution pattern of this gene at mRNA level. PMID:24273313

  2. Complex Tissue-Specific Patterns and Distribution of Multiple RAGE Splice Variants in Different Mammals

    PubMed Central

    López-Díez, Raquel; Rastrojo, Alberto; Villate, Olatz; Aguado, Begoña

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycosylation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor involved in diverse cell signaling pathways. Previous studies show that this gene expresses several splice variants in human, mouse, and dog. Alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in expanding transcriptomic and proteomic diversity, and it has been related to disease. AS is also one of the main evolutionary mechanisms in mammalian genomes. However, limited information is available regarding the AS of RAGE in a wide context of mammalian tissues. In this study, we examined in detail the different RAGE mRNAs generated by AS from six mammals, including two primates (human and monkey), two artiodactyla (cow and pig), and two rodentia (mouse and rat) in 6–18 different tissues including fetal, adult, and tumor. By nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) we identified a high number of splice variants including noncoding transcripts and predicted coding ones with different potential protein modifications affecting mainly the transmembrane and ligand-binding domains that could influence their biological function. However, analysis of RNA-seq data enabled detecting only the most abundant splice variants. More than 80% of the detected RT-PCR variants (87 of 101 transcripts) are novel (different exon/intron structure to the previously described ones), and interestingly, 20–60% of the total transcripts (depending on the species) are noncoding ones that present tissue specificity. Our results suggest that RAGE undergoes extensive AS in mammals, with different expression patterns among adult, fetal, and tumor tissues. Moreover, most splice variants seem to be species specific, especially the noncoding variants, with only two (canonical human Tv1-RAGE, and human N-truncated or Tv10-RAGE) conserved among the six different species. This could indicate a special evolution pattern of this gene at mRNA level. PMID:24273313

  3. Splicing of many human genes involves sites embedded within introns

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Steven; Georgomanolis, Theodore; Zirkel, Anne; Diermeier, Sarah; O'Reilly, Dawn; Murphy, Shona; Längst, Gernot; Cook, Peter R.; Papantonis, Argyris

    2015-01-01

    The conventional model for splicing involves excision of each intron in one piece; we demonstrate this inaccurately describes splicing in many human genes. First, after switching on transcription of SAMD4A, a gene with a 134 kb-long first intron, splicing joins the 3′ end of exon 1 to successive points within intron 1 well before the acceptor site at exon 2 is made. Second, genome-wide analysis shows that >60% of active genes yield products generated by such intermediate intron splicing. These products are present at ∼15% the levels of primary transcripts, are encoded by conserved sequences similar to those found at canonical acceptors, and marked by distinctive structural and epigenetic features. Finally, using targeted genome editing, we demonstrate that inhibiting the formation of these splicing intermediates affects efficient exon–exon splicing. These findings greatly expand the functional and regulatory complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:25897131

  4. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy ' Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24480542

  5. A nonsense mutation in mouse Tardbp affects TDP43 alternative splicing activity and causes limb-clasping and body tone defects.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas; McGoldrick, Philip; Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised Tardbp(Q101X) mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the Tardbp(Q101X) mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp(+/Q101X) ) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp(+/Q101X) mice were crossed with the SOD1(G93Adl) transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the Tardbp(Q101X) mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes

  6. A Nonsense Mutation in Mouse Tardbp Affects TDP43 Alternative Splicing Activity and Causes Limb-Clasping and Body Tone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Fratta, Pietro; de Oliveira, Hugo M.; Kent, Rosie; Phatak, Vinaya; Brandner, Sebastian; Blanco, Gonzalo; Greensmith, Linda; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Fisher, Elizabeth M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in TARDBP, encoding Tar DNA binding protein-43 (TDP43), cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Attempts to model TDP43 dysfunction in mice have used knockouts or transgenic overexpressors, which have revealed the difficulties of manipulating TDP43, whose level is tightly controlled by auto-regulation. In a complementary approach, to create useful mouse models for the dissection of TDP43 function and pathology, we have identified a nonsense mutation in the endogenous mouse Tardbp gene through screening an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutant mouse archive. The mutation is predicted to cause a Q101X truncation in TDP43. We have characterised TardbpQ101X mice to investigate this mutation in perturbing TDP43 biology at endogenous expression levels. We found the TardbpQ101X mutation is homozygous embryonic lethal, highlighting the importance of TDP43 in early development. Heterozygotes (Tardbp+/Q101X) have abnormal levels of mutant transcript, but we find no evidence of the truncated protein and mice have similar full-length TDP43 protein levels as wildtype littermates. Nevertheless, Tardbp+/Q101X mice have abnormal alternative splicing of downstream gene targets, and limb-clasp and body tone phenotypes. Thus the nonsense mutation in Tardbp causes a mild loss-of-function phenotype and behavioural assessment suggests underlying neurological abnormalities. Due to the role of TDP43 in ALS, we investigated potential interactions with another known causative gene, mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Tardbp+/Q101X mice were crossed with the SOD1G93Adl transgenic mouse model of ALS. Behavioural and physiological assessment did not reveal modifying effects on the progression of ALS-like symptoms in the double mutant progeny from this cross. In summary, the TardbpQ101X mutant mice are a useful tool for the dissection of TDP43 protein regulation, effects on splicing, embryonic development and neuromuscular phenotypes. These mice are

  7. Nanoplasmonic probes of RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh H.; Lee, Jong Uk; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    RNA splicing plays important roles in transcriptome and proteome diversity. Herein, we describe the use of a nanoplasmonic system that unveils RNA folding and assembly during pre-mRNA splicing wherein the quantification of mRNA splice variants is not taken into account. With a couple of SERS-probes and plasmonic probes binding at the boundary sites of exon-2/intron-2 and intron-2/exon-3 of the pre-mature RNA of the β-globin gene, the splicing process brings the probes into the plasmonic bands. For plasmonic probes, a plasmon shift increase of ~29 nm, corresponding to intron removal and exon-2 and exon-3 connection to form the mRNA molecule, is measured by plasmonic coupling. The increased scattering intensity and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fingerprinting reveal the clear dynamics of pre-mRNA splicing. Moreover, a time-resolved experiment of individual RNA molecules exhibited a successful splicing and an inhibited splicing event by 33 μM biflavonoid isoginkgetin, a general inhibitor of RNA splicing. The results suggest that the RNA splicing is successfully monitored with the nanoplasmonic system. Thus, this platform can be useful for studying RNA nanotechnology, biomolecular folding, alternative splicing, and maturation of microRNA.

  8. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct N-termini.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn K; Gee, Sherry L; Koury, Mark J; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G

    2003-05-15

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes were 3 mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C; all 3 are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80-kDa 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135-kDa isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated up-regulation of 80-kDa 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together, these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events. PMID:12522012

  9. Alternative 5' exons and differential splicing regulate expression of protein 4.1R isoforms with distinct n-termini

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn K.; Gee, Sherry L.; Koury, Mark J.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2003-03-25

    Among the alternative pre-mRNA splicing events that characterize protein 4.1R gene expression, one involving exon 2' plays a critical role in regulating translation initiation and N-terminal protein structure. Exon 2' encompasses translation initiation site AUG1 and is located between alternative splice acceptor sites at the 5' end of exon 2; its inclusion or exclusion from mature 4.1R mRNA regulates expression of longer or shorter isoforms of 4.1R protein, respectively. The current study reports unexpected complexity in the 5' region of the 4.1R gene that directly affects alternative splicing of exon 2'. Three mutually exclusive alternative 5' exons, designated 1A, 1B, and 1C, were identified far upstream of exon 2 in both mouse and human genomes; all three are associated with strong transcriptional promoters in the flanking genomic sequence. Importantly, exons 1A and 1B splice differentially with respect to exon 2', generating transcripts with different 5' ends and distinct N-terminal protein coding capacity. Exon 1A-type transcripts splice so as to exclude exon 2' and therefore utilize the downstream AUG2 for translation of 80kD 4.1R protein, whereas exon 1B transcripts include exon 2' and initiate at AUG1 to synthesize 135kD isoforms. RNA blot analyses revealed that 1A transcripts increase in abundance in late erythroblasts, consistent with the previously demonstrated upregulation of 80kD 4.1R during terminal erythroid differentiation. Together these results suggest that synthesis of structurally distinct 4.1R protein isoforms in various cell types is regulated by a novel mechanism requiring coordination between upstream transcription initiation events and downstream alternative splicing events.

  10. Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 alternative splicing events in basal chordates and vertebrates: a focus on paired box domain

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Peter; Kozmikova, Iryna; Kozmik, Zbynek; Pantzartzi, Chrysoula N.

    2015-01-01

    Paired box transcription factors play important role in development and tissue morphogenesis. The number of Pax homologs varies among species studied so far, due to genome and gene duplications that have affected PAX family to a great extent. Based on sequence similarity and functional domains, four Pax classes have been identified in chordates, namely Pax1/9, Pax2/5/8, Pax3/7, and Pax4/6. Numerous splicing events have been reported mainly for Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes. Of significant interest are those events that lead to Pax proteins with presumed novel properties, such as altered DNA-binding or transcriptional activity. In the current study, a thorough analysis of Pax2/5/8 splicing events from cephalochordates and vertebrates was performed. We focused more on Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 splicing events in which the paired domain is involved. Three new splicing events were identified in Oryzias latipes, one of which seems to be conserved in Acanthomorphata. Using representatives from deuterostome and protostome phyla, a comparative analysis of the Pax6 exon-intron structure of the paired domain was performed, during an attempt to estimate the time of appearance of the Pax6(5a) mRNA isoform. As shown in our analysis, this splicing event is characteristic of Gnathostomata and is absent in the other chordate subphyla. Moreover, expression pattern of alternative spliced variants was compared between cephalochordates and fish species. In summary, our data indicate expansion of alternative mRNA variants in paired box region of Pax2/5/8 and Pax6 genes during the course of vertebrate evolution. PMID:26191073

  11. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS) Gene.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoko; Meijer, Judith; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Xu; Kondo, Tomomi; Ito, Tetsuya; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Van Kuilenburg, André B P

    2016-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R) in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients. PMID:26771602

  12. Altered Pre-mRNA Splicing Caused by a Novel Intronic Mutation c.1443+5G>A in the Dihydropyrimidinase (DPYS) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yoko; Meijer, Judith; Zhang, Chunhua; Wang, Xu; Kondo, Tomomi; Ito, Tetsuya; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Van Kuilenburg, André B. P.

    2016-01-01

    Dihydropyrimidinase (DHP) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the DPYS gene. Patients present with highly elevated levels of dihydrouracil and dihydrothymine in their urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. The analysis of the effect of mutations in DPYS on pre-mRNA splicing is hampered by the fact that DHP is primarily expressed in liver and kidney cells. The minigene approach can detect mRNA splicing aberrations using cells that do not express the endogenous mRNA. We have used a minigene-based approach to analyze the effects of a presumptive pre-mRNA splicing mutation in two newly identified Chinese pediatric patients with DHP deficiency. Mutation analysis of DPYS showed that both patients were compound heterozygous for a novel intronic mutation c.1443+5G>A in intron 8 and a previously described missense mutation c.1001A>G (p.Q334R) in exon 6. Wild-type and the mutated minigene constructs, containing exons 7, 8 and 9 of DPYS, yielded different splicing products after expression in HEK293 cells. The c.1443+5G>A mutation resulted in altered pre-mRNA splicing of the DPYS minigene construct with full skipping of exon 8. Analysis of the DHP crystal structure showed that the deletion of exon 8 severely affects folding, stability and homooligomerization of the enzyme as well as disruption of the catalytic site. Thus, the analysis suggests that the c.1443+5G>A mutation results in aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding DHP, underlying the DHP deficiency in two unrelated Chinese patients. PMID:26771602

  13. Genetically-induced Estrogen Receptor Alpha mRNA (Esr1) Overexpression Does Not Adversely Affect Fertility or Penile Development in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heath, John; Abdelmageed, Yazeed; Braden, Tim D.; Williams, Carol S.; Williams, John W.; Paulose, Tessie; Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel; Gupta, Rupesh; Flaws, Jodi A.; Goyal, Hari O.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that estrogen receptor alpha mRNA (Esr1) or protein (ESR1) overexpression resulting from neonatal exposure to estrogens in rats was associated with infertility and mal-developed penis characterized by reduced length and weight and abnormal accumulation of fat cells. The objective of this study was to determine if mutant male mice overexpressing Esr1 are naturally infertile or have reduced fertility and/or develop abnormal penis. The fertility parameters, including fertility and fecundity indices, numbers of days from the day of cohabitation to the day of delivery, and numbers of pups per female, were not altered from controls, as a result of Esr1 overexpression. Likewise, penile morphology, including the length, weight, and diameter and os penis development, was not altered from controls. Conversely, weights of the seminal vesicles and bulbospongiosus and levator ani (BS/LA) muscles were significantly (P < 0.05) lower as compared to controls; however, the weight of the testis, the morphology of the testis and epididymis, and the plasma and testicular testosterone concentration were not different from controls. Hence, the genetically-induced Esr1 overexpression alone, without an exogenous estrogen exposure during the neonatal period, is unable to adversely affect the development of the penis as well as other male reproductive organs, except limited, but significant, reductions in weights of the seminal vesicles and BS/LA muscles. PMID:20930192

  14. Body Condition Score and Day of Lactation Affect Lipogenic mRNA Abundance and Transpription Factors in Adipose Tissue of Beef Cows Fed Supplemental Fat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that BCS at parturition and postpartum dietary fat supplementation will alter transcription factors and mRNA abundance of adipose tissue lipogenic and lipolytic enzymes during lactation in beef cows. Our objective was to determine abundance of mRNA for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), h...

  15. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected themore » splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.« less

  16. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. This large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs. PMID:26294686

  17. Regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila by 56 RNA binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Angela N.; Duff, Michael O.; May, Gemma; Yang, Li; Bolisetty, Mohan; Landolin, Jane; Wan, Ken; Sandler, Jeremy; Booth, Benjamin W.; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2015-08-20

    Alternative splicing is regulated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that recognize pre-mRNA sequence elements and activate or repress adjacent exons. Here, we used RNA interference and RNA-seq to identify splicing events regulated by 56 Drosophila proteins, some previously unknown to regulate splicing. Nearly all proteins affected alternative first exons, suggesting that RBPs play important roles in first exon choice. Half of the splicing events were regulated by multiple proteins, demonstrating extensive combinatorial regulation. We observed that SR and hnRNP proteins tend to act coordinately with each other, not antagonistically. We also identified a cross-regulatory network where splicing regulators affected the splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding other splicing regulators. In conclusion, this large-scale study substantially enhances our understanding of recent models of splicing regulation and provides a resource of thousands of exons that are regulated by 56 diverse RBPs.

  18. Electrical-splicing connector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stringer, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    Connection can be made without removing insulation, and connector case insulates splice. Device can be made in various sizes and saves time, especially when working on prototype boards with several interconnecting test leads.

  19. Splicing: is there an alternative contribution to Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    La Cognata, Valentina; D'Agata, Velia; Cavalcanti, Francesca; Cavallaro, Sebastiano

    2015-10-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism of gene expression regulation that enormously increases the coding potential of our genome and represents an intermediate step between messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription and protein posttranslational modifications. Alternative splicing occupies a central position in the development and functions of the nervous system. Therefore, its deregulation frequently leads to several neurological human disorders. In the present review, we provide an updated overview on the impact of alternative splicing in Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. We will describe the alternative splicing of major PD-linked genes by collecting the current evidences about this intricate and not carefully explored aspect. Assessing the role of this mechanism on PD pathobiology may represent a central step toward an improved understanding of this complex disease. PMID:25980689

  20. Evolution of a tissue-specific splicing network

    PubMed Central

    Taliaferro, J. Matthew; Alvarez, Nehemiah; Green, Richard E.; Blanchette, Marco; Rio, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) is a strategy employed by most eukaryotes to increase transcript and proteomic diversity. Many metazoan splicing factors are members of multigene families, with each member having different functions. How these highly related proteins evolve unique properties has been unclear. Here we characterize the evolution and function of a new Drosophila splicing factor, termed LS2 (Large Subunit 2), that arose from a gene duplication event of dU2AF50, the large subunit of the highly conserved heterodimeric general splicing factor U2AF (U2-associated factor). The quickly evolving LS2 gene has diverged from the splicing-promoting, ubiquitously expressed dU2AF50 such that it binds a markedly different RNA sequence, acts as a splicing repressor, and is preferentially expressed in testes. Target transcripts of LS2 are also enriched for performing testes-related functions. We therefore propose a path for the evolution of a new splicing factor in Drosophila that regulates specific pre-mRNAs and contributes to transcript diversity in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:21406555

  1. Characterization of the Regulation of CD46 RNA Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sze Jing; Luo, Shufang; Ho, Jia Xin Jessie; Ly, Phuong Thao; Goh, Eling; Roca, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Here we present a detailed analysis of the alternative splicing regulation of human CD46, which generates different isoforms with distinct functions. CD46 is a ubiquitous membrane protein that protects host cells from complement and plays other roles in immunity, autophagy, and cell adhesion. CD46 deficiency causes an autoimmune disorder, and this protein is also involved in pathogen infection and cancer. Before this study, the mechanisms of CD46 alternative splicing remained unexplored even though dysregulation of this process has been associated with autoimmune diseases. We proved that the 5' splice sites of CD46 cassette exons 7 and 8 encoding extracellular domains are defined by noncanonical mechanisms of base pairing to U1 small nuclear RNA. Next we characterized the regulation of CD46 cassette exon 13, whose inclusion or skipping generates different cytoplasmic tails with distinct functions. Using splicing minigenes, we identified multiple exonic and intronic splicing enhancers and silencers that regulate exon 13 inclusion via trans-acting splicing factors like PTBP1 and TIAL1. Interestingly, a common splicing activator such as SRSF1 appears to repress CD46 exon 13 inclusion. We also report that expression of CD46 mRNA isoforms is further regulated by non-sense-mediated mRNA decay and transcription speed. Finally, we successfully manipulated CD46 exon 13 inclusion using antisense oligonucleotides, opening up opportunities for functional studies of the isoforms as well as for therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. This study provides insight into CD46 alternative splicing regulation with implications for its function in the immune system and for genetic disease. PMID:27226545

  2. Intrauterine growth restriction in neonatal piglets affects small intestinal mucosal permeability and mRNA expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Degroote, Jeroen; Van Ginneken, Chris; Van Poucke, Mario; Vergauwen, Hans; Dam, Thi Minh Tho; Vanrompay, Daisy; Peelman, Luc J; De Smet, Stefaan; Michiels, Joris

    2016-02-01

    Neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) show lower efficiency of nutrient utilization compared to normal birth weight (NBW) newborns. This study was conducted using neonatal piglets as a model to test the hypothesis that IUGR affects the intestinal barrier function, intestinal structure, and antioxidant system development during the suckling period. The small intestinal mucosae were obtained from IUGR and NBW littermates in the suckling period (d 0, 3, 8, and 19 postnatal). The epithelial barrier function was assessed by FITC-dextran 4 (FD4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) fluxes across the epithelium, histomorphologic measurements, and expression of tight-junction proteins. Redox status represented by the glutathione disulfide/glutathione ratio and malondialdehyde concentrations was determined, whereas mRNA expressions of some redox-sensitive proteins were quantified. Results showed that IUGR piglets exhibited a 2-fold higher intestinal permeability in the proximal small intestine on d 0 (P < 0.05), and this difference between IUGR and NBW piglets was widened to 3 and 4 times for FD4 and HRP, respectively (P < 0.05), on d 3. In accordance, expression of occludin was down-regulated at the transcriptional level in IUGR piglets at d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the transcription of heme oxygenase 1, catalase, and thioredoxin reductase genes was down-regulated in IUGR piglets, mainly on postnatal d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). It appears that IUGR subjects have a lower capacity to mount an antioxidant response in the early postnatal period. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for intestinal dysfunction in IUGR neonates. PMID:26514167

  3. Definition of Proteasomal Peptide Splicing Rules for High-Efficiency Spliced Peptide Presentation by MHC Class I Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; de Jong, Annemieke; Schuurman, Karianne G.; Linnemann, Carsten; Meiring, Hugo D.; Janssen, Lennert; Neefjes, Jacques J.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rodenko, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Peptide splicing, in which two distant parts of a protein are excised and then ligated to form a novel peptide, can generate unique MHC class I–restricted responses. Because these peptides are not genetically encoded and the rules behind proteasomal splicing are unknown, it is difficult to predict these spliced Ags. In the current study, small libraries of short peptides were used to identify amino acid sequences that affect the efficiency of this transpeptidation process. We observed that splicing does not occur at random, neither in terms of the amino acid sequences nor through random splicing of peptides from different sources. In contrast, splicing followed distinct rules that we deduced and validated both in vitro and in cells. Peptide ligation was quantified using a model peptide and demonstrated to occur with up to 30% ligation efficiency in vitro, provided that optimal structural requirements for ligation were met by both ligating partners. In addition, many splicing products could be formed from a single protein. Our splicing rules will facilitate prediction and detection of new spliced Ags to expand the peptidome presented by MHC class I Ags. PMID:26401003

  4. Altered PLP1 splicing causes hypomyelination of early myelinating structures

    PubMed Central

    Kevelam, Sietske H; Taube, Jennifer R; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Bertini, Enrico; Sperle, Karen; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Tonduti, Davide; Valente, Enza Maria; Travaglini, Lorena; Sistermans, Erik A; Bernard, Geneviève; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; van Karnebeek, Clara D M; Østergaard, John R; Friederich, Richard L; Fawzi Elsaid, Mahmoud; Schieving, Jolanda H; Tarailo-Graovac, Maja; Orcesi, Simona; Steenweg, Marjan E; van Berkel, Carola G M; Waisfisz, Quinten; Abbink, Truus E M; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Hobson, Grace M; Wolf, Nicole I

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic etiology of the X-linked disorder “Hypomyelination of Early Myelinating Structures” (HEMS). Methods We included 16 patients from 10 families diagnosed with HEMS by brain MRI criteria. Exome sequencing was used to search for causal mutations. In silico analysis of effects of the mutations on splicing and RNA folding was performed. In vitro gene splicing was examined in RNA from patients’ fibroblasts and an immortalized immature oligodendrocyte cell line after transfection with mutant minigene splicing constructs. Results All patients had unusual hemizygous mutations of PLP1 located in exon 3B (one deletion, one missense and two silent), which is spliced out in isoform DM20, or in intron 3 (five mutations). The deletion led to truncation of PLP1, but not DM20. Four mutations were predicted to affect PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing by creating exonic splicing silencer motifs or new splice donor sites or by affecting the local RNA structure of the PLP1 splice donor site. Four deep intronic mutations were predicted to destabilize a long-distance interaction structure in the secondary PLP1 RNA fragment involved in regulating PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing. Splicing studies in fibroblasts and transfected cells confirmed a decreased PLP1/DM20 ratio. Interpretation Brain structures that normally myelinate early are poorly myelinated in HEMS, while they are the best myelinated structures in Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, also caused by PLP1 alterations. Our data extend the phenotypic spectrum of PLP1-related disorders indicating that normal PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing is essential for early myelination and support the need to include intron 3 in diagnostic sequencing. PMID:26125040

  5. Structure of the human myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene and multiple alternative spliced isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Pham-Dinh, D.; Gaspera, D.B.; Dautigny, A.

    1995-09-20

    Myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a special component of the central nervous system localization on the outermost lamellae of mature myelin, is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. We report here the organization of the human MOG gene, which spans approximately 17 kb, and the characterization of six MOG mRNA splicing variants. The intron/exon structure of the human MOG gene confirmed the splicing pattern, supporting the hypothesis that mRNA isoforms could arise by alternative splicing of a single gene. In addition to the eight exons coding for the major MOG isoform, the human MOG gene also contains 3` region, a previously unknown alternatively spliced coding exon, VIA. Alternative utilization of two acceptor splicing sites for exon VIII could produce two different C-termini. The nucleotide sequences presented here may be a useful tool to study further possible involvement if the MOG gene in hereditary neurological disorders. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Global analysis of alternative splicing differences between humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Calarco, John A; Xing, Yi; Cáceres, Mario; Calarco, Joseph P; Xiao, Xinshu; Pan, Qun; Lee, Christopher; Preuss, Todd M; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2007-11-15

    Alternative splicing is a powerful mechanism affording extensive proteomic and regulatory diversity from a limited repertoire of genes. However, the extent to which alternative splicing has contributed to the evolution of primate species-specific characteristics has not been assessed previously. Using comparative genomics and quantitative microarray profiling, we performed the first global analysis of alternative splicing differences between humans and chimpanzees. Surprisingly, 6%-8% of profiled orthologous exons display pronounced splicing level differences in the corresponding tissues from the two species. Little overlap is observed between the genes associated with alternative splicing differences and the genes that display steady-state transcript level differences, indicating that these layers of regulation have evolved rapidly to affect distinct subsets of genes in humans and chimpanzees. The alternative splicing differences we detected are predicted to affect diverse functions including gene expression, signal transduction, cell death, immune defense, and susceptibility to diseases. Differences in expression at the protein level of the major splice variant of Glutathione S-transferase omega-2 (GSTO2), which functions in the protection against oxidative stress and is associated with human aging-related diseases, suggests that this enzyme is less active in human cells compared with chimpanzee cells. The results of this study thus support an important role for alternative splicing in establishing differences between humans and chimpanzees. PMID:17978102

  7. A premature termination codon within an alternative exon affecting only the metabolism of transcripts that retain this exon.

    PubMed

    Maillet, P; Dalla Venezia, N; Lorenzo, F; Morinière, M; Bozon, M; Noël, B; Delaunay, J; Baklouti, F

    1999-01-01

    Protein 4.1 pre-mRNA splicing is regulated in tissue- and development-specific manners. Exon 16, which encodes the N-terminal region of the spectrin/actin-binding domain, is one of the alternatively spliced sequence motifs. It is present in late differentiated erythroid cells but absent from early erythroblasts and from lymphoid cells. We describe a single nucleotide deletion of the erythroid protein 4.1 gene associated with hereditary elliptocytosis. The deletion located in exon 16 leads to a frameshift and a premature termination codon within the same exon. In an effort to examine the premature stop codon effect in relationship with exon 16 alternative splicing, we analyzed erythroid and lymphoid protein 4.1 mRNAs using the mutation and a linked downstream polymorphism as markers. We found that the premature stop codon does not affect the tissue-specific alternative splicing among the two cell types analyzed and that the resulting alteration of mRNA metabolism correlates with the retention of exon 16 in reticulocytes. Conversely, skipping of exon 16 in lymphoid cells converts the mutant mRNA to a normal lymphoid-specific mRNA isoform, hence bypassing the nonsense codon. Consistent with data obtained on constitutive nonsense exons, our observations argue in favor of a stop codon recognition mechanism that occurs after the regulated splicing status of the nonsense exon has been achieved. PMID:10425037

  8. Influence of Intron Length on Alternative Splicing of CD44

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Martyn V.; Cowper, Alison E.; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Bell, John I.; Screaton, Gavin R.

    1998-01-01

    Although the splicing of transcripts from most eukaryotic genes occurs in a constitutive fashion, some genes can undergo a process of alternative splicing. This is a genetically economical process which allows a single gene to give rise to several protein isoforms by the inclusion or exclusion of sequences into or from the mature mRNA. CD44 provides a unique example; more than 1,000 possible isoforms can be produced by the inclusion or exclusion of a central tandem array of 10 alternatively spliced exons. Certain alternatively spliced exons have been ascribed specific functions; however, independent regulation of the inclusion or skipping of each of these exons would clearly demand an extremely complex regulatory network. Such a network would involve the interaction of many exon-specific trans-acting factors with the pre-mRNA. Therefore, to assess whether the exons are indeed independently regulated, we have examined the alternative exon content of a large number of individual CD44 cDNA isoforms. This analysis shows that the downstream alternatively spliced exons are favored over those lying upstream and that alternative exons are often included in blocks rather than singly. Using a novel in vivo alternative splicing assay, we show that intron length has a major influence upon the alternative splicing of CD44. We propose a kinetic model in which short introns may overcome the poor recognition of alternatively spliced exons. These observations suggest that for CD44, intron length has been exploited in the evolution of the genomic structure to enable tissue-specific patterns of splicing to be maintained. PMID:9742110

  9. Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing in Neurons, Growing Up and Extending Its Reach

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sika; Black, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing determines the protein output of most neuronally expressed genes. Many examples have been described of protein function being modulated by coding changes in different mRNA isoforms. Several recent studies demonstrate that through the coupling of splicing to other processes of mRNA metabolism alternative splicing can also act as an on/off switch for gene expression. Other regulated splicing events may determine how an mRNA is utilized in its later cytoplasmic life by changing its localization or translation. These studies make clear that the multiple steps of post-transcriptional gene regulation are strongly linked. Together these regulatory process play key roles in all aspects of the cell biology of neurons, from their initial differentiation, to their choice of connections, and finally to their function with mature circuits. PMID:23648015

  10. Final report: FASEB Summer Research Conference on ''Post-transcriptional control of gene expression: Effectors of mRNA decay'' [agenda and attendees list

    SciTech Connect

    Maquat, Lynne

    2002-12-01

    The goal of this meeting was to provide an interactive forum for scientists working on prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decay. A special seminar presented by a leader in the field of mRNA decay in S. cerevisiae focused on what is known and what needs to be determined, not only for yeast but for other organisms. The large attendance (110 participants) reflects the awareness that mRNA decay is a key player in gene regulation in a way that is affected by the many steps that precede mRNA formation. Sessions were held on the following topics: mRNA transport and mRNP; multicomponent eukaryotic nucleases; nonsense-mediated mRNA decay and nonsense-associated altered splicing; Cis-acting sequences/Trans-acting factors of mRNA decay; translational accuracy; multicomponent bacterial nucleases; interplay between mRNA polyadenylation, translation and decay in prokaryotes and prokaryotic organelles; and RNA interference and other RNA mediators of gene expression. In addition to the talks and two poster sessions, there were three round tables: (1) Does translation occur in the nucleus? (2) Differences and similarities in the mechanisms of mRNA decay in different eukaryotes, and (3) RNA surveillance in bacteria?

  11. Biomedical Impact of Splicing Mutations Revealed through Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Taneri, Bahar; Asilmaz, Esra; Gaasterland, Terry

    2012-01-01

    Splicing is a cellular mechanism, which dictates eukaryotic gene expression by removing the noncoding introns and ligating the coding exons in the form of a messenger RNA molecule. Alternative splicing (AS) adds a major level of complexity to this mechanism and thus to the regulation of gene expression. This widespread cellular phenomenon generates multiple messenger RNA isoforms from a single gene, by utilizing alternative splice sites and promoting different exon–intron inclusions and exclusions. AS greatly increases the coding potential of eukaryotic genomes and hence contributes to the diversity of eukaryotic proteomes. Mutations that lead to disruptions of either constitutive splicing or AS cause several diseases, among which are myotonic dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Aberrant splicing is also well established in cancer states. Identification of rare novel mutations associated with splice-site recognition, and splicing regulation in general, could provide further insight into genetic mechanisms of rare diseases. Here, disease relevance of aberrant splicing is reviewed, and the new methodological approach of starting from disease phenotype, employing exome sequencing and identifying rare mutations affecting splicing regulation is described. Exome sequencing has emerged as a reliable method for finding sequence variations associated with various disease states. To date, genetic studies using exome sequencing to find disease-causing mutations have focused on the discovery of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms that alter amino acids or introduce early stop codons, or on the use of exome sequencing as a means to genotype known single nucleotide polymorphisms. The involvement of splicing mutations in inherited diseases has received little attention and thus likely occurs more frequently than currently estimated. Studies of exome sequencing followed by molecular and bioinformatic analyses have great potential to reveal the high impact of splicing

  12. Modulation of RNA splicing as a potential treatment for cancer.

    PubMed

    Bauman, John A; Kole, Ryszard

    2011-01-01

    Close to 90% of human genes are transcribed into pre-mRNA that undergoes alternative splicing, producing multiple mRNAs and proteins from single genes. This process is largely responsible for human proteome diversity, and about half of genetic disease-causing mutations affect splicing. Splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) comprise an emerging class of antisense therapeutics that modify gene expression by directing pre-mRNA splice site usage. Bauman et al. investigated an SSO that up-regulated the expression of an anti-cancer splice variant while simultaneously eliminating an over-expressed cancer-causing splice variant.  This was accomplished by targeting pre-mRNA of the apoptotic regulator Bcl-x, which is alternatively spliced to express anti- and pro-apoptotic splice variants Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, respectively. High expression of Bcl-xL is a hallmark of many cancers and is considered a general mechanism used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis. Redirection of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing from Bcl-xL to -xS by SSO induced apoptotic and chemosensitizing effects in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, the paper shows that delivery of Bcl-x SSO using a lipid nanoparticle redirected Bcl-x splicing and reduced tumor burden in melanoma lung metastases. This was the first demonstration of SSO efficacy in tumors in vivo. SSOs are not limited to be solely potential anti-cancer drugs. SSOs were first applied to repair aberrant splicing in thalassemia, a genetic disease, they have been used to create novel proteins (e.g., ∆7TNFR1), and they have recently progressed to clinical trials for patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.  PMID:21637003

  13. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  14. Accurate Splicing of HDAC6 Pre-mRNA Requires SON

    PubMed Central

    Battini, Vishnu Priya; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing requires proper splice site selection mediated by many factors including snRNPs and serine-arginine rich (SR) splicing factors. Our lab previously reported that the SR-like protein SON maintains organization of pre-mRNA splicing factors in nuclear speckles as well as splicing of many human transcripts including mRNAs coding for the chromatin-modifying enzymes HDAC6, ADA and SETD8. However, the mechanism by which SON maintains accurate splicing is unknown. To build tools for understanding SON-dependent pre-mRNA splicing, we constructed a minigene reporter plasmid driving expression of the genomic sequence spanning exons 26 through 29 of HDAC6. Following SON depletion, we observed altered splicing of HDAC6 reporter transcripts that showed exclusion of exons 27 and 28, reflecting the splicing patterns of endogenous HDAC6 mRNA. Importantly, loss of HDAC6 biological function was also observed, as indicated by truncated HDAC6 protein and corresponding absence of aggresome assembly activities of HDAC6 binding-of-ubiquitin zinc finger (BUZ) domain. We therefore propose that SON-mediated splicing regulation of HDAC6 is essential for supporting protein degradation pathways that prevent human disease. PMID:25782155

  15. Splicing factor SR34b mutation reduces cadmium tolerance in Arabidopsis by regulating iron-regulated transporter 1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wentao; Du, Bojing; Liu, Di; Qi, Xiaoting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Arabidopsis splicing factor SR34b gene is cadmium-inducible. • SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant is sensitive to cadmium due to high cadmium uptake. • SR34b is a regulator of cadmium transporter IRT1 at the posttranscription level. • These results highlight the roles of splicing factors in cadmium tolerance of plant. - Abstract: Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are important splicing factors. However, the biological functions of plant SR proteins remain unclear especially in abiotic stresses. Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential element that negatively affects plant growth and development. In this study, we provided clear evidence for SR gene involved in Cd tolerance in planta. Systemic expression analysis of 17 Arabidopsis SR genes revealed that SR34b is the only SR gene upregulated by Cd, suggesting its potential roles in Arabidopsis Cd tolerance. Consistent with this, a SR34b T-DNA insertion mutant (sr34b) was moderately sensitive to Cd, which had higher Cd{sup 2+} uptake rate and accumulated Cd in greater amounts than wild-type. This was due to the altered expression of iron-regulated transporter 1 (IRT1) gene in sr34b mutant. Under normal growth conditions, IRT1 mRNAs highly accumulated in sr34b mutant, which was a result of increased stability of IRT1 mRNA. Under Cd stress, however, sr34b mutant plants had a splicing defect in IRT1 gene, thus reducing the IRT1 mRNA accumulation. Despite of this, sr34b mutant plants still constitutively expressed IRT1 proteins under Cd stress, thereby resulting in Cd stress-sensitive phenotype. We therefore propose the essential roles of SR34b in posttranscriptional regulation of IRT1 expression and identify it as a regulator of Arabidopsis Cd tolerance.

  16. Alternative splicing of inner-ear-expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfei; Liu, Yueyue; Nie, Hongyun; Ma, Xin; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Alternative splicing plays a fundamental role in the development and physiological function of the inner ear. Inner-ear-specific gene splicing is necessary to establish the identity and maintain the function of the inner ear. For example, exon 68 of Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) gene is subject to inner-ear-specific alternative splicing, and as a result, Cdh23(+ 68) is only expressed in inner ear hair cells. Alternative splicing along the tonotopic axis of the cochlea contributes to frequency tuning, particularly in lower vertebrates, such as chickens and turtles. Differential splicing of Kcnma1, which encodes for the α subunit of the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel), has been suggested to affect the channel gating properties and is important for frequency tuning. Consequently, deficits in alternative splicing have been shown to cause hearing loss, as we can observe in Bronx Waltzer (bv) mice and Sfswap mutant mice. Despite the advances in this field, the regulation of alternative splicing in the inner ear remains elusive. Further investigation is also needed to clarify the mechanism of hearing loss caused by alternative splicing deficits. PMID:27376950

  17. Splice assembly tool and method of splicing

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1980-01-01

    A splice assembly tool for assembling component parts of an electrical conductor while producing a splice connection between electrical cables therewith, comprises a first structural member adaptable for supporting force applying means thereon, said force applying means enabling a rotary force applied manually thereto to be converted to a longitudinal force for subsequent application against a first component part of said electrical connection, a second structural member adaptable for engaging a second component part in a manner to assist said first structural member in assembling the component parts relative to one another and transmission means for conveying said longitudinal force between said first and said second structural members, said first and said second structural members being coupled to one another by said transmission means, wherein at least one of said component parts comprises a tubular elastomeric sleeve and said force applying means provides a relatively high mechanical advantage when said rotary force is applied thereto so as to facilitate assembly of said at least one tubular elastomeric sleeve about said other component part in an interference fit manner.

  18. Light-regulated protein and poly(A)+ mRNA synthesis in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, J A; Hinkelammert, K; Russo, V E

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the effect of illumination upon the patterns of protein synthesis in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa by pulse labelling and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Light did not affect overall rates of protein synthesis but did induce the synthesis of six novel polypeptides whose appearance followed a temporally regulated pattern. When translation products of mRNA from illuminated cultures and dark control cultures were compared it was found that the synthesis of five out of six of the polypeptides specific to illuminated cultures could be seen in vitro. We believe that this is consistent with the hypothesis that light regulates the transcription of some genes in N. crassa, although we cannot exclude effects on mRNA stability or the control of precursor splicing. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2868891

  19. Purifying Selection on Exonic Splice Enhancers in Intronless Genes.

    PubMed

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-06-01

    Exonic splice enhancers (ESEs) are short nucleotide motifs, enriched near exon ends, that enhance the recognition of the splice site and thus promote splicing. Are intronless genes under selection to avoid these motifs so as not to attract the splicing machinery to an mRNA that should not be spliced, thereby preventing the production of an aberrant transcript? Consistent with this possibility, we find that ESEs in putative recent retrocopies are at a higher density and evolving faster than those in other intronless genes, suggesting that they are being lost. Moreover, intronless genes are less dense in putative ESEs than intron-containing ones. However, this latter difference is likely due to the skewed base composition of intronless sequences, a skew that is in line with the general GC richness of few exon genes. Indeed, after controlling for such biases, we find that both intronless and intron-containing genes are denser in ESEs than expected by chance. Importantly, nucleotide-controlled analysis of evolutionary rates at synonymous sites in ESEs indicates that the ESEs in intronless genes are under purifying selection in both human and mouse. We conclude that on the loss of introns, some but not all, ESE motifs are lost, the remainder having functions beyond a role in splice promotion. These results have implications for the design of intronless transgenes and for understanding the causes of selection on synonymous sites. PMID:26802218

  20. Purifying Selection on Exonic Splice Enhancers in Intronless Genes

    PubMed Central

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2016-01-01

    Exonic splice enhancers (ESEs) are short nucleotide motifs, enriched near exon ends, that enhance the recognition of the splice site and thus promote splicing. Are intronless genes under selection to avoid these motifs so as not to attract the splicing machinery to an mRNA that should not be spliced, thereby preventing the production of an aberrant transcript? Consistent with this possibility, we find that ESEs in putative recent retrocopies are at a higher density and evolving faster than those in other intronless genes, suggesting that they are being lost. Moreover, intronless genes are less dense in putative ESEs than intron-containing ones. However, this latter difference is likely due to the skewed base composition of intronless sequences, a skew that is in line with the general GC richness of few exon genes. Indeed, after controlling for such biases, we find that both intronless and intron-containing genes are denser in ESEs than expected by chance. Importantly, nucleotide-controlled analysis of evolutionary rates at synonymous sites in ESEs indicates that the ESEs in intronless genes are under purifying selection in both human and mouse. We conclude that on the loss of introns, some but not all, ESE motifs are lost, the remainder having functions beyond a role in splice promotion. These results have implications for the design of intronless transgenes and for understanding the causes of selection on synonymous sites. PMID:26802218

  1. Low-intensity red and infrared lasers affect mRNA expression of DNA nucleotide excision repair in skin and muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Luiz Philippe S; Campos, Vera Maria A; Vicentini, Solange C; Mencalha, Andre Luiz; de Paoli, Flavia; Fonseca, Adenilson S

    2016-04-01

    Lasers emit light beams with specific characteristics, in which wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode properties determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses. Low-intensity lasers could induce free radical generation in biological tissues and cause alterations in macromolecules, such as DNA. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate excision repair cross-complementing group 1 (ERCC1) and excision repair cross-complementing group 2 (ERCC2) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in biological tissues exposed to low-intensity lasers. Wistar rat (n = 28, 4 for each group) skin and muscle were exposed to low-intensity red (660 nm) and near-infrared (880 nm) lasers at different fluences (25, 50, and 100 J/cm(2)), and samples of these tissues were withdrawn for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and gene expression evaluation by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Laser exposure was in continuous wave and power of 100 mW. Data show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expressions decrease in skin (p < 0.001) exposed to near-infrared laser, but increase in muscle tissue (p < 0.001). ERCC1 mRNA expression does not alter (p > 0.05), but ERCC2 mRNA expression decreases in skin (p < 0.001) and increases in muscle tissue (p < 0.001) exposed to red laser. Our results show that ERCC1 and ERCC2 mRNA expression is differently altered in skin and muscle tissue exposed to low-intensity lasers depending on wavelengths and fluences used in therapeutic protocols. PMID:26796702

  2. Constant splice-isoform ratios in human lymphoblastoid cells support the concept of a splico-stat.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Marcel; Huse, Klaus; Menzel, Uwe; Backhaus, Oliver; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Hampe, Jochen; Platzer, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    Splicing generates mature transcripts from genes in pieces in eukaryotic cells. Overwhelming evidence has accumulated that alternative routes in splicing are possible for most human and mammalian genes, thereby allowing formation of different transcripts from one gene. No function has been assigned to the majority of identified alternative splice forms, and it has been assumed that they compose inert or tolerated waste from aberrant or noisy splicing. Here we demonstrate that five human transcription units (WT1, NOD2, GNAS, RABL2A, RABL2B) have constant splice-isoform ratios in genetically diverse lymphoblastoid cell lines independent of the type of alternative splicing (exon skipping, alternative donor/acceptor, tandem splice sites) and gene expression level. Even splice events that create premature stop codons and potentially trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay are found at constant fractions. The analyzed alternative splicing events were qualitatively but not quantitatively conserved in corresponding chimpanzee cell lines. Additionally, subtle splicing at tandem acceptor splice sites (GNAS, RABL2A/B) was highly constrained and strongly depends on the upstream donor sequence content. These results also demonstrate that unusual and unproductive splice variants are produced in a regulated manner. PMID:21220357

  3. AVISPA: a web tool for the prediction and analysis of alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Barash, Yoseph; Vaquero-Garcia, Jorge; González-Vallinas, Juan; Xiong, Hui Yuan; Gao, Weijun; Lee, Leo J; Frey, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptome complexity and its relation to numerous diseases underpins the need to predict in silico splice variants and the regulatory elements that affect them. Building upon our recently described splicing code, we developed AVISPA, a Galaxy-based web tool for splicing prediction and analysis. Given an exon and its proximal sequence, the tool predicts whether the exon is alternatively spliced, displays tissue-dependent splicing patterns, and whether it has associated regulatory elements. We assess AVISPA's accuracy on an independent dataset of tissue-dependent exons, and illustrate how the tool can be applied to analyze a gene of interest. AVISPA is available at http://avispa.biociphers.org. PMID:24156756

  4. Los1p, Involved in Yeast Pre-Trna Splicing, Positively Regulates Members of the Sol Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Shen, W. C.; Stanford, D. R.; Hopper, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    To understand the role of Los1p in pre-tRNA splicing, we sought los1 multicopy suppressors. We found SOL1 that suppresses both point and null LOS1 mutations. Since, when fused to the Gal4p DNA-binding domain, Los1p activates transcription, we tested whether Los1p regulates SOL1. We found that los1 mutants have depleted levels of SOL1 mRNA and Sollp. Thus, LOS1 appears to positively regulate SOL1. SOL1 belongs to a multigene family with at least two additional members, SOL2 and SOL3. Sol proteins have extensive similarity to an unusual group of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases. As the similarities are restricted to areas separate from the catalytic domain, these G6PDs may have more than one function. The SOL family appears to be unessential since cells with a triple disruption of all three SOL genes are viable. SOL gene disruptions negatively affect tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression and the severity increases with the number of mutant SOL genes. However, tRNA levels do not vary with either multicopy SOL genes or with SOL disruptions. Therefore, the Sol proteins affect tRNA expression/function at steps other than transcription or splicing. We propose that LOS1 regulates gene products involved in tRNA expression/function as well as pre-tRNA splicing. PMID:8725220

  5. Los1p, involved in yeast pre-tRNA splicing, positively regulates members of the SOL gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.C.; Stanford, D.R.; Hopper, A.K.

    1996-06-01

    To understand the role of Los1p in pre-tRNA splicing, we sought los1 multicopy suppressors. We found SOL1 that suppresses both point and null LOS1 mutations. Since, when fused to the Gal4p DNA-binding domain, Los1p activates transcription, we tested whether Los1p regulates SOL1. We found that los1 mutants have depleted levels of SOL1 mRNA and Sol1p. Thus, LOS1 appears to positively regulate SOL1. SOL1 belongs to a multigene family with at least two additional members, SOL2 and SOL3. Sol proteins have extensive similarity to an unusual group of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases (G6PDs). As the similarities are restricted to areas separate from the catalytic domain, these G6PDs may have more than one function. The SOL gene disruptions negatively affect tRNA-mediated nonsense suppression and the severity increases with the number of mutant SOL genes. However, tRNA levels do not vary with either multicopy SOL genes or with SOL disruptions. Therefore, the Sol proteins affect tRNA expression/function at steps other than transcription or splicing. We propose that LOS1 regulates gene products involved in tRNA expression/function as well as pre-tRNA splicing. 64 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. The human XPG gene: gene architecture, alternative splicing and single nucleotide polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Emmert, Steffen; Schneider, Thomas D.; Khan, Sikandar G.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Defects in the XPG DNA repair endonuclease gene can result in the cancer-prone disorders xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or the XP–Cockayne syndrome complex. While the XPG cDNA sequence was known, determination of the genomic sequence was required to understand its different functions. In cells from normal donors, we found that the genomic sequence of the human XPG gene spans 30 kb, contains 15 exons that range from 61 to 1074 bp and 14 introns that range from 250 to 5763 bp. Analysis of the splice donor and acceptor sites using an information theory-based approach revealed three splice sites with low information content, which are components of the minor (U12) spliceosome. We identified six alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms in cells from normal donors and from XPG patients: partial deletion of exon 8, partial retention of intron 8, two with alternative exons (in introns 1 and 6) and two that retained complete introns (introns 3 and 9). The amount of alternatively spliced XPG mRNA isoforms varied in different tissues. Most alternative splice donor and acceptor sites had a relatively high information content, but one has the U12 spliceosome sequence. A single nucleotide polymorphism has allele frequencies of 0.74 for 3507G and 0.26 for 3507C in 91 donors. The human XPG gene contains multiple splice sites with low information content in association with multiple alternatively spliced isoforms of XPG mRNA. PMID:11266544

  7. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  8. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila; Bendixen, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB) in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation. PMID:26101749

  9. Tissue-specific alternative splicing of TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Welch, Cullan; Hansson, Ola; Adhikari, Neeta; Scott, Laura J; Usher, Nicolle; Tong, Maurine; Sprau, Andrew; Swift, Amy; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Erdos, Michael R; He, Zhi; Saxena, Richa; Harmon, Brennan; Kotova, Olga; Hoffman, Eric P; Altshuler, David; Groop, Leif; Boehnke, Michael; Collins, Francis S; Hall, Jennifer L

    2009-10-15

    Common variants in the transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) gene have been identified as the strongest genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the mechanisms by which these non-coding variants increase risk for T2D are not well-established. We used 13 expression assays to survey mRNA expression of multiple TCF7L2 splicing forms in up to 380 samples from eight types of human tissue (pancreas, pancreatic islets, colon, liver, monocytes, skeletal muscle, subcutaneous adipose tissue and lymphoblastoid cell lines) and observed a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing. We tested whether the expression of TCF7L2 splicing forms was associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs7903146 and rs12255372, located within introns 3 and 4 of the gene and most strongly associated with T2D. Expression of two splicing forms was lower in pancreatic islets with increasing counts of T2D-associated alleles of the SNPs: a ubiquitous splicing form (P = 0.018 for rs7903146 and P = 0.020 for rs12255372) and a splicing form found in pancreatic islets, pancreas and colon but not in other tissues tested here (P = 0.009 for rs12255372 and P = 0.053 for rs7903146). Expression of this form in glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets correlated with expression of proinsulin (r(2) = 0.84-0.90, P < 0.00063). In summary, we identified a tissue-specific pattern of alternative splicing of TCF7L2. After adjustment for multiple tests, no association between expression of TCF7L2 in eight types of human tissue samples and T2D-associated genetic variants remained significant. Alternative splicing of TCF7L2 in pancreatic islets warrants future studies. GenBank Accession Numbers: FJ010164-FJ010174. PMID:19602480

  10. Prenatal ethanol increases ethanol intake throughout adolescence, alters ethanol-mediated aversive learning, and affects μ but not δ or κ opioid receptor mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Fabio, María Carolina; Macchione, Ana Fabiola; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2015-06-01

    Animal models of prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) have indicated a facilitatory effect of PEE on adolescent ethanol intake, but few studies have assessed the effects of moderate PEE throughout adolescence. The mechanisms underlying this facilitatory effect remain largely unknown. In the present study, we analysed ethanol intake in male and female Wistar rats with or without PEE (2.0 g/kg, gestational days 17-20) from postnatal days 37 to 62. The results revealed greater ethanol consumption in PEE rats than in controls, which persisted throughout adolescence. By the end of testing, ethanol ingestion in PEE rats was nearly 6.0 g/kg. PEE was associated with insensitivity to ethanol-induced aversion. PEE and control rats were further analysed for levels of μ, δ and κ opioid receptor mRNA in the infralimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens shell, and ventral tegmental area. Similar levels of mRNA were observed across most areas and opioid receptors, but μ receptor mRNA in the ventral tegmental area was significantly increased by PEE. Unlike previous studies that assessed the effects of PEE on ethanol intake close to birth, or in only a few sessions during adolescence, the present study observed a facilitatory effect of PEE that lasted throughout adolescence. PEE was associated with insensitivity to the aversive effect of ethanol, and increased levels of μ opioid receptor transcripts. PEE is a prominent vulnerability factor that probably favors the engagement of adolescents in risky trajectories of ethanol use. PMID:25865037

  11. Splicing changes in SMA mouse motoneurons and SMN-depleted neuroblastoma cells: Evidence for involvement of splicing regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Qing; Kayikci, Melis; Odermatt, Philipp; Meyer, Kathrin; Michels, Olivia; Saxena, Smita; Ule, Jernej; Schümperli, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by deletions or mutations in the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The second gene copy, SMN2, produces some, but not enough, functional SMN protein. SMN is essential to assemble small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that form the spliceosome. However, it is not clear whether SMA is caused by defects in this function that could lead to splicing changes in all tissues, or by the impairment of an additional, less well characterized, but motoneuron-specific SMN function. We addressed the first possibility by exon junction microarray analysis of motoneurons (MNs) isolated by laser capture microdissection from a severe SMA mouse model. This revealed changes in multiple U2-dependent splicing events. Moreover, splicing appeared to be more strongly affected in MNs than in other cells. By testing mutiple genes in a model of progressive SMN depletion in NB2a neuroblastoma cells, we obtained evidence that U2-dependent splicing changes occur earlier than U12-dependent ones. As several of these changes affect genes coding for splicing regulators, this may acerbate the splicing response induced by low SMN levels and induce secondary waves of splicing alterations. PMID:25692239

  12. Alternative Splice Variants, a New Class of Protein Cancer Biomarker Candidates: Findings in Pancreatic Cancer and Breast Cancer with Systems Biology Implications

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.; Yocum, Anastasia K.; Menon, Rajasree

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays an important role in protein diversity without increasing genome size. Earlier thought to be uncommon, splicing appears to affect the majority of genes. Alternative splice variants have been detected at the mRNA level in many diseases. We have designed and demonstrated a discovery pipeline for alternative splice variant (ASV) proteins from tandem MS/MS datasets. We created a modified ECgene database with entries from exhaustive three-frame translation of Ensembl transcripts and gene models from ECgene, with periodic updates. The human database has 14 million entries; the mouse database, 10 million entries. We match MS/MS findings against these potential translation products to identify and quantify known and novel ASVs. In this review, we summarize findings and systems biology implications of biomarker candidates from a mouse model of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [28] and a mouse model of human Her2/neu-induced breast cancer [27]. The same approach is being applied to human tumors, plasma, and cell line studies of other cancers. PMID:20534909

  13. A novel synonymous mutation in the MPZ gene causing an aberrant splicing pattern and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1b.

    PubMed

    Corrado, L; Magri, S; Bagarotti, A; Carecchio, M; Piscosquito, G; Pareyson, D; Varrasi, C; Vecchio, D; Zonta, A; Cantello, R; Taroni, F; D'Alfonso, S

    2016-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is an inherited peripheral neuropathy with a heterogeneous genetic background. Here, we describe two CMT1B families with a mild sensory-motor neuropathy and a novel synonymous variant (c.309G > T, p.G103G) in exon 3 of the MPZ gene. Next generation sequencing analysis on a 94 CMT gene panel showed no mutations in other disease genes. In vitro splicing assay and mRNA expression analysis indicated that the c.309T variant enhances a cryptic donor splice site at position c.304 resulting in the markedly increased expression of the r.304_448del alternative transcript in patients' cells. This transcript is predicted to encode a truncated P0 protein (p.V102Cfs11*) lacking the transmembrane domain, thus suggesting a possible haploinsufficiency mechanism for this mutation. This is the third reported synonymous MPZ variant associated with CMT1 and affecting splicing. These data confirm the functional impact of synonymous variants on MPZ splicing and their possible role as disease-causing mutations rather than silent polymorphisms. PMID:27344971

  14. Rapid generation of splicing reporters with pSpliceExpress

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Shivendra; Khanna, Amit; Stamm, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Almost all human protein-coding transcripts undergo pre-mRNA splicing and a majority of them is alternatively spliced. The most common technique used to analyze the regulation of an alternative exon is through reporter minigene constructs. However, their construction is time-consuming and is often complicated by the limited availability of appropriate restriction sites. Here, we report a fast and simple recombination-based method to generate splicing reporter genes, using a new vector, pSpliceExpress. The system allows generation of minigenes within one week. Minigenes generated with pSpliceExpress show the same regulation as displayed by conventionally cloned reporter constructs and provide an alternate avenue to study splice site selection in vivo. PMID:18930792

  15. Evolutionarily conserved autoregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing by ribosomal protein L10a

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Satomi; Togo-Ohno, Marina; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs can regulate expression of protein-coding genes by generating unproductive mRNAs rapidly degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Many of the genes directly regulated by alternative splicing coupled with NMD (AS-NMD) are related to RNA metabolism, but the repertoire of genes regulated by AS-NMD in vivo is to be determined. Here, we analyzed transcriptome data of wild-type and NMD-defective mutant strains of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and demonstrate that eight of the 82 cytoplasmic ribosomal protein (rp) genes generate unproductively spliced mRNAs. Knockdown of any of the eight rp genes exerted a dynamic and compensatory effect on alternative splicing of its own transcript and inverse effects on that of the other rp genes. A large subunit protein L10a, termed RPL-1 in nematodes, directly and specifically binds to an evolutionarily conserved 39-nt stretch termed L10ARE between the two alternative 5′ splice sites in its own pre-mRNA to switch the splice site choice. Furthermore, L10ARE-mediated splicing autoregulation of the L10a-coding gene is conserved in vertebrates. These results indicate that L10a is an evolutionarily conserved splicing regulator and that homeostasis of a subset of the rp genes are regulated at the level of pre-mRNA splicing in vivo. PMID:26961311

  16. Expression and RNA splicing of the maize glutathione S-transferase Bronze2 gene is regulated by cadmium and other stresses.

    PubMed Central

    Marrs, K A; Walbot, V

    1997-01-01

    The Bronze2 (Bz2) gene in maize (Zea mays) encodes a glutathione S-transferase that performs the last genetically defined step in anthocyanin biosynthesis--tagging anthocyanin precursors with glutathione, allowing for recognition and entry of anthocyanins into the vacuole. Here we show that Bz2 gene expression is highly induced by heavy metals such as cadmium. Treatment of maize seedlings with cadmium results in a 20-fold increase in Bz2 message accumulation and a 50-fold increase in the presence of the unspliced, intron-containing transcript. The increase in message levels during cadmium stress appears to result, at least in part, from activation of an alternative mRNA start site approximately 200 nucleotides upstream of the normal start site; this site is not used in unstressed or heat-stressed tissues. The effect of cadmium on the RNA splicing of Bz2 seems to be specific: splicing of other intron-containing maize genes, including a maize actin gene under the control of the cadmium-inducible Bz2 promoter, is unaffected by cadmium stress. Conversely, Bz2 intron splicing is not affected by other stress conditions that induce Bz2 gene expression, such as abscisic acid, auxin, or cold stress. Surprisingly, the increase in Bz2 mRNA during cadmium stress does not result in an increase in Bz2 glutathione S-transferase activity. We propose that an alternative protein may be encoded by Bz2 that has a role during responses to heavy metals. PMID:9008391

  17. Alternatively Spliced Methionine Synthase in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cobalamin and GSH Dependence and Inhibitory Effects of Neurotoxic Metals and Thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Waly, Mostafa; Power-Charnitsky, Verna-Ann; Hodgson, Nathaniel; Sharma, Alok; Audhya, Tapan; Zhang, Yiting; Deth, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The folate and cobalamin (Cbl-) dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) is highly sensitive to oxidation and its activity affects all methylation reactions. Recent studies have revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA in human brain and patient-derived fibroblasts. Here we show that MS mRNA in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells is alternatively spliced, resulting in three primary protein species, thus providing a useful model to examine cofactor dependence of these variant enzymes. MS activity was dependent upon methylcobalamin (MeCbl) or the combination of hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). OHCbl-based activity was eliminated by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) but could be rescued by provision of either glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl) or MeCbl. Pretreatment of cells with lead, arsenic, aluminum, mercury, or the ethylmercury-containing preservative thimerosal lowered GSH levels and inhibited MS activity in association with decreased uptake of cysteine, which is rate-limiting for GSH synthesis. Thimerosal treatment decreased cellular levels of GSCbl and MeCbl. These findings indicate that the alternatively spliced form of MS expressed in SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells is sensitive to inhibition by thimerosal and neurotoxic metals, and lower GSH levels contribute to their inhibitory action. PMID:26989453

  18. Alternatively Spliced Methionine Synthase in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cobalamin and GSH Dependence and Inhibitory Effects of Neurotoxic Metals and Thimerosal

    PubMed Central

    Power-Charnitsky, Verna-Ann; Sharma, Alok; Audhya, Tapan; Zhang, Yiting

    2016-01-01

    The folate and cobalamin (Cbl-) dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS) is highly sensitive to oxidation and its activity affects all methylation reactions. Recent studies have revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA in human brain and patient-derived fibroblasts. Here we show that MS mRNA in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells is alternatively spliced, resulting in three primary protein species, thus providing a useful model to examine cofactor dependence of these variant enzymes. MS activity was dependent upon methylcobalamin (MeCbl) or the combination of hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). OHCbl-based activity was eliminated by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH) but could be rescued by provision of either glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl) or MeCbl. Pretreatment of cells with lead, arsenic, aluminum, mercury, or the ethylmercury-containing preservative thimerosal lowered GSH levels and inhibited MS activity in association with decreased uptake of cysteine, which is rate-limiting for GSH synthesis. Thimerosal treatment decreased cellular levels of GSCbl and MeCbl. These findings indicate that the alternatively spliced form of MS expressed in SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells is sensitive to inhibition by thimerosal and neurotoxic metals, and lower GSH levels contribute to their inhibitory action. PMID:26989453

  19. In utero and lactational exposure to low-dose genistein-vinclozolin mixture affects the development and growth factor mRNA expression of the submandibular salivary gland in immature female rats.

    PubMed

    Kouidhi, Wided; Desmetz, Catherine; Nahdi, Afef; Bergès, Raymond; Cravedi, Jean-Pierre; Auger, Jacques; El May, Michèle; Canivenc-Lavier, Marie Chantal

    2012-06-01

    It has been suggested that hormonally controlled submandibular salivary gland (SSG) development and secretions may be affected by endocrine disruptor compounds. We investigated the effects of oral gestation-lactation exposure to 1 mg/kg body weight daily dose of the estrogenic soy-isoflavone genistein and/or the anti-androgenic food contaminant vinclozolin in female rats. The SSGs of female offspring were collected at postnatal day 35 to study gland morphogenesis and mRNA expression of sex-hormone receptors and endocrine growth factors as sex-dependent biomarkers. Because of high expression in neonatal SSG, mRNA expression of transforming growth factor α was also studied. Exposure to genistein, vinclozolin, or a genistein+vinclozolin mixture resulted in significantly lower numbers of striated ducts linked to an increase in their area and lower acinar proliferation (Ki-67-positive nuclei). Exposure to the mixture had the highest significant effects, which were particularly associated with repression of epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, and transforming growth factor α expression. In conclusion, early exposure to low doses of genistein and vinclozolin can affect glandular structure and endocrine gene mRNA expression in prepubertal SSG in female rats, and the effects are potentialized by the genistein+vinclozolin mixture. Our study provides the first evidence that SSG are targeted by both estrogenic and anti-androgenic disrupting compounds and are more sensitive to mixtures. PMID:22317923

  20. BUILDING ROBUST TRANSCRIPTOMES WITH MASTER SPLICING FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jangi, Mohini; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent splicing networks arise from many discrete splicing decisions regulated in unison. Here, we examine the properties of robust, context-specific splicing networks. We propose that a subset of key splicing regulators, or “master splicing factors,” respond to environmental cues to establish and maintain tissue transcriptomes during development. PMID:25417102

  1. Repair of Thalassemic Human β -globin mRNA in Mammalian Cells by Antisense Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowska, Halina; Sambade, Maria J.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Kole, Ryszard

    1996-11-01

    In one form of β -thalassemia, a genetic blood disorder, a mutation in intron 2 of the β -globin gene (IVS2-654) causes aberrant splicing of β -globin pre-mRNA and, consequently, β -globin deficiency. Treatment of mammalian cells stably expressing the IVS2-654 human β -globin gene with antisense oligonucleotides targeted at the aberrant splice sites restored correct splicing in a dose-dependent fashion, generating correct human β -globin mRNA and polypeptide. Both products persisted for up to 72 hr posttreatment. The oligonucleotides modified splicing by a true antisense mechanism without overt unspecific effects on cell growth and splicing of other pre-mRNAs. This novel approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore rather than to down-regulate the activity of the target gene is applicable to other splicing mutants and is of potential clinical interest.

  2. Genome-wide survey of Alternative Splicing in Sorghum Bicolor.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Bahman; Abbaszadeh, Bahram; Taghizadeghan, Mehdi; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2014-07-01

    Sorghum bicolor is a member of grass family which is an attractive model plant for genome study due to interesting genome features like low genome size. In this research, we performed comprehensive investigation of Alternative Splicing and ontology aspects of genes those have undergone these events in sorghum bicolor. We used homology based alignments between gene rich transcripts, represented by tentative consensus (TC) transcript sequences, and genomic scaffolds to deduce the structure of genes and identify alternatively spliced transcripts in sorghum. Using homology mapping of assembled expressed sequence tags with genomics data, we identified 2,137 Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor. Our study showed that complex events and intron retention are the main types of Alternative Splicing events in S. bicolor and highlights the prevalence of splicing site recognition for definition of introns in this plant. Annotations of the alternatively spliced genes revealed that they represent diverse biological process and molecular functions, suggesting a fundamental role for Alternative Splicing in affecting the development and physiology of S. bicolor. PMID:25049459

  3. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Patrick S.; Scanlan, Aaron T.; Dalbo, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45–50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD. PMID:26090382

  4. High Intensity Interval Training Favourably Affects Angiotensinogen mRNA Expression and Markers of Cardiorenal Health in a Rat Model of Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Patrick S; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of CKD-related complications stem from cardiovascular pathologies such as hypertension. To help reduce cardiovascular complications, aerobic exercise is often prescribed. Emerging evidence suggests high intensity interval training (HIIT) may be more beneficial than traditional aerobic exercise. However, appraisals of varying forms of aerobic exercise, along with descriptions of mechanisms responsible for health-related improvements, are lacking. This study examined the effects of 8 weeks of HIIT (85% VO2max), versus low intensity aerobic exercise (LIT; 45-50% VO2max) and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD. Tissue-specific mRNA expression of RAAS-related genes and CKD-related clinical markers were examined. Compared to SED, HIIT resulted in increased plasma albumin (p = 0.001), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.028), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.045). Compared to LIT, HIIT resulted in reduced Agt mRNA expression (p = 0.035), reduced plasma LDL (p = 0.001), triglycerides (p = 0.029), and total cholesterol (p = 0.002), increased plasma albumin (p = 0.047), reduced remnant kidney weight (p = 0.005), and reduced kidney weight-body weight ratios (p = 0.048). These results suggest HIIT is a more potent regulator of several markers that describe and influence health in CKD. PMID:26090382

  5. Organ-Specific Splice Variants of Aquaporin Water Channel AgAQP1 in the Malaria Vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Liu, Kun; Linser, Paul J.; Agre, Peter; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are important for water homeostasis in all organisms. Malaria transmission is dependent on Anopheles mosquitoes. Water balance is a major factor influencing mosquito survival, which may indirectly affect pathogen transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained full-length mRNA sequences for Anopheles gambiae aquaporin 1 (AgAQP1) and identified two splice variants for the gene. In vitro expression analysis showed that both variants transported water and were inhibited by Hg2+. One splice variant (AgAQP1A) was exclusively expressed in adult female ovaries indicating a function in mosquito reproduction. The other splice variant (AgAQP1B) was expressed in the midgut, malpighian tubules and the head in adult mosquitoes. Immunolabeling showed that in malpighian tubules, AgAQP1 is expressed in principal cells in the proximal portion and in stellate cells in the distal portion. Moreover, AgAQP1 is expressed in Johnston’s organ (the “ear”), which is important for courtship behavior. Conclusions And Significance These results suggest that AgAQP1 may play roles associated with mating (courtship) and reproduction in addition to water homeostasis in this important African malaria vector. PMID:24066188

  6. Identification by high-throughput imaging of the histone methyltransferase EHMT2 as an epigenetic regulator of VEGFA alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Salton, Maayan; Voss, Ty C.; Misteli, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence points to a role of chromatin in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS). In order to identify novel chromatin regulators of AS, we screened an RNAi library of chromatin proteins using a cell-based high-throughput in vivo assay. We identified a set of chromatin proteins that regulate AS. Using simultaneous genome-wide expression and AS analysis, we demonstrate distinct and non-overlapping functions of these chromatin modifiers on transcription and AS. Detailed mechanistic characterization of one dual function chromatin modifier, the H3K9 methyltransferase EHMT2 (G9a), identified VEGFA as a major chromatin-mediated AS target. Silencing of EHMT2, or its heterodimer partner EHMT1, affects AS by promoting exclusion of VEGFA exon 6a, but does not alter total VEGFA mRNA levels. The epigenetic regulatory mechanism of AS by EHMT2 involves an adaptor system consisting of the chromatin modulator HP1γ, which binds methylated H3K9 and recruits splicing regulator SRSF1. The epigenetic regulation of VEGFA is physiologically relevant since EHMT2 is transcriptionally induced in response to hypoxia and triggers concomitant changes in AS of VEGFA. These results characterize a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism of AS and they demonstrate separate roles of epigenetic modifiers in transcription and alternative splicing. PMID:25414343

  7. An EMT–Driven Alternative Splicing Program Occurs in Human Breast Cancer and Modulates Cellular Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Flytzanis, Nicholas C.; Balsamo, Michele; Condeelis, John S.; Oktay, Maja H.; Burge, Christopher B.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a mechanism important for embryonic development, plays a critical role during malignant transformation. While much is known about transcriptional regulation of EMT, alternative splicing of several genes has also been correlated with EMT progression, but the extent of splicing changes and their contributions to the morphological conversion accompanying EMT have not been investigated comprehensively. Using an established cell culture model and RNA–Seq analyses, we determined an alternative splicing signature for EMT. Genes encoding key drivers of EMT–dependent changes in cell phenotype, such as actin cytoskeleton remodeling, regulation of cell–cell junction formation, and regulation of cell migration, were enriched among EMT–associated alternatively splicing events. Our analysis suggested that most EMT–associated alternative splicing events are regulated by one or more members of the RBFOX, MBNL, CELF, hnRNP, or ESRP classes of splicing factors. The EMT alternative splicing signature was confirmed in human breast cancer cell lines, which could be classified into basal and luminal subtypes based exclusively on their EMT–associated splicing pattern. Expression of EMT–associated alternative mRNA transcripts was also observed in primary breast cancer samples, indicating that EMT–dependent splicing changes occur commonly in human tumors. The functional significance of EMT–associated alternative splicing was tested by expression of the epithelial-specific splicing factor ESRP1 or by depletion of RBFOX2 in mesenchymal cells, both of which elicited significant changes in cell morphology and motility towards an epithelial phenotype, suggesting that splicing regulation alone can drive critical aspects of EMT–associated phenotypic changes. The molecular description obtained here may aid in the development of new diagnostic and prognostic markers for analysis of breast cancer progression. PMID:21876675

  8. A conserved intronic U1 snRNP-binding sequence promotes trans-splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-Li; Fan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Jia; Li, Liang; Shao, Wei; Zhan, Shuai; Hao, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Unlike typical cis-splicing, trans-splicing joins exons from two separate transcripts to produce chimeric mRNA and has been detected in most eukaryotes. Trans-splicing in trypanosomes and nematodes has been characterized as a spliced leader RNA-facilitated reaction; in contrast, its mechanism in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. Here we investigate mod(mdg4), a classic trans-spliced gene in Drosophila, and report that two critical RNA sequences in the middle of the last 5′ intron, TSA and TSB, promote trans-splicing of mod(mdg4). In TSA, a 13-nucleotide (nt) core motif is conserved across Drosophila species and is essential and sufficient for trans-splicing, which binds U1 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) through strong base-pairing with U1 snRNA. In TSB, a conserved secondary structure acts as an enhancer. Deletions of TSA and TSB using the CRISPR/Cas9 system result in developmental defects in flies. Although it is not clear how the 5′ intron finds the 3′ introns, compensatory changes in U1 snRNA rescue trans-splicing of TSA mutants, demonstrating that U1 recruitment is critical to promote trans-splicing in vivo. Furthermore, TSA core-like motifs are found in many other trans-spliced Drosophila genes, including lola. These findings represent a novel mechanism of trans-splicing, in which RNA motifs in the 5′ intron are sufficient to bring separate transcripts into close proximity to promote trans-splicing. PMID:25838544

  9. The Octatricopeptide Repeat Protein Raa8 Is Required for Chloroplast trans Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christina; Wünsch, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The mRNA maturation of the tripartite chloroplast psaA gene from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii depends on various nucleus-encoded factors that participate in trans splicing of two group II introns. Recently, a multiprotein complex was identified that is involved in processing the psaA precursor mRNA. Using coupled tandem affinity purification (TAP) and mass spectrometry analyses with the trans-splicing factor Raa4 as a bait protein, we recently identified a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprising the previously characterized trans-splicing factors Raa1, Raa3, Raa4, and Rat2 plus novel components. Raa1 and Rat2 share a structural motif, an octatricopeptide repeat (OPR), that presumably functions as an RNA interaction module. Two of the novel RNP complex components also exhibit a predicted OPR motif and were therefore considered potential trans-splicing factors. In this study, we selected bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones encoding these OPR proteins and conducted functional complementation assays using previously generated trans-splicing mutants. Our assay revealed that the trans-splicing defect of mutant F19 was restored by a new factor we named RAA8; molecular characterization of complemented strains verified that Raa8 participates in splicing of the first psaA group II intron. Three of six OPR motifs are located in the C-terminal end of Raa8, which was shown to be essential for restoring psaA mRNA trans splicing. Our results support the important role played by OPR proteins in chloroplast RNA metabolism and also demonstrate that combining TAP and mass spectrometry with functional complementation studies represents a vigorous tool for identifying trans-splicing factors. PMID:26209695

  10. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  11. Identification of alternatively spliced mRNAs encoding potential new regulatory proteins in cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Carpenter, S; Christensen, J; Storgaard, T; Viuff, B; Wannemuehler, Y; Belousov, J; Roth, J A

    1993-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and characterize low-abundance bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mRNAs. In infected cattle we could detect spliced mRNA with a splice pattern consistent with a Tax/Rex mRNA, as well as at least four alternatively spliced RNAs. Two of the alternatively spliced mRNAs encoded hitherto unrecognized BLV proteins, designated RIII and GIV. The Tax/Rex and alternatively spliced mRNAs could be detected at their highest levels in BLV-infected cell cultures; the next highest levels were found in samples from calves experimentally infected at 6 weeks postinoculation. Alternatively spliced mRNAs were also expressed, albeit at lower levels, in naturally infected animals; they were detected by a nested polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, the GIV mRNA was specifically detected in naturally infected cows with persistent lymphocytosis and in two of five calves at 6 months after experimental infection with BLV. Furthermore, the calf with the strongest signal for GIV had the highest lymphocyte counts. These data may suggest a correlation between expression of the GIV product and development of persistent lymphocytosis. Some of the donor and acceptor sites in the alternatively spliced mRNAs were highly unusual. The biological mechanisms and significance of such a choice of unexpected splice sites are currently unknown. Images PMID:8380084

  12. Splicosomal and serine and arginine-rich splicing factors as targets for TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is a potent regulator of cell growth and differentiation. TGF-β1 has been shown to be a key player in tissue remodeling processes in a number of disease states by inducing expression of extracellular matrix proteins. In this study a quantitative proteomic analysis was undertaken to investigate if TGF-β1 contributes to tissue remodeling by mediating mRNA splicing and production of alternative isoforms of proteins. Methodology/Principal findings The expression of proteins involved in mRNA splicing from TGF-β1-stimulated lung fibroblasts was compared to non-stimulated cells by employing isotope coded affinity tag (ICATTM) reagent labeling and tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 1733 proteins were identified and quantified with a relative standard deviation of 11% +/− 8 from enriched nuclear fractions. Seventy-six of these proteins were associated with mRNA splicing, including 22 proteins involved in splice site selection. In addition, TGF-β1 was observed to alter the relative expression of splicing proteins that may be important for alternative splicing of fibronectin. Specifically, TGF-β1 significantly induced expression of SRp20, and reduced the expression of SRp30C, which has been suggested to be a prerequisite for generation of alternatively spliced fibronectin. The induction of SRp20 was further confirmed by western blot and immunofluorescence. Conclusions The results show that TGF-β1 induces the expression of proteins involved in mRNA splicing and RNA processing in human lung fibroblasts. This may have an impact on the production of alternative isoforms of matrix proteins and can therefore be an important factor in tissue remodeling and disease progression. PMID:22541002

  13. UAP56- a key player with surprisingly diverse roles in pre-mRNA splicing and nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haihong

    2009-04-30

    Transcripts contain introns that are usually removed from premessenger RNA (MRNA) in the process of pre-mRNA splicing. After splicing, the mature RNA is exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The splicing and export processes are coupled. UAP56 protein, which is ubiquitously present in organisms from yeasts to humans, is a DExD/H-box family RNA helicase that is an essential splicing factor with various functions in the prespliceosome assembly and mature spliceosome assembly. Collective evidence indicates that UAP56 has an essential role in mRNA nuclear export. This mini-review summarizes recent evidence for the role of UAP56 in pre-mRNA splicing and nuclear export. PMID:19403039

  14. Inhibitory activity of the equine infectious anemia virus major 5' splice site in the absence of Rev.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Schalling, M; Zhao, C; Luukkonen, M; Nilsson, M; Fenyö, E M; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1996-01-01

    The major 5' splice site of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) conforms to the consensus 5' splice site in eight consecutive positions and is located immediately upstream of the gag AUG. Our results show that the presence of this 5' splice site on the EIAV gag mRNA decreases Gag production 30- to 60-fold. This is caused by inefficient nuclear mRNA export and inefficient mRNA utilization. Inhibition could be overcome by providing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev/Rev-responsive element, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex/Rex-responsive element, or simian retrovirus type 1 constitutive transport element. In addition, inhibition could be abolished by introducing single point mutations in the 5' splice site or by moving the 5' splice site away from its natural position immediately upstream of the gag AUG. This demonstrates that both maintenance of a perfect consensus 5' splice site and its proper location on the mRNA are important for inhibitory activity of the EIAV major 5' splice site. PMID:8648699

  15. scaRNAs regulate splicing and vertebrate heart development.

    PubMed

    Patil, Prakash; Kibiryeva, Nataliya; Uechi, Tamayo; Marshall, Jennifer; O'Brien, James E; Artman, Michael; Kenmochi, Naoya; Bittel, Douglas C

    2015-08-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) plays an important role in regulating mammalian heart development, but a link between misregulated splicing and congenital heart defects (CHDs) has not been shown. We reported that more than 50% of genes associated with heart development were alternatively spliced in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the level of 12 small cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) that direct the biochemical modification of specific nucleotides in spliceosomal RNAs. We sought to determine if scaRNA levels influence patterns of AS and heart development. We used primary cells derived from the RV of infants with TOF to show a direct link between scaRNA levels and splice isoforms of several genes that regulate heart development (e.g., GATA4, NOTCH2, DAAM1, DICER1, MBNL1 and MBNL2). In addition, we used antisense morpholinos to knock down the expression of two scaRNAs (scarna1 and snord94) in zebrafish and saw a corresponding disruption of heart development with an accompanying alteration in splice isoforms of cardiac regulatory genes. Based on these combined results, we hypothesize that scaRNA modification of spliceosomal RNAs assists in fine tuning the spliceosome for dynamic selection of mRNA splice isoforms. Our results are consistent with disruption of splicing patterns during early embryonic development leading to insufficient communication between the first and second heart fields, resulting in conotruncal misalignment and TOF. Our findings represent a new paradigm for determining the mechanisms underlying congenital cardiac malformations. PMID:25916634

  16. Non-coding functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in development

    PubMed Central

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    A majority of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) in the higher eukaryotes undergo alternative splicing to generate more than one mature product. By targeting the open reading frame region this process increases diversity of protein isoforms beyond the nominal coding capacity of the genome. However, alternative splicing also frequently controls output levels and spatiotemporal features of cellular and organismal gene expression programs. Here we discuss how these non-coding functions of alternative splicing contribute to development through regulation of mRNA stability, translational efficiency and cellular localization. PMID:26493705

  17. SPACE: an algorithm to predict and quantify alternatively spliced isoforms using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Anton, Miguel A; Gorostiaga, Dorleta; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Segura, Victor; Carmona-Saez, Pedro; Pascual-Montano, Alberto; Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M; Rubio, Angel

    2008-01-01

    Exon and exon+junction microarrays are promising tools for studying alternative splicing. Current analytical tools applied to these arrays lack two relevant features: the ability to predict unknown spliced forms and the ability to quantify the concentration of known and unknown isoforms. SPACE is an algorithm that has been developed to (1) estimate the number of different transcripts expressed under several conditions, (2) predict the precursor mRNA splicing structure and (3) quantify the transcript concentrations including unknown forms. The results presented here show its robustness and accuracy for real and simulated data. PMID:18312629

  18. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  19. Convergent origins and rapid evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in Metazoa: Insights from the Ctenophora and Hydrozoa

    PubMed Central

    Derelle, Romain; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Manuel, Michael; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Houliston, Evelyn

    2010-01-01

    Replacement of mRNA 5′ UTR sequences by short sequences trans-spliced from specialized, noncoding, spliced leader (SL) RNAs is an enigmatic phenomenon, occurring in a set of distantly related animal groups including urochordates, nematodes, flatworms, and hydra, as well as in Euglenozoa and dinoflagellates. Whether SL trans-splicing has a common evolutionary origin and biological function among different organisms remains unclear. We have undertaken a systematic identification of SL exons in cDNA sequence data sets from non-bilaterian metazoan species and their closest unicellular relatives. SL exons were identified in ctenophores and in hydrozoan cnidarians, but not in other cnidarians, placozoans, or sponges, or in animal unicellular relatives. Mapping of SL absence/presence obtained from this and previous studies onto current phylogenetic trees favors an evolutionary scenario involving multiple origins for SLs during eumetazoan evolution rather than loss from a common ancestor. In both ctenophore and hydrozoan species, multiple SL sequences were identified, showing high sequence diversity. Detailed analysis of a large data set generated for the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica revealed trans-splicing of given mRNAs by multiple alternative SLs. No evidence was found for a common identity of trans-spliced mRNAs between different hydrozoans. One feature found specifically to characterize SL-spliced mRNAs in hydrozoans, however, was a marked adenosine enrichment immediately 3′ of the SL acceptor splice site. Our findings of high sequence divergence and apparently indiscriminate use of SLs in hydrozoans, along with recent findings in other taxa, indicate that SL genes have evolved rapidly in parallel in diverse animal groups, with constraint on SL exon sequence evolution being apparently rare. PMID:20142326

  20. Analysis of a Splice Array Experiment Elucidates Roles of Chromatin Elongation Factor Spt4–5 in Splicing

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4–5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4–5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4–Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function. PMID:16172632

  1. Determinants of Plant U12-Dependent Intron Splicing Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Dominika; Simpson, Craig G.; Clark, Gillian P.; Jennings, Nikki S.; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Makalowski, Wojciech; Brown, John W.S.; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Factors affecting splicing of plant U12-dependent introns have been examined by extensive mutational analyses in an in vivo tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) protoplast system using introns from three different Arabidopsis thaliana genes: CBP20, GSH2, and LD. The results provide evidence that splicing efficiency of plant U12 introns depends on a combination of factors, including UA content, exon bridging interactions between the U12 intron and flanking U2-dependent introns, and exon splicing enhancer sequences (ESEs). Unexpectedly, all three plant U12 introns required an adenosine at the upstream purine position in the branchpoint consensus UCCUURAUY. The exon upstream of the LD U12 intron is a major determinant of its higher level of splicing efficiency and potentially contains two ESE regions. These results suggest that in plants, U12 introns represent a level at which expression of their host genes can be regulated. PMID:15100401

  2. Intron Retention in the Alternatively Spliced Region of RON Results from Weak 3’ Splice Site Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lindsay D.; Lucas, Christian M.; Eperon, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The RON gene encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor for macrophage-stimulating protein. A constitutively active isoform that arises by skipping of exon 11 is expressed in carcinomas and contributes to an invasive phenotype. However, a high proportion of the mRNA expressed from the endogenous gene, or from transfected minigenes, appears to retain introns 10 and 11. It is not known whether this represents specific repression or the presence of weak splicing signals. We have used chimeric pre-mRNAs spliced in vitro to investigate the reason for intron retention. A systematic test showed that, surprisingly, the exon sequences known to modulate exon 11 skipping were not limiting, but the 3’ splice site regions adjacent to exons 11 and 12 were too weak to support splicing when inserted into a globin intron. UV-crosslinking experiments showed binding of hnRNP F/H just 5’ of these regions, but the hnRNP F/H target sequences did not mediate inhibition. Instead, the failure of splicing is linked to weak binding of U2AF65, and spliceosome assembly stalls prior to formation of any of the ATP-dependent complexes. We discuss mechanisms by which U2AF65 binding is facilitated in vivo. PMID:24155930

  3. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, Enrique; Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M.

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  4. Alternative splicing and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pistoni, Mariaelena; Ghigna, Claudia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs is a major contributor to proteomic diversity and to the control of gene expression in higher eukaryotic cells. For this reasons, alternative splicing is tightly regulated in different tissues and developmental stages and its disruption can lead to a wide range of human disorders. The aim of this review is to focus on the relevance of alternative splicing for muscle function and muscle disease. We begin by giving a brief overview of alternative splicing, muscle-specific gene expression and muscular dystrophy. Next, to illustrate these concepts we focus on two muscular dystrophy, myotonic muscular dystrophy and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, both associated to disruption of splicing regulation in muscle. PMID:20603608

  5. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation, and tumor characteristics.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A; Tavtigian, Sean V; Goldgar, David E; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2009-05-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened for splicing aberrations. Tumors of variant carriers were tested for microsatellite instability and MMR protein expression. Variant segregation in families was assessed using Bayes factor causality analysis. Amino acid alterations were examined for evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Splicing aberrations were detected for 10 variants, including a frameshift as a minor cDNA product, and altered ratio of known alternate splice products. Loss of splice sites was well predicted by splice-site prediction programs SpliceSiteFinder (90%) and NNSPLICE (90%), but consequence of splice site loss was less accurately predicted. No aberrations correlated with ESE predictions for the nine exonic variants studied. Seven of eight missense variants had normal splicing (88%), but only one was a substitution considered neutral from evolutionary/physicochemical analysis. Combined with information from tumor and segregation analysis, and literature review, 16 of 19 variants were considered clinically relevant. Bioinformatic tools for prediction of splicing aberrations need improvement before use without supporting studies to assess variant pathogenicity. Classification of mismatch repair gene variants is assisted by a comprehensive approach that includes in vitro, tumor pathology, clinical, and evolutionary conservation data. PMID:19267393

  6. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation and tumor characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D.; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Brown, Melissa A.; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Goldgar, David E.; Young, Joanne P.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened for splicing aberrations. Tumors of variant carriers were tested for microsatellite instability and MMR protein expression. Variant segregation in families was assessed using Bayes factor causality analysis. Amino acid alterations were examined for evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Splicing aberrations were detected for ten variants, including a frameshift as a minor cDNA product, and altered ratio of known alternate splice products. Loss of splice sites was well predicted by splice site prediction programs SpliceSiteFinder (90%) and NNSPLICE (90%), but consequence of splice site loss was less accurately predicted. No aberrations correlated with ESE predictions for the nine exonic variants studied. Seven of eight missense variants had normal splicing (88%), but only one was a substitution considered neutral from evolutionary/physicochemical analysis. Combined with information from tumor and segregation analysis, and literature review, 16/19 variants were considered clinically relevant. Bioinformatic tools for prediction of splicing aberrations need improvement before use without supporting studies to assess variant pathogenicity. Classification of mismatch repair gene variants is assisted by a comprehensive approach which includes in vitro, tumor pathology, clinical, and evolutionary conservation data. PMID:19267393

  7. The Soluble CTLA-4 Splice Variant Protects From Type 1 Diabetes and Potentiates Regulatory T-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Gerold, Kay D.; Zheng, Peilin; Rainbow, Daniel B.; Zernecke, Alma; Wicker, Linda S.; Kissler, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE CTLA4 gene variation associates with multiple autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes. The CTLA4 susceptibility allele was found to generate decreased levels of mRNA encoding soluble CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) relative to the full-length isoform, the functional consequence of which is as yet unknown. In this study, we investigated the contribution of sCTLA-4 to immune regulation with the aim to elucidate the functional basis of the disease association of CTLA4. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To model the disease-associated splicing variation of CTLA4, we generated NOD mice in which sCTLA-4 mRNA is silenced by RNA interference. RESULTS We found that loss of sCTLA-4 impairs the function of regulatory T (Treg) cells. This functional defect could be attributed, at least in part, to the failure of sCTLA-4 knockdown (KD) Treg cells to downregulate dendritic cell costimulation. sCTLA-4 KD Treg cells, in contrast with wild-type Treg cells, failed to inhibit colitis induced by transfer of CD4+CD45RBhi cells into NOD.SCID animals. Furthermore, diminished sCTLA-4 expression accelerated the onset of autoimmune diabetes in transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS Our results demonstrate that sCTLA-4 participates in immune regulation by potentiating the function of Treg cells. The functional outcome of silencing this splice variant in the NOD model provides an explanation for the association of CTLA4 variation with autoimmunity. Lower sCTLA-4 expression from the susceptibility allele may directly affect the suppressive capacity of Treg cells and thereby modulate disease risk. Our unprecedented approach establishes the feasibility of modeling splicing variations relevant to autoimmunity. PMID:21602513

  8. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  9. Huntington’s Disease Protein Huntingtin Associates with its own mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Culver, Brady P.; DeClercq, Josh; Dolgalev, Igor; Yu, Man Shan; Ma, Bin; Heguy, Adriana; Tanese, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Huntington’s disease (HD) protein huntingtin (Htt) plays a role in multiple cellular pathways. Deregulation of one or more of these pathways by the mutant Htt protein has been suggested to contribute to the disease pathogenesis. Our recent discovery-based proteomics studies have uncovered RNA binding proteins and translation factors associated with the endogenous Htt protein purified from mouse brains, suggesting a potential new role for Htt in RNA transport and translation. Objective: To investigate how Htt might affect RNA metabolism we set out to purify and analyze RNA associated with Htt. Methods: RNA was extracted from immunopurified Htt-containing protein complexes and analyzed by microarrays and RNA-Seq. Results: Surprisingly, the most enriched mRNA that co-purified with Htt was Htt mRNA itself. The association of Htt protein and Htt mRNA was detected independent of intact ribosomes suggesting that it is not an RNA undergoing translation. Furthermore, we identified the recently reported mis-spliced Htt mRNA encoding a truncated protein comprised of exon 1 and a portion of the downstream intron in the immunoprecipitates containing mutant Htt protein. We show that Htt protein co-localizes with Htt mRNA and that wild-type Htt reduces expression of a reporter construct harboring the Htt 3’ UTR. Conclusions: HD protein is found in a complex with its own mRNA and RNA binding proteins and translation factors. Htt may be involved in modulating its expression through post-transcriptional pathways. It is possible that Htt shares mechanistic properties similar to RNA binding proteins such as TDP-43 and FUS implicated in other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26891106

  10. The dark matter of the cancer genome: aberrations in regulatory elements, untranslated regions, splice sites, non-coding RNA and synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Sven; Bartsch, Lorenz; Berkmann, Julia C; Fröse, Karin; Heitmann, Jana; Hoppe, Caroline; Iggena, Deetje; Jazmati, Danny; Karschnia, Philipp; Linsenmeier, Miriam; Maulhardt, Thomas; Möhrmann, Lino; Morstein, Johannes; Paffenholz, Stella V; Röpenack, Paula; Rückert, Timo; Sandig, Ludger; Schell, Maximilian; Steinmann, Anna; Voss, Gjendine; Wasmuth, Jacqueline; Weinberger, Maria E; Wullenkord, Ramona

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a disease of the genome caused by oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene inhibition. Deep sequencing studies including large consortia such as TCGA and ICGC identified numerous tumor-specific mutations not only in protein-coding sequences but also in non-coding sequences. Although 98% of the genome is not translated into proteins, most studies have neglected the information hidden in this "dark matter" of the genome. Malignancy-driving mutations can occur in all genetic elements outside the coding region, namely in enhancer, silencer, insulator, and promoter as well as in 5'-UTR and 3'-UTR Intron or splice site mutations can alter the splicing pattern. Moreover, cancer genomes contain mutations within non-coding RNA, such as microRNA, lncRNA, and lincRNA A synonymous mutation changes the coding region in the DNA and RNA but not the protein sequence. Importantly, oncogenes such as TERT or miR-21 as well as tumor suppressor genes such as TP53/p53, APC, BRCA1, or RB1 can be affected by these alterations. In summary, coding-independent mutations can affect gene regulation from transcription, splicing, mRNA stability to translation, and hence, this largely neglected area needs functional studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis. This review will focus on the important role and novel mechanisms of these non-coding or allegedly silent mutations in tumorigenesis. PMID:26992833

  11. G to A substitution in 5{prime} donor splice site of introns 18 and 48 of COL1A1 gene of type I collagen results in different splicing alternatives in osteogenesis imperfecta type I cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Willing, M.; Deschenes, S.

    1994-09-01

    We have identified a G to A substitution in the 5{prime} donor splice site of intron 18 of one COL1A1 allele in two unrelated families with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. A third OI type I family has a G to A substitution at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele. Both mutations abolish normal splicing and lead to reduced steady-state levels of mRNA from the mutant COL1A1 allele. The intron 18 mutation leads to both exon 18 skipping in the mRNA and to utilization of a single alternative splice site near the 3{prime} end of exon 18. The latter results in deletion of the last 8 nucleotides of exon 18 from the mRNA, a shift in the translational reading-frame, and the creation of a premature termination codon in exon 19. Of the potential alternative 5{prime} splice sites in exon 18 and intron 18, the one utilized has a surrounding nucleotide sequence which most closely resembles that of the natural splice site. Although a G to A mutation was detected at the identical position in intron 48 of one COL1A1 allele in another OI type I family, nine complex alternative splicing patterns were identified by sequence analysis of cDNA clones derived from fibroblast mRNA from this cell strain. All result in partial or complete skipping of exon 48, with in-frame deletions of portions of exons 47 and/or 49. The different patterns of RNA splicing were not explained by their sequence homology with naturally occuring 5{prime} splice sites, but rather by recombination between highly homologous exon sequences, suggesting that we may not have identified the major splicing alternative(s) in this cell strain. Both G to A mutations result in decreased production of type I collagen, the common biochemical correlate of OI type I.

  12. Functional studies on the ATM intronic splicing processing element

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A.; Stuani, Cristiana; Parvizpur, Alireza; Baralle, Francisco E.; Pagani, Franco

    2005-01-01

    In disease-associated genes, the understanding of the functional significance of deep intronic nucleotide variants may represent a difficult challenge. We have previously reported a new disease-causing mechanism that involves an intronic splicing processing element (ISPE) in ATM, composed of adjacent consensus 5′ and 3′ splice sites. A GTAA deletion within ISPE maintains potential adjacent splice sites, disrupts a non-canonical U1 snRNP interaction and activates an aberrant exon. In this paper, we demonstrate that binding of U1 snRNA through complementarity within a ∼40 nt window downstream of the ISPE prevents aberrant splicing. By selective mutagenesis at the adjacent consensus ISPE splice sites, we show that this effect is not due to a resplicing process occurring at the ISPE. Functional comparison of the ATM mouse counterpart and evaluation of the pre-mRNA splicing intermediates derived from affected cell lines and hybrid minigene assays indicate that U1 snRNP binding at the ISPE interferes with the cryptic acceptor site. Activation of this site results in a stringent 5′–3′ order of intron sequence removal around the cryptic exon. Artificial U1 snRNA loading by complementarity to heterologous exonic sequences represents a potential therapeutic method to prevent the usage of an aberrant CFTR cryptic exon. Our results suggest that ISPE-like intronic elements binding U1 snRNPs may regulate correct intron processing. PMID:16030351

  13. Bacterial group II introns: not just splicing.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José Ignacio; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel

    2007-04-01

    Group II introns are both catalytic RNAs (ribozymes) and mobile retroelements that were discovered almost 14 years ago. It has been suggested that eukaryotic mRNA introns might have originated from the group II introns present in the alphaproteobacterial progenitor of the mitochondria. Bacterial group II introns are of considerable interest not only because of their evolutionary significance, but also because they could potentially be used as tools for genetic manipulation in biotechnology and for gene therapy. This review summarizes what is known about the splicing mechanisms and mobility of bacterial group II introns, and describes the recent development of group II intron-based gene-targetting methods. Bacterial group II intron diversity, evolutionary relationships, and behaviour in bacteria are also discussed. PMID:17374133

  14. A secreted form of the human lymphocyte cell surface molecule CD8 arises from alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Giblin, P.; Kavathas, P. ); Ledbetter, J.A. )

    1989-02-01

    The human lymphocyte differentiation antigen CD8 is encoded by a single gene that gives rise to a 33- to 34-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface as a dimer and in higher molecular mass forms. The authors demonstrate that the mRNA is alternatively spliced so that an exon encoding a transmembrane domain is deleted. This gives rise to a 30-kDa molecule that is secreted and exists primarily as a monomer. mRNA corresponding to both forms is present in peripheral blood lymphocytes, Con A-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, and three CD8{sup +} T-cell lines, with the membrane form being the major species. However, differences in the ratio of mRNA for membrane CD8 and secreted CD8 exist. In addition, the splicing pattern observed differs from the pattern found for the mouse CD8 gene. This mRNA is also alternatively spliced, but an exon encoding a cytoplasmic region is deleted, giving rise to a cell surface molecule that differs in its cytoplasmic tail from the protein encoded by the longer mRNA. Neither protein is secreted. This is one of the first examples of a different splicing pattern between two homologous mouse and human genes giving rise to very different proteins. This represents one mechanism of generating diversity during speciation.

  15. Prp40 and early events in splice site definition.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Soraya; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Prieto-Sánchez, Silvia; Hernández-Munain, Cristina; Suñé, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The alternative splicing (AS) of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) is a tightly regulated process through which introns are removed to leave the resulting exons in the mRNA appropriately aligned and ligated. The AS of pre-mRNA is a key mechanism for increasing the complexity of proteins encoded in the genome. In humans, more than 90% of genes undergo AS, underscoring the importance of this process in RNA biogenesis. As such, AS misregulation underlies multiple human diseases. The splicing reaction is catalyzed by the spliceosome, a highly dynamic complex that assembles at or near the intron/exon boundaries and undergoes sequential conformational and compositional changes during splicing. The initial recognition of splice sites defines the exons that are going to be removed, which is a critical step in the highly regulated splicing process. Although the available lines of evidence are increasing, the molecular mechanisms governing AS, including the initial interactions occurring at intron/exon boundaries, and the factors that modulate these critical connections by functioning as a scaffold for active-site RNAs or proteins, remain poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the major hallmarks of the initial steps in the splicing process and the role of auxiliary factors that contribute to the assembly of the spliceosomal complex. We also discuss the role of the essential yeast Prp40 protein and its mammalian homologs in the specificity of this pre-mRNA processing event. In addition, we provide the first exhaustive phylogenetic analysis of the molecular evolution of Prp40 family members. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:17-32. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1312 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26494226

  16. Minimum Factorization Agreement of Spliced ESTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Raffaella

    Producing spliced EST sequences is a fundamental task in the computational problem of reconstructing splice and transcript variants, a crucial step in the alternative splicing investigation. Now, given an EST sequence, there can be several spliced EST sequences associated to it, since the original EST sequences may have different alignments against wide genomic regions.

  17. A Gene Gun-mediated Nonviral RNA trans-splicing Strategy for Col7a1 Repair.

    PubMed

    Peking, Patricia; Koller, Ulrich; Hainzl, Stefan; Kitzmueller, Sophie; Kocher, Thomas; Mayr, Elisabeth; Nyström, Alexander; Lener, Thomas; Reichelt, Julia; Bauer, Johann W; Murauer, Eva M

    2016-01-01

    RNA trans-splicing represents an auspicious option for the correction of genetic mutations at RNA level. Mutations within COL7A1 causing strong reduction or absence of type VII collagen are associated with the severe skin blistering disease dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. The human COL7A1 mRNA constitutes a suitable target for this RNA therapy approach, as only a portion of the almost 9 kb transcript has to be delivered into the target cells. Here, we have proven the feasibility of 5' trans-splicing into the Col7a1 mRNA in vitro and in vivo. We designed a 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule, capable of replacing Col7a1 exons 1-15 and verified it in a fluorescence-based trans-splicing model system. Specific and efficient Col7a1 trans-splicing was confirmed in murine keratinocytes. To analyze trans-splicing in vivo, we used gene gun delivery of a minicircle expressing a FLAG-tagged 5' RNA trans-splicing molecule into the skin of wild-type mice. Histological and immunofluorescence analysis of bombarded skin sections revealed vector delivery and expression within dermis and epidermis. Furthermore, we have detected trans-spliced type VII collagen protein using FLAG-tag antibodies. In conclusion, we describe a novel in vivo nonviral RNA therapy approach to restore type VII collagen expression for causative treatment of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. PMID:26928235

  18. Modulation of Cell-adhesive Activity of Fibronectin by the Alternatively Spliced EDA Segment

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Oh-e, Naoko; Maeda, Toshinaga; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi

    1997-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) has a complex pattern of alternative splicing at the mRNA level. One of the alternatively spliced segments, EDA, is prominently expressed during biological processes involving substantial cell migration and proliferation, such as embryonic development, malignant transformation, and wound healing. To examine the function of the EDA segment, we overexpressed recombinant FN isoforms with or without EDA in CHO cells and compared their cell-adhesive activities using purified proteins. EDA+ FN was significantly more potent than EDA− FN in promoting cell spreading and cell migration, irrespective of the presence or absence of a second alternatively spliced segment, EDB. The cell spreading activity of EDA+ FN was not affected by antibodies recognizing the EDA segment but was abolished by antibodies against integrin α5 and β1 subunits and by Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro peptide, indicating that the EDA segment enhanced the cell-adhesive activity of FN by potentiating the interaction of FN with integrin α5β1. In support of this conclusion, purified integrin α5β1 bound more avidly to EDA+ FN than to EDA− FN. Augmentation of integrin binding by the EDA segment was, however, observed only in the context of the intact FN molecule, since the difference in integrin-binding activity between EDA+ FN and EDA− FN was abolished after limited proteolysis with thermolysin. Consistent with this observation, binding of integrin α5β1 to a recombinant FN fragment, consisting of the central cell-binding domain and the adjacent heparin-binding domain Hep2, was not affected by insertion of the EDA segment. Since the insertion of an extra type III module such as EDA into an array of repeated type III modules is expected to rotate the polypeptide up to 180° at the position of the insertion, the conformation of the FN molecule may be globally altered upon insertion of the EDA segment, resulting in an increased exposure of the RGD motif in III10 module and/or local

  19. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H.

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  20. Regulation of translation by upstream translation initiation codons of surfactant protein A1 splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Tsotakos, Nikolaos; Silveyra, Patricia; Lin, Zhenwu; Thomas, Neal; Vaid, Mudit

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a molecule with roles in lung innate immunity and surfactant-related functions, is encoded by two genes in humans: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The mRNAs from these genes differ in their 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTR) due to differential splicing. The 5′-UTR variant ACD′ is exclusively found in transcripts of SP-A1, but not in those of SP-A2. Its unique exon C contains two upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) that may affect SP-A1 translation efficiency. The first uAUG (u1) is in frame with the primary start codon (p), but the second one (u2) is not. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of uAUGs on SP-A1 expression. We employed RT-qPCR to determine the presence of exon C-containing SP-A1 transcripts in human RNA samples. We also used in vitro techniques including mutagenesis, reporter assays, and toeprinting analysis, as well as in silico analyses to determine the role of uAUGs. Exon C-containing mRNA is present in most human lung tissue samples and its expression can, under certain conditions, be regulated by factors such as dexamethasone or endotoxin. Mutating uAUGs resulted in increased luciferase activity. The mature protein size was not affected by the uAUGs, as shown by a combination of toeprint and in silico analysis for Kozak sequence, secondary structure, and signal peptide and in vitro translation in the presence of microsomes. In conclusion, alternative splicing may introduce uAUGs in SP-A1 transcripts, which in turn negatively affect SP-A1 translation, possibly affecting SP-A1/SP-A2 ratio, with potential for clinical implication. PMID:25326576

  1. The missing puzzle piece: splicing mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Marzena A

    2013-01-01

    Proper gene splicing is highly dependent on the correct recognition of exons. Among the elements allowing this process are the “cis” (conserved sequences) and “trans” (snRNP, splicing factors) elements. Splicing mutations are related with a number of genetic disorders and usually induce exon skipping, form new exon/intron boundaries or activate new cryptic exons as a result of alterations at donor/acceptor sites. They constitute more than 9% of the currently published mutations, but this value is highly underestimated as many of the potential mutations are located in the “cis” elements and should be confirmed experimentally. The most commonly detected splicing mutations are located at donor (5’) and acceptor (3’) sites. Mutations at the branch point are rare (only over a dozen are known to date), and are mostly searched and detected when no alteration has been detected in the sequenced exons and UTRs. Polypyrimidine tract mutations are equally rare. High throughput technologies, as well as traditional Sanger sequencing, allow detection of many changes in intronic sequences and intron/exon boundaries. However, the assessment whether a mutation affects exon recognition and results in a genetic disorder has to be conducted using molecular biology methods: in vitro transcription of the sequence of interest cloned into a plasmid, with and without alterations, or mutation analysis via a hybrid minigene system. Even though microarrays and new generation sequencing methods pose difficulties in detecting novel branch point mutations, these tools seem appropriate to expand the mutation detection panel especially for diagnostic purposes. PMID:24294354

  2. Identification of a Chloroplast Ribonucleoprotein Complex Containing Trans-splicing Factors, Intron RNA, and Novel Components*

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jessica; Marx, Christina; Kock, Vera; Reifschneider, Olga; Fränzel, Benjamin; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk; Kück, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Maturation of chloroplast psaA pre-mRNA from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires the trans-splicing of two split group II introns. Several nuclear-encoded trans-splicing factors are required for the correct processing of psaA mRNA. Among these is the recently identified Raa4 protein, which is involved in splicing of the tripartite intron 1 of the psaA precursor mRNA. Part of this tripartite group II intron is the chloroplast encoded tscA RNA, which is specifically bound by Raa4. Using Raa4 as bait in a combined tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometry approach, we identified core components of a multisubunit ribonucleoprotein complex, including three previously identified trans-splicing factors (Raa1, Raa3, and Rat2). We further detected tscA RNA in the purified protein complex, which seems to be specific for splicing of the tripartite group II intron. A yeast-two hybrid screen and co-immunoprecipitation identified chloroplast-localized Raa4-binding protein 1 (Rab1), which specifically binds tscA RNA from the tripartite psaA group II intron. The yeast-two hybrid system provides evidence in support of direct interactions between Rab1 and four trans-splicing factors. Our findings contribute to our knowledge of chloroplast multisubunit ribonucleoprotein complexes and are discussed in support of the generally accepted view that group II introns are the ancestors of the eukaryotic spliceosomal introns. PMID:23559604

  3. Splicing Efficiently Couples Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Method of splicing single-mode optical fibers results in very low transmission losses through joined fiber ends. Coupling losses between joined optical-fiber ends only 0.1 dB. Method needs no special operator training.

  4. RNA-seq analysis of impact of PNN on gene expression and alternative splicing in corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Newman, Jeremy R.B.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The specialized corneal epithelium requires differentiated properties, specific for its role at the anterior surface of the eye. Thus, tight maintenance of the differentiated qualities of the corneal epithelial is essential. Pinin (PNN) is an exon junction component (EJC) that has dramatic implications for corneal epithelial cell differentiation and may act as a stabilizer of the corneal epithelial cell phenotype. Our studies revealed that PNN is involved in transcriptional repression complexes and spliceosomal complexes, placing PNN at the fulcrum between chromatin and mRNA splicing. Transcriptome analysis of PNN-knockdown cells revealed clear and reproducible alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of a subset of genes that would significantly impact the epithelial cell phenotype. We further investigated PNN’s role in the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) in a corneal epithelial context. Methods Human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells that carry the doxycycline-inducible PNN-knockdown shRNA vector were used to perform RNA-seq to determine differential gene expression and differential AS events. Results Multiple genes and AS events were identified as differentially expressed between PNN-knockdown and control cells. Genes upregulated by PNN knockdown included a large proportion of genes that are associated with enhanced cell migration and ECM remodeling processes, such as MMPs, ADAMs, HAS2, LAMA3, CXCRs, and UNC5C. Genes downregulated in response to PNN depletion included IGFBP5, FGD3, FGFR2, PAX6, RARG, and SOX10. AS events in PNN-knockdown cells compared to control cells were also more likely to be detected, and upregulated. In particular, 60% of exon-skipping events, detected in only one condition, were detected in PNN-knockdown cells and of the shared exon-skipping events, 92% of those differentially expressed were more frequent in the PNN knockdown. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering of PNN levels in

  5. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  6. The exon junction complex controls transposable element activity by ensuring faithful splicing of the piwi transcript

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Colin D.; Mestdagh, Claire; Akhtar, Junaid; Kreim, Nastasja; Deinhard, Pia; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Treisman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The exon junction complex (EJC) is a highly conserved ribonucleoprotein complex that binds RNAs during splicing and remains associated with them following export to the cytoplasm. While the role of this complex in mRNA localization, translation, and degradation has been well characterized, its mechanism of action in splicing a subset of Drosophila and human transcripts remains to be elucidated. Here, we describe a novel function for the EJC and its splicing subunit, RnpS1, in preventing transposon accumulation in both Drosophila germline and surrounding somatic follicle cells. This function is mediated specifically through the control of piwi transcript splicing, where, in the absence of RnpS1, the fourth intron of piwi is retained. This intron contains a weak polypyrimidine tract that is sufficient to confer dependence on RnpS1. Finally, we demonstrate that RnpS1-dependent removal of this intron requires splicing of the flanking introns, suggesting a model in which the EJC facilitates the splicing of weak introns following its initial deposition at adjacent exon junctions. These data demonstrate a novel role for the EJC in regulating piwi intron excision and provide a mechanism for its function during splicing. PMID:25104425

  7. SAM68 is a physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pagliarini, Vittoria; Pelosi, Laura; Bustamante, Maria Blaire; Nobili, Annalisa; Berardinelli, Maria Grazia; D’Amelio, Marcello; Musarò, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by loss of motor neurons in patients with null mutations in the SMN1 gene. The almost identical SMN2 gene is unable to compensate for this deficiency because of the skipping of exon 7 during pre–messenger RNA (mRNA) processing. Although several splicing factors can modulate SMN2 splicing in vitro, the physiological regulators of this disease-causing event are unknown. We found that knockout of the splicing factor SAM68 partially rescued body weight and viability of SMAΔ7 mice. Ablation of SAM68 function promoted SMN2 splicing and expression in SMAΔ7 mice, correlating with amelioration of SMA-related defects in motor neurons and skeletal muscles. Mechanistically, SAM68 binds to SMN2 pre-mRNA, favoring recruitment of the splicing repressor hnRNP A1 and interfering with that of U2AF65 at the 3′ splice site of exon 7. These findings identify SAM68 as the first physiological regulator of SMN2 splicing in an SMA mouse model. PMID:26438828

  8. Restoration of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator function by splicing modulation

    PubMed Central

    Nissim-Rafinia, Malka; Aviram, Micha; Randell, Scott H; Shushi, Liat; Ozeri, Efrat; Chiba-Falek, Ornit; Eidelman, Ofer; Pollard, Harvey B; Yankaskas, James R; Kerem, Batsheva

    2004-01-01

    A significant fraction of disease-causing mutations affects pre-mRNA splicing. These mutations can generate both aberrant and correct transcripts, the level of which varies among different patients. An inverse correlation was found between this level and disease severity, suggesting a role for splicing regulation as a genetic modifier. Overexpression of splicing factors increased the level of correctly spliced RNA, transcribed from minigenes carrying disease-causing splicing mutations. However, whether this increase could restore the protein function was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of Htra2-β1 and SC35 increases the level of normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) transcripts in cystic-fibrosis-derived epithelial cells carrying the 3849+10 kb C → T splicing mutation. This led to activation of the CFTR channel and restoration of its function. Restoration was also obtained by sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, known to upregulate the expression of splicing factors. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of splicing modulation for genetic diseases caused by splicing mutations. PMID:15472711

  9. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a "splicing memory" hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  10. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a “splicing memory” hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. PMID:25934563

  11. Species-specific alternative splicing generates a catalytically inactive form of human hormone-sensitive lipase.

    PubMed

    Laurell, H; Grober, J; Vindis, C; Lacombe, T; Dauzats, M; Holm, C; Langin, D

    1997-11-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step of adipose tissue lipolysis. The enzyme is also expressed in steroidogenic tissues, mammary gland, muscle tissues and macrophages. A novel HSL mRNA termed hHSL-S, 228 bp shorter than the full-length HSL mRNA, was detected in human adipocytes. hHSL-S mRNA results from the in-frame skipping of exon 6, which encodes the serine residue of the catalytic triad. The corresponding 80 kDa protein was identified in human adipocytes after immunoprecipitation. The truncated protein expressed in COS cells showed neither lipase nor esterase activity but was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. hHSL-S mRNA was found in all human tissues expressing HSL, except brown adipose tissue from newborns. It represented approx. 20% of total HSL transcripts in human subcutaneous adipocytes. No alternative splicing was detected in other mammals. Human and mouse three-exon HSL minigenes transfected into primate and rodent cell lines reproduced the splicing pattern of the endogenous HSL genes. Analysis of hybrid human/mouse minigenes transfected into human cell lines showed that cis-acting elements responsible for the skipping of human exon 6 were restricted to a 247 bp region including exon 6 and the first 19 nt of intron 6. Moreover, divergence in exonic splicing elements between mouse and human was shown to be critical for the species-specific alternative splicing. PMID:9359844

  12. Lights, camera, action! Capturing the spliceosome and pre-mRNA splicing with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    DeHaven, Alexander C; Norden, Ian S; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2016-09-01

    The process of removing intronic sequences from a precursor to messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) to yield a mature mRNA transcript via splicing is an integral step in eukaryotic gene expression. Splicing is carried out by a cellular nanomachine called the spliceosome that is composed of RNA components and dozens of proteins. Despite decades of study, many fundamentals of spliceosome function have remained elusive. Recent developments in single-molecule fluorescence microscopy have afforded new tools to better probe the spliceosome and the complex, dynamic process of splicing by direct observation of single molecules. These cutting-edge technologies enable investigators to monitor the dynamics of specific splicing components, whole spliceosomes, and even cotranscriptional splicing within living cells. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:683-701. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1358 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27198613

  13. Regulation of mammalian transcription and splicing by Nuclear RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Roya; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known as a mechanism for controlling mammalian mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, but what would be the consequences if it also functions in cell nuclei? Although RNAi has also been found in nuclei of plants, yeast, and other organisms, there has been relatively little progress towards understanding the potential involvement of mammalian RNAi factors in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. This review summarizes evidence for mammalian RNAi factors in cell nuclei and mechanisms that might contribute to the control of gene expression. When RNAi factors bind small RNAs, they form ribonucleoprotein complexes that can be selective for target sequences within different classes of nuclear RNA substrates. The versatility of nuclear RNAi may supply a previously underappreciated layer of regulation to transcription, splicing, and other nuclear processes. PMID:26612865

  14. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing. PMID:26553470

  15. Prevention of 5-hydroxytryptamine2C receptor RNA editing and alternate splicing in C57BL/6 mice activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and alters mood

    PubMed Central

    Bombail, Vincent; Qing, Wei; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2014-01-01

    The 5-hydroxytryptamine2C (5-HT)2C receptor is widely implicated in the aetiology of affective and eating disorders as well as regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. Signalling through this receptor is regulated by A-to-I RNA editing, affecting three amino acids in the protein sequence, with unedited transcripts encoding a receptor (INI) that, in vitro, is hyperactive compared with edited isoforms. Targeted alteration (knock-in) of the Htr2c gene to generate ‘INI’ mice with no alternate splicing, solely expressing the full-length unedited isoform, did not produce an overt metabolic phenotype or altered anxiety behaviour, but did display reduced depressive-like and fear-associated behaviours. INI mice exhibited a hyperactive hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, with increased nadir plasma corticosterone and corticotrophin-releasing hormone expression in the hypothalamus but responded normally to chronic stress and showed normal circadian activity and activity in a novel environment. The circadian patterns of 5-HT2C receptor mRNA and mbii52, a snoRNA known to regulate RNA editing and RNA splicing of 5-HT2C receptor pre-mRNA, were altered in INI mice compared with wild-type control mice. Moreover, levels of 5-HT1A receptor mRNA were increased in the hippocampus of INI mice. These gene expression changes may underpin the neuroendocrine and behavioural changes observed in INI mice. However, the phenotype of INI mice was not consistent with a globally hyperactive INI receptor encoded by the unedited transcript in the absence of alternate splicing. Hence, the in vivo outcome of RNA editing may be neuronal cell type specific. PMID:25257581

  16. Spliced-leader trans-splicing in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Bold, Tyler D; Newmark, Phillip A

    2005-10-01

    trans-Splicing, in which a spliced-leader (SL) RNA is appended to the most 5' exon of independently transcribed pre-mRNAs, has been described in a wide range of eukaryotes, from protozoans to chordates. Here we describe trans-splicing in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea, a free-living member of the phylum Platyhelminthes. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) collection from this organism showed that over 300 transcripts shared one of two approximately 35-base sequences (Smed SL-1 and SL-2) at their 5' ends. Examination of genomic sequences encoding representatives of these transcripts revealed that these shared sequences were transcribed elsewhere in the genome. RNA blot analysis, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, as well as genomic sequence data showed that 42-nt SL sequences were derived from small RNAs of approximately 110 nt. Similar sequences were also found at the 5' ends of ESTs from the planarian Dugesia japonica. trans-Splicing has already been described in numerous representatives of the phylum Platyhelminthes (trematodes, cestodes, and polyclads); its presence in two representatives of the triclads supports the hypothesis that this mode of RNA processing is ancestral within this group. The upcoming complete genome sequence of S. mediterranea, combined with this animal's experimental accessibility and susceptibility to RNAi, provide another model organism in which to study the function of the still-enigmatic trans-splicing. PMID:15972844

  17. Mutations in the su(s) gene affect RNA processing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, P K; Chien, A J; Corces, V G; Green, M M

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the effect of mutations in the suppressor of sable [su(s)] gene on P element-induced yellow alleles. Two independent mutations tested, y76d28 and y1#7, contain a 1.1-kilobase (kb) P element inserted in the 5' transcribed untranslated portion of the yellow gene. Sequences responsible for the y1#7 mutation are inserted in the same transcriptional orientation as yellow and cannot be processed by splicing, and this mutation is not suppressed by su(s) mutations. P element sequences are located in a transcriptional orientation opposite to that of the yellow gene in y76d28; these sequences can be spliced from a composite P element-yellow mRNA, resulting in low accumulation of a functional 1.9-kb yellow transcript. The levels of both the putative precursor P element-yellow RNA and the 1.9-kb yellow transcript increase in y76d28 su(s) flies, suggesting that mutations in su(s) do not affect the efficiency of splicing of the P element sequences. Analysis of y76d28 cDNAs isolated from flies carrying a wild-type or mutant su(s) gene demonstrates that the choice of splice junctions to process P element sequences is unchanged in these different backgrounds, suggesting that mutations in su(s) do not affect the selection of donor and acceptor splice sites. We propose that the su(s) protein functions to control the stability of unprocessed RNA during the splicing reaction. Images PMID:1714588

  18. Methods for Characterization of Alternative RNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Samuel E.; Cheng, Chonghui

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of alternative splicing to detect the abundance of differentially spliced isoforms of a gene in total RNA can be accomplished via RT-PCR using both quantitative real-time and semi-quantitative PCR methods. These methods require careful PCR primer design to ensure specific detection of particular splice isoforms. We also describe analysis of alternative splicing using a splicing “minigene” in mammalian cell tissue culture to facilitate investigation of the regulation of alternative splicing of a particular exon of interest. PMID:26721495

  19. MapSplice: Accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L.; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A.; Perou, Charles M.; MacLeod, James N.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Prins, Jan F.; Liu, Jinze

    2010-01-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  20. MapSplice: accurate mapping of RNA-seq reads for splice junction discovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Singh, Darshan; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J; Huang, Yan; Savich, Gleb L; He, Xiaping; Mieczkowski, Piotr; Grimm, Sara A; Perou, Charles M; MacLeod, James N; Chiang, Derek Y; Prins, Jan F; Liu, Jinze

    2010-10-01

    The accurate mapping of reads that span splice junctions is a critical component of all analytic techniques that work with RNA-seq data. We introduce a second generation splice detection algorithm, MapSplice, whose focus is high sensitivity and specificity in the detection of splices as well as CPU and memory efficiency. MapSplice can be applied to both short (<75 bp) and long reads (≥ 75 bp). MapSplice is not dependent on splice site features or intron length, consequently it can detect novel canonical as well as non-canonical splices. MapSplice leverages the quality and diversity of read alignments of a given splice to increase accuracy. We demonstrate that MapSplice achieves higher sensitivity and specificity than TopHat and SpliceMap on a set of simulated RNA-seq data. Experimental studies also support the accuracy of the algorithm. Splice junctions derived from eight breast cancer RNA-seq datasets recapitulated the extensiveness of alternative splicing on a global level as well as the differences between molecular subtypes of breast cancer. These combined results indicate that MapSplice is a highly accurate algorithm for the alignment of RNA-seq reads to splice junctions. Software download URL: http://www.netlab.uky.edu/p/bioinfo/MapSplice. PMID:20802226

  1. A chloroplast retrograde signal regulates nuclear alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Petrillo, Ezequiel; Herz, Micaela A. Godoy; Fuchs, Armin; Reifer, Dominik; Fuller, John; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Simpson, Craig; Brown, John W. S.; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2015-01-01

    Light is a source of energy and also a regulator of plant physiological adaptations. We show here that light/dark conditions affect alternative splicing of a subset of Arabidopsis genes preferentially encoding proteins involved in RNA processing. The effect requires functional chloroplasts and is also observed in roots when the communication with the photosynthetic tissues is not interrupted, suggesting that a signaling molecule travels through the plant. Using photosynthetic electron transfer inhibitors with different mechanisms of action we deduce that the reduced pool of plastoquinones initiates a chloroplast retrograde signaling that regulates nuclear alternative splicing and is necessary for proper plant responses to varying light conditions. PMID:24763593

  2. Differential regulation of alternative 3{prime} splicing of {epsilon} messenger RNA variants

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Sanchez, D.; Zhang, K.; Saxon, A.

    1995-08-15

    Alternative 3{prime} splicing of the one active human {epsilon} heavy chain gene results in variants of {epsilon} mRNA encoding distinct IgE proteins. The same relative amounts of these {epsilon} mRNA variants were produced by non-atopic donor B cells when driven in a variety of T-dependent or T-independent systems. The most abundant variants were those for classic secreted {epsilon} and a novel secreted form (CH4-M2{double_prime}). In contrast, cells from subjects with high levels of serum IgE secondary to parasitic infection or atopy spontaneously produced higher relative levels of the CH4-M2{prime} {epsilon} mRNA variant, lower relative amounts of both the membrane and CH4-M2{double_prime} secreted variants, and very low levels of the CH4{prime}-CH5 variant. The existence of and corresponding changes in levels of the CH4-M2{prime}-enclosed secreted protein were demonstrated. IL-10 induced this same differential expression of {epsilon} splice variants in vitro when used to costimulate IL-4 plus CD40-driven B cells and could differentially enhance the production of CH4-M2{prime} protein by established IgE-secreting cell lines. Inhibition of IgE by cross-linking the low affinity IgE receptor (CD23) decreased the levels of {epsilon} mRNA and resulted in a distinct pattern of {epsilon} mRNA characterized by a dramatic decrease in CH4-M2{prime} splice variant. IL-6, IL-2, or IFN-{gamma} did not change the {epsilon} mRNA pattern. Overall, the absolute and relative amounts of the different {epsilon} mRNA splice variants produced appear to be controlled in a differentiation-related fashion.

  3. Alteration of NCoR Corepressor Splicing in Mice Causes Increased Body Weight and Hepatosteatosis without Glucose Intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Michael L.; Young, Briana M.; Snyder, Chelsea A.; Schroeder, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative mRNA splicing is an important means of diversifying function in higher eukaryotes. Notably, both NCoR and SMRT corepressors are subject to alternative mRNA splicing, yielding a series of distinct corepressor variants with highly divergent functions. Normal adipogenesis is associated with a switch in corepressor splicing from NCoRω to NCoRδ, which appears to help regulate this differentiation process. We report here that mimicking this development switch in mice by a splice-specific whole-animal ablation of NCoRω is very different from a whole-animal or tissue-specific total NCoR knockout and produces significantly enhanced weight gain on a high-fat diet. Surprisingly, NCoRω−/− mice are protected against diet-induced glucose intolerance despite enhanced adiposity and the presence of multiple additional, prodiabetic phenotypic changes. Our results indicate that the change in NCoR splicing during normal development both helps drive normal adipocyte differentiation and plays a key role in determining a metabolically appropriate storage of excess calories. We also conclude that whole-gene “knockouts” fail to reveal how important gene products are customized, tailored, and adapted through alternative mRNA splicing and thus do not reveal all the functions of the protein products of that gene. PMID:25182530

  4. Autistic-like phenotypes in Cadps2-knockout mice and aberrant CADPS2 splicing in autistic patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadakata, Tetsushi; Washida, Miwa; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Shoji, Satoshi; Sato, Yumi; Ohkura, Takeshi; Katoh-Semba, Ritsuko; Nakajima, Mizuho; Sekine, Yukiko; Tanaka, Mika; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Iwata, Yasuhide; Tsuchiya, Kenji J.; Mori, Norio; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla D.; Ichikawa, Hironobu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Furuichi, Teiichi

    2007-01-01

    Autism, characterized by profound impairment in social interactions and communicative skills, is the most common neurodevelopmental disorder, and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion 2 (CADPS2; also known as CAPS2) mediates the exocytosis of dense-core vesicles, and the human CADPS2 is located within the autism susceptibility locus 1 on chromosome 7q. Here we show that Cadps2-knockout mice not only have impaired brain-derived neurotrophic factor release but also show autistic-like cellular and behavioral phenotypes. Moreover, we found an aberrant alternatively spliced CADPS2 mRNA that lacks exon 3 in some autistic patients. Exon 3 was shown to encode the dynactin 1–binding domain and affect axonal CADPS2 protein distribution. Our results suggest that a disturbance in CADPS2-mediated neurotrophin release contributes to autism susceptibility. PMID:17380209

  5. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  6. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  7. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  8. Sporadic ALS has compartment-specific aberrant exon splicing and altered cell–matrix adhesion biology

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Stuart J.; Kim, Jae Mun ‘Hugo’; Baughn, Michael; Libby, Ryan T.; Kim, Young Joo; Fan, Yuxin; Libby, Randell T.; La Spada, Albert; Stone, Brad; Ravits, John

    2010-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive weakness from loss of motor neurons. The fundamental pathogenic mechanisms are unknown and recent evidence is implicating a significant role for abnormal exon splicing and RNA processing. Using new comprehensive genomic technologies, we studied exon splicing directly in 12 sporadic ALS and 10 control lumbar spinal cords acquired by a rapid autopsy system that processed nervous systems specifically for genomic studies. ALS patients had rostral onset and caudally advancing disease and abundant residual motor neurons in this region. We created two RNA pools, one from motor neurons collected by laser capture microdissection and one from the surrounding anterior horns. From each, we isolated RNA, amplified mRNA, profiled whole-genome exon splicing, and applied advanced bioinformatics. We employed rigorous quality control measures at all steps and validated findings by qPCR. In the motor neuron enriched mRNA pool, we found two distinct cohorts of mRNA signals, most of which were up-regulated: 148 differentially expressed genes (P ≤ 10−3) and 411 aberrantly spliced genes (P ≤ 10−5). The aberrantly spliced genes were highly enriched in cell adhesion (P ≤ 10−57), especially cell–matrix as opposed to cell–cell adhesion. Most of the enriching genes encode transmembrane or secreted as opposed to nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins. The differentially expressed genes were not biologically enriched. In the anterior horn enriched mRNA pool, we could not clearly identify mRNA signals or biological enrichment. These findings, perturbed and up-regulated cell–matrix adhesion, suggest possible mechanisms for the contiguously progressive nature of motor neuron degeneration. Data deposition: GeneChip raw data (CEL-files) have been deposited for public access in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO), www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo, accession number GSE18920. PMID:19864493

  9. Alternatively Spliced Androgen Receptor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Dehm, Scott M.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for increasing functional diversity from a limited set of genes. De-regulation of this process is common in diverse pathologic conditions. The androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid receptor transcription factor with functions critical for normal male development as well as the growth and survival of normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Studies of AR function in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer (PCa) have demonstrated loss-of-function AR alterations in AIS, and gain-of-function AR alterations in PCa. Over the past two decades, AR gene alterations have been identified in various individuals with AIS, which disrupt normal AR splicing patterns and yield dysfunctional AR protein variants. More recently, altered AR splicing patterns have been identified as a mechanism of PCa progression and resistance to androgen-depletion therapy. Several studies have described the synthesis of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding truncated AR isoforms that lack the ligand-binding domain, which is the ultimate target of androgen depletion. Many of these truncated AR isoforms function as constitutively active, ligand-independent transcription factors that can support androgen-independent expression of AR target genes, as well as the androgen-independent growth of PCa cells. In this review, we will summarize the various alternatively spliced AR variants that have been discovered, with a focus on their role and origin in the pathologic conditions of AIS and PCa. PMID:21778211

  10. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S.; Zeng, Zheng; Coleman, Stephen J.; Liu, Jinze; MacLeod, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6%) were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3%) were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression. PMID:26713731

  11. Sodium Channel Inhibitors Reduce DMPK mRNA and Protein.

    PubMed

    Witherspoon, Luke; O'Reilly, Sean; Hadwen, Jeremiah; Tasnim, Nafisa; MacKenzie, Alex; Farooq, Faraz

    2015-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by an expanded trinucleotide (CTG)n tract in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. This results in the aggregation of an expanded mRNA forming toxic intranuclear foci which sequester splicing factors. We believe down-regulation of DMPK mRNA represents a potential, and as yet unexplored, DM1 therapeutic avenue. Consequently, a computational screen for agents which down-regulate DMPK mRNA was undertaken, unexpectedly identifying the sodium channel blockers mexiletine, prilocaine, procainamide, and sparteine as effective suppressors of DMPK mRNA. Analysis of DMPK mRNA in C2C12 myoblasts following treatment with these agents revealed a reduction in the mRNA levels. In vivo analysis of CD1 mice also showed DMPK mRNA and protein down-regulation. The role of DMPK mRNA suppression in the documented efficacy of this class of compounds in DM1 is worthy of further investigation. PMID:26011798

  12. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Li, Samuel Q; Badgett, Tom C; Song, Young K; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-02-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates that MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p ≤ 0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification. PMID:26683771

  13. SEQassembly: A Practical Tools Program for Coding Sequences Splicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hongbin; Yang, Hang; Fu, Lei; Qin, Long; Li, Huili; He, Feng; Wang, Bo; Wu, Xiaoming

    CDS (Coding Sequences) is a portion of mRNA sequences, which are composed by a number of exon sequence segments. The construction of CDS sequence is important for profound genetic analysis such as genotyping. A program in MATLAB environment is presented, which can process batch of samples sequences into code segments under the guide of reference exon models, and splice these code segments of same sample source into CDS according to the exon order in queue file. This program is useful in transcriptional polymorphism detection and gene function study.

  14. Mutations in argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA of Japanese patients, causing classical citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Terazono, Hiroki; Saheki, Takeyori

    1994-12-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. In order to characterize mutations in Japanese patients with classical citrullinemia, RNA isolated from 10 unrelated patients was reverse-transcribed, and cDNA amplified by PCR was cloned and sequenced. The 10 mutations identified included 6 missense mutations (A118T, A192V, R272C, G280R, R304W, and R363L), 2 mutations associated with an absence of an exon 7 or exon 13, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bp in exon 16 (which might be caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bp within exons 15 and 16 in cDNA. The insertion mutation and the five missense mutations (R304W being excluded) are new mutations described in the present paper. These are in addition to 14 mutations (9 missense mutations, 4 mutations associated with an absence of an exon in mRNA, and 1 splicing mutation) that we identified previously in mainly American patients with neonatal citrullinemia. Two of these 20 mutations, a deletion of exon 13 sequence and a 7-bp deletion in exon 16, were common to Japanese and American populations from different ethnic backgrounds; however, other mutations were unique to each population. Furthermore, the presence of a frequent mutation - the exon 7 deletion mutation in mRNA, which accounts for 10 of 23 affected alleles - was demonstrated in Japanese citrullinemia. This differs from the situation in the United States, where there was far greater heterogeneity of mutations.

  15. A Bidirectional SF2/ASF- and SRp40-Dependent Splicing Enhancer Regulates Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 rev, env, vpu, and nef Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Caputi, Massimo; Freund, Marcel; Kammler, Susanne; Asang, Corinna; Schaal, Heiner

    2004-01-01

    The integrated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genome is transcribed in a single pre-mRNA that is alternatively spliced into more than 40 mRNAs. We characterized a novel bidirectional exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) that regulates the expression of the HIV-1 env, vpu, rev, and nef mRNAs. The ESE is localized downstream of the vpu-, env-, and nef-specific 3′ splice site no. 5. SF2/ASF and SRp40 activate the ESE and are required for efficient 3′ splice site usage and binding of the U1 snRNP to the downstream 5′ splice site no. 4. U1 snRNP binding to the 5′ splice site no. 4 is required for splicing of the rev and nef mRNAs and to increase expression of the partially spliced env mRNA. Finally, our results indicate that this ESE is necessary for the recruitment of the U1 snRNP to the 5′ splice site no. 4, even when the 5′ splice site and the U1 snRNA have been mutated to obtain a perfect complementary match. The ESE characterized here is highly conserved in most viral subtypes. PMID:15163745

  16. Spinal morphine but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia is affected by alternative splicing of voltage-gated calcium channel CaV2.2 pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu-Qiu; Andrade, Arturo; Lipscombe, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic voltage-gated calcium Ca(V)2.2 channels play a privileged role in spinal level sensitization following peripheral nerve injury. Direct and indirect inhibitors of Ca(V)2.2 channel activity in spinal dorsal horn are analgesic in chronic pain states. Ca(V)2.2 channels represent a family of splice isoforms that are expressed in different combinations according to cell-type. A pair of mutually exclusive exons in the Ca(V)2.2 encoding Cacna1b gene, e37a and e37b, differentially influence morphine analgesia. In mice that lack exon e37a, which is enriched in nociceptors, the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal morphine against noxious thermal stimuli is reduced. Here we ask if sequences unique to e37a influence: the development of abnormal thermal and mechanical sensitivity associated with peripheral nerve injury; and the actions of two other classes of analgesics that owe part or all of their efficacy to Ca(V)2.2 channel inhibition. We find that: i) the analgesic efficacy of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, is reduced in mice lacking e37a, ii) the induction and maintenance of behaviors associated with sensitization that accompany peripheral nerve injury, do not require e37a-specific sequence, iii) intrathecal morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin analgesia to thermal stimuli is significantly lower in wild-type mice after peripheral nerve injury, iv) the analgesic efficacy of ziconotide and gabapentin to mechanical stimuli is reduced following nerve injury, and iv) intrathecal morphine analgesia to thermal stimuli in mice lacking e37a is not further reduced by peripheral nerve injury. Our findings show that the analgesic action of morphine, but not ziconotide or gabapentin, to thermal stimuli is linked to which Cacna1b exon, e37a or e37b, is selected during alternative pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24369063

  17. Genome-Wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing during Development and Drought Stress in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Shawn R.; Meng, Xin; Beatty, Mary; Zastrow-Hayes, Gina; Harris, Charlotte; Habben, Jeffrey; Li, Bailin

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a crucial role in plant development as well as stress responses. Although alternative splicing has been studied during development and in response to stress, the interplay between these two factors remains an open question. To assess the effects of drought stress on developmentally regulated splicing in maize (Zea mays), 94 RNA-seq libraries from ear, tassel, and leaf of the B73 public inbred line were constructed at four developmental stages under both well-watered and drought conditions. This analysis was supplemented with a publicly available series of 53 libraries from developing seed, embryo, and endosperm. More than 48,000 novel isoforms, often with stage- or condition-specific expression, were uncovered, suggesting that developmentally regulated alternative splicing occurs in thousands of genes. Drought induced large developmental splicing changes in leaf and ear but relatively few in tassel. Most developmental stage-specific splicing changes affected by drought were tissue dependent, whereas stage-independent changes frequently overlapped between leaf and ear. A linear relationship was found between gene expression changes in splicing factors and alternative spicing of other genes during development. Collectively, these results demonstrate that alternative splicing is strongly associated with tissue type, developmental stage, and stress condition. PMID:26582726

  18. RBFOX1 regulates both splicing and transcriptional networks in human neuronal development

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.; Wexler, Eric; Wahnich, Amanda; Friedrich, Tara; Vijayendran, Chandran; Gao, Fuying; Parikshak, Neelroop; Konopka, Genevieve; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing plays a critical role in the programming of neuronal differentiation and, consequently, normal human neurodevelopment, and its disruption may underlie neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. The RNA-binding protein, fox-1 homolog (RBFOX1; also termed A2BP1 or FOX1), is a neuron-specific splicing factor predicted to regulate neuronal splicing networks clinically implicated in neurodevelopmental disease, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but only a few targets have been experimentally identified. We used RNA sequencing to identify the RBFOX1 splicing network at a genome-wide level in primary human neural stem cells during differentiation. We observe that RBFOX1 regulates a wide range of alternative splicing events implicated in neuronal development and maturation, including transcription factors, other splicing factors and synaptic proteins. Downstream alterations in gene expression define an additional transcriptional network regulated by RBFOX1 involved in neurodevelopmental pathways remarkably parallel to those affected by splicing. Several of these differentially expressed genes are further implicated in ASD and related neurodevelopmental diseases. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis demonstrates a high degree of connectivity among these disease-related genes, highlighting RBFOX1 as a key factor coordinating the regulation of both neurodevelopmentally important alternative splicing events and clinically relevant neuronal transcriptional programs in the development of human neurons. PMID:22730494

  19. Spliced XBP1 promotes macrophage survival and autophagy by interacting with Beclin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Ping-Ge; Jiang, Zhi-Xin; Li, Jian-Hua; Zhou, Zhe; Zhang, Qing-Hua

    2015-08-07

    Macrophage autophagy plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, but the precise mechanism mediating this process is unclear. The potential role of the X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), a crucial transduction factor that is involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response, in bone marrow-derived macrophage autophagy is unknown. This study mainly explores the roles of XBP1 mRNA splicing in bone marrow-derived macrophage autophagy. The present study shows that the transient overexpression of spliced XBP1 via adenovirus-mediated gene transfer induces autophagy and promotes proliferation in bone marrow-derived macrophages via the down-regulation of Beclin-1, but that the sustained overexpression of spliced XBP1 leads to apoptosis. When XBP1 is down-regulated in bone marrow-derived macrophages using siRNA, rapamycin-induced autophagosome formation is ablated. Furthermore, we have detected the overexpression of XBP1 in areas of atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries of ApoE−/− mice. These results demonstrate that XBP1 mRNA splicing plays an important role in maintaining the function of bone marrow-derived macrophages and provide new insight into the study and treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • XBP1 was up-regulated in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE−/− mice. • Transient spliced XBP1 overexpression induced macrophages autophagy via Beclin-1. • Sustained spliced XBP1 overexpression triggered macrophages apoptosis. • Spliced XBP1 plays a key role in maintaining the macrophages survival.

  20. Skipping of exons by premature termination of transcription and alternative splicing within intron-5 of the sheep SCF gene: a novel splice variant.

    PubMed

    Saravanaperumal, Siva Arumugam; Pediconi, Dario; Renieri, Carlo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is a growth factor, essential for haemopoiesis, mast cell development and melanogenesis. In the hematopoietic microenvironment (HM), SCF is produced either as a membrane-bound (-) or soluble (+) forms. Skin expression of SCF stimulates melanocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We report for the first time, a novel mRNA splice variant of SCF from the skin of white merino sheep via cloning and sequencing. Reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and molecular prediction revealed two different cDNA products of SCF. Full-length cDNA libraries were enriched by the method of rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE-PCR). Nucleotide sequencing and molecular prediction revealed that the primary 1519 base pair (bp) cDNA encodes a precursor protein of 274 amino acids (aa), commonly known as 'soluble' isoform. In contrast, the shorter (835 and/or 725 bp) cDNA was found to be a 'novel' mRNA splice variant. It contains an open reading frame (ORF) corresponding to a truncated protein of 181 aa (vs 245 aa) with an unique C-terminus lacking the primary proteolytic segment (28 aa) right after the D(175)G site which is necessary to produce 'soluble' form of SCF. This alternative splice (AS) variant was explained by the complete nucleotide sequencing of splice junction covering exon 5-intron (5)-exon 6 (948 bp) with a premature termination codon (PTC) whereby exons 6 to 9/10 are skipped (Cassette Exon, CE 6-9/10). We also demonstrated that the Northern blot analysis at transcript level is mediated via an intron-5 splicing event. Our data refine the structure of SCF gene; clarify the presence (+) and/or absence (-) of primary proteolytic-cleavage site specific SCF splice variants. This work provides a basis for understanding the functional role and regulation of SCF in hair follicle melanogenesis in sheep beyond what was known in mice, humans and other mammals. PMID:22719917

  1. A Subtle Alternative Splicing Event Gives Rise to a Widely Expressed Human RNase k Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Karousis, Evangelos D.; Sideris, Diamantis C.

    2014-01-01

    Subtle alternative splicing leads to the formation of RNA variants lacking or including a small number of nucleotides. To date, the impact of subtle alternative splicing phenomena on protein biosynthesis has been studied in frame-preserving incidents. On the contrary, mRNA isoforms derived from frame-shifting events were poorly studied and generally characterized as non-coding. This work provides evidence for a frame-shifting subtle alternative splicing event which results in the production of a novel protein isoform. We applied a combined molecular approach for the cloning and expression analysis of a human RNase κ transcript (RNase κ-02) which lacks four consecutive bases compared to the previously isolated RNase κ isoform. RNase κ-02 mRNA is expressed in all human cell lines tested end encodes the synthesis of a 134-amino-acid protein by utilizing an alternative initiation codon. The expression of RNase κ-02 in the cytoplasm of human cells was verified by Western blot and immunofluorescence analysis using a specific polyclonal antibody developed on the basis of the amino-acid sequence difference between the two protein isoforms. The results presented here show that subtle changes during mRNA splicing can lead to the expression of significantly altered protein isoforms. PMID:24797913

  2. Stability and Species Specificity of Renal VEGF-A Splicing Patterns in Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Turner, R J; Eikmans, M; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Baelde, H J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is essential for maintaining the glomerular filtration barrier. Absolute renal levels of VEGF-A change in patients with diabetic nephropathy and inflammatory kidney diseases, but whether changes in the renal splicing patterns of VEGF-A play a role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated mRNA splicing patterns of pro-angiogenic isoforms of VEGF-A in glomeruli and whole kidney samples from human patients with kidney disease and from mouse models of kidney disease. Kidney biopsies were obtained from patients with acute rejection following kidney transplantation, patients with diabetic nephropathy, and control subjects. In addition, kidney samples were obtained from mice with lupus nephritis, mice with diabetes mellitus, and control mice. The relative expression of each VEGF-A splice variant was measured using RT-PCR followed by quantitative fragment analysis. The pattern of renal VEGF-A splice variants was unchanged in diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephritis and was stable throughout disease progression in acute transplant rejection and diabetic nephropathy; these results suggest renal VEGF-A splicing stability during kidney disease. The splicing patterns were species-specific; in the control human kidney samples, VEGF-A 121 was the dominant isoform, whereas VEGF-A 164 was the dominant isoform measured in the mouse kidney samples. PMID:27598902

  3. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5' splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  4. The transcription factor FBI-1 inhibits SAM68-mediated BCL-X alternative splicing and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Bielli, Pamela; Busà, Roberta; Di Stasi, Savino M; Munoz, Manuel J; Botti, Flavia; Kornblihtt, Alberto R; Sette, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is tightly coupled to transcription for the majority of human genes. However, how these two processes are linked is not well understood. Here, we unveil a direct role for the transcription factor FBI-1 in the regulation of AS. FBI-1 interacts with the splicing factor SAM68 and reduces its binding to BCL-X mRNA. This, in turn, results in the selection of the proximal 5′ splice site in BCL-X exon 2, thereby favoring the anti-apoptotic BCL-XL variant and counteracting SAM68-mediated apoptosis. Conversely, depletion of FBI-1, or expression of a SAM68 mutant lacking the FBI-1 binding region, restores the ability of SAM68 to induce BCL-XS splicing and apoptosis. FBI-1's role in splicing requires the activity of histone deacetylases, whose pharmacological inhibition recapitulates the effects of FBI-1 knockdown. Our study reveals an unexpected function for FBI-1 in splicing modulation with a direct impact on cell survival. PMID:24514149

  5. Alternative splicing of RNAs transcribed from the human c- myb gene

    SciTech Connect

    Shen-Ong, G.L.C.; Skurla, R.M. Jr.; Owens, J.D.; Mushinski, J.F. )

    1990-06-01

    An alternative splicing event in which a portion of the intron bounded by the vE6 and vE7 exons with v-{ital myb} homology is included as an additional 363-nucleotide coding exon (termed E6A or coding exon 9A) has been described for normal and tumor murine cells that express {ital myb}. The authors show that this alternative splicing event is conserved in human c-{ital myb} transcripts. In addition, another novel exon (termed E7A or coding exon 10A) is identified in human c-{ital myb} mRNAs expressed in normal and tumor cells. Although the {ital myb} protein isoform encoded by murine E6A-containing mRNA is larger than the major c-{ital myb} protein, the predicted products of both forms of human alternatively spliced {ital myb} transcripts are 3{prime}-truncated {ital myb} proteins that terminate in the alternative exons. These proteins are predicted to lack the same carboxy-terminal domains as the viral {ital myb} proteins encoded by avian myeloblastosis virus and E26 virus. The junction sequences that flank these exons closely resemble the consensus splice donor and splice acceptor sequences, yet the alternative transcripts are less abundant than is the major form of c-{ital myb} transcripts. The contribution that alternative splicing events in c-{ital myb} expression may make on c-{ital myb} function remains to be elucidated.

  6. Alternative splicing for the alpha1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, D; Taylor, J F; Hoffmann, J W; Carnaghi, L; Giddings, S J; Zakeri, H; Kwok, P Y

    2000-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the receptor for nitric oxide, is a heterodimer consisting of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated the mRNA species for the alpha(1) subunit in human brain, heart, artery and immortalized B-lymphocytes. Three mRNA species were identified in these tissues. The major mRNA species contained the full expression sequence of the alpha(1) subunit. Two other types of mRNA were detected in which 5' sequences were deleted by splicing (506-590 and 412-590). Each of these deletions included the predicted translation start site, indicating that translation of these two alternatively spliced RNA species does not result in the production of full-length alpha(1) subunits. The relative amounts of the two mRNA species with deletions of the translation start site differed significantly between cell lines of immortalized B-lymphocytes from different individuals. sGC enzymic activity was significantly decreased in cellular extracts from cell lines with high proportions of mRNA species containing the deletion 506-590 when compared with extracts from cell lines that contained mostly mRNA without this deletion. PMID:10698711

  7. AEF1/MPR25 is implicated in RNA editing of plastid atpF and mitochondrial nad5, and also promotes atpF splicing in Arabidopsis and rice.

    PubMed

    Yap, Aaron; Kindgren, Peter; Colas des Francs-Small, Catherine; Kazama, Tomohiko; Tanz, Sandra K; Toriyama, Kinya; Small, Ian

    2015-03-01

    RNA editing is an essential mechanism that modifies target cytidines to uridine in both mitochondrial and plastid mRNA. Target sites are recognized by pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. Using bioinformatics predictions based on the code describing sequence recognition by PPR proteins, we have identified an Arabidopsis editing factor required for editing of atpF in plastids. A loss-of-function mutation in ATPF EDITING FACTOR 1 (AEF1, AT3G22150) results in severe variegation, presumably due to decreased plastid ATP synthase levels. Loss of editing at the atpF site is coupled with a large decrease in splicing of the atpF transcript, even though the editing site is within an exon and 53 nucleotides distant from the splice site. The rice orthologue of AEF1, MPR25, has been reported to be required for editing of a site in mitochondrial nad5 transcripts, and we confirm that editing of the same site is affected in the Arabidopsis aef1 mutant. We also show that splicing of chloroplast atpF transcripts is affected in the rice mpr25 mutant. AEF1 is thus highly unusual for an RNA editing specificity factor in that it has functions in both organelles. PMID:25585673

  8. Splicing tolerances of weakly coupled few-mode fibers for mode-division-multiplexed transmission using sparse MIMO equalizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    For one-polarization mode-division-multiplexed (MDM) system using sparse 2 × 2 MIMO equalizers over twofold spatially degenerate (TSD) LP modes, we numerically investigate the discrete modal crosstalk (XT) behaviors due to splices in weakly coupled few-mode fibers. Its impacts on transmission distance of uncoupled MDM link are comparably analyzed by evaluating the extreme cases relevant to the required splicing tolerances. Under different splicing conditions, the complexity of 2 × 2 MIMO equalizers is assessed by intra-modal relative group delay (RGD) emulation. Simulation results show that, by specifically controlling the lateral offsets at splicing points, an intra-modal RGD reduction of TSD LP11 modes can be obtained, benefiting the tap number decrease of the corresponding 2 × 2 MIMO equalizer. Besides, the propagation of TSD LP21 modes is verified to possess intra-modal splice-XT-immune property, indicating that the relevant intra-modal RGD will not be affected by splices.

  9. Mutations in DCPS and EDC3 in autosomal recessive intellectual disability indicate a crucial role for mRNA decapping in neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Iltaf; Buchert, Rebecca; Zhou, Mi; Jiao, Xinfu; Mittal, Kirti; Sheikh, Taimoor I.; Scheller, Ute; Vasli, Nasim; Rafiq, Muhammad Arshad; Brohi, M. Qasim; Mikhailov, Anna; Ayaz, Muhammad; Bhatti, Attya; Sticht, Heinrich; Nasr, Tanveer; Carter, Melissa T.; Uebe, Steffen; Reis, André; Ayub, Muhammad; John, Peter; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Vincent, John B.; Jamra, Rami Abou

    2015-01-01

    There are two known mRNA degradation pathways, 3′ to 5′ and 5′ to 3′. We identified likely pathogenic variants in two genes involved in these two pathways in individuals with intellectual disability. In a large family with multiple branches, we identified biallelic variants in DCPS in three affected individuals; a splice site variant (c.636+1G>A) that results in an in-frame insertion of 45 nucleotides and a missense variant (c.947C>T; p.Thr316Met). DCPS decaps the cap structure generated by 3′ to 5′ exonucleolytic degradation of mRNA. In vitro decapping assays showed an ablation of decapping function for both variants in DCPS. In another family, we identified a homozygous mutation (c.161T>C; p.Phe54Ser) in EDC3 in two affected children. EDC3 stimulates DCP2, which decaps mRNAs at the beginning of the 5′ to 3′ degradation pathway. In vitro decapping assays showed that altered EDC3 is unable to enhance DCP2 decapping at low concentrations and even inhibits DCP2 decapping at high concentration. We show that individuals with biallelic mutations in these genes of seemingly central functions are viable and that these possibly lead to impairment of neurological functions linking mRNA decapping to normal cognition. Our results further affirm an emerging theme linking aberrant mRNA metabolism to neurological defects. PMID:25701870

  10. COMMUNICATION: Alternative splicing and genomic stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2004-06-01

    Alternative splicing allows an organism to make different proteins in different cells at different times, all from the same gene. In a cell that uses alternative splicing, the total length of all the exons is much shorter than in a cell that encodes the same set of proteins without alternative splicing. This economical use of exons makes genes more stable during reproduction and development because a genome with a shorter exon length is more resistant to harmful mutations. Genomic stability may be the reason why higher vertebrates splice alternatively. For a broad class of alternatively spliced genes, a formula is given for the increase in their stability.

  11. Spliced synthetic genes as internal controls in RNA sequencing experiments.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Simon A; Chen, Wendy Y; Wong, Ted; Deveson, Ira W; Blackburn, James; Andersen, Stacey B; Nielsen, Lars K; Mattick, John S; Mercer, Tim R

    2016-09-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) can be used to assemble spliced isoforms, quantify expressed genes and provide a global profile of the transcriptome. However, the size and diversity of the transcriptome, the wide dynamic range in gene expression and inherent technical biases confound RNA-seq analysis. We have developed a set of spike-in RNA standards, termed 'sequins' (sequencing spike-ins), that represent full-length spliced mRNA isoforms. Sequins have an entirely artificial sequence with no homology to natural reference genomes, but they align to gene loci encoded on an artificial in silico chromosome. The combination of multiple sequins across a range of concentrations emulates alternative splicing and differential gene expression, and it provides scaling factors for normalization between samples. We demonstrate the use of sequins in RNA-seq experiments to measure sample-specific biases and determine the limits of reliable transcript assembly and quantification in accompanying human RNA samples. In addition, we have designed a complementary set of sequins that represent fusion genes arising from rearrangements of the in silico chromosome to aid in cancer diagnosis. RNA sequins provide a qualitative and quantitative reference with which to navigate the complexity of the human transcriptome. PMID:27502218

  12. Regulation of Natural mRNAs by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peccarelli, Megan

    2014-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway is a specialized mRNA degradation pathway that degrades select mRNAs. This pathway is conserved in all eukaryotes examined so far, and it triggers the degradation of mRNAs that prematurely terminate translation. Originally identified as a pathway that degrades mRNAs with premature termination codons as a result of errors during transcription, splicing, or damage to the mRNA, NMD is now also recognized as a pathway that degrades some natural mRNAs. The degradation of natural mRNAs by NMD has been identified in multiple eukaryotes, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, and humans. S. cerevisiae is used extensively as a model to study natural mRNA regulation by NMD. Inactivation of the NMD pathway in S. cerevisiae affects approximately 10% of the transcriptome. Similar percentages of natural mRNAs in the D. melanogaster and human transcriptomes are also sensitive to the pathway, indicating that NMD is important for the regulation of gene expression in multiple organisms. NMD can either directly or indirectly regulate the decay rate of natural mRNAs. Direct NMD targets possess NMD-inducing features. This minireview focuses on the regulation of natural mRNAs by the NMD pathway, as well as the features demonstrated to target these mRNAs for decay by the pathway in S. cerevisiae. We also compare NMD-targeting features identified in S. cerevisiae with known NMD-targeting features in other eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25038084

  13. Evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhixi; Wang, Jianmin; Yu, Jun; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Gu, Xun

    2006-02-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are two major sources of proteomic function diversity. Here, we study the evolutionary trend of alternative splicing after gene duplication by analyzing the alternative splicing differences between duplicate genes. We observed that duplicate genes have fewer alternative splice (AS) forms than single-copy genes, and that a negative correlation exists between the mean number of AS forms and the gene family size. Interestingly, we found that the loss of alternative splicing in duplicate genes may occur shortly after the gene duplication. These results support the subfunctionization model of alternative splicing in the early stage after gene duplication. Further analysis of the alternative splicing distribution in human duplicate pairs showed the asymmetric evolution of alternative splicing after gene duplications; i.e., the AS forms between duplicates may differ dramatically. We therefore conclude that alternative splicing and gene duplication may not evolve independently. In the early stage after gene duplication, young duplicates may take over a certain amount of protein function diversity that previously was carried out by the alternative splicing mechanism. In the late stage, the gain and loss of alternative splicing seem to be independent between duplicates. PMID:16365379

  14. Utilisation of a cryptic non-canonical donor splice site of the gene encoding PARAFIBROMIN is associated with familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, K; Cavaco, B; Bowl, M; Harding, B; Young, A; Thakker, R

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of all splice sites conform to consensus sequences that usually include the invariant dinucleotides gt and ag at the 5' and 3' ends of the introns, respectively. We report on the utilisation of a non-consensus (non-canonical) donor splice site within exon 1 of the HRPT2 gene in familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP). HRPT2 mutations are more frequently associated with the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome (HPT-JT). Patients with FIHP were identified to have a donor splice site mutation, IVS1+1 g→a, and the consequences of this for RNA processing were investigated. The mutant mRNA lacked 30 bp and DNA sequence analysis revealed this to result from utilisation of an alternative cryptic non-canonical donor splice site (gaatgt) in exon 1 together with the normally occurring acceptor splice site in intron 1. Translation of this mutant mRNA predicted the in-frame loss of 10 amino acids in the encoded protein, termed PARAFIBROMIN. Thus, these FIHP patients are utilising a ga-ag splice site pair, which until recently was considered to be incompatible with splicing but is now known to occur as a rare (<0.02%) normal splicing variant. PMID:16061557

  15. mRNA quality control goes transcriptional

    PubMed Central

    Kilchert, Cornelia; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are extensively processed to generate functional transcripts, which are 5′ capped, spliced and 3′ polyadenylated. Accumulation of unprocessed (aberrant) mRNAs can be deleterious for the cell, hence processing fidelity is closely monitored by QC (quality control) mechanisms that identify erroneous transcripts and initiate their selective removal. Nucleases including Xrn2/Rat1 and the nuclear exosome have been shown to play an important role in the turnover of aberrant mRNAs. Recently, with the growing appreciation that mRNA processing occurs concomitantly with polII (RNA polymerase II) transcription, it has become evident that QC acts at the transcriptional level in addition to degrading aberrant RNAs. In the present review, we discuss mechanisms that allow cells to co-transcriptionally initiate the removal of RNAs as well as down-regulate transcription of transcripts where processing repeatedly fails. PMID:24256272

  16. Traceless protein splicing utilizing evolved split inteins

    PubMed Central

    Lockless, Steve W.; Muir, Tom W.

    2009-01-01

    Split inteins are parasitic genetic elements frequently found inserted into reading frames of essential proteins. Their association and excision restore host protein function through a protein self-splicing reaction. They have gained an increasingly important role in the chemical modification of proteins to create cyclical, segmentally labeled, and fluorescently tagged proteins. Ideally, inteins would seamlessly splice polypeptides together with no remnant sequences and at high efficiency. Here, we describe experiments that identify the branched intermediate, a transient step in the overall splicing reaction, as a key determinant of the splicing efficiency at different splice-site junctions. To alter intein specificity, we developed a cell-based selection scheme to evolve split inteins that splice with high efficiency at different splice junctions and at higher temperatures. Mutations within these evolved inteins occur at sites distant from the active site. We present a hypothesis that a network of conserved coevolving amino acids in inteins mediates these long-range effects. PMID:19541616

  17. Nucleotide sequence composition adjacent to intronic splice sites improves splicing efficiency via its effect on pre-mRNA local folding in fungi.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, Zohar; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-10-01

    RNA splicing is the central process of intron removal in eukaryotes known to regulate various cellular functions such as growth, development, and response to external signals. The canonical sequences indicating the splicing sites needed for intronic boundary recognition are well known. However, the roles and evolution of the local folding of intronic and exonic sequence features adjacent to splice sites has yet to be thoroughly studied. Here, focusing on four fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus nidulans, and Candida albicans), we performed for the first time a comprehensive high-resolution study aimed at characterizing the encoding of intronic splicing efficiency in pre-mRNA transcripts and its effect on intron evolution. Our analysis supports the conjecture that pre-mRNA local folding strength at intronic boundaries is under selective pressure, as it significantly affects splicing efficiency. Specifically, we show that in the immediate region of 12-30 nucleotides (nt) surrounding the intronic donor site there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding; similarly, in the region of 15-33 nt surrounding the acceptor and branch sites there is a preference for weak pre-mRNA folding. We also show that in most cases there is a preference for strong pre-mRNA folding further away from intronic splice sites. In addition, we demonstrate that these signals are not associated with gene-specific functions, and they correlate with splicing efficiency measurements (r = 0.77, P = 2.98 × 10(-21)) and with expression levels of the corresponding genes (P = 1.24 × 10(-19)). We suggest that pre-mRNA folding strength in the above-mentioned regions has a direct effect on splicing efficiency by improving the recognition of intronic boundaries. These new discoveries are contributory steps toward a broader understanding of splicing regulation and intronic/transcript evolution. PMID:26246046

  18. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, R.; Thomas, J.; Spieth, J.; Blumenthal, T. )

    1991-04-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, Sl1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. The authors demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5[prime] splice site into the 5[prime] untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3[prime] splice site, were inserted into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. They termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5[prime] end and the first 3[prime] splice site an 'outrun'. The results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3[prime] splice site, this alone may constitute an outrun and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing.

  19. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5' untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, R; Thomas, J; Spieth, J; Blumenthal, T

    1991-01-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, SL1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. We demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5' splice site into the 5' untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3' splice site, were inserted into the 5' untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. We termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5' end and the first 3' splice site an "outron." Our results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3' splice site, this alone may constitute an outron and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing. Images PMID:1848665

  20. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, D C; McCloskey, D A; Simard, L R; McInnes, R R

    1990-01-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. We previously established by complementation analysis that 28 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, we sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 (approximately 1% of residual ASAL activity), from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283----T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. Expression in COS cells demonstrated that the R95C mutation produces normal amounts of ASAL mRNA but little protein and less than 1% ASAL activity. We observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5' 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. We conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus. Images PMID:2263616

  1. MIR retroposon exonization promotes evolutionary variability and generates species-specific expression of IGF-1 splice variants.

    PubMed

    Annibalini, Giosuè; Bielli, Pamela; De Santi, Mauro; Agostini, Deborah; Guescini, Michele; Sisti, Davide; Contarelli, Serena; Brandi, Giorgio; Villarini, Anna; Stocchi, Vilberto; Sette, Claudio; Barbieri, Elena

    2016-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) -1 is a pleiotropic hormone exerting mitogenic and anti-apoptotic effects. Inclusion or exclusion of exon 5 into the IGF-1 mRNA gives rise to three transcripts, IGF-1Ea, IGF-1Eb and IGF-1Ec, which yield three different C-terminal extensions called Ea, Eb and Ec peptides. The biological significance of the IGF-1 splice variants and how the E-peptides affect the actions of mature IGF-1 are largely unknown. In this study we investigated the origin and conservation of the IGF-1 E-peptides and we compared the pattern of expression of the IGF-1 isoforms in vivo, in nine mammalian species, and in vitro using human and mouse IGF-1 minigenes. Our analysis showed that only IGF-1Ea is conserved among all vertebrates, whereas IGF-1Eb and IGF-1Ec are an evolutionary novelty originated from the exonization of a mammalian interspersed repetitive-b (MIR-b) element. Both IGF-1Eb and IGF-1Ec mRNAs were constitutively expressed in all mammalian species analyzed but their expression ratio varies greatly among species. Using IGF-1 minigenes we demonstrated that divergence in cis-acting regulatory elements between human and mouse conferred species-specific features to the exon 5 region. Finally, the protein-coding sequences of exon 5 showed low rate of synonymous mutations and contain disorder-promoting amino acids, suggesting a regulatory role for these domains. In conclusion, exonization of a MIR-b element in the IGF-1 gene determined gain of exon 5 during mammalian evolution. Alternative splicing of this novel exon added new regulatory elements at the mRNA and protein level potentially able to regulate the mature IGF-1 across tissues and species. PMID:27048986

  2. The role of splicing factors in deregulation of alternative splicing during oncogenesis and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Asaf; Siegfried, Zahava; Karni, Rotem

    2015-01-01

    In past decades, cancer research has focused on genetic alterations that are detected in malignant tissues and contribute to the initiation and progression of cancer. These changes include mutations, copy number variations, and translocations. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic changes, including alternative splicing, play a major role in cancer development and progression. There are relatively few studies on the contribution of alternative splicing and the splicing factors that regulate this process to cancer development and progression. Recently, multiple studies have revealed altered splicing patterns in cancers and several splicing factors were found to contribute to tumor development. Studies using high-throughput genomic analysis have identified mutations in components of the core splicing machinery and in splicing factors in several cancers. In this review, we will highlight new findings on the role of alternative splicing and its regulators in cancer initiation and progression, in addition to novel approaches to correct oncogenic splicing. PMID:27308389

  3. Prediction and Quantification of Splice Events from RNA-Seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Cao, Yi; Pau, Gregoire; Lawrence, Michael; Wu, Thomas D.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gentleman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of splice variants from short read RNA-seq data remains a challenging problem. Here we present a novel method for the genome-guided prediction and quantification of splice events from RNA-seq data, which enables the analysis of unannotated and complex splice events. Splice junctions and exons are predicted from reads mapped to a reference genome and are assembled into a genome-wide splice graph. Splice events are identified recursively from the graph and are quantified locally based on reads extending across the start or end of each splice variant. We assess prediction accuracy based on simulated and real RNA-seq data, and illustrate how different read aligners (GSNAP, HISAT2, STAR, TopHat2) affect prediction results. We validate our approach for quantification based on simulated data, and compare local estimates of relative splice variant usage with those from other methods (MISO, Cufflinks) based on simulated and real RNA-seq data. In a proof-of-concept study of splice variants in 16 normal human tissues (Illumina Body Map 2.0) we identify 249 internal exons that belong to known genes but are not related to annotated exons. Using independent RNA samples from 14 matched normal human tissues, we validate 9/9 of these exons by RT-PCR and 216/249 by paired-end RNA-seq (2 x 250 bp). These results indicate that de novo prediction of splice variants remains beneficial even in well-studied systems. An implementation of our method is freely available as an R/Bioconductor package SGSeq. PMID:27218464

  4. Identification and characterization of a human smad3 splicing variant lacking part of the linker region.

    PubMed

    Kjellman, Christian; Honeth, Gabriella; Järnum, Sofia; Lindvall, Magnus; Darabi, Anna; Nilsson, Ingar; Edvardsen, Klaus; Salford, Leif G; Widegren, Bengt

    2004-03-01

    Smad3 is one of the signal transducers that are activated in response to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have identified and characterized a splicing variant of smad3. The splicing variant (smad3-Delta3) lacks exon 3 resulting in a truncated linker region. We could detect mRNA expression of smad3-Delta3 in all investigated human tissues. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that the fraction of smad3-Delta3 mRNA compared to normal smad3 varies between tissues. The amount of spliced mRNA was estimated to represent 0.5-5% of the normal smad3 mRNA. When smad3-Delta3 is overexpressed in a fibrosarcoma cell line, the Smad3-Delta3 is translocated to the nucleus upon TGF-beta stimulation and binds the Smad responsive element. Using a CAGA luciferase reporter system, we demonstrate that Smad3-Delta3 has transcriptional activity and we conclude that Smad3-Delta3 possesses functional transactivating properties. PMID:14980711

  5. Contribution of bioinformatics predictions and functional splicing assays to the interpretation of unclassified variants of the BRCA genes

    PubMed Central

    Théry, Jean Christophe; Krieger, Sophie; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Révillion, Françoise; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Killian, Audrey; Duponchel, Christiane; Rousselin, Antoine; Vaur, Dominique; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Berthet, Pascaline; Frébourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Hardouin, Agnès; Tosi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    A large fraction of sequence variants of unknown significance (VUS) of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 may induce splicing defects. We analyzed 53 VUSs of BRCA1 or BRCA2, detected in consecutive molecular screenings, by using five splicing prediction programs, and we classified them into two groups according to the strength of the predictions. In parallel, we tested them by using functional splicing assays. A total of 10 VUSs were predicted by two or more programs to induce a significant reduction of splice site strength or activation of cryptic splice sites or generation of new splice sites. Minigene-based splicing assays confirmed four of these predictions. Five additional VUSs, all at internal exon positions, were not predicted to induce alterations of splice sites, but revealed variable levels of exon skipping, most likely induced by the modification of exonic splicing regulatory elements. We provide new data in favor of the pathogenic nature of the variants BRCA1 c.212+3A>G and BRCA1 c.5194−12G>A, which induced aberrant out-of-frame mRNA forms. Moreover, the novel variant BRCA2 c.7977−7C>G induced in frame inclusion of 6 nt from the 3′ end of intron 17. The novel variants BRCA2 c.520C>T and BRCA2 c.7992T>A induced incomplete skipping of exons 7 and 18, respectively. This work highlights the contribution of splicing minigene assays to the assessment of pathogenicity, not only when patient RNA is not available, but also as a tool to improve the accuracy of bioinformatics predictions. PMID:21673748

  6. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3′-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  7. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3‧-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods.

  8. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yun