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Sample records for affect muscle performance

  1. Rapid increase in training load affects markers of skeletal muscle damage and mechanical performance.

    PubMed

    Kamandulis, Sigitas; Snieckus, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Aagaard, Per; Masiulis, Nerijus; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the changes in indirect markers of muscle damage during 3 weeks (9 training sessions) of stretch-shortening (drop jump) exercise with constant load alternated with steep increases in load. Physically active men (n = 9, mean age 19.1 years) performed a program involving a rapid stepwise increase in the number of jumps, drop height, and squat depth, and the addition of weight. Concentric, isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and stimulated knee extension torque were measured before and 10 minutes after each session. Muscle soreness and plasma creatine kinase activity were assessed after each session. Steep increments in stretch-shortening exercise load in sessions 4 and 7 amplified the postexercise decrease in stimulated muscle torque and slightly increased muscle soreness but had a minimal effect on the recovery of MVC and stimulated torque. Maximal jump height increased by 7.8 ± 6.3% (p < 0.05), 11.4 ± 3.3% (p < 0.05), and 12.8 ± 3.6% (p < 0.05) at 3, 10, and 17 days after the final training session, respectively. Gains in isometric knee extension MVC (7.9 ± 8.2%) and 100-Hz-evoked torque (9.9 ± 9.6%) (both p < 0.05) were observed within 17 days after the end of the training. The magnitude of improvement was greater after this protocol than that induced by a continuous constant progression loading pattern with small gradual load increments in each training session. These findings suggest that plyometric training using infrequent but steep increases in loading intensity and volume may be beneficial to athletic performance.

  2. Predicted optimum ambient temperatures for broiler chickens to dissipate metabolic heat do not affect performance or improve breast muscle quality

    PubMed Central

    Zahoor, I.; Mitchell, M.A.; Hall, S.; Beard, P.M.; Gous, R.M.; De Koning, D.J.; Hocking, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens is associated with an ambient temperature that does not permit the birds to lose metabolic heat resulting in physiological heat stress and a reduction in meat quality.The experiment was performed in 4 climate chambers and was repeated in 2 trials using a total of 200 male broiler chickens. Two treatments compared the recommended temperature profile and a cool regimen. The cool regimen was defined by a theoretical model that determined the environmental temperature that would enable heat generated by the bird to be lost to the environment.There were no differences in growth rate or feed intake between the two treatments. Breast muscles from birds on the recommended temperature regimen were lighter, less red and more yellow than those from the cool temperature regimen. There were no differences in moisture loss or shear strength but stiffness was greater in breast muscle from birds housed in the cool compared to the recommended regimen.Histopathological changes in the breast muscle were similar in both treatments and were characterised by mild to severe myofibre degeneration and necrosis with regeneration, fibrosis and adipocyte infiltration. There was no difference in plasma creatine kinase activity, a measure of muscle cell damage, between the two treatments consistent with the absence of differences in muscle pathology.It was concluded that breast muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens was not the result of an inability to lose metabolic heat at recommended ambient temperatures. The results suggest that muscle cell damage and breast meat quality concerns in modern broiler chickens are related to genetic selection for muscle yields and that genetic selection to address breast muscle integrity in a balanced breeding programme is imperative. PMID:26670305

  3. Predicted optimum ambient temperatures for broiler chickens to dissipate metabolic heat do not affect performance or improve breast muscle quality.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, I; Mitchell, M A; Hall, S; Beard, P M; Gous, R M; De Koning, D J; Hocking, P M

    2016-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens is associated with an ambient temperature that does not permit the birds to lose metabolic heat resulting in physiological heat stress and a reduction in meat quality. The experiment was performed in 4 climate chambers and was repeated in 2 trials using a total of 200 male broiler chickens. Two treatments compared the recommended temperature profile and a cool regimen. The cool regimen was defined by a theoretical model that determined the environmental temperature that would enable heat generated by the bird to be lost to the environment. There were no differences in growth rate or feed intake between the two treatments. Breast muscles from birds on the recommended temperature regimen were lighter, less red and more yellow than those from the cool temperature regimen. There were no differences in moisture loss or shear strength but stiffness was greater in breast muscle from birds housed in the cool compared to the recommended regimen. Histopathological changes in the breast muscle were similar in both treatments and were characterised by mild to severe myofibre degeneration and necrosis with regeneration, fibrosis and adipocyte infiltration. There was no difference in plasma creatine kinase activity, a measure of muscle cell damage, between the two treatments consistent with the absence of differences in muscle pathology. It was concluded that breast muscle damage in fast-growing broiler chickens was not the result of an inability to lose metabolic heat at recommended ambient temperatures. The results suggest that muscle cell damage and breast meat quality concerns in modern broiler chickens are related to genetic selection for muscle yields and that genetic selection to address breast muscle integrity in a balanced breeding programme is imperative.

  4. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-05-15

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (DeltaQ(tw,pot)) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) approximately 94%, 656 +/- 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 82%, 278 +/- 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2) approximately 67%; 125 +/- 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 +/- 61%). The magnitude of DeltaQ(tw,pot) at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (-35% to -36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 +/- 6 s). Although Q(tw,pot) was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (-23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central

  5. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) ∼94%, 656 ± 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2 ∼82%, 278 ± 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2 ∼67%; 125 ± 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 ± 61%). The magnitude of ΔQtw,pot at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (−35% to −36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 ± 6 s). Although Qtw,pot was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (−23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central component of fatigue, probably involving brain

  6. Effects of aestivation on skeletal muscle performance.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S

    2010-01-01

    Fitness, ecology, and behaviour of vertebrates are dependent upon locomotor performance. Locomotor performance can be constrained by underlying intrinsic skeletal muscle properties. Skeletal muscle is a highly plastic tissue undergoing phenotypic change in response to alteration in environment. Clinical and experimental models of muscle disuse cause decreases in skeletal muscle size and mechanical performance. However, in natural models of skeletal muscle disuse, both atrophy and changes in mechanical properties are more limited. Aestivation in frogs can cause decreases in muscle cross-sectional area and changes in some enzyme activities, with effects varying among muscles. However, long-term aestivation causes limited changes in muscle mechanics during simulated sprint or endurance type activities. Therefore, at least in frogs, there is maintenance of skeletal muscle performance during prolonged periods of aestivation, allowing avoidance of harsh environmental conditions without compromising the locomotor capacity to perform fitness-related activities when favourable environmental conditions return.

  7. Skeletal muscle adaptations and muscle genomics of performance horses.

    PubMed

    Rivero, José-Luis L; Hill, Emmeline W

    2016-03-01

    Skeletal muscles in horses are characterised by specific adaptations, which are the result of the natural evolution of the horse as a grazing animal, centuries of selective breeding and the adaptability of this tissue in response to training. These adaptations include an increased muscle mass relative to body weight, a great locomotor efficiency based upon an admirable muscle-tendon architectural design and an adaptable fibre-type composition with intrinsic shortening velocities greater than would be predicted from an animal of comparable body size. Furthermore, equine skeletal muscles have a high mitochondrial volume that permits a higher whole animal aerobic capacity, as well as large intramuscular stores of energy substrates (glycogen in particular). Finally, high buffer and lactate transport capacities preserve muscles against fatigue during anaerobic exercise. Many of these adaptations can improve with training. The publication of the equine genome sequence in 2009 has provided a major advance towards an improved understanding of equine muscle physiology. Equine muscle genomics studies have revealed a number of genes associated with elite physical performance and have also identified changes in structural and metabolic genes following exercise and training. Genes involved in muscle growth, muscle contraction and specific metabolic pathways have been found to be functionally relevant for the early performance evaluation of elite athletic horses. The candidate genes discussed in this review are important for a healthy individual to improve performance. However, muscle performance limiting conditions are widespread in horses and many of these conditions are also genetically influenced.

  8. A statistical model for predicting muscle performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, Diane Leslie De Caix

    The objective of these studies was to develop a capability for predicting muscle performance and fatigue to be utilized for both space- and ground-based applications. To develop this predictive model, healthy test subjects performed a defined, repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Throughout the exercise, surface electromyography (SEMG) data were collected from the erector spinae using a Mega Electronics ME3000 muscle tester and surface electrodes placed on both sides of the back muscle. These data were analyzed using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis. It was determined that an AR derived parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, significantly correlated with the maximum number of repetitions (designated Rmax) that a test subject was able to perform. Using the mean average magnitude of AR poles, a test subject's performance to failure could be predicted as early as the sixth repetition of the exercise. This predictive model has the potential to provide a basis for improving post-space flight recovery, monitoring muscle atrophy in astronauts and assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures, monitoring astronaut performance and fatigue during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations, providing pre-flight assessment of the ability of an EVA crewmember to perform a given task, improving the design of training protocols and simulations for strenuous International Space Station assembly EVA, and enabling EVA work task sequences to be planned enhancing astronaut performance and safety. Potential ground-based, medical applications of the predictive model include monitoring muscle deterioration and performance resulting from illness, establishing safety guidelines in the industry for repetitive tasks, monitoring the stages of rehabilitation for muscle-related injuries sustained in sports and accidents, and enhancing athletic performance through improved training protocols while reducing

  9. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT. PMID:27445844

  10. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  11. Delayed onset muscle soreness : treatment strategies and performance factors.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Karoline; Hume, Patria; Maxwell, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a familiar experience for the elite or novice athlete. Symptoms can range from muscle tenderness to severe debilitating pain. The mechanisms, treatment strategies, and impact on athletic performance remain uncertain, despite the high incidence of DOMS. DOMS is most prevalent at the beginning of the sporting season when athletes are returning to training following a period of reduced activity. DOMS is also common when athletes are first introduced to certain types of activities regardless of the time of year. Eccentric activities induce micro-injury at a greater frequency and severity than other types of muscle actions. The intensity and duration of exercise are also important factors in DOMS onset. Up to six hypothesised theories have been proposed for the mechanism of DOMS, namely: lactic acid, muscle spasm, connective tissue damage, muscle damage, inflammation and the enzyme efflux theories. However, an integration of two or more theories is likely to explain muscle soreness. DOMS can affect athletic performance by causing a reduction in joint range of motion, shock attenuation and peak torque. Alterations in muscle sequencing and recruitment patterns may also occur, causing unaccustomed stress to be placed on muscle ligaments and tendons. These compensatory mechanisms may increase the risk of further injury if a premature return to sport is attempted.A number of treatment strategies have been introduced to help alleviate the severity of DOMS and to restore the maximal function of the muscles as rapidly as possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated dosage-dependent effects that may also be influenced by the time of administration. Similarly, massage has shown varying results that may be attributed to the time of massage application and the type of massage technique used. Cryotherapy, stretching, homeopathy, ultrasound and electrical current modalities have demonstrated no effect on the alleviation of

  12. Maternal nutrient restriction affects properties of skeletal muscle in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei J; Ford, Stephen P; Means, Warrie J; Hess, Bret W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Du, Min

    2006-01-01

    Maternal nutrient restriction (NR) affects fetal development with long-term consequences on postnatal health of offspring, including predisposition to obesity and diabetes. Most studies have been conducted in fetuses in late gestation, and little information is available on the persistent impact of NR from early to mid-gestation on properties of offspring skeletal muscle, which was the aim of this study. Pregnant ewes were subjected to 50% NR from day 28–78 of gestation and allowed to deliver. The longissimus dorsi muscle was sampled from 8-month-old offspring. Maternal NR during early to mid-gestation decreased the number of myofibres in the offspring and increased the ratio of myosin IIb to other isoforms by 17.6 ± 4.9% (P < 0.05) compared with offspring of ad libitum fed ewes. Activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, a key enzyme controlling fatty acid oxidation, was reduced by 24.7 ± 4.5% (P < 0.05) in skeletal muscle of offspring of NR ewes and would contribute to increased fat accumulation observed in offspring of NR ewes. Intramuscular triglyceride content (IMTG) was increased in skeletal muscle of NR lambs, a finding which may be linked to predisposition to diabetes in offspring of NR mothers, since enhanced IMTG predisposes to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated downregulation of several catabolic enzymes in 8-month-old offspring of NR ewes. These data demonstrate that the early to mid-gestation period is important for skeletal muscle development. Impaired muscle development during this stage of gestation affects the number and composition of fibres in offspring which may lead to long-term physiological consequences, including predisposition to obesity and diabetes. PMID:16763001

  13. The influence of muscle tremor on shooting performance.

    PubMed

    Lakie, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Shooting ability is compromised by involuntary movement. Some of this movement is physiological tremor. Tremor size has a demonstrable inverse correlation with shooting performance. Consequently, factors which affect tremor size should affect shooting ability. Adrenaline and local muscle warming markedly increase tremor size, whereas local muscle cooling reduces it. The physiological mechanisms behind these changes are not well understood, but they have the potential to affect shooting performance in subjects who exercise heavily and/or are exposed to extreme environments. The Olympic biathlon is an event in which vigorous physical exercise alternates with rifle shooting and it often takes place in a cold environment. The possible impact of exercise, temperature and other factors on the Olympic biathlete is considered here.

  14. Heart muscle performance after experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, C O; Goldberg, A H; Phear, W P; Thorp, K A; Young, N A; Abelmann, W H

    1976-01-01

    As part of an inquiry into possible antecedents of idiopathic cardiomyopathy, acute experimental coxsackie virus myocarditis was studied for late structural and functional sequelae. Myocarditis was induced in 12- and 22-day-old hamsters by inoculation with coxsackie virus B3. Early viremia occurred, followed by virus replication in heart muscle. Maximum peak developed tension (Tpd) of isometrically contracting isolated heart muscle was depressed 17 and 43% in the animals inoculated at 12 days, and studied 18 and 90 days later, respectively, as compared to their uninoculated controls. In both infected groups, less muscle stretch was required to reach the length at which Tpd was produced. Animals studied 180 days after inoculation did not differ from controls. The muscles from animals inoculated at 22 days of age and studied 18 days later showed a 15% depression of Tpd compared to their controls. Glycerinated muscles from this infected group developed 50% less tension than their controls. The muscles of hamsters inoculated with virus at 22 days and studied 90 and 180 days later showed no change in Tpd. The data suggest that contractility and compliance of heart muscle are decreased 18 days after inoculation, but recover by 90 days if the animals are inoculated at age 22 days. However, if the animals are inoculated at a younger age (12 days), depression of myocardial performance persists for at least an additional 90 days. It is concluded that the inflammatory stage of experimental acute coxsackie virus B3 myocarditis in the Syrian golden hamster may be followed by residual alterations in contractile proteins and myocardial function. PMID:1249200

  15. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    PubMed

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  16. Proximal and distal muscle fatigue differentially affect movement coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle fatigue can cause people to change their movement patterns and these changes could contribute to acute or overuse injuries. However, these effects depend on which muscles are fatigued. The purpose of this study was to determine the differential effects of proximal and distal upper extremity muscle fatigue on repetitive movements. Fourteen subjects completed a repetitive ratcheting task before and after a fatigue protocol on separate days. The fatigue protocol either fatigued the proximal (shoulder flexor) or distal (finger flexor) muscles. Pre/Post changes in trunk, shoulder, elbow, and wrist kinematics were compared to determine how proximal and distal fatigue affected multi-joint movement patterns and variability. Proximal fatigue caused a significant increase (7°, p < 0.005) in trunk lean and velocity, reduced humeral elevation (11°, p < 0.005), and increased elbow flexion (4°, p < 0.01). In contrast, distal fatigue caused small but significant changes in trunk angles (2°, p < 0.05), increased velocity of wrench movement relative to the hand (17°/s, p < 0.001), and earlier wrist extension (4%, p < 0.005). Movement variability increased at proximal joints but not distal joints after both fatigue protocols (p < 0.05). Varying movements at proximal joints may help people adapt to fatigue at either proximal or distal joints. The identified differences between proximal and distal muscle fatigue adaptations could facilitate risk assessment of occupational tasks. PMID:28235005

  17. The influence of respiratory muscle training upon intermittent exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Nicks, C R; Morgan, D W; Fuller, D K; Caputo, J L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of respiratory muscle training (RMT) on intermittent exercise performance, respiratory muscle strength (PI (max)), respiratory muscle fatigue (RMF), and dyspnea in soccer athletes. Collegiate soccer athletes (20 male, 7 female) were randomly divided into either a RMT or control condition during off-season conditioning. The RMT group performed a 30RM protocol (10 times weekly) for 5 weeks using a commercially-available training device, while the controls received no RMT. Performance was evaluated utilizing Level 1 of the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test (IRT) and dyspnea was assessed during and immediately following the IRT. RMF was quantified within 2 minutes (RMF2) and 10 minutes (RMF10) after completing the IRT. Following training, the RMT group significantly increased IRT performance by 216.6 +/- 231.0 meters (p = .008) while the 49.2 +/- 75.1 meter increase observed in the controls was not significant. PI (max) in the RMT group increased from 138.1 +/- 19.6 to 165.3 +/- 23.5 cmH (2)O (p < .001), with no significant change observed in the controls. RMT did not significantly affect RMF or dyspnea. In conclusion, RMT improved intermittent exercise performance in these soccer athletes. The mechanisms by which RMT improves performance warrant further study.

  18. Does dystonic muscle activity affect sense of effort in cervical dystonia?

    PubMed Central

    Carment, Loïc; Maier, Marc A.; Sangla, Sophie; Guiraud, Vincent; Mesure, Serge; Vidailhet, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background Focal dystonia has been associated with deficient processing of sense of effort cues. However, corresponding studies are lacking in cervical dystonia (CD). We hypothesized that dystonic muscle activity would perturb neck force control based on sense of effort cues. Methods Neck extension force control was investigated in 18 CD patients with different clinical features (7 with and 11 without retrocollis) and in 19 control subjects. Subjects performed force-matching and force-maintaining tasks at 5% and 20% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Three task conditions were tested: i) with visual force feedback, ii) without visual feedback (requiring use of sense of effort), iii) without visual feedback, but with neck extensor muscle vibration (modifying muscle afferent cues). Trapezius muscle activity was recorded using electromyography (EMG). Results CD patients did not differ in task performance from healthy subjects when using visual feedback (ANOVA, p>0.7). In contrast, when relying on sense of effort cues (without visual feedback, 5% MVC), force control was impaired in patients without retrocollis (p = 0.006), but not in patients with retrocollis (p>0.2). Compared to controls, muscle vibration without visual feedback significantly affected performance in patients with retrocollis (p<0.001), but not in patients without retrocollis. Extensor EMG during rest, included as covariate in ANOVA, explained these group differences. Conclusion This study shows that muscle afferent feedback biases sense of effort cues when controlling neck forces in patients with CD. The bias acts on peripheral or central sense of effort cues depending on whether the task involves dystonic muscles. This may explain why patients with retrocollis more accurately matched isometric neck extension forces. This highlights the need to consider clinical features (pattern of dystonic muscles) when evaluating sensorimotor integration in CD. PMID:28192488

  19. Differences in Muscle Strength in Parkinsonian Patients Affected on the Right and Left Side

    PubMed Central

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Maestri, Roberto; Rovescala, Roberta; Guaglio, Gabriele; Bera, Rossana; Volpe, Daniele; Pezzoli, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Background Muscular weakness is a frequent cause of instability that contributes to falls in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Isokinetic dynamometry is a method of muscle assessment useful to measure the muscular strength giving a quantification of the weakness, but only few studies about isokinetic assessment were performed in PD. The aims of the study were to evaluate the muscle strength in PD and to investigate the differences in patients affected on the right and left side. Methods Knee flexor and extensor muscles strength was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer in 25 patients in stage 3 H&Y and in 15 healthy controls. Subjects were tested in both legs at three fixed angular velocities: 90°/s, 120°/s, 180°/s. Results Considering the whole population of Parkinsonians, no difference in strength was observed with respect to controls. Considering the side, patients affected on the right side showed a clear tendency to be weaker than patients affected on the left side and controls. Conclusions PD patients affected on the right side, but not those affected on the left side, had a reduction in muscle strength as compared to controls. We postulate a central origin deficit in muscle strength in PD. It is known that dopamine transporter binding is more severely reduced in the left posterior putamen and our results suggest that the control of the muscle strength in PD is linked to the right–left hemispheric asymmetry of the functional organization of basal ganglia and with their connections to cortical motor and pre-motor areas. PMID:25806509

  20. Noninvasive measurement of respiratory muscle performance after exhaustive endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Perret, C; Pfeiffer, R; Boutellier, U; Wey, H M; Spengler, C M

    1999-08-01

    The use of noninvasive techniques to measure respiratory muscle performance after different types of endurance exercise has not been entirely successful, as the results have not consistently indicated diminished performance for similar types of exercise. The aim of the present study was 1) to compare different, noninvasive methods to assess respiratory muscle performance before and after an exhaustive cycling endurance test (which has previously been shown to induce diaphragmatic fatigue) and 2) to determine which of the tests best reflect published results of measurements of diaphragmatic fatigue. Twelve healthy subjects participated in the study and performed three different test series in a random order on three different days. These tests were performed before, and 5, 40 and 75 min after an exhausting task (a cycling endurance run at 85% of maximal oxygen uptake (V'O2,max)). The tests of the three test series were 1) breathing against a constant inspiratory resistance to task failure, 2) determination of 12-min sustained ventilatory capacity, and 3) spirometric and maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressure measurements. The only measurement that was affected by exhaustive cycling was the time to task failure breathing against inspiratory resistance. It was significantly reduced from (mean+/-sD) 364+/-88 s before exercise to 219+/-122 s at 5 min after cessation of exercise. It is concluded that the constant-load resistive breathing test to task failure is the only noninvasive respiratory muscle performance test evaluated in this study which shows a decrease in respiratory muscle performance after exhaustive endurance exercise.

  1. Using Touch-evoked Response and Locomotion Assays to Assess Muscle Performance and Function in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Caitlin; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Zebrafish muscle development is highly conserved with mammalian systems making them an excellent model to study muscle function and disease. Many myopathies affecting skeletal muscle function can be quickly and easily assessed in zebrafish over the first few days of embryogenesis. By 24 hr post-fertilization (hpf), wildtype zebrafish spontaneously contract their tail muscles and by 48 hpf, zebrafish exhibit controlled swimming behaviors. Reduction in the frequency of, or other alterations in, these movements may indicate a skeletal muscle dysfunction. To analyze swimming behavior and assess muscle performance in early zebrafish development, we utilize both touch-evoked escape response and locomotion assays. Touch-evoked escape response assays can be used to assess muscle performance during short burst movements resulting from contraction of fast-twitch muscle fibers. In response to an external stimulus, which in this case is a tap on the head, wildtype zebrafish at 2 days post-fertilization (dpf) typically exhibit a powerful burst swim, accompanied by sharp turns. Our method quantifies skeletal muscle function by measuring the maximum acceleration during a burst swimming motion, the acceleration being directly proportional to the force produced by muscle contraction. In contrast, locomotion assays during early zebrafish larval development are used to assess muscle performance during sustained periods of muscle activity. Using a tracking system to monitor swimming behavior, we obtain an automated calculation of the frequency of activity and distance in 6-day old zebrafish, reflective of their skeletal muscle function. Measurements of swimming performance are valuable for phenotypic assessment of disease models and high-throughput screening of mutations or chemical treatments affecting skeletal muscle function. PMID:27842370

  2. Systemic blockade of ACVR2B ligands prevents chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting by restoring muscle protein synthesis without affecting oxidative capacity or atrogenes

    PubMed Central

    Nissinen, T. A.; Degerman, J.; Räsänen, M.; Poikonen, A. R.; Koskinen, S.; Mervaala, E.; Pasternack, A.; Ritvos, O.; Kivelä, R.; Hulmi, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin is a widely used and effective chemotherapy drug. However, cardiac and skeletal muscle toxicity of doxorubicin limits its use. Inhibiting myostatin/activin signalling can prevent muscle atrophy, but its effects in chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting are unknown. In the present study we investigated the effects of doxorubicin administration alone or combined with activin receptor ligand pathway blockade by soluble activin receptor IIB (sACVR2B-Fc). Doxorubicin administration decreased body mass, muscle size and bone mineral density/content in mice. However, these effects were prevented by sACVR2B-Fc administration. Unlike in many other wasting situations, doxorubicin induced muscle atrophy without markedly increasing typical atrogenes or protein degradation pathways. Instead, doxorubicin decreased muscle protein synthesis which was completely restored by sACVR2B-Fc. Doxorubicin administration also resulted in impaired running performance without effects on skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity/function or capillary density. Running performance and mitochondrial function were unaltered by sACVR2B-Fc administration. Tumour experiment using Lewis lung carcinoma cells demonstrated that sACVR2B-Fc decreased the cachectic effects of chemotherapy without affecting tumour growth. These results demonstrate that blocking ACVR2B signalling may be a promising strategy to counteract chemotherapy-induced muscle wasting without damage to skeletal muscle oxidative capacity or cancer treatment. PMID:27666826

  3. Do changes in muscle architecture affect post-activation potentiation?

    PubMed

    Reardon, Danielle; Hoffman, Jay R; Mangine, Gerald T; Wells, Adam J; Gonzalez, Adam M; Jajtner, Adam R; Townsend, Jeremy R; McCormack, William P; Stout, Jeffrey R; Fragala, Maren S; Fukuda, David H

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this randomized, cross-over design study was to examine the effect of three different muscle potentiation protocols on acute changes in muscle architecture and vertical jump performance. Eleven experienced, resistance trained men (25.2±3.6y) completed three potentiation squat protocols using moderate intensity (MI; 75%, 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (HI; 90%, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and 100% (1RM; 1 set x 1repetition) of their 1RM. In addition, all participants completed a control session (CTL) in which no protocol was performed. During each testing session, muscle architecture and vertical jump testing were assessed at baseline (BL), 8min post (8P) and 20min post (20P) workout. Ultrasound measures included cross sectional area (CSA) and pennation angle (PANG) of both the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL). Following each ultrasound measure, peak vertical jump power (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) power was assessed using an accelerometer. Magnitude based inferences were used to make comparisons between trials. The MI trial resulted in a likely greater increase from BL to 8P and 20P in RF-CSA and VL-CSA, while the HI trial resulted in a likely greater change from BL to 20P in both RF-CSA and VL-CSA. Meanwhile, changes in PVJP and MVJP for the MI trial was likely decreased at BL-8P and BL-20P, while the HI trial was shown to result in a likely or possible decrease compared to CTL at BL-8P and BL-20P, respectively. A likely negative relationship was observed between changes in VL-PANG and MVJP (r = -0.35; p , 0.018) at BL-8P, and between changes in PVJP and RF-CSA (r = -0.37; p , 0.014) at BL-20P. Results of this study were unable to demonstrate any potentiation response from the trials employed, however these protocols did result in acute muscle architectural changes. Key pointsThree squat protocols using moderate intensity (75% 1-RM; 3 sets x 10 repetitions), high intensity (90% 1-RM, 3 sets x 3 repetitions) and maximal intensity (100

  4. Knee joint angle affects EMG-force relationship in the vastus intermedius muscle.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Akima, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    It is not understood how the knee joint angle affects the relationship between electromyography (EMG) and force of four individual quadriceps femoris (QF) muscles. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the knee joint angle on the EMG-force relationship of the four individual QF muscles, particularly the vastus intermedius (VI), during isometric knee extensions. Eleven healthy men performed 20-100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) at knee joint angles of 90°, 120° and 150°. Surface EMG of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized by the root mean square during MVC. The normalized EMG of the four QF synergists at a knee joint angle of 150° was significantly lower than that at 90° and 120° (P < 0.05). Comparing the normalized EMG among the four QF synergists, a significantly lower normalized EMG was observed in the VI at 150° as compared with the other three QF muscles (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the EMG-force relationship of the four QF synergists shifted downward at an extended knee joint angle of 150°. Furthermore, the neuromuscular activation of the VI was the most sensitive to change in muscle length among the four QF synergistic muscles.

  5. Detection of differentially expressed genes in broiler pectoralis major muscle affected by White Striping - Wooden Breast myopathies.

    PubMed

    Zambonelli, Paolo; Zappaterra, Martina; Soglia, Francesca; Petracci, Massimiliano; Sirri, Federico; Cavani, Claudio; Davoli, Roberta

    2016-12-01

    White Striping and Wooden Breast (WS/WB) are abnormalities increasingly occurring in the fillets of high breast yield and growth rate chicken hybrids. These defects lead to consistent economic losses for poultry meat industry, as affected broiler fillets present an impaired visual appearance that negatively affects consumers' acceptability. Previous studies have highlighted in affected fillets a severely damaged muscle, showing profound inflammation, fibrosis, and lipidosis. The present study investigated the differentially expressed genes and pathways linked to the compositional changes observed in WS/WB breast muscles, in order to outline a more complete framework of the gene networks related to the occurrence of this complex pathological picture. The biochemical composition was performed on 20 pectoralis major samples obtained from high breast yield and growth rate broilers (10 affected vs. 10 normal) and 12 out of the 20 samples were used for the microarray gene expression profiling (6 affected vs. 6 normal). The obtained results indicate strong changes in muscle mineral composition, coupled to an increased deposition of fat. In addition, 204 differentially expressed genes (DEG) were found: 102 up-regulated and 102 down-regulated in affected breasts. The gene expression pathways found more altered in WS/WB muscles are those related to muscle development, polysaccharide metabolic processes, proteoglycans synthesis, inflammation, and calcium signaling pathway. On the whole, the findings suggest that a multifactorial and complex etiology is associated with the occurrence of WS/WB muscle abnormalities, contributing to further defining the transcription patterns associated with these myopathies.

  6. Two series of fifty jumps performed within sixty minutes do not exacerbate muscle fatigue and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Masiulis, Nerijus

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that an exercise bout repeated prior to full recovery, within 2-6 days, does not impair muscle function to a greater extent and does not affect the repair process. The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated exercise performed 60 minutes after the first one exacerbates muscle fatigue and damage. Ten healthy, physically active males (21.1 +/- 1.4 years, 75.2 +/- 4.1 kg, 178.7 +/- 4.5 cm) performed 2 bouts of 50 continuous maximal intensity jumps with a 60-minute rest period. Peak quadriceps muscle force evoked by electrical stimulation at 15 (P15) and 50 (P50) Hz and maximal voluntary contraction force (MVCF) were measured 2, 30, and 60 minutes after bout 1 and bout 2. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in P15, P50, and MVCF during bout 1 (p < 0.05). The force did not recover within 60 minutes after exercising. After the second bout, the MVCF and P50 decreased to similar extent both immediately after and 30-60 minutes after the first one despite the fact that bout 2 was repeated with the voluntary and involuntary force still depressed. It was concluded that within 60 minutes repeated jumping exercise does not exacerbate muscle fatigue and muscle damage. From the coach's point of view it is of significance that the neuromuscular system appears to be well protected from frequently repeated muscle damaging exercise.

  7. Mind and muscle: the cognitive-affective neuroscience of exercise.

    PubMed

    Stein, Dan J; Collins, Malcolm; Daniels, Willie; Noakes, Timothy D; Zigmond, Michael

    2007-01-01

    There is growing basic-science interest in the mechanisms underpinning the positive effects of exercise on brain function and cognitive-affective performance. There is also increasing clinical evidence that exercise may prevent and treat various neuropsychiatric disorders. At the same time, there is growing awareness that athletic performance is mediated in crucial ways by central nervous system mechanisms. The relevant mechanisms in all these cases requires further exploration, but likely includes neurotrophic, neuroendocrine, and neurotransmitter systems, which in turn are crucial mediators of psychopathology and resilience. The hypothesis that Homo sapiens evolved as a specialist endurance runner provides an intriguing context against which to research the proximal mechanisms relevant to a cognitive-affective neuroscience of exercise.

  8. Drosophila small heat shock protein CryAB ensures structural integrity of developing muscles, and proper muscle and heart performance.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Inga; Jabłońska, Jadwiga; Zmojdzian, Monika; Taghli-Lamallem, Ouarda; Renaud, Yoan; Junion, Guillaume; Daczewska, Malgorzata; Huelsmann, Sven; Jagla, Krzysztof; Jagla, Teresa

    2015-03-01

    Molecular chaperones, such as the small heat shock proteins (sHsps), maintain normal cellular function by controlling protein homeostasis in stress conditions. However, sHsps are not only activated in response to environmental insults, but also exert developmental and tissue-specific functions that are much less known. Here, we show that during normal development the Drosophila sHsp CryAB [L(2)efl] is specifically expressed in larval body wall muscles and accumulates at the level of Z-bands and around myonuclei. CryAB features a conserved actin-binding domain and, when attenuated, leads to clustering of myonuclei and an altered pattern of sarcomeric actin and the Z-band-associated actin crosslinker Cheerio (filamin). Our data suggest that CryAB and Cheerio form a complex essential for muscle integrity: CryAB colocalizes with Cheerio and, as revealed by mass spectrometry and co-immunoprecipitation experiments, binds to Cheerio, and the muscle-specific attenuation of cheerio leads to CryAB-like sarcomeric phenotypes. Furthermore, muscle-targeted expression of CryAB(R120G), which carries a mutation associated with desmin-related myopathy (DRM), results in an altered sarcomeric actin pattern, in affected myofibrillar integrity and in Z-band breaks, leading to reduced muscle performance and to marked cardiac arrhythmia. Taken together, we demonstrate that CryAB ensures myofibrillar integrity in Drosophila muscles during development and propose that it does so by interacting with the actin crosslinker Cheerio. The evidence that a DRM-causing mutation affects CryAB muscle function and leads to DRM-like phenotypes in the fly reveals a conserved stress-independent role of CryAB in maintaining muscle cell cytoarchitecture.

  9. Oral muscles are progressively affected in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: implications for dysphagia treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Erasmus, Corrie E; Hendriks, Jan C M; Geurts, Alexander C H; Klein, Willemijn M; Pillen, Sigrid; Sie, Lilian T; de Swart, Bert J M; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2013-05-01

    Dysphagia is reported in advanced stages of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The population of DMD is changing due to an increasing survival. We aimed to describe the dysphagia in consecutive stages and to assess the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in DMD, in order to develop mechanism based recommendations for safe swallowing. In this cross-sectional study, participants were divided into: early and late ambulatory stage (AS, n = 6), early non-ambulatory stage (ENAS, n = 7), and late non-ambulatory stage (LNAS, n = 11). Quantitative oral muscle ultrasound was performed to quantify echo intensity. Swallowing was assessed with a video fluoroscopic swallow study, surface electromyography (sEMG) of the submental muscle group and tongue pressure. Differences in outcome parameters among the three DMD stages were tested with analysis of variance. Oral muscles related to swallowing were progressively affected, starting in the AS with the geniohyoid muscle. Tongue (pseudo) hypertrophy was found in 70 % of patients in the ENAS and LNAS. Oral phase problems and post-swallow residue were observed, mostly in the LNAS with solid food. sEMG and tongue pressure data of swallowing solid food revealed the lowest sEMG amplitude, the longest duration and lowest tongue pressure in the LNAS. In case of swallowing problems in DMD, based on the disturbed mechanisms of swallowing, it is suggested to (1) adjust meals in terms of less solid food, and (2) drink water after meals to clear the oropharyngeal area.

  10. Listening to music affects diurnal variation in muscle power output.

    PubMed

    Chtourou, H; Chaouachi, A; Hammouda, O; Chamari, K; Souissi, N

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effects of listening to music while warming-up on the diurnal variations of power output during the Wingate test. 12 physical education students underwent four Wingate tests at 07:00 and 17:00 h, after 10 min of warm-up with and without listening to music. The warm-up consisted of 10 min of pedalling at a constant pace of 60 rpm against a light load of 1 kg. During the Wingate test, peak and mean power were measured. The main finding was that peak and mean power improved from morning to afternoon after no music warm-up (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). These diurnal variations disappeared for mean power and persisted with an attenuated morning-evening difference (p<0.05) for peak power after music warm-up. Moreover, peak and mean power were significantly higher after music than no music warm-up during the two times of testing. Thus, as it is a legal method and an additional aid, music should be used during warm-up before performing activities requiring powerful lower limbs' muscles contractions, especially in the morning competitive events.

  11. Might as Well Jump: Sound Affects Muscle Activation in Skateboarding

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Paola; Camponogara, Ivan; Papetti, Stefano; Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to reveal the role of sound in action anticipation and performance, and to test whether the level of precision in action planning and execution is related to the level of sensorimotor skills and experience that listeners possess about a specific action. Individuals ranging from 18 to 75 years of age - some of them without any skills in skateboarding and others experts in this sport - were compared in their ability to anticipate and simulate a skateboarding jump by listening to the sound it produces. Only skaters were able to modulate the forces underfoot and to apply muscle synergies that closely resembled the ones that a skater would use if actually jumping on a skateboard. More importantly we showed that only skaters were able to plan the action by activating anticipatory postural adjustments about 200 ms after the jump event. We conclude that expert patterns are guided by auditory events that trigger proper anticipations of the corresponding patterns of movements. PMID:24619134

  12. Motion and Muscle Activity Are Affected by Instability Location During a Squat Exercise.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Brian C; Sutherland, Chad A; Drake, Janessa D M

    2017-03-01

    Nairn, BC, Sutherland, CA, and Drake, JDM. Motion and muscle activity are affected by instability location during a squat exercise. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 677-685, 2017-Squat exercise training using instability devices has become increasingly popular for a multitude of reasons. Many devices generate instability at the feet and provide a bottom-up perturbation; however, the effect of a top-down instability device during a squat remains unclear. To induce instability at the upper body, a water-filled cylinder called the Attitube was used. This study analyzed the effects of instability location (top-down, bottom-up, and no instability) during a squat exercise in terms of kinematics and muscle activation. Ten male participants were instrumented with 75 reflective markers to track kinematics of the ankle, knee, hip, trunk, and the Bar/Attitube, and electromyography was recorded from 12 muscles bilaterally. Squats were performed with an Olympic bar on a stable surface, an Olympic bar on a BOSU ball (BALL, bottom-up), and the Attitube on solid ground (TUBE, top-down). The TUBE showed up to 1.5 times reduction in erector spinae activation and up to 1.5 times less trunk flexion while being performed at a slower velocity. There was also higher abdominal activation in the TUBE, with up to 2.8 times greater oblique activation compared with the stable condition. The BALL increased ankle eversion and knee flexion with higher muscle activation in gastrocnemius, biceps femoris, and quadriceps. Overall, changing the location of instability during a squat changed the motion and muscle activation patterns of the trunk and lower extremities. This provides information for future research into rehabilitation, learning proper squat technique, and for specific training scenarios.

  13. How muscle fiber lengths and velocities affect muscle force generation as humans walk and run at different speeds

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Edith M.; Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Millard, Matthew; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The lengths and velocities of muscle fibers have a dramatic effect on muscle force generation. It is unknown, however, whether the lengths and velocities of lower limb muscle fibers substantially affect the ability of muscles to generate force during walking and running. We examined this issue by developing simulations of muscle–tendon dynamics to calculate the lengths and velocities of muscle fibers from electromyographic recordings of 11 lower limb muscles and kinematic measurements of the hip, knee and ankle made as five subjects walked at speeds of 1.0–1.75 m s−1 and ran at speeds of 2.0–5.0 m s−1. We analyzed the simulated fiber lengths, fiber velocities and forces to evaluate the influence of force–length and force–velocity properties on force generation at different walking and running speeds. The simulations revealed that force generation ability (i.e. the force generated per unit of activation) of eight of the 11 muscles was significantly affected by walking or running speed. Soleus force generation ability decreased with increasing walking speed, but the transition from walking to running increased the force generation ability by reducing fiber velocities. Our results demonstrate the influence of soleus muscle architecture on the walk-to-run transition and the effects of muscle–tendon compliance on the plantarflexors' ability to generate ankle moment and power. The study presents data that permit lower limb muscles to be studied in unprecedented detail by relating muscle fiber dynamics and force generation to the mechanical demands of walking and running. PMID:23470656

  14. Ageing and muscular dystrophy differentially affect murine pharyngeal muscles in a region-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E; Luo, Qingwei; Ho, Justin; Vest, Katherine E; Sokoloff, Alan J; Pavlath, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    The inability to swallow, or dysphagia, is a debilitating and life-threatening condition that arises with ageing or disease. Dysphagia results from neurological or muscular impairment of one or more pharyngeal muscles, which function together to ensure proper swallowing and prevent the aspiration of food or liquid into the lungs. Little is known about the effects of age or disease on pharyngeal muscles as a group. Here we show ageing affected pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy in wild-type mice depending on the particular muscle analysed. Furthermore, wild-type mice also developed dysphagia with ageing. Additionally, we studied pharyngeal muscles in a mouse model for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, a dysphagic disease caused by a polyalanine expansion in the RNA binding protein, PABPN1. We examined pharyngeal muscles of mice overexpressing either wild-type A10 or mutant A17 PABPN1. Overexpression of mutant A17 PABPN1 differentially affected growth of the palatopharyngeus muscle dependent on its location within the pharynx. Interestingly, overexpression of wild-type A10 PABPN1 was protective against age-related muscle atrophy in the laryngopharynx and prevented the development of age-related dysphagia. These results demonstrate that pharyngeal muscles are differentially affected by both ageing and muscular dystrophy in a region-dependent manner. These studies lay important groundwork for understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate pharyngeal muscle growth and atrophy, which may lead to novel therapies for individuals with dysphagia. PMID:25326455

  15. Photobiomodulation in human muscle tissue: an advantage in sports performance?

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2016-12-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) describes the use of red or near-infrared (NIR) light to stimulate, heal, and regenerate damaged tissue. Both preconditioning (light delivered to muscles before exercise) and PBM applied after exercise can increase sports performance in athletes. This review covers the effects of PBM on human muscle tissue in clinical trials in volunteers related to sports performance and in athletes. The parameters used were categorized into those with positive effects or no effects on muscle performance and recovery. Randomized controlled trials and case-control studies in both healthy trained and untrained participants, and elite athletes were retrieved from MEDLINE up to 2016. Performance metrics included fatigue, number of repetitions, torque, hypertrophy; measures of muscle damage and recovery such as creatine kinase and delayed onset muscle soreness. Searches retrieved 533 studies, of which 46 were included in the review (n = 1045 participants). Studies used single laser probes, cluster of laser diodes, LED clusters, mixed clusters (lasers and LEDs), and flexible LED arrays. Both red, NIR, and red/NIR mixtures were used. PBM can increase muscle mass gained after training, and decrease inflammation and oxidative stress in muscle biopsies. We raise the question of whether PBM should be permitted in athletic competition by international regulatory authorities.

  16. The callipyge mutation and other genes that affect muscle hypertrophy in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Genetic strategies to improve the profitability of sheep operations have generally focused on traits for reproduction. However, natural mutations exist in sheep that affect muscle growth and development, and the exploitation of these mutations in breeding strategies has the potential to significantly improve lamb-meat quality. The best-documented mutation for muscle development in sheep is callipyge (CLPG), which causes a postnatal muscle hypertrophy that is localized to the pelvic limbs and loin. Enhanced skeletal muscle growth is also observed in animals with the Carwell (or rib-eye muscling) mutation, and a double-muscling phenotype has been documented for animals of the Texel sheep breed. However, the actual mutations responsible for these muscular hypertrophy phenotypes in sheep have yet to be identified, and further characterization of the genetic basis for these phenotypes will provide insight into the biological control of muscle growth and body composition. PMID:15601596

  17. Evaluation of Physicochemical Deterioration and Lipid Oxidation of Beef Muscle Affected by Freeze-thaw Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. H.; Hossain, M. M.; Rahman, S. M. E.; Amin, M. R.; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the deterioration of physicochemical quality of beef hind limb during frozen storage at −20℃, affected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of three successive freeze-thaw cycles on beef hind limb were investigated comparing with unfrozen beef muscle for 80 d by keeping at −20±1℃. The freeze-thaw cycles were subjected to three thawing methods and carried out to select the best one on the basis of deterioration of physicochemical properties of beef. As the number of repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased, drip loss decreased and water holding capacity (WHC) increased (p<0.05) till two cycles and then decreased. Cooking loss increased in cycle one and three but decreased in cycle two. Moreover, drip loss, WHC and cooking loss affected (p<0.05) by thawing methods within the cycles. However, pH value decreased (p<0.05), but peroxide value (p<0.05), free fatty acids value (p<0.05) and TBARS value increased (p<0.05) significantly as the number of repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased. Moreover, significant (p<0.05) interactive effects were found among the thawing methods and repeated cycles. As a result, freeze-thaw cycles affected the physicochemical quality of beef muscle, causing the degradation of its quality. PMID:26877637

  18. Various light source treatments affect body and skeletal muscle growth by affecting skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation in broilers.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Biran, I; Rozenboim, I

    1998-06-01

    In this study we addressed the effect of various monochromatic light treatments on muscle growth and satellite cell proliferation in broilers (Gallus domesticus). Broilers were reared under green (560 nm), blue (480 nm) and red (660 nm) monochromatic lights and white light as a control from day one until 35 days of age. At five days of age, satellite cells were prepared from the experimental chicks. The number of satellite cells per gram of breast muscle and total number of satellite cells derived from the experimental broilers was substantially higher in the groups reared under green and blue light, compared to the red and white light groups. Growth hormone receptor gene expression was also higher in the former groups. High correlation was found between the breast muscle weight observed on day 35 and the number of satellite cells per gram of breast muscle (r = 0.915) and total number of satellite cells (r = 0.833), derived from the experimental chicks as early as five days of age. In addition, the protein/DNA ratio found in breast muscle at 35 days of age was significantly lower in chicks that were reared under green and blue lights. The lowest ratio which was found in the green group and was twice as low as in the control group, indicates the highest number of nuclei in the former group. As satellite cells are the only source of additional nuclei in skeletal muscles of postnatal animals, our results suggest that the higher muscle weight found in the green and blue light groups was due to increased satellite cell proliferation during the first days of age.

  19. Physical and balance performance following exercise induced muscle damage in male soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muzaffar Ahmad; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Raza, Shahid; Verma, Shalini; Shareef, M.Y.; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to determine the changes in physical and balance performance following exercise-induced muscle damage using a sport-specific protocol. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen collegiate soccer players were asked to perform a sport-specific sprint protocol to induce muscle damage. The markers of muscle damage (soreness, range of motion, limb girth, muscle strength, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase), physical performance (speed, agility and power) and balance (static and dynamic balance) were assessed at baseline and 24, 48 and 72 hours following the sprint protocol. [Results] All variables, including the markers of muscle damage, physical performance and balance showed a significant difference when assessed at the 4 time points. [Conclusion] The study demonstrated that both the physical and balance performance were affected following repeated sprint protocol in soccer players. It is recommended the balance performance of an athlete be continually assessed following exercise-induced muscle damage so as to determine the appropriate return to sport decision thereby, minimizing the risk of further injury. PMID:27821967

  20. Physical and balance performance following exercise induced muscle damage in male soccer players.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzaffar Ahmad; Moiz, Jamal Ali; Raza, Shahid; Verma, Shalini; Shareef, M Y; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to determine the changes in physical and balance performance following exercise-induced muscle damage using a sport-specific protocol. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen collegiate soccer players were asked to perform a sport-specific sprint protocol to induce muscle damage. The markers of muscle damage (soreness, range of motion, limb girth, muscle strength, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase), physical performance (speed, agility and power) and balance (static and dynamic balance) were assessed at baseline and 24, 48 and 72 hours following the sprint protocol. [Results] All variables, including the markers of muscle damage, physical performance and balance showed a significant difference when assessed at the 4 time points. [Conclusion] The study demonstrated that both the physical and balance performance were affected following repeated sprint protocol in soccer players. It is recommended the balance performance of an athlete be continually assessed following exercise-induced muscle damage so as to determine the appropriate return to sport decision thereby, minimizing the risk of further injury.

  1. Effect of substrates on the mechanical performance of rhesus monkey papillary muscle.

    PubMed

    Snow, T R

    1980-04-15

    This study examines the effect of different substrates on mechanical performance of excised papillary muscles from rhesus monkeys which had been divided into a control group and an experimental group fed a high fat diet for 5 months prior to sacrifice. The results show that performance is affected by availabel substrate for both groups. The performance of the experimental group was depressed relative to control with the short chain fatty acid, butyrate (C4), producing a monotonically decreasing force-frequency response. Relative to the other mammals, isolated rhesus papillary muscles exhibited a protracted treppe which was sensitive to beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol.

  2. The effects of topical Arnica on performance, pain and muscle damage after intense eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Pumpa, Kate L; Fallon, Kieran E; Bensoussan, Alan; Papalia, Shona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if topical Arnica is effective in reducing pain, indicators of inflammation and muscle damage, and in turn improve performance in well-trained males experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty well-trained males matched by maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 Max) completed a double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial. Topical Arnica was applied to the skin superficial to the quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles immediately after a downhill running protocol designed to induce DOMS. Topical Arnica was reapplied every 4 waking hours for the duration of the study. Performance measures (peak torque, countermovement and squat jump), pain assessments (visual analogue scale (VAS) and muscle tenderness) and blood analysis (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, C-reactive protein, myoglobin and creatine kinase) were assessed at seven time points over five days (pre-, post-, 4, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after the downhill run). Participants in the topical Arnica group reported less pain as assessed through muscle tenderness and VAS 72 hours post-exercise. The application of topical Arnica did not affect any performance assessments or markers of muscle damage or inflammation. Topical Arnica used immediately after intense eccentric exercise and for the following 96 hours did not have an effect on performance or blood markers. It did however demonstrate the possibility of providing pain relief three days post-eccentric exercise.

  3. The effects of masseter muscle pain on biting performance.

    PubMed

    Shiau, Y Y; Peng, C C; Wen, S C; Lin, L D; Wang, J S; Lou, K L

    2003-10-01

    The present study applied a standardized test food of known hardness to evaluate the biting performance of 20 female patients who had pain mainly in the masseter muscle during palpation. Another 20 women of a similar age group who were pain-free during examination served as controls. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles and the jaw position were recorded and measured when the subjects were biting through two types of test foods with known hardness (hard type, 20 kg hardness and extra-hard type, 60 kg hardness). Pressure-pain-threshold (PPT) values of both the patients and the normal subjects were obtained with an algometer. It was found that the PPT of the patients with pain was significantly lower and that the extra-hard food took more masseter muscle activity and more working side jaw movement in both the pain and the normal groups. During both hard and extra-hard food biting, a significantly longer duration of masseter muscle activity was found in pain patients while the total muscle activity was not significantly stronger. Strong correlation existed between SCM and masseter muscle activity during both hard and extra-hard food biting in the patient group, while such correlation was very weak in the normal group. In conclusion, painful masseter muscles required longer masseter and SCM muscle contraction time for breaking through a hard food of 20 kg and more, and co-activation of SCM and masseter muscles existed and was more evident when the food was harder or the pain was more severe.

  4. Prediction of muscle performance during dynamic repetitive movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, D. L.; Byerly, K. A.; Sognier, M. A.; Squires, W. G.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During long-duration spaceflight, astronauts experience progressive muscle atrophy and often perform strenuous extravehicular activities. Post-flight, there is a lengthy recovery period with an increased risk for injury. Currently, there is a critical need for an enabling tool to optimize muscle performance and to minimize the risk of injury to astronauts while on-orbit and during post-flight recovery. Consequently, these studies were performed to develop a method to address this need. METHODS: Eight test subjects performed a repetitive dynamic exercise to failure at 65% of their upper torso weight using a Lordex spinal machine. Surface electromyography (SEMG) data was collected from the erector spinae back muscle. The SEMG data was evaluated using a 5th order autoregressive (AR) model and linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The best predictor found was an AR parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, with r = 0.75 and p = 0.03. This parameter can predict performance to failure as early as the second repetition of the exercise. CONCLUSION: A method for predicting human muscle performance early during dynamic repetitive exercise was developed. The capability to predict performance to failure has many potential applications to the space program including evaluating countermeasure effectiveness on-orbit, optimizing post-flight recovery, and potential future real-time monitoring capability during extravehicular activity.

  5. Acute arginine supplementation fails to improve muscle endurance or affect blood pressure responses to resistance training.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau K; Jones, Brett T

    2011-07-01

    Dietary supplement companies claim that arginine supplements acutely enhance skeletal muscular endurance. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute arginine α-ketoglutarate supplementation (AAKG) will affect local muscle endurance of the arm and shoulder girdle or the blood pressure (BP) response to anaerobic exercise. Twelve trained college-aged men (22.6 ± 3.8 years) performed 2 trials of exercise separated by at least 1 week. At 4 hours before, and 30 minutes before exercise, a serving of an AAKG supplement (3,700 mg arginine alpha-ketoglutarate per serving) or placebo was administered. Resting BP was assessed pre-exercise after 16 minutes of seated rest, and 5 and 10 minutes postexercise. Three sets each of chin-ups, reverse chin-ups, and push-ups were performed to exhaustion with 3 minutes of rest between each set. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests. The AAKG supplementation did not improve muscle endurance or significantly affect the BP response to anaerobic work. Subjects performed fewer total chin-ups (23.75 ± 6.38 vs. 25.58 ± 7.18) and total trial repetitions (137.92 ± 28.18 vs. 141.08 ± 28.57) in the supplement trial (p ≤ 0.05). Subjects executed fewer reverse chin-ups (5.83 ± 1.85 vs. 6.75 ± 2.09) during set 2 after receiving the supplement as compared to the placebo (p < 0.05). Because AAKG supplementation may hinder muscular endurance, the use of these supplements before resistance training should be questioned.

  6. Glucocorticoids increase adipocytes in muscle by affecting IL-4 regulated FAP activity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanjun; Silva, Kleiton Augusto Santos; Dong, Yanlan; Zhang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    An increase in intramuscular adipocyte tissue (IMAT) is associated with glucose dysregulation, decreased muscle strength, and increased risk of disability. Unfortunately, the mechanisms stimulating intramuscular adipogenesis remain unclear. We found that dexamethasone (Dex) administration to mice with injured muscles stimulates the accumulation of IMAT. To identify precursors of these adipocytes, we isolated satellite cells and fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) from muscle; satellite cells did not differentiate into adipocytes even following Dex treatment. In contrast, Dex stimulated FAP differentiation into adipocytes. In vivo, we transplanted purified FAPs from transgenic, EGFP mice into the injured muscles of C57/BL6 mice and found that Dex administration stimulated adipogenesis from FAP-EGFP. The increase in adipogenesis depended on Dex-induced inhibition of interleukin-4 (IL-4). In the injured muscle of IL-4-knockout mice, the levels of adipocytes were increased, while in the injured muscles of Dex-treated mice with IL-4 injections, adipogenesis was suppressed. In cultured FAPs, IL-4 inhibited Dex-induced conversion of FAPs into adipocytes; this did not occur in FAPs expressing knockdown of the IL-4 receptor. Thus, we concluded that glucocorticoids stimulate FAPs to differentiate into adipocytes in injured muscles. This process is blocked by IL-4, suggesting that interfering with IL-4 signaling could prevent adipogenesis in muscle.—Dong, Y., Silva, K. A. S., Dong, Y., Zhang, L. Glucocorticoids increase adipocytes in muscle by affecting IL-4 regulated FAP activity. PMID:24948596

  7. Chronic muscle stimulation improves ischaemic muscle performance in patients with peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tsang, G M; Green, M A; Crow, A J; Smith, F C; Beck, S; Hudlicka, O; Shearman, C P

    1994-07-01

    There is currently no established treatment for intermittent claudication with proven long term benefit. Exercise classes have been shown to improve walking distance. Chronic electromyostimulation (CEMS) a method of stimulating skeletal muscle has effects on normal muscle which may also benefit claudicants. We investigated the effects of one month of CEMS on claudicants in a single blind placebo controlled study. Patients were randomised to either CEMS (treatment) or transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) placebo. The effects of the two modalities were assessed using the conventional measures of claudicating distance (CD), maximum walking distance (MWD), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and pressure recovery time (PRT). Muscle performance was assessed by the fatigue index (FI) a technique determining the decrease in ischaemic muscle response to repeated contraction. After 4 weeks treatment the CEMS group showed significant improvements in their median CD (88 to 111) and MWD (118 to 158); this was not seen in the control group. Muscle performance also increased significantly during the 4 weeks of treatment in the CEMS group but not in the control group. These changes were not maintained after CEMS was stopped. This pilot study suggests that CEMS may well have a role to play in the treatment of intermittent claudication though a number of further studies need to be undertaken.

  8. Power training and postmenopausal hormone therapy affect transcriptional control of specific co-regulated gene clusters in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Vidal; Törmäkangas, Timo; Ronkainen, Paula H. A.; Taaffe, Dennis R.; Takala, Timo; Koskinen, Satu; Cheng, Sulin; Puolakka, Jukka; Kujala, Urho M.; Suominen, Harri; Sipilä, Sarianna; Kovanen, Vuokko

    2010-01-01

    At the moment, there is no clear molecular explanation for the steeper decline in muscle performance after menopause or the mechanisms of counteractive treatments. The goal of this genome-wide study was to identify the genes and gene clusters through which power training (PT) comprising jumping activities or estrogen containing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) may affect skeletal muscle properties after menopause. We used musculus vastus lateralis samples from early stage postmenopausal (50–57 years old) women participating in a yearlong randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with PT and HRT interventions. Using microarray platform with over 24,000 probes, we identified 665 differentially expressed genes. The hierarchical clustering method was used to assort the genes. Additionally, enrichment analysis of gene ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways was carried out to clarify whether assorted gene clusters are enriched with particular functional categories. The analysis revealed transcriptional regulation of 49 GO/KEGG categories. PT upregulated transcription in “response to contraction”—category revealing novel candidate genes for contraction-related regulation of muscle function while HRT upregulated gene expression related to functionality of mitochondria. Moreover, several functional categories tightly related to muscle energy metabolism, development, and function were affected regardless of the treatment. Our results emphasize that during the early stages of the postmenopause, muscle properties are under transcriptional modulation, which both PT and HRT partially counteract leading to preservation of muscle power and potentially reducing the risk for aging-related muscle weakness. More specifically, PT and HRT may function through improving energy metabolism, response to contraction as well as by preserving functionality of the mitochondria. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this

  9. Muscle - tendon unit mechanical and morphological properties and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Stafilidis, Savvas; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether sprint performance is related to the mechanical (elongation - force relationship of the tendon and aponeurosis, muscle strength) and morphological (fascicle length, pennation angle, muscle thickness) properties of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscle - tendon units. Two groups of sprinters (slow, n = 11; fast, n = 17) performed maximal isometric knee extension and plantar flexion contractions on a dynamometer at 11 different muscle - tendon unit lengths. Elongation of the tendon and aponeurosis of the gastrocnemius medialis and the vastus lateralis was measured using ultrasonography. We observed no significant differences in maximal joint moments at the ankle and knee joints or morphological properties of the gastrocnemius medialis and vastus lateralis between groups (P > 0.05). The fast group exhibited greater elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis at a given tendon force, and greater maximal elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis during maximum voluntary contraction (P < 0.05). Furthermore, maximal elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis showed a significant correlation with 100-m sprint times (r = -0.567, P = 0.003). For the elongation - force relationship at the gastrocnemius medialis tendon and aponeurosis, the two groups recorded similar values. It is suggested that the greater elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis of the fast group benefits energy storage and return as well as the shortening velocity of the muscle - tendon unit.

  10. Affection of the Respiratory Muscles in Combined Complex I and IV Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Rauschka, Helmut; Segal, Liane; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Rolinski, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Combined complex I+IV deficiency has rarely been reported to manifest with the involvement of the respiratory muscles. Case Report: A 45y male was admitted for hypercapnia due to muscular respiratory insufficiency. He required intubation and mechanical ventilation. He had a previous history of ophthalmoparesis since age 6y, ptosis since age 23y, and anterocollis since at least age 40y. Muscle biopsy from the right deltoid muscle at age 41y was indicative of mitochondrial myopathy. Biochemical investigations revealed a combined complex I+IV defect. Respiratory insufficiency was attributed to mitochondrial myopathy affecting not only the extra-ocular and the axial muscles but also the shoulder girdle and respiratory muscles. In addition to myopathy, he had mitochondrial neuropathy, abnormal EEG, and elevated CSF-protein. Possibly, this is why a single cycle of immunoglobulins was somehow beneficial. For muscular respiratory insufficiency he required tracheostomy and was scheduled for long-term intermittent positive pressure ventilation. Conclusion: Mitochondrial myopathy due to a combined complex I+IV defect with predominant affection of the extra-ocular muscles may progress to involvement of the limb-girdle, axial and respiratory muscles resulting in muscular respiratory insufficiency. In patients with mitochondrial myopathy, neuropathy and elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein, immunoglobulins may be beneficial even for respiratory functions. PMID:28217183

  11. Creatine Loading, Resistance Exercise Performance, and Muscle Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Scott W.; Dudley, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether creatine (CR) monohydrate loading would alter resistance exercise performance, isometric strength, or in vivo contractile properties of the quadriceps femoris muscle compared with placebo loading in resistance-trained athletes. Overall, CR loading did not provide an ergogenic benefit for the unilateral dynamic knee extension…

  12. Relationships between muscle fibre characteristics and physical performance capacity in trained athletic boys.

    PubMed

    Mero, A; Jaakkola, L; Komi, P V

    1991-01-01

    The relationships between muscle fibre characteristics and the physical performance capacity of trained athletic boys (aged 11-13 years) were studied over 2 days. The subjects were divided into two groups according to muscle fibre distribution. The 'fast' group (FG) comprised 10 subjects (sprinters, weightlifters, tennis players) with more than 50% fast-twitch fibres (type II), and the 'slow' group (SG) comprised 8 subjects (endurance runners, tennis players, one weightlifter) with more than 50% slow-twitch fibres (type I) in their vastus lateralis muscle. The 'fast' group had 59.2 +/- 6.3% and the 'slow' group had 39.4 +/- 9.8% type II fibres. Other clear differences (P less than 0.05-0.01) between the groups were observed as regards reaction time, rate of force development and rise of the body's centre of gravity in the squatting jump. For these variables, the 'fast' group was superior to the 'slow' group. Muscle fibre distribution (% type II) correlated (P less than 0.05-0.01) negatively with reaction time. Muscle fibre area (% type II) correlated negatively with reaction time (P less than 0.05-0.001) and positively with chronological age (P less than 0.05) height (P less than 0.05), mass (P less than 0.001), serum testosterone (P less than 0.05), force production (P less than 0.05-0.01) and blood lactate (P less than 0.05) in the 60-s maximal anaerobic test. There were no significant correlations between muscle fibre characteristics and maximal oxygen uptake. The present study assumes that heredity partly affects the selection of sporting event. Growth, development and training are associated with muscle fibre area, which affects the physical performance capacity of the neuromuscular system in trained young boys.

  13. Myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) expression is affected by exercise in postnatal chicken skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Huadong; Li, Diyan; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Xiaoling; Liu, Yiping; Yang, Zhiqin; Zhu, Qing

    2015-05-01

    The MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 proteins belong to the family of muscle regulatory factors (MRFs) and play important roles in skeletal muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy. We hypothesized that exercise would affect MRF mRNA and protein abundance in postnatal chicken skeletal muscle driving molecular changes that could ultimately lead to increased muscle fiber diameter. At day (d) 43, twelve hundred chickens with similar body weight were randomly assigned to cage, pen, and free-range groups. The MRF mRNA abundance was measured in the pectoralis major and thigh muscle at d56, d70, and d84, and the protein levels of MRFs were determined from the thigh muscle at d84. The results showed no significant difference in mRNA of the MRFs among the three groups at d56 (P>0.05). At d84, chicken in the pen and free-range group showed higher MyoD1, MyoG, Myf5, and Mrf4 mRNA abundance compared to the caged chickens (P<0.05). Free-range chickens had higher Mrf4 and MyoG expression than those in penned ones (P<0.05). Protein abundances of all four factors were lowest in the caged group, and Mrf4 and MyoG protein quantities were greatest in free-range chickens (P<0.05), but Myf5 and MyoD1 protein abundance did not differ between penned and caged groups. The results suggested that exercise up-regulated MRF expression in the postnatal skeletal muscles, which led to an increase in muscle fiber diameter, and eventually affected the meat quality of the skeletal muscles in adult chickens.

  14. Influence of Gender and Muscle Architecture Asymmetry on Jump and Sprint Performance

    PubMed Central

    Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; LaMonica, Michael B.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Townsend, Jeremy R.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Hoffman, Jay R.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle architecture is a determinant for sprinting speed and jumping power, which may be related to anaerobic sports performance. In the present investigation, the relationships between peak (PVJP) and mean (MVJP) vertical jump power, 30m maximal sprinting speed (30M), and muscle architecture were examined in 28 college-aged, recreationally-active men (n = 14; 24.3 ± 2.2y; 89.1 ± 9.3kg; 1.80 ± 0.07 m) and women (n = 14; 21.5 ± 1.7y; 65.2 ± 12.4kg; 1.63 ± 0.08 m). Ultrasound measures of muscle thickness (MT), pennation angle (PNG), cross-sectional area (CSA), and echo intensity (ECHO) were collected from the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) of both legs; fascicle length (FL) was estimated from MT and PNG. Men possessed lower ECHO, greater muscle size (MT & CSA), were faster, and were more powerful (PVJP & MVJP) than women. Stepwise regression indicated that muscle size and quality influenced speed and power in men. In women, vastus lateralis asymmetry negatively affected PVJP (MT: r = –0.73; FL: r = –0.60) and MVJP (MT: r = –0.76; FL: r = –0.64), while asymmetrical ECHO (VL) and FL (RF) positively influenced MVJP (r = 0.55) and 30M (r = 0.57), respectively. Thigh muscle architecture appears to influence jumping power and sprinting speed, though the effect may vary by gender in recreationally-active adults. Appropriate assessment of these ultrasound variables in men and women prior to training may provide a more specific exercise prescription. Key points The manner in which thigh muscle architecture affects jumping power and sprinting speed varies by gender. In men, performance is influenced by the magnitude of muscle size and architecture. In women, asymmetrical muscle size and architectural asymmetry significantly influence performance. To develop effective and precise exercise prescription for the improvement of jumping power and/or sprinting speed, muscle architecture assessment prior to the onset of a training program is advised. PMID

  15. Effects of Varying Recovery Periods on Muscle Enzymes, Soreness, and Performance in Baseball Pitchers

    PubMed Central

    Potteiger, Jeffrey A.; Blessing, Daniel L.; Wilson, G. Dennis

    1992-01-01

    In this study we examined the effects of varied recovery time on serum creatine kinase (CK), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), muscle soreness, and pitch velocity in baseball pitchers. Ten males who had pitching experience participated in the study. After an 18-day training period, subjects pitched three simulated games. Game A and Game B were separated by four days of rest, while Game B and Game C were separated by two days of rest. CK, LDH, and muscle soreness were evaluated at the following times: before and immediately after exercise, and six, 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. Muscle performance was evaluated by measuring pitch velocity during the games. The CK level was elevated after each game (Game A - 249 U/l; Game B - 243 U/l; and Game C - 240 U/l); then it dropped toward baseline (p≤0.01). CK post-exercise values were not different among games A, B, and C. LDH displayed a response similar to CK; however, there was a reduction over the span of the games (p≤0.05). Muscle soreness was significantly elevated immediately after exercise (p≤0.01) compared to all other measurement times. Pitch velocity was not different among games A, B, and C. Results indicate that muscle damage, as evidenced by CK release, occurs in response to baseball pitching. However CK values, muscle soreness, and pitch velocity are not significantly affected by changes in the amount of recovery time typically scheduled between games. PMID:16558126

  16. The science of cycling: factors affecting performance - part 2.

    PubMed

    Faria, Erik W; Parker, Daryl L; Faria, Irvin E

    2005-01-01

    This review presents information that is useful to athletes, coaches and exercise scientists in the adoption of exercise protocols, prescription of training regimens and creation of research designs. Part 2 focuses on the factors that affect cycling performance. Among those factors, aerodynamic resistance is the major resistance force the racing cyclist must overcome. This challenge can be dealt with through equipment technological modifications and body position configuration adjustments. To successfully achieve efficient transfer of power from the body to the drive train of the bicycle the major concern is bicycle configuration and cycling body position. Peak power output appears to be highly correlated with cycling success. Likewise, gear ratio and pedalling cadence directly influence cycling economy/efficiency. Knowledge of muscle recruitment throughout the crank cycle has important implications for training and body position adjustments while climbing. A review of pacing models suggests that while there appears to be some evidence in favour of one technique over another, there remains the need for further field research to validate the findings. Nevertheless, performance modelling has important implications for the establishment of performance standards and consequent recommendations for training.

  17. Aging affects passive stiffness and spindle function of the rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosant, Cédric; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pérot, Chantal

    2007-04-01

    Aging affects many motor functions, notably the spinal stretch reflexes and muscle spindle sensitivity. Spindle activation also depends on the elastic properties of the structures linked to the proprioceptive receptors. We have calculated a spindle efficacy index, SEI, for old rats. This index relates the spindle sensitivity, deduced from electroneurograms recording (ENG), to the passive stiffness of the muscle. Spindle sensitivity and passive incremental stiffness were calculated during ramp and hold stretches imposed on pseudo-isolated soleus muscles of control rats (aged 4 months, n=12) and old rats (aged 24 months, n=16). SEI were calculated for the dynamic and static phases of ramp (1-80 mm/s) and for hold (0.5-2mm) stretches imposed at two reference lengths: length threshold for spindle afferents discharges, L(n) (neurogram length) and slack length, L(s). The passive incremental stiffness was calculated from the peak and steady values of passive tension, measured under the stretch conditions used for the ENG recordings, and taking into account the muscle cross-sectional area. The pseudo-isolated soleus muscles were also stretched to establish the stress-strain relationship and to calculate muscle stiffness constant. The contralateral muscle was used to count muscle spindles and spindle fibers (ATPase staining) and immunostained to identify MyHC isoforms. L(n) and L(s) lengths were not significantly different in the control group, while L(n) was significantly greater than L(s) in old muscles. Under dynamic conditions, the SEI of old muscles was the same as in controls at L(s), but it was significantly lower than in controls at L(n) due to increased passive incremental stiffness under the stretch conditions used to analyze the ENG. Under static conditions, the SEI of old muscles was significantly lower than control values at all the stretch amplitudes and threshold lengths tested, due to increased passive incremental stiffness and decreased spindle sensitivity

  18. What can isolated skeletal muscle experiments tell us about the effects of caffeine on exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2015-08-01

    Caffeine is an increasingly popular nutritional supplement due to the legal, significant improvements in sporting performance that it has been documented to elicit, with minimal side effects. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on human performance continue to be a popular area of research as we strive to improve our understanding of this drug and make more precise recommendations for its use in sport. Although variations in exercise intensity seems to affect its ergogenic benefits, it is largely thought that caffeine can induce significant improvements in endurance, power and strength-based activities. There are a number of limitations to testing caffeine-induced effects on human performance that can be better controlled when investigating its effects on isolated muscles under in vitro conditions. The hydrophobic nature of caffeine results in a post-digestion distribution to all tissues of the body making it difficult to accurately quantify its key mechanism of action. This review considers the contribution of evidence from isolated muscle studies to our understating of the direct effects of caffeine on muscle during human performance. The body of in vitro evidence presented suggests that caffeine can directly potentiate skeletal muscle force, work and power, which may be important contributors to the performance-enhancing effects seen in humans.

  19. What can isolated skeletal muscle experiments tell us about the effects of caffeine on exercise performance?

    PubMed Central

    Tallis, Jason; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is an increasingly popular nutritional supplement due to the legal, significant improvements in sporting performance that it has been documented to elicit, with minimal side effects. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on human performance continue to be a popular area of research as we strive to improve our understanding of this drug and make more precise recommendations for its use in sport. Although variations in exercise intensity seems to affect its ergogenic benefits, it is largely thought that caffeine can induce significant improvements in endurance, power and strength-based activities. There are a number of limitations to testing caffeine-induced effects on human performance that can be better controlled when investigating its effects on isolated muscles under in vitro conditions. The hydrophobic nature of caffeine results in a post-digestion distribution to all tissues of the body making it difficult to accurately quantify its key mechanism of action. This review considers the contribution of evidence from isolated muscle studies to our understating of the direct effects of caffeine on muscle during human performance. The body of in vitro evidence presented suggests that caffeine can directly potentiate skeletal muscle force, work and power, which may be important contributors to the performance-enhancing effects seen in humans. PMID:25988508

  20. Hypoxia transiently affects skeletal muscle hypertrophy in a functional overload model.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Koulmann, Nathalie; Simler, Nadine; Meunier, Adélie; Serrurier, Bernard; Chapot, Rachel; Peinnequin, Andre; Beaudry, Michèle; Bigard, Xavier

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia induces a loss of skeletal muscle mass, but the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that hypoxia could impair skeletal muscle hypertrophy induced by functional overload (Ov). To test this hypothesis, plantaris muscles were overloaded during 5, 12, and 56 days in female rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (5,500 m), and then, we examined the responses of specific signaling pathways involved in protein synthesis (Akt/mTOR) and breakdown (atrogenes). Hypoxia minimized the Ov-induced hypertrophy at days 5 and 12 but did not affect the hypertrophic response measured at day 56. Hypoxia early reduced the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and its downstream targets P70(S6K) and rpS6, but it did not affect the phosphorylation levels of Akt and 4E-BP1, in Ov muscles. The role played by specific inhibitors of mTOR, such as AMPK and hypoxia-induced factors (i.e., REDD1 and BNIP-3) was studied. REDD1 protein levels were reduced by overload and were not affected by hypoxia in Ov muscles, whereas AMPK was not activated by hypoxia. Although hypoxia significantly increased BNIP-3 mRNA levels at day 5, protein levels remained unaffected. The mRNA levels of the two atrogenes MURF1 and MAFbx were early increased by hypoxia in Ov muscles. In conclusion, hypoxia induced a transient alteration of muscle growth in this hypertrophic model, at least partly due to a specific impairment of the mTOR/P70(S6K) pathway, independently of Akt, by an undefined mechanism, and increased transcript levels for MURF1 and MAFbx that could contribute to stimulate the proteasomal proteolysis.

  1. SIXTY SECONDS OF FOAM ROLLING DOES NOT AFFECT FUNCTIONAL FLEXIBILITY OR CHANGE MUSCLE TEMPERATURE IN ADOLESCENT ATHLETES

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Thomas W.; Horobeanu, Cosmin; Turner, Anthony P.; Sproule, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Physiotherapists and other practitioners commonly prescribe foam rolling as an intervention, but the mechanistic effects of this intervention are not known. Purpose The aim of this investigation was to establish if a single bout of foam rolling affects flexibility, skeletal muscle contractility and reflected temperature. Methods Twelve adolescent male squash players were evaluated on two separate occasions (treatment and control visits) and were tested on both legs for flexibility of the hip flexors and quadriceps, muscle contractility (as measured by tensiomyography) and temperature of the quadriceps (assessed via thermography) at repeated time points pre- and post a 60s rolling intervention (pre-, immediately post, 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes post). They rolled one leg on the treatment visit and did not perform rolling on the control visit. Results The main outcome measure was the flexibility of hip flexor and quadriceps at repeated time points up to 30 minutes post intervention. The average foam rolling force was 68% of subject's body weight. This force affected the combination of hip and quadriceps flexibility (p = 0.03; 2.4 degrees total increase with foam rolling) but not each muscle independently (p = 0.05 – 0.98) following a single 60s bout. Muscle contractility is not affected (p = 0.09 – 0.93) and temperature is not increased by foam rolling across time points (p = 0.19). Conclusions A single sixty-second bout of rolling applied to the quadriceps induces a small significant change in flexibility that is of little practical relevance, while muscle contractility and temperature remain unchanged. Investigation of larger doses of rolling is merited in athletic populations to justify current practice. Level of Evidence 2c PMID:27757289

  2. Respiratory muscle endurance, oxygen saturation index in vastus lateralis and performance during heavy exercise.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ferid; Boone, Jan; Ahmaidi, Said

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between respiratory muscle endurance, tissue oxygen saturation index dynamics of leg muscle (TSI) and the time to exhaustion (TTE) during high intensity exercise. Eleven males performed a respiratory muscle endurance test, a maximal incremental running field test (8 km h(-1)+0.5 km h(-1) each 60s) and a high-intensity constant speed field test at 90% VO2max. The TSI in vastus lateralis was monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy. The TSI remained steady between 20 and 80% of TTE. Between 80 and 100% of TTE (7.5 ± 6.1%, p<0.05), a significant drop in TSI concomitant with a minute ventilation increase (16 ± 10 l min(-1)) was observed. Moreover, the increase of ventilation was correlated to the drop in TSI (r=0.70, p<0.05). Additionally, respiratory muscle endurance was significantly correlated to TSI time plateau (20-80% TTE) (r=0.83, p<0.05) and to TTE (r=0.95, p<0.001). The results of the present study show that the tissue oxygen saturation plateau might be affected by ventilatory work and that respiratory muscle endurance could be considered as a determinant of performance during heavy exercise.

  3. Prediction of Muscle Performance During Dynamic Repetitive Exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byerly, D. L.; Byerly, K. A.; Sognier, M. A.; Squires, W. G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for predicting human muscle performance was developed. Eight test subjects performed a repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Electromyography (EMG) data was collected from the erector spinae. Evaluation of the EMG data using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis revealed that an AR parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, can predict performance to failure as early as the second repetition of the exercise. Potential applications to the space program include evaluating on-orbit countermeasure effectiveness, maximizing post-flight recovery, and future real-time monitoring capability during Extravehicular Activity.

  4. Cranial myology and bite force performance of Erlikosaurus andrewsi: a novel approach for digital muscle reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The estimation of bite force and bite performance in fossil and extinct animals is a challenging subject in palaeontology and is highly dependent on the reconstruction of the cranial myology. Furthermore, the morphology and arrangement of the adductor muscles considerably affect feeding processes and mastication and thus also have important dietary and ecological ramifications. However, in the past, the reconstruction of the (cranial) muscles was restricted to the identification of muscle attachment sites or simplified computer models. This study presents a detailed reconstruction of the adductor musculature of the Cretaceous therizinosaur Erlikosaurus andrewsi based on a stepwise and iterative approach. The detailed, three-dimensional models of the individual muscles allow for more accurate measurements of the muscle properties (length, cross-section, attachment angle and volume), from which muscle and bite force estimates are calculated. Bite force estimations are found to be the lowest at the tip of the snout (43–65 N) and respectively higher at the first (59–88 N) and last tooth (90–134 N) position. Nevertheless, bite forces are comparatively low for E. andrewsi, both in actual numbers as well as in comparison with other theropod dinosaurs. The results further indicate that the low bite performance was mainly used for leaf-stripping and plant cropping, rather than active mastication or chewing processes. Muscle and thus bite force in E. andrewsi (and most likely all therizinosaurs) is considerably constrained by the cranial anatomy and declines in derived taxa of this clade. This trend is reflected in the changes of dietary preferences from carnivory to herbivory in therizinosaurs. PMID:23061752

  5. Thermal effects on the performance, motor control and muscle dynamics of ballistic feeding in the salamander Eurycea guttolineata.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher V; Larghi, Nicholas P; Deban, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Temperature strongly affects muscle contractile rate properties and thus may influence whole-organism performance. Movements powered by elastic recoil, however, are known to be more thermally robust than muscle-powered movements. We examined the whole-organism performance, motor control and muscle contractile physiology underlying feeding in the salamander Eurycea guttolineata. We compared elastically powered tongue projection with the associated muscle-powered retraction to determine the thermal robustness of each of these functional levels. We found that tongue-projection distance in E. guttolineata was unaffected by temperature across the entire 4-26°C range, tongue-projection dynamics were significantly affected by temperature across only the 4-11°C interval, and tongue retraction was affected to a higher degree across the entire temperature range. The significant effect of temperature on projection dynamics across the 4-11°C interval corresponds to a significant decline in projector muscle burst intensity and peak contractile force of the projector muscle across the same interval. Across the remaining temperature range, however, projection dynamics were unaffected by temperature, with muscle contractile physiology showing typical thermal effects and motor patterns showing increased activity durations and latencies. These results reveal that elastically powered tongue-projection performance in E. guttolineata is maintained to a higher degree than muscle-powered tongue retraction performance across a wide temperature range. These results further indicate that thermal robustness of the elastically powered movement is dependent on motor control and muscle physiology that results in comparable energy being stored in elastic tissues across a range of temperatures.

  6. Annexin A1 Deficiency does not Affect Myofiber Repair but Delays Regeneration of Injured Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Leikina, Evgenia; Defour, Aurelia; Melikov, Kamran; Van der Meulen, Jack H.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Bhuvanendran, Shivaprasad; Gebert, Claudia; Pfeifer, Karl; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.

    2015-01-01

    Repair and regeneration of the injured skeletal myofiber involves fusion of intracellular vesicles with sarcolemma and fusion of the muscle progenitor cells respectively. In vitro experiments have identified involvement of Annexin A1 (Anx A1) in both these fusion processes. To determine if Anx A1 contributes to these processes during muscle repair in vivo, we have assessed muscle growth and repair in Anx A1-deficient mouse (AnxA1−/−). We found that the lack of Anx A1 does not affect the muscle size and repair of myofibers following focal sarcolemmal injury and lengthening contraction injury. However, the lack of Anx A1 delayed muscle regeneration after notexin-induced injury. This delay in muscle regeneration was not caused by a slowdown in proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, lack of Anx A1 lowered the proportion of differentiating myoblasts that managed to fuse with the injured myofibers by days 5 and 7 after notexin injury as compared to the wild type (w.t.) mice. Despite this early slowdown in fusion of Anx A1−/− myoblasts, regeneration caught up at later times post injury. These results establish in vivo role of Anx A1 in cell fusion required for myofiber regeneration and not in intracellular vesicle fusion needed for repair of myofiber sarcolemma. PMID:26667898

  7. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valentina; Gandaglia, Anna; Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions.

  8. Functional Task Test: 3. Skeletal Muscle Performance Adaptations to Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Wickwire, P. J.; Buxton, R. E.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    The functional task test is a multi-disciplinary study investigating how space-flight induced changes to physiological systems impacts functional task performance. Impairment of neuromuscular function would be expected to negatively affect functional performance of crewmembers following exposure to microgravity. This presentation reports the results for muscle performance testing in crewmembers. Functional task performance will be presented in the abstract "Functional Task Test 1: sensory motor adaptations associated with postflight alternations in astronaut functional task performance." METHODS: Muscle performance measures were obtained in crewmembers before and after short-duration space flight aboard the Space Shuttle and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. The battery of muscle performance tests included leg press and bench press measures of isometric force, isotonic power and total work. Knee extension was used for the measurement of central activation and maximal isometric force. Upper and lower body force steadiness control were measured on the bench press and knee extension machine, respectively. Tests were implemented 60 and 30 days before launch, on landing day (Shuttle crew only), and 6, 10 and 30 days after landing. Seven Space Shuttle crew and four ISS crew have completed the muscle performance testing to date. RESULTS: Preliminary results for Space Shuttle crew reveal significant reductions in the leg press performance metrics of maximal isometric force, power and total work on R+0 (p<0.05). Bench press total work was also significantly impaired, although maximal isometric force and power were not significantly affected. No changes were noted for measurements of central activation or force steadiness. Results for ISS crew were not analyzed due to the current small sample size. DISCUSSION: Significant reductions in lower body muscle performance metrics were observed in returning Shuttle crew and these adaptations are likely

  9. Skeletal muscle contractile function and neuromuscular performance in Zmpste24 -/- mice, a murine model of human progeria.

    PubMed

    Greising, Sarah M; Call, Jarrod A; Lund, Troy C; Blazar, Bruce R; Tolar, Jakub; Lowe, Dawn A

    2012-08-01

    Human progeroid syndromes and premature aging mouse models present as segmental, accelerated aging because some tissues and not others are affected. Skeletal muscle is detrimentally changed by normal aging but whether it is an affected tissue in progeria has not been resolved. We hypothesized that mice which mimic Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome would exhibit age-related alterations of skeletal muscle. Zmpste24 (-/-) and Zmpste24 (+/+) littermates were assessed for skeletal muscle functions, histo-morphological characteristics, and ankle joint mechanics. Twenty-four-hour active time, ambulation, grip strength, and whole body tension were evaluated as markers of neuromuscular performance, each of which was at least 33% lower in Zmpste24 (-/-) mice compared with littermates (p < 0.06). Contractile capacity of the posterior leg muscles were not affected in Zmpste24 (-/-) mice, but muscles of the anterior leg were 30-90% weaker than those of Zmpste24 (+/+) mice (p < 0.01). Leg muscles were 32-47% smaller in the Zmpste24 (-/-) mice and contained ~60% greater collagen relative to littermates (p < 0.01). Soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles of Zmpste24 (-/-) mice had excessive myonuclei and altered fiber size distributions but, otherwise, appeared normal. Ankle range of motion was 70% lower and plantar- and dorsiflexion passive torques were nearly 3-fold greater in Zmpste24 (-/-) than Zmpste24 (+/+) mice (p ≤ 0.01). The combined factors of muscle atrophy, collagen accumulation, and perturbed joint mechanics likely contributed to poor neuromuscular performance and selective muscle weakness displayed by Zmpste24 (-/-)mice. In summary, these characteristics are similar to those of aged mice indicating accelerated aging of skeletal muscle in progeria.

  10. Attribution, Affect, and College Exam Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkin, Robert M.; Maruyama, Geoffrey M.

    1979-01-01

    College students attributed their own performance and the performance of the average student to ability, test difficulty, preparation, and luck. Successful students perceived internal factors and unsuccessful students perceived external factors as more important causes of their own performance. Students' anxiety and their ratings of the course and…

  11. Anthropogenic changes in sodium affect neural and muscle development in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Espeset, Anne; Boser, Christopher J; White, William A; Smykalski, Rhea

    2014-07-15

    The development of organisms is changing drastically because of anthropogenic changes in once-limited nutrients. Although the importance of changing macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, is well-established, it is less clear how anthropogenic changes in micronutrients will affect organismal development, potentially changing dynamics of selection. We use butterflies as a study system to test whether changes in sodium availability due to road salt runoff have significant effects on the development of sodium-limited traits, such as neural and muscle tissue. We first document how road salt runoff can elevate sodium concentrations in the tissue of some plant groups by 1.5-30 times. Using monarch butterflies reared on roadside- and prairie-collected milkweed, we then show that road salt runoff can result in increased muscle mass (in males) and neural investment (in females). Finally, we use an artificial diet manipulation in cabbage white butterflies to show that variation in sodium chloride per se positively affects male flight muscle and female brain size. Variation in sodium not only has different effects depending on sex, but also can have opposing effects on the same tissue: across both species, males increase investment in flight muscle with increasing sodium, whereas females show the opposite pattern. Taken together, our results show that anthropogenic changes in sodium availability can affect the development of traits in roadside-feeding herbivores. This research suggests that changing micronutrient availability could alter selection on foraging behavior for some roadside-developing invertebrates.

  12. Anthropogenic changes in sodium affect neural and muscle development in butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C.; Espeset, Anne; Boser, Christopher J.; White, William A.; Smykalski, Rhea

    2014-01-01

    The development of organisms is changing drastically because of anthropogenic changes in once-limited nutrients. Although the importance of changing macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, is well-established, it is less clear how anthropogenic changes in micronutrients will affect organismal development, potentially changing dynamics of selection. We use butterflies as a study system to test whether changes in sodium availability due to road salt runoff have significant effects on the development of sodium-limited traits, such as neural and muscle tissue. We first document how road salt runoff can elevate sodium concentrations in the tissue of some plant groups by 1.5–30 times. Using monarch butterflies reared on roadside- and prairie-collected milkweed, we then show that road salt runoff can result in increased muscle mass (in males) and neural investment (in females). Finally, we use an artificial diet manipulation in cabbage white butterflies to show that variation in sodium chloride per se positively affects male flight muscle and female brain size. Variation in sodium not only has different effects depending on sex, but also can have opposing effects on the same tissue: across both species, males increase investment in flight muscle with increasing sodium, whereas females show the opposite pattern. Taken together, our results show that anthropogenic changes in sodium availability can affect the development of traits in roadside-feeding herbivores. This research suggests that changing micronutrient availability could alter selection on foraging behavior for some roadside-developing invertebrates. PMID:24927579

  13. Deletion of Kinin B2 Receptor Alters Muscle Metabolism and Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Haro, Anderson S.; Bacurau, Aline V. N.; Hirabara, Sandro M.; Wasinski, Frederick; Ormanji, Milene S.; Moreira, José B. N.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Bertoncini, Clelia R. A.; Brum, Patricia C.; Curi, Rui; Bader, Michael; Bacurau, Reury F. P.; Pesquero, João B.; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Mitochondria is the main site of ATP production and its dysfunction leads to decreased oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. Our group has demonstrated that kinins can modulate glucose and lipid metabolism as well as skeletal muscle mass. By using B2 receptor knockout mice (B2R-/-) we investigated whether kinin action affects weight gain and physical performance of the animals. Our results show that B2R-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity, have higher glucose tolerance as well as increased mitochondrial mass. These features are accompanied by higher energy expenditure and a lower feed efficiency associated with an increase in the proportion of type I fibers and intermediary fibers characterized by higher mitochondrial content and increased expression of genes related to oxidative metabolism. Additionally, the increased percentage of oxidative skeletal muscle fibers and mitochondrial apparatus in B2R-/- mice is coupled with a higher aerobic exercise performance. Taken together, our data give support to the involvement of kinins in skeletal muscle fiber type distribution and muscle metabolism, which ultimately protects against fat-induced obesity and improves aerobic exercise performance. PMID:26302153

  14. Sex steroids do not affect muscle weight, oxidative metabolism or cytosolic androgen reception binding of functionally overloaded rat Plantaris muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Max, S. R.; Rance, N.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of sex steroids on muscle weight and oxidative capacity of rat planaris muscles subjected to functional overload by removal of synergistic muscles were investigated. Ten weeks after bilateral synergist removal, plantaris muscles were significantly hypertrophic compared with unoperated controls. After this period, the ability of the muscles to oxide three substrates of oxidative metabolism was assessed. Experimental procedures are discussed and results are presented herein. Results suggest a lack of beneficial effect of sex hormone status on the process of hypertrophy and on biochemical changes in overloaded muscle. Such findings are not consistent with the idea of synergistic effects of sex steroids and muscle usage.

  15. Creatine but not betaine supplementation increases muscle phosphorylcreatine content and strength performance.

    PubMed

    del Favero, Serena; Roschel, Hamilton; Artioli, Guilherme; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Tricoli, Valmor; Costa, André; Barroso, Renato; Negrelli, Ana Lua; Otaduy, Maria Concepción; da Costa Leite, Cláudia; Lancha-Junior, Antonio Herbert; Gualano, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of betaine supplementation on muscle phosphorylcreatine (PCr) content and strength performance in untrained subjects. Additionally, we compared the ergogenic and physiological responses to betaine versus creatine supplementation. Finally, we also tested the possible additive effects of creatine and betaine supplementation. This was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Subjects were assigned to receive betaine (BET; 2 g/day), creatine (CR; 20 g/day), betaine plus creatine (BET+CR; 2+20 g/day, respectively) or placebo (PL). At baseline and after 10 days of supplementation, we assessed muscle strength and power, muscle PCr content, and body composition. The CR and BET+CR groups presented greater increase in muscle PCr content than PL (p=0.004 and p=0.006, respectively). PCr content was comparable between BET versus PL (p=0.78) and CR versus BET+CR (p=0.99). CR and BET+CR presented greater muscle power output than PL in the squat exercise following supplementation (p=0.003 and p=0.041, respectively). Similarly, bench press average power was significantly greater for the CR-supplemented groups. CR and BET+CR groups also showed significant pre- to post-test increase in 1-RM squat and bench press (CR: p=0.027 and p<0.0001; BET+CR: p=0.03 and p<0.0001 for upper- and lower-body assessments, respectively) No significant differences for 1-RM strength and power were observed between BET versus PL and CR versus BET+CR. Body composition did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, we reported that betaine supplementation does not augment muscle PCr content. Furthermore, we showed that betaine supplementation combined or not with creatine supplementation does not affect strength and power performance in untrained subjects.

  16. Exercise-induced changes in triceps surae tendon stiffness and muscle strength affect running economy in humans.

    PubMed

    Albracht, Kirsten; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether increased tendon-aponeurosis stiffness and contractile strength of the triceps surae (TS) muscle-tendon units induced by resistance training would affect running economy. Therefore, an exercise group (EG, n = 13) performed a 14-week exercise program, while the control group (CG, n = 13) did not change their training. Maximum isometric voluntary contractile strength and TS tendon-aponeurosis stiffness, running kinematics and fascicle length of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle during running were analyzed. Furthermore, running economy was determined by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption at two running velocities (3.0, 3.5 ms(-1)). The intervention resulted in a ∼7 % increase in maximum plantarflexion muscle strength and a ∼16 % increase in TS tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. The EG showed a significant ∼4 % reduction in the rate of oxygen consumption and energy cost, indicating a significant increase in running economy, while the CG showed no changes. Neither kinematics nor fascicle length and elongation of the series-elastic element (SEE) during running were affected by the intervention. The unaffected SEE elongation of the GM during the stance phase of running, in spite of a higher tendon-aponeurosis stiffness, is indicative of greater energy storage and return and a redistribution of muscular output within the lower extremities while running after the intervention, which might explain the improved running economy.

  17. Interaction Between Leg Muscle Performance and Sprint Acceleration Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Lockie, Robert G.; Jalilvand, Farzad; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Murphy, Aron J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated relationships between 10 m sprint acceleration, step kinematics (step length and frequency, contact and flight time), and leg muscle performance (power, stiffness, strength). Twenty-eight field sport athletes completed 10 m sprints that were timed and filmed. Velocity and step kinematics were measured for the 0–5, 5–10, and 0–10 m intervals to assess acceleration. Leg power was measured via countermovement jumps (CMJ), a five-bound test (5BT), and the reactive strength index (RSI) defined by 40 cm drop jumps. Leg stiffness was measured by bilateral and unilateral hopping. A three-repetition maximum squat determined strength. Pearson’s correlations and stepwise regression (p ≤ 0.05) determined velocity, step kinematics, and leg muscle performance relationships. CMJ height correlated with and predicted velocity in all intervals (r = 0.40–0.54). The 5BT (5–10 and 0–10 m intervals) and RSI (5–10 m interval) also related to velocity (r = 0.37–0.47). Leg stiffness did not correlate with acceleration kinematics. Greater leg strength related to and predicted lower 0–5 m flight times (r = −0.46 to −0.51), and a longer 0–10 m step length (r = 0.38). Although results supported research emphasizing the value of leg power and strength for acceleration, the correlations and predictive relationships (r2 = 0.14–0.29) tended to be low, which highlights the complex interaction between sprint technique and leg muscle performance. Nonetheless, given the established relationships between speed, leg power and strength, strength and conditioning coaches should ensure these qualities are expressed during acceleration in field sport athletes. PMID:26839607

  18. Critical process parameters affecting zincrometal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Iezzi, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    A laboratory study aimed at improving the corrosion resistance of Zincrometal has shown that excellent Zincrometal performance in laboratory corrosion tests can be obtained by achieving a trivalent (Cr+3) to hexavalent (Cr+6) Dacromet chromium ratio of at least 15. Increasing thermal energy input during curing increases the Cr+3/Cr+6 ratio and improves corrosion resistance in laboratory tests. Increasing curing energy input in production may be a viable approach to improve Zincrometal performance, provided that steels not susceptible to strain aging are used.

  19. Factors Affecting Information Literacy Perception and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehner, Drusilla Charlene Beecher

    2009-01-01

    Information literacy, defined as, "the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information" (American Library Association, 2003, paragraph 1), is necessary for success in life. The present study will examine whether the factors of gender, race, and/or socioeconomic status impact information literacy performance and…

  20. Factors affecting penetrating captive bolt gun performance.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Troy J; Mason, Charles W; Spence, Jade Y; Barker, Heather; Gregory, Neville G

    2015-01-01

    Captive bolt stunning is used for rendering livestock insensible at slaughter. The mechanical factors relating to performance of 6 penetrating captive bolt gun (CBG) models were examined. The Matador Super Sécurit 3000 and the .25 Cash Euro Stunner had the highest kinetic energy values (443 J and 412 J, respectively) of the CBGs tested. Ninety percent (27/30) of CBGs held at a government gun repository (United Kingdom) were found to have performed at a normal standard for the model, while 53% (10/19) of commercial contractor CBGs tested were found to underperform for the gun model. When the .22 Cash Special was fired 500 times at 4 shots per min, the gun reached a peak temperature of 88.8°C after 2.05 hr. Repeat firing during extended periods significantly reduced the performance of the CBG. When deciding on the appropriate CBG/cartridge combination, the kinetic energy delivered to the head of the nonhuman animal, bolt penetration depth, and species/animal type must be considered. It is recommended that CBGs are routinely checked for wear to the bolt and barrel if they are repeatedly fired in a session.

  1. Does posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affect performance?

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Vicki R; Regehr, Cheryl; Jelley, R Blake; Barath, Irene

    2007-08-01

    Research has increasingly identified alarming levels of traumatic stress symptoms in individuals working in emergency services and other high stress jobs. This study examined the effects of prior critical incident exposure and current posttraumatic symptoms on the performance of a nonpatient population, police recruits, during an acutely stressful event. A stressful policing situation was created through the use of a video simulator room that was responsive to actions of participants. The performance of participants to the simulated emergency was evaluated by 3 independent blinded raters. Prior exposure to critical incidents was measured using the Critical Incident History Questionnaire and current level of traumatic stress symptoms was measured using the Impact of Events Scale-Revised. Neither previous exposure to critical incidents nor trauma symptoms correlated with performance level. Recruits with high or severe levels of trauma symptoms did not demonstrate impairments in judgment, communication, or situation control compared with their colleagues with lesser or no trauma symptoms. On the basis of these findings, there is no reason to believe that police recruits with PTSD are prone to making errors of communication or judgment that would place them or others at increased risk.

  2. Is spinal excitability of the triceps surae mainly affected by muscle activity or body position?

    PubMed

    Cattagni, T; Martin, A; Scaglioni, G

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine how muscle activity and body orientation contribute to the triceps surae spinal transmission modulation, when moving from a sitting to a standing position. Maximal Hoffmann-reflex (Hmax) and motor potential (Mmax) were evoked in the soleus (SOL), medial and lateral gastrocnemius in 10 male subjects and in three conditions, passive sitting, active sitting and upright standing, with the same SOL activity in active sitting and upright standing. Moreover volitional wave (V) was evoked in the two active conditions (i.e., active sitting and upright standing). The results showed that SOL Hmax/Mmax was lower in active sitting than in passive sitting, while for the gastrocnemii it was not significantly altered. For the three plantar flexors, Hmax/Mmax was lower in upright standing than in active sitting, whereas V/Mmax was not modulated. SOL H-reflex is therefore affected by the increase in muscle activity and change in body orientation, while, in the gastrocnemii, it was only affected by a change in posture. In conclusion, passing from a sitting to a standing position affects the Hmax/Mmax of the whole triceps surae, but the mechanisms responsible for this change differ among the synergist muscles. The V/Mmax does not change when upright stance is assumed. This means that the increased inhibitory activity in orthostatic position is compensated by an increased excitatory inflow to the α-motoneurons of central and/or peripheral origin.

  3. Sprinting performance on the Woodway Curve 3.0 is related to muscle architecture.

    PubMed

    Mangine, Gerald T; Fukuda, David H; Townsend, Jeremy R; Wells, Adam J; Gonzalez, Adam M; Jajtner, Adam R; Bohner, Jonathan D; LaMonica, Michael; Hoffman, Jay R; Fragala, Maren S; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    To determine if unilateral measures of muscle architecture in the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) were related to (and predictive of) sprinting speed and unilateral (and bilateral) force (FRC) and power (POW) during a 30 s maximal sprint on the Woodway Curve 3.0 non-motorized treadmill. Twenty-eight healthy, physically active men (n = 14) and women (n = 14) (age = 22.9 ± 2.4 years; body mass = 77.1 ± 16.2 kg; height = 171.6 ± 11.2 cm; body-fa t = 19.4 ± 8.1%) completed one familiarization and one 30-s maximal sprint on the TM to obtain maximal sprinting speed, POW and FRC. Muscle thickness (MT), cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (ECHO) of the RF and VL in the dominant (DOM; determined by unilateral sprinting power) and non-dominant (ND) legs were measured via ultrasound. Pearson correlations indicated several significant (p < 0.05) relationships between sprinting performance [POW (peak, DOM and ND), FRC (peak, DOM, ND) and sprinting time] and muscle architecture. Stepwise regression indicated that POW(DOM) was predictive of ipsilateral RF (MT and CSA) and VL (CSA and ECHO), while POW(ND) was predictive of ipsilateral RF (MT and CSA) and VL (CSA); sprinting power/force asymmetry was not predictive of architecture asymmetry. Sprinting time was best predicted by peak power and peak force, though muscle quality (ECHO) and the bilateral percent difference in VL (CSA) were strong architectural predictors. Muscle architecture is related to (and predictive of) TM sprinting performance, while unilateral POW is predictive of ipsilateral architecture. However, the extent to which architecture and other factors (i.e. neuromuscular control and sprinting technique) affect TM performance remains unknown.

  4. Isobaric Tagging-Based Quantification for Proteomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of Spared and Affected Muscles from mdx Mice at the Early Phase of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Durbeej, Madeleine; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common childhood myopathy, characterized by muscle loss and cardiorespiratory failure. While the genetic basis of DMD is well established, secondary mechanisms associated with dystrophic pathophysiology are not fully clarified yet. In order to obtain new insights into the molecular mechanisms of muscle dystrophy during earlier stages of the disease, we performed a comparative proteomic profile of the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) vs. affected diaphragm from the mdx mice, using a label based shotgun proteomic approach. Out of the 857 identified proteins, 42 to 62 proteins had differential abundance of peptide ions. The calcium-handling proteins sarcalumenin and calsequestrin-1 were increased in control EOM compared with control DIA, reinforcing the view that constitutional properties of EOM are important for their protection against myonecrosis. The finding that galectin-1 (muscle regeneration), annexin A1 (anti-inflammatory) and HSP 47 (fibrosis) were increased in dystrophic diaphragm provides novel insights into the mechanisms through which mdx affected muscles are able to counteract dystrophy, during the early stage of the disease. Overall, the shotgun technique proved to be suitable to perform quantitative comparisons between distinct dystrophic muscles and allowed the suggestion of new potential biomarkers and drug targets for dystrophinopaties. PMID:23823696

  5. Volitional Weight-Lifting in Rats Promotes Adaptation via Performance and Muscle Morphology prior to Gains in Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Erik P; Miller, G Roger; Chetlin, Robert D; Wirth, Oliver; Baker, Brent A

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of volitional animal models of resistance training has been instrumental in our understanding of adaptive training. However, these studies have lacked reactive force measurements, a precise performance measure, and morphological analysis at a distinct phase of training – when initial strength gains precede muscle hypertrophy. Our aim was to expose rats to one month of training (70 or 700 g load) on a custom-designed weight-lifting apparatus for analysis of reactive forces and muscle morphology prior to muscle hypertrophy. Exclusively following 700 g load training, forces increased by 21% whereas muscle masses remained unaltered. For soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles, 700 g load training increased muscle fiber number per unit area by ∼20% and decreased muscle fiber area by ∼20%. Additionally, number of muscle fibers per section increased by 18% for SOL muscles. These results establish that distinct morphological alterations accompany early strength gains in a volitional animal model of load-dependent adaptive resistance training. PMID:25392697

  6. Inspiratory muscle training improves 100 and 200 m swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Kilding, Andrew E; Brown, Sarah; McConnell, Alison K

    2010-02-01

    Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been shown to improve time trial performance in competitive athletes across a range of sports. Surprisingly, however, the effect of specific IMT on surface swimming performance remains un-investigated. Similarly, it is not known whether any ergogenic influence of IMT upon swimming performance is confined to specific race distances. To determine the influence of IMT upon swimming performance over 3 competitive distances, 16 competitive club-level swimmers were assigned at random to either an experimental (pressure threshold IMT) or sham IMT placebo control group. Participants performed a series of physiological and performance tests, before and following 6 weeks of IMT, including (1) an incremental swim test to the limit of tolerance to determine lactate, heart rate and perceived exertion responses; (2) standard measures of lung function (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, peak expiratory flow) and maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP); and (3) 100, 200 and 400 m swim time trials. Training utilised a hand-held pressure threshold device and consisted of 30 repetitions, twice per day. Relative to control, the IMT group showed the following percentage changes in swim times: 100 m, -1.70% (90% confidence limits, +/-1.4%), 200 m, -1.5% (+/-1.0), and 400 m, 0.6% (+/-1.2). Large effects were observed for MIP and rates of perceived exertion. In conclusion, 6 weeks of IMT has a small positive effect on swimming performance in club-level trained swimmers in events shorter than 400 m.

  7. Body position affects performance in untrained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, M; Scroop, G; Frisken, P; Amery, C; Wilkins, M; Khan, K

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare cardiovascular and ventilatory variables in upright versus aero cycle ergometry at submaximal and maximal exercise intensities in untrained cyclists. Method: Ten physically active men (mean (SD) age 19.1 (1.10) years) who were unfamiliar with aerobars underwent maximal exercise testing and steady state cycling at 50, 100, and 150 W. Results: Participants had significantly greater maxima for oxygen uptake (VO2), ventilation, heart rate, and workload maximum in the upright position. During steady state cycling at the three workloads, VO2 (ml/kg/min) and gross mechanical efficiency were significantly greater in the upright position. Conclusions: In untrained subjects performing with maximal effort, the upright position permits greater VO2, ventilation, heart rate, and workload maxima. Further, in the steady state, exercise cycling may be less costly in the upright position. For this reason, untrained cyclists need to weigh body position effects against the well known aerodynamic advantages of the aero position. PMID:14514538

  8. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  9. Histological comparison of the smooth uterine muscle of healthy golden retriever bitches, carriers of the progressive muscular dystrophy (GRMD) gene, and GRMD-affected bitches.

    PubMed

    Brolio, M P; Cima, D S; Miglino, M A; Ambrósio, C E

    2014-11-10

    There is evidence to suggest that weakness of the pelvic and/or uterine musculature may negatively affect the obstetric performance of women who carry the gene for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The golden retriever dog is the ideal animal model for preclinical studies of progressive muscular dystrophy, and this model is referred to as "golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD)". This study evaluated and compared the histopathological aspects of the uterine muscle of eleven dogs: health, n=4; carriers of GRMD gene, n=5; and affected females, n=2. The obtained results showed that the uterine muscle of healthy dogs was exclusively composed of type III collagen, while a predominance of type I collagen and small amounts of type III were observed in the uterine muscle of the carriers. The myometrium of the affected bitches showed small quantities of both collagen types. The differences noted in the three evaluated groups suggest that female carrier and those individuals affected by muscular dystrophy had collagen alteration and muscle fiber commitment in the uterine muscle, a deficiency which could directly influence the composition and function of this tissue. In addition, this information is highly relevant to the reproductive management of these animals. This data open important venues for translate reproductive protocols for women, who carry the dystrophin gene.

  10. Inspiratory muscle fatigue affects latissimus dorsi but not pectoralis major activity during arms only front crawl sprinting.

    PubMed

    Lomax, Mitch; Tasker, Louise; Bostanci, Ozgur

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) affects the muscle activity of the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during maximal arms only front crawl swimming. Eight collegiate swimmers were recruited to perform 2 maximal 20-second arms only front crawl sprints in a swimming flume. Both sprints were performed on the same day, and IMF was induced 30 minutes after the first (control) sprint. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures (PImax and PEmax, respectively) were measured before and after each sprint. The median frequency (MDF) of the electromyographic signal burst was recorded from the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major during each 20-second sprint along with stroke rate and breathing frequency. Median frequency was assessed in absolute units (Hz) and then referenced to the start of the control sprint for normalization. After IMF inducement, stroke rate increased from 56 ± 4 to 59 ± 5 cycles per minute, and latissimus dorsi MDF fell from 67 ± 11 Hz at the start of the sprint to 61 ± 9 Hz at the end. No change was observed in the MDF of the latissimus dorsi during the control sprint. Conversely, the MDF of the pectoralis major shifted to lower frequencies during both sprints but was unaffected by IMF. As the latter induced fatigue in the latissimus dorsi, which was not otherwise apparent during maximal arms only control sprinting, the presence of IMF affects the activity of the latissimus dorsi during front crawl sprinting.

  11. Regional thermal specialisation in a mammal: temperature affects power output of core muscle more than that of peripheral muscle in adult mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Tallis, Jason; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    In endotherms, such as mammals and birds, internal organs can specialise to function within a narrow thermal range. Consequently, these organs should become more sensitive to changes in body temperature. Yet, organs at the periphery of the body still experience considerable fluctuations in temperature, which could select for lower thermal sensitivity. We hypothesised that the performance of soleus muscle taken from the leg would depend less on temperature than would the performance of diaphragm muscle taken from the body core. Soleus and diaphragm muscles were isolated from mice and subjected to isometric and work-loop studies to analyse mechanical performance at temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Across this thermal range, soleus muscle took longer to generate isometric force and longer to relax, and tended to produce greater normalised maximal force (stress) than did diaphragm muscle. The time required to produce half of maximal force during isometric tetanus and the time required to relax half of maximal force were both more sensitive to temperature in soleus than they were in diaphragm. However, thermal sensitivities of maximal force during isometric tetani were similar for both muscles. Consistent with our hypothesis, power output (the product of speed and force) was greater in magnitude and more thermally sensitive in diaphragm than it was in soleus. Our findings, when combined with previous observations of muscles from regionally endothermic fish, suggest that endothermy influences the thermal sensitivities of power output in core and peripheral muscles.

  12. How muscles define maximum running performance in lizards: an analysis using swing- and stance-phase muscles.

    PubMed

    Higham, Timothy E; Korchari, Paul G; McBrayer, Lance D

    2011-05-15

    Maximum locomotor performance is crucial for capturing prey, escaping predators and many other behaviors. However, we know little about what defines maximum performance in vertebrates. Muscles drive the movement of the limbs during locomotion, and thus likely play a major role in defining locomotor capacity. For lizards, the iliofibularis, a swing-phase muscle, is often linked to ecology and/or performance. However, stance-phase muscles likely limit performance given that they propel the animal. Using a small semi-arboreal lizard (Sceloporus woodi), we compared how swing- and stance-phase muscles relate to maximum running speed and acceleration. We employed both a level and vertical trackway to elicit ecologically relevant locomotor performance. Six individuals were filmed at 250 frames s⁻¹ in lateral view. Following performance trials, upper and lower hindlimbs were sectioned and assessed using histochemistry. Fast glycolytic, fast oxidative and slow oxidative fibers were detected and counted in the gastrocnemius (GA; stance phase) and iliofibularis (IF; swing phase) muscles. In addition, the mean fiber diameter for each fiber type in each muscle was determined, as was the fiber cross-sectional area. We found that properties of the GA, but not the IF, were positively correlated with performance. Interestingly, certain attributes of the GA were correlated with maximum vertical locomotion whereas others were correlated with maximum level locomotion. We conclude that stance phase, not swing phase, limits maximum performance in this species of lizard. In addition, we highlight the need to include properties of stance-phase muscles and a spectrum of ecologically relevant behaviors when attempting to correlate locomotor physiology with ecology and/or performance.

  13. Nickel affects gill and muscle development in oriental fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis) embryos.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Jin; Song, Sang Ha; Kim, Dae Han; Gye, Myung Chan

    2017-01-01

    The developmental toxicity of nickel was examined in the embryos of Bombina orientalis, a common amphibian in Korea. Based on a standard frog embryo teratogenesis assay, the LC50 and EC50 for malformation of nickel after 168h of treatment were 33.8μM and 5.4μM, respectively. At a lethal concentration (100μM), nickel treatment decreased the space between gill filaments and caused epithelial swelling and abnormal fusion of gill filaments. These findings suggest that nickel affects the functional development of gills, leading to embryonic death. At sublethal concentrations (1-10μM), nickel produced multiple embryonic abnormalities, including bent tail and tail dysplasia. At 10μM, nickel significantly decreased tail length and tail muscle fiber density in tadpoles, indicating inhibition of myogenic differentiation. Before hatching, the pre-muscular response to muscular response stages (stages 26-31) were the most sensitive period to nickel with respect to tail muscle development. During these stages, MyoD mRNA was upregulated, whereas myogenic regulatory factor 4 mRNA was downregulated by 0.1μM nickel. Calcium-dependent kinase activities in muscular response stage embryos were significantly decreased by nickel, whereas these activities were restored by exogenous calcium. In tadpoles, 10μM nickel significantly decreased the expression of the myosin heavy chain and the 12/101 muscle marker protein in the tail. Expression was restored by exogenous calcium. Our results indicate that nickel affects muscle development by disrupting calcium-dependent myogenesis in developing B. orientalis embryos.

  14. Muscle Strength and Speed Performance in Youth Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Peñailillo, Luis; Espíldora, Francisco; Jannas-Vela, Sebastián; Mujika, Iñigo; Zbinden-Foncea, Hermann

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximum leg extension strength and sprinting performance in youth elite male soccer players. Sixty-three youth players (12.5 ± 1.3 years) performed 5 m, flying 15 m and 20 m sprint tests and a zigzag agility test on a grass field using timing gates. Two days later, subjects performed a one-repetition maximum leg extension test (79.3 ± 26.9 kg). Weak to strong correlations were found between leg extension strength and the time to perform 5 m (r = -0.39, p = 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.72, p < 0.001) and 20 m (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) sprints; between body mass and 5 m (r = -0.43, p < 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), 20 m (r = -0.65, p < 0.001) sprints and agility (r =-0.29, p < 0.001); and between height and 5 m (r = -0.33, p < 0.01) and flying 15 m (r = -0.74, p < 0.001) sprints. Our results show that leg muscle strength and anthropometric variables strongly correlate with sprinting ability. This suggests that anthropometric characteristics should be considered to compare among youth players, and that youth players should undergo strength training to improve running speed.

  15. Muscle Strength and Speed Performance in Youth Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Peñailillo, Luis; Espíldora, Francisco; Jannas-Vela, Sebastián; Mujika, Iñigo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine the relationship between maximum leg extension strength and sprinting performance in youth elite male soccer players. Sixty-three youth players (12.5 ± 1.3 years) performed 5 m, flying 15 m and 20 m sprint tests and a zigzag agility test on a grass field using timing gates. Two days later, subjects performed a one-repetition maximum leg extension test (79.3 ± 26.9 kg). Weak to strong correlations were found between leg extension strength and the time to perform 5 m (r = -0.39, p = 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.72, p < 0.001) and 20 m (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) sprints; between body mass and 5 m (r = -0.43, p < 0.001), flying 15 m (r = -0.75, p < 0.001), 20 m (r = -0.65, p < 0.001) sprints and agility (r =-0.29, p < 0.001); and between height and 5 m (r = -0.33, p < 0.01) and flying 15 m (r = -0.74, p < 0.001) sprints. Our results show that leg muscle strength and anthropometric variables strongly correlate with sprinting ability. This suggests that anthropometric characteristics should be considered to compare among youth players, and that youth players should undergo strength training to improve running speed. PMID:28149358

  16. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  17. Use It or Lose It: Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance Results from Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program provided a wealth of valuable information regarding the adaptations of skeletal muscle to weightlessness. Studies conducted during the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) represented ground breaking work on the effects of spaceflight on muscle form and function from applied human research to cellular adaptations. Results from detailed supplementary objective (DSO) 477 demonstrated that muscle strength losses could occur rapidly in response to short-duration spaceflight. The effects of spaceflight-induced unloading were primarily restricted to postural muscles such as those of the back as well as the knee extensors. DSO 606 provided evidence from MRI that the observed strength losses were partially accounted for by a reduction in the size of the individual muscles. Muscle biopsy studies conducted during DSO 475 were able to show muscle atrophy in individual muscle fibers from the quadriceps muscles. Reduced quadriceps muscle size and strength was also observed during the 17-d Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission aboard STS-78. Multiple maximal strength tests were conducted in flight on the calf muscles and it has been hypothesized that these high force contractions may have acted as a countermeasure. Muscle fiber mechanics were studied on calf muscle samples pre- and postflight. While some responses were crewmember specific, the general trend was that muscle fiber force production dropped and shortening velocity increased. The increased shortening velocity helped to maintain muscle fiber power. Numerous rodent studies performed during Shuttle missions suggest that many of the effects reported in Shuttle crewmembers could be due to lesions in the cellular signaling pathways that stimulate protein synthesis as well as an increase in the mechanisms that up-regulate protein breakdown. The results have important implications regarding the overall health and performance capabilities of future crewmembers that will venture beyond

  18. Jaw-opening accuracy is not affected by masseter muscle vibration in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, B; Häggman-Henrikson, B; Wänman, A; Lindkvist, M; Hellström, F

    2014-11-01

    There is a functional integration between the jaw and neck regions with head extension-flexion movements during jaw-opening/closing tasks. We recently reported that trigeminal nociceptive input by injection of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle altered this integrated jaw-neck function during jaw-opening/closing tasks. Thus, in jaw-opening to a predefined position, the head-neck component increased during pain. Previous studies have indicated that muscle spindle stimulation by vibration of the masseter muscle may influence jaw movement amplitudes, but the possible effect on the integrated jaw-neck function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of masseter muscle vibration on jaw-head movements during a continuous jaw-opening/closing task to a target position. Sixteen healthy men performed two trials without vibration (Control) and two trials with bilateral masseter muscle vibration (Vibration). Movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. Differences in jaw-opening and head movement amplitudes between Control and Vibration, as well as achievement of the predefined jaw-opening target position, were analysed with Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. No significant group effects from vibration were found for jaw or head movement amplitudes, or in the achievement of the target jaw-opening position. A covariation between the jaw and head movement amplitudes was observed. The results imply a high stability for the jaw motor system in a target jaw-opening task and that this task was achieved with the head-neck and jaw working as an integrated system.

  19. BTX-A administration to the target muscle affects forces of all muscles within an intact compartment and epimuscular myofascial force transmission.

    PubMed

    Yucesoy, Can A; Emre Arıkan, Önder; Ateş, Filiz

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of forces of mono- and bi-articular muscles of an entire intact muscle compartment can allow for a comprehensive assessment of the effects of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) both at and beyond the injection site, and in conditions close to those in vivo. The goal was to test the hypotheses that BTX-A affects (1) the forces of not only the injected but also the noninjected muscles of the compartment, and (2) epimuscular myofascial force transmission (EMFT). Two groups of Wistar rats were tested: Control (no BTX-A injected) and BTX (0.1 units of BTX-A were injected exclusively to the mid-belly of TA). Isometric forces were measured simultaneously at the distal tendons of the tibialis anterior (TA) at different lengths, the restrained extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and the extensor hallucis longus (EHL) muscles and at the proximal tendon of EDL. Five days post-injection, BTX-A did affect the total forces of all muscles significantly: (1) The TA force decreased differentially (by 46.6%-55.9%) for most lengths such that a significant negative correlation was found between force reductions and increased muscle length. The maximum TA force decreased by 47.3%. However, the muscle's length range of force production did not change significantly. (2) Distal and proximal EDL forces decreased (on average by 67.8% and 62.9%, respectively). (3) The EHL force also decreased (on average by 9.2%). The passive forces of only the TA showed a significant increase at higher lengths. EMFT effects were shown for the control group: (1) at the shortest TA lengths, the EDL proximo-distal force differences were in favor of the distal force, which was reversed at higher lengths. (2) the EHL force measured at the shortest TA length decreased (by 34%) as a function of TA lengthening. After BTX-A exposure, such EMFT effects disappeared for the EDL, whereas they remained as profound for the EHL. Exposure to BTX-A does affect forces of all muscles operating in an intact compartment. For

  20. The influence of desk and display design on posture and muscle activity variability whilst performing information technology tasks.

    PubMed

    Straker, L; Burgess-Limerick, R; Pollock, C; Maslen, B

    2009-09-01

    Desk design and computer display height can affect posture and muscle activation during computer use. Amplitudes of postural variables and muscle activity during computer use do not explain the results from epidemiological studies of musculoskeletal discomfort and disorders related to computer use. The purpose of this study was to assess variability of posture and muscle activity during work with two computer display heights and book/paper, in conjunction with a curved desk designed to provide forearm support and a traditional, straight desk. 18 male and 18 female participants performed 10-min tasks involving keying, mousing, reading and writing in six desk/display conditions. 3D posture and surface emg were assessed for the final 2 min of each task. The curved desk resulted in greater postural and muscle activity variation, suggesting an advantage of this supportive surface over the straight desk. There was little difference in variability associated with the two display heights. However, greater variability of posture and muscle activity was evident with the book/paper condition. Non-touch typists had greater neck flexion variation. The design of information technology tasks and workstations can influence the short term variation in posture and muscle activity. Variation is influenced independently of mean postures and muscle amplitudes and therefore needs to be considered to adequately assess the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

  1. Lack of myostatin impairs mechanical performance and ATP cost of contraction in exercising mouse gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Vilmen, Christophe; Amthor, Helge; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David

    2013-07-01

    Although it is well established that the lack of myostatin (Mstn) promotes skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the corresponding changes regarding force generation have been studied mainly in vitro and remain conflicting. Furthermore, the metabolic underpinnings of these changes are very poorly documented. To clarify this issue, we have investigated strictly noninvasively in vivo the impact of the lack of Mstn on gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics in Mstn-targeted knockout (Mstn-/-) mice using ¹H-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ³¹P-MR spectroscopy during maximal repeated isometric contractions induced by transcutaneous electrostimulation. In Mstn-/- animals, although body weight, gastrocnemius muscle volume, and absolute force were larger (+38, +118, and +34%, respectively) compared with wild-type (Mstn+/+) mice, specific force (calculated from MR imaging measurements) was significantly lower (-36%), and resistance to fatigue was decreased. Besides, Mstn deficiency did not affect phosphorylated compound concentrations and intracellular pH at rest but caused a large increase in ATP cost of contraction (up to +206% compared with Mstn+/+) throughout the stimulation period. Further, Mstn deficiency limits the shift toward oxidative metabolism during muscle activity despite the fact that oxidative ATP synthesis capacity was not altered. Our data demonstrate in vivo that the absence of Mstn impairs both mechanical performance and energy cost of contraction in hypertrophic muscle. These findings must be kept in mind when considering Mstn as a potential therapeutic target for increasing muscle mass in patients suffering from muscle-wasting disorders.

  2. Extraocular muscle satellite cells are high performance myo-engines retaining efficient regenerative capacity in dystrophin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Stuelsatz, Pascal; Shearer, Andrew; Li, Yunfei; Muir, Lindsey A; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Shen, Qingwu W; Kirillova, Irina; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora

    2015-01-01

    Extraocular muscles (EOMs) are highly specialized skeletal muscles that originate from the head mesoderm and control eye movements. EOMs are uniquely spared in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and animal models of dystrophin deficiency. Specific traits of myogenic progenitors may be determinants of this preferential sparing, but very little is known about the myogenic cells in this muscle group. While satellite cells (SCs) have long been recognized as the main source of myogenic cells in adult muscle, most of the knowledge about these cells comes from the prototypic limb muscles. In this study, we show that EOMs, regardless of their distinctive Pax3-negative lineage origin, harbor SCs that share a common signature (Pax7(+), Ki67(-), Nestin-GFP(+), Myf5(nLacZ+), MyoD-positive lineage origin) with their limb and diaphragm somite-derived counterparts, but are remarkably endowed with a high proliferative potential as revealed in cell culture assays. Specifically, we demonstrate that in adult as well as in aging mice, EOM SCs possess a superior expansion capacity, contributing significantly more proliferating, differentiating and renewal progeny than their limb and diaphragm counterparts. These robust growth and renewal properties are maintained by EOM SCs isolated from dystrophin-null (mdx) mice, while SCs from muscles affected by dystrophin deficiency (i.e., limb and diaphragm) expand poorly in vitro. EOM SCs also retain higher performance in cell transplantation assays in which donor cells were engrafted into host mdx limb muscle. Collectively, our study provides a comprehensive picture of EOM myogenic progenitors, showing that while these cells share common hallmarks with the prototypic SCs in somite-derived muscles, they distinctively feature robust growth and renewal capacities that warrant the title of high performance myo-engines and promote consideration of their properties for developing new approaches in cell-based therapy to combat skeletal muscle wasting.

  3. Phosphorylation by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin.

    PubMed Central

    Bogatcheva, N V; Vorotnikov, A V; Birukov, K G; Shirinsky, V P; Gusev, N B

    1993-01-01

    Smooth muscle caldesmon was phosphorylated by casein kinase II, and the effects of phosphorylation on the interaction of caldesmon and its chymotryptic peptides with myosin and tropomyosin were investigated. The N-terminal chymotryptic peptide of caldesmon of molecular mass 27 kDa interacted with myosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II resulted in a 2-fold decrease in the affinity of the native caldesmon (or its 27 kDa N-terminal peptide) for smooth muscle myosin. At low ionic strength, caldesmon and its N-terminal peptides of molecular masses 25 and 27 kDa were retarded on a column of immobilized tropomyosin. Phosphorylation of Ser-73 led to a 2-4-fold decrease in the affinity of caldesmon (or its N-terminal peptides) for tropomyosin. Thus phosphorylation of Ser-73 catalysed by casein kinase II affects the interaction of caldesmon with both smooth muscle myosin and tropomyosin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8452532

  4. Performance, muscle composition and meat texture in veal calves administered a β-agonist (clenbuterol).

    PubMed

    Berge, P; Culioli, J; Ouali, A; Parat, M F

    1993-01-01

    The effect of clenbuterol administration on performance, muscle composition and meat texture was studied in veal calves. Three groups, of ten animals each, were assigned to the three following treatments for 27 days: control, administration of 0·3 and 1·0 ppm in the feed (dry matter basis). After a 14-day withdrawal period, the animals were slaughtered, and three muscles were sampled (M. longissumus thoracis; M. triceps brachii caput longum; M. rectus abdominis). During the period of clenbuterol administration, the treated calves exhibited a higher daily liveweight gain (DLWG) and a higher feed conversion efficiency (FCE) compared to those of the control calves, but these effects were reversed during the subsequent withdrawal period. At slaughter, the overall DLWG, FCE and carcass weight were similar in the three treatments, but the dressing percentage in the clenbuterol-treated calves was up to 5·7 points higher than that of the control calves. In the muscles studied, the clenbuterol had little effect on pH, sarcomere length, dry matter and nitrogen contents, collagen heat stability (solubility, isometric tension) or cooking loss; but it markedly reduced the content of lipids, collagen and haem pigments. The clenbuterol also affected myofibrillar strength after ageing, measured either on raw meat or on cooked meat. This was particularly evident in cooked meat which showed up to a two-fold increase in mechanical parameters (maximum stress, compression modulus) after the clenbuterol treatment. No dose effect was detected except for the mechanical parameters. It was concluded that clenbuterol administration affects, meat in two opposite ways, viz. a marked toughening effects, due to a reduction in the muscle ageing rate, that is not compensated by a concomitant tenderizing effect (through a decrease in the intramuscular collagen content).

  5. Performance processes within affect-related performance zones: a multi-modal investigation of golf performance.

    PubMed

    van der Lei, Harry; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2012-12-01

    Individual affect-related performance zones (IAPZs) method utilizing Kamata et al. (J Sport Exerc Psychol 24:189-208, 2002) probabilistic model of determining the individual zone of optimal functioning was utilized as idiosyncratic affective patterns during golf performance. To do so, three male golfers of a varsity golf team were observed during three rounds of golf competition. The investigation implemented a multi-modal assessment approach in which the probabilistic relationship between affective states and both, performance process and performance outcome, measures were determined. More specifically, introspective (i.e., verbal reports) and objective (heart rate and respiration rate) measures of arousal were incorporated to examine the relationships between arousal states and both, process components (i.e., routine consistency, timing), and outcome scores related to golf performance. Results revealed distinguishable and idiosyncratic IAPZs associated with physiological and introspective measures for each golfer. The associations between the IAPZs and decision-making or swing/stroke execution were strong and unique for each golfer. Results are elaborated using cognitive and affect-related concepts, and applications for practitioners are provided.

  6. Stair Descending Exercise Using a Novel Automatic Escalator: Effects on Muscle Performance and Health-Related Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Paschalis, Vassilis; Theodorou, Anastasios A.; Panayiotou, George; Kyparos, Antonios; Patikas, Dimitrios; Grivas, Gerasimos V.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Vrabas, Ioannis S.

    2013-01-01

    A novel automatic escalator was designed, constructed and used in the present investigation. The aim of the present investigation was to compare the effect of two repeated sessions of stair descending versus stair ascending exercise on muscle performance and health-related parameters in young healthy men. Twenty males participated and were randomly divided into two equal-sized groups: a stair descending group (muscle-damaging group) and a stair ascending group (non-muscle-damaging group). Each group performed two sessions of stair descending or stair ascending exercise on the automatic escalator while a three week period was elapsed between the two exercise sessions. Indices of muscle function, insulin sensitivity, blood lipid profile and redox status were assessed before and immediately after, as well as at day 2 and day 4 after both exercise sessions. It was found that the first bout of stair descending exercise caused muscle damage, induced insulin resistance and oxidative stress as well as affected positively blood lipid profile. However, after the second bout of stair descending exercise the alterations in all parameters were diminished or abolished. On the other hand, the stair ascending exercise induced only minor effects on muscle function and health-related parameters after both exercise bouts. The results of the present investigation indicate that stair descending exercise seems to be a promising way of exercise that can provoke positive effects on blood lipid profile and antioxidant status. PMID:23437093

  7. Effect of linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation and light exercise on muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Demura, Tomohiro; Demura, Shinichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Uchida, Yuu; Yamaji, Shunsuke

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of active warm-up by local muscle light exercise and passive warm-up by polarized light irradiation on skin and muscle temperatures and forearm muscle performance (muscle strength, power, endurance, and controlled force-exertion). Ten healthy males performed various grip tests before and after active (local muscle light exercise) and passive (linear polarized near-infrared light irradiation) warm-ups. An active warm-up involved intermittent gripping exercise (contraction: 1 second and relaxation: 1 second) for 10 minutes using a sponge. A passive warm-up consisted of polarized light irradiation to the forearm (superficial digital flexor) for 10 minutes (irradiation: 5 seconds and rest: 1 second). Skin and muscle temperatures were measured during both warm-ups. Skin and muscle temperatures increased significantly after 5 minutes of local muscle light exercise and after 10 minutes of polarized light irradiation. Temperatures were significantly higher after 6 minutes of local muscle light exercise than after 6 minutes of polarized light irradiation. There were no significant differences of muscle strength, power, and controlled force-exertion before and after either warm-up. Average force outputs in all conditions significantly decreased with exertion time, and at 30, 60, 90, and 120 seconds they were higher in both warm-up conditions than in the non-warm-up condition. In conclusion, both warm-ups may contribute to improve muscle endurance performance in the decreasing force phase.

  8. Mathematics Anxiety and the Affective Drop in Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcraft, Mark H.; Moore, Alex M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors provide a brief review of the history and assessment of math anxiety, its relationship to personal and educational consequences, and its important impact on measures of performance. Overall, math anxiety causes an "affective drop," a decline in performance when math is performed under timed, high-stakes conditions, both in laboratory…

  9. Tumor inoculation site affects the development of cancer cachexia and muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Okayama, Tetsuya; Oka, Kaname; Adachi, Satoko; Mizushima, Katsura; Kimura, Reiko; Okajima, Manabu; Sakai, Hiromi; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-12-01

    The phenotype and severity of cancer cachexia differ among tumor types and metastatic site in individual patients. In this study, we evaluated if differences in tumor microenvironment would affect the development of cancer cachexia in a murine model, and demonstrated that body weight, adipose tissue and gastrocnemius muscle decreased in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, a reduction in heart weight was observed in the intraperitoneal tumor group but not in the subcutaneous group. We evaluated 23 circulating cytokines and members of the TGF-β family, and found that levels of IL-6, TNF-α and activin A increased in both groups of tumor-bearing mice. Eotaxin and G-CSF levels in the intraperitoneal tumor group were higher than in the subcutaneous group. Atrogin 1 and MuRF1 mRNA expressions in the gastrocnemius muscle increased significantly in both groups of tumor-bearing mice, however, in the myocardium, expression of these mRNAs increased in the intraperitoneal group but not in subcutaneous group. Based on these results, we believe that differences in microenvironment where tumor cells develop can affect the progression and phenotype of cancer cachexia through alterations in various circulating factors derived from the tumor microenvironment.

  10. Improving Academic Performance and Working Memory in Health Science Graduate Students Using Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Kurt K; Blyler, Diane

    Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, we randomly assigned participants to a PMR group or a control group. Results indicated that PMR reduced state anxiety, F(1, 126) = 15.58, p < .001, thereby freeing up working memory and leading to improved academic performance in the treatment group. The results of this study contribute to the literature on Attentional Control Theory by clarifying the process through which working memory and anxiety affect cognitive performance.

  11. Muscle power output limits fast-start performance in fish.

    PubMed

    Wakeling, J M; Johnston, I A

    1998-05-01

    Fast-starts associated with escape responses were filmed at the median habitat temperatures of six teleost fish: Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii (Antarctica), Myoxocephalus scorpius (North Sea), Scorpaena notata and Serranus cabrilla (Mediterranean) and Paracirrhites forsteri (Indo-West-Pacific Ocean). Methods are presented for estimating the spine positions for silhouettes of swimming fish. These methods were used to validate techniques for calculating kinematics and muscle dynamics during fast-starts. The starts from all species show common patterns, with waves of body curvature travelling from head to tail and increasing in amplitude. Cross-validation with sonomicrometry studies allowed gearing ratios between the red and white muscle to be calculated. Gearing ratios must decrease towards the tail with a corresponding change in muscle geometry, resulting in similar white muscle fibre strains in all the myotomes during the start. A work-loop technique was used to measure mean muscle power output at similar strain and shortening durations to those found in vivo. The fast Sc. notata myotomal fibres produced a mean muscle-mass-specific power of 142.7 W kg-1 at 20 degrees C. Velocity, acceleration and hydrodynamic power output increased both with the travelling rate of the wave of body curvature and with the habitat temperature. At all temperatures, the predicted mean muscle-mass-specific power outputs, as calculated from swimming sequences, were similar to the muscle power outputs measured from work-loop experiments.

  12. Genetic factors contributing to obesity and body weight can act through mechanisms affecting muscle weight, fat weight, or both.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Neuschl, Christina; Churchill, Gary A; Li, Renhua

    2009-01-08

    Genetic loci for body weight and subphenotypes such as fat weight have been mapped repeatedly. However, the distinct effects of different loci and physiological interactions among different traits are often not accounted for in mapping studies. Here we used the method of structural equation modeling to identify the specific relationships between genetic loci and different phenotypes influencing body weight. Using this technique, we were able to distinguish genetic loci that affect adiposity from those that affect muscle growth. We examined the high body weight-selected mouse lines NMRI8 and DU6i and the intercross populations NMRI8 x DBA/2 and DU6i x DBA/2. Structural models help us understand whether genetic factors affect lean mass and fat mass pleiotropically or nonpleiotropically. Sex has direct effects on both fat and muscle weight but also influences fat weight indirectly via muscle weight. Three genetic loci identified in these two crosses showed exclusive effects on fat deposition, and five loci contributed exclusively to muscle weight. Two additional loci showed pleiotropic effects on fat and muscle weight, with one locus acting in both crosses. Fat weight and muscle weight were influenced by epistatic effects. We provide evidence that significant fat loci in strains selected for body weight contribute to fat weight both directly and indirectly via the influence on lean weight. These results shed new light on the action of genes in quantitative trait locus regions potentially influencing muscle and fat mass and thus controlling body weight as a composite trait.

  13. Muscle Functions and Functional Performance among Older Persons with and without Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to compare muscle functions and functional performances between older persons with and without low back pain (LBP) and to determine the association between muscle functions and functional performances. This is a cross-sectional study, involving 95 older persons (age = 70.27 ± 7.26 years). Anthropometric characteristics, muscle functions, and functional performances were measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, Pearson's correlation, and multiple linear regression. The functional performances showed no significant differences (females LBP versus non-LBP, males LBP versus non-LBP) (p < 0.05). For muscle functions, significant differences were found (females LBP versus non-LBP) for abdominal muscle strength (p = 0.006) and back muscle strength (p = 0.07). In the LBP group, significant correlations were found between back and abdominal muscle strength and hand grip strength (r = 0.377 and r = 0.396, resp.), multifidus control and lower limb function (r = 0.363) in females, and back muscle strength and lower limb function (r = 0.393) in males (all p < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that abdominal and back muscle strengths were significant predictors of hand grip strength (p = 0.041 and p = 0.049, resp.), and multifidus control was a significant predictor of lower limb function in females (p = 0.047). This study demonstrates that older women with LBP exhibit poorer muscle functions compared to older women without LBP. PMID:27872641

  14. Isokinetic muscle strength and hiking performance in elite sailors.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, P; Beyer, N; Simonsen, E B; Larsson, B; Magnusson, S P; Kjaer, M

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the isokinetic strength profile and its relation to hiking performance in male (SM, n = 15) and female (SF, n = 6) elite sailors compared to a group of male control subjects (CM, n = 8) similar in age, anthropometry and level of fitness. Eccentric knee extension strength was higher in SM compared to CM (P < 0.01). Furthermore, SM were stronger during trunk extension (P < 0.05), but not during trunk flexion compared to CM. Overall muscle strength was lower in SF compared to SM (P < 0.01) and CM (P < 0.05), except for eccentric knee extension strength, where SF and CM did not differ (P > 0.05). Hiking performance correlated to maximal eccentric and isometric knee extensor strength in SF (rs = 0.83-0.88, P < 0.05) and in CM (rs = 0.73-0.77, P < 0.05) and to maximal eccentric knee extensor strength at high velocity in SM (rs = 0.46-0.54, P < 0.05). For a subgroup of hikers in SM (n = 8), hiking performance correlated to maximal isometric-eccentric knee extensor strength (rs = 0.67-0.74, P < 0.05), whereas no correlations emerged for the non-hikers (n = 7). Few correlations were observed between hiking performance and maximal concentric trunk flexor strength (rs = 0.69-0.92, P < 0.05). Unexpectedly, in SM correlations also were observed between hiking performance and maximal strength of the trunk extensors (rs = 0.46-0.53, hiker subgroup: rs = 0.64-0.67, P < 0.05). In conclusion, notably high levels of maximal eccentric knee extensor strength were observed for the male and female elite sailors examined in the present study. Furthermore, the present results suggest that hiking performance depends in part on maximal isometric-eccentric knee extensor strength. The maximal strength of the trunk extensors, which potentially stabilizes the lower back and spine, also seems to have some importance for the hiking performance of top-level sailors.

  15. How Hinge Positioning in Cross-Country Ski Bindings Affect Exercise Efficiency, Cycle Characteristics and Muscle Coordination during Submaximal Roller Skiing

    PubMed Central

    Bolger, Conor M.; Sandbakk, Øyvind; Ettema, Gertjan; Federolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to 1) test if the hinge position in the binding of skating skis has an effect on gross efficiency or cycle characteristics and 2) investigate whether hinge positioning affects synergistic components of the muscle activation in six lower leg muscles. Eleven male skiers performed three 4-min sessions at moderate intensity while cross-country ski-skating and using a klapskate binding. Three different positions were tested for the binding’s hinge, ranging from the front of the first distal phalange to the metatarsal-phalangeal joint. Gross efficiency and cycle characteristics were determined, and the electromyographic (EMG) signals of six lower limb muscles were collected. EMG signals were wavelet transformed, normalized, joined into a multi-dimensional vector, and submitted to a principle component analysis (PCA). Our results did not reveal any changes to gross efficiency or cycle characteristics when altering the hinge position. However, our EMG analysis found small but significant effects of hinge positioning on muscle coordinative patterns (P < 0.05). The changed patterns in muscle activation are in alignment with previously described mechanisms that explain the effects of hinge positioning in speed-skating klapskates. Finally, the within-subject results of the EMG analysis suggested that in addition to the between-subject effects, further forms of muscle coordination patterns appear to be employed by some, but not all participants. PMID:27203597

  16. Heavy Resistance Training and Peri-Exercise Ingestion of a Multi-Ingredient Ergogenic Nutritional Supplement in Males: Effects on Body Composition, Muscle Performance and Markers of Muscle Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil; Willoughby, Darryn S.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the effects of heavy resistance training and peri-exercise ergogenic multi-ingredient nutritional supplement ingestion on blood and skeletal markers of muscle protein synthesis (MPS), body composition, and muscle performance. Twenty-four college-age males were randomly assigned to either a multi-ingredient SizeOn Maximum Performance (SIZE) or protein/carbohydrate/creatine (PCC) comparator supplement group in a double-blind fashion. Body composition and muscle performance were assessed, and venous blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained before and after 6 weeks of resistance training and supplementation. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Total body mass, body water, and fat mass were not differentially affected (p > 0.05). However, fat-free mass was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p = 0.037). Lower-body muscle strength (p = 0.029) and endurance (p = 0.027) were significantly increased with resistance training, but not supplementation (p > 0.05). Serum insulin, IGF-1, GH, and cortisol were not differentially affected (p > 0.05). Muscle creatine content was significantly increased in both groups from supplementation (p = 0.044). Total muscle protein (p = 0.038), MHC 1 (p = 0.041), MHC 2A, (p = 0.029), total IRS- (p = 0.041), and total Akt (p = 0.011) were increased from resistance training, but not supplementation. In response to heavy resistance training when compared to PCC, the peri-exercise ingestion of SIZE did not preferentially improve body composition, muscle performance, and markers indicative of MPS. Key points In response to 42 days of heavy resistance training and either SizeOn Maximum Performance or protein/carbohydrate/creatine supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The supplementation of SizeOn Maximum Performance had no preferential effect on

  17. Perfectionism, Performance, and State Positive Affect and Negative Affect after a Classroom Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flett, Gordon L.; Blankstein, Kirk R.; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the associations among trait dimensions of perfectionism, test performance, and levels of positive and negative affect after taking a test. A sample of 92 female university students completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale one week prior to an actual class test. Measures of positive affect and negative affect…

  18. Relationships of ultrasound measures of intrinsic foot muscle cross-sectional area and muscle volume with maximum toe flexor muscle strength and physical performance in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takashi; Tayashiki, Kota; Nakatani, Miyuki; Watanabe, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the relationships between toe flexor muscle strength with (TFS-5-toes) and without (TFS-4-toes) the contribution of the great toe, anatomical and physiological muscle cross-sectional areas (CSA) of intrinsic toe flexor muscle and physical performance were measured. [Subjects] Seventeen men (82% sports-active) and 17 women (47% sports-active), aged 20 to 35 years, volunteered. [Methods] Anatomical CSA was measured in two intrinsic toe flexor muscles (flexor digitorum brevis [FDB] and abductor hallucis) by ultrasound. Muscle volume and muscle length of the FDB were also estimated, and physiological CSA was calculated. [Results] Both TFS-5-toes and TFS-4-toes correlated positively with walking speed in men (r=0.584 and r=0.553, respectively) and women (r=0.748 and r=0.533, respectively). Physiological CSA of the FDB was significantly correlated with TFS-5-toes (r=0.748) and TFS-4-toes (r=0.573) in women. In men, physiological CSA of the FDB correlated positively with TFS-4-toes (r=0.536), but not with TFS-5-toes (r=0.333). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that physiological CSA of the FDB is moderately associated with TFS-4-toes while toe flexor strength correlates with walking performance. PMID:26957721

  19. Diurnal variations of plasma homocysteine, total antioxidant status, and biological markers of muscle injury during repeated sprint: effect on performance and muscle fatigue--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hammouda, Omar; Chtourou, Hamdi; Chahed, Henda; Ferchichi, Salyma; Kallel, Choumous; Miled, Abdelhedi; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was (i) to evaluate whether homocysteine (Hcy), total antioxidant status (TAS), and biological markers of muscle injury would be affected by time of day (TOD) in football players and (ii) to establish a relationship between diurnal variation of these biomarkers and the daytime rhythm of power and muscle fatigue during repeated sprint ability (RSA) exercise. In counterbalanced order, 12 football (soccer) players performed an RSA test (5 x[6 s of maximal cycling sprint + 24 s of rest]) on two different occasions: 07:00-08:30 h and 17:00-18:30 h. Fasting blood samples were collected from a forearm vein before and 3-5 min after each RSA test. Core temperature, rating of perceived exertion, and performances (i.e., Sprint 1, Sprint 2, and power decrease) during the RSA test were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p < .001, p < .05, and p < .05, respectively). The results also showed significant diurnal variation of resting Hcy levels and all biological markers of muscle injury with acrophases (peak times) observed at 17:00 h. These fluctuations persisted after the RSA test. However, biomarkers of antioxidant status' resting levels (i.e., total antioxidant status, uric acid, and total bilirubin) were higher in the morning. This TOD effect was suppressed after exercise for TAS and uric acid. In conclusion, the present study confirms diurnal variation of Hcy, selected biological markers of cellular damage, and antioxidant status in young football players. Also, the higher performances and muscle fatigue showed in the evening during RSA exercise might be due to higher levels of biological markers of muscle injury and lower antioxidant status at this TOD.

  20. Burst muscle performance predicts the speed, acceleration, and turning performance of Anna’s hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    Segre, Paolo S; Dakin, Roslyn; Zordan, Victor B; Dickinson, Michael H; Straw, Andrew D; Altshuler, Douglas L

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the study of animal flight, the biomechanical determinants of maneuverability are poorly understood. It is thought that maneuverability may be influenced by intrinsic body mass and wing morphology, and by physiological muscle capacity, but this hypothesis has not yet been evaluated because it requires tracking a large number of free flight maneuvers from known individuals. We used an automated tracking system to record flight sequences from 20 Anna's hummingbirds flying solo and in competition in a large chamber. We found that burst muscle capacity predicted most performance metrics. Hummingbirds with higher burst capacity flew with faster velocities, accelerations, and rotations, and they used more demanding complex turns. In contrast, body mass did not predict variation in maneuvering performance, and wing morphology predicted only the use of arcing turns and high centripetal accelerations. Collectively, our results indicate that burst muscle capacity is a key predictor of maneuverability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11159.001 PMID:26583753

  1. Mechanical performance of artificial pneumatic muscles to power an ankle-foot orthosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Keith E; Sawicki, Gregory S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2006-01-01

    We developed a powered ankle-foot orthosis that uses artificial pneumatic muscles to produce active plantar flexor torque. The purpose of this study was to quantify the mechanical performance of the orthosis during human walking. Three subjects walked at a range of speeds wearing ankle-foot orthoses with either one or two artificial muscles working in parallel. The orthosis produced similar total peak plantar flexor torque and network across speeds independent of the number of muscles used. The orthosis generated approximately 57% of the peak ankle plantar flexor torque during stance and performed approximately 70% of the positive plantar flexor work done during normal walking. Artificial muscle bandwidth and force-length properties were the two primary factors limiting torque production. The lack of peak force and work differences between single and double muscle conditions can be explained by force-length properties. Subjects altered their ankle kinematics between conditions resulting in changes in artificial muscle length. In the double muscle condition greater plantar flexion yielded shorter artificial muscles lengths and decreased muscle forces. This finding emphasizes the importance of human testing in the design and development of robotic exoskeleton devices for assisting human movement. The results of this study outline the mechanical performance limitations of an ankle-foot orthosis powered by artificial pneumatic muscles. This orthosis could be valuable for gait rehabilitation and for studies investigating neuromechanical control of human walking.

  2. Unilateral Nasal Obstruction during Later Growth Periods Affects Craniofacial Muscles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Uchima Koecklin, Karin H.; Hiranuma, Maya; Kato, Chiho; Funaki, Yukiha; Kataguchi, Taku; Yabushita, Tadachika; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Nasal obstruction can occur at different life stages. In early stages of life the respiratory system is still under development, maturing during the growth period. Previous studies have shown that nasal obstruction in neonatal rats alters craniofacial function. However, little is known about the effects of nasal obstruction that develops during later growth periods. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nasal obstruction during later periods of growth on the functional characteristics of the jaw-opening reflex (JOR) and tongue-protruding muscles. In total, 102 6-day-old male Wistar rats were randomized into either a control or experimental group (both n = 51). In order to determine the appropriate timing of nasal obstruction, the saturation of arterial oxygen (SpO2) was monitored at 8 days, and at 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11 weeks in the control group. Rats in the experimental group underwent unilateral nasal obstruction at the age of 5 weeks. The SpO2 was monitored at 7, 9, and 11 weeks in the experimental group. The electromyographic responses of JOR and the contractile properties of the tongue-protruding muscles were recorded at 7, 9, and 11 weeks. In the control group, SpO2 decreased until 5 weeks of age, and remained relatively stable until 11 weeks of age. The SpO2 was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control. In the experimental group, JOR changes included a longer latency and smaller peak-to-peak amplitude, while changes in the contractile properties of the tongue-protruding muscles included larger twitch and tetanic forces, and a longer half-decay time. These results suggest that nasal obstruction during later growth periods may affect craniofacial function. PMID:28119621

  3. The impact of a pre-loaded multi-ingredient performance supplement on muscle soreness and performance following downhill running.

    PubMed

    Ormsbee, Michael J; Ward, Emery G; Bach, Christopher W; Arciero, Paul J; McKune, Andrew J; Panton, Lynn B

    2015-01-01

    The effects of multi-ingredient performance supplements (MIPS) on perceived soreness, strength, flexibility and vertical jump performance following eccentric exercise are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of MIPS (NO-Shotgun®) pre-loaded 4 weeks prior to a single bout of downhill running (DHR) on muscle soreness and performance. Trained male runners (n = 20) were stratified by VO2max, strength, and lean mass into two groups; MIPS (n = 10) ingested one serving daily of NO-Shotgun® for 28 days and 30 min prior to all post-testing visits, Control (CON; n = 10) consumed an isocaloric maltodextrin placebo in an identical manner as MIPS. Perceived soreness and performance measurements (strength, flexibility, and jump height) were tested on 6 occasions; 28 days prior to DHR, immediately before DHR (PRE), immediately post (POST) DHR, 24, 48, and 72 hr post-DHR. Perceived soreness significantly increased (p < 0.05) post DHR compared to PRE at all time-points, with no difference between groups. Creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) increased over time (p < 0.001) with no group x time interactions (p = 0.236 and p = 0.535, respectively). Significant time effects were measured for strength (p = 0.001), flexibility (p = 0.025) and vertical jump (p < 0.001). There were no group x time interactions for any performance measurements. Consumption of MIPS for 4 weeks prior to a single bout of DHR did not affect perceived soreness, muscle damage, strength, flexibility, or jump performance compared to an isocaloric placebo in trained male runners following a single bout of DHR.

  4. Factors Affecting Performance of Undergraduate Students in Construction Related Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Samuel Olusola; Aghimien, Douglas Omoregie; Oke, Ayodeji Emmanuel; Olushola, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Academic performance of students in Nigerian institutions has been of much concern to all and sundry hence the need to assess the factors affecting performance of undergraduate students in construction related discipline in Nigeria. A survey design was employed with questionnaires administered on students in the department of Quantity Surveying,…

  5. Focus of Attention Affects Performance of Motor Skills in Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; Cash, Carla Davis; Allen, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    To test the extent to which learners performing a simple keyboard passage would be affected by directing their focus of attention to different aspects of their movements, 16 music majors performed a brief keyboard passage under each of four focus conditions arranged in a counterbalanced design--a total of 64 experimental sessions. As they…

  6. Co-cultivation of human aortic smooth muscle cells with epicardial adipocytes affects their proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Ždychová, J; Čejková, S; Králová Lesná, I; Králová, A; Malušková, J; Janoušek, L; Kazdová, L

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Adipocytes produce several bioactive paracrine substances that can affect the growth and migration of VSMCs. Our study focuses on the direct effect of the bioactive substances in conditioned media (CM) that was obtained by incubation with primary adipocyte-derived cell lines, including cell lines derived from both preadipocytes and from more mature cells, on the proliferation rate of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs). We used a Luminex assay to measure the adipokine content of the CM and showed that there was a higher concentration of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in renal preadipocyte-CM compared with the HAoSMC control (p<0.5). The addition of both renal preadipocyte- and epicardial adipocyte- CM resulted in the elevated production of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the control HASoSMC CM (p<0.001). The adiponectin content in renal adipocyte-CM was increased compared to all the remaining adipocyte-CM (p<0.01). Moreover, the results showed a higher proliferation rate of HAoSMCs after co-culture with epicardial adipocyte-CM compared to the HAoSMC control (p<0.05). These results suggest that bioactive substances produced by adipocytes have a stimulatory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  7. Muscle-tendon unit stiffness does not independently affect voluntary explosive force production or muscle intrinsic contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of muscle-tendon unit (MTU) stiffness and explosive force production during voluntary and evoked contractions of the knee extensors. Thirty-four untrained participants performed a series of explosive voluntary and electrically evoked (octets (8 pulses, 300 Hz) via femoral nerve stimulation) isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was assessed during maximum voluntary contractions. Explosive force production was assessed as the time taken, from force onset (0 N), to achieve specific levels of absolute (25-300 N) and relative force (5%-75% MVF) during the explosive contractions. Ultrasonic images of the vastus lateralis were recorded during 10-s ramp contractions to assess MTU stiffness, which was expressed in absolute (N · mm(-1)) and relative (to MVF and resting tendon-aponeurosis length) terms. Bivariate correlations suggested that absolute MTU stiffness was associated with voluntary explosive force (time to achieve 150-300 N: r = -0.35 to -0.54, P < 0.05). However, no relationships between stiffness and voluntary explosive force were observed when the influence of MVF was removed, either via partial correlations of absolute values (P ≥ 0.49) or considering relative values (P ≥ 0.14). Similarly, absolute MTU stiffness was related to explosive force during evoked octet contractions (r = -0.41 to -0.64, P < 0.05), but these correlations were no longer present when accounting for the influence of MVF (P ≥ 0.15). Therefore, once maximum strength was considered, MTU stiffness had no independent relationship with voluntary explosive force production or the evoked capacity for explosive force.

  8. Influence of racial origin and skeletal muscle properties on disease prevalence and physical performance.

    PubMed

    Suminski, Richard R; Mattern, Craig O; Devor, Steven T

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal muscle properties are related to disease (e.g. obesity) and physical performance. For example, a predominance of type I muscle fibres is associated with better performance in endurance sports and a lower risk of obesity. Disease and physical performance also differ among certain racial groups. African Americans are more likely than Caucasians to develop obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Empirical studies indicate that aerobic capacity is lower in African Americans than Caucasians. Because genetics is a partial determinant of skeletal muscle properties, it is reasonable to assume that skeletal muscle properties vary as a function of race. As such, genetically determined and race-specific skeletal muscle properties may partially explain racial disparities in disease and physical performance. However, additional research is needed in this area to enable the development of more definitive conclusions.

  9. Force-velocity Relationship of Muscles Performing Multi-joint Maximum Performance Tasks.

    PubMed

    Jaric, S

    2015-08-01

    Manipulation of external loads typically provides a range of force, velocity, and power data that allows for modeling muscle mechanical characteristics. While a typical force-velocity relationship obtained from either in vitro muscles or isolated muscle groups can be described by a hyperbolic equation, the present review paper reveals the evidence that the same relationship obtained from maximum-performance multi-joint movements could be approximately linear. As a consequence, this pattern also results in a relatively simple shape of the power-velocity relationship. The parameters of the linear force-velocity relationship reveal the maximum force, velocity and power. Recent studies conducted on various functional movement tasks reveal that these parameters could be reliable, on average moderately valid, and typically sensitive enough to detect differences among populations of different physical abilities. Therefore, the linear force-velocity relationship together with the associated parabolic power-velocity relationship could provide both a new and simplified approach to studies of the design and function of human muscular system and its modeling. Regarding the practical applications, the reviewed findings also suggest that the loaded multi-joint movements could be developed into relatively simple routine tests of the force-, velocity- and power-generating capacity of the neuromuscular system.

  10. Measurement of Contractile Stress Generated by Cultured Rat Muscle on Silicon Cantilevers for Toxin Detection and Muscle Performance Enhancement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    neuromuscular junction [11]. Other diseases affect the muscle directly such as muscular dystrophy and muscular atrophy [12], which cause deterioration of...approximately 15 mm615 mm square chamber was milled out of the sheet and fitted with silver wires (0.015 inch diameter ) for field stimulation. The silver wires...myosin heavy chain. B) Side view of a three dimensional image reconstructed from a stack of confocal sections. Scale bars are 20 mm. doi:10.1371

  11. IL-6 signaling blockade increases inflammation but does not affect muscle function in the mdx mouse

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates inflammatory responses and plays critical roles in muscle maintenance and remodeling. In the mouse model (mdx) of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, IL-6 and muscle inflammation are elevated, which is believed to contribute to the chronic inflammation and failure of muscle regeneration in DMD. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of blocking IL-6 signaling on the muscle phenotype including muscle weakness and pathology in the mdx mouse. Methods A monoclonal antibody against the IL-6 receptor (IL-6r mAb) that blocks local and systemic IL-6 signaling was administered to mdx and BL-10 mice for 5 weeks and muscle function, histology, and inflammation were examined. Results IL-6r mAb treatment increased mdx muscle inflammation including total inflammation score and ICAM-1 positive lumens in muscles. There was no significant improvement in muscle strength nor muscle pathology due to IL-6r mAb treatment in mdx mice. Conclusions These results showed that instead of reducing inflammation, IL-6 signaling blockade for 5 weeks caused an increase in muscle inflammation, with no significant change in indices related to muscle regeneration and muscle function. The results suggest a potential anti-inflammatory instead of the original hypothesized pro-inflammatory role of IL-6 signaling in the mdx mice. PMID:22716658

  12. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  13. Predicting performance expectations from affective impressions: linking affect control theory and status characteristics theory.

    PubMed

    Dippong, Joseph; Kalkhoff, Will

    2015-03-01

    Affect control theory (ACT) and status characteristics theory (SCT) offer separate and distinct explanations for how individuals interpret and process status- and power-relevant information about interaction partners. Existing research within affect control theory offers evidence that status and power are related to the affective impressions that individuals form of others along the dimensions of evaluation and potency, respectively. Alternately, status characteristics theory suggests that status and power influence interaction through the mediating cognitive construct of performance expectations. Although both theories have amassed an impressive amount of empirical support, research has yet to articulate theoretical and empirical connections between affective impressions and performance expectations. The purpose of our study is to address this gap. Elaborating a link between ACT and SCT in terms of their central concepts can serve as a stepping stone to improving the explanatory capacity of both theories, while providing a potential bridge by which they can be employed jointly.

  14. The weak link: do muscle properties determine locomotor performance in frogs?

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Thomas J.; Abbott, Emily M.; Azizi, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    Muscles power movement, yet the conceptual link between muscle performance and locomotor performance is poorly developed. Frog jumping provides an ideal system to probe the relationship between muscle capacity and locomotor performance, because a jump is a single discrete event and mechanical power output is a critical determinant of jump distance. We tested the hypothesis that interspecific variation in jump performance could be explained by variability in available muscle power. We used force plate ergometry to measure power produced during jumping in Cuban tree frogs (Osteopilus septentrionalis), leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) and cane toads (Bufo marinus). We also measured peak isotonic power output in isolated plantaris muscles for each species. As expected, jump performance varied widely. Osteopilus septentrionalis developed peak power outputs of 1047.0 ± 119.7 W kg−1 hindlimb muscle mass, about five times that of B. marinus (198.5 ± 54.5 W kg−1). Values for R. pipiens were intermediate (543.9 ± 96.2 W kg−1). These differences in jump power were not matched by differences in available muscle power, which were 312.7 ± 28.9, 321.8 ± 48.5 and 262.8 ± 23.2 W kg−1 muscle mass for O. septentrionalis, R. pipiens and B. marinus, respectively. The lack of correlation between available muscle power and jump power suggests that non-muscular mechanisms (e.g. elastic energy storage) can obscure the link between muscle mechanical performance and locomotor performance. PMID:21502120

  15. Shifts in macrophage phenotypes and macrophage competition for arginine metabolism affect the severity of muscle pathology in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Nguyen, Hal X; Deng, Bo; Gotoh, Tomomi; Tidball, James G

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal, muscle-wasting disease of childhood. Previous investigations have shown that muscle macrophages may play an important role in promoting the pathology in the mdx mouse model of DMD. In the present study, we investigate the mechanism through which macrophages promote mdx dystrophy and assess whether the phenotype of the macrophages changes between the stage of peak muscle necrosis (4 weeks of age) and muscle regeneration (12 weeks). We find that 4-week-old mdx muscles contain a population of pro-inflammatory, classically activated M1 macrophages that lyse muscle in vitro by NO-mediated mechanisms. Genetic ablation of the iNOS gene in mdx mice also significantly reduces muscle membrane lysis in 4-week-old mdx mice in vivo. However, 4-week mdx muscles also contain a population of alternatively activated, M2a macrophages that express arginase. In vitro assays show that M2a macrophages reduce lysis of muscle cells by M1 macrophages through the competition of arginase in M2a cells with iNOS in M1 cells for their common, enzymatic substrate, arginine. During the transition from the acute peak of mdx pathology to the regenerative stage, expression of IL-4 and IL-10 increases, either of which can deactivate the M1 phenotype and promote activation of a CD163+, M2c phenotype that can increase tissue repair. Our findings further show that IL-10 stimulation of macrophages activates their ability to promote satellite cell proliferation. Deactivation of the M1 phenotype is also associated with a reduced expression of iNOS, IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10. Thus, these results show that distinct subpopulations of macrophages can promote muscle injury or repair in muscular dystrophy, and that therapeutic interventions that affect the balance between M1 and M2 macrophage populations may influence the course of muscular dystrophy.

  16. Skeletal muscle myofilament adaptations to aging, disease, and disuse and their effects on whole muscle performance in older adult humans

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark S.; Callahan, Damien M.; Toth, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contractile function declines with aging, disease, and disuse. In vivo muscle contractile function depends on a variety of factors, but force, contractile velocity and power generating capacity ultimately derive from the summed contribution of single muscle fibers. The contractile performance of these fibers are, in turn, dependent upon the isoform and function of myofilament proteins they express, with myosin protein expression and its mechanical and kinetic characteristics playing a predominant role. Alterations in myofilament protein biology, therefore, may contribute to the development of functional limitations and disability in these conditions. Recent studies suggest that these conditions are associated with altered single fiber performance due to decreased expression of myofilament proteins and/or changes in myosin-actin cross-bridge interactions. Furthermore, cellular and myofilament-level adaptations are related to diminished whole muscle and whole body performance. Notably, the effect of these various conditions on myofilament and single fiber function tends to be larger in older women compared to older men, which may partially contribute to their higher rates of disability. To maintain functionality and provide the most appropriate and effective countermeasures to aging, disease, and disuse in both sexes, a more thorough understanding is needed of the contribution of myofilament adaptations to functional disability in older men and women and their contribution to tissue level function and mobility impairment. PMID:25309456

  17. Erythropoietin administration alone or in combination with endurance training affects neither skeletal muscle morphology nor angiogenesis in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mads S; Vissing, Kristian; Thams, Line; Sieljacks, Peter; Dalgas, Ulrik; Nellemann, Birgitte; Christensen, Britt

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the ability of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), alone or in combination with endurance training, to induce changes in human skeletal muscle fibre and vascular morphology. In a comparative study, 36 healthy untrained men were randomly dispersed into the following four groups: sedentary-placebo (SP, n = 9); sedentary-ESA (SE, n = 9); training-placebo (TP, n = 10); or training-ESA (TE, n = 8). The ESA or placebo was injected once weekly. Training consisted of progressive bicycling three times per week for 10 weeks. Before and after the intervention period, muscle biopsies and magnetic resonance images were collected from the thigh muscles, blood was collected, body composition measured and endurance exercise performance evaluated. The ESA treatment (SE and TE) led to elevated haematocrit, and both ESA treatment and training (SE, TP and TE) increased maximal O2 uptake. With regard to skeletal muscle morphology, TP alone exhibited increases in whole-muscle cross-sectional area and fibre diameter of all fibre types. Also exclusively for TP was an increase in type IIa fibres and a corresponding decrease in type IIx fibres. Furthermore, an overall training effect (TP and TE) was statistically demonstrated in whole-muscle cross-sectional area, muscle fibre diameter and type IIa and type IIx fibre distribution. With regard to muscle vascular morphology, TP and TE both promoted a rise in capillary to muscle fibre ratio, with no differences between the two groups. There were no effects of ESA treatment on any of the muscle morphological parameters. Despite the haematopoietic effects of ESA, we provide novel evidence that endurance training rather than ESA treatment induces adaptational changes in angiogenesis and muscle morphology.

  18. High performance electrochemical and electrothermal artificial muscles from twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Ah; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2015-04-01

    High performance torsional and tensile artificial muscles are described, which utilize thermally- or electrochemically-induced volume changes of twist-spun, guest-filled, carbon nanotube (CNT) yarns. These yarns were prepared by incorporating twist in carbon nanotube sheets drawn from spinnable CNT forests. Inserting high twist into the CNT yarn results in yarn coiling, which can dramatically amplify tensile stroke and work capabilities compared with that for the non-coiled twisted yarn. When electrochemically driven in a liquid electrolyte, these artificial muscles can generate a torsional rotation per muscle length that is over 1000 times higher than for previously reported torsional muscles. All-solid-state torsional electrochemical yarn muscles have provided a large torsional muscle stroke (53° per mm of yarn length) and a tensile stroke of up to 1.3% when lifting loads that are ~25 times heavier than can be lifted by the same diameter human skeletal muscle. Over a million torsional and tensile actuation cycles have been demonstrated for thermally powered CNT hybrid yarns muscles filled with paraffin wax, wherein a muscle spins a rotor at an average 11,500 revolutions/minute or delivers 3% tensile contraction at 1200 cycles/minute. At lower actuation rates, these thermally powered muscles provide tensile strokes of over 10%.

  19. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  20. Improvement and quantitative performance estimation of the back support muscle suit.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Y; Umehara, H; Kobayashi, H

    2013-01-01

    We have been developing the wearable muscle suit for direct and physical motion supports. The use of the McKibben artificial muscle has opened the way to the introduction of "muscle suits" compact, lightweight, reliable, wearable "assist-bots" enabling manual worker to lift and carry weights. Since back pain is the most serious problem for manual worker, improvement of the back support muscle suit under the feasibility study and quantitative estimation are shown in this paper. The structure of the upper body frame, the method to attach to the body, and the axes addition were explained as for the improvement. In the experiments, we investigated quantitative performance results and efficiency of the back support muscle suit in terms of vertical lifting of heavy weights by employing integral electromyography (IEMG). The results indicated that the values of IEMG were reduced by about 40% by using the muscle suit.

  1. Augmenter of liver regeneration, a protective factor against ROS-induced oxidative damage in muscle tissue of mitochondrial myopathy affected patients.

    PubMed

    Polimeno, Lorenzo; Rossi, Roberta; Mastrodonato, Maria; Montagnani, Monica; Piscitelli, Domenico; Pesetti, Barbara; De Benedictis, Leonarda; Girardi, Bruna; Resta, Leonardo; Napoli, Anna; Francavilla, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria-related myopathies (MM) are a group of different diseases defined by a varying degree of dysfunctions of the mitochondrial respiratory chain which leads to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation followed by oxidative stress and cellular damage. In mitochondrial myopathy muscle tissue an overexpression of antioxidant enzymes has been documented probably as an attempt to counteract the free radical generation. We previously documented, in human non-pathological muscle fibres, the expression of the augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR), a sulfhydryl oxidase enzyme, whose presence is related to the mitochondria; indeed it has been demonstrated that ALR mainly localizes in the mitochondrial inter-membrane space. Furthermore we reported, in different experimental models, in vivo and in vitro, the anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative capacities of ALR, achieved by up-regulating Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic family factors and the anti-apoptotic/anti-oxidative secretory isoform of clusterin (sClu). With the present study we aimed to determine ALR, Bcl-2 protein, clusterin and ROS expression in muscle tissue biopsies from MM-affected patients. Non-pathological muscle tissue was used as control. Enzymatic, histochemical, immunohistochemical and immune electron microscopy techniques were performed. The data obtained revealed in MM-derived muscle tissue, compared to non-pathological tissue, the over-expression of ROS, ALR and Bcl-2 and the induction of the nuclear, pro-apoptotic, isoform of clusterin (nCLU).

  2. Effect of inspiratory muscle fatigue on exercise performance taking into account the fatigue-induced excess respiratory drive.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Thomas U; Notter, Dominic A; Spengler, Christina M

    2013-12-01

    Inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) is suggested to compromise exercise performance, possibly via a respiratory muscle metaboreflex that impairs blood flow to working muscles, thereby accelerating the development of fatigue in these muscles. Cycling with IMF has also been associated with an excess ventilatory response, which could per se impair performance. Therefore, the present study investigated whether prior-induced IMF would affect subsequent cycling performance via increased quadriceps muscle fatigue alone and whether fatigue-induced excess ventilation would contribute to this impairment. Fourteen healthy male subjects (peak oxygen uptake, 57.0 ± 5.5 ml min(-1) kg(-1)) cycled to exhaustion at 85% of their maximal work output with prior-induced IMF (PF-EX) and without prior-induced IMF (C-EX). Subjects then cycled twice for the duration of PF-EX but without prior IMF, once with spontaneous breathing (C-ISO) and once with breathing coached to match PF-EX ventilation (MATCH-ISO). Inspiratory muscle (P(tw)) and quadriceps muscle contractility (Q(tw)) was assessed via magnetic nerve stimulation before and after exercise. The time to exhaustion in the PF-EX conditions was significantly reduced by 14% compared with C-EX. The reduction in P(tw) and Q(tw) was greater after PF-EX (P(tw), 17.3 ± 9.7%; Q(tw), 32.0 ± 10.8%) than after MATCH-ISO (P(tw), 10.8 ± 10.3%; Q(tw), 23.3 ± 15.2%; P < 0.05), which may explain the increased perception of exertion and earlier task failure with prior-induced IMF. The augmented ventilatory drive had no effect on reductions in P(tw) and Q(tw) after MATCH-ISO compared with C-ISO. Thus, prior-induced IMF reduces exercise performance, probably as a result of the increased quadriceps muscle fatigue and thus greater perception of exertion independent of the excess respiratory drive when cycling with fatigued inspiratory muscles.

  3. Performance pressure and caffeine both affect cognitive performance, but likely through independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boere, Julia J; Fellinger, Lizz; Huizinga, Duncan J H; Wong, Sebastiaan F; Bijleveld, Erik

    2016-02-01

    A prevalent combination in daily life, performance pressure and caffeine intake have both been shown to impact people's cognitive performance. Here, we examined the possibility that pressure and caffeine affect cognitive performance via a shared pathway. In an experiment, participants performed a modular arithmetic task. Performance pressure and caffeine intake were orthogonally manipulated. Findings indicated that pressure and caffeine both negatively impacted performance. However, (a) pressure vs. caffeine affected performance on different trial types, and (b) there was no hint of an interactive effect. So, though the evidence is indirect, findings suggest that pressure and caffeine shape performance via distinct mechanisms, rather than a shared one.

  4. Polyphenolic composition of grape stem extracts affects antioxidant activity in endothelial and muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Goutzourelas, Nikolaos; Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanidis, Ypatios; Liosi, Maria; Apostolou, Anna; Priftis, Alexandros; Haroutounian, Serko; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was the assessment of the antioxidant effects of polyphenolic extracts derived from the stems of three Greek grape varieties (Moshomayro, Mavrotragano and Mandilaria) in endothelial (EA.hy926) and muscle (C2C12) cells. We also investigated the effects of the polyphenolic composition on the antioxidant effects of the grape stem extracts. For this purpose, the endothelial and muscle cells were treated with low non-cytotoxic concentrations of the extracts for 24 h in order to assess the effects of the extracts on cellular redox status using oxidative stress biomarkers. The oxidative stress markers were thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl (CARB) levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and glutathione (GSH) levels. The results revealed that treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 14.8% and the CARB levels by 25.9 %, while it increased the GSH levels by 15.8% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the EA.hy926 cells with Mavrotragano extract significantly increased the GSH levels by 20.2%, while it significantly decreased the TBARS and CARB levels by 12.5% and 16.6%, respectively. Treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mandilaria extract significantly decreased the TBARS levels by 47.3 %, the CARB levels by 39.0 % and the ROS levels by 21.8%, while it increased the GSH levels by 22.6% compared to the controls. Moreover, treatment of the C2C12 cells with Mavrotragano significantly decreased the TBARS, CARB and ROS levels by 36.2%, 35.9% and 16.5%, respectively. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledgel, our results demonstrate for the first time that treatment with grape stem extracts at low concentrations improves the redox status of endothelial and muscle cells. Thus, grape stem extracts may be used for developing antioxidant food supplements or biofunctional foods. However, it was also found that the polyphenolic composition of grape stem

  5. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  6. Ibuprofen Ingestion Does Not Affect Markers of Post-exercise Muscle Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vella, Luke; Markworth, James F.; Paulsen, Gøran; Raastad, Truls; Peake, Jonathan M.; Snow, Rod J.; Cameron-Smith, David; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated if oral ingestion of ibuprofen influenced leucocyte recruitment and infiltration following an acute bout of traditional resistance exercise Methods: Sixteen male subjects were divided into two groups that received the maximum over-the-counter dose of ibuprofen (1200mg d−1) or a similarly administered placebo following lower body resistance exercise. Muscle biopsies were taken from m.vastus lateralis and blood serum samples were obtained before and immediately after exercise, and at 3 and 24 h after exercise. Muscle cross-sections were stained with antibodies against neutrophils (CD66b and MPO) and macrophages (CD68). Muscle damage was assessed via creatine kinase and myoglobin in blood serum samples, and muscle soreness was rated on a ten-point pain scale. Results: The resistance exercise protocol stimulated a significant increase in the number of CD66b+ and MPO+ cells when measured 3 h post exercise. Serum creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness all increased post-exercise. Muscle leucocyte infiltration, creatine kinase, myoglobin and subjective muscle soreness were unaffected by ibuprofen treatment when compared to placebo. There was also no association between increases in inflammatory leucocytes and any other marker of cellular muscle damage. Conclusion: Ibuprofen administration had no effect on the accumulation of neutrophils, markers of muscle damage or muscle soreness during the first 24 h of post-exercise muscle recovery. PMID:27064890

  7. Motor activity affects adult skeletal muscle re-innervation acting via tyrosine kinase receptors.

    PubMed

    Sartini, Stefano; Bartolini, Fanny; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Betti, Michele; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Lattanzi, Davide; Di Palma, Michael; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2013-05-01

    Recently, muscle expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein under activity control has been reported. BDNF is a neurotrophin known to be involved in axon sprouting in the CNS. Hence, we set out to study the effect of chronic treadmill mid-intensity running on adult rat muscle re-innervation, and to explore the involvement of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors. After nerve crush, muscle re-innervation was evaluated using intracellular recordings, tension recordings, immunostaining and Western blot analyses. An enhanced muscle multiple innervation was found in running rats that was fully reversed to control values blocking Trk receptors or interrupting the running activity. An increase in muscle multiple innervation was also found in sedentary rats treated with a selective TrkB receptor agonist. The expression of TrkB receptors by intramuscular axons was demonstrated, and increased muscle expression of BDNF was found in running animals. The increase in muscle multiple innervation was consistent with the faster muscle re-innervation that we found in running animals. We conclude that, when regenerating axons contact muscle cells, muscle activity progressively increases modulating BDNF and possibly other growth factors, which in turn, acting via Trk receptors, induce axon sprouting to re-innervate skeletal muscle.

  8. Principals' Perception regarding Factors Affecting the Performance of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akram, Muhammad Javaid; Raza, Syed Ahmad; Khaleeq, Abdur Rehman; Atika, Samrana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the perception of principals on how the factors of subject mastery, teaching methodology, personal characteristics, and attitude toward students affect the performance of teachers at higher secondary level in the Punjab. All principals of higher secondary level in the Punjab were part of the population of the study. From…

  9. Factors Affecting Performance in an Introductory Sociology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwenda, Maxwell

    2011-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting students' performances in an Introductory Sociology course over five semesters. Employing simple and ordered logit regression models, the author explains final grades by focusing on individual demographic and educational characteristics that students bring into the classroom. The results show that a student's…

  10. Relations between affective music and speech: evidence from dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoluan; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study compares affective piano performance with speech production from the perspective of dynamics: unlike previous research, this study uses finger force and articulatory effort as indexes reflecting the dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production respectively. Moreover, for the first time physical constraints such as piano fingerings and speech articulatory constraints are included due to their potential contribution to different patterns of dynamics. A piano performance experiment and speech production experiment were conducted in four emotions: anger, fear, happiness and sadness. The results show that in both piano performance and speech production, anger and happiness generally have high dynamics while sadness has the lowest dynamics. Fingerings interact with fear in the piano experiment and articulatory constraints interact with anger in the speech experiment, i.e., large physical constraints produce significantly higher dynamics than small physical constraints in piano performance under the condition of fear and in speech production under the condition of anger. Using production experiments, this study firstly supports previous perception studies on relations between affective music and speech. Moreover, this is the first study to show quantitative evidence for the importance of considering motor aspects such as dynamics in comparing music performance and speech production in which motor mechanisms play a crucial role. PMID:26217252

  11. Relations between affective music and speech: evidence from dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoluan; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study compares affective piano performance with speech production from the perspective of dynamics: unlike previous research, this study uses finger force and articulatory effort as indexes reflecting the dynamics of affective piano performance and speech production respectively. Moreover, for the first time physical constraints such as piano fingerings and speech articulatory constraints are included due to their potential contribution to different patterns of dynamics. A piano performance experiment and speech production experiment were conducted in four emotions: anger, fear, happiness and sadness. The results show that in both piano performance and speech production, anger and happiness generally have high dynamics while sadness has the lowest dynamics. Fingerings interact with fear in the piano experiment and articulatory constraints interact with anger in the speech experiment, i.e., large physical constraints produce significantly higher dynamics than small physical constraints in piano performance under the condition of fear and in speech production under the condition of anger. Using production experiments, this study firstly supports previous perception studies on relations between affective music and speech. Moreover, this is the first study to show quantitative evidence for the importance of considering motor aspects such as dynamics in comparing music performance and speech production in which motor mechanisms play a crucial role.

  12. Physical exercise in aging human skeletal muscle increases mitochondrial calcium uniporter expression levels and affects mitochondria dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Sandra; Mammucari, Cristina; Romanello, Vanina; Barberi, Laura; Pietrangelo, Laura; Fusella, Aurora; Mosole, Simone; Gherardi, Gaia; Höfer, Christian; Löfler, Stefan; Sarabon, Nejc; Cvecka, Jan; Krenn, Matthias; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Protasi, Feliciano; Musarò, Antonio; Sandri, Marco; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    Age-related sarcopenia is characterized by a progressive loss of muscle mass with decline in specific force, having dramatic consequences on mobility and quality of life in seniors. The etiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial and underlying mechanisms are currently not fully elucidated. Physical exercise is known to have beneficial effects on muscle trophism and force production. Alterations of mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis regulated by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) have been recently shown to affect muscle trophism in vivo in mice. To understand the relevance of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in aging and to investigate the effect of physical exercise on MCU expression and mitochondria dynamics, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from 70-year-old subjects 9 weeks trained with either neuromuscular electrical stimulation (ES) or leg press. Here, we demonstrate that improved muscle function and structure induced by both trainings are linked to increased protein levels of MCU Ultrastructural analyses by electron microscopy showed remodeling of mitochondrial apparatus in ES-trained muscles that is consistent with an adaptation to physical exercise, a response likely mediated by an increased expression of mitochondrial fusion protein OPA1. Altogether these results indicate that the ES-dependent physiological effects on skeletal muscle size and force are associated with changes in mitochondrial-related proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis and mitochondrial shape. These original findings in aging human skeletal muscle confirm the data obtained in mice and propose MCU and mitochondria-related proteins as potential pharmacological targets to counteract age-related muscle loss.

  13. Operator performance and localized muscle fatigue in a simulated space vehicle control task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Fourier transforms in a special purpose computer were utilized to obtain power spectral density functions from electromyograms of the biceps brachii, triceps brachii, brachioradialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, brachialis, and pronator teres in eight subjects performing isometric tracking tasks in two directions utilizing a prototype spacecraft rotational hand controller. Analysis of these spectra in general purpose computers aided in defining muscles involved in performing the task, and yielded a derived measure potentially useful in predicting task termination. The triceps was the only muscle to show significant differences in all possible tests for simple effects in both tasks and, overall, was the most consistently involved of the six muscles. The total power monitored for triceps, biceps, and brachialis dropped to minimal levels across all subjects earlier than for other muscles. However, smaller variances existed for the biceps, brachioradialis, brachialis, and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles and could provide longer predictive times due to smaller standard deviations for a greater population range.

  14. The influence of muscle physiology and advanced technology on sports performance.

    PubMed

    Neptune, Richard R; McGowan, Craig P; Fiandt, John M

    2009-01-01

    Muscle mechanical output such as force and power are governed by highly nonlinear intrinsic muscle properties associated with different muscle fiber types and are influenced by training and age. Many of the interactions between these properties pose trade-offs such that an individual's anthropometrics and muscle morphology may allow an athlete to excel in one sport but not in others. Advanced modeling and simulation techniques are powerful tools to gain insight into performance limits, optimal equipment designs, and mechanisms that may lead to injury. Recent technological innovations have produced faster running tracks, bicycles, speed skates, and swimming pools. This review discusses the influence of intrinsic muscle properties in sports and how advanced technology can be used to extend the limits of human performance.

  15. Preparatory power posing affects nonverbal presence and job interview performance.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Amy J C; Wilmuth, Caroline A; Yap, Andy J; Carney, Dana R

    2015-07-01

    The authors tested whether engaging in expansive (vs. contractive) "power poses" before a stressful job interview--preparatory power posing--would enhance performance during the interview. Participants adopted high-power (i.e., expansive, open) poses or low-power (i.e., contractive, closed) poses, and then prepared and delivered a speech to 2 evaluators as part of a mock job interview. All interview speeches were videotaped and coded for overall performance and hireability and for 2 potential mediators: verbal content (e.g., structure, content) and nonverbal presence (e.g., captivating, enthusiastic). As predicted, those who prepared for the job interview with high- (vs. low-) power poses performed better and were more likely to be chosen for hire; this relation was mediated by nonverbal presence, but not by verbal content. Although previous research has focused on how a nonverbal behavior that is enacted during interactions and observed by perceivers affects how those perceivers evaluate and respond to the actor, this experiment focused on how a nonverbal behavior that is enacted before the interaction and unobserved by perceivers affects the actor's performance, which, in turn, affects how perceivers evaluate and respond to the actor. This experiment reveals a theoretically novel and practically informative result that demonstrates the causal relation between preparatory nonverbal behavior and subsequent performance and outcomes.

  16. How motivation affects academic performance: a structural equation modelling analysis.

    PubMed

    Kusurkar, R A; Ten Cate, Th J; Vos, C M P; Westers, P; Croiset, G

    2013-03-01

    Few studies in medical education have studied effect of quality of motivation on performance. Self-Determination Theory based on quality of motivation differentiates between Autonomous Motivation (AM) that originates within an individual and Controlled Motivation (CM) that originates from external sources. To determine whether Relative Autonomous Motivation (RAM, a measure of the balance between AM and CM) affects academic performance through good study strategy and higher study effort and compare this model between subgroups: males and females; students selected via two different systems namely qualitative and weighted lottery selection. Data on motivation, study strategy and effort was collected from 383 medical students of VU University Medical Center Amsterdam and their academic performance results were obtained from the student administration. Structural Equation Modelling analysis technique was used to test a hypothesized model in which high RAM would positively affect Good Study Strategy (GSS) and study effort, which in turn would positively affect academic performance in the form of grade point averages. This model fit well with the data, Chi square = 1.095, df = 3, p = 0.778, RMSEA model fit = 0.000. This model also fitted well for all tested subgroups of students. Differences were found in the strength of relationships between the variables for the different subgroups as expected. In conclusion, RAM positively correlated with academic performance through deep strategy towards study and higher study effort. This model seems valid in medical education in subgroups such as males, females, students selected by qualitative and weighted lottery selection.

  17. Sleep complaints affecting school performance at different educational levels.

    PubMed

    Pagel, James F; Kwiatkowski, Carol F

    2010-01-01

    The clear association between reports of sleep disturbance and poor school performance has been documented for sleepy adolescents. This study extends that research to students outside the adolescent age grouping in an associated school setting (98 middle school students, 67 high school students, and 64 college students). Reported restless legs and periodic limb movements are significantly associated with lower GPA's in junior high students. Consistent with previous studies, daytime sleepiness was the sleep variable most likely to negatively affects high school students. Sleep onset and maintenance insomnia were the reported sleep variables significantly correlated with poorer school performance in college students. This study indicates that different sleep disorder variables negatively affect performance at different age and educational levels.

  18. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  19. Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy composition of diet affects muscle fiber recruitment, body composition, and growth trajectory in rainbow trout (Oncorhnychus mykiss) The cost and scarcity of key ingredients for aquaculture feed formulation call for a wise use of resources, especially dietary proteins and energy. For years t...

  20. The role of FFM accumulation and skeletal muscle architecture in powerlifting performance.

    PubMed

    Brechue, William F; Abe, Takashi

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution and architectural characteristics of skeletal muscle in elite powerlifters, and to investigate their relationship to fat-free mat (FFM) accumulation and powerlifting performance. Twenty elite male powerlifters (including four world and three US national champions) volunteered for this study. FFM, skeletal muscle distribution (muscle thickness at 13 anatomical sites), and isolated muscle thickness and fascicle pennation angle (PAN) of the triceps long-head (TL), vastus lateralis, and gastrocnemius medialis (MG) muscles were measured with B-mode ultrasound. Fascicle length (FAL) was calculated. Best lifting performance in the bench press (BP), squat lift (SQT), and dead lift (DL) was recorded from competition performance. Significant correlations (P < or = 0.01) were observed between muscle distribution (individual muscle thickness from 13 sites) and performance of the SQT (r = 0.79 to r = 0.91), BP (r = 0.63 to r = 0.85) and DL (r = 0.70 to r = 0.90). Subscapular muscle thickness was the single best predictor of powerlifting performance in each lift. Performance of the SQT, BP, and DL was strongly correlated with FFM and FFM relative to standing height (r = 0.86 to 0.95, P < or = 0.001). FAL of the triceps long head and vastus lateralis were significantly correlated with FFM (r = 0.59, P < or = 0.01; 0.63, P < or = 0.01, respectively) and performance of the SQT (r = 0.45; r = 0.50, respectively; P < or = 0.05), BP (r = 0.52; r = 0.56, respectively; P < or = 0.05), and DL (r = 0.56; r = 0.54, respectively; P < or = 0.01). A significant positive correlation was observed between isolated muscle thickness and PAN for triceps long-head (r = 0.64, P < or = 0.01) and gastrocnemius medialis (r = 0.48, P < or = 0.05) muscles, but not for vastus lateralis (r = 0.35). PAN was negatively correlated with powerlifting performance. Our results indicate that powerlifting performance is a function of FFM and, therefore, may

  1. Massage Timing Affects Postexercise Muscle Recovery and Inflammation in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Caroline; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Abshire, Sarah; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Best, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the effect of immediate versus delayed massage-like compressive loading (MLL) on peak isometric torque recovery and inflammatory cell infiltration following eccentric exercise (EEX). Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were instrumented with peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of hindlimb tibialis anterior muscles. Following a bout of EEX, rabbits were randomly assigned to a MLL protocol (0.5Hz, 10N, 15min) started immediately post-EEX, 48 hours post-EXX, or no-MLL control and performed for four consecutive days. A torque-angle (T-Θ) relationship was obtained for 21 joint angles pre and post-EEX and post four consecutive days of MLL or no-MLL. Muscle wet weights and immunohistochemical sections were obtained following final treatments. Results EEX produced an average 51% (±13%) decrease in peak isometric torque output. Greatest peak torque recovery occurred with immediate application of MLL. There were differences in torque recovery between immediate and delayed MLL (p=0.0012), immediate MLL and control (p<0.0001), and delayed MLL and control (p=0.025). Immunohistochemical analysis showed 39.3% and 366.0% differences in the number of RPN3/57 and CD11b positive cells between immediate (p=0.71) and delayed MLL (p=0.12). Area under the T-Θ curve showed a difference for immediate (p<0.0001) and delayed (p=0.0051) MLL as compared to control. Exercise produced an average 10°± 0.2 rightward shift from pre exercise peak isometric torque angle. Control, immediate MLL and delayed MLL produced an average leftward angular shift from the post exercise angle (p=0.28, p=0.03, and p=0.47, respectively). Conclusion Post-EEX, immediate MLL was more beneficial than delayed MLL in restoring muscle function and modulating inflammatory cell infiltration. These findings invite similar human studies in order to make definitive conclusions on optimal timing of massage-based therapies. PMID:23274593

  2. The effect of creatine supplementation on mass and performance of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert E; Young, John C

    2007-08-09

    This study investigated the effect of dietary creatine supplementation on hypertrophy and performance of rat skeletal muscle. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either tibialis anterior ablation or partial ablation of the plantaris/gastrocnemius to induce compensatory hypertrophy of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) or soleus respectively, or sham surgery. Creatine (300 mg/kg) was administered to one half of each group for 5 weeks, after which force production was measured. With the leg fixed at the knee and ankle, the distal tendon of the EDL or soleus was attached to a force transducer and the muscle was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve. Synergist ablation resulted in a significant increase in EDL mass and in soleus mass relative to control muscles. However, no effect of creatine supplementation on muscle mass or performance was found between control and either group of creatine-treated rats. Despite an apparent increase in muscle creatine content, creatine supplementation did not augment muscle hypertrophy or force production in rat EDL or soleus muscle, providing evidence that the potential benefits of creatine supplementation are not due to a direct effect on muscle but rather to an enhanced ability to train.

  3. Chicken muscle mitochondrial content appears co-ordinately regulated and is associated with performance phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Reverter, Antonio; Okimoto, Ron; Sapp, Robyn; Bottje, Walter G.; Hawken, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial content is a fundamental cellular bioenergetic phenotype. Previous work has hypothesised possible links between variation in muscle mitochondrial content and animal performance. However, no population screens have been performed in any production species. Here, we have designed a high throughput molecular approach to estimate mitochondrial content in commercial broilers. Technical validity was established using several approaches, including its performance in monoclonal DF-1 cells, cross-tissue comparisons in tissues with differing metabolic demands (white fatmusclemusclemuscle) and, as a negative control, a near absence of mtDNA amplification from whole blood. We screened breast muscle and thigh muscle in 80 birds individually phenotyped for 11 growth and development traits. Substantial individual variation (fivefold) was discovered in both breast and thigh muscle mitochondrial content. Interestingly, across birds we detected a very strong positive relationship between breast and thigh content (correlation coefficient 0.61; P<0.0001), consistent with coordinate regulatory control across the musculature. Further, breast muscle mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with breast muscle yield (−0.27; P=0.037), abdominal fat content (−0.31; P=0.017) and carcass yield (−0.26; P=0.045). Therefore, low breast muscle mitochondrial content is associated with more muscular birds possessing higher abdominal fat, the latter being in line with biomedical models of obesity. Finally, thigh mitochondrial content is negatively correlated with the bow out leg defect (−0.30; P=0.011). Overall, our data point to mitochondrial content as a promising consideration in predictive modelling of production traits. PMID:27934661

  4. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-08-15

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways.

  5. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  6. Dietary inclusion level and time effects of taurine on broiler performance, meat quality, oxidative status and muscle taurine content.

    PubMed

    Huang, C X; Wang, B; Min, Z; Yuan, J

    2014-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of taurine on growth performance, meat quality, oxidative status and muscle taurine content in broilers. In Experiment 1, 50 one-day-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 0, 0.125, 0.50, 2.00 or 8.00 g/kg taurine from 1 to 42 d of age. In Experiment 2, 80 22-d-old male Cobb chicks were given a diet supplemented with 4.00 g/kg taurine for 0, 1, 2 or 3 weeks. Taurine contents of thigh and breast muscle increased linearly with increasing dietary taurine. Taurine supplementation for 1, 2 and 3 weeks significantly increased the taurine content of breast muscle. The taurine contents of liver and thigh meat were significantly increased by taurine supplementation for 3 weeks. The taurine contents of thigh and breast meat from broilers given a diet supplemented with 4 g/kg taurine for 3 weeks increased to 1.89 times the concentrations of the control group. There were no detrimental effects on growth performance, breast or thigh muscle yield, pH value or drip-water loss, and taurine supplementation did not affect the serum carbonyl content. Serum malondialdehyde concentration was significantly decreased by taurine supplementation for 1, 2 or 3 weeks.

  7. Thermal manipulation during embryogenesis affects myoblast proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in meat-type chickens.

    PubMed

    Piestun, Yogev; Yahav, Shlomo; Halevy, Orna

    2015-10-01

    Thermal manipulation (TM) of 39.5°C applied during mid-embryogenesis (embryonic d 7 to 16) has been proven to promote muscle development and enhance muscle growth and meat production in meat-type chickens. This study aimed to elucidate the cellular basis for this effect. Continuous TM or intermittent TM (for 12 h/d) increased myoblast proliferation manifested by higher (25 to 48%) myoblast number in the pectoral muscles during embryonic development but also during the first week posthatch. Proliferation ability of the pectoral-muscle-derived myoblasts in vitro was significantly higher in the TM treatments until embryonic d 15 (intermittent TM) or 13 (continuous TM) compared to that of controls, suggesting increased myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle. However, the proliferation ability of myoblasts was lower in the TM treatments vs. control during the last days of incubation. This coincided with higher levels of myogenin expression in the muscle, indicating enhanced cell differentiation in the TM muscle. A similar pattern was observed posthatch: Myoblast proliferation was significantly higher in the TM chicks relative to controls during the peak of posthatch cell proliferation until d 6, followed by lower cell number 2 wk posthatch as myoblast number sharply decreases. Higher myogenin expression was observed in the TM chicks on d 6. This resulted in increased muscle growth, manifested by significantly higher relative weight of breast muscle in the embryo and posthatch. It can be concluded that temperature elevation during mid-term embryogenesis promotes myoblast proliferation, thus increasing myogenic progeny reservoir in the muscle, resulting in enhanced muscle growth in the embryo and posthatch.

  8. Factors Affecting Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Performance and Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Moller-Holst S.

    1998-11-01

    Development of fuel cells is often based on small-scale laboratory studies. Due to limited time and budgets, a minimum number of cells are usually prepared and tested, thus, conclusions about improved performance are often drawn from studies of a few cells. Generally, statistics showing the significance of an effect are seldom reported. In this work a simple PEM fuel cell electrode optimization experiment is used as an example to illustrate the importance of statistical evaluation of factors affecting cell performance. The use of fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of cells that have to be studied is also addressed.

  9. Protein turnover and cellular stress in mildly and severely affected muscles from patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Sveen, Marie L; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting primarily in the proximal muscles, while distal muscles often are spared. Our aim was to investigate if wasting could be caused by impaired regeneration in the proximal compared to distal muscles. Biopsies were simultaneously obtained from proximal and distal muscles of the same patients with LGMD2I (n = 4) and healthy subjects (n = 4). The level of past muscle regeneration was evaluated by counting internally nucleated fibers and determining actively regenerating fibers by using the developmental markers embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMHC) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also assessing satellite cell activation status by myogenin positivity. Severe muscle histopathology was occasionally observed in the proximal muscles of patients with LGMD2I whereas distal muscles were always relatively spared. No difference was found in the regeneration markers internally nucleated fibers, actively regenerating fibers or activation status of satellite cells between proximal and distal muscles. Protein turnover, both synthesis and breakdown, as well as cellular stress were highly increased in severely affected muscles compared to mildly affected muscles. Our results indicate that alterations in the protein turnover and myostatin levels could progressively impair the muscle mass maintenance and/or regeneration resulting in gradual muscular atrophy.

  10. Establishment of clonal myogenic cell lines from severely affected dystrophic muscles - CDK4 maintains the myogenic population

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A hallmark of muscular dystrophies is the replacement of muscle by connective tissue. Muscle biopsies from patients severely affected with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) may contain few myogenic cells. Because the chromosomal contraction at 4q35 linked to FSHD is thought to cause a defect within myogenic cells, it is important to study this particular cell type, rather than the fibroblasts and adipocytes of the endomysial fibrosis, to understand the mechanism leading to myopathy. Results We present a protocol to establish clonal myogenic cell lines from even severely dystrophic muscle that has been replaced mostly by fat, using overexpression of CDK4 and the catalytic component of telomerase (human telomerase reverse transcriptase; hTERT), and a subsequent cloning step. hTERT is necessary to compensate for telomere loss during in vitro cultivation, while CDK4 prevents a telomere-independent growth arrest affecting CD56+ myogenic cells, but not their CD56- counterpart, in vitro. Conclusions These immortal cell lines are valuable tools to reproducibly study the effect of the FSHD mutation within myoblasts isolated from muscles that have been severely affected by the disease, without the confounding influence of variable amounts of contaminating connective-tissue cells. PMID:21798090

  11. Muscle performance and physical function are associated with voluntary rate of neuromuscular activation in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Participants were recruited to three experimental groups: middle-aged healthy adults (MH), older healthy adults (OH), and older adults with mobility limitations (OML). OH and OML were primarily differentiated by performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Muscle performance (accele...

  12. Binaural auditory beats affect vigilance performance and mood.

    PubMed

    Lane, J D; Kasian, S J; Owens, J E; Marsh, G R

    1998-01-01

    When two tones of slightly different frequency are presented separately to the left and right ears the listener perceives a single tone that varies in amplitude at a frequency equal to the frequency difference between the two tones, a perceptual phenomenon known as the binaural auditory beat. Anecdotal reports suggest that binaural auditory beats within the electroencephalograph frequency range can entrain EEG activity and may affect states of consciousness, although few scientific studies have been published. This study compared the effects of binaural auditory beats in the EEG beta and EEG theta/delta frequency ranges on mood and on performance of a vigilance task to investigate their effects on subjective and objective measures of arousal. Participants (n = 29) performed a 30-min visual vigilance task on three different days while listening to pink noise containing simple tones or binaural beats either in the beta range (16 and 24 Hz) or the theta/delta range (1.5 and 4 Hz). However, participants were kept blind to the presence of binaural beats to control expectation effects. Presentation of beta-frequency binaural beats yielded more correct target detections and fewer false alarms than presentation of theta/delta frequency binaural beats. In addition, the beta-frequency beats were associated with less negative mood. Results suggest that the presentation of binaural auditory beats can affect psychomotor performance and mood. This technology may have applications for the control of attention and arousal and the enhancement of human performance.

  13. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; Papanikolaou, Dimitra-Tania; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI) score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM) was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67) completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p < 0.05). However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p < 0.05) in the tested muscles' PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold. PMID:27990302

  14. Relationship Between Sprint Performance of Front Crawl Swimming and Muscle Fascicle Length in Young Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Nasirzade, Alireza; Ehsanbakhsh, Alireza; Ilbeygi, Saeed; Sobhkhiz, Azadeh; Argavani, Hamed; Aliakbari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between 25-m sprint front crawl swimming performance and muscle fascicle length in young male swimmers. 23 swimmers were selected and divided into two groups according to their best records of 25-m sprint performance: 14.6-15.7 sec (S1, n = 11) and 15.8-17 sec (S2, n = 12). Muscle thickness and pennation angle of Biceps Brachii (BB; only muscle thickness), Triceps Brachii (TB), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM) and Lateralis (GL) muscles were measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and fascicle length was estimated. Although, there was no significant differences between groups in anthropometrical parameter as standing height, body mass, arm length, thigh length and leg length (p < 0.001), however, S1 significantly had a greater muscle thickness in VL, GL, and TB muscles (p < 0.05). Pennation angle only in TB was significantly smaller in S1 (p < 0.05). S1 in VL, GL, and TB muscles significantly had greater absolute fascicle length and in VL and TB muscles had relatively (relative to limb length) greater fascicle length (p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant relationship between sprint swimming time and absolute and relative fascicle length in VL (absolute: r = -0.49 and relative: r = -0.43, both p < 0.05) and GL (absolute: r = -0.47 and relative: r = -0.42, both p < 0.05). Potentially, it seems that fascicle geometry developed in muscles of faster young swimmers to help them to perform their high speed movement. Key Points This study investigated the relationship between muscle fascicle length and sprint front crawl performance in young male swimmers. It seems that young swimmers with faster front crawl sprint swimming performance trend to have smaller pennation angle and greater absolute and relative fascicle length (relative to limb length) in their locomotor muscles. Potentially, fascicle geometry developed in faster swimmers to help them to perform higher speed movement via higher

  15. Relationship between sprint performance of front crawl swimming and muscle fascicle length in young swimmers.

    PubMed

    Nasirzade, Alireza; Ehsanbakhsh, Alireza; Ilbeygi, Saeed; Sobhkhiz, Azadeh; Argavani, Hamed; Aliakbari, Mehdi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between 25-m sprint front crawl swimming performance and muscle fascicle length in young male swimmers. 23 swimmers were selected and divided into two groups according to their best records of 25-m sprint performance: 14.6-15.7 sec (S1, n = 11) and 15.8-17 sec (S2, n = 12). Muscle thickness and pennation angle of Biceps Brachii (BB; only muscle thickness), Triceps Brachii (TB), Vastus Lateralis (VL), Gastrocnemius Medialis (GM) and Lateralis (GL) muscles were measured by B-mode ultrasonography, and fascicle length was estimated. Although, there was no significant differences between groups in anthropometrical parameter as standing height, body mass, arm length, thigh length and leg length (p < 0.001), however, S1 significantly had a greater muscle thickness in VL, GL, and TB muscles (p < 0.05). Pennation angle only in TB was significantly smaller in S1 (p < 0.05). S1 in VL, GL, and TB muscles significantly had greater absolute fascicle length and in VL and TB muscles had relatively (relative to limb length) greater fascicle length (p < 0.05). Moreover, there was a significant relationship between sprint swimming time and absolute and relative fascicle length in VL (absolute: r = -0.49 and relative: r = -0.43, both p < 0.05) and GL (absolute: r = -0.47 and relative: r = -0.42, both p < 0.05). Potentially, it seems that fascicle geometry developed in muscles of faster young swimmers to help them to perform their high speed movement. Key PointsThis study investigated the relationship between muscle fascicle length and sprint front crawl performance in young male swimmers.It seems that young swimmers with faster front crawl sprint swimming performance trend to have smaller pennation angle and greater absolute and relative fascicle length (relative to limb length) in their locomotor muscles.Potentially, fascicle geometry developed in faster swimmers to help them to perform higher speed movement via higher

  16. The effect of a prophylactic dose of flurbiprofen on muscle soreness and sprinting performance in trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Semark, A; Noakes, T D; St Clair Gibson, A; Lambert, M I

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a prophylactic dose of a local, transcutaneously administered, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on muscle soreness, muscle damage and sprinting performance in young trained males. Twenty-five subjects aged 19+/-3 years, actively participating in rugby union and field hockey, were familiarized with the test procedure and then divided at random into an experimental group (n = 13) and a control group (n = 12). The experimental group received two patches, each containing 40 mg flurbiprofen (TransAct LAT), 12 h before an exercise bout designed to produce delayed-onset soreness (DOMS). The control group received identical non-medicated placebo patches at the same time. Delayed-onset muscle soreness was induced by an exercise protocol consisting of drop jumps (seven sets of 10 repetitions). Serum creatine kinase activity, muscle soreness, muscle girth and acceleration in a maximal sprint over 30 m were measured before the induction of DOMS and at 12, 24, 48 and 72 h thereafter. Plasma lactate concentration was measured 3 min after the 30-m sprint tests. Subjects in both groups had significantly more pain at 24 and 48 h compared with at 12 and 72 h (P < 0.05; Friedman two-way analysis of variance). Thigh girth and serum creatine kinase did not change throughout the experiment. Although plasma lactate concentrations were elevated after the 30-m sprint, there were no differences between groups or as a result of DOMS. The greatest acceleration occurred between 5 and 10 m. This was not affected by the anti-inflammatory drug or DOMS. In conclusion, the aetiology of the DOMS induced in the trained subjects in this study seems to be independent of inflammatory processes or, more specifically, of increases in prostaglandin synthesis in the muscles.

  17. Effect of bladder wall thickness on miniature pneumatic artificial muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Pillsbury, Thomas E; Kothera, Curt S; Wereley, Norman M

    2015-09-28

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are actuators known for their high power to weight ratio, natural compliance and light weight. Due to these advantages, PAMs have been used for orthotic devices and robotic limbs. Small scale PAMs have the same advantages, as well as requiring greatly reduced volumes with potential application to prostheses and small scale robotics. The bladder of a PAM affects common actuator performance metrics, specifically: blocked force, free contraction, hysteresis, and dead-band pressure. This paper investigates the effect that bladder thickness has on static actuation performance of small scale PAMs. Miniature PAMs were fabricated with a range of bladder thicknesses to quantify the change in common actuator performance metrics specifically: blocked force, free contraction, and dead-band pressure. These PAMs were then experimentally characterized in quasi-static conditions, where results showed that increasing bladder wall thickness decreases blocked force and free contraction, while dead-band pressure increases. A nonlinear model was then applied to determine the structure of the stress-strain relationship that enables accurate modeling and the minimum number of terms. Two nonlinear models are compared and the identified parameters are analyzed to study the effect of the bladder thickness on the model.

  18. Creatine supplementation does not affect human skeletal muscle glycogen content in the absence of prior exercise.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Dean A; Robinson, Tristan M; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2008-02-01

    Due to the current lack of clarity, we examined whether 5 days of dietary creatine (Cr) supplementation per se can influence the glycogen content of human skeletal muscle. Six healthy male volunteers participated in the study, reporting to the laboratory on four occasions to exercise to the point of volitional exhaustion, each after 3 days of a controlled normal habitual dietary intake. After a familiarization visit, participants cycled to exhaustion in the absence of any supplementation (N), and then 2 wk later again they cycled to exhaustion after 5 days of supplementation with simple sugars (CHO). Finally, after a further 2 wk, they again cycled to exhaustion after 5 days of Cr supplementation. Muscle samples were taken at rest before exercise, at the time point of exhaustion in visit 1, and at subsequent visit time of exhaustion. There was a treatment effect on muscle total Cr content in Cr compared with N and CHO supplementation (P < 0.01). Resting muscle glycogen content was elevated above N following CHO (P < 0.05) but not after Cr. At exhaustion following N, glycogen content was no different from CHO and Cr measured at the same time point during exercise. Cr supplementation under conditions of controlled habitual dietary intake had no effect on muscle glycogen content at rest or after exhaustive exercise. We suggest that any Cr-associated increases in muscle glycogen storage are the result of an interaction between Cr supplementation and other mediators of muscle glycogen storage.

  19. Management of sleep-time masticatory muscle activity using stabilisation splints affects psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Masaki, C; Makino, M; Yoshida, M; Mukaibo, T; Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Hosokawa, R

    2013-12-01

    To treat sleep bruxism (SB), symptomatic therapy using stabilisation splints (SS) is frequently used. However, their effects on psychological stress and sleep quality have not yet been examined fully. The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of SS use on psychological stress and sleep quality. The subjects (11 men, 12 women) were healthy volunteers. A crossover design was used. Sleep measurements were performed for three consecutive days or longer without (baseline) or with an SS or palatal splint (PS), and data for the final day were evaluated. We measured masseter muscle activity during sleep using portable electromyography to evaluate SB. Furthermore, to compare psychological stress before and after sleep, assessments were made based on STAI-JYZ and the measurement of salivary chromogranin A. To compare each parameter among the three groups (baseline, SS and PS), Friedman's and Dunn's tests were used. From the results of the baseline measurements, eight subjects were identified as high group and 15 as low group. Among the high group, a marked decrease in the number of bruxism events per hour and an increase in the difference in the total STAI Y-1 scores were observed in the SS group compared with those at baseline (P < 0·05). No significant difference was observed in sleep stages. SS use may be effective in reducing the number of SB events, while it may increase psychological stress levels, and SS use did not apparently influence sleep stages.

  20. Impact of supplementation with bicarbonate on lower-extremity muscle performance in older men and women

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda-Sceppa, C.; Harris, S. S.; Palermo, N. J.; Cloutier, G.; Ceglia, L.; Dallal, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study describes the impact of bicarbonate treatment for 3 months on net acid excretion (NAE), nitrogen excretion, and muscle performance in older men and women. Bicarbonate reduced NAE, and the decrement was associated with a decrease in nitrogen excretion. Treatment also improved muscle power and endurance in the women. Introduction Bicarbonate enhances muscle performance during strenuous exercise, but its effect on performance during normal activity in older subjects is unknown. Methods In this trial, healthy subjects age 50 and older were randomized to 67.5 mmol of bicarbonate or to no bicarbonate daily for 3 months. Changes in lower-extremity muscle power, endurance, urinary nitrogen, and NAE were compared across treatment groups in the 162 participants included in the analyses. Results In the men and the women, bicarbonate was well tolerated, and as expected, it significantly decreased NAE. The change in NAE correlated with change in nitrogen excretion in women (r=0.32, P=0.002) with a similar trend in men (r=0.23, P=0.052). In the women, bicarbonate increased double leg press power at 70% one repetition maximum by 13% (P=0.003) compared with no bicarbonate and improved other performance measures. Treatment with bicarbonate had no significant effect on muscle performance in the men. Conclusions Ingestion of bicarbonate decreased nitrogen excretion and improved muscle performance in healthy postmenopausal women. The bicarbonate-induced decline in NAE was associated with reduced nitrogen excretion in both men and women. These findings suggest that bicarbonate merits further evaluation as a safe, low-cost intervention that may attenuate age-related loss of muscle performance and mass in the elderly. PMID:19727904

  1. Deficiency of alpha-sarcoglycan differently affects fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Danieli-Betto, Daniela; Esposito, Alessandra; Germinario, Elena; Sandonà, Dorianna; Martinello, Tiziana; Jakubiec-Puka, Anna; Biral, Donatella; Betto, Romeo

    2005-11-01

    Alpha-sarcoglycan (Sgca) is a transmembrane glycoprotein of the dystrophin complex located at skeletal and cardiac muscle sarcolemma. Defects in the alpha-sarcoglycan gene (Sgca) cause the severe human-type 2D limb girdle muscular dystrophy. Because Sgca-null mice develop progressive muscular dystrophy similar to human disorder they are a valuable animal model for investigating the physiopathology of the disorder. In this study, biochemical and functional properties of fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of the Sgca-null mice were analyzed. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice showed twitch and tetanic kinetics comparable with those of wild-type controls. In contrast, soleus muscle showed reduction of twitch half-relaxation time, prolongation of tetanic half-relaxation time, and increase of maximal rate of rise of tetanus. EDL muscle of Sgca-null mice demonstrated a marked reduction of specific twitch and tetanic tensions and a higher resistance to fatigue compared with controls, changes that were not evident in dystrophic soleus. Contrary to EDL fibers, soleus muscle fibers of Sgca-null mice distinctively showed right shift of the pCa-tension (pCa is the negative log of Ca2+ concentration) relationships and reduced sensitivity to caffeine of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Both EDL and soleus muscles showed striking changes in myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition, whereas EDL showed a larger number of hybrid fibers than soleus. In contrast to the EDL, soleus muscle of Sgca-null mice contained a higher number of regenerating fibers and thus higher levels of embryonic MHC. In conclusion, this study revealed profound distinctive biochemical and physiological modifications in fast- and slow-twitch muscles resulting from alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency.

  2. Does Question Structure Affect Exam Performance in the Geosciences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, E. A.; D'Arcy, M. K.; Craig, L.; Streule, M. J.; Passmore, E.; Irving, J. C. E.

    2015-12-01

    The jump to university level exams can be challenging for some students, often resulting in poor marks, which may be detrimental to their confidence and ultimately affect their overall degree class. Previous studies have found that question structure can have a strong impact on the performance of students in college level exams (see Gibson et al., 2015, for a discussion of its impact on physics undergraduates). Here, we investigate the effect of question structure on the exam results of geology and geophysics undergraduate students. Specifically, we analyse the performance of students in questions that have a 'scaffolded' framework and compare them to their performance in open-ended questions and coursework. We also investigate if observed differences in exam performance are correlated with the educational background and gender of students, amongst other factors. It is important for all students to be able to access their degree courses, no matter what their backgrounds may be. Broadening participation in the geosciences relies on removing systematic barriers to achievement. Therefore we recommend that exams are either structured with scaffolding in questions at lower levels, or students are explicitly prepared for this transition. We also recommend that longitudinal studies of exam performance are conducted within individual departments, and this work outlines one approach to analysing performance data.

  3. Relaxin Affects Smooth Muscle Biophysical Properties and Mechanical Activity of the Female Mouse Colon.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Garella, Rachele; Idrizaj, Eglantina; Nistri, Silvia; Francini, Fabio; Baccari, Maria Caterina

    2015-12-01

    The hormone relaxin (RLX) has been reported to influence gastrointestinal motility in mice. However, at present, nothing is known about the effects of RLX on the biophysical properties of the gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Other than extending previous knowledge of RLX on colonic motility, the purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of the hormone to induce changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) and on sarcolemmal ion channels of colonic SMCs of mice that are related to its mechanical activity. To this aim, we used a combined mechanical and electrophysiological approach. In the mechanical experiments, we observed that RLX caused a decay of the basal tone coupled to an increase of the spontaneous contractions, completely abolished by the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]-quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). The electrophysiological results indicate for the first time that RLX directly affects the SMC biophysical properties inducing hyperpolarization of RMP and cycles of slow hyperpolarization/depolarization oscillations. The effects of RLX on RMP were abolished by ODQ as well as by a specific inhibitor of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, KT5823. RLX reduced Ca(2+) entry through the voltage-dependent L-type channels and modulated either voltage- or ATP-dependent K(+) channels. These effects were abolished by ODQ, suggesting the involvement of the nitric oxide/guanylate cyclase pathway in the effects of RLX on RMP and ion channel modulation. These actions of RLX on membrane properties may contribute to the regulation of the proximal colon motility by the nitric oxide/cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

  4. Molecules, muscles, and machines: Universal performance characteristics of motors

    PubMed Central

    Marden, James H.; Allen, Lee R.

    2002-01-01

    Animal- and human-made motors vary widely in size and shape, are constructed of vastly different materials, use different mechanisms, and produce an enormous range of mass-specific power. Despite these differences, there is remarkable consistency in the maximum net force produced by broad classes of animal- and human-made motors. Motors that use force production to accomplish steady translational motion of a load (myosin, kinesin, dynein, and RNA polymerase molecules, muscle cells, whole muscles, winches, linear actuators, and rockets) have maximal force outputs that scale as the two-thirds power of mass, i.e., with cross-sectional area. Motors that use cyclical motion to generate force and are more subject to multiaxial stress and vibration have maximal force outputs that scale as a single isometric function of motor mass with mass-specific net force output averaging 57 N⋅kg−1 (SD = 14). Examples of this class of motors includes flying birds, bats, and insects, swimming fish, various taxa of running animals, piston engines, electric motors, and all types of jets. Dependence of force production and stress resistance on cross-sectional area is well known, but the isometric scaling and common upper limit of mass-specific force production by cyclical motion motors has not been recognized previously and is not explained by an existing body of theory. Remarkably, this finding indicates that most of the motors used by humans and animals for transportation have a common upper limit of mass-specific net force output that is independent of materials and mechanisms. PMID:11917097

  5. Humeral external rotation handling by using the Bobath concept approach affects trunk extensor muscles electromyography in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Grazziotin Dos Santos, C; Pagnussat, Aline S; Simon, A S; Py, Rodrigo; Pinho, Alexandre Severo do; Wagner, Mário B

    2014-10-20

    This study aimed to investigate the electromyographic activity of cervical and trunk extensors muscles in children with cerebral palsy during two handlings according to the Bobath concept. A crossover trial involving 40 spastic diplegic children was conducted. Electromyography (EMG) was used to measure muscular activity at sitting position (SP), during shoulder internal rotation (IR) and shoulder external rotation (ER) handlings, which were performed using the elbow joint as key point of control. Muscle recordings were performed at the fourth cervical (C4) and at the tenth thoracic (T10) vertebral levels. The Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) was used to assess whether muscle activity would vary according to different levels of severity. Humeral ER handling induced an increase on EMG signal of trunk extensor muscles at the C4 (P=0.007) and T10 (P<0.001) vertebral levels. No significant effects were observed between SP and humeral IR handling at C4 level; However at T10 region, humeral IR handling induced an increase of EMG signal (P=0.019). Humeral ER resulted in an increase of EMG signal at both levels, suggesting increase of extensor muscle activation. Furthermore, the humeral ER handling caused different responses on EMG signal at T10 vertebra level, according to the GMFCS classification (P=0.017). In summary, an increase of EMG signal was observed during ER handling in both evaluated levels, suggesting an increase of muscle activation. These results indicate that humeral ER handling can be used for diplegic CP children rehabilitation to facilitate cervical and trunk extensor muscles activity in a GMFCS level-dependent manner.

  6. Effects of training and testosterone on muscle fiber types and locomotor performance in male six-lined racerunners (Aspidoscelis sexlineata).

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jennifer L; McBrayer, Lance D; Higham, Timothy E; Husak, Jerry F; Moore, Ignacio T; Rostal, David C

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone (T) is thought to affect a variety of traits important for fitness, including coloration, the size of sexual ornaments, aggression, and locomotor performance. Here, we investigated the effects of experimentally elevated T and locomotor training on muscle physiology and running performance in a nonterritorial male lizard species (Aspidoscelis sexlineata). Additionally, several morphological attributes were quantified to examine other characters that are likely affected by T and/or a training regimen. Neither training alone nor training with T supplementation resulted in increased locomotor performance. Instead, we found that T and training resulted in a decrease in each of three locomotor performance variables as well as in hematocrit, ventral coloration, and testis size. Strikingly, neither the size nor the fiber composition of the iliofibularis or gastrocnemius muscles was different among the two treatments or a group of untrained control animals. Hence, the relationships among T, training, and associated characters are not clear. Our results offer important insights for those hoping to conduct laboratory manipulations on nonmodel organisms and highlight the challenges of studying both training effects and the effects of steroid hormones on locomotor performance.

  7. Error framing effects on performance: cognitive, motivational, and affective pathways.

    PubMed

    Steele-Johnson, Debra; Kalinoski, Zachary T

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine whether positive error framing, that is, making errors salient and cuing individuals to see errors as useful, can benefit learning when task exploration is constrained. Recent research has demonstrated the benefits of a newer approach to training, that is, error management training, that includes the opportunity to actively explore the task and framing errors as beneficial to learning complex tasks (Keith & Frese, 2008). Other research has highlighted the important role of errors in on-the-job learning in complex domains (Hutchins, 1995). Participants (N = 168) from a large undergraduate university performed a class scheduling task. Results provided support for a hypothesized path model in which error framing influenced cognitive, motivational, and affective factors which in turn differentially affected performance quantity and quality. Within this model, error framing had significant direct effects on metacognition and self-efficacy. Our results suggest that positive error framing can have beneficial effects even when tasks cannot be structured to support extensive exploration. Whereas future research can expand our understanding of error framing effects on outcomes, results from the current study suggest that positive error framing can facilitate learning from errors in real-time performance of tasks.

  8. Histology, composition, and quality traits of chicken Pectoralis major muscle affected by wooden breast abnormality.

    PubMed

    Soglia, F; Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Di Nunzio, M; Mazzoni, M; Sirri, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2016-03-01

    Only a few years ago, the poultry industry began to face a recent abnormality in breast meat, known as wooden breast, which frequently overlaps with white striping. This study aimed to assess the impact of wooden breast abnormality on quality traits of meat. For this purpose, 32 normal (NRM), 32 wooden (WB), and 32 wooden and white-striped (WB/WS) Pectoralis major muscles were selected from the same flock of heavy broilers (males, Ross 708, weighing around 3.7 kg) in the deboning area of a commercial processing plant at 3 h postmortem and used to assess histology, proximate (moisture, protein, fat, ash, and collagen) and mineral composition (Mg, K, P, Na and Ca), sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein patterns, and technological traits of breast meat. Compared to the normal group, WB/WS fillets showed more severe histological lesions characterized by fiber degeneration, fibrosis, and lipidosis, coupled with a significantly harder texture. With regard to proximate and mineral composition, abnormal samples exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher moisture, fat, and collagen contents coupled with lower (P < 0.001) amounts of protein and ash. Furthermore, increased calcium (131 vs. 84 mg kg(-1); P < 0.05) and sodium (741 vs. 393 mg kg(-1); P < 0.001) levels were found in WB/WS meat samples. The SDS-PAGE analysis revealed a significantly lower amount of calcium-ATPase (SERCA, 114 kDa), responsible for the translocation of Ca ions across the membrane, in normal breasts compared to abnormal ones. As for meat quality traits, fillets affected by wooden abnormality exhibited significantly (P < 0.001) higher ultimate pH and lower water-holding/water-binding capacity. In particular, compared to normal, abnormal samples showed reduced marinade uptake coupled with increased drip loss and cooking losses as well. In conclusion, this study revealed that meat affected by wooden breast or both wooden breast and white striping abnormalities exhibit poorer nutritional value, harder

  9. Electromyographic analysis of lower limb muscles during the golf swing performed with three different clubs.

    PubMed

    Marta, Sérgio; Silva, Luís; Vaz, João Rocha; Castro, Maria António; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the EMG patterns of select lower limb muscles throughout the golf swing, performed with three different clubs, in non-elite middle-aged players. Fourteen golfers performed eight swings each using, in random order, a pitching wedge, 7-iron and 4-iron. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from lower limb muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, gastrocnemius medialis, gastrocnemius lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Three-dimensional high-speed video analysis was used to determine the golf swing phases. Results showed that, in average handicap golfers, the highest muscle activation levels occurred during the Forward Swing Phase, with the right semitendinosus and the right biceps femoris muscles producing the highest mean activation levels relative to maximal electromyography (70-76% and 68-73% EMG(MAX), respectively). Significant differences between the pitching wedge and the 4-iron club were found in the activation level of the left semitendinosus, right tibialis anterior, right peroneus longus, right vastus medialis, right rectus femuris and right gastrocnemius muscles. The lower limb muscles showed, in most cases and phases, higher mean values of activation on electromyography when golfers performed shots with a 4-iron club.

  10. Effect of copper on performance, carcass characteristics, and muscle fatty acid composition of meat goat kids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y L; Wang, Y; Spears, J W; Lin, X; Guo, C H

    2013-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary Cu on performance, carcass characteristics, and muscle fatty acid composition in meat goats. Thirty five Jianyang Big-ear goat (JYB) kids (average BW 20.3 ± 0.6 kg and age 3 to 4 mo) were stratified by weight and randomly assigned to 1 of 7 experimental treatments (n = 5 goats per treatment). Treatments consisted of: 1) control (no supplemental Cu; 14.3 mg Cu/kg DM), 2) 20 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 3) 40 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 4) 80 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 5) 160 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, 6) 320 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM, and 7) 640 mg supplemental Cu/kg DM. Copper was supplemented from CuSO4•5H2O (25.2% Cu). Goats were individually fed a concentrate-hay based diet for 96 d. Performance was not affected by Cu concentration. Liver Cu concentration was increased (P < 0.01) with Cu supplementation. Goats supplemented with 0 or 20 mg Cu/kg DM had lower (P < 0.01) liver Cu concentrations than the other treatments. Backfat depth (P < 0.01) and intramuscular fat (IMF) content (P < 0.01) were also increased with Cu supplementation. However, Cu-supplemented goats had lower (P = 0.04) longissimus muscle area (LMA) compared with control. Dietary Cu supplementation increased the percentage of C14:0 (P < 0.01), C20:4 (P < 0.01), and total polyunsaturated fatty acids (P = 0.03), decreased C18:1 trans (P = 0.04), and tended to decrease C18:0 (P = 0.08) in LM. Other fatty acids detected were not affected by dietary Cu supplementation (P > 0.10). These results indicate that JYB goats can tolerate up to 640 mg Cu/kg DM for 96 d without adverse effects on performance, but fat deposition and fatty acid composition in the body could be altered by Cu supplementation as low as 20 mg/kg of diet with high concentrate-hay. Copper supplementation increased backfat depth, IMF, and percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids in LM and decreased LMA in the carcass of JYB goats.

  11. Acclimation temperature affects the metabolic response of amphibian skeletal muscle to insulin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ann M; Gleeson, Todd T

    2011-09-01

    Frog skeletal muscle mainly utilizes the substrates glucose and lactate for energy metabolism. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of insulin on the uptake and metabolic fate of lactate and glucose at rest in skeletal muscle of the American bullfrog, Lithobates catesbeiana, under varying temperature regimens. We hypothesize that lactate and glucose metabolic pathways will respond differently to the presence of insulin in cold versus warm acclimated frog tissues, suggesting an interaction between temperature and metabolism under varying environmental conditions. We employed radiolabeled tracer techniques to measure in vitro uptake, oxidation, and incorporation of glucose and lactate into glycogen by isolated muscles from bullfrogs acclimated to 5 °C (cold) or 25 °C (warm). Isolated bundles from Sartorius muscles were incubated at 5 °C, 15 °C, or 25 °C, and in the presence and absence of 0.05 IU/mL bovine insulin. Insulin treatment in the warm acclimated and incubated frogs resulted in an increase in glucose incorporation into glycogen, and an increase in intracellular [glucose] of 0.5 μmol/g (P<0.05). Under the same conditions lactate incorporation into glycogen was reduced (P<0.05) in insulin-treated muscle. When compared to the warm treatment group, cold acclimation and incubation resulted in increased rates of glucose oxidation and glycogen synthesis, and a reduction in free intracellular glucose levels (P<0.05). When muscles from either acclimation group were incubated at an intermediate temperature of 15 °C, insulin's effect on substrate metabolism was attenuated or even reversed. Therefore, a significant interaction between insulin and acclimation condition in controlling skeletal muscle metabolism appears to exist. Our findings further suggest that one of insulin's actions in frog muscle is to increase glucose incorporation into glycogen, and to reduce reliance on lactate as the primary metabolic fuel.

  12. Effect of Preexercise Creatine Ingestion on Muscle Performance in Healthy Aging Males.

    PubMed

    Baker, Taylor P; Candow, Darren G; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Preexercise creatine supplementation may have a beneficial effect on aging muscle performance. Using a double-blind, repeated measures, crossover design, healthy males (N = 9, 54.8 ± 4.3 years; 92.9 ± 11.5 kg; 179.2 ± 11.1 cm) were randomized to consume creatine (20 g) and placebo (20 g corn starch maltodextrin), on 2 separate occasions (7 days apart), 3 hours before performing leg press and chest press repetitions to muscle fatigue (3 sets at 70% 1-repetition maximum; 1 minute rest between sets). There was a set main effect (p ≤ 0.05) for the leg press and chest press with the number of repetitions performed decreasing similarly for creatine and placebo. These results suggest that a bolus ingestion of creatine consumed 3 hours before resistance exercise has no effect on upper or lower-body muscle performance in healthy aging males.

  13. Activation of forearm muscles for wrist extension in patients affected by lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Monica; Mañanas, Miquel A; Muller, Bertram; Chaler, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    Work related upper extremity disorders are associated with cumulative trauma resulting from the continuous use of forearm muscles rather than from a specific incident. The aim of this work is to compare wrist extensor muscles activation between patients with lateral epicondylitis and healthy subjects. Differences can be used in the design of rehabilitation or injury prevention programs according to biomechanical deficits. Surface EMG signals from three forearm extensor muscles (Carpi Radialis-ECR, Digitorum Communis-EDC and Carpi Ulnaris-ECU) were recorded by linear electrode arrays in wrist extension as well as during selective contractions. Average Rectified Values (ARV) were calculated in order to identify the contribution of each muscle to different tasks. On the other hand, Muscle Fiber Conduction Velocity, Mean and Median Frequencies and also ARV were studied to obtain fatigue indexes related to metabolic changes in the muscles during a high force sustained contraction. Results showed muscular imbalance with lower ECR activity compensated by higher ECU activation, and higher fatigue indexes in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

  14. Aging affects spatial distribution of leg muscle oxygen saturation during ramp cycling exercise.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Kime, Ryotaro; Murase, Norio; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Osada, Takuya; Niwayama, Masatsugu; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2013-01-01

    We compared muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) responses in several leg muscles and within a single muscle during ramp cycling exercise between elderly men (n = 8; age, 65 ± 3 years; ELD) and young men (n = 10; age, 23 ± 3 years; YNG). SmO2 was monitored at the distal site of the vastus lateralis (VLd), proximal site of the vastus lateralis (VLp), rectus femoris (RF), vastus medialis (VM), biceps femoris (BF), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and tibialis anterior (TA) by near-infrared spatial resolved spectroscopy. During submaximal exercise, significantly lower SmO2 at a given absolute work rate was observed in VLd, RF, BF, GL, and TA but not in VLp, VM, and GM in ELD than in YNG. In contrast, at all measurement sites, SmO2 at peak exercise was not significantly different between groups. These results indicate that the effects of aging on SmO2 responses are heterogeneous between leg muscles and also within a single muscle. The lower SmO2 in older men may have been caused by reduced muscle blood flow or altered blood flow distribution.

  15. Feeding modality affects muscle protein deposition by influencing protein synthesis, but not degradation in muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal pigs can serve as dual-use models for nutrition research in animal agriculture and biomedical fields. To determine how feeding modality by either intermittent bolus or continuous schedule affects protein anabolism and catabolism, neonatal pigs (n = 6/group, 9-d-old) were overnight fasted (F...

  16. Effects of concurrent inspiratory and expiratory muscle training on respiratory and exercise performance in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Wells, Gregory D; Plyley, Michael; Thomas, Scott; Goodman, Len; Duffin, James

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of the respiratory system presents significant limitations on the body's ability to perform exercise due to the effects of the increased work of breathing, respiratory muscle fatigue, and dyspnoea. Respiratory muscle training is an intervention that may be able to address these limitations, but the impact of respiratory muscle training on exercise performance remains controversial. Therefore, in this study we evaluated the effects of a 12-week (10 sessions week(-1)) concurrent inspiratory and expiratory muscle training (CRMT) program in 34 adolescent competitive swimmers. The CRMT program consisted of 6 weeks during which the experimental group (E, n = 17) performed CRMT and the sham group (S, n = 17) performed sham CRMT, followed by 6 weeks when the E and S groups performed CRMT of differing intensities. CRMT training resulted in a significant improvement in forced inspiratory volume in 1 s (FIV1.0) (P = 0.050) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1.0) (P = 0.045) in the E group, which exceeded the S group's results. Significant improvements in pulmonary function, breathing power, and chemoreflex ventilation threshold were observed in both groups, and there was a trend toward an improvement in swimming critical speed after 12 weeks of training (P = 0.08). We concluded that although swim training results in attenuation of the ventilatory response to hypercapnia and in improvements in pulmonary function and sustainable breathing power, supplemental respiratory muscle training has no additional effect except on dynamic pulmonary function variables.

  17. Tail regeneration affects the digestive performance of a Mediterranean lizard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagonas, Kostas; Karambotsi, Niki; Bletsa, Aristoula; Reppa, Aikaterini; Pafilis, Panayiotis; Valakos, Efstratios D.

    2017-04-01

    In caudal autotomy, lizards shed their tail to escape from an attacking predator. Since the tail serves multiple functions, caudal regeneration is of pivotal importance. However, it is a demanding procedure that requires substantial energy and nutrients. Therefore, lizards have to increase energy income to fuel the extraordinary requirements of the regenerating tail. We presumed that autotomized lizards would adjust their digestion to acquire this additional energy. To clarify the effects of tail regeneration on digestion, we compared the digestive performance before autotomy, during regeneration, and after its completion. Tail regeneration indeed increased gut passage time but did not affect digestive performance in a uniform pattern: though protein income was maximized, lipid and sugar acquisition remained stable. This divergence in proteins may be attributed to their particular role in tail reconstruction, as they are the main building blocks for tissue formation.

  18. Can small shifts in circadian phase affect performance?

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J.; Legasto, Carlo S.; Fogg, Louis F.; Smith, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Small shifts in circadian timing occur frequently as a result of daylight saving time or later weekend sleep. These subtle shifts in circadian phase have been shown to influence subjective sleepiness, but it remains unclear if they can significantly affect performance. In a retrospective analysis we examined performance on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test before bedtime and after wake time in 11 healthy adults on fixed sleep schedules based on their habitual sleep times. The dim light melatonin onset, a marker of circadian timing, was measured on two occasions. An average 1.1 hour shift away from a proposed optimal circadian phase angle (6 hours between melatonin onset and midpoint of sleep) significantly slowed mean, median and fastest 10% reaction times before bedtime and after wake time (p<0.05). These results add to previous reports that suggest that humans may be sensitive to commonly occurring small shifts in circadian timing. PMID:22695081

  19. Can small shifts in circadian phase affect performance?

    PubMed

    Burgess, Helen J; Legasto, Carlo S; Fogg, Louis F; Smith, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    Small shifts in circadian timing occur frequently as a result of daylight saving time or later weekend sleep. These subtle shifts in circadian phase have been shown to influence subjective sleepiness, but it remains unclear if they can significantly affect performance. In a retrospective analysis we examined performance on the Psychomotor Vigilance Test before bedtime and after wake time in 11 healthy adults on fixed sleep schedules based on their habitual sleep times. The dim light melatonin onset, a marker of circadian timing, was measured on two occasions. An average 1.1 h shift away from a proposed optimal circadian phase angle (6 h between melatonin onset and midpoint of sleep) significantly slowed mean, median and fastest 10% reaction times before bedtime and after wake time (p < 0.05). These results add to previous reports that suggest that humans may be sensitive to commonly occurring small shifts in circadian timing.

  20. Progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running increases hypertrophy and differentially affects muscle protein synthesis, ribosome biogenesis, and proteolytic markers in rat muscle.

    PubMed

    Mobley, C B; Holland, A M; Kephart, W C; Mumford, P W; Lowery, R P; Kavazis, A N; Wilson, J M; Roberts, M D

    2017-03-15

    We examined if 6 weeks of progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running in rats induced plantaris, soleus, and/or gastrocnemius hypertrophy and/or affected markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and markers of proteolysis. For 6 weeks, 8 male Sprague-Dawley rats (~9-10 weeks of age, ~300-325 g) rats were assigned to the progressive resistance-loaded voluntary wheel running model (EX), and ten rats were not trained (SED). For EX rats, the wheel-loading paradigm was as follows - days 1-7: free-wheel resistance, days 8-15: wheel resistance set to 20%-25% body mass, days 16-24: 40% body mass, days 25-32: 60% body mass, days 33-42: 40% body mass. Following the intervention, muscles were analysed for markers of translational efficiency, ribosome biogenesis, and muscle proteolysis. Raw gastrocnemius mass (+13%, p < .01), relative (body mass-corrected) gastrocnemius mass (+16%, p < .001), raw plantaris mass (+13%, p < .05), and relative plantaris mass (+15%, p < .01) were greater in EX vs. SED rats. In spite of gastrocnemius hypertrophy, EX animals presented a 54% decrease in basal muscle protein synthesis levels (p < .01), a 125% increase in pan 4EBP1 levels (p < .001) and a 31% decrease in pan eIF4E levels (p < .05). However, in relation to SED animals, EX animals presented a 70% increase in gastrocnemius c-Myc protein levels (p < .05). Most markers of translational efficiency and ribosome biogenesis were not altered in the plantaris or soleus muscles of EX vs. SED animals. Gastrocnemius F-box protein 32 and poly-ubiquinated protein levels were approximately 150% and 200% greater in SED vs. EX rats (p < .001). These data suggest that the employed resistance training model increases hind limb muscle hypertrophy, and this may be mainly facilitated through reductions in skeletal muscle proteolysis, rather than alterations in ribosome biogenesis or translational efficiency.

  1. Acute alcohol consumption aggravates the decline in muscle performance following strenuous eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of acute moderate alcohol intake on muscular performance during recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. Eleven healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed a beverage containing 1g/kg bodyweight ethanol (as vodka and orange juice) (ALC). On another occasion they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed an isocaloric quantity of orange juice (OJ). Measurement of maximal isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced across the knee, plasma creatine kinase (CK) concentrations and muscle soreness were made before and at 36 and 60h following each exercise bout. All measures of muscle performance were significantly reduced at 36 and 60h post-exercise compared to pre-exercise measures (all p<0.05). The greatest decreases in peak strength were observed at 36h with losses of 12%, 28% and 19% occurring for OJ isometric, concentric, and eccentric contractions, respectively. However, peak strength loss was significantly greater in ALC with the same performance measures decreasing by 34%, 40% and 34%, respectively. Post-exercise plasma creatine kinase activity and ratings of muscle soreness were not different between conditions (both p>0.05). These results indicate that consumption of even moderate amounts of alcohol following eccentric-based exercise magnifies the normally observed losses in dynamic and static strength. Therefore, to minimise exercise related losses in muscle function and expedite recovery, participants in sports involving eccentric muscle work should avoid alcohol-containing beverages in the post-event period.

  2. Does a SLAP lesion affect shoulder muscle recruitment as measured by EMG activity during a rugby tackle?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The study objective was to assess the influence of a SLAP lesion on onset of EMG activity in shoulder muscles during a front on rugby football tackle within professional rugby players. Methods Mixed cross-sectional study evaluating between and within group differences in EMG onset times. Testing was carried out within the physiotherapy department of a university sports medicine clinic. The test group consisted of 7 players with clinically diagnosed SLAP lesions, later verified on arthroscopy. The reference group consisted of 15 uninjured and full time professional rugby players from within the same playing squad. Controlled tackles were performed against a tackle dummy. Onset of EMG activity was assessed from surface EMG of Pectorialis Major, Biceps Brachii, Latissimus Dorsi, Serratus Anterior and Infraspinatus muscles relative to time of impact. Analysis of differences in activation timing between muscles and limbs (injured versus non-injured side and non injured side versus matched reference group). Results Serratus Anterior was activated prior to all other muscles in all (P = 0.001-0.03) subjects. In the SLAP injured shoulder Biceps was activated later than in the non-injured side. Onset times of all muscles of the non-injured shoulder in the injured player were consistently earlier compared with the reference group. Whereas, within the injured shoulder, all muscle activation timings were later than in the reference group. Conclusions This study shows that in shoulders with a SLAP lesion there is a trend towards delay in activation time of Biceps and other muscles with the exception of an associated earlier onset of activation of Serratus anterior, possibly due to a coping strategy to protect glenohumeral stability and thoraco-scapular stability. This trend was not statistically significant in all cases PMID:20184752

  3. The effects of Creatine Long-Term Supplementation on Muscle Morphology and Swimming Performance in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Ercan; Gulturk, Sefa; Erdal, Sena

    2009-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON), no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats) (INCO), Cr supplementation 1 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-I) and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg(-1)·day(-1) (CREAT-II). Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05). In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats. Key pointsThere is no study about the effects of creatine long-term supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance in rats.Long-term creatine supplementation increase muscle hypertrophy (but not body weight) and enhance endurance swimming performance in rats.The quantitative analysis indicated that the number of muscle fibers per defined area

  4. The Effects of Audiotaped Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on the Reading Performance of Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; Pica, Louis, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the degree to which audiotaped progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training influenced the oral and silent reading performance of eight adolescents who were legally classified as emotionally disturbed. Finds that PMR training can have a positive influence on the reading performance of emotionally disturbed adolescents. (MG)

  5. Respiratory muscle training in healthy individuals: physiological rationale and implications for exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Sheel, A William

    2002-01-01

    The respiratory system has traditionally been viewed to be capable of meeting the substantial demands for ventilation and gas exchange and the cardiopulmonary interactions imposed by short-term maximum exercise or long-term endurance exercise. Recent studies suggest that specific respiratory muscle (RM) training can improve the endurance and strength of the respiratory muscles in healthy humans. The effects of RM training on exercise performance remains controversial. When whole-body exercise performance is evaluated using submaximal fixed work-rate tests, significant improvements are seen and smaller, but significant improvements have also been reported in placebo-trained individuals. When performance is measured using time-trial type performance measures versus fixed workload tests, performance is increased to a much lesser extent with RM training. It appears that RM training influences relevant measures of physical performance to a limited extent at most. Interpretation of the collective literature is difficult because most studies have utilised relatively small sample sizes and very few studies have used appropriate control or placebo groups. Mechanisms to explain the purported improvements in exercise performance remain largely unknown. However, possible candidates include improved ratings of breathing perception, delay of respiratory muscle fatigue, ventilatory efficiency, or blood-flow competition between respiratory and locomotor muscles. This review summarises the current literature on the physiology of RM training in healthy individuals and critically evaluates the possible implications for exercise performance.

  6. Skeletal muscle fiber types in the ghost crab, Ocypode quadrata: implications for running performance.

    PubMed

    Perry, Michael J; Tait, Jennifer; Hu, John; White, Scott C; Medler, Scott

    2009-03-01

    Ghost crabs possess rapid running capabilities, which make them good candidates for comparing invertebrate exercise physiology with that of more extensively studied vertebrates. While a number of studies have examined various aspects of running physiology and biomechanics in terrestrial crabs, none to date have defined the basic skeletal muscle fiber types that power locomotion. In the current study, we investigated skeletal muscle fiber types comprising the extensor and flexor carpopodite muscles in relation to running performance in the ghost crab. We used kinematic analyses to determine stride frequency and muscle shortening velocity and found that both parameters are similar to those of comparably sized mammals but slower than those observed in running lizards. Using several complementary methods, we found that the muscles are divided into two primary fiber types: those of the proximal and distal regions possess long sarcomeres (6.2+/-2.3 microm) observed in crustacean slow fibers and have characteristics of aerobic fibers whereas those of the muscle mid-region have short sarcomeres (3.5+/-0.4 microm) characteristic of fast fibers and appear to be glycolytic. Each fiber type is characterized by several different myofibrillar protein isoforms including multiple isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC), troponin I (TnI), troponin T (TnT) and a crustacean fast muscle protein, P75. Three different isoforms of MHC are differentially expressed in the muscles, with fibers of the mid-region always co-expressing two isoforms at a 1:1 ratio within single fibers. Based on our analyses, we propose that these muscles are functionally divided into a two-geared system, with the aerobic fibers used for slow sustained activities and the glycolytic mid-region fibers being reserved for explosive sprints. Finally, we identified subtle differences in myofibrillar isoform expression correlated with crab body size, which changes by several orders of magnitude during an animal's lifetime.

  7. Alternative splicing, muscle calcium sensitivity, and the modulation of dragonfly flight performance

    PubMed Central

    Marden, James H.; Fitzhugh, Gail H.; Wolf, Melisande R.; Arnold, Kristina D.; Rowan, Barry

    1999-01-01

    Calcium sensitivity of myosin cross-bridge activation in striated muscles commonly varies during ontogeny and in response to alterations in muscle usage, but the consequences for whole-organism physiology are not well known. Here we show that the relative abundances of alternatively spliced transcripts of the calcium regulatory protein troponin T (TnT) vary widely in flight muscle of Libellula pulchella dragonflies, and that the mixture of TnT splice variants explains significant portions of the variation in muscle calcium sensitivity, wing-beat frequency, and an index of aerodynamic power output during free flight. Two size-distinguishable morphs differ in their maturational pattern of TnT splicing, yet they show the same relationship between TnT transcript mixture and calcium sensitivity and between calcium sensitivity and aerodynamic power output. This consistency of effect in different developmental and physiological contexts strengthens the hypothesis that TnT isoform variation modulates muscle calcium sensitivity and whole-organism locomotor performance. Modulating muscle power output appears to provide the ecologically important ability to operate at different points along a tradeoff between performance and energetic cost. PMID:10611380

  8. Analysis of muscle synergy for evaluation of task-specific performance in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Zhuang, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao; Niu, Chuanxin M; Xie, Qing; Lan, Ning; Si Li; Cheng Zhuang; Xiao Zhang; Niu, Chuanxin M; Qing Xie; Ning Lan; Niu, Chuanxin M; Zhang, Xiao; Zhuang, Cheng; Li, Si; Lan, Ning; Xie, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Muscle synergy represents a central neural module that organizes and activates a group of muscles when performing a certain task. However, whether muscle synergy is a good physiological indicator of motor ability in task performance for patients suffering stroke is not clear. The purpose of this study is to understand how information of task-specific muscle synergy in healthy subjects and patients post stroke can be used to evaluate their motor ability, and further to assist motor rehabilitation for stroke patients. Electromyography (EMG) signals and movement kinematics in reaching tasks were recorded in 5 healthy subjects and 4 stroke patients. Muscle synergies were extracted from EMGs and compared cross healthy and stroke subjects. Normal synergies displayed a characteristic pattern common in healthy subjects. But pathological synergies in stroke subjects lacked the characteristics of normal synergy without a common component, implicating varying extent of damage to the motor module due to lesion in cerebral circuits. Further analysis in stroke subjects showed that pathological patterns of synergy in stroke subjects corresponded to the abnormality in their movement control compared with healthy subjects. Data showed that task-specific muscle synergy did reveal a positive correlation to the ability of neural control of tasks. It was further observed that task-specific synergy was changed towards the normal pattern after intervention with functional electrical stimulation in patients post stroke.

  9. An alternative domain near the nucleotide-binding site of Drosophila muscle myosin affects ATPase kinetics.

    PubMed

    Miller, Becky M; Zhang, Shuxing; Suggs, Jennifer A; Swank, Douglas M; Littlefield, Kimberly P; Knowles, Aileen F; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2005-10-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster expression of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms occurs by alternative splicing of transcripts from a single gene. The exon 7 domain is one of four variable regions in the catalytic head and is located near the nucleotide-binding site. To ascribe a functional role to this domain, we created two chimeric myosin isoforms (indirect flight isoform-exon 7a and embryonic-exon 7d) that differ from the native indirect flight muscle and embryonic body-wall muscle isoforms only in the exon 7 region. Germline transformation and subsequent expression of the chimeric myosins in the indirect flight muscle of myosin-null Drosophila allowed us to purify the myosin for in vitro studies and to assess in vivo structure and function of transgenic muscles. Intriguingly, in vitro experiments show the exon 7 domain modulates myosin ATPase activity but has no effect on actin filament velocity, a novel result compared to similar studies with other Drosophila variable exons. Transgenic flies expressing the indirect flight isoform-exon 7a have normal indirect flight muscle structure, and flight and jump ability. However, expression of the embryonic-exon 7d chimeric isoform yields flightless flies that show improvements in both the structural stability of the indirect flight muscle and in locomotor abilities as compared to flies expressing the embryonic isoform. Overall, our results suggest the exon 7 domain participates in the regulation of the attachment of myosin to actin in order to fine-tune the physiological properties of Drosophila myosin isoforms.

  10. THE EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLE PERFORMANCE: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Russell; Cheatham, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) is a non-invasive therapeutic technique used to theoretically aid in scar tissue breakdown and absorption, fascial mobilization, and improved tissue healing. Researchers have hypothesized that utilizing IASTM will improve muscular efficiency and performance; yet previous Investigations has been focused on treating injury. Objective The purpose of this investigation was to explore the effects of IASTM on muscle performance to assess if typical treatment application affected measures of muscular performance. Design A pretest-posttest randomized control design. Participants A convenience sample of 48 physically active adults (mean age 24 ± 4 years), randomly assigned to one of three groups: quadriceps treatment group, triceps surae treatment group, or control group. Interventions Participants performed a five-minute warm-up on a Monark bicycle ergometer before performing three countermovement vertical jumps (CMJ). Immediately after, the IASTM treatment was applied by one researcher for three minutes on each leg at the specified site (e.g., quadriceps) for those assigned to the treatment groups, while the control group rested for six minutes. Immediately following treatment, participants performed three additional CMJs. Pre- and post-testing included measures of vertical jump height (JH), peak power (PP) and peak velocity (PV). Results There were no statistically significant differences found between treatment groups in JH, PP, or PV or across pre- and post-test trials. Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that standard treatment times of IASTM do not produce an immediate effect in muscular performance in healthy participants. This may help clinicians determine the optimal sequencing of IASTM when it is part of a pre-performance warm-up program. Future research should be conducted to determine the muscle performance effects of IASTM in individuals with known myofascial restriction and to

  11. Changes in jump performance and muscle activity following soccer-specific exercise.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Jon; Armstrong, Neil; Williams, Craig

    2008-01-15

    The jump performance of ten youth soccer players (mean age 15.8 years, s= 0.4) was assessed before and after 42 min of soccer-specific exercise performed on a non-motorized treadmill. A squat, countermovement, and drop jump were performed on a force platform and simultaneously surface EMG activity of four lower limb muscles was collected. Jump height deteriorated across all conditions with mean reductions of - 1.4 cm (s = 1.6; P < 0.05), - 3.0 cm (s = 2.9; P < 0.05), and -2.3 cm (s = 1.7; P < 0.01) in the squat, countermovement, and drop jump respectively. The impact force in the drop jump was the only force variable to show a significant change with fatigue (P < 0.05). Following the prolonged exercise, reductions in total muscle activity were non-significant for the squat jump, approached significance for the counter-ovement jump (P = 0.07), and achieved significance for the drop jump (P < 0.05). The results showed that completing soccer-specific exercise reduced performance in all jump tasks. Reductions in muscle activity were greatest for the drop jump, suggesting an influence of muscle stretch and loading on reduced muscle activity when fatigued.

  12. Impaired Exercise Performance and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Rats with Secondary Carnitine Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bouitbir, Jamal; Haegler, Patrizia; Singh, François; Joerin, Lorenz; Felser, Andrea; Duthaler, Urs; Krähenbühl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of carnitine depletion upon exercise performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function remain largely unexplored. We therefore investigated the effect of N-trimethyl-hydrazine-3-propionate (THP), a carnitine analog inhibiting carnitine biosynthesis and renal carnitine reabsorption, on physical performance and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in rats. Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were treated daily with water (control rats; n = 12) or with 20 mg/100 g body weight THP (n = 12) via oral gavage for 3 weeks. Following treatment, half of the animals of each group performed an exercise test until exhaustion. Results: Distance covered and exercise performance were lower in THP-treated compared to control rats. In the oxidative soleus muscle, carnitine depletion caused atrophy (–24%) and impaired function of complex II and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The free radical leak (ROS production relative to oxygen consumption) was increased and the cellular glutathione pool decreased. Moreover, mRNA expression of markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA were decreased in THP-treated compared to control rats. In comparison, in the glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, carnitine depletion was associated with impaired function of complex IV and increased free radical leak, whilst muscle weight and cellular glutathione pool were maintained. Markers of mitochondrial proliferation and mitochondrial DNA were unaffected. Conclusions: Carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired exercise capacity in rats treated with THP. THP-induced carnitine deficiency is associated with impaired function of the electron transport chain in oxidative and glycolytic muscle as well as with atrophy and decreased mitochondrial DNA in oxidative muscle. PMID:27559315

  13. Effects of high-intensity interval cycling performed after resistance training on muscle strength and hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Tsitkanou, S; Spengos, K; Stasinaki, A-N; Zaras, N; Bogdanis, G; Papadimas, G; Terzis, G

    2016-09-23

    Aim of the study was to investigate whether high-intensity interval cycling performed immediately after resistance training would inhibit muscle strength increase and hypertrophy expected from resistance training per se. Twenty-two young men were assigned into either resistance training (RE; N = 11) or resistance training plus high-intensity interval cycling (REC; N = 11). Lower body muscle strength and rate of force development (RFD), quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and vastus lateralis muscle architecture, muscle fiber type composition and capillarization, and estimated aerobic capacity were evaluated before and after 8 weeks of training (2 times per week). Muscle strength and quadriceps CSA were significantly and similarly increased after both interventions. Fiber CSA increased significantly and similarly after both RE (type I: 13.6 ± 3.7%, type IIA: 17.6 ± 4.4%, type IIX: 23.2 ± 5.7%, P < 0.05) and REC (type I: 10.0 ± 2.7%, type IIA: 14.8 ± 4.3% type IIX: 20.8 ± 6.0%, P < 0.05). In contrast, RFD decreased and fascicle angle increased (P < 0.05) only after REC. Capillary density and estimated aerobic capacity increased (P < 0.05) only after REC. These results suggest that high-intensity interval cycling performed after heavy-resistance exercise may not inhibit resistance exercise-induced muscle strength/hypertrophy after 2 months of training, while it prompts aerobic capacity and muscle capillarization. The addition of high-intensity cycling after heavy-resistance exercise may decrease RFD partly due to muscle architectural changes.

  14. How does the structure of extraocular muscles and their nerves affect their function?

    PubMed Central

    Bruenech, J R; Kjellevold Haugen, I B

    2015-01-01

    The sensory and motor control of human extraocular muscles (EOMs) have been subjected to considerable speculation in ophthalmic literature, often related to infranuclear structures such as the unique complement of muscle fibres and their associated sensory organs. The intrafusal fibres do not resemble their somatic counterparts and their peculiar morphology has raised questions about their proprioceptive capacity. No Golgi tendon organs have so far been observed and the myotendinous nerve endings, previously assumed to convey sensory information, have recently been argued to merely represent constituents of the efferent innervation serving the multiply innervated muscles fibres. These observations raise questions about the overall capacity to monitor the activity created by the generous efferent nerve supply observed in these muscles. Furthermore, the argued independent activity of muscular layers and compartments suggest that the required feedback must be highly structured and more specific than previously assumed. Yet, uncertainty about the source of such information remains. The purpose of this paper is to provide a short review of neuromuscular properties of human extraocular muscles. Their functional implications and the most reputable sources of proprioception will also be discussed. The promoted views are based on pertinent literature and previous research undertaken by the authors. PMID:25397785

  15. Early-age heat exposure affects skeletal muscle satellite cell proliferation and differentiation in chicks.

    PubMed

    Halevy, O; Krispin, A; Leshem, Y; McMurtry, J P; Yahav, S

    2001-07-01

    Exposure of young chicks to thermal conditioning (TC; i.e., 37 degrees C for 24 h) resulted in significantly improved body and muscle growth at a later age. We hypothesized that TC causes an increase in satellite cell proliferation, necessary for further muscle hypertrophy. An immediate increase was observed in satellite cell DNA synthesis in culture and in vivo in response to TC of 3-day-old chicks to levels that were significantly higher than those of control chicks. This was accompanied by a marked induction of insulin-like growth factor-I (IFG-I), but not hepatocyte growth factor in the breast muscle. No significant difference between treatments in plasma IGF-I levels was observed. A marked elevation in muscle regulatory factors on day 5, followed by a decline in cell proliferation on day 6 together with continuous high levels of IGF-I in the TC chick muscle may indicate accelerated cell differentiation. These data suggest a central role for IGF-I in the immediate stimulation of satellite cell myogenic processes in response to heat exposure.

  16. Noggin inactivation affects the number and differentiation potential of muscle progenitor cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Costamagna, Domiziana; Mommaerts, Hendrik; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Tylzanowski, Przemko

    2016-01-01

    Inactivation of Noggin, a secreted antagonist of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs), in mice leads, among others, to severe malformations of the appendicular skeleton and defective skeletal muscle fibers. To determine the molecular basis of the phenotype, we carried out a histomorphological and molecular analysis of developing muscles Noggin−/− mice. We show that in 18.5 dpc embryos there is a marked reduction in muscle fiber size and a failure of nuclei migration towards the cell membrane. Molecularly, the absence of Noggin results in an increased BMP signaling in muscle tissue as shown by the increase in SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation, concomitant with the induction of BMP target genes such as Id1, 2, 3 as well as Msx1. Finally, upon removal of Noggin, the number of mesenchymal Pax7+ muscle precursor cells is reduced and they are more prone to differentiate into adipocytes in vitro. Thus, our results highlight the importance of Noggin/BMP balance for myogenic commitment of early fetal progenitor cells. PMID:27573479

  17. Swimming performance of hatchling green turtles is affected by incubation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Elizabeth A.; Booth, David T.; Lanyon, Janet M.

    2006-08-01

    In an experiment repeated for two separate years, incubation temperature was found to affect the body size and swimming performance of hatchling green turtles ( Chelonia mydas). In the first year, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 26°C were larger in size than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C, whilst in the second year hatchlings from 25.5°C were similar in size to hatchings from 30°C. Clutch of origin influenced the size of hatchlings at all incubation temperatures even when differences in egg size were taken into account. In laboratory measurements of swimming performance, in seawater at 28°C, hatchlings from eggs incubated at 25.5 and 26°C had a lower stroke rate frequency and lower force output than hatchlings from 28 and 30°C. These differences appeared to be caused by the muscles of hatchlings from cooler temperatures fatiguing at a faster rate. Clutch of origin did not influence swimming performance. This finding that hatchling males incubated at lower temperature had reduced swimming ability may affect their survival whilst running the gauntlet of predators in shallow near-shore waters, prior to reaching the relative safety of the open sea.

  18. Analysis of Skeletal Muscle Metrics as Predictors of Functional Task Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Buxton, Roxanne E.; Redd, Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle J.; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: The ability to predict task performance using physiological performance metrics is vital to ensure that astronauts can execute their jobs safely and effectively. This investigation used a weighted suit to evaluate task performance at various ratios of strength, power, and endurance to body weight. METHODS: Twenty subjects completed muscle performance tests and functional tasks representative of those that would be required of astronauts during planetary exploration (see table for specific tests/tasks). Subjects performed functional tasks while wearing a weighted suit with additional loads ranging from 0-120% of initial body weight. Performance metrics were time to completion for all tasks except hatch opening, which consisted of total work. Task performance metrics were plotted against muscle metrics normalized to "body weight" (subject weight + external load; BW) for each trial. Fractional polynomial regression was used to model the relationship between muscle and task performance. CONCLUSION: LPMIF/BW is the best predictor of performance for predominantly lower-body tasks that are ambulatory and of short duration. LPMIF/BW is a very practical predictor of occupational task performance as it is quick and relatively safe to perform. Accordingly, bench press work best predicts hatch-opening work performance.

  19. AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins: AHNAK1 affects transverse skeletal muscle fiber stiffness

    SciTech Connect

    Marg, Andreas; Haase, Hannelore; Neumann, Tanja; Kouno, Michiyoshi; Morano, Ingo

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 are costameric proteins. {yields} Intact membrane repair in AHNAK1-deficient mice. {yields} AHNAK1{sup -/-} single fibers have a higher transverse stiffness. -- Abstract: The AHNAK scaffold PDZ-protein family is implicated in various cellular processes including membrane repair; however, AHNAK function and subcellular localization in skeletal muscle are unclear. We used specific AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 antibodies to analyzed the detailed localization of both proteins in mouse skeletal muscle. Co-localization of AHNAK1 and AHNAK2 with vinculin clearly demonstrates that both proteins are components of the costameric network. In contrast, no AHNAK expression was detected in the T-tubule system. A laser wounding assay with AHNAK1-deficient fibers suggests that AHNAK1 is not involved in membrane repair. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we observed a significantly higher transverse stiffness of AHNAK1{sup -/-} fibers. These findings suggest novel functions of AHNAK proteins in skeletal muscle.

  20. Lithium-oxygen batteries-Limiting factors that affect performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padbury, Richard; Zhang, Xiangwu

    2011-05-01

    Lithium-oxygen batteries have recently received attention due to their extremely high theoretical energy densities, which far exceed that of any other existing energy storage technology. The significantly larger theoretical energy density of the lithium-oxygen batteries is due to the use of a pure lithium metal anode and the fact that the cathode oxidant, oxygen, is stored externally since it can be readily obtained from the surrounding air. Before the lithium-oxygen batteries can be realized as high performance, commercially viable products, there are still many challenges to overcome, from designing their cathode structure, to optimizing their electrolyte compositions and elucidating the complex chemical reactions that occur during charge and discharge. The scientific obstacles that are related to the performance of the lithium-oxygen batteries open up an exciting opportunity for researchers from many different backgrounds to utilize their unique knowledge and skills to bridge the knowledge gaps that exist in current research projects. This article is a summary of the most significant limiting factors that affect the performance of the lithium-oxygen batteries from the perspective of the authors. The article indicates the relationships that form between various limiting factors and highlights the complex yet captivating nature of the research within this field.

  1. Acute supplementation of N-acetylcysteine does not affect muscle blood flow and oxygenation characteristics during handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Smith, Joshua R; Broxterman, Ryan M; Ade, Carl J; Evans, Kara K; Kurti, Stephanie P; Hammer, Shane M; Barstow, Thomas J; Harms, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC; antioxidant and thiol donor) supplementation has improved exercise performance and delayed fatigue, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. One possibility isNACsupplementation increases limb blood flow during severe-intensity exercise. The purpose was to determine ifNACsupplementation affected exercising arm blood flow and muscle oxygenation characteristics. We hypothesized thatNACwould lead to higher limb blood flow and lower muscle deoxygenation characteristics during severe-intensity exercise. Eight healthy nonendurance trained men (21.8 ± 1.2 years) were recruited and completed two constant power handgrip exercise tests at 80% peak power until exhaustion. Subjects orally consumed either placebo (PLA) orNAC(70 mg/kg) 60 min prior to handgrip exercise. Immediately prior to exercise, venous blood samples were collected for determination of plasma redox balance. Brachial artery blood flow (BABF) was measured via Doppler ultrasound and flexor digitorum superficialis oxygenation characteristics were measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. FollowingNACsupplementaiton, plasma cysteine (NAC: 47.2 ± 20.3 μmol/L vs.PLA: 9.6 ± 1.2 μmol/L;P = 0.001) and total cysteine (NAC: 156.2 ± 33.9 μmol/L vs.PLA: 132.2 ± 16.3 μmol/L;P = 0.048) increased. Time to exhaustion was not significantly different (P = 0.55) betweenNAC(473.0 ± 62.1 sec) andPLA(438.7 ± 58.1 sec). RestingBABFwas not different (P = 0.79) withNAC(99.3 ± 31.1 mL/min) andPLA(108.3 ± 46.0 mL/min).BABFwas not different (P = 0.42) during exercise or at end-exercise (NAC: 413 ± 109 mL/min;PLA: 445 ± 147 mL/min). Deoxy-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] and total-[hemoglobin+myoglobin] were not significantly different (P = 0.73 andP = 0.54, respectively) at rest or during exercise between conditions. We conclude that acuteNACsupplementation does not alter oxygen delivery during exercise in men.

  2. Androgens affect muscle, motor neuron, and survival in a mouse model of SOD1-related amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Tanya; Polanco, Maria J; Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Emionite, Laura; Ognio, Emanuela; Sambataro, Fabio; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo; Pennuto, Maria

    2014-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective loss of upper and lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle atrophy. Epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggest the involvement of androgens in ALS pathogenesis, but the mechanism through which androgens modify the ALS phenotype is unknown. Here, we show that androgen ablation by surgical castration extends survival and disease duration of a transgenic mouse model of ALS expressing mutant human SOD1 (hSOD1-G93A). Furthermore, long-term treatment of orchiectomized hSOD1-G93A mice with nandrolone decanoate (ND), an anabolic androgenic steroid, worsened disease manifestations. ND treatment induced muscle fiber hypertrophy but caused motor neuron death. ND negatively affected survival, thereby dissociating skeletal muscle pathology from life span in this ALS mouse model. Interestingly, orchiectomy decreased androgen receptor levels in the spinal cord and muscle, whereas ND treatment had the opposite effect. Notably, stimulation with ND promoted the recruitment of endogenous androgen receptor into biochemical complexes that were insoluble in sodium dodecyl sulfate, a finding consistent with protein aggregation. Overall, our results shed light on the role of androgens as modifiers of ALS pathogenesis via dysregulation of androgen receptor homeostasis.

  3. Parents' job insecurity affects children's academic performance through cognitive difficulties.

    PubMed

    Barling, J; Zacharatos, A; Hepburn, C G

    1999-06-01

    The authors developed and tested a model in which children who perceive their parents to be insecure about their jobs are distracted cognitively, which in turn affects their academic performance negatively. Participants were 102 female and 18 male undergraduates (mean age = 18 years), their fathers (mean age = 49 years), and their mothers (mean age = 47 years). Students completed questionnaires measuring perceived parental job insecurity, identification with parents, and cognitive difficulties; 3 months later, they also reported their midyear grades. Fathers and mothers each completed questionnaires assessing their job insecurity. Support for the model was obtained using LISREL 8, and as predicted, children's identification with their mothers and fathers moderated the relationship between their perceptions of their mothers' and fathers' job insecurity and their own cognitive difficulties.

  4. Irrelevant events affect voters' evaluations of government performance

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Andrew J.; Malhotra, Neil; Mo, Cecilia Hyunjung

    2010-01-01

    Does information irrelevant to government performance affect voting behavior? If so, how does this help us understand the mechanisms underlying voters’ retrospective assessments of candidates’ performance in office? To precisely test for the effects of irrelevant information, we explore the electoral impact of local college football games just before an election, irrelevant events that government has nothing to do with and for which no government response would be expected. We find that a win in the 10 d before Election Day causes the incumbent to receive an additional 1.61 percentage points of the vote in Senate, gubernatorial, and presidential elections, with the effect being larger for teams with stronger fan support. In addition to conducting placebo tests based on postelection games, we demonstrate these effects by using the betting market's estimate of a team's probability of winning the game before it occurs to isolate the surprise component of game outcomes. We corroborate these aggregate-level results with a survey that we conducted during the 2009 NCAA men's college basketball tournament, where we find that surprising wins and losses affect presidential approval. An experiment embedded within the survey also indicates that personal well-being may influence voting decisions on a subconscious level. We find that making people more aware of the reasons for their current state of mind reduces the effect that irrelevant events have on their opinions. These findings underscore the subtle power of irrelevant events in shaping important real-world decisions and suggest ways in which decision making can be improved. PMID:20615955

  5. Irrelevant events affect voters' evaluations of government performance.

    PubMed

    Healy, Andrew J; Malhotra, Neil; Mo, Cecilia Hyunjung

    2010-07-20

    Does information irrelevant to government performance affect voting behavior? If so, how does this help us understand the mechanisms underlying voters' retrospective assessments of candidates' performance in office? To precisely test for the effects of irrelevant information, we explore the electoral impact of local college football games just before an election, irrelevant events that government has nothing to do with and for which no government response would be expected. We find that a win in the 10 d before Election Day causes the incumbent to receive an additional 1.61 percentage points of the vote in Senate, gubernatorial, and presidential elections, with the effect being larger for teams with stronger fan support. In addition to conducting placebo tests based on postelection games, we demonstrate these effects by using the betting market's estimate of a team's probability of winning the game before it occurs to isolate the surprise component of game outcomes. We corroborate these aggregate-level results with a survey that we conducted during the 2009 NCAA men's college basketball tournament, where we find that surprising wins and losses affect presidential approval. An experiment embedded within the survey also indicates that personal well-being may influence voting decisions on a subconscious level. We find that making people more aware of the reasons for their current state of mind reduces the effect that irrelevant events have on their opinions. These findings underscore the subtle power of irrelevant events in shaping important real-world decisions and suggest ways in which decision making can be improved.

  6. Endurance training of respiratory muscles improves cycling performance in fit young cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Paige; Sattler, Angela; Fregosi, Ralph F

    2004-01-01

    Background Whether or not isolated endurance training of the respiratory muscles improves whole-body endurance exercise performance is controversial, with some studies reporting enhancements of 50 % or more, and others reporting no change. Twenty fit (VO2 max 56.0 ml/kg/min), experienced cyclists were randomly assigned to three groups. The experimental group (n = 10) trained their respiratory muscles via 20, 45 min sessions of hyperpnea. The placebo group (n = 4) underwent "sham" training (20, 5 min sessions), and the control group (n = 6) did no training. Results After training, the experimental group increased their respiratory muscle endurance capacity by 12 %. Performance on a bicycle time trial test designed to last about 40 min improved by 4.7 % (9 of 10 subjects showed improvement). There were no test-re-test improvements in either respiratory muscle or bicycle exercise endurance performance in the placebo group, nor in the control group. After training, the experimental group had significantly higher ventilatory output and VO2, and lower PCO2, during constant work-rate exercise; the placebo and control groups did not show these changes. The perceived respiratory effort was unchanged in spite of the higher ventilation rate after training. Conclusions The results suggest that respiratory muscle endurance training improves cycling performance in fit, experienced cyclists. The relative hyperventilation with no change in respiratory effort sensations suggest that respiratory muscle training allows subjects to tolerate the higher exercise ventilatory response without more dyspnea. Whether or not this can explain the enhanced performance is unknown. PMID:15132753

  7. Effects of vitamin D in skeletal muscle: falls, strength, athletic performance and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Girgis, Christian M; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick J; Turner, Nigel; Lau, Sue Lynn; Gunton, Jenny E

    2014-02-01

    Accompanying the high rates of vitamin D deficiency observed in many countries, there is increasing interest in the physiological functions of vitamin D. Vitamin D is recognized to exert extra-skeletal actions in addition to its classic roles in bone and mineral homeostasis. Here, we review the evidence for vitamin D's actions in muscle on the basis of observational studies, clinical trials and basic research. Numerous observational studies link vitamin D deficiency with muscle weakness and sarcopaenia. Randomized trials predominantly support an effect of vitamin D supplementation and the prevention of falls in older or institutionalized patients. Studies have also examined the effect of vitamin D in athletic performance, both inferentially by UV radiation and directly by vitamin D supplementation. Effects of vitamin D in muscle metabolic function, specifically insulin sensitivity, are also addressed in this review. At a mechanistic level, animal studies have evaluated the roles of vitamin D and associated minerals, calcium and phosphate, in muscle function. In vitro studies have identified molecular pathways by which vitamin D regulates muscle cell signalling and gene expression. This review evaluates evidence for the various roles of vitamin D in skeletal muscle and discusses controversies that have made this a dynamic field of research.

  8. An integrative study of the temperature dependence of whole animal and muscle performance during jumping and swimming in the frog Rana temporaria.

    PubMed

    Navas, C A; James, R S; Wakeling, J M; Kemp, K M; Johnston, I A

    1999-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to analyze individual variation in frog locomotor performance, (2) to compare the thermal sensitivity of jumping and swimming, and (3) to contrast whole animal versus muscle fiber performance at different temperatures. The jumping and swimming performance of Rana temporaria was analyzed at 5, 10, 15 and 20 degrees C. Muscle fiber bundles were isolated from lateral gastrocnemius and subjected to the length and activation patterns thought to occur in vivo. As temperature increased, locomotor performance in R. temporaria improved with a Q10 of 1.2 for both jump take-off velocity and mean swimming velocity. The slope of the relationship between performance and temperature (TE) was similar for both locomotor parameters and was described by the equation z-scores of locomotor performance = 0.127 x TE - 1.585. Although some frogs performed better than others relative performance was affected by locomotor type and temperature. Locomotor performance improved with temperature as the power required during take-off and the mean muscle power output increased with Q10 values of 1.7 and 1.6 respectively. The mean muscle power output during take-off was only 34% of the calculated requirements for the whole animal, suggesting the involvement of elastic strain energy storage mechanisms.

  9. Effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Eric S; Volek, Jeff S

    2003-11-01

    Creatine monohydrate has become the supplement of choice for many athletes striving to improve sports performance. Recent data indicate that athletes may not be using creatine as a sports performance booster per se but instead use creatine chronically as a training aid to augment intense resistance training workouts. Although several studies have evaluated the combined effects of creatine supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and weightlifting performance, these data have not been analyzed collectively. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle strength and weightlifting performance when ingested concomitant with resistance training. The effects of gender, interindividual variability, training status, and possible mechanisms of action are discussed. Of the 22 studies reviewed, the average increase in muscle strength (1, 3, or 10 repetition maximum [RM]) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 8% greater than the average increase in muscle strength following placebo ingestion during resistance training (20 vs. 12%). Similarly, the average increase in weightlifting performance (maximal repetitions at a given percent of maximal strength) following creatine supplementation plus resistance training was 14% greater than the average increase in weightlifting performance following placebo ingestion during resistance training (26 vs. 12%). The increase in bench press 1RM ranged from 3 to 45%, and the improvement in weightlifting performance in the bench press ranged from 16 to 43%. Thus there is substantial evidence to indicate that creatine supplementation during resistance training is more effective at increasing muscle strength and weightlifting performance than resistance training alone, although the response is highly variable.

  10. Effects of respiratory muscle training on performance in athletes: a systematic review with meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    HajGhanbari, Bahareh; Yamabayashi, Cristiane; Buna, Teryn R; Coelho, Jonathan D; Freedman, Kyle D; Morton, Trevor A; Palmer, Sheree A; Toy, Melissa A; Walsh, Cody; Sheel, A William; Reid, W Darlene

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review to determine if respiratory muscle training (RMT) improves sport performance and respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Methodology followed the Cochrane Collaboration protocol. MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, PEDro, EMBASE, EBM reviews, and COCHRANE electronic databases were searched until July 2011. Articles were included if: (a) participants were athletes; (b) RMT was compared with sham or control in a randomized controlled design and included outcomes of respiratory muscle and sport performance; and (d) published in English. Quality assessment using PEDro and data abstraction was performed by 2 authors. Outcomes evaluated were measures of sport performance, exercise capacity, spirometry, and respiratory muscle strength and endurance. Meta-analyses were performed on outcomes reported in 2 or more papers. Results of this systematic review revealed that of the 6,923 citations retrieved from the search strategy, 21 met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses demonstrated a significant positive effect of RMT on sport performance outcomes of time trials, exercise endurance time, and repetitions on Yo-Yo tests. Inspiratory muscle strength and endurance improved in most studies, which in part, was dependent on the type of RMT employed. Determination of the type of athlete that may benefit most from RMT was limited by small sample sizes, differing RMT protocols, and differences in outcome measures across studies. In conclusion, RMT can improve sport performance. Closer attention to matching the ventilatory demands of RMT to those required during athletic competition and more aggressive progression of training intensity may show greater improvements in future studies.

  11. Spinal muscle activity in simulated rugby union scrummaging is affected by different engagement conditions.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, D; Stone, B; Holsgrove, T P; Trewartha, G; Preatoni, E

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical studies of rugby union scrummaging have focused on kinetic and kinematic analyses, while muscle activation strategies employed by front-row players during scrummaging are still unknown. The aim of the current study was to investigate the activity of spinal muscles during machine and live scrums. Nine male front-row forwards scrummaged as individuals against a scrum machine under "crouch-touch-set" and "crouch-bind-set" conditions, and against a two-player opposition in a simulated live condition. Muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, and erector spinae were measured over the pre-engagement, engagement, and sustained-push phases. The "crouch-bind-set" condition increased muscle activity of the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid before and during the engagement phase in machine scrummaging. During the sustained-push phase, live scrummaging generated higher activities of the erector spinae than either machine conditions. These results suggest that the pre-bind, prior to engagement, may effectively prepare the cervical spine by stiffening joints before the impact phase. Additionally, machine scrummaging does not replicate the muscular demands of live scrummaging for the erector spinae, and for this reason, we advise rugby union forwards to ensure scrummaging is practiced in live situations to improve the specificity of their neuromuscular activation strategies in relation to resisting external loads.

  12. The Affect on Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Recovery for Ultrasound with Bee Venom

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Kyun; Kim, Myung Chul

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom is effective in treating delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii muscle, using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test (flexion and extension), and serum creatine kinase level. [Subjects] Twenty women participated in this study. [Methods] Repeated eccentric contractions were used to induce delayed onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexor of the subjects. The subjects were randomized to be treated with ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom. We evaluated the effects of treatments in the 2 groups. Individual subjects were assessed using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test, and serum creatine kinase level. The assessment parameters were evaluated 4 times: before exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The visual analogue scale scores were significantly different before and after the experiment in both the group treated with ultrasound and the group treated with ultrasound and bee venom. The difference in elbow flexion and extension before and after the experiment was significantly different in both groups. No significant difference was found in the serum creatine kinase levels before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] Treatment with ultrasound and bee venom is effective for managing delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:25276027

  13. The affect on delayed onset muscle soreness recovery for ultrasound with bee venom.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Kyun; Kim, Myung Chul

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom is effective in treating delayed onset muscle soreness of the biceps brachii muscle, using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test (flexion and extension), and serum creatine kinase level. [Subjects] Twenty women participated in this study. [Methods] Repeated eccentric contractions were used to induce delayed onset muscle soreness in the elbow flexor of the subjects. The subjects were randomized to be treated with ultrasound alone or ultrasound with bee venom. We evaluated the effects of treatments in the 2 groups. Individual subjects were assessed using the visual analogue scale, range of motion test, and serum creatine kinase level. The assessment parameters were evaluated 4 times: before exercise and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. [Results] The visual analogue scale scores were significantly different before and after the experiment in both the group treated with ultrasound and the group treated with ultrasound and bee venom. The difference in elbow flexion and extension before and after the experiment was significantly different in both groups. No significant difference was found in the serum creatine kinase levels before and after the experiment. [Conclusion] Treatment with ultrasound and bee venom is effective for managing delayed onset muscle soreness.

  14. Ecdysteroids affect in vivo protein metabolism of the flight muscle of the tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Wu, M.; Cook, P.; Hodsden, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ecdysteroid growth promotion of the dorsolongitudinal flight muscle of Manduca sexta was studied by measuring in vivo protein metabolism using both "flooding-dose" and "non-carrier" techniques. These procedures differ in that the former method includes injection of non-labelled phenylalanine (30 micromoles/insect) together with the [3H]amino acid. Injected radioactivity plateaued in the haemolymph within 7 min. With the flooding-dose method, haemolymph and intramuscular specific radioactivities were similar between 15 min and 2 h. Incorporation of [3H]phenylalanine into muscle protein was linear with either method between 30 and 120 min. Fractional rates (%/12 h) of synthesis with the flooding-dose technique were best measured after 1 h because of the initial delay in radioactivity equilibration. Estimation of body phenylalanine turnover with the non-carrier method showed 24-53%/h which was negligible with the flooding-dose method. Since the two methods yielded similar rates of protein synthesis, the large injection of non-labelled amino acid did not alter the rate of synthesis. Because the flooding-dose technique requires only a single time point measurement, it is the preferred method. The decline and eventual cessation of flight-muscle growth was mostly a consequence of declining protein synthesis though degradation increased between 76-86 h before eclosion and was relatively rapid. This decline in muscle growth could be prevented by treating pupae with 20-hydroxyecdysone (10 micrograms/insect). Protein accretion was promoted by a decline of up to 80% in protein breakdown, which was offset in part by a concurrent though much smaller decrease in protein synthesis. Therefore, ecdysteroids may increase flight-muscle growth by inhibiting proteolysis.

  15. Calpain 3 deficiency affects SERCA expression and function in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toral-Ojeda, Ivan; Aldanondo, Garazi; Lasa-Elgarresta, Jaione; Lasa-Fernández, Haizpea; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; López de Munain, Adolfo; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara

    2016-04-08

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3). Several studies have implicated Ca2+ dysregulation as an underlying event in several muscular dystrophies, including LGMD2A. In this study we used mouse and human myotube cultures, and muscle biopsies in order to determine whether dysfunction of sarco/endoplasmatic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) is involved in the pathology of this disease. In CAPN3-deficient myotubes, we found decreased levels of SERCA 1 and 2 proteins, while mRNA levels remained comparable with control myotubes. Also, we found a significant reduction in SERCA function that resulted in impairment of Ca2+ homeostasis, and elevated basal intracellular [Ca2+] in human myotubes. Furthermore, small Ankyrin 1 (sAnk1), a SERCA1-binding protein that is involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum integrity, was also diminished in CAPN3-deficient fibres. Interestingly, SERCA2 protein was patently reduced in muscles from LGMD2A patients, while it was normally expressed in other forms of muscular dystrophy. Thus, analysis of SERCA2 expression may prove useful for diagnostic purposes as a potential indicator of CAPN3 deficiency in muscle biopsies. Altogether, our results indicate that CAPN3 deficiency leads to degradation of SERCA proteins and Ca2+ dysregulation in the skeletal muscle. While further studies are needed in order to elucidate the specific contribution of SERCA towards muscle degeneration in LGMD2A, this study constitutes a reasonable foundation for the development of therapeutic approaches targeting SERCA1, SERCA2 or sAnk1.

  16. Activation and aponeurosis morphology affect in vivo muscle tissue strains near the myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Niccolo M; Epstein, Frederick H; Blemker, Silvia S

    2012-02-23

    Hamstring strain injury is one of the most common injuries in athletes, particularly for sports that involve high speed running. The aims of this study were to determine whether muscle activation and internal morphology influence in vivo muscle behavior and strain injury susceptibility. We measured tissue displacement and strains in the hamstring muscle injured most often, the biceps femoris long head muscle (BFLH), using cine DENSE dynamic magnetic resonance imaging. Strain measurements were used to test whether strain magnitudes are (i) larger during active lengthening than during passive lengthening and (ii) larger for subjects with a relatively narrow proximal aponeurosis than a wide proximal aponeurosis. Displacement color maps showed higher tissue displacement with increasing lateral distance from the proximal aponeurosis for both active lengthening and passive lengthening, and higher tissue displacement for active lengthening than passive lengthening. First principal strain magnitudes were averaged in a 1cm region near the myotendinous junction, where injury is most frequently observed. It was found that strains are significantly larger during active lengthening (0.19 SD 0.09) than passive lengthening (0.13 SD 0.06) (p<0.05), which suggests that elevated localized strains may be a mechanism for increased injury risk during active as opposed to passive lengthening. First principal strains were higher for subjects with a relatively narrow aponeurosis width (0.26 SD 0.15) than wide (0.14 SD 0.04) (p<0.05). This result suggests that athletes who have BFLH muscles with narrow proximal aponeuroses may have an increased risk for BFLH strain injuries.

  17. Effect of exercise-diet manipulation on muscle glycogen and its subsequent utilization during performance.

    PubMed

    Sherman, W M; Costill, D L; Fink, W J; Miller, J M

    1981-05-01

    This study examined the effect of three exercise-diet regimens on muscle glycogen supercompensation and subsequent performance during a 20.9-km run. A diet containing 15% carbohydrate (CHO,L), 50% CHO (M), or 70% (CHO (H) was arranged in three trials as follows: trial A = 3 days L, 3 days H; trial B = 3 days M, 3 days H; trial C = 6 days M. For each trial a 5-day depletion-taper exercise sequence was conducted on the treadmill at 73% VO2 max. The runs were 90, 40, 40, 20, and 20 min, respectively. A day of rest preceded the 20.9-km performance run. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius on days 4 and 7 (both prior to and after the performance run). Trials A, B, and C elevated muscle glycogen to 207, 203, and 159 mmol glucosyl units/kg wet tissue (mmG), respectively. The performance run in both trials A and B utilized significantly more glycogen than in trial C: 5.0 and 5.1 mmG/km vs. 3.1 mmG/km. There were, however, no differences in either performance run times or post-performance run glycogen levels between the trials. These data demonstrate that (1) muscle glycogen can be elevated to high levels with a moderate exercise-diet regimen; (2) initial muscle glycogen levels influence the amount subsequently utilized during exercise; (3) carbohydrate loading is of no benefit to performance for trained runners during a 20.9-km run.

  18. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  19. Immediate Effects of Kinesiology Taping of Quadriceps on Motor Performance after Muscle Fatigued Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ick Keun; Kim, You Lim; Bae, Young-Hyeon; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of this cross-sectional single-blind study was to investigate the immediate effects of Kinesiology taping of quadriceps on motor performance after muscle fatigued induction. Design. Randomized controlled cross-sectional design. Subjects. Forty-five subjects participated in this study. Participants were divided into three groups: Kinesiology taping group, placebo taping group, and nontaping group. Methods. Subjects performed short-term exercise for muscle fatigued induction, followed by the application of each intervention. Peak torque test, one-leg single hop test, active joint position sense test, and one-leg static balance test were carried out before and after the intervention. Results. Peak torque and single-leg hopping distance were significantly increased when Kinesiology taping was applied (p < 0.05). But there were no significant effects on active joint position sense and single-leg static balance. Conclusions. We proved that Kinesiology taping is effective in restoring muscle power reduced after muscle fatigued induction. Therefore, we suggest that Kinesiology taping is beneficial for fatigued muscles. PMID:26246835

  20. Acute caffeine ingestion enhances performance and dampens muscle pain following resistance exercise to failure.

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Oxford, S W

    2012-06-01

    This double-blind, within-subjects experiment examined the effects of acute caffeine ingestion on perceptions of muscle pain following a bout of high-intensity, upper-body resistance exercise to failure. Moderately trained males (N.=18) ingested a dose of caffeine (5 mg · kg-1) or placebo in a randomised and counterbalanced order and 1 hour later completed bench press exercise to failure at an intensity of 60% 1 repetition maximum. Repetitions completed was taken as a measure of performance, peak heart rate was determined via heart rate telemetry during the exercise bout, rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and upper body muscle pain was recorded immediately upon failure of the exercise task and peak blood lactate concentration was determined post-exercise. Caffeine resulted in improved repetitions to failure (t [17]=3.119, P=0.006), greater peak blood lactate (t [17] =5.080, P=0.0001) and lower RPE (t 17=-3.431, P=0.003) compared to placebo. Muscle pain perception was also significantly lower in the caffeine condition compared to placebo (t [17]=-2.567, P=0.04). These results support prior studies using aerobic based exercise modes in suggesting that caffeine ingestion can dampen exercise-induced muscle pain. Specifically, caffeine ingestion enhances muscular strength performance and reduces upper body muscle pain perception immediately following a bout of high-intensity resistance exercise to failure.

  1. Low-intensity cycling affects the muscle activation pattern of consequent countermovement jumps.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Gonzalo J; Mon, Javier; Acero, Rafael M; Sanchez, Jose A; Fernandez-del-Olmo, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Players (eg, basketball, soccer, and football) often use a static bicycle during a game to maintain warming. However, the effectiveness of this procedure has not been addressed in the literature. Thus, it remains unknown whether low-intensity cycling movement can affect explosive movement performance. In this study, 10 male subjects performed countermovement jumps before and after a 15-minutes cycling bout at 35% of their maximal power output. Three sessions were tested for 3 different cadences of cycling: freely chosen cadence, 20% lower than freely chosen cadence (FCC-20%), and 20% higher than freely chosen cadence (FCC+20%). Jump height, kinematics, and electromyogram were recorded simultaneously during the countermovement jumps. The results showed a significant decreasing in the height of countermovement jump after cycling at freely chosen cadence and FCC-20% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.04, respectively), but not for FCC+20% cadences. The electromyographic parameters suggest that changes in the countermovement jump after cycling can be attributed to alteration of the pattern of activation and may be modulated by the preceding cycling cadence. Our study indicates that to avoid a possible negative effect of the cycling in the subsequent explosive movements, a cadence 20% higher than the preferred cadence must be used.

  2. Repetitive Peripheral Magnetic Stimulation (15 Hz RPMS) of the Human Soleus Muscle did not Affect Spinal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Möller, Anett; Zschorlich, Volker; Bruhn, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The electric field induced by repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (RPMS) is able to activate muscles artificially due to the stimulation of deep intramuscular motor axons. RPMS applied to the muscle induces proprioceptive input to the central nervous system in different ways. Firstly, the indirect activation of mechanoreceptors and secondly, direct activation of afferent nerve fibers. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of RPMS applied to the soleus. Thirteen male subjects received RPMS once and were investigated before and after the treatment regarding the parameters maximal M wave (Mmax), maximal H-reflex (Hmax), Hmax/Mmax-ratio, Hmax and Mmax onset latencies and plantar flexor peak twitch torque associated with Hmax (PTH). Eleven male subjects served as controls. No significant changes were observed for Hmax and PTH of the treatment group but the Hmax/Mmax-ratio increased significantly (p = 0.015) on account of a significantly decreased Mmax (p = 0.027). Hmax onset latencies were increased for the treatment group (p = 0.003) as well as for the control group (p = 0.011) while Mmax onset latencies did not change. It is concluded that the RPMS protocol did not affect spinal excitability but acted on the muscle fibres which are part of fast twitch units and mainly responsible for the generation of the maximal M wave. RPMS probably modified the integrity of neuromuscular propagation. Key points RPMS probably did not affect spinal excitability. Data suggested that RPMS likely acted on the muscle fibres which are part of fast twitch units and mainly responsible for the generation of the maximal M wave. RPMS probably modified the integrity of neuromuscular propagation. PMID:24149293

  3. Effect of inspiratory muscle warm-up on submaximal rowing performance.

    PubMed

    Arend, Mati; Mäestu, Jarek; Kivastik, Jana; Rämson, Raul; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2015-01-01

    Performing inspiratory muscle warm-up might increase exercise performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of inspiratory muscle warm-up to submaximal rowing performance and to find if there is an effect on lactic acid accumulation and breathing parameters. Ten competitive male rowers aged between 19 and 27 years (age, 23.1 ± 3.8 years; height, 188.1 ± 6.3 cm; body mass, 85.6 ± 6.6 kg) were tested 3 times. During the first visit, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) assessment and the incremental rowing test were performed to measure maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (Pamax). A submaximal intensity (90% Pamax) rowing test was performed twice with the standard rowing warm-up as test 1 and with the standard rowing warm-up and specific inspiratory muscle warm-up as test 2. During the 2 experimental tests, distance, duration, heart rate, breathing frequency, ventilation, peak oxygen consumption, and blood lactate concentration were measured. The only value that showed a significant difference between the test 1 and test 2 was breathing frequency (52.2 ± 6.8 vs. 53.1 ± 6.8, respectively). Heart rate and ventilation showed a tendency to decrease and increase, respectively, after the inspiratory muscle warm-up (p < 0.1). Despite some changes in respiratory parameters, the use of 40% MIP intensity warm-up is not suggested if the mean intensity of the competition is at submaximal level (at approximately 90% maximal oxygen consumption). In conclusion, the warm-up protocol of the respiratory muscles used in this study does not have a significant influence on submaximal endurance performance in highly trained male rowers.

  4. The Effects of Audiotaped Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on the Reading Performance of Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; Pica, Louis, Jr.

    A study examined the degree to which audiotaped progressive muscle relaxation training influenced the oral and silent reading performance of eight adolescents who were legally classified as emotionally disturbed. A single-case ABAB withdrawal design was used to examine the effects of relaxation training on oral reading. In addition, a…

  5. Body composition, physical performance and muscle quality of active elderly women.

    PubMed

    Vilaça, Karla Helena Coelho; Carneiro, José Ailton Oliveira; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Lima, Nereida Kilza da Costa; de Paula, Francisco José Albuquerque; Moriguti, Julio Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Fat gain is one of the major factors aggravating physical disability in the elderly population, which presents an increase in fat mass and a decrease in lean mass compared to the young population. For this reason it is important to assess body composition and the effects of these alterations in obese elderly women. The purpose of this study was to assess body composition, physical performance and muscle quality in active elderly women. Cross-sectional study included 75 elderly women (29 eutrophic and 46 obese) 65-80 years old. Body composition was evaluated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and the physical performance was determined by 6-minute walk test (6MWT), handgrip strength (HS) and knee extension strength (KES). Muscle quality was calculated as the ratio between muscle strength and lean mass. Fat free mass, lean mass, fat mass and percent body fat were significantly higher in the obese group (p<0.05). Furthermore, the obese group showed a poorer performance than the eutrophic group in the 6MWT (432.31±66.13 m and 472.07±74.03 m, respectively, p=0.01). HS and KES did not differ between groups, however, regarding muscle quality, the obese group exhibited a impaired in comparison to the eutrophic group in the upper (11.45±2.57 kg and 13.31±2.03 kg, respectively, p<0.01) and lower limb (2.91±1.16 kg and 3.44±0.97 kg, respectively, p=0.05). The increase in muscle mass detected in the obese elderly was not sufficient to maintain adequate muscle quality and physical function, showing a negative influence of the excess of body fat.

  6. Relative Age Affects Marathon Performance in Male and Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Connick, Mark J.; Beckman, Emma M.; Tweedy, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Marathon runners are ranked in 5-year age groups. However the extent to which 5-year groupings facilitates equitable competition has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative age in male and female marathon running. Marathon finishing times for the top ten male (aged 20-69 years) and female athletes (aged 20-64 years) were obtained from the 2013 New York and Chicago marathons. Intra-class and inter-class validity were evaluated by comparing performances within (intra-class) and between (inter-class) the 5-year age groups. Results showed intra-class effects in all male age groups over 50 years, in all female age groups over 40 years, and in male and female 20-24 age groups (p < 0.05). Inter-class differences existed between the 20-24 and 25-29 age groups in both males and females, between all male age groups over 50 years, and between all female age groups over 40 years (p < 0.05). This study provided the first evaluation of the effects of relative age in male and female marathon running. The results provide preliminary but compelling evidence that the relatively older male athletes in age groups over 50 years and the relatively older females in age groups over 40 years are competitively disadvantaged compared to the younger athletes in these age groups. Key points Results showed a curvilinear relationship between age and marathon running performance with the negative effect of age becoming more pronounced in older runners. Relative age effects were found in all age groups over age 50 years in males and over age 40 years in females indicating that the relatively older runners were competitively disadvantaged compared to the relatively younger runners in these age groups. Relative age affected the 20-24 age classification which is consistent with the hypothesis that marathon performance improves until peak performance occurs in the 25-29 age classification. PMID:26336355

  7. Relative Age Affects Marathon Performance in Male and Female Athletes.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Beckman, Emma M; Tweedy, Sean M

    2015-09-01

    Marathon runners are ranked in 5-year age groups. However the extent to which 5-year groupings facilitates equitable competition has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of relative age in male and female marathon running. Marathon finishing times for the top ten male (aged 20-69 years) and female athletes (aged 20-64 years) were obtained from the 2013 New York and Chicago marathons. Intra-class and inter-class validity were evaluated by comparing performances within (intra-class) and between (inter-class) the 5-year age groups. Results showed intra-class effects in all male age groups over 50 years, in all female age groups over 40 years, and in male and female 20-24 age groups (p < 0.05). Inter-class differences existed between the 20-24 and 25-29 age groups in both males and females, between all male age groups over 50 years, and between all female age groups over 40 years (p < 0.05). This study provided the first evaluation of the effects of relative age in male and female marathon running. The results provide preliminary but compelling evidence that the relatively older male athletes in age groups over 50 years and the relatively older females in age groups over 40 years are competitively disadvantaged compared to the younger athletes in these age groups. Key pointsResults showed a curvilinear relationship between age and marathon running performance with the negative effect of age becoming more pronounced in older runners.Relative age effects were found in all age groups over age 50 years in males and over age 40 years in females indicating that the relatively older runners were competitively disadvantaged compared to the relatively younger runners in these age groups.Relative age affected the 20-24 age classification which is consistent with the hypothesis that marathon performance improves until peak performance occurs in the 25-29 age classification.

  8. Factors affecting student performance in an undergraduate genetics course.

    PubMed

    Bormann, J Minick; Moser, D W; Bates, K E

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine some of the factors that affect student success in a genetics course. Genetics for the Kansas State University College of Agriculture is taught in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and covers Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and quantitative/population genetics. Data collected from 1,516 students over 7 yr included year and semester of the course; age; gender; state of residence; population of hometown; Kansas City metro resident or not; instructor of course; American College Testing Program (ACT) scores; number of transfer credits; major; college; preveterinary student or not; freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior grade point average (GPA); semester credits when taking genetics; class standing when enrolled in genetics; cumulative GPA before and after taking genetics; semester GPA in semester taking genetics, number of semesters between the biology prerequisite and genetics; grade in biology; location of biology course; and final percentage in genetics. Final percentage in genetics did not differ due to instructor, gender, state of residence, major, or college (P > 0.16). Transfer students tended to perform better than nontransfer students (P = 0.09), and students from the Kansas City metro outscored students from other areas (P = 0.03). Preveterinary option students scored higher in genetics than non-preveterinary students (P < 0.01). Seniors scored higher than juniors and sophomores, who scored higher than freshmen (P < 0.02). We observed a tendency for students with higher grades in biology to perform better in genetics (P = 0.06). Students who took biology at Kansas State University performed better in genetics than students who transferred the credit (P < 0.01). There was a negative regression of hometown population on score in genetics (P < 0.01), and positive regressions of ACT score, all measures of GPA, course load, and cumulative credits on final percentage in the course (P < 0.02). To

  9. Factors affecting the structure and maturation of human tissue engineered skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil R W; Passey, Samantha L; Player, Darren J; Khodabukus, Alastair; Ferguson, Richard A; Sharples, Adam P; Mudera, Vivek; Baar, Keith; Lewis, Mark P

    2013-07-01

    Tissue engineered skeletal muscle has great utility in experimental studies of physiology, clinical testing and its potential for transplantation to replace damaged tissue. Despite recent work in rodent tissue or cell lines, there is a paucity of literature concerned with the culture of human muscle derived cells (MDCs) in engineered constructs. Here we aimed to tissue engineer for the first time in the literature human skeletal muscle in self-assembling fibrin hydrogels and determine the effect of MDC seeding density and myogenic proportion on the structure and maturation of the constructs. Constructs seeded with 4 × 10(5) MDCs assembled to a greater extent than those at 1 × 10(5) or 2 × 10(5), and immunostaining revealed a higher fusion index and a higher density of myotubes within the constructs, showing greater structural semblance to in vivo tissue. These constructs primarily expressed perinatal and slow type I myosin heavy chain mRNA after 21 days in culture. In subsequent experiments MACS(®) technology was used to separate myogenic and non-myogenic cells from their heterogeneous parent population and these cells were seeded at varying myogenic (desmin +) proportions in fibrin based constructs. Only in the constructs seeded with 75% desmin + cells was there evidence of striations when immunostained for slow myosin heavy chain compared with constructs seeded with 10 or 50% desmin + cells. Overall, this work reveals the importance of cell number and myogenic proportions in tissue engineering human skeletal muscle with structural resemblance to in vivo tissue.

  10. Iron Content Affects Lipogenic Gene Expression in the Muscle of Nelore Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Wellison Jarles da Silva; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann; Tizioto, Polyana Cristine; Cesar, Aline Silva Mello; Gromboni, Caio Fernando; Nogueira, Ana Rita Araújo; de Oliveira, Priscila Silva Neubern; de Souza, Marcela Maria

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential mineral for metabolism and plays a central role in a range of biochemical processes. Therefore, this study aimed to identify differentially expressed (DE) genes and metabolic pathways in Longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle from cattle with divergent iron content, as well as to investigate the likely role of these DE genes in biological processes underlying beef quality parameters. Samples for RNA extraction for sequencing and iron, copper, manganese, and zinc determination were collected from LD muscles at slaughter. Eight Nelore steers, with extreme genomic estimated breeding values for iron content (Fe-GEBV), were selected from a reference population of 373 animals. From the 49 annotated DE genes (FDR<0.05) found between the two groups, 18 were up-regulated and 31 down-regulated for the animals in the low Fe-GEBV group. The functional enrichment analyses identified several biological processes, such as lipid transport and metabolism, and cell growth. Lipid metabolism was the main pathway observed in the analysis of metabolic and canonical signaling pathways for the genes identified as DE, including the genes FASN, FABP4, and THRSP, which are functional candidates for beef quality, suggesting reduced lipogenic activities with lower iron content. Our results indicate metabolic pathways that are partially influenced by iron, contributing to a better understanding of its participation in skeletal muscle physiology. PMID:27532424

  11. One-year high fat diet affects muscle-but not brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Tenna; Grunnet, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that few weeks of high fat (HF) diet may induce metabolic disturbances and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. However, little is known about the effects of long-term HF exposure and effects on brain mitochondria are unknown. Wistar rats were fed either chow (13E% fat) or HF diet (60E% fat) for 1 year. The HF animals developed obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and dysfunction of isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria: state 3 and state 4 were 30% to 50% increased (P<0.058) with palmitoyl carnitine (PC), while there was no effect with pyruvate as substrate. Adding also succinate in state 3 resulted in a higher substrate control ratio (SCR) with PC, but a lower SCR with pyruvate (P<0.05). The P/O2 ratio was lower with PC (P<0.004). However, similar tests on isolated brain mitochondria from the same animal showed no changes with the substrates relevant for brain (pyruvate and 3-hydroxybutyrate). Thus, long-term HF diet was associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and significantly altered mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Yet, brain mitochondria were unaffected. We suggest that the relative isolation of the brain due to the blood-brain barrier may play a role in this strikingly different phenotype of mitochondria from the two tissues of the same animal.

  12. Low-level lasers affect uncoupling protein gene expression in skin and skeletal muscle tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuto, K. S.; Sergio, L. P. S.; Paoli, F.; Mencalha, A. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength, frequency, power, fluence, and emission mode determine the photophysical, photochemical, and photobiological responses of biological tissues to low-level lasers. Free radicals are involved in these responses acting as second messengers in intracellular signaling processes. Irradiated cells present defenses against these chemical species to avoid unwanted effects, such as uncoupling proteins (UCPs), which are part of protective mechanisms and minimize the effects of free radical generation in mitochondria. In this work UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA gene relative expression in the skin and skeletal muscle tissues of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers was evaluated. Samples of the skin and skeletal muscle tissue of Wistar rats exposed to low-level red and infrared lasers were withdrawn for total RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis, and the evaluation of gene expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. UCP2 and UCP3 mRNA expression was differently altered in skin and skeletal muscle tissues exposed to lasers in a wavelength-dependent effect, with the UCP3 mRNA expression dose-dependent. Alteration on UCP gene expression could be part of the biostimulation effect and is necessary to make cells exposed to red and infrared low-level lasers more resistant or capable of adapting in damaged tissues or diseases.

  13. Eccentric and concentric muscle performance following 7 days of simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Judith C.; Roper, Mary L.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Mcbrine, John J.; Barrows, Linda H.; Harris, Bernard A.; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in skeletal muscle strength occur in response to chronic disuse or insufficient functional loading. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in muscle performance of the lower extremity and torso prior to and immediately after 7 days of simulated weightlessness (horizontal bed rest). A Biodex was used to determine concentric and eccentric peak torque and angle at peak torque for the back, abdomen, quadriceps, hamstring, soleus, and tibialis anterior. A reference angle of 0 degrees was set at full extension. Data were analyzed by ANOVA.

  14. Relationships between metabolic rate, muscle electromyograms, and swim performance of adult chinook salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R. ); Brown, Richard S. ); Cullinan, Valerie I. ); Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A. )

    2003-10-01

    We measured oxygen consumption rates of adult spring Chinook salmon and compared these values to other species of Pacific salmon. Our results indicated that adult salmon achieve their maximum level of oxygen consumption at about their upper critical swim speed. It is also at this speed that the majority of the energy supplied to the swimming fish switches from red muscle (powered by aerobic metabolism) to white muscle (powered by anaerobic metabolism). Determining the swimming performance of adult salmon will assist managers in developing fishways and other means to safely pass fish over hydroelectric dams and other man-made structures.

  15. Ultrasound Changes in Achilles Tendon and Gastrocnemius Medialis Muscle on Squat Eccentric Overload and Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Sanz-López, Fernando; Berzosa Sánchez, César; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Cruz-Diaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Sanz-López, F, Berzosa Sánchez, C, Hita-Contreras, F, Cruz-Diaz, D, and Martínez-Amat, A. Ultrasound changes in Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis muscle on squat eccentric overload and running performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2015-Previous studies have proven the adaptation to load in the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle after different types of exercise, such as running, heel drop training, and a variety of sports. These findings have been applied to improve performance and in the treatment and prevention of overuse injuries. However, the effects that squat performance may have on the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle are still unknown. Squats are a widely used training exercise that involves calf-muscle activation. Similarly, no reports have been published regarding the adaptation to load of trained and untrained subjects during several consecutive days of running. The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angles of the gastrocnemius medialis after eccentric overload training and within 3 days of running. Twenty healthy males who volunteered for this study were divided into 2 groups. Subjects in the eccentric overload training (ECC) group performed 6 weeks of eccentric overload training (twice weekly, 4 sets of 7 repetitions in a Yoyo squat device) before the running intervention. All participants, ECC and control (CONT) groups, ran on 3 consecutive days. After the eccentric training, an increase in the cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle was observed. As for the running intervention, the behavior of tissues in both groups was similar. These results suggest that eccentric overload training with squats promotes changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis muscle. Nevertheless, significant changes in the tissue do not appear between the running performance of trained and untrained subjects.

  16. Does the speed of shortening affect steady-state force depression in cat soleus muscle?

    PubMed

    Leonard, T R; Herzog, W

    2005-11-01

    It has been stated repeatedly for the past 50 years that the steady-state force depression following shortening of an activated muscle depends on the speed of shortening. However, these statements were based on results from experiments in which muscles were shortened at different speeds but identical activation levels. Therefore, the force during shortening was changed in accordance with the force-velocity relationship of muscles: that is, increasing speeds of shortening were associated with decreasing forces, and vice versa. Consequently, it is not possible at present to distinguish whether force depression is caused by the changes in speed, as frequently stated, or the associated changes in force, or both. The purpose of this study was to test if force depression depends on the speed of shortening. We hypothesized that force depression was dependent on the force but not the speed of contraction. Our prediction is that the amount of force depression after shortening contractions at different speeds could be similar if the force during contraction was controlled at a similar level. Cat soleus muscles (n=7) were shortened by 9 or 12 mm at speeds of 3, 9, and 27 mm/s, first with a constant activation during shortening (30Hz), then with activation levels that were reduced (<30Hz) for the slow speeds (3 and 9 mm/s) to approximate the shortening forces of the fast speed contractions (27 mm/s). If done properly, force depression could be precisely matched at the three different speeds, indicating that force depression was related to the force during the shortening contraction but not to the speed. However, in order to match force depression, the forces during shortening had to be systematically greater for the slow compared to the fast speeds of shortening, suggesting that force depression also depends on the level of activation, as force depression at constant activation levels can only be matched if the force during shortening, evaluated by the mechanical work, is

  17. Comparative Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Mildly versus Severely Affected mdx Mouse Skeletal Muscles Identifies Annexin, Lamin, and Vimentin as Universal Dystrophic Markers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Winkler, Claudia K; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-06-19

    The primary deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in complex changes in dystrophic muscles. In order to compare the degree of secondary alterations in differently affected subtypes of skeletal muscles, we have conducted a global analysis of proteome-wide changes in various dystrophin-deficient muscles. In contrast to the highly degenerative mdx diaphragm muscle, which showed considerable alterations in 35 distinct proteins, the spectrum of mildly to moderately dystrophic skeletal muscles, including interosseus, flexor digitorum brevis, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus muscle, exhibited a smaller number of changed proteins. Compensatory mechanisms and/or cellular variances may be responsible for differing secondary changes in individual mdx muscles. Label-free mass spectrometry established altered expression levels for diaphragm proteins associated with contraction, energy metabolism, the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix and the cellular stress response. Comparative immunoblotting verified the differences in the degree of secondary changes in dystrophin-deficient muscles and showed that the up-regulation of molecular chaperones, the compensatory increase in proteins of the intermediate filaments, the fibrosis-related increase in collagen levels and the pathophysiological decrease in calcium binding proteins is more pronounced in mdx diaphragm as compared to the less severely affected mdx leg muscles. Annexin, lamin, and vimentin were identified as universal dystrophic markers.

  18. Skeletal muscle mass and exercise performance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lang, C C; Chomsky, D B; Rayos, G; Yeoh, T K; Wilson, J R

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle atrophy limits the maximal exercise capacity of stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition and maximal exercise capacity were measured in 100 stable ambulatory patients with heart failure. Body composition was assessed by using dual-energy X-ray absorption. Peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and the anaerobic threshold were measured by using a Naughton treadmill protocol and a Medical Graphics CardioO2 System. VO2peak averaged 13.4 +/- 3.3 ml.min-1.kg-1 or 43 +/- 12% of normal. Lean body mass averaged 52.9 +/- 10.5 kg and leg lean mass 16.5 +/- 3.6 kg. Leg lean mass correlated linearly with VO2peak (r = 0.68, P < 0.01), suggesting that exercise performance is influences by skeletal muscle mass. However, lean body mass was comparable to levels noted in 1,584 normal control subjects, suggesting no decrease in muscle mass. Leg muscle mass was comparable to levels noted in 34 normal control subjects, further supporting this conclusion. These findings suggest that exercise intolerance in stable ambulatory patients with heart failure is not due to skeletal muscle atrophy.

  19. Effect of Dietary Patterns on Muscle Strength and Physical Performance in the Very Old: Findings from the Newcastle 85+ Study

    PubMed Central

    Granic, Antoneta; Jagger, Carol; Davies, Karen; Adamson, Ashley; Kirkwood, Thomas; Hill, Tom R.; Siervo, Mario; Mathers, John C.; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthy diet has been associated with better muscle strength and physical performance in cross-sectional studies of older adults but the effect of dietary patterns (DP) on subsequent decline, particularly in the very old (aged 85+), has not been determined. Objective We investigated the association between previously established DP and decline in muscle strength and physical performance in the very old. Design 791 participants (61.8% women) from the Newcastle 85+ Study were followed-up for change in hand grip strength (HGS) and Timed Up-and Go (TUG) test over 5 years (four waves 1.5 years apart). Mixed models were used to determine the effects of DP on muscle strength and physical performance in the entire cohort and separately by sex. Results Previously we have established three DP that varied in intake of red meats, potato, gravy and butter and differed with key health and social factors. HGS declined linearly by 1.59 kgF in men and 1.08 kgF in women (both p<0.001), and TUG slowed by 0.13 log10-transformed seconds (log10-s) in men and 0.11 log10-s in women per wave after adjusting for important covariates (both p<0.001), and also showed a nonlinear change (p<0.001). Men in DP1 (‘High Red Meat’) had worse overall HGS (β = -1.70, p = 0.05), but men in DP3 (‘High Butter’) had a steeper decline (β = -0.63, p = 0.05) than men in DP2 (‘Low Meat’). Men in DP1 and women in DP3 also had overall slower TUG than those in DP2 (β = 0.08, p = 0.001 and β = 0.06, p = 0.01, respectively), but similar rate of decline after adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle, health, and functioning factors. The results for HGS and TUG were not affected by participants’ cognitive status. Conclusions DP high in red meats, potato and gravy (DP1), or butter (DP3) may adversely affect muscle strength and physical performance in later life, independently of important covariates and cognitive status. PMID:26934360

  20. Effects of Morphological Characteristics of Muscle Fibers on Porcine Growth Performance and Pork Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Mo; Ryu, Youn Chul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of morphological characteristics of porcine muscle fibers on growth performance, muscle fiber characteristics, and pork quality taken from the longissimus dorsi muscle. A total of 239 crossbred pigs (164 castrated males and 75 females) were used in this study. Experimental pigs were categorized by the total number of muscle fiber (TNF: High and Low) and cross sectional area of muscle fiber (CSAF: Large, Middle, and Small). Their combinations were classified into six groups (High-Large, HL; High-Middle, HM; High-Small, HS; Low-Large, LL; Low-Middle, LM; Low-Small, LS). The TNF and CSAF were significantly (p<0.05) correlated with growth rate and carcass productivity, while the only of the type I number had no meaningful relationships excluding the correlation with loin area (p<0.001). The proportion of type I area was positively correlated with pH45 min while the proportion of type IIB area was negatively correlated with pH45 min and pH24 h (p<0.05). Drip loss and protein denaturation had strong relationships with the proportion of type IIB number or area. The HL group exhibited the greatest growth performance. In addition, the HL group had significantly greater values in protein solubility than the other groups. In conclusion, this study suggest that high TNF combined to large CSAF improve the ultimate lean meat productivity and assure normal meat quality simultaneously with increased both proportion of number and area of type I, type IIA muscle fibers and lowered proportion of number and area of type IIB. PMID:27857533

  1. Age associated declines in muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance: impact on fear of falling and quality of life

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SUMMARY: This 3 year longitudinal study among older adults showed that declining muscle mass, strength, power, and physical performance are independent contributing factors to increased fear of falling, while declines of muscle mass and physical performance contribute to deterioration of quality of ...

  2. Effects of different rest intervals between antagonist paired sets on repetition performance and muscle activation.

    PubMed

    Maia, Marianna F; Willardson, Jeffrey M; Paz, Gabriel A; Miranda, Humberto

    2014-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercising the antagonist musculature acutely enhances subsequent performance for the agonist musculature. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different rest intervals between sets for exercises that involve antagonistic muscle groups, a technique referred to as antagonist paired sets (APS). Fifteen recreationally trained men were tested for knee extension (KE) exercise performance, with or without previous knee flexion (KF) exercise for the antagonist musculature. The following protocols were performed in random order with 10 repetition maximum loads for the KF and KE exercises: (a) traditional protocol (TP)-1 set of KE only to repetition failure; (b) paired sets with minimal allowable rest (PMR)-1 set of KF followed immediately by a set of KE; (c) P30-30-second rest between paired sets of KF and KE; (d) P1-1-minute rest between paired sets; (e) P3-3-minute rest between paired sets; and (f) P5-5-minute rest between paired sets. The number of repetitions performed and electromyographic (EMG) activity of vastus lateralis, vastus medialis (VM), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles were recorded during the KE set in each protocol. It was demonstrated that significantly greater KE repetitions were completed during the PMR, P30, and P1 protocols vs. the TP protocol. Significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the RF muscle during the KE exercise in the PMR and P30 vs. the TP, P3, and P5, respectively. In addition, significantly greater EMG activity was demonstrated for the VM muscle during the PMR vs. all other protocols. The results of this study indicate that no rest or relatively shorter rest intervals (30 seconds and 1 minute) between APS might be more effective to elicit greater agonist repetition enhancement and muscle activation.

  3. Effects of a Six-Month Local Vibration Training on Bone Density, Muscle Strength, Muscle Mass, and Physical Performance in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Tankisheva, Ekaterina; Bogaerts, An; Boonen, Steven; Delecluse, Christophe; Jansen, Paul; Verschueren, Sabine M P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of 6 months' local vibration training on bone mineral density (BMD), muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance in postmenopausal women (66-88 years). The study was organized as a randomized controlled trial for postmenopausal women who lived in daily care service flats and rest homes. Thirty-five postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to either a vibration (n = 17) or a control group (n = 18). The vibration group received 6-month local vibration treatment with frequency between 30 and 45 Hz and acceleration between 1.71 and 3.58g. The vibration was applied on the midthigh and around the hip in supine-lying position once per day, 5 d·wk. The participants of the control group continued their usual activities and were not involved in any additional training program. The primary outcome variables were the isometric and dynamic quadriceps muscle strength and the BMD of the hip. We assessed the muscle mass of the quadriceps and physical performance. Additionally, the feasibility, side effects, and compliance were evaluated after 6 months of local vibration training. Overall, the results showed a net benefit of 13.84% in isometric muscle strength at 60° knee angle in favor of the vibration group compared with controls (p < 0.01). No changes in BMD, muscle mass, or physical performance were found in both groups (p > 0.05). Six months of local vibration training improved some aspects of muscle strength but had no effect on BMD, muscle mass, and physical performance in postmenopausal women. The specific vibration protocol used in this study can be considered as safe and suitable for a local vibration training program.

  4. Lactobacillus plantarum TWK10 Supplementation Improves Exercise Performance and Increases Muscle Mass in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ming; Wei, Li; Chiu, Yen-Shuo; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Tsai, Tsung-Yu; Wang, Ming-Fu; Huang, Chi-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) is a well-known probiotic among the ingested-microorganism probiotics (i.e., ingested microorganisms associated with beneficial effects for the host). However, few studies have examined the effects of L. plantarum TWK10 (LP10) supplementation on exercise performance, physical fatigue, and gut microbial profile. Male Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) strain mice were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group) for oral administration of LP10 for six weeks at 0, 2.05 × 108, or 1.03 × 109 colony-forming units/kg/day, designated the vehicle, LP10-1X and LP10-5X groups, respectively. LP10 significantly decreased final body weight and increased relative muscle weight (%). LP10 supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength (p < 0.0001) and endurance swimming time (p < 0.001) and decreased levels of serum lactate (p < 0.0001), ammonia (p < 0.0001), creatine kinase (p = 0.0118), and glucose (p = 0.0151) after acute exercise challenge. The number of type I fibers (slow muscle) in gastrocnemius muscle significantly increased with LP10 treatment. In addition, serum levels of albumin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and triacylglycerol significantly decreased with LP10 treatment. Long-term supplementation with LP10 may increase muscle mass, enhance energy harvesting, and have health-promotion, performance-improvement, and anti-fatigue effects. PMID:27070637

  5. Intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated Sertoli cells restores muscle morphology and performance in dystrophic mice.

    PubMed

    Chiappalupi, Sara; Luca, Giovanni; Mancuso, Francesca; Madaro, Luca; Fallarino, Francesca; Nicoletti, Carmine; Calvitti, Mario; Arato, Iva; Falabella, Giulia; Salvadori, Laura; Di Meo, Antonio; Bufalari, Antonello; Giovagnoli, Stefano; Calafiore, Riccardo; Donato, Rosario; Sorci, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disease characterized by progressive muscle degeneration leading to impaired locomotion, respiratory failure and premature death. In DMD patients, inflammatory events secondary to dystrophin mutation play a major role in the progression of the pathology. Sertoli cells (SeC) have been largely used to protect xenogeneic engraftments or induce trophic effects thanks to their ability to secrete trophic, antiinflammatory, and immunomodulatory factors. Here we have purified SeC from specific pathogen-free (SPF)-certified neonatal pigs, and embedded them into clinical grade alginate microcapsules. We show that a single intraperitoneal injection of microencapsulated SPF SeC (SeC-MC) in an experimental model of DMD can rescue muscle morphology and performance in the absence of pharmacologic immunosuppressive treatments. Once i.p. injected, SeC-MC act as a drug delivery system that modulates the inflammatory response in muscle tissue, and upregulates the expression of the dystrophin paralogue, utrophin in muscles through systemic release of heregulin-β1, thus promoting sarcolemma stability. Analyses performed five months after single injection show high biocompatibility and long-term efficacy of SeC-MC. Our results might open new avenues for the treatment of patients with DMD and related diseases.

  6. Skeletal muscle sodium channel is affected by an epileptogenic beta1 subunit mutation.

    PubMed

    Moran, O; Conti, F

    2001-03-23

    The syndrome of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus type 1 (GEFS+) has been associated to the gene SCN1B coding for the sodium channel beta1 subunit (Wallace, R. H. et al. (1998) Nature Genetics 19, 366-370). In patients, a mutation of the cysteine 121 to trpyptophane (C121W) would cause a lack of modulatory activity of the beta1 subunit on sodium channels expressed in the brain, rendering neurons hyperexcitable. We have confirmed that the normal beta1-modulation of type-IIA adult brain alpha subunits (BIIA) expressed in frog oocytes is defective in C121W. We observed that the mixture of wild-type and mutant beta1 subunits is less effective than wild-type alone, suggesting that the mutant beta1 subunit does bind the alpha subunit. However, we also observed a similar lack of modulation by C121W of the in adult skeletal muscle alpha subunit (SkM1). This finding is in contrast with the simple idea that the mutational effect observed in the oocyte expression system is the principal physiopathological correlate of GEFS+, because no skeletal muscle symptoms have been reported in GEFS+ patients. We conclude that the manifestation of the pathological phenotype is conditioned by the presence of susceptibility genes and/or that the frog oocyte expression system is inadequate for the study of the mutant beta1 subunit physiopathology.

  7. BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Blomstrand, E; Saltin, B

    2001-08-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) or a placebo was given to seven subjects during 1 h of ergometer cycle exercise and a 2-h recovery period. Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, in the legs during exercise or the increase in their concentration in muscle. The increase was approximately 30% in both conditions. On the other hand, in the recovery period after exercise, a faster decrease in the muscle concentration of aromatic amino acids was found in the BCAA experiment (46% compared with 25% in the placebo condition). There was also a tendency to a smaller release (an average of 32%) of these amino acids from the legs during the 2-h recovery. The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin.

  8. The longissimus thoracis muscle proteome in Alentejana bulls as affected by growth path.

    PubMed

    Almeida, André M; Nanni, Paolo; Ferreira, Ana M; Fortes, Claudia; Grossmann, Jonas; Bessa, Rui J B; Costa, Paulo

    2017-01-30

    Beef production is an important economic activity. In Southern Europe there are two types of beef production systems based on growth paths: continuous (CG) versus discontinuous growth (DG). DG is a traditional system dependent on pasture; whereas in CG animals are supplemented on concentrate feed. We compare the protein abundance profiles of the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle in CG and DG animals using label-free quantitative proteomics. Twenty three Alentejana male calves (9months-old, 239kg live-weight) were allocated to two feeding regimens. In CG (n=12) production system, animals were fed ad libitum on concentrates plus hay and slaughtered at 18months. In DG (n=11) production system, animals were fed ad libitum on hay from 9 to 15months of age and then the same diet provided to the CG group and slaughtered at 24months. The LT muscle was sampled and protein abundance profiles determined using label-free quantification. We identified 510 proteins, of which 26 showed differential abundance. Several proteins (e.g. Myozenin-2, glyoclythic enzymes and 14-3-3 protein zeta/delta) are proposed as indicators of a more intensive growth path. Myosin binding protein H had higher abundance in the DG group, suggesting it could be associated to discontinuous growth path.

  9. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMS<0.8%). The rate constant of the additional slow component decreased with increasing shortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  10. Muscular strategy shift in human running: dependence of running speed on hip and ankle muscle performance.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Tim W; Schache, Anthony G; Pandy, Marcus G

    2012-06-01

    Humans run faster by increasing a combination of stride length and stride frequency. In slow and medium-paced running, stride length is increased by exerting larger support forces during ground contact, whereas in fast running and sprinting, stride frequency is increased by swinging the legs more rapidly through the air. Many studies have investigated the mechanics of human running, yet little is known about how the individual leg muscles accelerate the joints and centre of mass during this task. The aim of this study was to describe and explain the synergistic actions of the individual leg muscles over a wide range of running speeds, from slow running to maximal sprinting. Experimental gait data from nine subjects were combined with a detailed computer model of the musculoskeletal system to determine the forces developed by the leg muscles at different running speeds. For speeds up to 7 m s(-1), the ankle plantarflexors, soleus and gastrocnemius, contributed most significantly to vertical support forces and hence increases in stride length. At speeds greater than 7 m s(-1), these muscles shortened at relatively high velocities and had less time to generate the forces needed for support. Thus, above 7 m s(-1), the strategy used to increase running speed shifted to the goal of increasing stride frequency. The hip muscles, primarily the iliopsoas, gluteus maximus and hamstrings, achieved this goal by accelerating the hip and knee joints more vigorously during swing. These findings provide insight into the strategies used by the leg muscles to maximise running performance and have implications for the design of athletic training programs.

  11. Item Context Factors Affecting Students' Performance on Mathematics Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgado, Felipe Almuna; Stacey, Kaye

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports how the context in which a mathematics item is embedded impacts on students' performance. The performance of Year 10 students on four PISA items was compared with performance on variants with more familiar contexts. Performance was not better when they solved items with more familiar contexts but there was some evidence that…

  12. Post-exercise leg and forearm flexor muscle cooling in humans attenuates endurance and resistance training effects on muscle performance and on circulatory adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Motoi; Teruya, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Masataka; Ogai, Ryuji; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Kosaka, Mitsuo

    2006-03-01

    The influence of regular post-exercise cold application to exercised muscles trained by ergometer cycling (leg muscles) or handgrip exercise using a weight-loaded handgrip ergometer (forearm flexor muscles) was studied in human volunteers. Muscle loads were applied during exercise programs three to four times a week for 4-6 weeks. Besides measuring parameters characterizing muscle performance, femoral and brachial artery diameters were determined ultrasonographically. Training effects were identified by comparing pre- and post-training parameters in matched groups separately for the trained limbs cooled after exercise by cold-water immersion and the corresponding trained limbs kept at room temperature. Significant training effects were three times more frequent in the control than in the cold group, including increases in artery diameters in the control but not in the cold group. It is concluded that training-induced molecular and humoral adjustments, including muscle hyperthermia, are physiological, transient and essential for training effects (myofiber regeneration, muscle hypertrophy and improved blood supply). Cooling generally attenuates these temperature-dependent processes and, in particular, hyperthermia-induced HSP formation. This seems disadvantageous for training, in contrast to the beneficial combination of rest, ice, compression and elevation in the treatment of macroscopic musculo-tendinous damage.

  13. Skeletal muscle alterations and exercise performance decrease in erythropoietin-deficient mice: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin (EPO) is known to improve exercise performance by increasing oxygen blood transport and thus inducing a higher maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max). Furthermore, treatment with (or overexpression of) EPO induces protective effects in several tissues, including the myocardium. However, it is not known whether EPO exerts this protective effect when present at physiological levels. Given that EPO receptors have been identified in skeletal muscle, we hypothesized that EPO may have a direct, protective effect on this tissue. Thus, the objectives of the present study were to confirm a decrease in exercise performance and highlight muscle transcriptome alterations in a murine EPO functional knock-out model (the EPO-d mouse). Methods We determined VO2max peak velocity and critical speed in exhaustive runs in 17 mice (9 EPO-d animals and 8 inbred controls), using treadmill enclosed in a metabolic chamber. Mice were sacrificed 24h after a last exhaustive treadmill exercise at critical speed. The tibialis anterior and soleus muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted for microarray gene expression analysis. Results The EPO-d mice’s hematocrit was about 50% lower than that of controls (p < 0.05) and their performance level was about 25% lower (p < 0.001). A total of 1583 genes exhibited significant changes in their expression levels. However, 68 genes were strongly up-regulated (normalized ratio > 1.4) and 115 were strongly down-regulated (normalized ratio < 0.80). The transcriptome data mining analysis showed that the exercise in the EPO-d mice induced muscle hypoxia, oxidative stress and proteolysis associated with energy pathway disruptions in glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Conclusions Our results showed that the lack of functional EPO induced a decrease in the aerobic exercise capacity. This decrease was correlated with the hematocrit and reflecting poor oxygen supply to the muscles. The observed

  14. Intrinsic muscle strength and voluntary activation of both lower limbs and functional performance after stroke.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Astrid M; Beltman, Marijke J; Gerrits, Karin H; Koppe, Peter; Janssen, Thomas W; Elich, Peter; de Haan, Arnold

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the nature of muscle weakness in both legs after stroke compared with able-bodied control individuals and to examine whether there is a relationship between the degree of muscle weakness and coactivation of knee extensors and flexors as well as voluntary activation capacity of knee extensors of both paretic and non-paretic legs and indices of functional performance. Maximal voluntary isometric torques of knee extensors (MVCe) and flexors (MVCf) were determined in 14 patients (bilaterally) and 12 able-bodied controls. Simultaneous measurements were made of torque and surface EMG from agonist and antagonist muscles. Coactivation was calculated. Supramaximal triplets were evoked with electrical stimulation to estimate maximal torque capacity and degree of voluntary activation of knee extensors. MVCs, activation and coactivation parameters were correlated to scores of seven functional performance tests. MVCe, MVCf and voluntary activation were lower in paretic lower limb (PL) compared with both non-paretic lower limb (NL) and control. Besides, all these parameters of NL were also lower than control. Electrically evoked torque capacity of knee extensors of PL was about 60% of both NL and control, which were not significantly different from each other. Strong significant correlations between strength, as well as voluntary activation, and functional performance were found. Coactivation did not correlate well with functional performance. Thus, whereas for NL activation failure can explain weakness, for PL both activation failure and reduced intrinsic torque capacity are responsible for the severe weakness. Activation capacity and muscle strength correlated strongly to functional performance, while coactivation did not.

  15. Zebrafish: A Model for the Study of Toxicants Affecting Muscle Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Lewicka, Anna; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Niedbalska-Tarnowska, Joanna; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The rapid progress in medicine, agriculture, and allied sciences has enabled the development of a large amount of potentially useful bioactive compounds, such as drugs and pesticides. However, there is another side of this phenomenon, which includes side effects and environmental pollution. To avoid or minimize the uncontrollable consequences of using the newly developed compounds, researchers seek a quick and effective means of their evaluation. In achieving this goal, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has proven to be a highly useful tool, mostly because of its fast growth and development, as well as the ability to absorb the molecules diluted in water through its skin and gills. In this review, we focus on the reports concerning the application of zebrafish as a model for assessing the impact of toxicants on skeletal muscles, which share many structural and functional similarities among vertebrates, including zebrafish and humans. PMID:27869769

  16. Zebrafish: A Model for the Study of Toxicants Affecting Muscle Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Daczewska, Małgorzata; Lewicka, Anna; Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Niedbalska-Tarnowska, Joanna; Jagla, Krzysztof

    2016-11-19

    The rapid progress in medicine, agriculture, and allied sciences has enabled the development of a large amount of potentially useful bioactive compounds, such as drugs and pesticides. However, there is another side of this phenomenon, which includes side effects and environmental pollution. To avoid or minimize the uncontrollable consequences of using the newly developed compounds, researchers seek a quick and effective means of their evaluation. In achieving this goal, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has proven to be a highly useful tool, mostly because of its fast growth and development, as well as the ability to absorb the molecules diluted in water through its skin and gills. In this review, we focus on the reports concerning the application of zebrafish as a model for assessing the impact of toxicants on skeletal muscles, which share many structural and functional similarities among vertebrates, including zebrafish and humans.

  17. Getting the jump on skeletal muscle disuse atrophy: preservation of contractile performance in aestivating Cyclorana alboguttata (Gunther 1867).

    PubMed

    Symonds, Beth L; James, Rob S; Franklin, Craig E

    2007-03-01

    Prolonged immobilisation or unloading of skeletal muscle causes muscle disuse atrophy, which is characterised by a reduction in muscle cross-sectional area and compromised locomotory function. Animals that enter seasonal dormancy, such as hibernators and aestivators, provide an interesting model for investigating atrophy associated with disuse. Previous research on the amphibian aestivator Cyclorana alboguttata (Günther 1867) demonstrated an absence of muscle disuse atrophy after 3 months of aestivation, as measured by gastrocnemius muscle contractile properties and locomotor performance. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of aestivation on iliofibularis and sartorius muscle morphology and contractile function of C. alboguttata over a longer, more ecologically relevant time-frame of 9 months. We found that whole muscle mass, muscle cross-sectional area, fibre number and proportions of fibre types remained unchanged after prolonged disuse. There was a significant reduction in iliofibularis fibre cross-sectional area (declined by 36% for oxidative fibre area and 39% for glycolytic fibre area) and sartorius fibre density (declined by 44%). Prolonged aestivation had little effect on the isometric properties of the skeletal muscle of C. alboguttata. There was a significant reduction in the isometric contraction times of the relatively slow-twitch iliofibularis muscle, suggesting that the muscle was becoming slower after 9 months of aestivation (time to peak twitch increased by 25%, time from peak twitch to half relaxation increased by 34% and time from last stimulus to half tetanus relation increased by 20%). However, the results of the work-loop analysis clearly demonstrate that, despite changes to muscle morphology and isometric kinetics, the overall contractile performance and power output levels of muscles from 9-month aestivating C. alboguttata are maintained at control levels.

  18. Maternal prolactin inhibition during lactation affects physical performance evaluated by acute exhaustive swimming exercise in adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Casimiro-Lopes, G; Lisboa, P C; Koury, J C; Boaventura, G; Passos, M C F; Moura, E G

    2012-02-01

    Maternal prolactin inhibition at the end of lactation programs for metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism in adult offspring, which could negatively affect exercise performance. We evaluated the effects of maternal hypoprolactinemia in late lactation on physical performance in adult progeny. Lactating Wistar rats were treated with bromocriptine (BRO, 1 mg per day) or saline on days 19, 20, and 21 of lactation and offspring were followed until 180 days old. Physical performance was recorded in untrained rats at 90 and 180 days by an acute exhaustive swimming test (exercise group-Ex). At day 90, BRO offspring showed higher visceral fat mass, higher plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lower total antioxidant capacity, higher liver glycogen, lower glycemia, and normal insulinemia. Although thyroid hormones (TH) levels were unchanged, mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) activity was lower in muscle and in brown adipose tissue (BAT). At this age, BRO-Ex offspring showed higher exercise capacity, lower blood lactate, higher serum T3, and higher muscle and BAT mGPD activities. At day 180, BRO offspring showed central obesity, hypothyroidism, insulin resistance, and lower EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle glycogen with unaltered plasma oxidative stress markers. This group showed no alteration of exercise capacity or blood lactate. After exercise, EDL and liver glycogen were lower, while T3 levels, BAT and muscle mGPD activities were normalized. Liver glycogen seem to be related with higher exercise capacity in younger BRO offspring, while the loss of this temporary advantage maybe related to the hypothyroidism and insulin resistance developed with age.

  19. Fast skeletal muscle troponin activator tirasemtiv increases muscle function and performance in the B6SJL-SOD1G93A ALS mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hwee, Darren T; Kennedy, Adam; Ryans, Julie; Russell, Alan J; Jia, Zhiheng; Hinken, Aaron C; Morgans, David J; Malik, Fady I; Jasper, Jeffrey R

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss resulting in muscle atrophy, declining muscle function, and eventual paralysis. Patients typically die from respiratory failure 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms. Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium; this mechanism of action amplifies the response of muscle to neuromuscular input producing greater force when nerve input is reduced. Here, we demonstrate that a single dose of tirasemtiv significantly increases submaximal isometric force, forelimb grip strength, grid hang time, and rotarod performance in a female transgenic mouse model (B6SJL-SOD1 G93A) of ALS with functional deficits. Additionally, diaphragm force and tidal volume are significantly higher in tirasemtiv-treated female B6SJL-SOD1 G93A mice. These results support the potential of fast skeletal troponin activators to improve muscle function in neuromuscular diseases.

  20. Fast Skeletal Muscle Troponin Activator tirasemtiv Increases Muscle Function and Performance in the B6SJL-SOD1G93A ALS Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ryans, Julie; Russell, Alan J.; Jia, Zhiheng; Hinken, Aaron C.; Morgans, David J.; Malik, Fady I.; Jasper, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease characterized by progressive motor neuron loss resulting in muscle atrophy, declining muscle function, and eventual paralysis. Patients typically die from respiratory failure 3 to 5 years from the onset of symptoms. Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium; this mechanism of action amplifies the response of muscle to neuromuscular input producing greater force when nerve input is reduced. Here, we demonstrate that a single dose of tirasemtiv significantly increases submaximal isometric force, forelimb grip strength, grid hang time, and rotarod performance in a female transgenic mouse model (B6SJL-SOD1G93A) of ALS with functional deficits. Additionally, diaphragm force and tidal volume are significantly higher in tirasemtiv-treated female B6SJL-SOD1G93A mice. These results support the potential of fast skeletal troponin activators to improve muscle function in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:24805850

  1. Vertical jumping performance of bonobo (Pan paniscus) suggests superior muscle properties.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Melanie N; D'Août, Kristiaan; Bobbert, Maarten F; Aerts, Peter

    2006-09-07

    Vertical jumping was used to assess muscle mechanical output in bonobos and comparisons were drawn to human jumping. Jump height, defined as the vertical displacement of the body centre of mass during the airborne phase, was determined for three bonobos of varying age and sex. All bonobos reached jump heights above 0.7 m, which greatly exceeds typical human maximal performance (0.3-0.4m). Jumps by one male bonobo (34 kg) and one human male (61.5 kg) were analysed using an inverse dynamics approach. Despite the difference in size, the mechanical output delivered by the bonobo and the human jumper during the push-off was similar: about 450 J, with a peak power output close to 3000 W. In the bonobo, most of the mechanical output was generated at the hips. To account for the mechanical output, the muscles actuating the bonobo's hips (directly and indirectly) must deliver muscle-mass-specific power and work output of 615 Wkg-1 and 92 Jkg-1, respectively. This was twice the output expected on the basis of muscle mass specific work and power in other jumping animals but seems physiologically possible. We suggest that the difference is due to a higher specific force (force per unit of cross-sectional area) in the bonobo.

  2. Relative Importance of Four Muscle Groups for Indoor Rock Climbing Performance.

    PubMed

    Deyhle, Michael R; Hsu, Hung-Sheng; Fairfield, Timothy J; Cadez-Schmidt, Taryn L; Gurney, Burke A; Mermier, Christine M

    2015-07-01

    Little research is available to guide training programs for rock climbers. To help meet this need, we sought to determine the relative importance of 4 muscle groups for rock climbing performance. Eleven male climbers were familiarized with an indoor climbing route before 5 separate days of testing. On testing days, subjects were randomly assigned to climb with no prefatiguing exercise (control climb) or after a prefatiguing exercise designed to specifically target the digit flexors (DF), shoulder adductors (SA), elbow flexors (EF), or lumbar flexors (LF). Immediately after the prefatiguing exercise, the subject climbed the route as far as possible without rest until failure. The number of climbing moves was recorded for each climb. Surface electromyography of the target muscles was recorded during the prefatigue. Fewer climbing moves were completed after prefatigue of the DF (50 ± 18%) and EF (78 ± 22%) (p ≤ 0.05) compared with the control climb. The number of moves completed after prefatigue of the LF and SA were not statistically significant compared with the control climb (p > 0.05). The short time lapse between the end of prefatiguing exercise and the start of climbing (transit time), which may have allowed for some recovery, was not different among trials (p > 0.05). Electromyography median frequency was reduced from beginning to end of each prefatiguing exercise. These results suggest that among the muscle groups studied in men, muscular endurance of DF and EF muscle groups is especially important for rock climbing on 40° overhanging terrain.

  3. Vertical jumping performance of bonobo (Pan paniscus) suggests superior muscle properties

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Melanie N; D'Août, Kristiaan; Bobbert, Maarten F; Aerts, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Vertical jumping was used to assess muscle mechanical output in bonobos and comparisons were drawn to human jumping. Jump height, defined as the vertical displacement of the body centre of mass during the airborne phase, was determined for three bonobos of varying age and sex. All bonobos reached jump heights above 0.7 m, which greatly exceeds typical human maximal performance (0.3–0.4 m). Jumps by one male bonobo (34 kg) and one human male (61.5 kg) were analysed using an inverse dynamics approach. Despite the difference in size, the mechanical output delivered by the bonobo and the human jumper during the push-off was similar: about 450 J, with a peak power output close to 3000 W. In the bonobo, most of the mechanical output was generated at the hips. To account for the mechanical output, the muscles actuating the bonobo's hips (directly and indirectly) must deliver muscle-mass-specific power and work output of 615 W kg−1 and 92 J kg−1, respectively. This was twice the output expected on the basis of muscle mass specific work and power in other jumping animals but seems physiologically possible. We suggest that the difference is due to a higher specific force (force per unit of cross-sectional area) in the bonobo. PMID:16901837

  4. Performance during the Wingate anaerobic test and muscle morphology in males and females.

    PubMed

    Froese, E A; Houston, M E

    1987-02-01

    Performance indices during the Wingate 30-s anaerobic test and their relationship to muscle morphology of the vastus lateralis muscle were studied in 30 untrained male and female subjects. Absolute values for peak power (P05), total work performed (TW), power decrease (PD), and post-test blood lactate concentration were significantly greater for the male subjects. When expressed per unit of body mass or leg volume, both P05 and TW were larger for the males than the females (P less than 0.05). Significant correlations were noted for P05, TW, PD, and blood lactate and the percent of fast-twitch (FT) fibers and the percent relative area of FT fibers for the male but not the female subjects. The results from this experiment reveal a significant influence of muscle morphology on short-term anaerobic work performance for these male subjects. The absence of a similar relationship for the women subjects was likely due to the use of an inappropriately high resistance setting.

  5. Kinesiology tape does not facilitate muscle performance: A deceptive controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Poon, K Y; Li, S M; Roper, M G; Wong, M K M; Wong, O; Cheung, R T H

    2015-02-01

    Kinesiology tape (KinTape) is a therapeutic tape without much understanding of its mechanism. KinTape claims to increase cutaneous stimulation, which facilitates motor unit firing, and consequently improves functional performance; however these, benefits could be due to placebo effects. This study investigated the true effects of KinTape by a deceptive, randomized, and controlled trial. Thirty healthy participants performed isokinetic testing of three taping conditions: true facilitative KinTape, sham KinTape, and no KinTape. The participants were blindfolded during the evaluation. Under the pretense of applying adhesive muscle sensors, KinTape was applied to their quadriceps in the first two conditions. Normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque were measured at two angular speeds (60°/s and 180°/s) and analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Participants were successfully deceived and they were ignorant about KinTape. No significant differences were found between normalized peak torque, normalized total work, and time to peak torque at 60°/s or 180°/s (p = 0.31-0.99) between three taping conditions. The results showed that KinTape did not facilitate muscle performance in generating higher peak torque, yielding a greater total work, or inducing an earlier onset of peak torque. These findings suggest that previously reported muscle facilitatory effects using KinTape may be attributed to placebo effects.

  6. Different Levels of Eccentric Resistance during Eight Weeks of Training Affect Muscle Strength and Lean Tissue Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, K. L.; Loehr, J. A.; Lee, S. M. C.; Laughlin, M. S.; Hagan, R. D.

    2008-01-01

    .3%) groups. All groups significantly increased HR strength pre- to posttraining (33%: 7.5 +/- 6.1%; 66%: 6.6 +/- 3.7%; 100%: 12.2 +/- 1.8%; 138%: 11.0 +/- 6.4%) except for the 0% (4.9 +/- 9.1%) group. There were no differences between groups. LLM increased significantly pre- to post-training in only the 138% group; there were no differences between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Eight wks of lower body resistive exercise training with eccentric overload resulted in greater increases in LP strength than training with eccentric loads of 66% or less. Post-training HR strength was not affected by eccentric training load, perhaps because of the predominance of Type I fibers typical in the gastrocnemius. Only 138% eccentric training significantly increased LLM. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: For athletes or others desiring to maximize muscle strength and hypertrophy gains, training with eccentric loads greater than 100% of concentric resistance will provide greater increases in muscle strength and lean tissue mass in some muscle groups. In a rehabilitation or geriatric exercise setting that places primary emphasis on program adherence and moderate strength gains, training with an eccentric underload may provide strength increases comparable to those of traditional 1:1 training but with less muscle soreness and physiologic insult to the patient, but this has yet to be proven.

  7. How Does Test Exemption Affect Schools' and Students' Academic Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer L.; Beveridge, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing data from a large urban district in Texas, this study examines how high-stakes test exemptions alter officially reported scores and asks whether test exemption has implications for the academic achievement of special education students. Test exemption inflated overall passing rates but especially affected the passing rates of African…

  8. Selected Factors Affecting the Performance Assessment of Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Scott

    1990-01-01

    This study determined whether nontraditional assessment factors (principal's gender, choice of subject matter for demonstrating competence, or years of teacher experience) would affect elementary teachers' scores when completing the Leon County (Florida) Teacher Assessment Process. Principal's gender and subject selected were significant…

  9. An Analysis of Team Composition as It Affects Simulation Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnakumar, Parameswar; Chisholm, Thomas Alexander

    This study investigated the extent to which sex composition and average team academic achievement of student simulation teams affect team effectiveness. Seventy-four students in two sections of a marketing principles class were divided into 20 teams to test their decision-making skills. For 10 weeks, each team operated a simulated supermarket…

  10. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  11. Procedure of rectal temperature measurement affects brain, muscle, skin, and body temperatures and modulates the effects of intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Bae, David D; Brown, P Leon; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2007-06-18

    Rectal probe thermometry is commonly used to measure body core temperature in rodents because of its ease of use. Although previous studies suggest that rectal measurement is stressful and results in long-lasting elevations in body temperatures, we evaluated how this procedure affects brain, muscle, skin, and core temperatures measured with chronically implanted thermocouple electrodes in rats. Our data suggest that the procedure of rectal measurement results in powerful locomotor activation, rapid and strong increases in brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures, as well as a biphasic, down-up fluctuation in skin temperature, matching the response pattern observed during tail-pinch, a representative stressful procedure. This response, moreover, did not habituate after repeated day-to-day testing. Repeated rectal probe insertions also modified temperature responses induced by intravenous cocaine. Under quiet resting conditions, cocaine moderately increased brain, muscle, and deep body temperatures. However, during repeated rectal measurements, which increased temperatures, cocaine induced both hyperthermic and hypothermic responses. Direct comparisons revealed that body temperatures measured by a rectal probe are typically lower (approximately 0.6 degrees C) and more variable than body temperatures recorded by chronically implanted electrodes; the difference is smaller at low and greater at high basal temperatures. Because of this difference and temperature increases induced by the rectal probe per se, cocaine had no significant effect on rectal temperatures compared to control animals exposed to repeated rectal probes. Therefore, although rectal temperature measurements provide a decent correlation with directly measured deep body temperatures, the arousing influence of this procedure may drastically modulate the effects of other arousing stimuli and drugs.

  12. Certain Organizational Characteristics Affect ACO Preventive Care Quality Performance.

    PubMed

    Ticse, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Key findings. (1) ACOs at provider workforce extremes--few primary care providers or many specialists--performed worse on measures of preventive care quality relative to those with more PCPs and fewer specialists. (2) Upfront investment in ACO formation is associated with higher performance in preventive care quality. (3) ACOs with a higher proportion of minority beneficiaries performed worse on disease prevention measures than did ACOs with a lower proportion of minority beneficiaries. (4) ACOs facing barriers to quality performance may benefit from organizational characteristics such as electronic health record capabilities and hospital inclusion in the ACO.

  13. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on potassium kinetics and performance in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Jung; Mohr, Magni; Klarskov, Christina; Kristensen, Michael; Krustrup, Peter; Juel, Carsten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2004-02-01

    A rise in extracellular potassium concentration in human skeletal muscle may play an important role in development of fatigue during intense exercise. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training on muscle interstitial potassium kinetics and its relationship to the density of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase subunits and K(ATP) channels, as well as exercise performance, in human skeletal muscle. Six male subjects performed intense one-legged knee-extensor training for 7 weeks. On separate days the trained leg (TL) and the control leg (CL) performed a 30 min exercise period of 30 W and an incremental test to exhaustion. At frequent intervals during the exercise periods interstitial potassium ([K(+)](I)) was determined by microdialysis, femoral arterial and venous blood samples were drawn and thigh blood flow was measured. Time to fatigue for TL was 28% longer (P < 0.05) than for CL (10.6 +/- 0.7 (mean +/-s.e.m.) versus 8.2 +/- 0.7 min). The amounts of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha(1) and alpha(2) subunits were, respectively, 29.0 +/- 8.4 and 15.1 +/- 2.7% higher (P < 0.05) in TL than in CL, while the amounts of beta(1) subunits and ATP-dependent K(+) (K(ATP)) channels were the same. In CL [K(+)](I) increased more rapidly and was higher (P < 0.05) throughout the 30 W exercise bout, as well at 60 and 70 W, compared to TL, whereas [K(+)](I) was similar at the point of fatigue (9.9 +/- 0.7 and 9.1 +/- 0.5 mmol l(-1), respectively). During the 30 W exercise bouts and at 70 W during the incremental exercise femoral venous potassium concentration ([K(+)](v)) was higher (P < 0.05) in CL than in TL, but identical at exhaustion (6.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1)). Release of potassium to the blood was not different in the two legs. The present data demonstrated that intense intermittent training reduce accumulation of potassium in human skeletal muscle interstitium during exercise, probably through a larger re-uptake of potassium due to greater activity of the

  14. Muscle physiology changes induced by every other day feeding and endurance exercise in mice: effects on physical performance.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Bies, Elizabeth; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Fontán-Lozano, Angela; Peña Amaro, José; Berral de la Rosa, Francisco J; Carrión, Angel M; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2010-11-09

    Every other day feeding (EOD) and exercise induce changes in cell metabolism. The aim of the present work was to know if both EOD and exercise produce similar effects on physical capacity, studying their physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects on muscle. Male OF-1 mice were fed either ad libitum (AL) or under EOD. After 18 weeks under EOD, animals were also trained by using a treadmill for another 6 weeks and then analyzed for physical activity. Both, EOD and endurance exercise increased the resistance of animals to extenuating activity and improved motor coordination. Among the groups that showed the highest performance, AL and EOD trained animals, ALT and EODT respectively, only the EODT group was able to increase glucose and triglycerides levels in plasma after extenuating exercise. No high effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities or protein levels neither on coenzyme Q levels were found in gastrocnemius muscle. However, exercise and EOD did increase β-oxidation activity in this muscle accompanied by increased CD36 levels in animals fed under EOD and by changes in shape and localization of mitochondria in muscle fibers. Furthermore, EOD and training decreased muscle damage after strenuous exercise. EOD also reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in muscle. Our results indicate that EOD improves muscle performance and resistance by increasing lipid catabolism in muscle mitochondria at the same time that prevents lipid peroxidation and muscle damage.

  15. Muscle Physiology Changes Induced by Every Other Day Feeding and Endurance Exercise in Mice: Effects on Physical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Bies, Elizabeth; Santa-Cruz Calvo, Sara; Fontán-Lozano, Ángela; Peña Amaro, José; Berral de la Rosa, Francisco J.; Carrión, Ángel M.; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Every other day feeding (EOD) and exercise induce changes in cell metabolism. The aim of the present work was to know if both EOD and exercise produce similar effects on physical capacity, studying their physiological, biochemical and metabolic effects on muscle. Male OF-1 mice were fed either ad libitum (AL) or under EOD. After 18 weeks under EOD, animals were also trained by using a treadmill for another 6 weeks and then analyzed for physical activity. Both, EOD and endurance exercise increased the resistance of animals to extenuating activity and improved motor coordination. Among the groups that showed the highest performance, AL and EOD trained animals, ALT and EODT respectively, only the EODT group was able to increase glucose and triglycerides levels in plasma after extenuating exercise. No high effects on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities or protein levels neither on coenzyme Q levels were found in gastrocnemius muscle. However, exercise and EOD did increase β-oxidation activity in this muscle accompanied by increased CD36 levels in animals fed under EOD and by changes in shape and localization of mitochondria in muscle fibers. Furthermore, EOD and training decreased muscle damage after strenuous exercise. EOD also reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation in muscle. Our results indicate that EOD improves muscle performance and resistance by increasing lipid catabolism in muscle mitochondria at the same time that prevents lipid peroxidation and muscle damage. PMID:21085477

  16. Membrane stretch affects gating modes of a skeletal muscle sodium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, I V; Juranka, P; Morris, C E

    1999-01-01

    The alpha subunit of the human skeletal muscle Na(+) channel recorded from cell-attached patches yielded, as expected for Xenopus oocytes, two current components that were stable for tens of minutes during 0.2 Hz stimulation. Within seconds of applying sustained stretch, however, the slower component began decreasing and, depending on stretch intensity, disappeared in 1-3 min. Simultaneously, the faster current increased. The resulting fast current kinetics and voltage sensitivity were indistinguishable from the fast components 1) left after 10 Hz depolarizations, and 2) that dominated when alpha subunit was co-expressed with human beta1 subunit. Although high frequency depolarization-induced loss of slow current was reversible, the stretch-induced slow-to-fast conversion was irreversible. The conclusion that stretch converted a single population of alpha subunits from an abnormal slow to a bona fide fast gating mode was confirmed by using gigaohm seals formed without suction, in which fast gating was originally absent. For brain Na(+) channels, co-expressing G proteins with the channel alpha subunit yields slow gating. Because both stretch and beta1 subunits induced the fast gating mode, perhaps they do so by minimizing alpha subunit interactions with G proteins or with other regulatory molecules available in oocyte membrane. Because of the possible involvement of oocyte molecules, it remains to be determined whether the Na(+) channel alpha subunit was directly or secondarily susceptible to bilayer tension. PMID:10423424

  17. Age-Related Changes in Dynamic Postural Control and Attentional Demands are Minimally Affected by Local Muscle Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Remaud, Anthony; Thuong-Cong, Cécile; Bilodeau, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n = 15; healthy seniors: n = 13) performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior (AP) and the medio-lateral (ML) axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time (RT) task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP). This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantar flexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. RTs were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, RT increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks. PMID:26834626

  18. Age-Related Changes in Dynamic Postural Control and Attentional Demands are Minimally Affected by Local Muscle Fatigue.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Anthony; Thuong-Cong, Cécile; Bilodeau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Normal aging results in alterations in the visual, vestibular and somtaosensory systems, which in turn modify the control of balance. Muscle fatigue may exacerbate these age-related changes in sensory and motor functions, and also increase the attentional demands associated with dynamic postural control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aging on dynamic postural control and posture-related attentional demands before and after a plantar flexor fatigue protocol. Participants (young adults: n = 15; healthy seniors: n = 13) performed a dynamic postural task along the antero-posterior (AP) and the medio-lateral (ML) axes, with and without the addition of a simple reaction time (RT) task. The dynamic postural task consisted in following a moving circle on a computer screen with the representation of the center of pressure (COP). This protocol was repeated before and after a fatigue task where ankle plantar flexor muscles were targeted. The mean COP-target distance and the mean COP velocity were calculated for each trial. Cross-correlation analyses between the COP and target displacements were also performed. RTs were recorded during dual-task trials. Results showed that while young adults adopted an anticipatory control mode to move their COP as close as possible to the target center, seniors adopted a reactive control mode, lagging behind the target center. This resulted in longer COP-target distance and higher COP velocity in the latter group. Concurrently, RT increased more in seniors when switching from static stance to dynamic postural conditions, suggesting potential alterations in the central nervous system (CNS) functions. Finally, plantar flexor muscle fatigue and dual-tasking had only minor effects on dynamic postural control of both young adults and seniors. Future studies should investigate why the fatigue-induced changes in quiet standing postural control do not seem to transfer to dynamic balance tasks.

  19. Learners' Metalinguistic and Affective Performance in Blogging to Write

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ping-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The documentation of the benefits of blog use in foreign language education has proliferated since 2006. In the field of blogging to write, most studies focus on learners' linguistic performance and perceptions. To provide an analysis of learners' writing performance by using blogs, in addition to the often-researched areas, this study examines…

  20. Young Children's Knowledge About Effects of Affect on Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the issue of whether preschoolers are aware of the connection between their emotions, their performance on a task of eye-hand coordination, and their evaluation of the task and their performance. Results indicate a developmental trend that children's predictions conform more to mood congruity theory as they grow older. (Author/DST)

  1. Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 expression and genetic polymorphism significantly affect intramuscular fat deposition in the longissimus muscle of Erhualian and Sutai pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Yang, X J; Xia, D; Chen, J; Wegner, J; Jiang, Z; Zhao, R Q

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments were performed to elucidate the role of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1) in i.m. fat (IMF) deposition in pigs. In Exp. 1, LM samples were removed from 4 male and 4 female Erhualian piglets at 3, 20, and 45 d of age, and SREBF1 mRNA expression level and IMF content were measured. Intramuscular fat content and expression of SREBF1 mRNA was greater (P < 0.05) in females than males at all 3 stages of age, providing initial evidence that the level of SREBF1 mRNA expression is related to IMF deposition in muscle of suckling pigs. Additionally, in Exp. 2 there was a positive correlation between the SREBF1 mRNA level and IMF content (r = 0.67, P < 0.01) in 100 Sutai finishing pigs, a synthetic line produced by crossing Erhualian and Duroc pigs. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the reverse transcription PCR products of the SREBF1 gene revealed 3 genotypes in Sutai pigs with frequencies of 50% for AA, 36% for AB, and 14% for BB, respectively. Both SREBF1 mRNA level and IMF content in muscle were greater (P < 0.05) in AB and BB animals than in AA animals, whereas no difference in backfat thickness was observed among the 3 genotypes. Sequencing analysis identified 2 SNP at T1006C and C1033T within the open reading frame of the SREBF1 gene (NM_214157). Although both are silent mutations, they affected the secondary structure of SREBF1 mRNA. These results suggest that SREBF1 might play an important role in regulation of muscle fat deposition during postnatal growth of pigs. The SNP identified in the SREBF1 gene suggest that it could be used as a genetic marker to improve IMF content in pigs.

  2. Silver nanoparticles administered to chicken affect VEGFA and FGF2 gene expression in breast muscle and heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotowy, Anna; Sawosz, Ewa; Pineda, Lane; Sawosz, Filip; Grodzik, Marta; Chwalibog, André

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of colloidal silver (AgNano) can influence gene expression. Concerning trials of AgNano application in poultry nutrition, it is useful to reveal whether they affect the expression of genes crucial for bird development. AgNano were administered to broiler chickens as a water solution in two concentrations (10 and 20 ppm). After dissection of the birds, breast muscles and hearts were collected. Gene expression of FGF2 and VEGFA on the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The results for gene expression in the breast muscle revealed changes on the mRNA level ( FGF2 was up-regulated, P < 0.05) but not on the protein level. In the heart, 20 ppm of silver nanoparticles in drinking water increased the expression of VEGFA ( P < 0.05), at the same time decreasing FGF2 expression both on the transcriptional and translational levels. Changes in the expression of these genes may lead to histological changes, but this needs to be proven using histological and immunohistochemical examination of tissues. In general, we showed that AgNano application in poultry feeding influences the expression of FGF2 and VEGFA genes on the mRNA and protein levels in growing chicken.

  3. Evaluation of upper body muscle activity during cardiopulmonary resuscitation performance in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waye, A. B.; Krygiel, R. G.; Susin, T. B.; Baptista, R.; Rehnberg, L.; Heidner, G. S.; de Campos, F.; Falcão, F. P.; Russomano, T.

    2013-09-01

    Performance of efficient single-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is vital to maintain cardiac and cerebral perfusion during the 2-4 min it takes for deployment of advanced life support during a space mission. The aim of the present study was to investigate potential differences in upper body muscle activity during CPR performance at terrestrial gravity (+1Gz) and in simulated microgravity (μG). Muscle activity of the triceps brachii, erector spinae, rectus abdominis and pectoralis major was measured via superficial electromyography in 20 healthy male volunteers. Four sets of 30 external chest compressions (ECCs) were performed on a mannequin. Microgravity was simulated using a body suspension device and harness; the Evetts-Russomano (ER) method was adopted for CPR performance in simulated microgravity. Heart rate and perceived exertion via Borg scores were also measured. While a significantly lower depth of ECCs was observed in simulated microgravity, compared with +1Gz, it was still within the target range of 40-50 mm. There was a 7.7% decrease of the mean (±SEM) ECC depth from 48 ± 0.3 mm at +1Gz, to 44.3 ± 0.5 mm during microgravity simulation (p < 0.001). No significant difference in number or rate of compressions was found between the two conditions. Heart rate displayed a significantly larger increase during CPR in simulated microgravity than at +1Gz, the former presenting a mean (±SEM) of 23.6 ± 2.91 bpm and the latter, 76.6 ± 3.8 bpm (p < 0.001). Borg scores were 70% higher post-microgravity compressions (17 ± 1) than post +1Gz compressions (10 ± 1) (p < 0.001). Intermuscular comparisons showed the triceps brachii to have significantly lower muscle activity than each of the other three tested muscles, in both +1Gz and microgravity. As shown by greater Borg scores and heart rate increases, CPR performance in simulated microgravity is more fatiguing than at +1Gz. Nevertheless, no significant difference in muscle activity between conditions

  4. Muscle characteristics and plasma lactate and ammonia response after racing in Standardbred trotters: relation to performance.

    PubMed

    Ronéus, N; Essén-Gustavsson, B; Lindholm, A; Persson, S

    1999-03-01

    Blood samples from the jugular vein and muscle biopsies (gluteus medius) in 25 Standardbred trotters were obtained 5-10 min after racing. The biopsies were analysed for fibre type composition and enzymatic profile and blood samples for plasma lactate and ammonia concentrations. Muscle characteristics, plasma lactate and ammonia concentrations after racing were compared with each horse's individual performance index (IPI). The IPI is calculated annually from the individual horse's racing performance (% placing 1, 2 or 3, total annual earnings, average earning per start, and best racing record), respectively, converted to and expressed as a percentage deviation from the average record of the same sex and age group. The IPI values were 100-116. Plasma lactate concentrations were 15.0-42.7 mmol/l (mean 31.3 mmol/l) and ammonia concentrations 65-210 micromol/l (mean 141 micromol/l) after racing. Fibre type composition varied among horses (range 9-27% for Type I, 32-54% for Type IIA, and 27-46% for Type IIB). Fibre type composition, enzyme activities, plasma lactate and ammonia responses to racing were not correlated to IPI. Ten of the horses also performed a submaximal test on the track, consisting of 5 incremental 1000 m heats at approximate speeds of 9.1, 9.5, 10.0, 10.5, and 11.1 m/s. Immediately after each heat a blood sample was drawn from the jugular vein for plasma lactate analysis. Plasma lactate response to exercise differed between horses, but no correlation was seen with IPI. Muscle characteristics, plasma lactate and ammonia concentrations after racing and lactate response to a submaximal track test did not correlate with current race performance expressed as IPI in a group of horses with average or better performance capacity at the time of testing. Analysis of lactate and ammonia in blood after racing is not a valuable tool to predict an individual performance index.

  5. Ischemic preconditioning of the muscle improves maximal exercise performance but not maximal oxygen uptake in humans.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Tangianu, Flavio; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Mameli, Ombretta; Mulliri, Gabriele; Caria, Marcello A

    2011-08-01

    Brief episodes of nonlethal ischemia, commonly known as "ischemic preconditioning" (IP), are protective against cell injury induced by infarction. Moreover, muscle IP has been found capable of improving exercise performance. The aim of the study was the comparison of standard exercise performances carried out in normal conditions with those carried out following IP, achieved by brief muscle ischemia at rest (RIP) and after exercise (EIP). Seventeen physically active, healthy male subjects performed three incremental, randomly assigned maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer up to exhaustion. One was the reference (REF) test, whereas the others were performed after the RIP and EIP sessions. Total exercise time (TET), total work (TW), and maximal power output (W(max)), oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), and pulmonary ventilation (VE(max)) were assessed. Furthermore, impedance cardiography was used to measure maximal heart rate (HR(max)), stroke volume (SV(max)), and cardiac output (CO(max)). A subgroup of volunteers (n = 10) performed all-out tests to assess their anaerobic capacity. We found that both RIP and EIP protocols increased in a similar fashion TET, TW, W(max), VE(max), and HR(max) with respect to the REF test. In particular, W(max) increased by ∼ 4% in both preconditioning procedures. However, preconditioning sessions failed to increase traditionally measured variables such as VO(2max), SV(max,) CO(max), and anaerobic capacity(.) It was concluded that muscle IP improves performance without any difference between RIP and EIP procedures. The mechanism of this effect could be related to changes in fatigue perception.

  6. The effect of strength training, recreational soccer and running exercise on stretch-shortening cycle muscle performance during countermovement jumping.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Kjær, Michael; Andersen, Lars L; Krustrup, Peter; Aagaard, Per

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of contrasting training modalities on mechanical muscle performance and neuromuscular activity during maximal SSC (stretch-shortening cycle) countermovement jumps (CMJ). Bilateral countermovement jumping, surface electromyography (EMG) and muscle fiber size (CSA) were studied in untrained individuals (n=49, 21-45 yrs) pre and post 12 weeks of progressive heavy-resistance strength training (ST, n=8), recreational soccer training (SOC, n=15), high-intensity interval running (INT, n=7), continuous running (RUN, n=9) or continuation of an inactive life-style (CON, n=10). ST displayed shortened CMJ take-off time (p<.05) and increased (p<.05) maximal CMJ jump height, peak down- and upward velocity of center of mass (COM), rate of vertical force development (RFD: ΔF(Z)/Δt), peak power production, rate of power development (RPD), mean plantar flexor EMG and peak hamstring rate of EMG rise (RER). Peak quadriceps EMG rate of rise increased in SOC (p<.05). Moreover, ST and SOC demonstrated increased quadriceps muscle fiber CSA and lean leg mass. Positive relationships (r>.70) were observed following ST between training-induced changes in CMJ SSC muscle performance, neuromuscular activity and muscle fiber CSA, respectively. ST induced a more rapid CMJ take-off phase and elevated muscle power production, indicating a more explosive-type SSC muscle performance. No effects were detected in CMJ performance after continuous running, high-intensity interval running and recreational soccer, despite an increased muscle fiber CSA and quadriceps muscle activity in SOC. Enhanced neuromuscular activity in the hip extensors (hamstrings) and plantar flexors, and increased myofiber fiber size were responsible for the enhanced CMJ SSC muscle performance with ST.

  7. Factors affecting intrauterine contraceptive device performance. I. Endometrial cavity length.

    PubMed

    Hasson, H M; Berger, G S; Edelman, D A

    1976-12-15

    The relationship of endometrial cavity length to intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) performance was evaluated in 319 patients wearing three types of devices. The rate of events, defined as pregnancy, expulsion, or medical removal, increased significantly when the length of the IUD was equal to, exceeded, or was shorter by two or more centimeters than the length of the endometrial cavity. Total uterine length was found to be a less accurate prognostic indicator of IUD performance than endometrial cavity length alone.

  8. Effect of aestivation on muscle characteristics and locomotor performance in the green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata.

    PubMed

    Hudson, N J; Franklin, C E

    2002-02-01

    The Green-striped burrowing frog, Cyclorana alboguttata survives extended drought periods by burrowing underground and aestivating. These frogs remain immobile within cocoons of shed skin and mucus during aestivation and emerge from their burrows upon heavy rains to feed and reproduce. Extended periods of immobilisation in mammals typically result in muscle atrophy and a decrease in muscle performance. We examined the effect of aestivation and hence prolonged immobilisation, on skeletal muscle mass, in vitro muscle performance, and locomotor performance in C. alboguttata. Frogs were aestivated in soil for 3 months and were compared with control animals that remained active, were fed, and had a continual supply of water. Compared to the controls, the wet mass of the gastrocnemius, sartorius, gracilus major, semimembranosus, peroneus, extensor cruris, tibialis posticus and tibialis anticus longus of aestivators remained unchanged indicating no muscle atrophy. The in-vitro performance characteristics of the gastrocnemius muscle were maintained and burst swimming speed was unaffected, requiring no recovery from the extended period of immobilisation associated with aestivation. This preservation of muscle size, contractile condition and locomotor performance through aestivation enables C. alboguttata to compress their life history into unpredictable windows of opportunity, whenever heavy rains occur.

  9. Effect of supplementation on the performance of grazing Belgian Blue double-muscled heifers.

    PubMed

    Fiems, L O; De Boever, J L; Vanacker, J M

    2013-11-01

    Six experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of a feed supplement on the performance of grazing Belgian Blue double-muscled (BBDM) heifers with an initial weight and age of 195 ± 43 kg and 190 ± 52 days. Treatments included were: Exp. 1: supplementation with beet pulp (BP): 2 kg/day per head v. ad libitum intake; Exp. 2: supplementation ad libitum with BP v. a mixture of BP and soybean meal (SBM; BP/SBM ratio of 80/20; FW (fresh weight) basis); Exp. 3: supplementation with 4 kg/day per head of a mixture of BP/SBM (80/20; FW basis) v. BP/formaldehyde-treated SBM (BP/FSBM); Exp. 4: supplementation with 4 kg/day per head of a mixture with a similar protein content (125 g DVE per kg dry matter (DM)), consisting of 80/20 BP/SBM v. 92/8 BP/FSBM; Exp. 5: supplementation with 3 kg/day per head of a mixture of BP/SBM (80/20; FW basis) v. BP/DDGS (dried distillers grains and solubles; 70/30, FW basis); and Exp. 6: supplementation with 3 kg/day per head of 80/20 BP/SBM v. maize silage (MS) and SBM, on the basis of a similar protein concentration in the DM as the 80/20 BP/SBM supplement, and fed at a similar amount of DM as in the BP/SBM group. Supplementing BP ad libitum did not affect daily gain (0.54 v. 0.48 kg) and partial feed conversion (3.62 kg on average) compared with 2 kg/day. Supplying SBM besides BP increased growth rate compared with BP (0.87 v. 0.62 kg/day; P < 0.001), but partial feed conversion was similar. Supplying FSBM did not affect growth rate and partial feed conversion (P > 0.10), but blood urea levels were reduced by FSBM (P < 0.05). DDGS tended to increase growth rate (0.77 v. 0.59 kg/day; P < 0.10) compared with BP/SBM, without effect on partial feed conversion. Replacing BP by MS did not affect daily gain, but partial feed conversion tended to be higher (3.21 v. 3.60 kg/kg body weight (BW) gain; P = 0.062). Increasing the supplement (80/20 BP/SBM) level from 3 to 4 kg daily, corresponding to 1.02% and 1.18% of the mean BW, respectively

  10. Influence of Lower Extremity Muscle Size and Quality on Stair-Climb Performance in Career Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Kleinberg, Craig R; Ryan, Eric D; Tweedell, Andrew J; Barnette, Timothy J; Wagoner, Chad W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of lower extremity muscular size and quality on stair-climb performance (SCP) in career firefighters. Forty-six male career firefighters (age = 37.0 ± 7.2 years; stature = 180.2 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 108.0 ± 19.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Panoramic ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were obtained to determine cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (EI) of each muscle. The CSA of each muscle was then summed together and normalized to body mass (CSA/BM [QCSA]). Additionally, EI was averaged across both muscles (QEI). Participants then performed a timed and weighted SCP assessment where they ascended and descended 26 stairs 4 times as quickly as possible while wearing a weighted vest (22.73 kg) to simulate the weight of their self-contained breathing apparatus and turnout gear. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among variables and the relative contributions of QCSA and QEI to SCP. Partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between QCSA and SCP and QEI and SCP while controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). The results indicated that QCSA and QEI were significantly related to SCP before (r = -0.492, p = 0.001; r = 0.363, p = 0.013, respectively) and after accounting for age and BMI (r = -0.324, p = 0.032; r = 0.413, p = 0.005, respectively). Both QCSA and QEI contributed significantly to the prediction of SCP (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that lower extremity muscle size and quality are important contributors to critical firefighting tasks, which have been shown to be improved with resistance training.

  11. Respiratory muscle endurance training: effect on normoxic and hypoxic exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Keramidas, Michail E; Debevec, Tadej; Amon, Mojca; Kounalakis, Stylianos N; Simunic, Bostjan; Mekjavic, Igor B

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of respiratory muscle endurance training on endurance exercise performance in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Eighteen healthy males were stratified for age and aerobic capacity; and randomly assigned either to the respiratory muscle endurance training (RMT = 9) or to the control training group (CON = 9). Both groups trained on a cycle-ergometer 1 h day(-1), 5 days per week for a period of 4 weeks at an intensity corresponding to 50% of peak power output. Additionally, the RMT group performed a 30-min specific endurance training of respiratory muscles (isocapnic hyperpnea) prior to the cycle ergometry. Pre, Mid, Post and 10 days after the end of training period, subjects conducted pulmonary function tests (PFTs), maximal aerobic tests in normoxia (VO(2max)NOR), and in hypoxia (VO(2max)HYPO; F(I)O(2) = 0.12); and constant-load tests at 80% of VO(2max)NOR in normoxia (CLT(NOR)), and in hypoxia (CLTHYPO). Both groups enhanced VO(2max)NOR (CON: +13.5%; RMT: +13.4%), but only the RMT group improved VO(2max)HYPO Post training (CON: -6.5%; RMT: +14.2%). Post training, the CON group increased peak power output, whereas the RMT group had higher values of maximum ventilation. Both groups increased CLT(NOR) duration (CON: +79.9%; RMT: +116.6%), but only the RMT group maintained a significantly higher CLT(NOR) 10 days after training (CON: +56.7%; RMT: +91.3%). CLT(HYPO) remained unchanged in both groups. Therefore, the respiratory muscle endurance training combined with cycle ergometer training enhanced aerobic capacity in hypoxia above the control values, but did not in normoxia. Moreover, no additional effect was obtained during constant-load exercise.

  12. Effect of exercise performance by elderly women on balance ability and muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo-Cheol; Lee, Mi Lim; Kim, Seon-Rye

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an exercise intervention on the balance ability and muscle function of elderly women. [Subjects] The subjects were randomly divided into a control group (n=10) and an exercise group (n=10). [Methods] The subjects participated in an elastic band exercise program lasting for 8 weeks, exercising for 40 minutes, four days a week with resting terms of 60 sec. Subjects used a band corresponding to 60% of the strength of the color band with which repetitive exercise was possible up to twelve times. The subjects performed elastic band exercises, with variations to the number of band exercises according to the improvement of their physical fitness levels. When fifteen repetitive elastic band exercises could be performed with no damage of the body, we changed the band for one which was one level up from the former one and subjects used the same band for the upper body and lower body. [Results] Leg muscular strength measured as sit-stand repetitions in 30 s significantly increased in the exercise group after the intervention compared to before the intervention. Leg muscular endurance measured as the number of knee ups in 2 minutes significantly increased in the exercise group after the intervention compared to before the intervention. Balance measured by one-leg standing time with the eyes open significantly improved in the exercise group after the intervention compared to before the intervention. [Conclusion] Balance ability and muscle function significantly improved in the exercise group and showing that the intervention is effective at improving balance, muscle strength, and muscle endurance of elderly women. PMID:25995539

  13. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Heros Ribeiro; Ferreira, Pamela Gill; Loures, João Paulo; Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio; Buck, Hudson Sousa; Montor, Wagner Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years' experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance.

  14. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes Filho, José; Fernandes, Luiz Cláudio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test), and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years’ experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m). The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05) after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76), while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46) with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance. PMID:27111088

  15. Aversive Pavlovian Responses Affect Human Instrumental Motor Performance

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Francesco; Pavone, Enea Francesco; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In neuroscience and psychology, an influential perspective distinguishes between two kinds of behavioral control: instrumental (habitual and goal-directed) and Pavlovian. Understanding the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction is fundamental for the comprehension of decision-making. Animal studies (as those using the negative auto-maintenance paradigm), have demonstrated that Pavlovian mechanisms can have maladaptive effects on instrumental performance. However, evidence for a similar effect in humans is scarce. In addition, the mechanisms modulating the impact of Pavlovian responses on instrumental performance are largely unknown, both in human and non-human animals. The present paper describes a behavioral experiment investigating the effects of Pavlovian conditioned responses on performance in humans, focusing on the aversive domain. Results showed that Pavlovian responses influenced human performance, and, similar to animal studies, could have maladaptive effects. In particular, Pavlovian responses either impaired or increased performance depending on modulator variables such as threat distance, task controllability, punishment history, amount of training, and explicit punishment expectancy. Overall, these findings help elucidating the computational mechanisms underlying the instrumental-Pavlovian interaction, which might be at the base of apparently irrational phenomena in economics, social behavior, and psychopathology. PMID:23060738

  16. Exogenous lactate supply affects lactate kinetics of rainbow trout, not swimming performance

    PubMed Central

    Omlin, Teye; Langevin, Karolanne

    2014-01-01

    Intense swimming causes circulatory lactate accumulation in rainbow trout because lactate disposal (Rd) is not stimulated as strongly as lactate appearance (Ra). This mismatch suggests that maximal Rd is limited by tissue capacity to metabolize lactate. This study uses exogenous lactate to investigate what constrains maximal Rd and minimal Ra. Our goals were to determine how exogenous lactate affects: 1) Ra and Rd of lactate under baseline conditions or during graded swimming, and 2) exercise performance (critical swimming speed, Ucrit) and energetics (cost of transport, COT). Results show that exogenous lactate allows swimming trout to boost maximal Rd lactate by 40% and reach impressive rates of 56 μmol·kg−1·min−1. This shows that the metabolic capacity of tissues for lactate disposal is not responsible for setting the highest Rd normally observed after intense swimming. Baseline endogenous Ra (resting in normoxic water) is not significantly reduced by exogenous lactate supply. Therefore, trout have an obligatory need to produce lactate, either as a fuel for oxidative tissues and/or from organs relying on glycolysis. Exogenous lactate does not affect Ucrit or COT, probably because it acts as a substitute for glucose and lipids rather than extra fuel. We conclude that the observed 40% increase in Rd lactate is made possible by accelerating lactate entry into oxidative tissues via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). This observation together with the weak expression of MCTs and the phenomenon of white muscle lactate retention show that lactate metabolism of rainbow trout is significantly constrained by transmembrane transport. PMID:25121611

  17. Environmental context change affects memory for performed actions.

    PubMed

    Sahakyan, Lili

    2010-03-01

    The current study investigated the effect of environmental context change between the study and test on the recall of action phrases that either were performed during encoding (subject-performed tasks, SPTs) or were verbally encoded (verbal tasks, VTs). Both SPTs and VTs showed the same magnitude of impaired recall when the study and test contexts mismatched. Furthermore, changing the context between the two study lists reduced cross-list intrusion errors compared to encoding the lists in the same context. Both SPTs and VTs benefited from studying the lists in different contexts as evidenced by reduced intrusions. Taken together, the results suggest that SPTs are integrated with their context because they suffered when context changed between the study and test, and they also benefited when they were performed in two environments versus the same environment.

  18. Wheat gluten hydrolysate affects race performance in the triathlon.

    PubMed

    Koikawa, Natsue; Aoki, Emi; Suzuki, Yoshio; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Nagaoka, Isao; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Shimmura, Yuki; Sawaki, Keisuke

    2013-07-01

    Wheat gluten hydrolysate (WGH) is a food ingredient, prepared by partial enzymatic digestion of wheat gluten, which has been reported to suppress exercise-induced elevation of serum creatinine kinase (CK) activity. However, its effects on athletic performance have not yet been elucidated. This is the presentation of an experiment performed on five female college triathletes who completed an Olympic distance triathlon with or without ingestion of 21 g of WGH during the cycling leg. The experiment was performed in a crossover double-blind manner. The race time of the running leg and thus the total race time was significantly shorter when WGH was ingested. However, serum CK levels exhibited no apparent differences between the two WGH or placebo groups.

  19. When children affect parents: Children's academic performance and parental investment.

    PubMed

    Yurk Quadlin, Natasha

    2015-07-01

    Sociologists have extensively documented the ways that parent resources predict children's achievement. However, less is known about whether and how children's academic performance shapes parental investment behaviors. I use data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K) and longitudinal fixed effects models to examine how changes in teacher assessments are related to changes in the conferral of various parent resources. Overall, I find that the relationship between achievement and investment varies based on the directionality in children's achievement and the type of resource at hand. Children whose performance improves receive a broad range of enrichment resources, while declines in performance are met with corrective educational resources. Results are largely consistent whether language or math assessments are used to predict investment, and also among children whose achievement does not change over time. I discuss these patterns, along with implications for the use of parent resources in education and family research.

  20. Effect of using a suspension training system on muscle activation during the performance of a front plank exercise.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Jeannette M; Bishop, Nicole S; Caines, Andrew M; Crane, Kalynn A; Feaver, Ashley M; Pearcey, Gregory E P

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of suspension training on muscle activation during performance of variations of the plank exercise. Twenty-one participants took part. All individuals completed 2 repetitions each of 4 different plank exercises that consisted of a floor based plank, or planks with arms suspended, feet suspended, or feet and arms suspended using a TRX Suspension System. During plank performance, muscle activation was recorded from rectus abdominis, external oblique, rectus femoris, and serratus anterior (SA) muscles using electromyography. All planks were performed for a total of 3 seconds. Resulting muscle activation data were amplitude normalized, and root mean square activation was then determined over the full 3 second duration of the exercise. A significant main effect of plank type was found for all muscles. Post hoc analysis and effect size examination indicated that abdominal muscle activation was higher in all suspended conditions compared to the floor based plank. The highest level of abdominal muscle activation occurred in the arms suspended and arms/feet suspended conditions, which did not differ from one another. Rectus femoris activation was greatest during the arms suspended condition, whereas SA activity peaked during normal and feet suspended planks. These results indicate that suspension training as performed in this study seems to be an effective means of increasing muscle activation during the plank exercise. Contrary to expectations, the additional instability created by suspending both the arms and feet did not result in any additional abdominal muscle activation. These findings have implications in prescription and progression of core muscle training programs.

  1. Teacher Dispositions Affecting Self-Esteem and Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helm, Carroll

    2007-01-01

    Research supports several factors related to student success. Darling-Hammond (2000) indicated that the quality of teachers, as measured by whether the teachers were fully certified and had a major in their teaching field, was related to student performance. Measures of teacher preparation and certification were the strongest predictors of student…

  2. Factors Affecting Student Performance in Law School Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegfried, John J.

    1981-01-01

    Noting the increasing role of economics in the law, many law schools have introduced formal economics instruction into their curricula. Several of the controversies surrounding liberal arts courses taught in law schools are examined. Prior formal coursework in the subject appeared to have no relationship to course performance. (MLW)

  3. Factors Affecting School District Performance Scores in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Ronnie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between District Performance Scores (DPS) in Louisiana and (a) socio-economic status of students, (b) academic achievement using average ACT scores, (c) percentage of certified teachers, (d) district class size, (e) per pupil expenditure, and (f) percentage of minority students in…

  4. Performativity and Affectivity: Lesson Observations in England's Further Education Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgington, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Teaching and learning observations (TLOs) are used in educational environments worldwide to measure and improve quality and support professional development. TLOs can be positive for teachers who enjoy opportunities to "perform" their craft and/or engage in professional dialogue. However, if this crucial, collaborative developmental…

  5. Does Participative Decision Making Affect Lecturer Performance in Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukirno, D. S.; Siengthai, Sununta

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The relationship between participation and job performance has captured the interest of not only business researchers but also education researchers. However, the topic has not gained significant attention in the educational management research arena. The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the impact of participation in…

  6. How Motivation Affects Academic Performance: A Structural Equation Modelling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusurkar, R. A.; Ten Cate, Th. J.; Vos, C. M. P.; Westers, P.; Croiset, G.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies in medical education have studied effect of quality of motivation on performance. Self-Determination Theory based on quality of motivation differentiates between Autonomous Motivation (AM) that originates within an individual and Controlled Motivation (CM) that originates from external sources. To determine whether Relative Autonomous…

  7. Unit Cohesion and the Surface Navy: Does Cohesion Affect Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Relationship of Group Cohe- sion to Group Performance: A Research Integration Attempt, by L. W. Oliver, A199069, July 1988. Cartwright , D., "The Nature of...Group Cohesiveness," in Darwin Cart- wright and Alvin Zander, eds., Group Dynamics: Research and Theory, New York: Harper and Row, 1968. Gujarati, D. N

  8. Foam Rolling for Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Recovery of Dynamic Performance Measures

    PubMed Central

    Pearcey, Gregory E. P.; Bradbury-Squires, David J.; Kawamoto, Jon-Erik; Drinkwater, Eric J.; Behm, David G.; Button, Duane C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: After an intense bout of exercise, foam rolling is thought to alleviate muscle fatigue and soreness (ie, delayed-onset muscle soreness [DOMS]) and improve muscular performance. Potentially, foam rolling may be an effective therapeutic modality to reduce DOMS while enhancing the recovery of muscular performance. Objective: To examine the effects of foam rolling as a recovery tool after an intense exercise protocol through assessment of pressure-pain threshold, sprint time, change-of-direction speed, power, and dynamic strength-endurance. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 8 healthy, physically active males (age = 22.1 ± 2.5 years, height = 177.0 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 88.4 ± 11.4 kg) participated. Intervention(s): Participants performed 2 conditions, separated by 4 weeks, involving 10 sets of 10 repetitions of back squats at 60% of their 1-repetition maximum, followed by either no foam rolling or 20 minutes of foam rolling immediately, 24, and 48 hours postexercise. Main Outcome Measure(s): Pressure-pain threshold, sprint speed (30-m sprint time), power (broad-jump distance), change-of-direction speed (T-test), and dynamic strength-endurance. Results: Foam rolling substantially improved quadriceps muscle tenderness by a moderate to large amount in the days after fatigue (Cohen d range, 0.59 to 0.84). Substantial effects ranged from small to large in sprint time (Cohen d range, 0.68 to 0.77), power (Cohen d range, 0.48 to 0.87), and dynamic strength-endurance (Cohen d = 0.54). Conclusions: Foam rolling effectively reduced DOMS and associated decrements in most dynamic performance measures. PMID:25415413

  9. Does familiarity with computers affect computerized neuropsychological test performance?

    PubMed

    Iverson, Grant L; Brooks, Brian L; Ashton, V Lynn; Johnson, Lynda G; Gualtieri, C Thomas

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported computer familiarity is related to performance on computerized neurocognitive testing. Participants were 130 healthy adults who self-reported whether their computer use was "some" (n = 65) or "frequent" (n = 65). The two groups were individually matched on age, education, sex, and race. All completed the CNS Vital Signs (Gualtieri & Johnson, 2006b) computerized neurocognitive battery. There were significant differences on 6 of the 23 scores, including scores derived from the Symbol-Digit Coding Test, Stroop Test, and the Shifting Attention Test. The two groups were also significantly different on the Psychomotor Speed (Cohen's d = 0.37), Reaction Time (d = 0.68), Complex Attention (d = 0.40), and Cognitive Flexibility (d = 0.64) domain scores. People with "frequent" computer use performed better than people with "some" computer use on some tests requiring rapid visual scanning and keyboard work.

  10. Scales affect performance of Monarch butterfly forewings in autorotational flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demko, Anya; Lang, Amy

    2012-11-01

    Butterfly wings are characterized by rows of scales (approximately 100 microns in length) that create a shingle-like pattern of cavities over the entire surface. It is hypothesized that these cavities influence the airflow around the wing and increase aerodynamic performance. A forewing of the Monarch butterfly (Danus plexippus) naturally undergoes autorotational flight in the laminar regime. Autorotational flight is an accurate representation of insect flight because the rotation induces a velocity gradient similar to that found over a flapping wing. Drop test flights of 22 forewings before and after scale removal were recorded with a high-speed camera and flight behavior was quantified. It was found that removing the scales increased the descent speed and decreased the descent factor, a measure of aerodynamic efficacy, suggesting that scales increased the performance of the forewings. Funded by NSF REU Grant 1062611.

  11. Efficacy of massage on muscle soreness, perceived recovery, physiological restoration and physical performance in male bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Lam, Eddie T C; Shariat, Ardalan; Shaw, Ina; Shaw, Brandon S; Tamrin, Shamsul B M

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that sport massage after intensive exercise might improve power and perceptual recovery in athletes. However, few studies have been done in this area. This study aimed to examine the effect of massage on the performance of bodybuilders. Thirty experienced male bodybuilders were randomly assigned to either a massage group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 15). Both groups performed five repetition sets at 75-77% of 1RM of knee extensor and flexor muscle groups. The massage group then received a 30-min massage after the exercise protocol while the control group maintained their normal passive recovery. Criteria under investigation included: plasma creatine kinase (CK) level, agility test, vertical jump test, isometric torque test, and perception of soreness. All variables were measured over 6 time periods: baseline, immediately after the DOMS inducing protocol, right after the massage, and 24, 48, and 72 h after the massage. Both groups showed significant (P < .001) decreases in jumping, agility performance, and isometric torque, but significant (P < .001) increases in CK and muscle soreness levels. The massage group in general demonstrated a better recovery rate. As such, a post-exercise massage session can improve the exercise performance and recovery rate in male bodybuilders after intensive exercise.

  12. Neuroticism Negatively Affects Multitasking Performance through State Anxiety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    interruptions, is greater than ever. As a result, multitasking has become a necessity in both home and work life for many individuals (e.g., Bühner...at work and at home . As such, researchers have begun to focus attention on understanding and predicting multitasking performance. Though past...technological innovation, and information overload, the pace of life is rapidly increasing. The pressure to do more in less time, often with frequent

  13. Personality Factors Affecting Pilot Combat Performance: A Preliminary Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    collected by personnel from Metrica , Inc., under Contract F33615-91-D-0010 (Delivery Order 0005) sponsored by the Air Force Armstrong Laboratory. The...authors would like to thank ’their colleagues at Metrica for their contributions to . this effort; in particular, Mr John Quebe and Mr Martin Dittmar...aircrew combat performance. San Antonio TX: Metrica Inc. 7 . Dolgin, D.L., & Gibb, G.D. (1988). Personality assessment in aviator selection (NAMRL

  14. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.M. ); Fein, G. ); Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F. )

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m[sup 2] and 73 cd/m[sup 2]. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  15. Luminance controlled pupil size affects Landolt C task performance. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, S.M.; Fein, G.; Jewett, D.L.; Ashford, F.

    1993-02-01

    Subjects judged the orientation of a 2 min. gap Landolt C located at a distance of 2.4 m. The stimuli were presented in central vision on a CRT, at low to medium contrast. The effects of varying the spectrum and luminance of surround lighting were assessed on both pupil size (measured using infrared pupillometry during task performance) and task accuracy. The task display was protected from the surround lighting, so that its luminance and contrast could be varied independently of the changes in the surround lighting. Indirect surround illumination was provided by either two illuminants of very different scotopic spectral content but with the same photopic luminance (Experiments 1 and 3), or by using the same illuminant at two different luminance levels (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, the effect of changing surround spectrum was compared to the effect of varying task background luminance between 12 cd/m{sup 2} and 73 cd/m{sup 2}. In all experiments, scotopically enhanced surround lighting produced pupil areas which were reduced by almost 50% in comparison with surround lighting with relatively less scotopic luminance. Concomitantly there was improvement in Landolt C task performance with the scotopically enhanced surround lighting at all contrast and luminance levels. In these experiments, smaller pupil sizes were associated with significantly better visual-task performance in spite of lower task retinal illuminance when compared to the condition with larger pupils. These results suggest that changes in surround spectrum can compensate for the effect on task performance of a reduction in task luminance and supports the hypothesis that lighting energy savings could accrue in the workplace by shifting lamp spectra to obtain greater scotopic efficacy.

  16. Factors That Affect Academic Performance Among Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Sansgiry, Sujit S.; Bhosle, Monali; Sail, Kavita

    2006-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine factors such as academic competence, test competence, time management, strategic studying, and test anxiety, and identify whether these factors could distinguish differences among students, based on academic performance and enrollment in the experiential program. Methods A cross-sectional study design utilizing questionnaires measuring previously validated constructs was used to evaluate the effect of these factors on students with low and high cumulative grade point averages (GPAs). Pharmacy students (N = 198) enrolled at the University of Houston participated in the study. Results Academic performance was significantly associated with factors such as academic competence and test competence. Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater significantly differed in their level of test competence than those with a GPA of less than 3.0. Students enrolled in their experiential year differed from students enrolled in their second year of curriculum on factors such as test anxiety, academic competence, test competence, and time management skills. Conclusion Test competence was an important factor to distinguish students with low vs. high academic performance. Factors such as academic competence, test competence, test anxiety and time management improve as students' progress in their experiential year. PMID:17149433

  17. Reduced activation in isometric muscle action after lengthening contractions is not accompanied by reduced performance fatigability

    PubMed Central

    Seiberl, W.; Hahn, D.; Paternoster, F. K.

    2016-01-01

    After active lengthening contractions, a given amount of force can be maintained with less muscle activation compared to pure isometric contractions at the same muscle length and intensity. This increase in neuromuscular efficiency is associated with mechanisms of stretch-induced residual force enhancement. We hypothesized that stretch-related increase in neuromuscular efficiency reduces fatigability of a muscle during submaximal contractions. 13 subjects performed 60 s isometric knee extensions at 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) with and without prior stretch (60°/s, 20°). Each 60 s trial was preceded and followed by neuromuscular tests consisting of MVCs, voluntary activation (VA) and resting twitches (RT), and there was 4 h rest between sets. We found a significant (p = 0.036) 10% reduction of quadriceps net-EMG after lengthening compared to pure isometric trials. However, increase in neuromuscular efficiency did not influence the development of fatigue. Albeit we found severe reduction of MVC (30%), RT (30%) and VA (5%) after fatiguing trials, there were no differences between conditions with and without lengthening. As the number of subjects showing no activation reduction increased with increasing contraction time, intensity may have been too strenuous in both types of contractions, such that a distinction between different states of fatigue was not possible anymore. PMID:27966620

  18. Aging Enhances Indirect Flight Muscle Fiber Performance yet Decreases Flight Ability in Drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Mark S.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O.

    2008-10-02

    We investigated the effects of aging on Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle from the whole organism to the actomyosin cross-bridge. Median-aged (49-day-old) flies were flight impaired, had normal myofilament number and packing, barely longer sarcomeres, and slight mitochondrial deterioration compared with young (3-day-old) flies. Old (56-day-old) flies were unable to beat their wings, had deteriorated ultrastructure with severe mitochondrial damage, and their skinned fibers failed to activate with calcium. Small-amplitude sinusoidal length perturbation analysis showed median-aged indirect flight muscle fibers developed greater than twice the isometric force and power output of young fibers, yet cross-bridge kinetics were similar. Large increases in elastic and viscous moduli amplitude under active, passive, and rigor conditions suggest that median-aged fibers become stiffer longitudinally. Small-angle x-ray diffraction indicates that myosin heads move increasingly toward the thin filament with age, accounting for the increased transverse stiffness via cross-bridge formation. We propose that the observed protein composition changes in the connecting filaments, which anchor the thick filaments to the Z-disk, produce compensatory increases in longitudinal stiffness, isometric tension, power and actomyosin interaction in aging indirect flight muscle. We also speculate that a lack of MgATP due to damaged mitochondria accounts for the decreased flight performance.

  19. Muscle adaptations and performance enhancements of soccer training for untrained men.

    PubMed

    Krustrup, Peter; Christensen, Jesper F; Randers, Morten B; Pedersen, Henrik; Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Krustrup, Birgitte R; Nielsen, Jens J; Suetta, Charlotte; Nybo, Lars; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-04-01

    We examined the physical demands of small-sided soccer games in untrained middle-age males and muscle adaptations and performance effects over 12 weeks of recreational soccer training in comparison with continuous running. Thirty-eight healthy subjects (20-43 years) were randomized into a soccer (SO), running (RU) and control (CO) group. Two-three weekly 1-h training sessions were performed. Muscle lactate (30.1 +/- 4.1 vs. 15.6 +/- 3.3 mmol/kg d.w.), blood lactate, blood glucose and time above 90% HR(max) (20 +/- 4% vs. 1 +/- 1%) were higher (p < 0.05) during training in SO than in RU. After 12 weeks of training, quadriceps muscle mass and mean muscle fibre area were 9 and 15% larger (p < 0.05) in SO, but unaltered in RU, and in SO, the fraction of FTx fibres was lowered (10.7 +/- 1.8 vs. 17.9 +/- 3.2%). In SO, citrate synthase activity was 10 and 14% higher (p < 0.05) after 4 and 12 weeks, but unaltered in RU. After 4 weeks VO(2max) and Yo-Yo IE2 performance were elevated (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in SO (7 and 37%) and RU (6 and 36%) but increased further (p < 0.05) from 4 to 12 weeks in SO (6 and 23%). In SO, 30-m sprint performance was improved (p < 0.05) by 0.11 +/- 0.02 s. Blood lactate during running at 11 km/h was lowered (p < 0.05) from 0 to 4 and 4 to 12 weeks (2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.8 +/- 0.6 vs. 6.1 +/- 0.9 mM) and from 0 to 12 weeks in RU. No changes occurred for CO. In conclusion, recreational soccer organized as small-sided games stimulates both aerobic and anaerobic energy turnover and is an effective type of training leading to significant cardiovascular and muscular adaptations as well as performance enhancements throughout a 12-week training period.

  20. The effects of stretching on the flexibility, muscle performance and functionality of institutionalized older women.

    PubMed

    Gallon, D; Rodacki, A L F; Hernandez, S G; Drabovski, B; Outi, T; Bittencourt, L R; Gomes, A R S

    2011-03-01

    Stretching has been widely used to increase the range of motion. We assessed the effects of a stretching program on muscle-tendon length, flexibility, torque, and activities of daily living of institutionalized older women. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were according to Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (>13), Barthel Index (>13) and Lysholm Scoring Scale (>84). Seventeen 67 ± 9 year-old elderly women from a nursing home were divided into 2 groups at random: the control group (CG, N = 9) participated in enjoyable cultural activities; the stretching group (SG, N = 8) performed active stretching of hamstrings, 4 bouts of 1 min each. Both groups were supervised three times per week over a period of 8 weeks. Peak torque was assessed by an isokinetic method. Both groups were evaluated by a photogrammetric method to assess muscle-tendon length of uni- and biarticular hip flexors and hamstring flexibility. All measurements were analyzed before and after 8 weeks by two-way ANOVA with the level of significance set at 5%. Hamstring flexibility increased by 30% in the SG group compared to pre-training (76.5 ± 13.0° vs 59.5 ± 9.0°, P = 0.0002) and by 9.2% compared to the CG group (76.5 ± 13.0° vs 64.0 ± 12.0°, P = 0.0018). Muscle-tendon lengths of hip biarticular flexor muscles (124 ± 6.8° vs 118.3 ± 7.6°, 5.0 ± 7.0%, P = 0.031) and eccentric knee extensor peak torque were decreased in the CG group compared to pre-test values (-49.4 ± 16.8 vs -60.5 ± 18.9 Nm, -15.7 ± 20%, P = 0.048). The stretching program was sufficient to increase hamstring flexibility and a lack of stretching can cause reduction of muscle performance.

  1. Positive affective tone and team performance: The moderating role of collective emotional skills.

    PubMed

    Collins, Amy L; Jordan, Peter J; Lawrence, Sandra A; Troth, Ashlea C

    2016-01-01

    Research on affect as a group-level phenomenon has shown that over time, individual members within a group become highly similar in their affect (i.e., members experience and display similar emotions and moods), and often become similar enough that the aggregation of individuals' affect can meaningfully represent the "affective tone" of the group. It is generally assumed that a more positive affective tone will lead to better team performance. We challenge the conclusion that positive affective tone is always good for team performance, suggesting that the relationship between positive affective tone and team performance is subject to moderating influences. Across two studies, we demonstrate that the self-reported collective emotional skills of team members play a crucial role in determining whether positive affective tone is beneficial or detrimental to team performance. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  2. Characterization of titanium dioxide: Factors affecting photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Presley, R.W.

    1995-06-01

    Titanium dioxide is being evaluated as a photocatalyst in the destruction of contaminants in aqueous waste streams. Commercial samples of TiO{sub 2} powder have been obtained for base line studies of the photocatalytic destruction of salicylic acid standards. These commercial samples have been prepared by flame hydrolysis and aerosol or spray pyrolysis. Additional samples of TiO{sub 2} have been prepared in house by precipitation from TiCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution, some with the addition of dopants. X-ray powder diffraction data analysis indicates the predominate phase of these commercial and prepared powders to be anatase. A minor amount of the rutile crystalline phase of TiO{sub 2} was observed at various levels in some of these catalysts. The broadness of the x-ray diffraction bands varied among the samples analyzed and indicated the primary particle size to be within the 500 to 1,000 angstrom range with the product produced in house having the smallest crystallite size. Experiments were then performed to assess the photocatalytic performance of these various types of catalyst in the destruction of 30 ppm salicylic acid in deionized water.

  3. The bone-muscle ratio of fetal lambs is affected more by maternal nutrition during pregnancy than by maternal size.

    PubMed

    Firth, E C; Rogers, C W; Vickers, M; Kenyon, P R; Jenkinson, C M C; Blair, H T; Johnson, P L; Mackenzie, D D S; Peterson, S W; Morris, S T

    2008-06-01

    Bone formation and loss are related to the strain imposed on bone by muscle forces. Bone mineral content (BMC) and lean mass (LM) of fetal lambs was determined at day 140 of pregnancy in 8 groups of ewes, which were of either large or small body size, on either high (ad libitum) or maintenance pasture intake from day 21 of pregnancy, or carrying either singletons or twins. BMC and LM (using DXA scanning) of fetal hindquarters/spine were corrected to leg length. BMC and LM were less in twin than singleton groups (P < 0.001). Large ewes on high intake produced single fetuses with a (group mean) BMC/LM ratio that was higher (P < 0.002) than that in fetuses of large ewes with singletons on maintenance intake or twins on either high or maintenance intakes, the ratios of which were not different. In single fetuses from small ewes on high intake, the BMC/LM ratio was higher than those from small ewes with singletons on maintenance intake or twins on either high or maintenance intakes, the ratios of which were not different. The ratio was not different in singleton fetuses of ewes on high intake, whether they were large or small. Different fetal environments resulted in a given amount of muscle being associated with a higher or lower bone mass. Dietary intake during pregnancy was more important than maternal size in affecting the ratio. We conclude that intrauterine environmental factors may be important in determining bone mass postnatally, and possibly later in life.

  4. What are the stimulation parameters that affect the extent of twitch force potentiation in the adductor pollicis muscle?

    PubMed

    Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Muscle force potentiation affects force output during electrical stimulation. Few studies have examined stimulation train parameters that influence potentiation such as pulse number, stimulation frequency, train duration, and force-time integral and peak force produced during the train. Pulse-matched trains (100 pulses) at 7.5, 15, 25, 30, 50, and 100 Hz, and trains of varying pulse number (50, 100, and 200 pulses) at 30 and 50 Hz were delivered to the ulnar nerve of 10 (5 male, 5 female; 23.4 ± 0.9 years), healthy individuals in random order. Single twitches of the adductor pollicis muscle were elicited before and after each train with a rest interval of at least 5 min between each train. No differences in potentiation occurred across the pulse-matched trains at frequencies of 15-50 Hz (38.9 ± 5.4-44.6 ± 5.5%). Twitch force potentiation following the highest (100 Hz) and lowest (7.5 Hz) frequency trains were not significantly different and were lower than the other 100 pulse-matched trains. As pulse number increased, potentiation increased for both the 30 and 50-Hz trains. There was a significant positive correlation between force potentiation and force-time integral produced by the stimulation train, r = 0.70. The results indicate that potentiation magnitude is dependent on the force-time integral produced during the test train and the number of pulses delivered, independent of stimulation frequency.

  5. Investigation of Factors Affecting Aerodynamic Performance of Nebulized Nanoemulsion

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Hosein; Abbasi, Shayan; Amini, Mohammad Ali; Amani, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This work aimed to prepare a nanoemulsion preparation containing budesonide and assess its aerodynamic behavior in comparison with suspension of budesonide. In-vitro aerodynamic performance of the corresponding micellar solution (ie. nanoemulsion preparation without oil) was investigated too. Nanoemulsions of almond oil containing budesonide, as a hydrophobic model drug molecule, were prepared and optimized. Then, the effect of variation of surfactant/co-surfactant concentration on the aerodynamic properties of the nebulized aerosol was studied. The results indicated that the most physically stable formulation makes the smallest aerodynamic size. The concentration of co-surfactant was also shown to be critical in determination of aerodynamic size. Furthermore, the optimized sample, with 3% w/w almond oil, 20% w/w Tween 80+Span 80 and 2% w/w ethanol showed a smaller MMAD in comparison with the commercially available suspension and the micellar solution. PMID:28243265

  6. Prepartum nutritional strategy affects reproductive performance in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, F C; LeBlanc, S J; Murphy, M R; Drackley, J K

    2013-09-01

    Negative energy balance during early postpartum is associated with reduced reproductive performance in dairy cows. A pooled statistical analysis of 7 studies completed in our group from 1993 to 2010 was conducted to investigate the association between prepartum energy feeding regimen and reproductive performance. The interval from calving to pregnancy (days to pregnancy, DTP) was the dependent variable to assess reproductive performance. Individual data for 408 cows (354 multiparous and 54 primiparous) were included in the analysis. The net energy for lactation (NEL) intake was determined from each cow's average dry matter intake and calculated dietary NEL density. Treatments applied prepartum were classified as either controlled-energy (CE; limited NEL intake to ≤100% of requirement) or high-energy (HE; cows were allowed to consume >100%) diets fed during the far-off (FO) or close-up (CU) dry periods. Cow was the experimental unit. The Cox proportional hazard model revealed that days to pregnancy was shorter for CE (median=157 d) than HE (median=167 d) diets during the CU period [hazard ratio (HR)=0.70]. Cows fed HE diets during the last 4 wk prepartum lost more body condition score in the first 6 wk postpartum than those fed CE diets (-0.43 and -0.30, respectively). Cows fed CE diets during the FO period had lower nonesterified fatty acids concentrations in wk 1, 2, and 3 of lactation than cows fed HE diets. Higher nonesterified fatty acids concentration in wk 1 postpartum was associated with a greater probability of disease (n=251; odds ratio=1.18). Cows on the CE regimen during the FO period had greater plasma glucose concentrations during wk 1 and 3 after calving than cows fed the HE regimen. Higher plasma glucose (HG) concentration compared with lower glucose (LG) in wk 3 (HG: n=154; LG: n=206) and wk 4 (HG: n=71; LG: n=254) after calving was associated with shorter days to pregnancy (wk 3: median=151 and 171 d for HG and LG, respectively, and HR=1.3; wk 4

  7. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Harvey F; Patterson, William R; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m x 8 m x 3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  8. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Harvey F.; Patterson, William R.; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m×8 m×3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  9. Physical Performance, Balance, Mobility, and Muscle Strength Decline at Different Rates in Elderly People

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Márcia Mariko; Otonari, Thais Satie; Takara, Kelly Sayuri; Carmo, Carolina M; Tanaka, Clarice

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to verify the decline in functionality of elderly people. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects comprised 152 individuals (96 women; 56 men) divided into 3 groups: G1 (60 to 69 years, n=53); G2 (70 to 79 years, n=65); and G3 (80 years or older, n=34). Physical performance, balance, mobility, and muscle strength were assessed using Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale (BERG), Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, and leg press test, respectively. Comparison among age-stratified groups (G1, G2 and G3) and between genders were examined using analysis of variance with Tukey’s test as a post hoc test or the Kruskal-Wallis test with Bonferroni correction. [Results] SPPB and BERG scores decreased significantly in comparison between G1 and G3, and between G2 and G3 in women. TUG and leg press scores decreased significantly in comparison between G1 and G3 and between G2 and G3. [Conclusion] People in their 60s and 70s have similar functional characteristics (physical performance, balance, mobility and muscle strength for both genders), and functionality starts to decline when people are in their 80s. PMID:24764638

  10. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of five clinical muscle performance tests in patients with and without neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates the reliability of muscle performance tests using cost- and time-effective methods similar to those used in clinical practice. When conducting reliability studies, great effort goes into standardising test procedures to facilitate a stable outcome. Therefore, several test trials are often performed. However, when muscle performance tests are applied in the clinical setting, clinicians often only conduct a muscle performance test once as repeated testing may produce fatigue and pain, thus variation in test results. We aimed to investigate whether cervical muscle performance tests, which have shown promising psychometric properties, would remain reliable when examined under conditions similar to those of daily clinical practice. Methods The intra-rater (between-day) and inter-rater (within-day) reliability was assessed for five cervical muscle performance tests in patients with (n = 33) and without neck pain (n = 30). The five tests were joint position error, the cranio-cervical flexion test, the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine and in a 45°-upright position and a new neck extensor test. Results Intra-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.48-0.82), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.69), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.68) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.41) with the exception of a new test (neck extensor test), which ranged from slight to moderate agreement (ICC = 0.14-0.41). Likewise, inter-rater reliability ranged from moderate to almost perfect agreement for joint position error (ICC ≥ 0.51-0.75), the cranio-cervical flexion test (ICC ≥ 0.85), the neck flexor muscle endurance test performed in supine (ICC ≥ 0.70) and in a 45°-upright position (ICC ≥ 0.56). However, only slight to fair agreement was found for the neck extensor test (ICC

  11. Range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance in older adults with normal, pronated, and supinated feet

    PubMed Central

    Justine, Maria; Ruzali, Dhiya; Hazidin, Ezzaty; Said, Aisyah; Bukry, Saiful Adli; Manaf, Haidzir

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the lower limb joint range of motion and muscle length between different types of foot posture, and determine the correlation of range of motion and muscle length with balance performance. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety individuals (age, 65.2±4.6 years) were assessed using the Foot Posture Index to determine their type of foot (Normal [0 to +5], pronated [+6 to +9], and supinated [−1 to −4]; n=30 per group). The range of motion (goniometer), muscle length (goniometer and tape measure), and balance performance (functional reach test and four square step test) were measured for each participant. Data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Spearman’s rank-order correlation. [Results] No significant differences were found in range of motion, muscle length, and balance performance among different types of foot posture, except for right and left ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. Balance performance was significantly correlated with selected muscle length and range of motion, especially in the supinated foot. [Conclusion] Range of motion and muscle length of the lower limb may be associated with balance performance in older adults with foot deformities. These findings may guide physiotherapists in choosing intervention based on specific assessments for older adults with foot deformity. PMID:27134384

  12. Deltoid muscle volume affects clinical outcome of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Seo, Anna; Kim, Jeong Jun; Lee, Chang-Hwa; Baek, Seung-Hun; Kim, Shin Yoon; Jeong, Eun Taek; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the interrelation between preoperative deltoid muscle status by measuring the 3-dimensional deltoid muscle volume and postoperative functional outcomes after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty(RTSA). Thirty-five patients who underwent RTSA participated in this study. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) as well as pre- and postoperative radiography and various functional outcome evaluations at least 1 year. The primary outcome parameter was set as age- and sex-matched Constant scores. The 3-dimensional deltoid muscle model was generated using a medical image processing software and in-house code, and the deltoid muscle volume was calculated automatically. Various clinical and radiographic factors comprising the deltoid muscle volume adjusted for body mass index(BMI) were analyzed, and their interrelation with the outcome parameters was appraised using a multivariate analysis. As a result, all practical consequences considerably improved following surgery(all p<0.01). Overall, 20 and 15 indicated a higher and a lower practical consequence than the average, respectively, which was assessed by the matched Constant scores. The deltoid muscle volume adjusted for BMI(p = 0.009), absence of a subscapularis complete tear (p = 0.040), and greater change in acromion-deltoid tuberosity distance(p = 0.013) were associated with higher matched Constant scores. Multivariate analysis indicated that the deltoid muscle volume was the single independent prognostic factor for practical consequences(p = 0.011). In conclusion, the preoperative deltoid muscle volume significantly affected the functional outcome following RTSA in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears. Therefore, more attention should be paid to patients with severe atrophied deltoid muscle who are at a high risk for poor practical consequences subsequent to RTSA. PMID:28355234

  13. Noise Affects Performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Kate; Marchuk, Veronica; Pichora-Fuller, M Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effect of background noise on performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Two groups of older adults (one with clinically normal hearing, one with hearing loss) and a younger adult group with clinically normal hearing were administered two versions of the MoCA under headphones in low and high levels of background noise. Intensity levels used to present the test were customized based on the hearing abilities of participants with hearing loss to yield a uniform level of difficulty across listeners in the high-level noise condition. Both older groups had poorer MoCA scores in noise than the younger group. Importantly, all participants had poorer MoCA scores in the high-noise (M = 22.7/30) compared to the low-noise condition (M = 25.7/30, p < .001). Results suggest that background noise in the test environment should be considered when cognitive tests are conducted and results interpreted, especially when testing older adults.

  14. Relationship between performance at different exercise intensities and skeletal muscle characteristics.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Perez-Gomez, Jorge; Thomassen, Martin; Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2011-06-01

    The hypothesis investigated whether exercise performance over a broad range of intensities is determined by specific skeletal muscle characteristics. Seven subjects performed 8-10 exhaustive cycle trials at different workloads, ranging from 150 to 700 W (150 min to 20 s). No relationships between the performance times at high and low workloads were observed. A relationship (P < 0.05) was noticed between the percentage of fast-twitch x fibers and the exercise time at 579 ± 21 W (∼30 s; r(2) = 0.88). Capillary-to-fiber-ratio (r(2): 0.58-0.85) was related (P < 0.05) to exercise time at work intensities ranging from 395 to 270 W (2.5-21 min). Capillary density was correlated (r(2) = 0.68; P < 0.05) with the net rate of plasma K(+) accumulation during an ∼3-min bout and was estimated to explain 50-80% (P < 0.05) of the total variance observed in exercise performances lasting ∼30 s to 3 min. The Na(+)-K(+) pump β(1)-subunit expression was found to account for 13-34% (P < 0.05) during exhaustive exercise of ∼1-4 min. In conclusion, exercise performance at different intensities is related to specific physiological variables. A large distribution of fast-twitch x fibers may play a role during very intense efforts, i.e., ∼30 s. Muscle capillaries and the Na(+)-K(+) pump β(1)-subunit seem to be important determinants for performance during exhaustive high-intensity exercises lasting between 30 s and 4 min.

  15. Does training frequency and supervision affect compliance, performance and muscular health? A cluster randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dalager, Tina; Bredahl, Thomas G V; Pedersen, Mogens T; Boyle, Eleanor; Andersen, Lars L; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2015-10-01

    The aim was to determine the effect of one weekly hour of specific strength training within working hours, performed with the same total training volume but with different training frequencies and durations, or with different levels of supervision, on compliance, muscle health and performance, behavior and work performance. In total, 573 office workers were cluster-randomized to: 1 WS: one 60-min supervised session/week, 3 WS: three 20-min supervised sessions/week, 9 WS: nine 7-min supervised sessions/week, 3 MS: three 20-min sessions/week with minimal supervision, or REF: a reference group without training. Outcomes were diary-based compliance, total training volume, muscle performance and questionnaire-based health, behavior and work performance. Comparisons were made among the WS training groups and between 3 WS and 3 MS. If no difference, training groups were collapsed (TG) and compared with REF. Results demonstrated similar degrees of compliance, mean(range) of 39(33-44)%, and total training volume, 13.266(11.977-15.096)kg. Musculoskeletal pain in neck and shoulders were reduced with approx. 50% in TG, which was significant compared with REF. Only the training groups improved significantly their muscle strength 8(4-13)% and endurance 27(12-37)%, both being significant compared with REF. No change in workability, productivity or self-rated health was demonstrated. Secondary analysis showed exercise self-efficacy to be a significant predictor of compliance. Regardless of training schedule and supervision, similar degrees of compliance were shown together with reduced musculoskeletal pain and improved muscle performance. These findings provide evidence that a great degree of flexibility is legitimate for companies in planning future implementation of physical exercise programs at the workplace. ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01027390.

  16. How neighbor canopy architecture affects target plant performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tremmel, D.C.; Bazzaz, F.A. )

    1993-10-01

    Plant competition occurs through the negative effects that individual plants have on resource availability to neighboring individuals. Therefore competition experiments need to examine how different species change resource availability to their neighbors, and how different species respond to these changes-allocationally, architecturally, and physiologically-through time. In a greenhouse study we used a model system of annuals to examine how canopies of species having differing morphologies differed in their architectures and light-interception abilities, and how different species performed when grown in these canopies. Abutilon theophrasti, Datura stramonium, and Polygonum pensylvanicum were grown as [open quotes]targets[close quotes]. Plants were grown in pots, with one target plant and four neighbor plants. Detailed measurements of neighbor canopy structure and target plant canopy architecture were made at five harvests. Species with different morphologies showed large differences in canopy structure, particularly when grass and forb species were compared. Setaria, a grass, had a more open canopy than the other species (all forbs), and was a consistently weak competitor. Overall, however, the relative effects of different neighbors on target biomass varied with target species. Target biomass was poorly correlated with neighbor biomass and leaf area, but was highly correlated with a measure of target light-interception ability that took into account both target leaf deployment and neighbor light interception. Despite clear differences among neighbor species in canopy structure and effect on light penetration, the results suggest no broad generalizations about the effects of different species as neighbors. Knowledge of morphological, physiological, and life history characteristics of both the target and neighbor species may be necessary to explain the results of their competition. 53 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power characteristics correlates with running performance in young runners.

    PubMed

    Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Guglielmo, Luiz G A; Santos, Bruno V; Hernandez, Sara G; da Silva, Sérgio G; de Campos, Wagner

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power variables and a 5-km time trial (5kmT) in young runners. Twenty-three runners volunteered to participate in this study. Height, body mass, body fat, and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured. The subjects underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), velocity at ventilatory threshold (VVT), running economy (RE), velocity associated with maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)), and peak velocity (PV). Peak torque, total work, and power were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s(-1) and 240°·s(-1) angular velocities. Right and left knee flexor and extensor torques were evaluated. Finally, the participants performed a 5kmT. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the variables that significantly related to 5kmT. Strength and muscle power variables did not correlate with 5kmT. However, most physiological variables were associated with 5kmT. Velocity at ventilatory threshold alone explains 40% of the variance in 5kmT. The addition of the RE at speed 11.2 km·h(-1) (RE11.2) and FFM to the prediction equation allowed for 71% of the adjusted variance in 5kmT to be predicted. These results show that strength and muscle power variables are not good predictors of 5kmT; however, the physiological variables presented high prediction capacity in the 5kmT. Moreover, the anthropometric measures showed significant influence in performance prediction.

  18. PHYSIOLOGICAL, ANTHROPOMETRIC, STRENGTH, AND MUSCLE POWER CHARACTERISTICS CORRELATE WITH RUNNING PERFORMANCE IN YOUNG RUNNERS.

    PubMed

    Dellagrana, Rodolfo A; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme A; Santos, Bruno V; Hernandez, Sara G; Silva, SÉrgio G; Campos, Wagner DE

    2014-12-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between physiological, anthropometric, strength, and muscle power variables and a 5 km time trial (5kmT) in young runners. Twenty-three runners volunteered to participate in this study. Height, body mass (BM), body fat (BF), and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured. The subjects underwent laboratory testing to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), velocity at ventilatory threshold (VVT), running economy (RE), velocity associated with maximal oxygen uptake (vVO2max), and peak velocity (PV). Peak torque (PT), total work (TW), and power (PW) were measured by an isokinetic dynamometer at 60°·s and 240° s angular velocities. Right and left knee flexor and extensor torques were evaluated. Finally, the participants performed a 5kmT. Multiple regression and correlation analysis were used to determine the variables that significantly related to 5kmT. Strength and muscle power variables did not correlate with 5kmT. On the other hand, most physiological variables were associated with 5kmT. VVT alone explains 40% of the variance in 5kmT. The addition of the RE at speed 11.2 km.h (RE11.2) and FFM to the prediction equation allowed for 71% of the adjusted variance in 5kmT to be predicted. These results show that strength and muscle power variables are not good predictors of 5kmT; however, the physiological variables presented high prediction capacity in the 5kmT. Moreover, the anthropometric measures showed significant influence in performance prediction.

  19. Comparison of Two Different Modes of Active Recovery on Muscles Performance after Fatiguing Exercise in Mountain Canoeist and Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Mika, Anna; Oleksy, Łukasz; Kielnar, Renata; Wodka-Natkaniec, Ewa; Twardowska, Magdalena; Kamiński, Kamil; Małek, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess if the application of different methods of active recovery (working the same or different muscle groups from those which were active during fatiguing exercise) results in significant differences in muscle performance and if the efficiency of the active recovery method is dependent upon the specific sport activity (training loads). Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with repeated measurements. Methods Thirteen mountain canoeists and twelve football players participated in this study. Measurements of the bioelectrical activity, torque, work and power of the vastus lateralis oblique, vastus medialis oblique, and rectus femoris muscles were performed during isokinetic tests at a velocity of 90°/s. Results Active legs recovery in both groups was effective in reducing fatigue from evaluated muscles, where a significant decrease in fatigue index was observed. The muscles peak torque, work and power parameters did not change significantly after both modes of active recovery, but in both groups significant decrease was seen after passive recovery. Conclusions We suggest that 20 minutes of post-exercise active recovery involving the same muscles that were active during the fatiguing exercise is more effective in fatigue recovery than active exercise using the muscles that were not involved in the exercise. Active arm exercises were less effective in both groups which indicates a lack of a relationship between the different training regimens and the part of the body which is principally used during training. PMID:27706260

  20. Effects of a single bout of lower-body aerobic exercise on muscle activation and performance during subsequent lower- and upper-body resistance exercise workouts.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jeremy G; Coburn, Jared W; Brown, Lee E; Judelson, Daniel A

    2014-05-01

    A single bout of lower-body aerobic exercise may negatively affect a subsequent lower-body resistance exercise workout. However, less is known regarding the effects of a lower-body aerobic workout on muscle activation and performance during a subsequent upper-body resistance exercise workout. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare muscle activation and performance during lower- and upper-body resistance exercise workouts after a single bout of lower-body aerobic exercise on an elliptical machine. Fourteen men (mean age = 24.1 ± 2.3 years, height = 180.8 ± 6.9 cm, body mass = 91.9 ± 16.4 kg) completed 4 trials in random order. Two trials consisted of 30 minutes on the elliptical machine, using the lower body only, at 70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate before either a back squat or bench press workout, consisting of 3 sets to failure performed at 75% 1 repetition maximum. The other 2 trials consisted of only the back squat or bench press resistance workouts. To quantify muscle activation, bipolar surface electromyography electrodes were placed on the rectus femoris and vastus lateralis or pectoralis major. Acute lower-body aerobic exercise on an elliptical machine significantly reduced the number of repetitions completed for the back squat but not the bench press exercise. There was no significant difference in muscle activation between the elliptical and no elliptical conditions. However, for both exercises and conditions, muscle activation increased significantly between the first and final repetitions for the first 2 sets but not for the third set. These results suggest that to optimize the quality of a lower-body resistance-training workout, the workout should not be preceded by lower-body aerobic exercise.

  1. Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned Change-of-Direction and Reactive Agility Performance and Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers

    PubMed Central

    Jeffriess, Matthew D.; Schultz, Adrian B.; McGann, Tye S.; Callaghan, Samuel J.; Lockie, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of preventative ankle taping on planned change-of-direction and reactive agility performance and peak ankle muscle activity in basketballers. Twenty male basketballers (age = 22.30 ± 3.97 years; height = 1.84 ± 0.09 meters; body mass = 85.96 ± 11.88 kilograms) with no ankle pathologies attended two testing sessions. Within each session, subjects completed six planned and six reactive randomized trials (three to the left and three to the right for each condition) of the Y-shaped agility test, which was recorded by timing lights. In one session, subjects had both ankles un-taped. In the other, both ankles were taped using a modified subtalar sling. Peak tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and soleus muscle activity was recorded for both the inside and outside legs across stance phase during the directional change, which was normalized against 10-meter sprint muscle activity (nEMG). Both the inside and outside cut legs during the change-of-direction step were investigated. Repeated measures ANOVA determined performance time and nEMG differences between un-taped and taped conditions. There were no differences in planned change-of-direction or reactive agility times between the conditions. Inside cut leg PL nEMG decreased when taped for the planned left, reactive left, and reactive right cuts (p = 0.01). Outside leg PB and soleus nEMG increased during the taped planned left cut (p = 0.02). There were no other nEMG changes during the cuts with taping. Taping did not affect change-of-direction or agility performance. Inside leg PL activity was decreased, possibly due to the tape following the line of muscle action. This may reduce the kinetic demand for the PL during cuts. In conclusion, ankle taping did not significantly affect planned change-of-direction or reactive agility performance, and did not demonstrate large changes in activity of the muscle complex in healthy basketballers. Key points Ankle

  2. Effects of Preventative Ankle Taping on Planned Change-of-Direction and Reactive Agility Performance and Ankle Muscle Activity in Basketballers.

    PubMed

    Jeffriess, Matthew D; Schultz, Adrian B; McGann, Tye S; Callaghan, Samuel J; Lockie, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of preventative ankle taping on planned change-of-direction and reactive agility performance and peak ankle muscle activity in basketballers. Twenty male basketballers (age = 22.30 ± 3.97 years; height = 1.84 ± 0.09 meters; body mass = 85.96 ± 11.88 kilograms) with no ankle pathologies attended two testing sessions. Within each session, subjects completed six planned and six reactive randomized trials (three to the left and three to the right for each condition) of the Y-shaped agility test, which was recorded by timing lights. In one session, subjects had both ankles un-taped. In the other, both ankles were taped using a modified subtalar sling. Peak tibialis anterior, peroneus longus (PL), peroneus brevis (PB), and soleus muscle activity was recorded for both the inside and outside legs across stance phase during the directional change, which was normalized against 10-meter sprint muscle activity (nEMG). Both the inside and outside cut legs during the change-of-direction step were investigated. Repeated measures ANOVA determined performance time and nEMG differences between un-taped and taped conditions. There were no differences in planned change-of-direction or reactive agility times between the conditions. Inside cut leg PL nEMG decreased when taped for the planned left, reactive left, and reactive right cuts (p = 0.01). Outside leg PB and soleus nEMG increased during the taped planned left cut (p = 0.02). There were no other nEMG changes during the cuts with taping. Taping did not affect change-of-direction or agility performance. Inside leg PL activity was decreased, possibly due to the tape following the line of muscle action. This may reduce the kinetic demand for the PL during cuts. In conclusion, ankle taping did not significantly affect planned change-of-direction or reactive agility performance, and did not demonstrate large changes in activity of the muscle complex in healthy basketballers. Key pointsAnkle taping

  3. Effect of traditional resistance and power training using rated perceived exertion for enhancement of muscle strength, power, and functional performance.

    PubMed

    Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Dias, Caroline Pieta; Radaelli, Regis; Massa, Jéssica Cassales; Bortoluzzi, Rafael; Schoenell, Maira Cristina Wolf; Noll, Matias; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2016-04-01

    The present study compared the effects of 12 weeks of traditional resistance training and power training using rated perceived exertion (RPE) to determine training intensity on improvements in strength, muscle power, and ability to perform functional task in older women. Thirty healthy elderly women (60-75 years) were randomly assigned to traditional resistance training group (TRT; n = 15) or power training group (PT; n = 15). Participants trained twice a week for 12 weeks using six exercises. The training protocol was designed to ascertain that participants exercised at an RPE of 13-18 (on a 6-20 scale). Maximal dynamic strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limb muscles were assessed. Maximal dynamic strength muscle strength leg press (≈58 %) and knee extension (≈20 %) increased significantly (p < 0.001) and similarly in both groups after training. Muscle power also increased with training (≈27 %; p < 0.05), with no difference between groups. Both groups also improved their functional performance after training period (≈13 %; p < 0.001), with no difference between groups. The present study showed that TRT and PT using RPE scale to control intensity were significantly and similarly effective in improving maximal strength, muscle power, and functional performance of lower limbs in elderly women.

  4. Effects of acute lipid overload on skeletal muscle insulin resistance, metabolic flexibility, and mitochondrial performance

    PubMed Central

    Coen, Paul M.; DiStefano, Giovanna; Chacon, Alexander C.; Helbling, Nicole L.; Desimone, Marisa E.; Stafanovic-Racic, Maja; Hames, Kazanna C.; Despines, Alex A.; Toledo, Frederico G. S.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute lipid-induced insulin resistance would be attenuated in high-oxidative muscle of lean trained (LT) endurance athletes due to their enhanced metabolic flexibility and mitochondrial capacity. Lean sedentary (LS), obese sedentary (OS), and LT participants completed two hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with and without (glycerol control) the coinfusion of Intralipid. Metabolic flexibility was measured by indirect calorimetry as the oxidation of fatty acids and glucose during fasted and insulin-stimulated conditions, the latter with and without lipid oversupply. Muscle biopsies were obtained for mitochondrial and insulin-signaling studies. During hyperinsulinemia without lipid, glucose infusion rate (GIR) was lowest in OS due to lower rates of nonoxidative glucose disposal (NOGD), whereas state 4 respiration was increased in all groups. Lipid infusion reduced GIR similarly in all subjects and reduced state 4 respiration. However, in LT subjects, fat oxidation was higher with lipid oversupply, and although glucose oxidation was reduced, NOGD was better preserved compared with LS and OS subjects. Mitochondrial performance was positively associated with better NOGD and insulin sensitivity in both conditions. We conclude that enhanced mitochondrial performance with exercise is related to better metabolic flexibility and insulin sensitivity in response to lipid overload. PMID:25352435

  5. A Limousin specific myostatin allele affects longissimus muscle area and fatty acid profiles in a Wagyu-Limousin F*2* population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microsatellite-based genome scan of a Wagyu x Limousin F2 cross population previously demonstrated QTL affecting longissimus muscle area (LMA) and fatty acid composition were present in regions near the centromere of BTA 2. In this study we used 70 SNP markers to examine the centromeric 20 megabas...

  6. Warm-up effects on muscle oxygenation, metabolism and sprint cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Wittekind, Anna; Cooper, Chris E; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Beneke, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of warm-up intensity on all-out sprint cycling performance, muscle oxygenation and metabolism, 8 trained male cyclists/triathletes undertook a 30-s sprint cycling test preceded by moderate, heavy or severe warm up and 10-min recovery. Muscle oxygenation was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, with deoxyhaemoglobin ([HHb]) during the sprint analysed with monoexponential models with time delay. Aerobic, anaerobic-glycolytic and phosphocreatine energy provision to the sprint were estimated from oxygen uptake and lactate production. Immediately prior to the sprint, blood [lactate] was different for each warm up and higher than resting for the heavy and severe warm ups (mod. 0.94 ± 0.36, heavy 1.92 ± 0.64, severe 4.37 ± 0.93 mmol l(-1) P < 0.05), although muscle oxygenation was equally raised above rest. Mean power during the sprint was lower following severe compared to moderate warm up (mod. 672 ± 54, heavy 666 ± 56, severe 655 ± 59 W, P < 0.05). The [HHb] kinetics during the sprint were not different among conditions, although the time delay before [HHb] increased was shorter for severe versus moderate warm up (mod. 5.8 ± 0.6, heavy 5.6 ± 0.9, severe 5.2 ± 0.7 s, P < 0.05). The severe warm up was without effect on estimated aerobic metabolism, but increased estimated phosphocreatine hydrolysis, the latter unable to compensate for the reduction in estimated anaerobic-glycolytic metabolism. It appears that despite all warm ups equally increasing muscle oxygenation, and indicators of marginally faster oxygen utilisation at the start of exercise following a severe-intensity warm up, other energy sources may not be able to fully compensate for a reduced glycolytic rate in sprint exercise with potential detrimental effects on performance.

  7. Training effects on peripheral muscle oxygenation and performance in children with congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Moalla, Wassim; Elloumi, Mohamed; Chamari, Karim; Dupont, Grégory; Maingourd, Yves; Tabka, Zouhair; Ahmaidi, Said

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the effect of training on peripheral muscular performance and oxygenation during exercise and recovery in children with congenital heart diseases (CHD). Eighteen patients with CHD aged 12 to 15 years were randomly assigned into either an individualized 12-week aerobic cycling training group (TG) or a control group (CG). Maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and endurance at 50% MVC (time to exhaustion, T(lim)) of the knee extensors were measured before and after training. During the 50% MVC exercise and recovery, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to assess the fall in muscle oxygenation, i.e., deoxygenation ([Formula: see text]) of the vastus lateralis, the mean rate of decrease in muscle oxygenation, the half time of recovery (T(1/2R)), and the recovery speed to maximal oxygenation (R(S)). There was no effect of time on any parameter in the CG. After training, significant improvements were observed in TG for MVC (101.6 ± 14.0 vs. 120.2 ± 19.4 N·m, p < 0.01) and T(lim) (66.2 ± 22.6 vs. 86.0 ± 23.0 s, p< 0.01). Increased oxygenation (0.20 ± 0.13 vs. 0.15 ± 0.07 a.u., p < 0.01) and faster mean rate of decrease in muscle oxygenation were also shown after training in TG (1.22 ± 0.45 vs. 1.71 ± 0.78%·s(-1), p < 0.001). Moreover, a shorter recovery time was observed in TG after training for T(1/2R) (27.2 ± 6.1 vs. 20.8 ± 4.2 s, p < 0.01) and R(S) (63.1 ± 18.4 vs. 50.3 ± 11.4 s, p < 0.01). A significant relationship between the change in [Formula: see text] and both MVC (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and T(lim) (r = 0.90, p < 0.001) in TG was observed. We concluded that exercise training improves peripheral muscular function by enhancing strength and endurance performance in children with CHD. This improvement was associated with increased oxygenation of peripheral muscles and faster recovery.

  8. Affective Responses to an Aerobic Dance Class: The Impact of Perceived Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, John B.; Miller, Bridget M.

    2002-01-01

    Tested the mastery hypothesis as an explanation for the affective benefits of acute exercise. Undergraduate women from a self-selected aerobic dance class rated their exercise performance following class. Affect questionnaires were completed before and at 5 and 20 minutes after the class. Results showed an overall improvement in affect following…

  9. Task Failure during Exercise to Exhaustion in Normoxia and Hypoxia Is Due to Reduced Muscle Activation Caused by Central Mechanisms While Muscle Metaboreflex Does Not Limit Performance

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Peralta, Rafael; Morales-Alamo, David; González-Izal, Miriam; Losa-Reyna, José; Pérez-Suárez, Ismael; Izquierdo, Mikel; Calbet, José A. L.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether task failure during incremental exercise to exhaustion (IE) is principally due to reduced neural drive and increased metaboreflex activation eleven men (22 ± 2 years) performed a 10 s control isokinetic sprint (IS; 80 rpm) after a short warm-up. This was immediately followed by an IE in normoxia (Nx, PIO2:143 mmHg) and hypoxia (Hyp, PIO2:73 mmHg) in random order, separated by a 120 min resting period. At exhaustion, the circulation of both legs was occluded instantaneously (300 mmHg) during 10 or 60 s to impede recovery and increase metaboreflex activation. This was immediately followed by an IS with open circulation. Electromyographic recordings were obtained from the vastus medialis and lateralis. Muscle biopsies and blood gases were obtained in separate experiments. During the last 10 s of the IE, pulmonary ventilation, VO2, power output and muscle activation were lower in hypoxia than in normoxia, while pedaling rate was similar. Compared to the control sprint, performance (IS-Wpeak) was reduced to a greater extent after the IE-Nx (11% lower P < 0.05) than IE-Hyp. The root mean square (EMGRMS) was reduced by 38 and 27% during IS performed after IE-Nx and IE-Hyp, respectively (Nx vs. Hyp: P < 0.05). Post-ischemia IS-EMGRMS values were higher than during the last 10 s of IE. Sprint exercise mean (IS-MPF) and median (IS-MdPF) power frequencies, and burst duration, were more reduced after IE-Nx than IE-Hyp (P < 0.05). Despite increased muscle lactate accumulation, acidification, and metaboreflex activation from 10 to 60 s of ischemia, IS-Wmean (+23%) and burst duration (+10%) increased, while IS-EMGRMS decreased (−24%, P < 0.05), with IS-MPF and IS-MdPF remaining unchanged. In conclusion, close to task failure, muscle activation is lower in hypoxia than in normoxia. Task failure is predominantly caused by central mechanisms, which recover to great extent within 1 min even when the legs remain ischemic. There is dissociation between the

  10. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    PubMed

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L), and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  11. Shoulder muscle loading and task performance for overhead work on ladders versus Mobile Elevated Work Platforms.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Denis; O'Sullivan, Leonard

    2014-11-01

    A high incidence of Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) has been reported in the construction sector. The use of ladders in the workplace has long been identified as a significant risk that can lead to workplace accidents. However, it is unclear if platform types have an effect on the physical risk factors for MSDs in overhead work. The aim of this study is to perform a pilot study on the effects of hand activity on both shoulder muscle loading and task performance while working on ladders versus Mobile Elevated Working Platforms (MEWPs). It is hypothesised that work on ladders would result in greater muscle loading demands, increased levels of discomfort, and reduced performance due to the restrictions on postures that could be adopted. A field study (n = 19) of experienced electricians on a construction site found that workers spent approximately 28% of their working time on ladders versus 6% on MEWPs. However, the durations of individual tasks were higher on MEWPs (153 s) than on ladders (73 s). Additionally, maximum levels of perceived discomfort (on a VAS 0-100) were reported for the shoulders (27), neck (23), and lower regions of the body (22). A simulated study (n = 12) found that task performance and discomfort were not significantly different between platform types (ladder vs. MEWP) when completing either of three tasks: cabling, assembly and drilling. However, platform and task had significant effects (p < 0.05) on median electromyographic (EMG) activity of the anterior deltoid and upper trapezius. EMG amplitudes were higher for the deltoid than the upper trapezius. For the deltoid, the peak amplitudes were, on average, higher for ladder work over MEWP work for the hand intensive cabling (32 vs. 27% Maximal Voluntary Exertion (MVE)) and the assembly task (19 vs. 6% MVE). Conversely, for drilling, the peak EMG amplitudes were marginally lower for ladder compared to the MEWP (3.9 vs. 5.1% MVE). The general implication was that working on the MEWP

  12. "Functional" Inspiratory and Core Muscle Training Enhances Running Performance and Economy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tomas K; McConnell, Alison K; Lin, Hua; Nie, Jinlei; Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jiayuan

    2016-10-01

    Tong, TK, McConnell, AK, Lin, H, Nie, J, Zhang, H, and Wang, J. "Functional" inspiratory and core muscle training enhances running performance and economy. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2942-2951, 2016-We compared the effects of two 6-week high-intensity interval training interventions. Under the control condition (CON), only interval training was undertaken, whereas under the intervention condition (ICT), interval training sessions were followed immediately by core training, which was combined with simultaneous inspiratory muscle training (IMT)-"functional" IMT. Sixteen recreational runners were allocated to either ICT or CON groups. Before the intervention phase, both groups undertook a 4-week program of "foundation" IMT to control for the known ergogenic effect of IMT (30 inspiratory efforts at 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0] per set, 2 sets per day, 6 days per week). The subsequent 6-week interval running training phase consisted of 3-4 sessions per week. In addition, the ICT group undertook 4 inspiratory-loaded core exercises (10 repetitions per set, 2 sets per day, inspiratory load set at 50% post-IMT P0) immediately after each interval training session. The CON group received neither core training nor functional IMT. After the intervention phase, global inspiratory and core muscle functions increased in both groups (p ≤ 0.05), as evidenced by P0 and a sport-specific endurance plank test (SEPT) performance, respectively. Compared with CON, the ICT group showed larger improvements in SEPT, running economy at the speed of the onset of blood lactate accumulation, and 1-hour running performance (3.04% vs. 1.57%, p ≤ 0.05). The changes in these variables were interindividually correlated (r ≥ 0.57, n = 16, p ≤ 0.05). Such findings suggest that the addition of inspiratory-loaded core conditioning into a high-intensity interval training program augments the influence of the interval program on endurance running performance and that this may be

  13. Students' Achievement Goals, Emotion Perception Ability and Affect and Performance in the Classroom: A Multilevel Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassiou, Aikaterini; Mouratidis, Athanasios; Andreou, Eleni; Kafetsios, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Performance at school is affected not only by students' achievement goals but also by emotional exchanges among classmates and their teacher. In this study, we investigated relationships between students' achievement goals and emotion perception ability and class affect and performance. Participants were 949 Greek adolescent students in 49 classes…

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnnn of... - Performance Test Requirements for HCl Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Performance Test Requirements for HCl... Requirements for HCl Production Affected Sources As stated in § 63.9020, you must comply with the following requirements for performance tests for HCl production for each affected source. For each HCl process vent...

  15. Do Trunk Muscles Affect the Lumbar Interbody Fusion Rate?: Correlation of Trunk Muscle Cross Sectional Area and Fusion Rates after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion Using Stand-Alone Cage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man Kyu; Park, Bong Jin; Park, Chang Kyu; Kim, Sung Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although trunk muscles in the lumbar spine preserve spinal stability and motility, little is known about the relationship between trunk muscles and spinal fusion rate. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the correlation between trunk muscles cross sectional area (MCSA) and fusion rate after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using stand-alone cages. Methods A total of 89 adult patients with degenerative lumbar disease who were performed PLIF using stand-alone cages at L4–5 were included in this study. The cross-sectional area of the psoas major (PS), erector spinae (ES), and multifidus (MF) muscles were quantitatively evaluated by preoperative lumbar magnetic resonance imaging at the L3–4, L4–5, and L5–S1 segments, and bone union was evaluated by dynamic lumbar X-rays. Results Of the 89 patients, 68 had bone union and 21 did not. The MCSAs at all segments in both groups were significantly different (p<0.05) for the PS muscle, those at L3–4 and L4–5 segments between groups were significantly different (p=0.048, 0.021) for the ES and MF muscles. In the multivariate analysis, differences in the PS MCSA at the L4–5 and L5–S1 segments remained significant (p=0.048, 0.043 and odds ratio=1.098, 1.169). In comparison analysis between male and female patients, most MCSAs of male patients were larger than female's. Fusion rates of male patients (80.7%) were higher than female's (68.8%), too. Conclusion For PLIF surgery, PS muscle function appears to be an important factor for bone union and preventing back muscle injury is essential for better fusion rate. PMID:27226860

  16. How well do muscle biomechanics predict whole-animal locomotor performance? The role of Ca2+ handling.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Pollard, Samuel R; James, Rob S

    2012-06-01

    It is important to determine the enabling mechanisms that underlie locomotor performance to explain the evolutionary patterns and ecological success of animals. Our aim was to determine the extent to which calcium (Ca(2+)) handling dynamics modulate the contractile properties of isolated skeletal muscle, and whether the effects of changing Ca(2+) handling dynamics in skeletal muscle are paralleled by changes in whole-animal sprint and sustained swimming performance. Carp (Cyprinus carpio) increased swimming speed by concomitant increases in tail-beat amplitude and frequency. Reducing Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by blocking ryanodine receptors with dantrolene decreased isolated peak muscle force and was paralleled by a decrease in tail-beat frequency and whole-animal sprint performance. An increase in fatigue resistance following dantrolene treatment may reflect the reduced depletion of Ca(2+) stores in the SR associated with lower ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity. Blocking RyRs may be detrimental by reducing force production and beneficial by reducing SR Ca(2+) depletion so that there was no net effect on critical sustained swimming speed (U(crit)). In isolated muscle, there was no negative effect on force production of blocking Ca(2+) release via dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) with nifedipine. Nifedipine decreased fatigue resistance of isolated muscle, which was paralleled by decreases in tail-beat frequency and U(crit). However, sprint performance also decreased with DHPR inhibition, which may indicate a role in muscle contraction of the Ca(2+) released by DHPR into the myocyte. Inhibiting sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity with thapsigargin decreased fatigue resistance, suggesting that SERCA activity is important in avoiding Ca(2+) store depletion and fatigue. We have shown that different molecular mechanisms modulate the same muscle and whole-animal traits, which provides an explanatory model for the observed

  17. Creb coactivators direct anabolic responses and enhance performance of skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Nelson E; Kelly, Kimberly A; Hawkins, Richard; Bramah-Lawani, Mariam; Amelio, Antonio L; Nwachukwu, Jerome C; Nettles, Kendall W; Conkright, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    During the stress response to intense exercise, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) induces rapid catabolism of energy reserves through the release of catecholamines and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Paradoxically, chronic administration of sympathomimetic drugs (β-agonists) leads to anabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, suggesting that sympathetic outflow also regulates myofiber remodeling. Here, we show that β-agonists or catecholamines released during intense exercise induce Creb-mediated transcriptional programs through activation of its obligate coactivators Crtc2 and Crtc3. In contrast to the catabolic activity normally associated with SNS function, activation of the Crtc/Creb transcriptional complex by conditional overexpression of Crtc2 in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice fostered an anabolic state of energy and protein balance. Crtc2-overexpressing mice have increased myofiber cross-sectional area, greater intramuscular triglycerides and glycogen content. Moreover, maximal exercise capacity was enhanced after induction of Crtc2 expression in transgenic mice. Collectively these findings demonstrate that the SNS-adrenergic signaling cascade coordinates a transient catabolic stress response during high-intensity exercise, which is followed by transcriptional reprogramming that directs anabolic changes for recovery and that augments subsequent exercise performance. PMID:24674967

  18. Effects of dietary methionine on growth performance, meat quality and oxidative status of breast muscle in fast- and slow-growing broilers.

    PubMed

    Wen, C; Jiang, X Y; Ding, L R; Wang, T; Zhou, Y M

    2016-12-22

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary methionine (Met) on growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and oxidative status of breast muscle in fast- (Arbor Acres, AA) and slow- (Partridge Shank, PS) growing broilers from 1 to 42 d of age. The broilers were divided into a 2 × 3 factorial design with 6 replicates per treatment. Diets were formulated to contain low (LM, 0.35 and 0.31% during 1 to 21 and 22 to 42 d), adequate (AM, 0.50 and 0.44%) and high (HM, 0.65 and 0.57%) Met, respectively. The main effects showed that the AA broilers had superior (P < 0.05) growth performance and carcass traits compared with those of the PS broilers. The breast muscle of the AA broilers had lower (P < 0.05) drip loss and malondialdehyde (MDA) content but higher (P < 0.05) cooking loss and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity than that of the PS broilers. Compared with the LM diets, the AM and HM diets increased (P < 0.05) 42-d BW, ADG, eviscerated yield and breast muscle yield only in the AA broilers. The AA broilers fed the HM diets had higher (P < 0.05) pH but lower (P < 0.05) L*, cooking loss and ether extract content in breast muscle than those fed the LM diets. Compared with the LM diets, the HM diets resulted in strain-dependent changes (P < 0.05) in muscle oxidative status, with total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) increased in the AA broilers, GPX activity increased and MDA content decreased in the PS broilers, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased in both strains of broilers. No differences were observed between the AM and HM diets except for T-AOC in breast muscle. In conclusion, the LM treatment negatively affected broiler growth performance, carcass traits, meat quality and oxidative status of breast muscle in a strain-dependent manner, particularly in the AA broilers, whereas the HM treatment had limited effects compared to the AM treatment.

  19. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482.

  20. Dietary lysine affected the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been reported that some amino acids can function as signaling molecules to regulate skeletal muscle growth in mammals. This study was conducted to identify those genes that may be regulated by amino acid lysine and responsible for muscle growth and meat quality of pigs. Nine crossbred barrows...

  1. Relationships between explosive and maximal triple extensor muscle performance and vertical jump height.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eunwook; Norcross, Marc F; Johnson, Sam T; Kitagawa, Taichi; Hoffman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between maximum vertical jump height and (a) rate of torque development (RTD) calculated during 2 time intervals, 0-50 milliseconds (RTD50) and 0-200 milliseconds (RTD200) after torque onset and (b) peak torque (PT) for each of the triple extensor muscle groups. Thirty recreationally active individuals performed maximal isometric voluntary contractions (MVIC) of the hip, knee and ankle extensors, and a countermovement vertical jump. Rate of torque development was calculated from 0 to 50 (RTD50) and 0 to 200 (RTD200) milliseconds after the onset of joint torque. Peak torque was identified and defined as the maximum torque value during each MVIC trial. Greater vertical jump height was associated with greater knee and ankle extension RTD50, RTD200, and PT (p ≤ 0.05). However, hip extension RTD50, RTD200, and PT were not significantly related to maximal vertical jump height (p > 0.05). The results indicate that 47.6 and 32.5% of the variability in vertical jump height was explained by knee and ankle extensor RTD50, respectively. Knee and ankle extensor RTD50 also seemed to be more closely related to vertical jump performance than RTD200 (knee extensor: 28.1% and ankle extensor: 28.1%) and PT (knee extensor: 31.4% and ankle extensor: 13.7%). Overall, these results suggest that training specifically targeted to improve knee and ankle extension RTD, especially during the early phases of muscle contraction, may be effective for increasing maximal vertical jump performance.

  2. Caffeine intake improves intense intermittent exercise performance and reduces muscle interstitial potassium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2011-11-01

    The effect of oral caffeine ingestion on intense intermittent exercise performance and muscle interstitial ion concentrations was examined. The study consists of two studies (S1 and S2). In S1, 12 subjects completed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) test with prior caffeine (6 mg/kg body wt; CAF) or placebo (PLA) intake. In S2, 6 subjects performed one low-intensity (20 W) and three intense (50 W) 3-min (separated by 5 min) one-legged knee-extension exercise bouts with (CAF) and without (CON) prior caffeine supplementation for determination of muscle interstitial K(+) and Na(+) with microdialysis. In S1 Yo-Yo IR2 performance was 16% better (P < 0.05) in CAF compared with PLA. In CAF, plasma K(+) at the end of the Yo-Yo IR2 test was 5.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l with no difference between the trials. Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) were higher (P < 0.05) in CAF than PLA at rest and remained higher (P < 0.05) during exercise. Peak blood glucose (8.0 ± 0.6 vs. 6.2 ± 0.4 mmol/l) and plasma NH(3) (137.2 ± 10.8 vs. 113.4 ± 13.3 μmol/l) were also higher (P < 0.05) in CAF compared with PLA. In S2 interstitial K(+) was 5.5 ± 0.3, 5.7 ± 0.3, 5.8 ± 0.5, and 5.5 ± 0.3 mmol/l at the end of the 20-W and three 50-W periods, respectively, in CAF, which were lower (P < 0.001) than in CON (7.0 ± 0.6, 7.5 ± 0.7, 7.5 ± 0.4, and 7.0 ± 0.6 mmol/l, respectively). No differences in interstitial Na(+) were observed between CAF and CON. In conclusion, caffeine intake enhances fatigue resistance and reduces muscle interstitial K(+) during intense intermittent exercise.

  3. Identifying Affective Domains That Correlate and Predict Mathematics Performance in High-Performing Students in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Siew Yee; Chapman, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have shown that distinct yet highly correlated sub-constructs of three broad mathematics affective variables: (a) motivation, (b) attitudes and (c) anxiety, have varying degree of correlation with mathematics achievement. The sub-constructs of these three affective constructs are as follows: (a) (i) amotivation, (ii) external…

  4. Alternative S2 hinge regions of the myosin rod differentially affect muscle function, myofibril dimensions and myosin tail length

    PubMed Central

    Suggs, Jennifer A.; Cammarato, Anthony; Kronert, William A.; Nikkhoy, Massoud; Dambacher, Corey M.; Megighian, Aram; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2007-01-01

    Muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) rod domains intertwine to form alpha-helical coiled-coil dimers; these subsequently multimerize into thick filaments via electrostatic interactions. The subfragment 2/light meromyosin “hinge” region of the MHC rod, located in the C-terminal third of heavy meromyosin, may form a less stable coiled-coil than flanking regions. Partial “melting” of this region has been proposed to result in a helix to random-coil transition. A portion of the Drosophila melanogaster MHC hinge is encoded by mutually exclusive alternative exons 15a and 15b, the use of which correlates with fast (hinge A) or slow (hinge B) muscle physiological properties. To test the functional significance of alternative hinge regions, we constructed transgenic fly lines in which fast muscle isovariant hinge A was switched for slow muscle hinge B in the MHC isoforms of indirect flight and jump muscles. Substitution of the slow muscle hinge B impaired flight ability, increased sarcomere lengths by approximately 13% and resulted in minor disruption to indirect flight muscle sarcomeric structure compared with a transgenic control. With age, residual flight ability decreased rapidly and myofibrils developed peripheral defects. Computational analysis indicates that hinge B has a greater coiled-coil propensity and thus reduced flexibility compared to hinge A. Intriguingly, the MHC rod with hinge B was ~5 nm longer than myosin with hinge A, consistent with the more rigid coiled-coil conformation predicted for hinge B. Our study demonstrates that hinge B cannot functionally substitute for hinge A in fast muscle types, likely as a result of differences in the molecular structure of the rod, subtle changes in myofibril structure and decreased ability to maintain sarcomere structure in indirect flight muscle myofibrils. Thus alternative hinges are important in dictating the distinct functional properties of myosin isoforms and the muscles in which they are expressed. PMID

  5. Differential effects of 30- vs. 60-second static muscle stretching on vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Matheus D; Wilhelm, Eurico N; Tricoli, Valmor; Pinto, Ronei S; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-12-01

    It has been proposed that pre-exercise static stretching may reduce muscle force and power. Recent systematic and meta-analytical reviews have proposed a threshold regarding the effect of short (<45 seconds) and moderate (≥60 seconds) stretching durations on subsequent performance in a multi-joint task (e.g., jump performance), although its effect on power output remains less clear. Furthermore, no single experimental study has explicitly compared the effect of short (e.g., 30 seconds) and moderate (60 seconds) durations of continuous static stretching on multi-joint performance. Therefore, the aim of the present study was determine the effect of acute short- and moderate-duration continuous stretching interventions on vertical jump performance and power output. Sixteen physically active men (21.0 ± 1.9 years; 1.7 ± 0.1 m; 78.4 ± 12.1 kg) volunteered for the study. After familiarization, subjects attended the laboratory for 3 testing sessions. In the nonstretching (NS) condition, subjects performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) test without a preceding stretching bout. In the other 2 conditions, subjects performed 30-second (30SS; 4 minutes) or 60-second (60SS; 8 minutes) static stretching bouts in calf muscles, hamstrings, gluteus maximus, and quadriceps, respectively, followed by the CMJ test. Results were compared by repeated-measures analysis of variance. In comparison with NS, 60SS resulted in a lower CMJ height (-3.4%, p ≤ 0.05) and average (-2.7%, p ≤ 0.05) and peak power output (-2.0%, p ≤ 0.05), but no difference was observed between 30SS and the other conditions (p > 0.05). These data suggest a dose-dependent effect of stretching on muscular performance, which is in accordance with previous studies. The present results suggest a threshold of continuous static stretching in which muscular power output in a multi-joint task may be impaired immediately following moderate-duration (60 seconds; 8 minutes) static stretching while short-duration (30

  6. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice.

  7. A randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of statins on skeletal muscle function and performance: rationale and study design.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul D; Parker, Beth A; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Pescatello, Linda S; White, C Michael; Grimaldi, Adam S; Levine, Benjamin D; Haller, Ronald G; Hoffman, Eric P

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors or statins are the most effective medications for reducing elevated concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Statins reduce cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease and previously healthy persons. Current recommendations for LDL-C treatment goals indicate that more patients will be treated with higher doses of these medications. Statins have been extremely well-tolerated in controlled clinical trials but are increasingly recognized to produce skeletal muscle myalgia, cramps, and weakness. The reported frequency of such mild symptoms is not clear, and muscle performance has not been examined with these medications. Accordingly, the present investigation, the Effect of Statins on Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance (STOMP) study, will recruit approximately 440 healthy persons. Participants will be randomly assigned to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg/d or placebo. Handgrip, elbow and knee isometric and isokinetic strength, knee extensor endurance, and maximal aerobic exercise performance will be determined at baseline. Participants will undergo repeat testing after 6 months of treatment or after meeting the study definition of statin myalgia. This study will determine the effect of statins on skeletal muscle strength, endurance, and aerobic exercise performance and may ultimately help clinicians better evaluate statin-related muscle and exercise complaints.

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess the Effect of Statins on Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance: Rationale and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Paul D.; Parker, Beth A.; Clarkson, Priscilla M.; Pescatello, Linda S.; White, C. Michael; Grimaldi, Adam S.; Levine, Benjamin D.; Haller, Ronald G.; Hoffman, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors or statins are the most effective medications for reducing elevated concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Statins reduce cardiac events in patients with coronary artery disease and previously healthy persons. Current recommendations for LDL-C treatment goals indicate that more patients will be treated with higher doses of these medications. Statins have been extremely well-tolerated in controlled clinical trials but are increasingly recognized to produce skeletal muscle myalgia, cramps, and weakness. The reported frequency of such mild symptoms is not clear, and muscle performance has not been examined with these medications. Accordingly, the present investigation, the Effect of Statins on Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance (STOMP) study, will recruit approximately 440 healthy persons. Participants will be randomly assigned to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg/d or placebo. Handgrip, elbow and knee isometric and isokinetic strength, knee extensor endurance, and maximal aerobic exercise performance will be determined at baseline. Participants will undergo repeat testing after 6 months of treatment or after meeting the study definition of statin myalgia. This study will determine the effect of statins on skeletal muscle strength, endurance, and aerobic exercise performance and may ultimately help clinicians better evaluate statin-related muscle and exercise complaints. PMID:20626664

  9. It wears me out just imagining it! Mental imagery leads to muscle fatigue and diminished performance of isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Graham, Jeffrey D; Sonne, Michael W L; Bray, Steven R

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aftereffects of self-generated mental imagery of an effortful task on physical self-control endurance and muscle fatigue. Participants performed two isometric handgrip endurance trials (50% of maximum contraction) separated by either an imagery manipulation or a quiet rest period. The imagery group showed greater negative changes in endurance performance from trial 1 to trial 2 (p=.003, d=0.87) and increased muscle activation at baseline (p=.01, d=0.73) and at 25% (p=.03, d=0.61) of the second endurance trial compared to controls. We conclude that imagined performance of an effortful task depletes self-control strength and contributes to muscle fatigue.

  10. Influence of Inspiratory Muscle Training on Ventilatory Efficiency and Cycling Performance in Normoxia and Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Martínez, Eduardo; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Naranjo Orellana, José; Santalla, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on ventilatory efficiency, in normoxia and hypoxia, and to investigate the relationship between ventilatory efficiency and cycling performance. Sixteen sport students (23.05 ± 4.7 years; 175.11 ± 7.1 cm; 67.0 ± 19.4 kg; 46.4 ± 8.7 ml·kg−1·min−1) were randomly assigned to an inspiratory muscle training group (IMTG) and a control group (CG). The IMTG performed two training sessions/day [30 inspiratory breaths, 50% peak inspiratory pressure (Pimax), 5 days/week, 6-weeks]. Before and after the training period subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to exhaustion with gas analysis, lung function testing, and a cycling time trial test in hypoxia and normoxia. Simulated hypoxia (FiO2 = 16.45%), significantly altered the ventilatory efficiency response in all subjects (p < 0.05). Pimax increased significantly in the IMTG whereas no changes occurred in the CG (time × group, p < 0.05). Within group analyses showed that the IMTG improved ventilatory efficiency (VE/VCO2 slope; EqCO2VT2) in hypoxia (p < 0.05) and cycling time trial performance [WTTmax (W); WTTmean (W); PTF(W)] (p < 0.05) in hypoxia and normoxia. Significant correlations were not found in hypoxia nor normoxia found between ventilatory efficiency parameters (VE/VCO2 slope; LEqCO2; EqCO2VT2) and time trial performance. On the contrary the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) was highly correlated with cycling time trial performance (r = 0.89; r = 0.82; p < 0.001) under both conditions. Even though no interaction effect was found, the within group analysis may suggest that IMT reduces the negative effects of hypoxia on ventilatory efficiency. In addition, the data suggest that OUES plays an important role in submaximal cycling performance. PMID:28337149

  11. Acute Effects of Different Methods of Stretching and Specific Warm-ups on Muscle Architecture and Strength Performance.

    PubMed

    Sá, Marcos A; Matta, Thiago T; Carneiro, Simone P; Araujo, Carolina O; Novaes, Jefferson S; Oliveira, Liliam F

    2016-08-01

    Sá, MA, Matta, TT, Carneiro, SP, Araujo, CO, Novaes, JS, and Oliveira, LF. Acute effects of different methods of stretching and specific warm-ups on muscle architecture and strength performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2324-2329, 2016-The purpose of the study was to investigate the acute effects of 2 stretching interventions, proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) and passive static stretching (PSS), and a specific warm-up (SW) on the strength and architecture of the vastus laterallis and biceps femoris muscles in a subsequent performance on a strength training session (STS). Musculoskeletal ultrasound images were acquired from 9 men before and immediately after stretchings or a SW, and 10 minutes after a STS. The STS consisted of the following exercises: leg extension, leg curl, leg press, and hack machine squat. The PNF resulted in lower performance for all situations. The PSS and SW improved performance for the leg press compared with the PNF and controls (CSs). For the hack machine squat, SWs resulted in higher performance than stretching conditions. The vastus lateralis muscle fascicle length (FL) increases after a STS for PNF. The biceps femoris muscle showed a higher pennation angle 10 minutes after the STS for PSS; the FL increases immediately after PSS and then decreases 10 minutes after the STS for PSS. As per our results, the SWs should be performed before STSs, whereas PNF stretching should not be prescribed because this condition impairs subsequent performance. These results may assist health professionals in prescribing resistance training.

  12. Multimodal high-intensity interval training increases muscle function and metabolic performance in females.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Stephanie; Knapp, Kelly; Lackie, Amy; Lewry, Colin; Horvey, Karla; Benko, Chad; Trinh, Jason; Butcher, Scotty

    2015-11-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient method of improving aerobic and anaerobic power and capacity. In most individuals, however, HIIT using modalities such as cycling, running, and rowing does not typically result in increased muscle strength, power, or endurance. The purpose of this study is to compare the physiological outcomes of traditional HIIT using rowing (Row-HIIT) with a novel multimodal HIIT (MM-HIIT) circuit incorporating multiple modalities, including strength exercises, within an interval. Twenty-eight recreationally active women (age 24.7 ± 5.4 years) completed 6 weeks of either Row-HIIT or MM-HIIT and were tested on multiple fitness parameters. MM-HIIT and Row-HIIT resulted in similar improvements (p < 0.05 for post hoc pre- vs. post-training increases for each group) in maximal aerobic power (7% vs. 5%), anaerobic threshold (13% vs. 12%), respiratory compensation threshold (7% vs. 5%), anaerobic power (15% vs. 12%), and anaerobic capacity (18% vs. 14%). The MM-HIIT group had significant (p < 0.01 for all) increases in squat (39%), press (27%), and deadlift (18%) strength, broad jump distance (6%), and squat endurance (280%), whereas the Row-HIIT group had no increase in any muscle performance variable (p values 0.33-0.90). Post-training, 1-repetition maximum (1RM) squat (64.2 ± 13.6 vs. 45.8 ± 16.2 kg, p = 0.02), 1RM press (33.2 ± 3.8 vs. 26.0 ± 9.6 kg, p = 0.01), and squat endurance (23.9 ± 12.3 vs. 10.2 ± 5.6 reps, p < 0.01) were greater in the MM-HIIT group than in the Row-HIIT group. MM-HIIT resulted in similar aerobic and anaerobic adaptations but greater muscle performance increases than Row-HIIT in recreationally active women.

  13. Different dietary energy intake affects skeletal muscle development through an Akt-dependent pathway in Dorper × Small Thin-Tailed crossbred ewe lambs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J X; Liu, X D; Li, K; Liu, W Z; Ren, Y S; Zhang, J X

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the mechanisms through which different levels of dietary energy affect postnatal skeletal muscle development in ewe lambs. Twelve Dorper × Small Thin-Tailed crossbred ewe lambs (100 d of age; 20 ± 0.5 kg BW) were selected randomly and divided into 2 groups in a completely randomized design. Animals were offered identical diets at 100% or 65% of ad libitum intake. Lambs were euthanized when BW in the ad libitum group reached 35 kg and the semitendinosus muscle was sampled. Final BW and skeletal muscle weight were decreased (P < 0.01) by feed restriction. Both muscle fiber size distribution and myofibril cross-sectional area were altered by feed restriction. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) messenger RNA (mRNA) content was decreased (P < 0.05) when lambs were underfed, whereas no difference for IGF-2 mRNA expression was observed (P > 0.05). Feed restriction altered phosphor-Akt protein abundance (P < 0.01). Moreover, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was inhibited by feed restriction, which was associated with decreased phosphor-mTOR, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (phosphor-4EBP1), and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 kinase (phosphor-S6K). Both mRNA expression of myostatin and its protein content were elevated in feed-restricted ewe lambs (P < 0.05). In addition, mRNA expression of both muscle RING finger 1 and muscle atrophy F-box was increased when ewe lambs were underfed. In summary, feed restriction in young growing ewe lambs attenuates skeletal muscle hypertrophy by inhibiting protein synthesis and increasing protein degradation, which may act through the Akt-dependent pathway.

  14. Ryanodine modification of RyR1 retrogradely affects L-type Ca(2+) channel gating in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bannister, R A; Beam, K G

    2009-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, there is bidirectional signalling between the L-type Ca(2+) channel (1,4-dihydropyridine receptor; DHPR) and the type 1 ryanodine-sensitive Ca(2+) release channel (RyR1) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). In the case of "orthograde signalling" (i.e., excitation-contraction coupling), the conformation of RyR1 is controlled by depolarization-induced conformational changes of the DHPR resulting in Ca(2+) release from the SR. "Retrograde coupling" is manifested as enhanced L-type current. The nature of this retrograde signal, and its dependence on RyR1 conformation, are poorly understood. Here, we have examined L-type currents in normal myotubes after an exposure to ryanodine (200 microM, 1 h at 37 degrees C) sufficient to lock RyR1 in a non-conducting, inactivated, conformational state. This treatment caused an increase in L-type current at less depolarized test potentials in comparison to myotubes similarly exposed to vehicle as a result of a approximately 5 mV hyperpolarizing shift in the voltage-dependence of activation. Charge movements of ryanodine-treated myotubes were also shifted to more hyperpolarizing potentials (approximately 13 mV) relative to vehicle-treated myotubes. Enhancement of the L-type current by ryanodine was absent in dyspedic (RyR1 null) myotubes, indicating that ryanodine does not act directly on the DHPR. Our findings indicate that in retrograde signaling, the functional state of RyR1 influences conformational changes of the DHPR involved in activation of L-type current. This raises the possibility that physiological regulators of the conformational state of RyR1 (e.g., Ca(2+), CaM, CaMK, redox potential) may also affect DHPR gating.

  15. The effect of exercise training with an additional inspiratory load on inspiratory muscle fatigue and time-trial performance.

    PubMed

    McEntire, Serina J; Smith, Joshua R; Ferguson, Christine S; Brown, Kelly R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Harms, Craig A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose was to determine the effect of moderate-intensity exercise training (ET) on inspiratory muscle fatigue (IMF) and if an additional inspiratory load during ET (ET+IL) would further improve inspiratory muscle strength, IMF, and time-trial performance. 15 subjects were randomly divided to ET (n=8) and ET+IL groups (n=7). All subjects completed six weeks of exercise training three days/week at ∼70%V̇O2peak for 30min. The ET+IL group breathed through an inspiratory muscle trainer (15% PImax) during exercise. 5-mile, and 30-min time-trials were performed pre-training, weeks three and six. Inspiratory muscle strength increased (p<0.05) for both groups to a similar (p>0.05) extent. ET and ET+IL groups improved (p<0.05) 5-mile time-trial performance (∼10% and ∼18%) and the ET+IL group was significantly faster than ET at week 6. ET and ET+IL groups experienced less (p<0.05) IMF compared to pre-training following the 5-mile time-trial. In conclusion, these data suggest ET leads to less IMF, ET+IL improves inspiratory muscle strength and IMF, but not different than ET alone.

  16. The susceptibility of the knee extensors to eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage is not affected by leg dominance but by exercise order.

    PubMed

    Hody, S; Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Laglaine, T; Croisier, J-L

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were first to compare the response of dominant and non-dominant legs to eccentric exercise and second, to examine whether there is an effect of exercise order on the magnitude of symptoms associated with intense eccentric protocols. Eighteen young men performed three sets of 30 maximal eccentric isokinetic (60° s(-1)) contractions of the knee extensors (range of motion, ROM: 0°-100°, 0 = full extension) using either dominant or non-dominant leg. They repeated a similar eccentric bout using the contralateral leg 6 weeks later. The sequence of leg's use was allocated to create equally balanced groups. Four indirect markers of muscle damage including subjective pain intensity, maximal isometric strength, muscle stiffness and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before and 24 h after exercise. All markers changed significantly following the eccentric bout performed either by dominant or non-dominant legs, but no significant difference was observed between legs. Interestingly, the comparison between the first and second eccentric bouts revealed that muscle soreness (-42%, P<0.001), CK activity (-62%, P<0.05) and strength loss (-54%, P<0.01) were significantly lower after the second bout. This study suggests that leg dominance does not influence the magnitude of exercise-induced muscle damage and supports for the first time the existence of a contralateral protection against exercise-induced muscle damage in the lower limbs.

  17. Does medical students’ clinical performance affect their actual performance during medical internship?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study examines the relationship between the clinical performance of medical students and their performance as doctors during their internships. METHODS This retrospective study involved 63 applicants of a residency programme conducted at Chonnam National University Hospital, South Korea, in November 2012. We compared the performance of the applicants during their internship with their clinical performance during their fourth year of medical school. The performance of the applicants as interns was periodically evaluated by the faculty of each department, while their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students was assessed using the Clinical Performance Examination (CPX) and the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). RESULTS The performance of the applicants as interns was positively correlated with their clinical performance as fourth-year medical students, as measured by the CPX and OSCE. The performance of the applicants as interns was moderately correlated with the patient-physician interaction items addressing communication and interpersonal skills in the CPX. CONCLUSION The clinical performance of medical students during their fourth year in medical school was related to their performance as medical interns. Medical students should be trained to develop good clinical skills through actual encounters with patients or simulated encounters using manikins, to enable them to become more competent doctors. PMID:26768172

  18. Adipose triglyceride lipase decrement affects skeletal muscle homeostasis during aging through FAs-PPARα-PGC-1α antioxidant response

    PubMed Central

    Aquilano, Katia; Baldelli, Sara; Barbera, Livia La; Barbato, Daniele Lettieri; Tatulli, Giuseppe; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    During aging skeletal muscle shows an accumulation of oxidative damage as well as intramyocellular lipid droplets (IMLDs). However, although the impact of these modifications on muscle tissue physiology is well established, the direct effectors critical for their occurrence are poorly understood. Here we show that during aging the main lipase of triacylglycerols, ATGL, significantly declines in gastrocnemius and its downregulation in C2C12 myoblast leads to the accumulation of lipid droplets. Indeed, we observed an increase of oxidative damage to proteins in terms of carbonylation, S-nitrosylation and ubiquitination that is dependent on a defective antioxidant cell response mediated by ATGL-PPARα-PGC-1α. Overall our findings describe a pivotal role for ATGL in the antioxidant/anti-inflammatory response of muscle cells highlighting this lipase as a therapeutic target for fighting the progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and strength. PMID:27056902

  19. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition and performance during repeated bouts of maximal, concentric contractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, E. B.; Dudley, G. A.; Tesch, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Force output and fatigue and recovery patterns were studied during intermittent short-term exercise. 27 men performed three bouts of 30 maximal unilateral knee extensions on 2 different occasions. Blood flow was maintained or occluded during recovery periods (60 s). Blood flow was restricted by inflating a pneumatic cuff placed around the proximal thigh. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were analyzed for identification of fast twitch (FT) and slow twitch (ST) fibers and relative FT area. Peak torque decreased during each bout of exercise and more when blood flow was restricted during recovery. Initial peak torque (IPT) and average peak torque (APT) decreased over the three exercise bouts. This response was 3 fold greater without than with blood flow during recovery. IPT and APT decreased more in individuals with mainly FT fibers than in those with mainly ST fibers. It is suggested that performance during repeated bouts of maximal concentric contractions differs between individuals with different fiber type composition. Specifically, in high intensity, intermittent exercise with emphasis on anaerobic energy release a high FT composition may not necessarily be advantageous for performance.

  20. Degraded postural performance after muscle fatigue can be compensated by skin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thedon, Thibaud; Mandrick, Kevin; Foissac, Matthieu; Mottet, Denis; Perrey, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    It has been shown that the ability of humans to maintain a quiet standing posture is degraded after fatigue of the muscles at the ankle. Yet, it has also been shown that skin stimulation at the ankle could improve postural performance. In the present study, we addressed the issue of the interaction of these two effects. Subjects were tested with the eyes closed in four conditions of quiet stance: with or without skin stimulation and before and after a fatigue protocol. The skin was stimulated with a piece of medical adhesive tape on the Achilles' tendon. The fatigue protocol consisted of multiple sets of ankle plantar flexion of both legs on stool. Without fatigue, we did not observe a significant effect of the tape. With fatigue, subjects decreased their postural performance significantly, but this effect was cancelled out when a piece of tape was glued on the Achilles' tendon. This indicated that the beneficial effect of the tape was unveiled by the degraded postural performance after fatigue. We conclude that, when the muscular sensory input flow normally relevant for the postural system is impaired due to fatigue, the weight of cutaneous information increases for the successful representation of movements in space to adjust postural control.

  1. Assessment of maximal cardiorespiratory performance and muscle power in the Italian Olympic judoka.

    PubMed

    Sbriccoli, Paola; Bazzucchi, Ilenia; Di Mario, Alberto; Marzattinocci, Giulia; Felici, Francesco

    2007-08-01

    The main purposes of this study were to describe the cardiorespiratory fitness and lower limbs maximal muscle power of a selected group of Olympic Italian male (M) and female (F) judokas. Eleven subjects (6 M, 5 F) underwent 3 different tests. The VO(2)max and ventilatory threshold (VT; V-slope method) were assessed during a graded maximal treadmill test. Lower limbs muscle peak power (PP) and mean power (MP) were determined during a 30-second Wingate test (WIN). Post-WIN blood lactate peak was also measured. Subjects were tested also during a 5-minute combat test (CT), during which blood lactate and heart rate (HR) were monitored. VO(2)max (mean +/- SD) was 47.3 +/- 10.9 and 52.9 +/- 4.4 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) for M and F judokas, respectively. The VT corresponded to 80.8% (M) and 86.5% (F) of VO(2)max. Both PP and MP, measured during the WIN, were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in M than in F judokas (PP: 12.1 +/- 2.4 vs. 9.5 +/- 1.1 W x kg(-1); MP: 5.4 +/- 1.1 W x kg(-1); F: 4.3 +/- 0.5 W x kg(-1)). Post WIN blood lactate peak was 6.9 +/- 2.8 mmol x l(-1) and 6.1 +/- 1.8 mmol x l(-1) for M and F judokas, respectively (not significant). During the CT blood lactate peak was 9.9 +/- 3.0 mmol x l(-1) (M) and 9.2 +/- 2.0 mmol x l(-1) (F); these values being significantly higher than those obtained after the WIN (p < 0.05). In conclusion, Italian Olympic judokas showed high levels of muscle power but accompanied by a moderate engagement of the aerobic metabolic pathway, which is well in accordance with the characteristics of judo. Having these results in top-level athletes may represent a useful contribution to the work of coaches and trainers in optimizing training programs for the achievement of the best performance of the judoka.

  2. Variations in Hypoxia Impairs Muscle Oxygenation and Performance during Simulated Team-Sport Running

    PubMed Central

    Sweeting, Alice J.; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C.; Rodriguez, Ramón F.; Hopkins, William G.; Aughey, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of acute hypoxia on muscle oxygenation and power during simulated team-sport running. Methods: Seven individuals performed repeated and single sprint efforts, embedded in a simulated team-sport running protocol, on a non-motorized treadmill in normoxia (sea-level), and acute normobaric hypoxia (simulated altitudes of 2,000 and 3,000 m). Mean and peak power was quantified during all sprints and repeated sprints. Mean total work, heart rate, blood oxygen saturation, and quadriceps muscle deoxyhaemoglobin concentration (assessed via near-infrared spectroscopy) were measured over the entire protocol. A linear mixed model was used to estimate performance and physiological effects across each half of the protocol. Changes were expressed in standardized units for assessment of magnitude. Uncertainty in the changes was expressed as a 90% confidence interval and interpreted via non-clinical magnitude-based inference. Results: Mean total work was reduced at 2,000 m (−10%, 90% confidence limits ±6%) and 3,000 m (−15%, ±5%) compared with sea-level. Mean heart rate was reduced at 3,000 m compared with 2,000 m (−3, ±3 min−1) and sea-level (−3, ±3 min−1). Blood oxygen saturation was lower at 2,000 m (−8, ±3%) and 3,000 m (−15, ±2%) compared with sea-level. Sprint mean power across the entire protocol was reduced at 3,000 m compared with 2,000 m (−12%, ±3%) and sea-level (−14%, ±4%). In the second half of the protocol, sprint mean power was reduced at 3,000 m compared to 2,000 m (−6%, ±4%). Sprint mean peak power across the entire protocol was lowered at 2,000 m (−10%, ±6%) and 3,000 m (−16%, ±6%) compared with sea-level. During repeated sprints, mean peak power was lower at 2,000 m (−8%, ±7%) and 3,000 m (−8%, ±7%) compared with sea-level. In the second half of the protocol, repeated sprint mean power was reduced at 3,000 m compared to 2,000 m (−7%, ±5%) and sea-level (−9%, ±5%). Quadriceps muscle

  3. Effects of Gender Difference and Caffeine Supplementation on Anaerobic Muscle Performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, H-Y; Wang, H-S; Tung, K; Chao, H-H

    2015-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of gender difference and caffeine supplementation to maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and submaximal voluntary isometric contractions (T(lim)). 10 male (age: 20.10 ± 2.18 years, BMI: 22.23±1.96 kg/m(2)) and 10 female (age: 19.90±0.99 years, BMI: 21.76±2.65 kg/m(2)) elite collegiate athletes were recruited. Subjects ingested caffeine (6 mg/kg) or a placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-control, and counter-balanced fashion. MVIC and T(lim) were measured after supplementations. T(lim) result was calculated based on the time to exhaustion of isometric contraction with 50% MVIC. Fatigue index (FI%) referred to the MVIC tested 20 s after the cessation of T(lim) test, and was indexed by the percentage of MVIC decline. No significant interaction effect was found between the gender factor and the supplementation factor for all dependent variables. Compared to the placebo, caffeine supplementation significantly increased MVIC (5.9%) and T(lim) (15.5%) (p<0.05) whereas it had no significant effect on FI%. This study demonstrates that caffeine supplementation at a 6 mg/kg dosage facilitates performances in MVIC and T(lim). The ergogenic effect of caffeine on muscle power and muscle endurance does not show a gender bias.

  4. Using leg muscles as shock absorbers: theoretical predictions and experimental results of drop landing performance.

    PubMed

    Minetti, A E; Ardigò, L P; Susta, D; Cotelli, F

    1998-12-01

    The use of muscles as power dissipators is investigated in this study, both from the modellistic and the experimental points of view. Theoretical predictions of the drop landing manoeuvre for a range of initial conditions have been obtained by accounting for the mechanical characteristics of knee extensor muscles, the limb geometry and assuming maximum neural activation. Resulting dynamics have been represented in the phase plane (vertical displacement versus speed) to better classify the damping performance. Predictions of safe landing in sedentary subjects were associated to dropping from a maximum (feet) height of 1.6-2.0 m (about 11 m on the moon). Athletes can extend up to 2.6-3.0 m, while for obese males (m = 100 kg, standard stature) the limit should reduce to 0.9-1.3 m. These results have been calculated by including in the model the estimated stiffness of the 'global elastic elements' acting below the squat position. Experimental landings from a height of 0.4, 0.7, 1.1 m (sedentary males (SM) and male (AM) and female (AF) athletes from the alpine ski national team) showed dynamics similar to the model predictions. While the peak power (for a drop height of about 0.7 m) was similar in SM and AF (AM shows a +40% increase, about 33 W/kg), AF stopped the downward movement after a time interval (0.219 +/- 0.030 s) from touch-down 20% significantly shorter than SM. Landing strategy and the effect of anatomical constraints are discussed in the paper.

  5. Relationships Between Metabolic Rate, Muscle Electromyograms and Swim Performance of Adult Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Brown, Richard S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Mesa, Matthew G.; VanderKooi, S P.; McKinstry, Craig A.

    2003-10-01

    In 2000 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated a two-year study to investigate the metabolic rate and swimming performance and to estimate the total energy used (i.e., aerobic and anaerobic) by adult spring Chinook salmon migrating upstream through a large hydropower dam on the Columbia River. The investigation involved one year of laboratory study and one year of field study at Bonneville Dam. The objectives of the laboratory study, reported here, were to (1) measure active rates of oxygen consumption of adult spring chinook salmon at three water temperatures over a range of swimming speeds; (2) estimate the Ucrit of adult spring chinook salmon; and (3) monitor EMGs of red and white muscle in the salmon over a range of swimming speeds. Future papers will report on the results of the field study. Our results indicated that the rate of oxygen consumption and red and white muscle activity in adult spring chinook salmon were strongly correlated with swimming speed over a range of fish sizes and at three different temperatures. Active oxygen consumption increased linearly with swim speed before leveling off at speeds at or above Ucrit. This pattern was similar at each water temperature and indicated that fish were approaching their maximal aerobic oxygen consumption at higher swim speeds. Modeling showed that temperature, but not size or sex, influenced the relation between V02 and swim speed, thus a V02-swim speed model based on temperature (but independent of sex and size) should be a biologically relevant way of estimating the energy use of fish in the wild.

  6. Discharge properties of motor units during steady isometric contractions performed with the dorsiflexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Jesunathadas, Mark; Klass, Malgorzata; Duchateau, Jacques; Enoka, Roger M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to record the discharge characteristics of tibialis anterior motor units over a range of target forces and to import these data, along with previously reported observations, into a computational model to compare experimental and simulated measures of torque variability during isometric contractions with the dorsiflexor muscles. The discharge characteristics of 44 motor units were quantified during brief isometric contractions at torques that ranged from recruitment threshold to an average of 22 ± 14.4% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque above recruitment threshold. The minimal [range: 5.8-19.8 pulses per second (pps)] and peak (range: 8.6-37.5 pps) discharge rates of motor units were positively related to the recruitment threshold torque (R(2) ≥ 0.266; P < 0.001). The coefficient of variation for interspike interval at recruitment was positively associated with recruitment threshold torque (R(2) = 0.443; P < 0.001) and either decreased exponentially or remained constant as target torque increased above recruitment threshold torque. The variability in the simulated torque did not differ from the experimental values once the recruitment range was set to ∼85% MVC torque, and the association between motor twitch contraction times and peak twitch torque was defined as a weak linear association (R(2) = 0.096; P < 0.001). These results indicate that the steadiness of isometric contractions performed with the dorsiflexor muscle depended more on the distributions of mechanical properties than discharge properties across the population of motor units in the tibialis anterior.

  7. To branch out or stay focused? Affective shifts differentially predict organizational citizenship behavior and task performance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu-Qin; Simon, Lauren S; Wang, Lei; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2016-06-01

    We draw from personality systems interaction (PSI) theory (Kuhl, 2000) and regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997) to examine how dynamic positive and negative affective processes interact to predict both task and contextual performance. Using a twice-daily diary design over the course of a 3-week period, results from multilevel regression analysis revealed that distinct patterns of change in positive and negative affect optimally predicted contextual and task performance among a sample of 71 employees at a medium-sized technology company. Specifically, within persons, increases (upshifts) in positive affect over the course of a workday better predicted the subsequent day's organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) when such increases were coupled with decreases (downshifts) in negative affect. The optimal pattern of change in positive and negative affect differed, however, in predicting task performance. That is, upshifts in positive affect over the course of the workday better predicted the subsequent day's task performance when such upshifts were accompanied by upshifts in negative affect. The contribution of our findings to PSI theory and the broader affective and motivation regulation literatures, along with practical implications, are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Performance-Based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA). Implementation and Supporting Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.; And Others

    This document contains two sections: implementation of the performance-based Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis (OABA), and supporting research. Section 1 presents OABA, an analytic procedure designed to identify those affective behaviors important to success in an occupation, and gives directions on how to implement the procedure. The…

  9. Investigating Learner Affective Performance in Web-Based Learning by Using Entrepreneurship as a Metaphor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Ming-Chou; Chi, Ming-Hsiao

    2012-01-01

    In the era of the Internet, factors which influence effective learning in a Web-based learning environment are well worth exploring. In addition to knowledge acquisition and skills training, affect is also an important factor, since successful learning requires excellent affective performance. Thus this study focuses on learners' affective…

  10. Psychological Factor Affecting English Speaking Performance for the English Learners in Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haidara, Youssouf

    2016-01-01

    In every learning situation or environment, human psychology plays a significant role. English speaking is a language skill that is highly affected by human psychology. This research aimed at describing the psychological factor that affects negatively the English speaking performance for the English learners in Indonesia. A descriptive qualitative…

  11. Using a False Biofeedback Methodology to Explore Relationships between Learners' Affect, Metacognition, and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strain, Amber Chauncey; Azevedo, Roger; D'Mello, Sidney K.

    2013-01-01

    We used a false-biofeedback methodology to manipulate physiological arousal in order to induce affective states that would influence learners' metacognitive judgments and learning performance. False-biofeedback is a method used to induce physiological arousal (and resultant affective states) by presenting learners with audio stimuli of false heart…

  12. Happy Places, Horrible Times, and Scary Learners: Affective Performances and Sticky Objects in Inclusive Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naraian, Srikala; Khoja-Moolji, Shenila

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on data from two studies conducted in US public schools, this paper traces the affective productions and performances of teachers to illustrate the role of affect in delineating (non)normative pedagogical practices in inclusive classrooms. Occupying a borderland space in narrative inquiry that permitted the straddling of differing…

  13. Early effects of ageing on the mechanical performance of isolated locomotory (EDL) and respiratory (diaphragm) skeletal muscle using the work-loop technique.

    PubMed

    Tallis, Jason; James, Rob S; Little, Alexander G; Cox, Val M; Duncan, Michael J; Seebacher, Frank

    2014-09-15

    Previous isolated muscle studies examining the effects of ageing on contractility have used isometric protocols, which have been shown to have poor relevance to dynamic muscle performance in vivo. The present study uniquely uses the work-loop technique for a more realistic estimation of in vivo muscle function to examine changes in mammalian skeletal muscle mechanical properties with age. Measurements of maximal isometric stress, activation and relaxation time, maximal power output, and sustained power output during repetitive activation and recovery are compared in locomotory extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and core diaphragm muscle isolated from 3-, 10-, 30-, and 50-wk-old female mice to examine the early onset of ageing. A progressive age-related reduction in maximal isometric stress that was of greater magnitude than the decrease in maximal power output occurred in both muscles. Maximal force and power developed earlier in diaphragm than EDL muscle but demonstrated a greater age-related decline. The present study indicates that ability to sustain skeletal muscle power output through repetitive contraction is age- and muscle-dependent, which may help rationalize previously reported equivocal results from examination of the effect of age on muscular endurance. The age-related decline in EDL muscle performance is prevalent without a significant reduction in muscle mass, and biochemical analysis of key marker enzymes suggests that although there is some evidence of a more oxidative fiber type, this is not the primary contributor to the early age-related reduction in muscle contractility.

  14. Does a bout of strength training affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power 24 h later?

    PubMed

    Gee, Thomas I; French, Duncan N; Howatson, Glyn; Payton, Stephen J; Berger, Nicolas J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2011-11-01

    Rowers regularly undertake rowing training within 24 h of performing bouts of strength training; however, the effect of this practice has not been investigated. This study evaluated the impact of a bout of high-intensity strength training on 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance and rowing-specific maximal power. Eight highly trained male club rowers performed baseline measures of five separate, static squat jumps (SSJ) and countermovement jumps (CMJ), maximal rowing ergometer power strokes (PS) and a single 2,000 m rowing ergometer test (2,000 m). Subsequently, participants performed a high-intensity strength training session consisting of various multi-joint barbell exercises. The 2,000 m test was repeated at 24 and 48 h post-ST, in addition SSJ, CMJ and PS tests were performed at these time points and also at 2 h post-ST. Muscle soreness, serum creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were assessed pre-ST and 2, 24 and 48 h post-ST. Following the ST, there were significant elevations in muscle soreness (2 and 24 h, P < 0.01), CK (2, 24 and 48 h, P < 0.01), and LDH (2 h, P < 0.05) in comparison to baseline values. There were significant decrements across all time points for SSJ, CMJ and PS, which ranged between 3 and 10% (P < 0.05). However, 2,000 m performance and related measurements of heart rate and blood lactate were not significantly affected by ST. In summary, a bout of high-intensity strength training resulted in symptoms of muscle damage and decrements in rowing-specific maximal power, but this did not affect 2,000 m rowing ergometer performance in highly trained rowers.

  15. Increased Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Impaired Executive Performance Capacity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goya, Thiago T.; Silva, Rosyvaldo F.; Guerra, Renan S.; Lima, Marta F.; Barbosa, Eline R.F.; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; Lobo, Denise M.L.; Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Busatto-Filho, Geraldo; Negrão, Carlos E.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Ueno-Pardi, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) response and executive performance during mental stress in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Individuals with no other comorbidities (age = 52 ± 1 y, body mass index = 29 ± 0.4, kg/m2) were divided into two groups: (1) control (n = 15) and (2) untreated OSA (n = 20) defined by polysomnography. Mini-Mental State of Examination (MMSE) and Inteligence quocient (IQ) were assessed. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and MSNA (microneurography) were measured at baseline and during 3 min of the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT). Sustained attention and inhibitory control were assessed by the number of correct answers and errors during SCWT. Results: Control and OSA groups (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI = 8 ± 1 and 47 ± 1 events/h, respectively) were similar in age, MMSE, and IQ. Baseline HR and BP were similar and increased similarly during SCWT in control and OSA groups. In contrast, baseline MSNA was higher in OSA compared to controls. Moreover, MSNA significantly increased in the third minute of SCWT in OSA, but remained unchanged in controls (P < 0.05). The number of correct answers was lower and the number of errors was significantly higher during the second and third minutes of SCWT in the OSA group (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation (P < 0.01) between the number of errors in the third minute of SCWT with AHI (r = 0.59), arousal index (r = 0.55), and minimum O2 saturation (r = −0.57). Conclusions: As compared to controls, MSNA is increased in patients with OSA at rest, and further significant MSNA increments and worse executive performance are seen during mental stress. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, registration number: NCT002289625. Citation: Goya TT, Silva RF, Guerra RS, Lima MF, Barbosa ER, Cunha PJ, Lobo DM, Buchpiguel CA, Busatto-Filho G, Negrão CE, Lorenzi-Filho G, Ueno-Pardi LM. Increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity and

  16. Performing a secondary executive task with affective stimuli interferes with decision making under risk conditions.

    PubMed

    Gathmann, Bettina; Pawlikowski, Mirko; Schöler, Tobias; Brand, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that executive functions are crucial for advantageous decision making under risk and that therefore decision making is disrupted when working memory capacity is demanded while working on a decision task. While some studies also showed that emotions can affect decision making under risk, it is unclear how affective processing and executive functions predict decision-making performance in interaction. The current experimental study used a between-subjects design to examine whether affective pictures (positive and negative pictures compared to neutral pictures), included in a parallel executive task (working memory 2-back task), have an impact on decision making under risk as assessed by the Game of Dice Task (GDT). Moreover, the performance GDT plus 2-back task was compared to the performance in the GDT without any additional task (GDT solely). The results show that the performance in the GDT differed between groups (positive, negative, neutral, and GDT solely). The groups with affective pictures, especially those with positive pictures in the 2-back task, showed more disadvantageous decisions in the GDT than the groups with neutral pictures and the group performing the GDT without any additional task. However, executive functions moderated the effect of the affective pictures. Regardless of affective influence, subjects with good executive functions performed advantageously in the GDT. These findings support the assumption that executive functions and emotional processing interact in predicting decision making under risk.

  17. Timing influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion on muscle soreness and next-day running performance.

    PubMed

    Greer, Beau Kjerulf; Price, Anna; Jones, Brett

    2014-06-01

    The present study investigates timing effects of a carbohydrate-protein (CHO-PROT) beverage on indicators of muscle damage and next day running performance. Nine trained subjects completed three trials of a 30 min downhill run, followed by a 1.5 mile treadmill running time trial 24 hr later in a blinded, crossover design. Either a CHO-PROT or noncaloric placebo beverage was given 30 and 5 min prior to, at the 15 min mark during, immediately after, and 30 min after the downhill running protocol. In the first treatment (T1), a total of 360 kilocalories were given 30 and 5 min prior to downhill running, as well as at the 15 min mark, with placebos used at other time points. In the second treatment (T2), an isocaloric amount was given but only immediately after and 30 min after downhill running, with placebos used at other time points. In the placebo treatment, a placebo was given at all time points. There were no significant differences in the 1.5 mile time trial or soreness between trials (p > .05). Regardless of timing, the ingestion of a CHO-PROT beverage had no effect on next day running performance or muscular soreness versus a placebo.

  18. The Effect of Anthocyanin Supplementation on Body Composition, Exercise Performance and Muscle Damage Indices in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Yarahmadi, Masoome; Askari, Gholamreza; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Ghiasvand, Reza; Hoseini, Mohsen; Mohamadi, Hajar; Asadi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Flavonoids consider as a large group of plant metabolites that 6,000 types of them have been identified till now. In some studies, it has been shown that they can increase aerobic performance and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of anthocyanin (as one of the most important kind of flavonoids) supplementation on body composition, exercise performance and muscle damage indices in athletes. Methods: This double-blinded clinical trial involved 54 female and male athletes at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences with athletic history of at least 3 years. Body composition, exercise performance, creatine kinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were assessed. Individuals were selected by simple sampling method, they divided into two groups using permuted block randomization method. First group received 100 mg anthocyanin pills, and the second group received 100 mg placebo pills, daily for 6 weeks. Participants asked to continue their routine diet and physical activity during the study period, and they were followed through phone calls or text messages. Results: Soft lean mass, total body water and percent body fat were not changed significantly in the anthocyanin group after intervention but VO2 max increased significantly in the anthocyanin group (48.65 ± 4.73 vs. 52.62 ± 5.04) (P ≤ 0.0001), also a significant difference was observed between two studied groups (52.62 ± 5.04 for intervention group vs. 49.61 ± 5.33 for placebo) (P = 0.003). Conclusions: Our findings suggested that the supplementation with anthocyanin in athletes may improve some indices of performance such as VO2 max. PMID:25709796

  19. Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance.

    PubMed

    D'Lugos, Andrew C; Luden, Nicholas D; Faller, Justin M; Akers, Jeremy D; McKenzie, Alec I; Saunders, Michael J

    2016-09-07

    The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (-0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (-9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance.

  20. Supplemental Protein during Heavy Cycling Training and Recovery Impacts Skeletal Muscle and Heart Rate Responses but Not Performance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lugos, Andrew C.; Luden, Nicholas D.; Faller, Justin M.; Akers, Jeremy D.; McKenzie, Alec I.; Saunders, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of protein supplementation on cycling performance, skeletal muscle function, and heart rate responses to exercise were examined following intensified (ICT) and reduced-volume training (RVT). Seven cyclists performed consecutive periods of normal training (NT), ICT (10 days; average training duration 220% of NT), and RVT (10 days; training duration 66% of NT). In a crossover design, subjects consumed supplemental carbohydrate (CHO) or an equal amount of carbohydrate with added protein (CP) during and following each exercise session (CP = +0.94 g/kg/day protein during ICT; +0.39 g/kg/day during RVT). A 30-kilometer time trial performance (following 120 min at 50% Wmax) was modestly impaired following ICT (+2.4 ± 6.4% versus NT) and returned to baseline levels following RVT (−0.7 ± 4.5% versus NT), with similar responses between CHO and CP. Skeletal muscle torque at 120 deg/s benefited from CP, compared to CHO, following ICT. However, this effect was no longer present at RVT. Following ICT, muscle fiber cross-sectional area was increased with CP, while there were no clear changes with CHO. Reductions in constant-load heart rates (at 50% Wmax) following RVT were likely greater with CP than CHO (−9 ± 9 bpm). Overall it appears that CP supplementation impacted skeletal muscle and heart rate responses during a period of heavy training and recovery, but this did not result in meaningful changes in time trial performance. PMID:27618091

  1. Is high-frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation a suitable tool for muscle performance improvement in both healthy humans and athletes?

    PubMed

    Gondin, Julien; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David

    2011-10-01

    We aimed at providing an overview of the currently acknowledged benefits and limitations of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) training programs in both healthy individuals and in recreational and competitive athletes regarding muscle performance. Typical NMES resistance exercises are performed under isometric conditions and involve the application of electrical stimuli delivered as intermittent high frequencies trains (>40-50 Hz) through surface electrodes. NMES has been acknowledged as an efficient modality leading to significant improvements in isometric maximal voluntary strength. However, the resulting changes in dynamic strength, motor performance skills and explosive movements (i.e., jump performance, sprint ability) are still ambiguous and could only be obtained when NMES is combined with voluntary dynamic exercise such as plyometrics. Additionally, the effects of NMES on muscle fatigability are still poorly understood and required further investigations. While NMES effectiveness could be partially related to several external adjustable factors such as training intensity, current characteristics (e.g., intensity, pulse duration…) or the design of training protocols (number of contractions per session, number of sessions per week…), anatomical specificities (e.g., morphological organization of the axonal branches within the muscle) appear as the main factor accounting for the differences in NMES response. Overall, NMES cannot be considered as a surrogate training method, but rather as an adjunct to voluntary resistance training. The combination of these two training modalities should optimally improve muscle function.

  2. Testosterone and growth hormone improve body composition and muscle performance in older men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CONTEXT: Impairments in the pituitary-gonadal axis with aging are associated with loss of muscle mass and function and accumulation of upper body fat. OBJECTIVES: We tested the hypothesis that physiological supplementation with testosterone and GH together improves body composition and muscle perfor...

  3. Impact on nutrition on muscle strength and performance in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscle strength plays an important role in determining risk for falls, which result in fractures and other injuries. While bone loss has long been recognized as an inevitable consequence of aging, sarcopenia-the gradual loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with advancing age-has rec...

  4. Two Consecutive Days of Crossfit Training Affects Pro and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines and Osteoprotegerin without Impairments in Muscle Power

    PubMed Central

    Tibana, Ramires A.; de Almeida, Leonardo M.; Frade de Sousa, Nuno M.; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Neto, Ivo V. de Sousa; de Almeida, Jeeser A.; de Souza, Vinicius C.; Lopes, Maria de Fátima T. P. L.; Nobrega, Otávio de Tolêdo; Vieira, Denis C. L.; Navalta, James W.; Prestes, Jonato

    2016-01-01

    = 0.018) as compared to pre-exercise values. Osteoprotegerin displayed a decrease 48 h following WOD 2 (~25%; p = 0.018) as compared with pre intervention. In conclusion, two consecutive Crossfit® training sessions increase pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines with no interference on muscle performance in the recovery period. PMID:27445850

  5. Two Consecutive Days of Crossfit Training Affects Pro and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines and Osteoprotegerin without Impairments in Muscle Power.

    PubMed

    Tibana, Ramires A; de Almeida, Leonardo M; Frade de Sousa, Nuno M; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; Neto, Ivo V de Sousa; de Almeida, Jeeser A; de Souza, Vinicius C; Lopes, Maria de Fátima T P L; Nobrega, Otávio de Tolêdo; Vieira, Denis C L; Navalta, James W; Prestes, Jonato

    2016-01-01

    = 0.018) as compared to pre-exercise values. Osteoprotegerin displayed a decrease 48 h following WOD 2 (~25%; p = 0.018) as compared with pre intervention. In conclusion, two consecutive Crossfit® training sessions increase pro/anti-inflammatory cytokines with no interference on muscle performance in the recovery period.

  6. Multiple brain parenchymal neurocysticercosis with extraocular muscle cysticercosis affecting levator palpebral superioris and superior rectus complex: an unusual association

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Jaiswal, Anupam

    2013-01-01

    An 8-year-old girl presented to the neurology department with a complaint of insidious onset of left-sided ptosis and restricted elevation of the left eye. A CT scan orbit and brain revealed a ring-enhancing lesion in the levator palpebral superioris (LPS) and superior rectus (SR) muscle complex of the left eye and left parietal and right temporal region. She was started on steroid, followed by albendazole with improvement. The LPS/SR complex is the least common site of involvement among extraocular muscles in ocular cysticercosis. Specially, with brain neurocysticercosis (NCC), it is extremely rare. We report an unusual association of multiple brain NCC with ocular cysticercosis involving LPS and SR muscle. PMID:23355567

  7. MicroRNA-199a is induced in dystrophic muscle and affects WNT signaling, cell proliferation, and myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, M S; Kawahara, G; Motohashi, N; Casar, J C; Eisenberg, I; Myers, J A; Gasperini, M J; Estrella, E A; Kho, A T; Mitsuhashi, S; Shapiro, F; Kang, P B; Kunkel, L M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the absence of a functional dystrophin protein results in sarcolemmal instability, abnormal calcium signaling, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal muscle degeneration. Using the dystrophin-deficient sapje zebrafish model, we have identified microRNAs (miRNAs) that, in comparison to our previous findings in human DMD muscle biopsies, are uniquely dysregulated in dystrophic muscle across vertebrate species. MiR-199a-5p is dysregulated in dystrophin-deficient zebrafish, mdx5cv mice, and human muscle biopsies. MiR-199a-5p mature miRNA sequences are transcribed from stem loop precursor miRNAs that are found within the introns of the dynamin-2 and dynamin-3 loci. The miR-199a-2 stem loop precursor transcript that gives rise to the miR-199a-5p mature transcript was found to be elevated in human dystrophic muscle. The levels of expression of miR-199a-5p are regulated in a serum response factor (SRF)-dependent manner along with myocardin-related transcription factors. Inhibition of SRF-signaling reduces miR-199a-5p transcript levels during myogenic differentiation. Manipulation of miR-199a-5p expression in human primary myoblasts and myotubes resulted in dramatic changes in cellular size, proliferation, and differentiation. MiR-199a-5p targets several myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation regulatory factors within the WNT signaling pathway, including FZD4, JAG1, and WNT2. Overexpression of miR-199a-5p in the muscles of transgenic zebrafish resulted in abnormal myofiber disruption and sarcolemmal membrane detachment, pericardial edema, and lethality. Together, these studies identify miR-199a-5p as a potential regulator of myogenesis through suppression of WNT-signaling factors that act to balance myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:23764775

  8. MicroRNA-199a is induced in dystrophic muscle and affects WNT signaling, cell proliferation, and myogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, M S; Kawahara, G; Motohashi, N; Casar, J C; Eisenberg, I; Myers, J A; Gasperini, M J; Estrella, E A; Kho, A T; Mitsuhashi, S; Shapiro, F; Kang, P B; Kunkel, L M

    2013-09-01

    In patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the absence of a functional dystrophin protein results in sarcolemmal instability, abnormal calcium signaling, cardiomyopathy, and skeletal muscle degeneration. Using the dystrophin-deficient sapje zebrafish model, we have identified microRNAs (miRNAs) that, in comparison to our previous findings in human DMD muscle biopsies, are uniquely dysregulated in dystrophic muscle across vertebrate species. MiR-199a-5p is dysregulated in dystrophin-deficient zebrafish, mdx(5cv) mice, and human muscle biopsies. MiR-199a-5p mature miRNA sequences are transcribed from stem loop precursor miRNAs that are found within the introns of the dynamin-2 and dynamin-3 loci. The miR-199a-2 stem loop precursor transcript that gives rise to the miR-199a-5p mature transcript was found to be elevated in human dystrophic muscle. The levels of expression of miR-199a-5p are regulated in a serum response factor (SRF)-dependent manner along with myocardin-related transcription factors. Inhibition of SRF-signaling reduces miR-199a-5p transcript levels during myogenic differentiation. Manipulation of miR-199a-5p expression in human primary myoblasts and myotubes resulted in dramatic changes in cellular size, proliferation, and differentiation. MiR-199a-5p targets several myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation regulatory factors within the WNT signaling pathway, including FZD4, JAG1, and WNT2. Overexpression of miR-199a-5p in the muscles of transgenic zebrafish resulted in abnormal myofiber disruption and sarcolemmal membrane detachment, pericardial edema, and lethality. Together, these studies identify miR-199a-5p as a potential regulator of myogenesis through suppression of WNT-signaling factors that act to balance myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation.

  9. Attenuation of changes in capillary fine structure and leukocyte adhesion improves muscle performance following chronic ischaemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hudlická, O; Garnham, A; Shiner, R; Egginton, S

    2008-01-01

    Acute ischaemia–reperfusion disrupts capillary fine structure and increases leukocyte adhesion in postcapillary venules. We determined whether chronic muscle ischaemia has similar consequences, and whether it is possible to ameliorate its effect on muscle performance. Following ischaemia (unilateral ligation, common iliac artery) rat hindlimb muscles were examined without other intervention or following treatment with an xanthine oxidase inhibitor (allopurinol), a Na+/H+ exchange blocker (amiloride), or an oxygen free radical scavenger (vitamin E). No significant leukocyte adhesion or rolling, nor changes in capillary fine structure were observed 3 days postsurgery, when limb use was limited. However, leukocyte rolling and adhesion almost trebled by 7 days (P < 0.001), when normal gait was largely restored. Capillary fine structure was disturbed over a similar time course, e.g. relative endothelial volume (control 46%, 7 days 61%; P < 0.05), that resolved by 5 weeks. Where activity was increased by mild electrical stimulation 3 days after ligation muscles showed enhanced capillary swelling (endothelial volume 66%versus 50%, P < 0.005), but improved fatigue index (52%versus 16%, P < 0.001) as a result of greater blood flow. Muscle fatigue after ligation was related to the extent of contraction-induced hyperaemia (R2= 0.725), but not capillary swelling. Amiloride, and to a lesser extent allopurinol but not vitamin E, significantly decreased leukocyte rolling and adhesion, as well as capillary endothelial swelling. We conclude that increased activity of ischaemic muscles on recovery is likely to accentuate acidosis accompanying changes in microcirculation and contribute to enhanced muscle fatigue, whereas formation of oxygen free radicals may be attenuated by endogenous protective mechanisms. PMID:18755748

  10. Does feed restriction and re-alimentation differently affect lipid content and metabolism according to muscle type in pigs (Sus scrofa)?

    PubMed

    Gondret, Florence; Lebret, Bénédicte

    2007-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether feed restriction and re-alimentation differently affect lipid content and activities of lipogenic or catabolic enzymes according to muscle types in pigs. At around 28 kg body mass (BW), sixty pigs (n=30 per group) were allocated to either ad libitum (AL) or restricted/re-feeding (RA) regimens. After feed restriction (80 kg BW), lipid content was reduced (P<0.01) in the oxidative rhomboideus (RH) as in the glycolytic biceps femoris (BF) muscles of RA pigs compared with AL pigs. Lower activities (P<0.05) of the lipogenic enzymes fatty acid synthase (FAS) and malic enzyme (ME) were observed in the RH but not in the BF of RA vs. AL pigs. After re-feeding (110 kg BW), lipid content was restored in the RH, but was still 12% lower (P<0.05) in the BF of RA compared with AL pigs. In the RH, the trend for an enhanced FAS activity and for a smaller weight-related decrease of ME activity in RA pigs than AL pigs during re-feeding, may have contributed to the muscle fat recovery observed in the RA pigs. In the BF, higher oxidative enzyme activities (P<0.10) in RA pigs compared to AL pigs might explain the incomplete lipid recovery observed after re-feeding in the former animals. In conclusion, metabolic activities in response to restriction and re-feeding differed according to muscle metabolic type.

  11. Reduced muscle strength and functional performance in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen suppression: a comprehensive cross-sectional investigation.

    PubMed

    Galvão, D A; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Joseph, D; Turner, D; Newton, R U

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of androgen suppression therapy (AST) on upper and lower body muscle strength and a range of direct measures of physical performance using a cross-sectional design with 118 men (48 men undertaking AST for prostate cancer and 70 healthy aged-matched controls) from a single tertiary center. Primary end points included muscle strength for the upper- and lower-body; functional performance--repeated chair rise, usual and fast 6-m walk, 6-m backwards walk and 400-m walk time; and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry assessment--whole body, regional soft tissue composition and bone mineral density (BMD). Men on AST had significantly reduced muscle strength for the upper- and lower-body and impaired functional performance compared to controls (P<0.05). As expected, AST patients had significantly lower whole-body and hip BMD and higher percent of body fat than controls (P<0.05), and tended to have lower whole-body lean mass (-2.3 kg, P=0.077). Appendicular skeletal muscle was positively associated with upper-body (r=0.400-0.606, P<0.001) and lower-body (r=0.549-0.588, P<0.001) muscle strength, and strength was related to functional performance. Men undertaking AST were consistently impaired across a broad range of physical and functional musculoskeletal performance assessments compared with their age-matched normal controls. These findings are relevant for those patients considering AST for subclinical disease management, but whose physical reserve is marginal. Strategies to counter these adverse effects of AST need to be initiated so that independent living and quality of life can be maintained.

  12. Some Factors That Affecting the Performance of Mathematics Teachers in Junior High School in Medan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manullang, Martua; Rajagukguk, Waminton

    2016-01-01

    Some Factor's That Affecting The Mathematic Teacher Performance For Junior High School In Medan. This research will examine the effect of direct and indirect of the Organizational Knowledge towards the achievement motivation, decision making, organizational commitment, the performance of mathematics teacher. The research method is a method of…

  13. Using Representations in Geometry: A Model of Students' Cognitive and Affective Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panaoura, Areti

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs in mathematics, as a dimension of the affective domain, are related with students' performance on solving tasks and mainly on overcoming cognitive obstacles. The present study investigated the interrelations of cognitive performance on geometry and young students' self-efficacy beliefs about using representations for solving…

  14. Centrality and Charisma: Comparing How Leader Networks "and" Attributions Affect Team Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkundi, Prasad; Kilduff, Martin; Harrison, David A.

    2011-01-01

    When leaders interact in teams with their subordinates, they build social capital that can have positive effects on team performance. Does this social capital affect team performance because subordinates come to see the leader as charismatic? We answered this question by examining 2 models. First, we tested the charisma-to-centrality model…

  15. The Developmental Dynamics of Children's Academic Performance and Mothers' Homework-Related Affect and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silinskas, Gintautas; Kiuru, Noona; Aunola, Kaisa; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal associations between children's academic performance and their mothers' affect, practices, and perceptions of their children in homework situations. The children's (n = 2,261) performance in reading and math was tested in Grade 1 and Grade 4, and the mothers (n = 1,476) filled out questionnaires on their…

  16. Affective Cues and Processing Strategy: Color-Coded Examination Forms Influence Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Robert C.; Soldat, Alexander S.; Mark, Melvin M.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that external cues provide affective information that influence processing strategy and, therefore, examination performance. Notes the differences in performance for two midterm examinations, identical, except that they were printed on blue and red paper. Discusses a method for appropriately adjusting scores to control for form effects.…

  17. Performance Assessment in CTE: Focusing on the Cognitive, Psychomotor ...and Affective Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washer, Bart; Cochran, Lori

    2012-01-01

    When a student is performing in the psychomotor domain, the authors believe the student is also performing in the cognitive domain (sequencing steps, evaluating the situation) and in the affective domain (appreciating a job well done, quality control, safety). As Dabney Doty, former instructor at the University of Central Missouri, stated, "There…

  18. The developmental dynamics of children's academic performance and mothers' homework-related affect and practices.

    PubMed

    Silinskas, Gintautas; Kiuru, Noona; Aunola, Kaisa; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal associations between children's academic performance and their mothers' affect, practices, and perceptions of their children in homework situations. The children's (n = 2,261) performance in reading and math was tested in Grade 1 and Grade 4, and the mothers (n = 1,476) filled out questionnaires on their affect, practices, and perceptions while their children were in Grades 2, 3, and 4. The results showed, first, that the more help in homework the mothers reported, the slower was the development of their children's academic performance from Grade 1 to Grade 4. This negative association was true especially if mothers perceived their children not to be able to work autonomously. Second, children's good academic performance in Grade 1 predicted mothers' perception of child's ability to be autonomous and positive affect in homework situations later on, whereas poor performance predicted mothers' negative affect, help, and monitoring. Finally, mothers' negative affect mediated the association between children's poor performance, maternal practices, and perceptions of their children.

  19. Effects of aquatic exercise on muscle strength and functional performance of individuals with osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Fernanda de; Leite, Neiva; Pitta, Arthur; Bento, Paulo Cesar Barauce

    Water-based exercises are recommended for people with osteoarthritis (OA), due to the beneficial effects on physical function, quality of life and symptom reduction. However, the effects on muscle strength are still controversial. The aim of this review was to assess a