Science.gov

Sample records for affect neurotransmitter release

  1. Dendritic Release of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Mike; Apps, David; Menzies, John; Patel, Jyoti C; Rice, Margaret E

    2016-12-06

    Release of neuroactive substances by exocytosis from dendrites is surprisingly widespread and is not confined to a particular class of transmitters: it occurs in multiple brain regions, and includes a range of neuropeptides, classical neurotransmitters, and signaling molecules, such as nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, ATP, and arachidonic acid. This review is focused on hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells that release vasopressin and oxytocin and midbrain neurons that release dopamine. For these two model systems, the stimuli, mechanisms, and physiological functions of dendritic release have been explored in greater detail than is yet available for other neurons and neuroactive substances. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:235-252, 2017.

  2. Evidence to suggest that gonadotropin-releasing hormone inhibits its own secretion by affecting hypothalamic amino acid neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Jarry, H; Leonhardt, S; Moguilevsky, J A; Wuttke, W

    1996-10-01

    The mediobasal hypothalamus of rats contains gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors. These hypothalamic neurons also express the GnRH corresponding gene. Under these circumstances, the possibility exists that these GnRH receptors could be localized in other neurons, which are GnRH-receptive, unknowing the neurotransmitter quality. Therefore, we studied the in vitro effects of the GnRH agonist buserelin on GnRH, glutamate, gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) and taurine release from explanted superfused hypothalami of untreated and buserelin-pretreated (down-regulated) male rats. When buserelin was added to the superfusion medium it inhibited promptly the release of GnRH and the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate, but stimulated the release of the inhibitory neurotransmitters, GABA and taurine. Hypothalamic release of GnRH from hypothalami collected from buserelin-treated (30 micrograms/100 g b.w. twice daily for 4 days) male rats released significantly less GnRH, glutamate and more GABA and taurine. The inhibitory effect of buserelin was maintained when the superfusion medium continuously contained the GnRH analog. When superfusion of hypothalami from buserelin-pretreated animals was performed in the absence of buserelin, GnRH and glutamate release increased significantly within 45-60 min, whereas GABA and taurine release decreased at this time point. When buserelin was added to the superfusion medium 2 h after buserelin-free superfusion, GnRH and glutamate release decreased whereas GABA and taurine release increased instantaneously. Buserelin-treated rats showed significantly low values of LH and testosterone than the untreated rats. These results suggest that GnRH receptors may not only be present in GnRH axon terminals in the median eminence, but also on glutamatergic, GABAergic and taurinergic neurons by which GnRH may exert an autoinhibitory ultrashort loop feedback on its own secretion. This effect appears to be connected with glutamatergic

  3. Neurotransmitter Release Can Be Stabilized by a Mechanism That Prevents Voltage Changes Near the End of Action Potentials from Affecting Calcium Currents.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Stephen G; Scarnati, Matthew S; Paradiso, Kenneth G

    2016-11-09

    At chemical synapses, presynaptic action potentials (APs) activate voltage-gated calcium channels, allowing calcium to enter and trigger neurotransmitter release. The duration, peak amplitude, and shape of the AP falling phase alter calcium entry, which can affect neurotransmitter release significantly. In many neurons, APs do not immediately return to the resting potential, but instead exhibit a period of depolarization or hyperpolarization referred to as an afterpotential. We hypothesized that presynaptic afterpotentials should alter neurotransmitter release by affecting the electrical driving force for calcium entry and calcium channel gating. In support of this, presynaptic calcium entry is affected by afterpotentials after standard instant voltage jumps. Here, we used the mouse calyx of Held synapse, which allows simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic patch-clamp recording, to show that the postsynaptic response is affected significantly by presynaptic afterpotentials after voltage jumps. We therefore tested the effects of presynaptic afterpotentials using simultaneous presynaptic and postsynaptic recordings and AP waveforms or real APs. Surprisingly, presynaptic afterpotentials after AP stimuli did not alter calcium channel responses or neurotransmitter release appreciably. We show that the AP repolarization time course causes afterpotential-induced changes in calcium driving force and changes in calcium channel gating to effectively cancel each other out. This mechanism, in which electrical driving force is balanced by channel gating, prevents changes in calcium influx from occurring at the end of the AP and therefore acts to stabilize synaptic transmission. In addition, this mechanism can act to stabilize neurotransmitter release when the presynaptic resting potential changes.

  4. Release of a single neurotransmitter from an identified interneuron coherently affects motor output on multiple time scales.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Andrew M; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2013-05-01

    Neurotransmitters can have diverse effects that occur over multiple time scales often making the consequences of neurotransmission difficult to predict. To explore the consequences of this diversity, we used the buccal ganglion of Aplysia to examine the effects of GABA release by a single interneuron, B40, on the intrinsic properties and motor output of the radula closure neuron B8. B40 induces a picrotoxin-sensitive fast IPSP lasting milliseconds in B8 and a slow EPSP lasting seconds. We found that the excitatory effects of this slow EPSP are also mediated by GABA. Together, these two GABAergic actions structure B8 firing in a pattern characteristic of ingestive programs. Furthermore, we found that repeated B40 stimulation induces a persistent increase in B8 excitability that was occluded in the presence of the GABA B receptor agonist baclofen, suggesting that GABA affects B8 excitability over multiple time scales. The phasing of B8 activity during the feeding motor programs determines the nature of the behavior elicited during that motor program. The persistent increase in B8 excitability induced by B40 biased the activity of B8 during feeding motor programs causing the motor programs to become more ingestive in nature. Thus, a single transmitter released from a single interneuron can have consequences for motor output that are expressed over multiple time scales. Importantly, despite the differences in their signs and temporal characteristics, the three actions of B40 are coherent in that they promote B8 firing patterns that are characteristic of ingestive motor outputs.

  5. Regulation of neurotransmitter release kinetics by NSF.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, F E; Dresbach, T; DeBello, W M; O'Connor, V; Augustine, G J; Betz, H

    1998-02-20

    NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor) is an adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) that contributes to a protein complex essential for membrane fusion. The synaptic function of this protein was investigated by injecting, into the giant presynaptic terminal of squid, peptides that inhibit the ATPase activity of NSF stimulated by the soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP). These peptides reduced the amount and slowed the kinetics of neurotransmitter release as a result of actions that required vesicle turnover and occurred at a step subsequent to vesicle docking. These results define NSF as an essential participant in synaptic vesicle exocytosis that regulates the kinetics of neurotransmitter release and, thereby, the integrative properties of synapses.

  6. Chemical delivery array with millisecond neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Amanda; Sjöström, Theresia Arbring; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus; Simon, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies that restore or augment dysfunctional neural signaling represent a promising route to deeper understanding and new therapies for neurological disorders. Because of the chemical specificity and subsecond signaling of the nervous system, these technologies should be able to release specific neurotransmitters at specific locations with millisecond resolution. We have previously demonstrated an organic electronic lateral electrophoresis technology capable of precise delivery of charged compounds, such as neurotransmitters. However, this technology, the organic electronic ion pump, has been limited to a single delivery point, or several simultaneously addressed outlets, with switch-on speeds of seconds. We report on a vertical neurotransmitter delivery device, configured as an array with individually controlled delivery points and a temporal resolution of 50 ms. This is achieved by supplementing lateral electrophoresis with a control electrode and an ion diode at each delivery point to allow addressing and limit leakage. By delivering local pulses of neurotransmitters with spatiotemporal dynamics approaching synaptic function, the high-speed delivery array promises unprecedented access to neural signaling and a path toward biochemically regulated neural prostheses. PMID:27847873

  7. Pharmacology of neurotransmitter release: measuring exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Khvotchev, Mikhail; Kavalali, Ege T

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmission in the nervous system is initiated at presynaptic terminals by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane and subsequent exocytic release of chemical transmitters. Currently, there are multiple methods to detect neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals, each with their own particular advantages and disadvantages. For instance, most commonly employed methods monitor actions of released chemical substances on postsynaptic receptors or artificial substrates such as carbon fibers. These methods are closest to the physiological setting because they have a rapid time resolution and they measure the action of the endogenous neurotransmitters rather than the signals emitted by exogenous probes. However, postsynaptic receptors only indirectly report neurotransmitter release in a form modified by the properties of receptors themselves, which are often nonlinear detectors of released substances. Alternatively, released chemical substances can be detected biochemically, albeit on a time scale slower than electrophysiological methods. In addition, in certain preparations, where presynaptic terminals are accessible to whole cell recording electrodes, fusion of vesicles with the plasma membrane can be monitored using capacitance measurements. In the last decade, in addition to electrophysiological and biochemical methods, several fluorescence imaging modalities have been introduced which report synaptic vesicle fusion, endocytosis, and recycling. These methods either take advantage of styryl dyes that can be loaded into recycling vesicles or exogenous expression of synaptic vesicle proteins tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP variant at regions facing the vesicle lumen. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of these methods with particular emphasis on their relative strengths and weaknesses and discuss the types of information one can obtain from them.

  8. Imaging neurotransmitter release kinetics in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Weihong; Yeung, E.S.; Haydon, P.G.

    1996-12-31

    A new UV-laser based optical microscope and CCD detection system has been developed to image neurotransmitter in living biological cells. We demonstrate the detection of serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual living glial cells (astrocytes) based on its native fluorescence. The detection methodology has high sensitivity, low limit of detection and does not require coupling to fluorescence dyes. We have studied serotonin uptake kinetics and its release dynamics in single glial cells. Different regions of a glial cell have taken up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of kinetics. Similarly, different serotonin release mechanisms have been observed in different astrocyte cell regions. The temporal resolution of this detection system is as fast as 50 ms, and the spatial resolution is diffraction limited. We will also report on single enzyme molecule reaction studies and single metal ion detection based on CCD imaging of pL reaction vials formed by micromachining on fused silica.

  9. The Role of Neurotrophins in Neurotransmitter Release

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Perrett, Stephen P.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been shown to elicit pronounced effects on quantal neurotransmitter release at both central and peripheral nervous system synapses. Due to their activity-dependent release, as well as the subcellular localization of both protein and receptor, NTs are ideally suited to modify the strength of neuronal connections by “fine-tuning” synaptic activity through direct actions at presynaptic terminals. Here, using BDNF as a prototypical example, the authors provide an update of recent evidence demonstrating that NTs enhance quantal neurotransmitter release at synapses through presynaptic mechanisms. The authors further propose that a potential target for NT actions at presynaptic terminals is the mechanism by which terminals retrieve synaptic vesicles after exocytosis. Depending on the temporal demands placed on synapses during high-frequency synaptic transmission, synapses may use two alternative modes of synaptic vesicle retrieval, the conventional slow endosomal recycling or a faster rapid retrieval at the active zone, referred to as “kiss-and-run.” By modulating Ca2+ microdomains associated with voltage-gated Ca2+ channels at active zones, NTs may elicit a switch from the slow to the fast mode of endocytosis of vesicles at presynaptic terminals during high-frequency synaptic transmission, allowing more reliable information transfer and neuronal signaling in the central nervous system. PMID:12467374

  10. Time-coded neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Serafim; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin; Cortes, Jesus M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Ali, Afia B.

    2016-01-01

    Communication between neurons at chemical synapses is regulated by hundreds of different proteins that control the release of neurotransmitter that is packaged in vesicles, transported to an active zone, and released when an input spike occurs. Neurotransmitter can also be released asynchronously, that is, after a delay following the spike, or spontaneously in the absence of a stimulus. The mechanisms underlying asynchronous and spontaneous neurotransmitter release remain elusive. Here, we describe a model of the exocytotic cycle of vesicles at excitatory and inhibitory synapses that accounts for all modes of vesicle release as well as short-term synaptic plasticity (STSP). For asynchronous release, the model predicts a delayed inertial protein unbinding associated with the SNARE complex assembly immediately after vesicle priming. Experiments are proposed to test the model’s molecular predictions for differential exocytosis. The simplicity of the model will also facilitate large-scale simulations of neural circuits. PMID:26858411

  11. Neurotransmitters

    NASA Video Gallery

    Our nerve cells (neurons) communicate with each other using little chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. These neurotransmitters are transferred from one neuron to the next within a space c...

  12. Fast neurotransmitter release regulated by the endocytic scaffold intersectin

    PubMed Central

    Sakaba, Takeshi; Kononenko, Natalia L.; Bacetic, Jelena; Pechstein, Arndt; Schmoranzer, Jan; Yao, Lijun; Barth, Holger; Shupliakov, Oleg; Kobler, Oliver; Aktories, Klaus; Haucke, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Sustained fast neurotransmission requires the rapid replenishment of release-ready synaptic vesicles (SVs) at presynaptic active zones. Although the machineries for exocytic fusion and for subsequent endocytic membrane retrieval have been well characterized, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the rapid recruitment of SVs to release sites. Here we show that the Down syndrome-associated endocytic scaffold protein intersectin 1 is a crucial factor for the recruitment of release-ready SVs. Genetic deletion of intersectin 1 expression or acute interference with intersectin function inhibited the replenishment of release-ready vesicles, resulting in short-term depression, without significantly affecting the rate of endocytic membrane retrieval. Acute perturbation experiments suggest that intersectin-mediated vesicle replenishment involves the association of intersectin with the fissioning enzyme dynamin and with the actin regulatory GTPase CDC42. Our data indicate a role for the endocytic scaffold intersectin in fast neurotransmitter release, which may be of prime importance for information processing in the brain. PMID:23633571

  13. Ricardo Miledi and the calcium hypothesis of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jade-Ming

    2002-01-01

    Ricardo Miledi has made significant contributions to our basic understanding of how synapses work. Here I discuss aspects of Miledi's research that helped to establish the requirement of presynaptic calcium for neurotransmitter release, from his earliest scientific studies to his classic experiments in the squid giant synapse.

  14. Alterations in Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitter Release at High Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    exposure results from a general imbalance of encephalopathies. Parkinson’s Syndrome, MPTP the three monoamine neurotransmitter systems toxicity . or...the [3 H]monoamines by Dopamine release, on the other hand, was reduced synaptosomes isolated from the CNS. 5-A n 4 A Pn5 p<.05 0.05 LI * 4- U) 4...Lffect of’ pressure of 3.4-miethylenledioxy-miethamiiphetamnine ( MDMA ) and re- on the release of radioaetive glycine and (IABA from spinal lated

  15. Dynamic Control of Neurotransmitter Release by Presynaptic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zbili, Mickael; Rama, Sylvain; Debanne, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Action potentials (APs) in the mammalian brain are thought to represent the smallest unit of information transmitted by neurons to their postsynaptic targets. According to this view, neuronal signaling is all-or-none or digital. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that subthreshold changes in presynaptic membrane potential before triggering the spike also determines spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter. We discuss here how analog changes in presynaptic voltage may regulate spike-evoked release of neurotransmitter through the modulation of biophysical state of voltage-gated potassium, calcium and sodium channels in the presynaptic compartment. The contribution of this regulation has been greatly underestimated and we discuss the impact for information processing in neuronal circuits. PMID:27994539

  16. Re-examining how complexin inhibits neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Trimbuch, Thorsten; Xu, Junjie; Flaherty, David; Tomchick, Diana R; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Complexins play activating and inhibitory functions in neurotransmitter release. The complexin accessory helix inhibits release and was proposed to insert into SNARE complexes to prevent their full assembly. This model was supported by ‘superclamp’ and ‘poor-clamp’ mutations that enhanced or decreased the complexin-I inhibitory activity in cell–cell fusion assays, and by the crystal structure of a superclamp mutant bound to a synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complex. NMR studies now show that the complexin-I accessory helix does not insert into synaptobrevin-truncated SNARE complexes in solution, and electrophysiological data reveal that superclamp mutants have slightly stimulatory or no effects on neurotransmitter release, whereas a poor-clamp mutant inhibits release. Importantly, increasing or decreasing the negative charge of the complexin-I accessory helix inhibits or stimulates release, respectively. These results suggest a new model whereby the complexin accessory helix inhibits release through electrostatic (and perhaps steric) repulsion enabled by its location between the vesicle and plasma membranes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02391.001 PMID:24842998

  17. Delayed release of neurotransmitter from cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atluri, P P; Regehr, W G

    1998-10-15

    At fast chemical synapses the rapid release of neurotransmitter that occurs within a few milliseconds of an action potential is followed by a more sustained elevation of release probability, known as delayed release. Here we characterize the role of calcium in delayed release and test the hypothesis that facilitation and delayed release share a common mechanism. Synapses between cerebellar granule cells and their postsynaptic targets, stellate cells and Purkinje cells, were studied in rat brain slices. Presynaptic calcium transients were measured with calcium-sensitive fluorophores, and delayed release was detected with whole-cell recordings. Calcium influx, presynaptic calcium dynamics, and the number of stimulus pulses were altered to assess their effect on delayed release and facilitation. Following single stimuli, delayed release can be separated into two components: one lasting for tens of milliseconds that is steeply calcium-dependent, the other lasting for hundreds of milliseconds that is driven by low levels of calcium with a nearly linear calcium dependence. The amplitude, calcium dependence, and magnitude of delayed release do not correspond to those of facilitation, indicating that these processes are not simple reflections of a shared mechanism. The steep calcium dependence of delayed release, combined with the large calcium transients observed in these presynaptic terminals, suggests that for physiological conditions delayed release provides a way for cells to influence their postsynaptic targets long after their own action potential activity has subsided.

  18. Rapid structural alterations of the active zone lead to sustained changes in neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Matz, Jacob; Gilyan, Andrew; Kolar, Annette; McCarvill, Terrence; Krueger, Stefan R

    2010-05-11

    The likelihood with which an action potential elicits neurotransmitter release, the release probability (p(r)), is an important component of synaptic strength. Regulatory mechanisms controlling several steps of synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis may affect p(r), yet their relative importance in determining p(r) and eliciting temporal changes in neurotransmitter release at individual synapses is largely unknown. We have investigated whether the size of the active zone cytomatrix is a major determinant of p(r) and whether changes in its size lead to corresponding alterations in neurotransmitter release. We have used a fluorescent sensor of SV exocytosis, synaptophysin-pHluorin, to measure p(r) at individual synapses with high accuracy and employed a fluorescently labeled cytomatrix protein, Bassoon, to quantify the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at these synapses. We find that, for synapses made by a visually identified presynaptic neuron, p(r) is indeed strongly correlated with the amount of active zone cytomatrix present at the presynaptic specialization. Intriguingly, active zone cytomatrices are frequently subject to synapse-specific changes in size on a time scale of minutes. These spontaneous alterations in active zone size are associated with corresponding changes in neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that the size of the active zone cytomatrix has a large influence on the reliability of synaptic transmission. Furthermore, they implicate mechanisms leading to rapid structural alterations at active zones in synapse-specific forms of plasticity.

  19. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  20. Molecular mechanisms driving homeostatic plasticity of neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Lazarevic, Vesna; Pothula, Santosh; Andres-Alonso, Maria; Fejtova, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Homeostatic plasticity is a process by which neurons adapt to the overall network activity to keep their firing rates in a reasonable range. At the cellular level this kind of plasticity comprises modulation of cellular excitability and tuning of synaptic strength. In this review we concentrate on presynaptic homeostatic plasticity controlling the efficacy of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic boutons. While morphological and electrophysiological approaches were successful to describe homeostatic plasticity-induced changes in the presynaptic architecture and function, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying those modifications remained largely unknown for a long time. We summarize the latest progress made in the understanding of homeostasis-induced regulation of different steps of the synaptic vesicle cycle and the molecular machineries involved in this process. We particularly focus on the role of presynaptic scaffolding proteins, which functionally and spatially organize synaptic vesicle clusters, neurotransmitter release sites and the associated endocytic machinery. These proteins turned out to be major presynaptic substrates for remodeling during homeostatic plasticity. Finally, we discuss cellular processes and signaling pathways acting during homeostatic molecular remodeling and their potential involvement in the maladaptive plasticity occurring in multiple neuropathologic conditions such as neurodegeneration, epilepsy and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24348337

  1. [Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation in strontium solutions].

    PubMed

    Mukhamed'iarov, M A; Kochunova, Iu O; Telina, E N; Zefirov, A L

    2008-02-01

    Mechanisms of neurotransmitter release facilitation were studied using electrophysiological recording of end-plate currents (EPC) and nerve ending (NE) responses after substitution of extracellular Ca ions with Sr ions at the frog neuromuscular junction. The solutions with 0.5 mM concentration of Ca ions (calcium solution) or 1 mM concentration of Sr ions (strontium solution) were used where baseline neurotransmitter release (at low-frequency stimulation) is equal. Decay of paired-pulse facilitation of EPC at calcium solutions with increase of interpulse interval from 5 to 500 ms was well described by three-exponential function consisting of early, first and second components. Facilitation at strontium solutions was significantly diminished due mainly to decrease of early and first components. At the same time, EPC facilitation with rhythmic stimulation (10 or 50 imp/s) at strontium solutions was significantly increased. Also more pronounced decrease of NE response 3rd phase, reflecting potassium currents was detected under rhythmic stimulation of 50 imp/s at strontium solutions comparing to calcium solutions. It was concluded that facilitation sites underlying first and early components had lower affinity to Sr ions than to Ca ions. The enhancement of frequency facilitation at strontium solutions is mediated by two mechanisms: more pronounced broadening of NE action potential and increase of bivalent cation influx due to feebly marked activation of Ca(2+)-dependent potassium current by Sr ions, and slower dynamics of Sr(2+) removal from NE axoplasm comparing to Ca(2+).

  2. Stabilization of spontaneous neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses by ribbon-specific subtypes of complexin.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Zanazzi, George; Henry, Diane; Akmentin, Wendy; Matthews, Gary

    2013-05-08

    Ribbon synapses of tonically releasing sensory neurons must provide a large pool of releasable vesicles for sustained release, while minimizing spontaneous release in the absence of stimulation. Complexins are presynaptic proteins that may accomplish this dual task at conventional synapses by interacting with the molecular machinery of synaptic vesicle fusion at the active zone to retard spontaneous vesicle exocytosis yet facilitate release evoked by depolarization. However, ribbon synapses of photoreceptor cells and bipolar neurons in the retina express distinct complexin subtypes, perhaps reflecting the special requirements of these synapses for tonic release. To investigate the role of ribbon-specific complexins in transmitter release, we combined presynaptic voltage clamp, fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and behavioral assays of photoreceptive function in zebrafish. Acute interference with complexin function using a peptide derived from the SNARE-binding domain increased spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion at ribbon synapses of retinal bipolar neurons without affecting release triggered by depolarization. Knockdown of complexin by injection of an antisense morpholino into zebrafish embryos prevented photoreceptor-driven migration of pigment in skin melanophores and caused the pigment distribution to remain in the dark-adapted state even when embryos were exposed to light. This suggests that loss of complexin function elevated spontaneous release in illuminated photoreceptors sufficiently to mimic the higher release rate normally associated with darkness, thus interfering with visual signaling. We conclude that visual system-specific complexins are required for proper illumination-dependent modulation of the rate of neurotransmitter release at visual system ribbon synapses.

  3. Stabilization of spontaneous neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses by ribbon-specific subtypes of Complexin

    PubMed Central

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Zanazzi, George; Henry, Diane; Akmentin, Wendy; Matthews, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Ribbon synapses of tonically releasing sensory neurons must provide a large pool of releasable vesicles for sustained release, while minimizing spontaneous release in the absence of stimulation. Complexins are presynaptic proteins that may accomplish this dual task at conventional synapses, by interacting with the molecular machinery of synaptic vesicle fusion at the active zone to retard spontaneous vesicle exocytosis yet facilitate release evoked by depolarization. However, ribbon synapses of photoreceptor cells and bipolar neurons in the retina express distinct Complexin subtypes, perhaps reflecting the special requirements of these synapses for tonic release. To investigate the role of ribbon-specific Complexins in transmitter release, we combined presynaptic voltage-clamp, fluorescence imaging, electron microscopy, and behavioral assays of photoreceptive function in zebrafish. Acute interference with Complexin function using a peptide derived from the SNARE-binding domain increased spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion at ribbon synapses of retinal bipolar neurons without affecting release triggered by depolarization. Knockdown of Complexin by injection of an antisense morpholino into zebrafish embryos prevented photoreceptor-driven migration of pigment in skin melanophores and caused the pigment distribution to remain in the dark-adapted state even when embryos were exposed to light. This suggests that loss of Complexin function elevated spontaneous release in illuminated photoreceptors sufficiently to mimic the higher release rate normally associated with darkness, thus interfering with visual signaling. We conclude that visual system-specific Complexins are required for proper illumination-dependent modulation of the rate of neurotransmitter release at visual system ribbon synapses. PMID:23658160

  4. Waterborne lead affects circadian variations of brain neurotransmitters in fathead minnows

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, R.E.; Russo, A.C.; Weber, D.N.

    1995-09-01

    Lead is a potent neurotoxin affecting brain levels of a number of vertebrate neurotransmitters. Reports on these effects are, however, not consistent either among or within species. For example, with lead-intoxicated rats there are reports of decreased acetylcholine (ACh) release and decreased ACh brain levels as well as reports of increased levels or no change in levels. Also, with rats there are reports of increased levels, decreased levels, or no change in brain catecholamines, with lead producing similar changes in both norephinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) in some cases and differences in response between the two in others. Although most early reports dealt with whole brain levels, reports on neurotransmitter levels in specific brain regions can be equally conflicting. Similar sorts of discrepancies exist among studies with fishes. Much of the variation among studies on lead effects on neurotransmitters is, no doubt, due to differences among the studies in variables such as: species, age, dosage and duration, route of administration. However, lead can apparently affect circadian locomotor rhythms of both rats and fishes. Therefore, another possible cause for the variation among studies is that there is an interaction among dosage, sampling time and endogenous rhythms. A lead-produced phase shift or disruption in endogenous neurotransmitter rhythms could in turn elicit a host of varying results and interpretations depending on the circadian time of sampling. We elected to examine this possibility in the fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a freshwater species widely used for toxicity studies. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Mimicking Neurotransmitter Release in Chemical Synapses via Hysteresis Engineering in MoS2 Transistors.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Andrew J; Razavieh, Ali; Nasr, Joseph R; Schulman, Daniel S; Eichfeld, Chad M; Das, Saptarshi

    2017-03-28

    Neurotransmitter release in chemical synapses is fundamental to diverse brain functions such as motor action, learning, cognition, emotion, perception, and consciousness. Moreover, improper functioning or abnormal release of neurotransmitter is associated with numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy, sclerosis, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. We have utilized hysteresis engineering in a back-gated MoS2 field effect transistor (FET) in order to mimic such neurotransmitter release dynamics in chemical synapses. All three essential features, i.e., quantal, stochastic, and excitatory or inhibitory nature of neurotransmitter release, were accurately captured in our experimental demonstration. We also mimicked an important phenomenon called long-term potentiation (LTP), which forms the basis of human memory. Finally, we demonstrated how to engineer the LTP time by operating the MoS2 FET in different regimes. Our findings could provide a critical component toward the design of next-generation smart and intelligent human-like machines and human-machine interfaces.

  6. Kv3 voltage-gated potassium channels regulate neurotransmitter release from mouse motor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Ruth E; Moores, Thomas S; Morris, Neil P; Parson, Simon H; Deuchars, Jim

    2004-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are critical to regulation of neurotransmitter release throughout the nervous system but the roles and identity of the subtypes involved remain unclear. Here we show that Kv3 channels regulate transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Light- and electron-microscopic immunohistochemistry revealed Kv3.3 and Kv3.4 subunits within all motor nerve terminals of muscles examined [transversus abdominus, lumbrical and flexor digitorum brevis (FDB)]. To determine the roles of these Kv3 subunits, intracellular recordings were made of end-plate potentials (EPPs) in FDB muscle fibres evoked by electrical stimulation of tibial nerve. Tetraethylammonium (TEA) applied at low concentrations (0.05-0.5 mM), which blocks only a few known potassium channels including Kv3 channels, did not affect muscle fibre resting potential but significantly increased the amplitude of all EPPs tested. Significantly, this effect of TEA was still observed in the presence of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blockers iberiotoxin (25-150 nM) and Penitrem A (100 nM), suggesting a selective action on Kv3 subunits. Consistent with this, 15-microM 4-aminopyridine, which blocks Kv3 but not large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels, enhanced evoked EPP amplitude. Unexpectedly, blood-depressing substance-I, a toxin selective for Kv3.4 subunits, had no effect at 0.05-1 microM. The combined presynaptic localization of Kv3 subunits and pharmacological enhancement of EPP amplitude indicate that Kv3 channels regulate neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals at the NMJ.

  7. Functional roles of complexin in neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses of mouse retinal bipolar neurons.

    PubMed

    Vaithianathan, Thirumalini; Henry, Diane; Akmentin, Wendy; Matthews, Gary

    2015-03-04

    Ribbon synapses of photoreceptor cells and bipolar neurons in the retina signal graded changes in light intensity via sustained release of neurotransmitter. One molecular specialization of retinal ribbon synapses is the expression of complexin protein subtypes Cplx3 and Cplx4, whereas conventional synapses express Cplx1 and Cplx2. Because complexins bind to the molecular machinery for synaptic vesicle fusion (the SNARE complex) and modulate transmitter release at conventional synapses, we examined the roles of ribbon-specific complexin in regulating release at ribbon synapses of ON bipolar neurons from mouse retina. To interfere acutely with the interaction of native complexins with the SNARE complex, a peptide consisting of the highly conserved SNARE-binding domain of Cplx3 was introduced via a whole-cell patch pipette placed directly on the synaptic terminal, and vesicle fusion was monitored using capacitance measurements and FM-dye destaining. The inhibitory peptide, but not control peptides, increased spontaneous synaptic vesicle fusion, partially depleted reserve synaptic vesicles, and reduced fusion triggered by opening voltage-gated calcium channels under voltage clamp, without affecting the number of synaptic vesicles associated with ribbons, as revealed by electron microscopy of recorded terminals. The results are consistent with a dual role for ribbon-specific complexin, acting as a brake on the SNARE complex to prevent spontaneous fusion in the absence of calcium influx, while at the same time facilitating release evoked by depolarization.

  8. Ectopic vesicular neurotransmitter release along sensory axons mediates neurovascular coupling via glial calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Anne; Hirnet, Daniela; Wolburg, Hartwig; Schmalzing, Günther; Deitmer, Joachim W; Lohr, Christian

    2010-08-24

    Neurotransmitter release generally is considered to occur at active zones of synapses, and ectopic release of neurotransmitters has been demonstrated in a few instances. However, the mechanism of ectopic neurotransmitter release is poorly understood. We took advantage of the intimate morphological and functional proximity of olfactory receptor axons and specialized glial cells, olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), to study ectopic neurotransmitter release. Axonal stimulation evoked purinergic and glutamatergic Ca(2+) responses in OECs, indicating ATP and glutamate release. In axons expressing synapto-pHluorin, stimulation evoked an increase in synapto-pHluorin fluorescence, indicative of vesicle fusion. Transmitter release was dependent on Ca(2+) and could be inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and botulinum toxin A. Ca(2+) transients in OECs evoked by ATP, axonal stimulation, and laser photolysis of NP-EGTA resulted in constriction of adjacent blood vessels. Our results indicate that ATP and glutamate are released ectopically by vesicles along axons and mediate neurovascular coupling via glial Ca(2+) signaling.

  9. Feeding-associated alterations in striatal neurotransmitter release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acworth, I. N.; Ressler, K.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Published evidence suggests a role for dopaminergic (DA) brain pathways in feeding-associated behaviors. Using the novel technique of brain microdialysis of striatal extracellular fluid (ECF) as an index of DA release, Church et al. described increases in levels of DA when animals had limited access to pellets, but not with free access. Dopamine release from the nucleus accumbens did increase with free access to pellets post starvation or after food reward. We used permanently implanted microdialysis probes to measure ECF levels of DA, DOPAC, HVA, and large neutral amino acids (LNAA) for up to 72 hours after implantation among rats experiencing different dietary regimens.

  10. Phosphorylation of Complexin by PKA Regulates Activity-dependent Spontaneous Neurotransmitter Release and Structural Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Richard W.; Buhl, Lauren K.; Volfson, Dina; Tran, Adrienne; Li, Feng; Akbergenova, Yulia; Littleton, J. Troy

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic plasticity is a fundamental feature of the nervous system that allows adaptation to changing behavioral environments. Most studies of synaptic plasticity have examined the regulated trafficking of postsynaptic glutamate receptors that generates alterations in synaptic transmission. Whether and how changes in the presynaptic release machinery contribute to neuronal plasticity is less clear. The SNARE complex mediates neurotransmitter release in response to presynaptic Ca++ entry. Here we show that the SNARE fusion clamp Complexin undergoes activity-dependent phosphorylation that alters the basic properties of neurotransmission in Drosophila. Retrograde signaling following stimulation activates PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the Complexin C-terminus that selectively and transiently enhances spontaneous release. Enhanced spontaneous release is required for activity-dependent synaptic growth. These data indicate that SNARE-dependent fusion mechanisms can be regulated in an activity-dependent manner and highlight the key role of spontaneous neurotransmitter release as a mediator of functional and structural plasticity. PMID:26590346

  11. Self administration of oxycodone by adolescent and adult mice affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Blackwell, B; Schlussman, S D; Butelman, E R; Ho, A; Ott, J; Kreek, M J; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-31

    Illicit use of prescription opioid analgesics (e.g., oxycodone) in adolescence is a pressing public health issue. Our goal was to determine whether oxycodone self administration differentially affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent compared to adult C57BL/6J mice. Groups of adolescent mice (4 weeks old, n=12) and of adult mice (11 weeks old, n=11) underwent surgery during which a catheter was implanted into their jugular veins. After recovering from surgery, mice self administered oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg/infusion) 2 h/day for 14 consecutive days or served as yoked saline controls. Mice were sacrificed within 1h after the last self-administration session and the dorsal striatum was isolated for mRNA analysis. Gene expression was analyzed with real time PCR using a commercially available neurotransmitter receptor PCR array containing 84 genes. We found that adolescent mice self administered less oxycodone than adult mice over the 14 days. Monoamine oxidase A (Maoa) and neuropeptide Y receptor 5 mRNA levels were lower in adolescent mice than in adult mice without oxycodone exposure. Oxycodone self administration increased Maoa mRNA levels compared to controls in both age groups. There was a positive correlation of the amount of oxycodone self administered in the last session or across 14 sessions with Maoa mRNA levels. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mRNA showed a significant Drug × Age interaction, with point-wise significance. More genes in the dorsal striatum of adolescents (19) changed in response to oxycodone self administration compared to controls than in adult (4) mice. Overall, this study demonstrates that repeated oxycodone self administration alters neurotransmitter receptors gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent and adult mice.

  12. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  13. Modulation of neurotransmitter release via histamine H3 heteroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Malinowska, B; Kathmann, M; Göthert, M

    1994-01-01

    Presynaptic H3 receptors occur on histaminergic neurones of the CNS (autoreceptors) and on non-histaminergic neurones of the central and autonomic nervous system (heteroreceptors). H3 heteroreceptors, most probably located on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres innervating the resistance vessels and the heart, have been identified in the model of the pithed rat. Furthermore, we could show in superfusion experiments that H3 heteroreceptors also occur on the sympathetic neurones supplying the human saphenous vein and the vasculature of the pig retina and on the serotoninergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurones in the brain of various mammalian species, including man. The effects of three recently described H3 receptor ligands were studied in superfused mouse brain cortex slices. The potency of the novel H3 receptor agonist imetit exceeded that of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (the reference H3 receptor agonist) by one log unit and that of histamine by almost two log units. Clobenpropit was shown to be a competitive H3 receptor antagonist, exhibiting a pA2 as high as 9.6 (exceeding the pA2 of the reference H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide by one log unit). The irreversible antagonism of N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) was also studied. Interactions of the H3 heteroreceptor with the dopamine autoreceptor in mouse striatal slices and the alpha 2-autoreceptor in mouse brain cortex slices could be demonstrated. Activation of alpha 2-autoreceptors decreases the H3 receptor-mediated effect. Blockade of alpha 2-autoreceptors increases the H3 receptor-mediated effect only if the alpha 2-autoreceptors are simultaneously activated by endogenous noradrenaline. The H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in mouse brain cortex slices was attenuated by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium but this attenuation was abolished by reduction of the Ca2+ concentration in the medium (to compensate for the facilitatory effect of

  14. Glycine receptors support excitatory neurotransmitter release in developing mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Portia A; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Philpot, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyRs) are found in most areas of the brain, and their dysfunction can cause severe neurological disorders. While traditionally thought of as inhibitory receptors, presynaptic-acting GlyRs (preGlyRs) can also facilitate glutamate release under certain circumstances, although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we sought to better understand the role of GlyRs in the facilitation of excitatory neurotransmitter release in mouse visual cortex. Using whole-cell recordings, we found that preGlyRs facilitate glutamate release in developing, but not adult, visual cortex. The glycinergic enhancement of neurotransmitter release in early development depends on the high intracellular to extracellular Cl− gradient maintained by the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter and requires Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. The glycine transporter 1, localized to glial cells, regulates extracellular glycine concentration and the activation of these preGlyRs. Our findings demonstrate a developmentally regulated mechanism for controlling excitatory neurotransmitter release in the neocortex. PMID:22988142

  15. Protein-protein interactions and protein modules in the control of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed Central

    Benfenati, F; Onofri, F; Giovedí, S

    1999-01-01

    Information transfer among neurons is operated by neurotransmitters stored in synaptic vesicles and released to the extracellular space by an efficient process of regulated exocytosis. Synaptic vesicles are organized into two distinct functional pools, a large reserve pool in which vesicles are restrained by the actin-based cytoskeleton, and a quantitatively smaller releasable pool in which vesicles approach the presynaptic membrane and eventually fuse with it on stimulation. Both synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release depend on a precise sequence of events that include release from the reserve pool, targeting to the active zone, docking, priming, fusion and endocytotic retrieval of synaptic vesicles. These steps are mediated by a series of specific interactions among cytoskeletal, synaptic vesicle, presynaptic membrane and cytosolic proteins that, by acting in concert, promote the spatial and temporal regulation of the exocytotic machinery. The majority of these interactions are mediated by specific protein modules and domains that are found in many proteins and are involved in numerous intracellular processes. In this paper, the possible physiological role of these multiple protein-protein interactions is analysed, with ensuing updating and clarification of the present molecular model of the process of neurotransmitter release. PMID:10212473

  16. Neuronal release and successful astrocyte uptake of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters after spinal cord injury in lampreys.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Blanca; Valle-Maroto, Silvia María; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Rodicio, María Celina

    2014-08-01

    In contrast to mammals, the spinal cord of lampreys spontaneously recovers from a complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Understanding the differences between lampreys and mammals in their response to SCI could provide valuable information to propose new therapies. Unique properties of the astrocytes of lampreys probably contribute to the success of spinal cord regeneration. The main aim of our study was to investigate, in the sea lamprey, the release of aminoacidergic neurotransmitters and the subsequent astrocyte uptake of these neurotransmitters during the first week following a complete SCI by detecting glutamate, GABA, glycine, Hu and cytokeratin immunoreactivities. This is the first time that aminoacidergic neurotransmitter release from neurons and the subsequent astrocytic response after SCI are analysed by immunocytochemistry in any vertebrate. Spinal injury caused the immediate loss of glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivities in neurons close to the lesion site (except for the cerebrospinal fluid-contacting GABA cells). Only after SCI, astrocytes showed glutamate, GABA and glycine immunoreactivity. Treatment with an inhibitor of glutamate transporters (DL-TBOA) showed that neuronal glutamate was actively transported into astrocytes after SCI. Moreover, after SCI, a massive accumulation of inhibitory neurotransmitters around some reticulospinal axons was observed. Presence of GABA accumulation significantly correlated with a higher survival ability of these neurons. Our data show that, in contrast to mammals, astrocytes of lampreys have a high capacity to actively uptake glutamate after SCI. GABA may play a protective role that could explain the higher regenerative and survival ability of specific descending neurons of lampreys.

  17. Hexabromocyclododecane inhibits depolarization-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels and neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Dingemans, Milou M L; Heusinkveld, Harm J; de Groot, Aart; Bergman, Ake; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2009-02-01

    Environmental levels of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) have been increasing. HBCD has been shown to cause adverse effects on learning and behavior in mice, as well as on dopamine uptake in rat synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. For other BFRs, alterations in the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis have been observed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the technical HBCD mixture and individual stereoisomers affect the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in a neuroendocrine in vitro model (PC12 cells). [Ca(2+)](i) and vesicular catecholamine release were measured using respectively single-cell Fura-2 imaging and amperometry. Exposure of PC12 cells to the technical HBCD mixture or individual stereoisomers did neither affect basal [Ca(2+)](i), nor the frequency of basal neurotransmitter release. However, exposure to HBCD (0-20 microM) did cause a dose-dependent reduction of a subsequent depolarization-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). This effect was apparent only when HBCD was applied at least 5 min before depolarization (maximum effect after 20 min exposure). The effects of alpha- and beta-HBCD were comparable to that of the technical mixture, whereas the inhibitory effect of gamma-HBCD was larger. Using specific blockers of L-, N- or P/Q-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs) it was shown that the inhibitory effect of HBCD is not VGCC-specific. Additionally, the number of cells showing depolarization-evoked neurotransmitter release was markedly reduced following HBCD exposure. Summarizing, HBCD inhibits depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)](i) and neurotransmitter release. As increasing HBCD levels should be anticipated, these findings justify additional efforts to establish an adequate exposure, hazard and risk assessment.

  18. FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release and synaptic information transmission by modulating action potential duration via BK channels.

    PubMed

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S; Klyachko, Vitaly A

    2013-02-20

    Loss of FMRP causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx, and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel's regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology.

  19. Multiple roles of calcium ions in the regulation of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Neher, Erwin; Sakaba, Takeshi

    2008-09-25

    The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]) has important roles in the triggering of neurotransmitter release and the regulation of short-term plasticity (STP). Transmitter release is initiated by quite high concentrations within microdomains, while short-term facilitation is strongly influenced by the global buildup of "residual calcium." A global rise in [Ca(2+)] also accelerates the recruitment of release-ready vesicles, thereby controlling the degree of short-term depression (STD) during sustained activity, as well as the recovery of the vesicle pool in periods of rest. We survey data that lead us to propose two distinct roles of [Ca(2+)] in vesicle recruitment: one accelerating "molecular priming" (vesicle docking and the buildup of a release machinery), the other promoting the tight coupling between releasable vesicles and Ca(2+) channels. Such coupling is essential for rendering vesicles sensitive to short [Ca(2+)] transients, generated during action potentials.

  20. High-Probability Neurotransmitter Release Sites Represent an Energy-Efficient Design.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhongmin; Chouhan, Amit K; Borycz, Jolanta A; Lu, Zhiyuan; Rossano, Adam J; Brain, Keith L; Zhou, You; Meinertzhagen, Ian A; Macleod, Gregory T

    2016-10-10

    Nerve terminals contain multiple sites specialized for the release of neurotransmitters. Release usually occurs with low probability, a design thought to confer many advantages. High-probability release sites are not uncommon, but their advantages are not well understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that high-probability release sites represent an energy-efficient design. We examined release site probabilities and energy efficiency at the terminals of two glutamatergic motor neurons synapsing on the same muscle fiber in Drosophila larvae. Through electrophysiological and ultrastructural measurements, we calculated release site probabilities to differ considerably between terminals (0.33 versus 0.11). We estimated the energy required to release and recycle glutamate from the same measurements. The energy required to remove calcium and sodium ions subsequent to nerve excitation was estimated through microfluorimetric and morphological measurements. We calculated energy efficiency as the number of glutamate molecules released per ATP molecule hydrolyzed, and high-probability release site terminals were found to be more efficient (0.13 versus 0.06). Our analytical model indicates that energy efficiency is optimal (∼0.15) at high release site probabilities (∼0.76). As limitations in energy supply constrain neural function, high-probability release sites might ameliorate such constraints by demanding less energy. Energy efficiency can be viewed as one aspect of nerve terminal function, in balance with others, because high-efficiency terminals depress significantly during episodic bursts of activity.

  1. Involvement of multiple calcium channels in neurotransmitter release from cultured sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Hirning, L.D.; Perney, T.M.; Miller, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The release of neurotransmitters has been defined to be a Ca/sup + +/ dependent process, however, the role of Ca/sup + +/ channels in the release process is unclear. Primary cultures of sympathetic nerves from superior cervical ganglia were used to examine the specific actions of dihydropyridine (DHP) drugs. In nerve cultures, /sup 3/H-norepinepharine (NE) was taken up in a desipramine blockable fashion and released on exposure to high external K/sup +/ concentrations. NE release was virtually abolished by Co/sup + +/ (3 mM) or in Ca/sup + +/ free media, demonstrating the Ca/sup + +/ dependence of the release. However, the antagonist DHP, nimodipine, was ineffective in blocking transmitter release in concentrations up to 10/sup -5/M. In contrast, the agonist DHP, Bay K8644 (10/sup -6/M), significantly enhanced transmitter release by 35-40% of control. This enhancement was blocked down to control levels by nimodipine (10/sup -6/M). The authors have also demonstrated high affinity /sup 3/H-nitrendipine binding sites (B/sub max/ = 179 fmoles/mg, Kd = 0.25 nM) on these sympathetic neuronal membranes. These data suggest that DHP sensitive Ca/sup + +/ channels, which have been shown to modulate SP release from DRG neurons in culture are not usually involved in NE release from sympathetic neurons. However, prolonged opening of these channels by the DHP agonist, Bay K8644, increases the overall Ca/sup + +/ influx into sympathetic nerves to enhance transmitter release.

  2. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca(2+)-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-04-05

    Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca(2+) sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca(2+)-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release.

  3. PRRT2 Is a Key Component of the Ca2+-Dependent Neurotransmitter Release Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Pierluigi; Castroflorio, Enrico; Rossi, Pia; Fadda, Manuela; Sterlini, Bruno; Cervigni, Romina Ines; Prestigio, Cosimo; Giovedì, Silvia; Onofri, Franco; Mura, Elisa; Guarnieri, Fabrizia C.; Marte, Antonella; Orlando, Marta; Zara, Federico; Fassio, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Baldelli, Pietro; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders, including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia, and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression, suggesting that loss of PRRT2 function may contribute to pathogenesis. We show that PRRT2 is enriched in presynaptic terminals and that its silencing decreases the number of synapses and increases the number of docked synaptic vesicles at rest. PRRT2-silenced neurons exhibit a severe impairment of synchronous release, attributable to a sharp decrease in release probability and Ca2+ sensitivity and associated with a marked increase of the asynchronous/synchronous release ratio. PRRT2 interacts with the synaptic proteins SNAP-25 and synaptotagmin 1/2. The results indicate that PRRT2 is intimately connected with the Ca2+-sensing machinery and that it plays an important role in the final steps of neurotransmitter release. PMID:27052163

  4. Bacterial endotoxin inhibits LHRH secretion following the increased release of hypothalamic GABA levels. Different effects on amino acid neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Feleder, C; Refojo, D; Jarry, H; Wuttke, W; Moguilevsky, J A

    1996-01-01

    Immune system disorders are often accompanied by alterations in the reproductive axis. The bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) has inflammatory effects and activates cytokine release in the pituitary and hypothalamus. LPS inhibition of luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) release at the hypothalamic level appears to be associated with modifications in the inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmitter system. Then, knowing that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) mediates other neurotransmitter effects in the central nervous system, the possibility arises that this amino acid might mediate the effect of LPS on LHRH release by modifying amino acid neurotransmitter release at the hypothalamic level. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate a possible mediatory function of the GABAergic system in the LPS-induced inhibition of LHRH secretion. To this end, the modifications in the excitatory (glutamate, Glu) and inhibitory (taurine, Tau, and GABA) amino acid neurotransmitter release after the application of GABA-A and GABA-B antagonists, respectively, were studied and the effects of LPS on their release determined. Male rats were decapitated at 9.00 h, and the preoptic/mediobasal hypothalamic area (POA/MBH) was dissected and superfused with Earle's balanced salt solution. Superfusate fractions were collected at 15-min intervals after a 60-min stabilization superfusion period. LPS (100 ng/ml) was then added to the superfusion medium over 1 h in three different experimental designs: (1) LPS only (2) LPS simultaneously with bicuculline (GABA-A antagonist) or with phaclofen (GABA-B antagonist), and (3) LPS and subsequently bicuculline or phaclofen, performed in different experiments. This was followed by a wash-out period. The POA/MBH fragments were then subjected to a 56-mM K+ stimulus. Control POA/MBH fragments were continuously superfused with Earle's solution. As expected, LHRH release was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) during and following

  5. Ethanol's effects on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake, metabolism or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced both a stimulation of the release of (/sup 3/H)NE as well as an increase in intracellular free Ca2+. The increase in basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca2+ occurred independent of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca2+ or transmitter section. These results demonstrate the relationship of the effects of ethanol on cellular free Ca2+ and neurotransmitter release.

  6. Effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release and intracellular free calcium in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, C.S.; Weight, F.F.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of ethanol on muscarine-stimulated release of l-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine ((/sup 3/H)NE) was studied using the rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12. At concentrations of 25 mM and above, ethanol produced a dose-dependent inhibition of muscarine-stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)NE. The inhibition of muscarine-stimulated transmitter release occurred in the absence of any detectable effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)NE uptake or on muscarinic binding to the cells. However, ethanol produced an inhibition of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ which corresponded with the inhibition of transmitter release. At concentrations greater than 100 mM, ethanol produced an increase in the basal release of (/sup 3/H)NE. Intracellular free Ca++ also was increased by ethanol concentrations greater than 100 mM. The elevation of basal transmitter release and intracellular free Ca++ by concentrations of ethanol greater than 100 mM occurred independently of the inhibition by ethanol of muscarine-stimulated elevation of intracellular free Ca++ and transmitter secretion. These results suggest that the effects of ethanol on neurotransmitter release are associated with the effects of ethanol on intracellular free Ca++.

  7. LKB1 Regulates Mitochondria-Dependent Presynaptic Calcium Clearance and Neurotransmitter Release Properties at Excitatory Synapses along Cortical Axons

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Sando, Richard; Maximov, Anton; Polleux, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Individual synapses vary significantly in their neurotransmitter release properties, which underlie complex information processing in neural circuits. Presynaptic Ca2+ homeostasis plays a critical role in specifying neurotransmitter release properties, but the mechanisms regulating synapse-specific Ca2+ homeostasis in the mammalian brain are still poorly understood. Using electrophysiology and genetically encoded Ca2+ sensors targeted to the mitochondrial matrix or to presynaptic boutons of cortical pyramidal neurons, we demonstrate that the presence or absence of mitochondria at presynaptic boutons dictates neurotransmitter release properties through Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU)-dependent Ca2+ clearance. We demonstrate that the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 regulates MCU expression, mitochondria-dependent Ca2+ clearance, and thereby, presynaptic release properties. Re-establishment of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake at glutamatergic synapses rescues the altered neurotransmitter release properties characterizing LKB1-null cortical axons. Our results provide novel insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms whereby mitochondria control neurotransmitter release properties in a bouton-specific way through presynaptic Ca2+ clearance. PMID:27429220

  8. FMRP Regulates Neurotransmitter Release and Synaptic Information Transmission by Modulating Action Potential Duration via BK channels

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Pan-Yue; Rotman, Ziv; Blundon, Jay A.; Cho, Yongcheol; Cui, Jianmin; Cavalli, Valeria; Zakharenko, Stanislav S.; Klyachko, Vitaly A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS), but the physiological functions of FMRP remain highly debatable. Here we show that FMRP regulates neurotransmitter release in CA3 pyramidal neurons by modulating action potential (AP) duration. Loss of FMRP leads to excessive AP broadening during repetitive activity, enhanced presynaptic calcium influx and elevated neurotransmitter release. The AP broadening defects caused by FMRP loss have a cell-autonomous presynaptic origin and can be acutely rescued in postnatal neurons. These presynaptic actions of FMRP are translation-independent and are mediated selectively by BK channels via interaction of FMRP with BK channel’s regulatory β4 subunits. Information-theoretical analysis demonstrates that loss of these FMRP functions causes marked dysregulation of synaptic information transmission. FMRP-dependent AP broadening is not limited to the hippocampus, but also occurs in cortical pyramidal neurons. Our results thus suggest major translation-independent presynaptic functions of FMRP that may have important implications for understanding FXS neuropathology. PMID:23439122

  9. Dystrobrevin controls neurotransmitter release and muscle Ca2+ transients by localizing BK channels in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bojun; Liu, Ping; Zhan, Haiying; Wang, Zhao-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Dystrobrevin is a major component of a dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC). It is widely expressed in mammalian tissues including the nervous system, where it is localized to the presynaptic nerve terminal with unknown function. In a genetic screen for suppressors of a lethargic phenotype caused by a gain-of-function (gf) isoform of SLO-1 in C. elegans, we isolated multiple loss-of-function (lf) mutants of the dystrobrevin gene dyb-1. dyb-1(lf) phenocopied slo-1(lf), causing increased neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction, increased frequency of Ca2+ transients in body-wall muscle, and abnormal locomotion behavior. Neuron- and muscle-specific rescue experiments suggest that DYB-1 is required for SLO-1 function in both neurons and muscle cells. DYB-1 colocalized with SLO-1 at presynaptic sites in neurons and dense body regions in muscle cells, and dyb-1(lf) caused SLO-1 mislocalization in both types of cells without altering SLO-1 protein level. The neuronal phenotypes of dyb-1(lf) were partially rescued by mouse α-dystrobrevin-1 (αDB1). These observations revealed novel functions of the BK channel in regulating muscle Ca2+ transients, and of dystrobrevin in controlling neurotransmitter release and muscle Ca2+ transients by localizing the BK channel. PMID:22131396

  10. Can Nanofluidic Chemical Release Enable Fast, High Resolution Neurotransmitter-Based Neurostimulation?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter D.; Stelzle, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Artificial chemical stimulation could provide improvements over electrical neurostimulation. Physiological neurotransmission between neurons relies on the nanoscale release and propagation of specific chemical signals to spatially-localized receptors. Current knowledge of nanoscale fluid dynamics and nanofluidic technology allows us to envision artificial mechanisms to achieve fast, high resolution neurotransmitter release. Substantial technological development is required to reach this goal. Nanofluidic technology—rather than microfluidic—will be necessary; this should come as no surprise given the nanofluidic nature of neurotransmission. This perspective reviews the state of the art of high resolution electrical neuroprostheses and their anticipated limitations. Chemical release rates from nanopores are compared to rates achieved at synapses and with iontophoresis. A review of microfluidic technology justifies the analysis that microfluidic control of chemical release would be insufficient. Novel nanofluidic mechanisms are discussed, and we propose that hydrophobic gating may allow control of chemical release suitable for mimicking neurotransmission. The limited understanding of hydrophobic gating in artificial nanopores and the challenges of fabrication and large-scale integration of nanofluidic components are emphasized. Development of suitable nanofluidic technology will require dedicated, long-term efforts over many years. PMID:27065794

  11. The impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release in the electrically stimulated retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werginz, Paul; Rattay, Frank

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In spite of intense theoretical and experimental investigations on electrical nerve stimulation, the influence of reversed ion currents on network activity during extracellular stimulation has not been investigated so far. Approach. Here, the impact of calcium current reversal on neurotransmitter release during subretinal stimulation was analyzed with a computational multi-compartment model of a retinal bipolar cell (BC) that was coupled with a four-pool model for the exocytosis from its ribbon synapses. Emphasis was laid on calcium channel dynamics and how these channels influence synaptic release. Main results. Stronger stimulation with anodic pulses caused transmembrane voltages above the Nernst potential of calcium in the terminals and, by this means, forced calcium ions to flow in the reversed direction from inside to the outside of the cell. Consequently, intracellular calcium concentration decreased resulting in a reduced vesicle release or preventing release at all. This mechanism is expected to lead to a pronounced ring-shaped pattern of exocytosis within a group of neighbored BCs when the stronger stimulated cells close to the electrode fail in releasing vesicles. Significance. Stronger subretinal stimulation causes failure of synaptic exocytosis due to reversal of calcium flow into the extracellular space in cells close to the electrode.

  12. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E.

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by ≈1,000–17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation. PMID:17640910

  13. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  14. Activity-dependent, homeostatic regulation of neurotransmitter release from auditory nerve fibers

    PubMed Central

    Ngodup, Tenzin; Goetz, Jack A.; McGuire, Brian C.; Sun, Wei; Lauer, Amanda M.; Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Information processing in the brain requires reliable synaptic transmission. High reliability at specialized auditory nerve synapses in the cochlear nucleus results from many release sites (N), high probability of neurotransmitter release (Pr), and large quantal size (Q). However, high Pr also causes auditory nerve synapses to depress strongly when activated at normal rates for a prolonged period, which reduces fidelity. We studied how synapses are influenced by prolonged activity by exposing mice to constant, nondamaging noise and found that auditory nerve synapses changed to facilitating, reflecting low Pr. For mice returned to quiet, synapses recovered to normal depression, suggesting that these changes are a homeostatic response to activity. Two additional properties, Q and average excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitude, were unaffected by noise rearing, suggesting that the number of release sites (N) must increase to compensate for decreased Pr. These changes in N and Pr were confirmed physiologically using the integration method. Furthermore, consistent with increased N, endbulbs in noise-reared animals had larger VGlut1-positive puncta, larger profiles in electron micrographs, and more release sites per profile. In current-clamp recordings, noise-reared BCs had greater spike fidelity even during high rates of synaptic activity. Thus, auditory nerve synapses regulate excitability through an activity-dependent, homeostatic mechanism, which could have major effects on all downstream processing. Our results also suggest that noise-exposed bushy cells would remain hyperexcitable for a period after returning to normal quiet conditions, which could have perceptual consequences. PMID:25944933

  15. Effects of soluble β-amyloid on the release of neurotransmitters from rat brain synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Olivero, Guendalina; Grilli, Massimo; Chen, Jiayang; Preda, Stefania; Mura, Elisa; Govoni, Stefano; Marchi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Contradictory results have been reported on the interaction of beta-amyloid (Aβ) with cholinergic receptors. The present paper investigates the modulatory effect of Aβ1-40 on the neurotransmitter release evoked by nicotinic (nAChRs) and muscarinic (mAChRs) receptors. Aβ1-40 inhibits both nicotinic and muscarinic-evoked [3H]DA overflow from rat nerve endings. Added to perfusion medium, Aβ1-40 is able to enter into synaptosomes; it exerts its inhibitory effect at extracellular sites when release is stimulated by nAChRs and intracellularly when release is evoked by mAChRs. Moreover, our data show that Aβ1-40 acts as non competitive antagonist of heteromeric α4β2* but not of α3β4* nAChRs which modulate [3H]NA overflow. Positive allosteric modulators of nAChRs counteract its inhibitory effect. It might be that compounds of this type could be useful to prevent, slow down the appearance or reverse the cognitive decline typical of the normal processes of brain aging. PMID:25076904

  16. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Cirnaru, Maria D.; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex. PMID:24904275

  17. Nigella sativa L. Seed Extract Modulates the Neurotransmitter Amino Acids Release in Cultured Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    El-Naggar, Tarek; Gómez-Serranillos, María Pilar; Palomino, Olga María; Arce, Carmen; Carretero, María Emilia

    2010-01-01

    Nigella sativa L. (NS) has been used for medicinal purposes since ancient times. This study aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of NS dry methanolic extract on cultured cortical neurons and its influence on neurotransmitter release, as well as the presence of excitatory (glutamate and aspartate) and inhibitory amino acids (gamma-aminobutyric acid—GABA—and glycine) in NS extract. Cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to different times and concentrations of NS dry methanolic extract and cell viability was then determined by a quantitative colorimetric method. NS did not induce any toxicity. The secretion of different amino acids was studied in primary cultured cortical neurons by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a derivation before injection with dansyl chloride. NS modulated amino acid release in cultured neurons; GABA was significantly increased whereas secretion of glutamate, aspartate, and glycine were decreased. The in vitro findings support the hypothesis that the sedative and depressive effects of NS observed in vivo could be based on changes of inhibitory/excitatory amino acids levels. PMID:20625485

  18. Real-time monitoring of inhibitory effects on glutamate-induced neurotransmitter release using a potassium ion image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Akiteru; Sakurai, Takashi; Hattori, Toshiaki; Okumura, Koichi; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To directly image the release of neurotransmitters from neurons, we combined a substance-selective layer with a 128 × 128-pixel ion image sensor based on CMOS technology. Using the substance-specific image sensors, we studied the dynamics of potassium ion ( K+) release from neurons and examined the effect of ouabain on K+ release. K+ transients were significantly inhibited by ouabain. The K+ image sensor used in this study demonstrated the dynamic analysis of ligand-operated signal release and the pharmacological assessment of secretagogues without requiring cell labeling.

  19. Determining Ca2+-sensor binding time and its variability in evoked neurotransmitter release

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ava Chomee; Kathpalia, Vinnie; D/Silva, Sahana; Cimenser, Aylin; Hua, Shao-Ying

    2008-01-01

    The speed and reliability of neuronal reactions are important factors for proper functioning of the nervous system. To understand how organisms use protein molecules to carry out very fast biological actions, we quantified single-molecule reaction time and its variability in synaptic transmission. From the synaptic delay of crayfish neuromuscular synapses the time for a few Ca2+ ions to bind with their sensors in evoked neurotransmitter release was estimated. In standard crayfish saline at room temperature, the average Ca2+ binding time was 0.12 ms for the first evoked quanta. At elevated extracellular Ca2+ concentrations this binding time reached a limit due to saturation of Ca2+ influx. Analysis of the synaptic delay variance at various Ca2+ concentrations revealed that the variability of the Ca2+-sensor binding time is the major source of the temporal variability of synaptic transmission, and that the Ca2+-independent molecular reactions after Ca2+ influx were less stochastic. The results provide insights into how organisms maximize reaction speed and reliability. PMID:18063666

  20. Live Imaging of Nicotine Induced Calcium Signaling and Neurotransmitter Release Along Ventral Hippocampal Axons.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2015-06-24

    Sustained enhancement of axonal signaling and increased neurotransmitter release by the activation of pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) is an important mechanism for neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh). The difficulty with access to probing the signaling mechanisms within intact axons and at nerve terminals both in vitro and in vivo has limited progress in the study of the pre-synaptic components of synaptic plasticity. Here we introduce a gene-chimeric preparation of ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-accumbens (nAcc) circuit in vitro that allows direct live imaging to analyze both the pre- and post-synaptic components of transmission while selectively varying the genetic profile of the pre- vs post-synaptic neurons. We demonstrate that projections from vHipp microslices, as pre-synaptic axonal input, form multiple, reliable glutamatergic synapses with post-synaptic targets, the dispersed neurons from nAcc. The pre-synaptic localization of various subtypes of nAChRs are detected and the pre-synaptic nicotinic signaling mediated synaptic transmission are monitored by concurrent electrophysiological recording and live cell imaging. This preparation also provides an informative approach to study the pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in vitro.

  1. Synaptic PI(3,4,5)P3 is required for Syntaxin1A clustering and neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Khuong, Thang Manh; Habets, Ron L P; Kuenen, Sabine; Witkowska, Agata; Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Swerts, Jef; Jahn, Reinhard; van den Bogaart, Geert; Verstreken, Patrik

    2013-03-20

    PI(3,4,5)P3 is a low-abundance lipid thought to play a role in the regulation of synaptic activity; however, the mechanism remains obscure. We have constructed novel split Venus-based probes and used superresolution imaging to localize PI(3,4,5)P3 at Drosophila larval neuromuscular synapses. We find the lipid in membrane domains at neurotransmitter release sites, where it concentrates with Syntaxin1A, a protein essential for vesicle fusion. Reducing PI(3,4,5)P3 availability disperses Syntaxin1A clusters and increasing PI(3,4,5)P3 levels rescues this defect. In artificial giant unilamellar vesicles, PI(3,4,5)P3 also induces Syntaxin1A domain formation and this clustering, in vitro and in vivo, is dependent on positively charged residues in the Syntaxin1A-juxtamembrane domain. Functionally, reduced PI(3,4,5)P3 causes temperature-sensitive paralysis and reduced neurotransmitter release, a phenotype also seen in animals expressing a Syntaxin1A with a mutated juxtamembrane domain. Thus, our data indicate that PI(3,4,5)P3, based on electrostatic interactions, clusters Syntaxin1A at release sites to regulate neurotransmitter release.

  2. Planar Diamond-Based Multiarrays to Monitor Neurotransmitter Release and Action Potential Firing: New Perspectives in Cellular Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Valentina; Marcantoni, Andrea; Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Olivero, Paolo; Carbone, Emilio

    2017-02-15

    High biocompatibility, outstanding electrochemical responsiveness, inertness, and transparency make diamond-based multiarrays (DBMs) first-rate biosensors for in vitro detection of electrochemical and electrical signals from excitable cells together, with potential for in vivo applications as neural interfaces and prostheses. Here, we will review the electrochemical and physical properties of various DBMs and how these devices have been employed for recording released neurotransmitter molecules and all-or-none action potentials from living cells. Specifically, we will overview how DBMs can resolve localized exocytotic events from subcellular compartments using high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs), or monitoring oxidizable neurotransmitter release from populations of cells in culture and tissue slices using low-density MEAs. Interfacing DBMs with excitable cells is currently leading to the promising opportunity of recording electrical signals as well as creating neuronal interfaces through the same device. Given the recent increasingly growing development of newly available DBMs of various geometries to monitor electrical activity and neurotransmitter release in a variety of excitable and neuronal tissues, the discussion will be limited to planar DBMs.

  3. Protein kinase A mediates adenosine A2a receptor modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation in cultured cells from medulla oblongata.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Joao Paulo Pontes; Almeida, Marina Gomes; Castilho-Martins, Emerson Augusto; Costa, Maisa Aparecida; Fior-Chadi, Debora Rejane

    2014-08-01

    Synaptic transmission is an essential process for neuron physiology. Such process is enabled in part due to modulation of neurotransmitter release. Adenosine is a synaptic modulator of neurotransmitter release in the Central Nervous System, including neurons of medulla oblongata, where several nuclei are involved with neurovegetative reflexes. Adenosine modulates different neurotransmitter systems in medulla oblongata, specially glutamate and noradrenaline in the nucleus tractussolitarii, which are involved in hypotensive responses. However, the intracellular mechanisms involved in this modulation remain unknown. The adenosine A2a receptor modulates neurotransmitter release by activating two cAMP protein effectors, the protein kinase A and the exchange protein activated by cAMP. Therefore, an in vitro approach (cultured cells) was carried out to evaluate modulation of neurotransmission by adenosine A2a receptor and the signaling intracellular pathway involved. Results show that the adenosine A2a receptor agonist, CGS 21680, increases neurotransmitter release, in particular, glutamate and noradrenaline and such response is mediated by protein kinase A activation, which in turn increased synapsin I phosphorylation. This suggests a mechanism of A2aR modulation of neurotransmitter release in cultured cells from medulla oblongata of Wistar rats and suggest that protein kinase A mediates this modulation of neurotransmitter release via synapsin I phosphorylation.

  4. Preferentially impaired neurotransmitter release sites not their discreteness compromise the validity of microdialysis zero-net-flux method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin C

    2005-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis is a popular technique for studying neurochemistry and neural circuits in various brain regions. Recent studies called into question the validity of the microdialysis zero-net-flux (ZNF) method by suggesting that this method significantly underestimates the basal level of extracellular dopamine as a result of the discreteness of dopamine release sites as well as the preferential damage to dopamine release over uptake. To identify which factor is most important in undermining the microdialysis ZNF measurements and the extent of underestimation, two mathematical models were developed to explore the influences of the discrete nature and the probe-induced impairment in the neurotransmitter release. The two models differ in their characterizations of the transmitter release as spatially discrete and homogeneous, respectively. Simulations using physiologically reasonable parameters for striatal dopamine systems indicate that the preferential release site damage surrounding the implanted probe is the most important determinant to the underestimation of the microdialysis ZNF concentration. Under normal physiological conditions, the discreteness of neurotransmitter release sites is of minor importance, except when neuronal degeneration occurs. It is concluded that homogeneous models can adequately describe microdialysis operating processes as long as the corresponding tissue damage parameters in such models are appropriately incorporated.

  5. Synaptic optical imaging platforms: Examining pharmacological modulation of neurotransmitter release at discrete synapses.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Paolomi; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor

    2015-11-01

    Chemical synapses are not only fundamental functional units of the brain but also anatomical and functional biomarkers of numerous brain disorders. Therefore, new experimental readouts of synaptic function are needed--with the spatial resolution of single synapses and the scale to image large ensembles of synapses in specific circuits--for the study of both acute and chronic effects of pharmacological agents on synaptic plasticity in living mammals. In this article we discuss the design and use of fluorescent false neurotransmitters (FFNs) as an important step in the development of versatile synaptic imaging platforms. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'.

  6. BDNF Enhances Quantal Neurotransmitter Release and Increases the Number of Docked Vesicles at the Active Zones of Hippocampal Excitatory Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas D.

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is emerging as a key mediator of activity-dependent modifications of synaptic strength in the CNS. We investigated the hypothesis that BDNF enhances quantal neurotransmitter release by modulating the distribution of synaptic vesicles within presynaptic terminals using organotypic slice cultures of postnatal rat hippocampus. BDNF specifically increased the number of docked vesicles at the active zone of excitatory synapses on CA1 dendritic spines, with only a small increase in active zone size. In agreement with the hypothesis that an increased docked vesicle density enhances quantal neurotransmitter release, BDNF increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) recorded from CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices. Synapse number, independently estimated from dendritic spine density and electron microscopy measurements, was also increased after BDNF treatment, indicating that the actions of BNDF on mEPSC frequency can be partially attributed to an increased synaptic density. Our results further suggest that all these actions were mediated via tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) receptor activation, established by inhibition of plasma membrane tyrosine kinases with K-252a. These results provide additional evidence of a fundamental role of the BDNF–TrkB signaling cascade in synaptic transmission, as well as in cellular models of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. PMID:11404410

  7. Altered neurotransmitter release, vesicle recycling and presynaptic structure in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Upreti, Chirag; Otero, Rafael; Partida, Carlos; Skinner, Frank; Thakker, Ravi; Pacheco, Luis F.; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Maglakelidze, Giorgi; Velíšková, Jana; Velíšek, Libor; Romanovicz, Dwight; Jones, Theresa; Stanton, Patric K.

    2012-01-01

    In searching for persistent seizure-induced alterations in brain function that might be causally related to epilepsy, presynaptic transmitter release has relatively been neglected. To measure directly the long-term effects of pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus on vesicular release and recycling in hippocampal mossy fibre presynaptic boutons, we used (i) two-photon imaging of FM1-43 vesicular release in rat hippocampal slices; and (ii) transgenic mice expressing the genetically encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent reporter synaptopHluorin preferentially at glutamatergic synapses. In this study we found that, 1–2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, there were significant increases in mossy fibre bouton size, faster rates of action potential-driven vesicular release and endocytosis. We also analysed the ultrastructure of rat mossy fibre boutons using transmission electron microscopy. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus led to a significant increase in the number of release sites, active zone length, postsynaptic density area and number of vesicles in the readily releasable and recycling pools, all correlated with increased release probability. Our data show that presynaptic release machinery is persistently altered in structure and function by status epilepticus, which could contribute to the development of the chronic epileptic state and may represent a potential new target for antiepileptic therapies. PMID:22344585

  8. Computational modeling of extracellular dopamine kinetics suggests low probability of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Katherine E; Wallace, Lane J

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine in the striatum signals the saliency of current environmental input and is involved in learned formation of appropriate responses. The regular baseline-firing rate of dopaminergic neurons suggests that baseline dopamine is essential for proper brain function. The first goal of the study was to estimate the likelihood of full exocytotic dopamine release associated with each firing event under baseline conditions. A computer model of extracellular space associated with a single varicosity was developed using the program MCell to estimate kinetics of extracellular dopamine. Because the literature provides multiple kinetic values for dopamine uptake depending on the system tested, simulations were run using different kinetic parameters. With all sets of kinetic parameters evaluated, at most, 25% of a single vesicle per varicosity would need to be released per firing event to maintain a 5-10 nM extracellular dopamine concentration, the level reported by multiple microdialysis experiments. The second goal was to estimate the fraction of total amount of stored dopamine released during a highly stimulated condition. This was done using the same model system to simulate published measurements of extracellular dopamine following electrical stimulation of striatal slices in vitro. The results suggest the amount of dopamine release induced by a single electrical stimulation may be as large as the contents of two vesicles per varicosity. We conclude that dopamine release probability at any particular varicosity is low. This suggests that factors capable of increasing release probability could have a powerful effect on sculpting dopamine signals.

  9. Acute Effect of Manganese on Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone Releasing Hormone Secretion in Adult Male Rats: Involvement of Specific Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Prestifilippo, Juan Pablo; Fernández-Solari, Javier; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Mohn, Claudia Ester; de la Cal, Carolina; Reynoso, Roxana; Dees, W. Les; Rettori, Valeria

    2008-01-01

    Manganese chloride (MnCl2) is capable of stimulating luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats through the activation of the hypothalamic nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of specific neurotransmitters involved in this action. Our results indicate that dopamine, but not glutamic acid and prostaglandinds, mediates the MnCl2 stimulated secretion of LHRH from medial basal hypothalami in vitro, as well as increases the activity of nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, a biphasic response was observed in that gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) release was also increased, which acts to attenuate the MnCl2 action to stimulate LHRH secretion. Although it is clear that manganese (Mn+2) can acutely induce LHRH secretion in adult males, we suggest that the additional action of MnCl2 to release GABA, a LHRH inhibitor, may ultimately contribute to suppressed reproductive function observed in adult animals following exposure to high chromic levels of Mn+2. PMID:18603625

  10. Intracellular Ca2+ and Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Mediate Acute Potentiation of Neurotransmitter Release by Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiang-ping; Yang, Feng; Xie, Zuo-ping; Lu, Bai

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins have been shown to acutely modulate synaptic transmission in a variety of systems, but the underlying signaling mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide evidence for an unusual mechanism that mediates synaptic potentiation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT3), using Xenopus nerve–muscle co-culture. Unlike brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which requires Ca2+ influx for its acute effect, NT3 rapidly enhances spontaneous transmitter release at the developing NMJ even when Ca2+ influx is completely blocked, suggesting that the NT3 effect is independent of extracellular Ca2+. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, or blockade of inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate (IP3) or ryanodine receptors, prevents the NT3-induced synaptic potentiation. Blockade of IP3 receptors can not prevent BDNF-induced potentiation, suggesting that BDNF and NT3 use different mechanisms to potentiate transmitter release. Inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) completely blocks the acute effect of NT3. Furthermore, the NT3-induced potentiation requires a continuous activation of CaMKII, because application of the CaMKII inhibitor KN62 reverses the previously established NT3 effect. Thus, NT3 potentiates neurotransmitter secretion by stimulating Ca2+ release from intracellular stores through IP3 and/or ryanodine receptors, leading to an activation of CaMKII. PMID:10811820

  11. Electrochemical and electrophysiological characterization of neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerves supplying rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, William R; Brock, James A; Hardy, Todd A

    1999-01-01

    Characteristic features of noradrenaline (NA) and adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) release from postganglionic sympathetic nerves in rat small mesenteric arteries in vitro have been investigated on an impulse-by-impulse basis. NA release was measured using continuous amperometry and ATP release was monitored by intracellular recording of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.ps). Electrical stimuli evoked transient increases in oxidation current. During trains of ten stimuli at 0.5–4 Hz there was a depression in the amplitude of oxidation currents evoked following the first stimulus in the train. The neuronal NA uptake inhibitor, desmethylimipramine (1 μM), increased the amplitude of the summed oxidation current evoked by ten stimuli at 1 Hz and slowed the decay of oxidation currents evoked by trains of ten stimuli at 1 and 10 Hz. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan (1 μM), increased the amplitudes of the oxidation currents evoked during trains of ten stimuli at 0.5–10 Hz but had no effect on the oxidation currents evoked by the first stimulus in the train. Idazoxan (1 μM) increased the amplitude of all e.j.ps evoked during trains of stimuli at 0.5 and 1 Hz. In addition, the facilitatory effect of idazoxan on e.j.ps was significantly greater than that on oxidation currents. The findings indicate that NA release from sympathetic nerves supplying small mesenteric arteries is regulated by activation of presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors and that clearance of released NA in this tissue depends, in part, upon neuronal uptake. The different effects of idazoxan on the oxidation currents and e.j.ps may indicate that the release of NA and ATP is differentially modulated. PMID:10498849

  12. THE IMPACT OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S) ON NEUROTRANSMITTER RELEASE FROM THE CAT CAROTID BODY

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Robert S.; Shirahata, Machiko; Chang, Irene; Kostuk, Eric; Kiihl, Samara

    2011-01-01

    Do cat carotid bodies (CBs) increase their release of acetylcholine and ATP in response to H2S? Two CBs, incubated in a Krebs Ringer bicarbonate solution at 37° C, exhibited a normal response to hypoxia -- increased release of acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP. They were challenged with several concentrations of Na2S, an H2S donor. H2S, a new gasotransmitter, is reported to open KATP channels. Under normoxic conditions the CBs reduced their release of ACh and ATP below control values. They responded identically to pinacidil, a well-known KATP channel opener. CB glomus cells exhibited a positive immunohistochemical signal for cystathione-β-synthetase, a H2S synthesizing enzyme, and for a subunit of the KATP channel. The data suggest that Na2S may have opened the glomus cells’ KATP channels, hyperpolarizing the cells, thus reducing their tonic release of ACh and ATP. Since during hypoxia H2S levels rise, the glomus cells responding very actively to hypoxia may be protected from over-exertion by the H2S opening of the KATP channels. PMID:21292043

  13. Quantal release of neurotransmitter: an iterative method for the automatic computation of binomial distribution parameters.

    PubMed

    Belluzzi, O

    1984-01-01

    A computational method is presented by which, when the amplitude-frequency histogram of the excitatory post-synaptic potentials shows a binomial distribution, an accurate evaluation of the statistical parameters p and n may be obtained. The entire procedure is a combination of 3 basic methods: steepest descent, parabolic interpolation and Montecarlo technique. The two statistical parameters are evaluated independently with respect to each other, which makes an effective control of the accuracy of the calculation possible by comparing the p by n product with the average number of quanta released in response to each nerve impulse, conventionally computed. Applications to quantal release studies in both rat and guinea-pig superior cervical ganglia are also presented.

  14. Parallel Recording of Neurotransmitters Release from Chromaffin Cells Using a 10 × 10 CMOS IC Potentiostat Array with On-Chip Working Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brian Namghi; Herbst, Adam D.; Kim, Sung June; Minch, Bradley A.; Lindau, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is modulated by many drugs and molecular manipulations. We present an active CMOS-based electrochemical biosensor array with high throughput capability (100 electrodes) for on-chip amperometric measurement of neurotransmitter release. The high-throughput of the biosensor array will accelerate the data collection needed to determine statistical significance of changes produced under varying conditions, from several weeks to a few hours. The biosensor is designed and fabricated using a combination of CMOS integrated circuit (IC) technology and a photolithography process to incorporate platinum working electrodes on-chip. We demonstrate the operation of an electrode array with integrated high-gain potentiostats and output time-division multiplexing with minimum dead time for readout. The on-chip working electrodes are patterned by conformal deposition of Pt and lift-off photolithography. The conformal deposition method protects the underlying electronic circuits from contact with the electrolyte that covers the electrode array during measurement. The biosensor was validated by simultaneous measurement of amperometric currents from 100 electrodes in response to dopamine injection, which revealed the time course of dopamine diffusion along the surface of the biosensor array. The biosensor simultaneously recorded neurotransmitter release successfully from multiple individual living chromaffin cells. The biosensor was capable of resolving small and fast amperometric spikes reporting release from individual vesicle secretions. We anticipate that this device will accelerate the characterization of the modulation of neurotransmitter secretion from neuronal and endocrine cells by pharmacological and molecular manipulations of the cells. PMID:23084756

  15. Calcium dependence of neurotransmitter release and rate of spontaneous vesicle fusions are altered in Drosophila synaptotagmin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Littleton, J T; Stern, M; Perin, M; Bellen, H J

    1994-01-01

    Since the demonstration that Ca2+ influx into the presynaptic terminal is essential for neurotransmitter release, there has been much speculation about the Ca2+ receptor responsible for initiating exocytosis. Numerous experiments have shown that the protein, or protein complex, binds multiple Ca2+ ions, resides near the site of Ca2+ influx, and has a relatively low affinity for Ca2+. Synaptotagmin is an integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles that contains two copies of a domain known to be involved in Ca(2+)-dependent membrane interactions. Synaptotagmin has been shown to bind Ca2+ in vitro with a relatively low affinity. In addition, synaptotagmin has been shown to bind indirectly to Ca2+ channels, positioning the protein close to the site of Ca2+ influx. Recently, a negative regulatory role for synaptotagmin has been proposed, in which it functions as a clamp to prevent fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. Release of the clamp would allow exocytosis. Here we present genetic and electrophysiological evidence that synaptotagmin forms a multimeric complex that can function as a clamp in vivo. However, upon nerve stimulation and Ca2+ influx, all synaptotagmin mutations dramatically decrease the ability of Ca2+ to promote release, suggesting that synaptotagmin probably plays a key role in activation of synaptic vesicle fusion. This activity cannot simply be attributed to the removal of a barrier to secretion, as we can electrophysiologically separate the increase in rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion from the decrease in evoked response. We also find that some syt mutations, including those that lack the second Ca(2+)-binding domain, decrease the fourth-order dependence of release on Ca2+ by approximately half, consistent with the hypothesis that a synaptotagmin complex functions as a Ca2+ receptor for initiating exocytosis. Images PMID:7971978

  16. Administration of caffeine inhibited adenosine receptor agonist-induced decreases in motor performance, thermoregulation, and brain neurotransmitter release in exercising rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinyan; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of an adenosine receptor agonist on caffeine-induced changes in thermoregulation, neurotransmitter release in the preoptic area and anterior hypothalamus, and endurance exercise performance in rats. One hour before the start of exercise, rats were intraperitoneally injected with either saline alone (SAL), 10 mg kg(-1) caffeine and saline (CAF), a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine [NECA]: 0.5 mg kg(-1)) and saline (NECA), or the combination of caffeine and NECA (CAF+NECA). Rats ran until fatigue on the treadmill with a 5% grade at a speed of 18 m min(-1) at 23 °C. Compared to the SAL group, the run time to fatigue (RTTF) was significantly increased by 52% following caffeine administration and significantly decreased by 65% following NECA injection (SAL: 91 ± 14.1 min; CAF: 137 ± 25.8 min; NECA: 31 ± 13.7 min; CAF+NECA: 85 ± 11.8 min; p<0.05). NECA decreased the core body temperature (Tcore), oxygen consumption, which is an index of heat production, tail skin temperature, which is an index of heat loss, and extracellular dopamine (DA) release at rest and during exercise. Furthermore, caffeine injection inhibited the NECA-induced decreases in the RTTF, Tcore, heat production, heat loss, and extracellular DA release. Neither caffeine nor NECA affected extracellular noradrenaline or serotonin release. These results support the findings of previous studies showing improved endurance performance and overrides in body limitations after caffeine administration, and imply that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may be associated with the adenosine receptor blockade-induced increases in brain DA release.

  17. Synapsin knockdown is associated with decreased neurite outgrowth, functional synaptogenesis impairment, and fast high-frequency neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Oscar; Giachello, Carlo Natale Giuseppe; Corradi, Anna Margherita; Ghirardi, Mirella; Montarolo, Pier Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    Synapsins (Syns) are an evolutionarily conserved family of synaptic vesicle-associated proteins related to fine tuning of synaptic transmission. Studies with mammals have partially clarified the different roles of Syns; however, the presence of different genes and isoforms and the development of compensatory mechanisms hinder accurate data interpretation. Here, we use a simple in vitro monosynaptic Helix neuron connection, reproducing an in vivo physiological connection as a reliable experimental model to investigate the effects of Syn knockdown. Cells overexpressing an antisense construct against Helix Syn showed a time-dependent decrease of Syn immunostaining, confirming protein loss. At the morphological level, Syn-silenced cells showed a reduction in neurite linear outgrowth and branching and in the size and number of synaptic varicosities. Functionally, Syn-silenced cells presented a reduced ability to form synaptic connections; however, functional chemical synapses showed similar basal excitatory postsynaptic potentials and similar short-term plasticity paradigms. In addition, Syn-silenced cells presented faster neurotransmitter release and decreased postsynaptic response toward the end of long tetanic presynaptic stimulations, probably related to an impairment of the synaptic vesicle trafficking resulting from a different vesicle handling, with an increased readily releasable pool and a compromised reserve pool.

  18. The chemokine CXCL16 modulates neurotransmitter release in hippocampal CA1 area

    PubMed Central

    Di Castro, Maria Amalia; Trettel, Flavia; Milior, Giampaolo; Maggi, Laura; Ragozzino, Davide; Limatola, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines have several physio-pathological roles in the brain. Among them, the modulation of synaptic contacts and neurotransmission recently emerged as crucial activities during brain development, in adulthood, upon neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. CXCL16 is a chemokine normally expressed in the brain, where it exerts neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced damages through cross communication with astrocytes and the involvement of the adenosine receptor type 3 (A3R) and the chemokine CCL2. Here we demonstrated for the first time that CXCL16 exerts a modulatory activity on inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in CA1 area. We found that CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature inhibitory synaptic currents (mIPSCs) and the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs), suggesting a presynaptic modulation of the probability of GABA release. In addition, CXCL16 increases the frequency of the miniature excitatory synaptic currents (mEPSCs) and reduces the PPR of evoked excitatory transmission, indicating that the chemokine also modulates and enhances the release of glutamate. These effects were not present in the A3RKO mice and in WT slices treated with minocycline, confirming the involvement of A3 receptors and introducing microglial cells as key mediators of the modulatory activity of CXCL16 on neurons. PMID:27721466

  19. Cannabinoid- and lysophosphatidylinositol-sensitive receptor GPR55 boosts neurotransmitter release at central synapses.

    PubMed

    Sylantyev, Sergiy; Jensen, Thomas P; Ross, Ruth A; Rusakov, Dmitri A

    2013-03-26

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPR) 55 is sensitive to certain cannabinoids, it is expressed in the brain and, in cell cultures, it triggers mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+). However, the adaptive neurobiological significance of GPR55 remains unknown. Here, we use acute hippocampal slices and combine two-photon excitation Ca(2+) imaging in presynaptic axonal boutons with optical quantal analysis in postsynaptic dendritic spines to find that GPR55 activation transiently increases release probability at individual CA3-CA1 synapses. The underlying mechanism involves Ca(2+) release from presynaptic Ca(2+) stores, whereas postsynaptic stores (activated by spot-uncaging of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) remain unaffected by GPR55 agonists. These effects are abolished by genetic deletion of GPR55 or by the GPR55 antagonist cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa. GPR55 shows colocalization with synaptic vesicle protein vesicular glutamate transporter 1 in stratum radiatum. Short-term potentiation of CA3-CA1 transmission after a short train of stimuli reveals a presynaptic, Ca(2+) store-dependent component sensitive to cannabidiol. The underlying cascade involves synthesis of phospholipids, likely in the presynaptic cell, but not the endocannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol or anandamide. Our results thus unveil a signaling role for GPR55 in synaptic circuits of the brain.

  20. PGC-1α provides a transcriptional framework for synchronous neurotransmitter release from parvalbumin-positive interneurons.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Dougherty, Sarah E; McMeekin, Laura J; Reid, Courtney S; Dobrunz, Lynn E; West, Andrew B; Hablitz, John J; Cowell, Rita M

    2014-10-22

    Accumulating evidence strongly implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in the pathophysiology of multiple neurological disorders, but the downstream gene targets of PGC-1α in the brain have remained enigmatic. Previous data demonstrate that PGC-1α is primarily concentrated in inhibitory neurons and that PGC-1α is required for the expression of the interneuron-specific Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) throughout the cortex. To identify other possible transcriptional targets of PGC-1α in neural tissue, we conducted a microarray on neuroblastoma cells overexpressing PGC-1α, mined results for genes with physiological relevance to interneurons, and measured cortical gene and protein expression of these genes in mice with underexpression and overexpression of PGC-1α. We observed bidirectional regulation of novel PGC-1α-dependent transcripts spanning synaptic [synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) and complexin 1 (Cplx1)], structural [neurofilament heavy chain (Nefh)], and metabolic [neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1 (Nceh1), adenylate kinase 1 (Ak1), inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase J (Inpp5j), ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 complex O subunit (Atp5o), phytanol-CoA-2hydroxylase (Phyh), and ATP synthase mitrochondrial F1 complex α subunit 1 (Atp5a1)] functions. The neuron-specific genes Syt2, Cplx1, and Nefh were developmentally upregulated in an expression pattern consistent with that of PGC-1α and were expressed in cortical interneurons. Conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons significantly decreased cortical transcript expression of these genes, promoted asynchronous GABA release, and impaired long-term memory. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGC-1α is required for normal PV-positive interneuron function and that loss of PGC-1α in this interneuron subpopulation could contribute to cortical dysfunction in disease states.

  1. PGC-1α Provides a Transcriptional Framework for Synchronous Neurotransmitter Release from Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Dougherty, Sarah E.; McMeekin, Laura J.; Reid, Courtney S.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.; West, Andrew B.; Hablitz, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence strongly implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in the pathophysiology of multiple neurological disorders, but the downstream gene targets of PGC-1α in the brain have remained enigmatic. Previous data demonstrate that PGC-1α is primarily concentrated in inhibitory neurons and that PGC-1α is required for the expression of the interneuron-specific Ca2+-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) throughout the cortex. To identify other possible transcriptional targets of PGC-1α in neural tissue, we conducted a microarray on neuroblastoma cells overexpressing PGC-1α, mined results for genes with physiological relevance to interneurons, and measured cortical gene and protein expression of these genes in mice with underexpression and overexpression of PGC-1α. We observed bidirectional regulation of novel PGC-1α-dependent transcripts spanning synaptic [synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) and complexin 1 (Cplx1)], structural [neurofilament heavy chain (Nefh)], and metabolic [neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1 (Nceh1), adenylate kinase 1 (Ak1), inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase J (Inpp5j), ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 complex O subunit (Atp5o), phytanol-CoA-2hydroxylase (Phyh), and ATP synthase mitrochondrial F1 complex α subunit 1 (Atp5a1)] functions. The neuron-specific genes Syt2, Cplx1, and Nefh were developmentally upregulated in an expression pattern consistent with that of PGC-1α and were expressed in cortical interneurons. Conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons significantly decreased cortical transcript expression of these genes, promoted asynchronous GABA release, and impaired long-term memory. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGC-1α is required for normal PV-positive interneuron function and that loss of PGC-1α in this interneuron subpopulation could contribute to cortical dysfunction in disease states. PMID:25339750

  2. Genetic suppression of neurodegeneration and neurotransmitter release abnormalities caused by expanded full-length huntingtin accumulating in the cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Eliana; Cha, Guang-Ho; Verstreken, Patrik; Ly, Cindy V.; Hughes, Robert; Bellen, Hugo J.; Botas, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Huntington's Disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a translated CAG repeat in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein. Here we describe the generation and characterization of a novel full-length HD Drosophila model to reveal a previously unknown disease mechanism that occurs early in the course of pathogenesis, before expanded huntingtin is cleaved and imported into the nucleus in detectable amounts. We find that expanded full-length huntingtin (128QhttFL) leads to behavioral, neurodegenerative, and electrophysiological phenotypes. These phenotypes are caused by a Ca2+-dependent increase in neurotransmitter release efficiency in 128QhttFL animals. Partial loss of function in synaptic transmission (Syntaxin, Snap, Rop) and voltage-gated Ca2+ channel genes suppresses both the electrophysiological and the neurodegenerative phenotypes. Thus, our data indicate that increased neurotransmission is at the root of neuronal degeneration caused by expanded full-length huntingtin during early stages of pathogenesis. PMID:18184562

  3. Schizophrenia-Associated MIR204 Regulates Noncoding RNAs and Affects Neurotransmitter and Ion Channel Gene Sets

    PubMed Central

    Cammaerts, Sophia; Strazisar, Mojca; Smets, Bart; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Nordin, Annelie; De Jonghe, Peter; Adolfsson, Rolf; De Rijk, Peter; Del Favero, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    As regulators of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) are likely to play an important role in the development of disease. In this study we present a large-scale strategy to identify miRNAs with a role in the regulation of neuronal processes. Thereby we found variant rs7861254 located near the MIR204 gene to be significantly associated with schizophrenia. This variant resulted in reduced expression of miR-204 in neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells. Analysis of the consequences of the altered miR-204 expression on the transcriptome of these cells uncovered a new mode of action for miR-204, being the regulation of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including several miRNAs, such as MIR296. Furthermore, pathway analysis showed downstream effects of miR-204 on neurotransmitter and ion channel related gene sets, potentially mediated by miRNAs regulated through miR-204. PMID:26714269

  4. Sex hormones affect neurotransmitters and shape the adult female brain during hormonal transition periods

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Claudia; Villringer, Arno; Sacher, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Sex hormones have been implicated in neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, dendritic branching, myelination and other important mechanisms of neural plasticity. Here we review the evidence from animal experiments and human studies reporting interactions between sex hormones and the dominant neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, dopamine, GABA and glutamate. We provide an overview of accumulating data during physiological and pathological conditions and discuss currently conceptualized theories on how sex hormones potentially trigger neuroplasticity changes through these four neurochemical systems. Many brain regions have been demonstrated to express high densities for estrogen- and progesterone receptors, such as the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the hippocampus. As the hippocampus is of particular relevance in the context of mediating structural plasticity in the adult brain, we put particular emphasis on what evidence could be gathered thus far that links differences in behavior, neurochemical patterns and hippocampal structure to a changing hormonal environment. Finally, we discuss how physiologically occurring hormonal transition periods in humans can be used to model how changes in sex hormones influence functional connectivity, neurotransmission and brain structure in vivo. PMID:25750611

  5. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10-8 M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  6. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2015-07-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  7. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Bucher, Elizabeth S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements. PMID:25939038

  8. Electrochemical Analysis of Neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Elizabeth S; Wightman, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Chemical signaling through the release of neurotransmitters into the extracellular space is the primary means of communication between neurons. More than four decades ago, Ralph Adams and his colleagues realized the utility of electrochemical methods for the study of easily oxidizable neurotransmitters, such as dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin and their metabolites. Today, electrochemical techniques are frequently coupled to microelectrodes to enable spatially resolved recordings of rapid neurotransmitter dynamics in a variety of biological preparations spanning from single cells to the intact brain of behaving animals. In this review, we provide a basic overview of the principles underlying constant-potential amperometry and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, the most commonly employed electrochemical techniques, and the general application of these methods to the study of neurotransmission. We thereafter discuss several recent developments in sensor design and experimental methodology that are challenging the current limitations defining the application of electrochemical methods to neurotransmitter measurements.

  9. Recommended for release on recognizance: factors affecting pretrial release recommendations.

    PubMed

    Petee, T A

    1994-06-01

    Researchers have acknowledged the influence of pretrial release agencies in judicial decision making regarding bail; however, few researchers have focused on the process used by the pretrial release agencies to make bail-bond recommendations. In this study I sought to establish which factors were most salient in making the decision to recommend a defendant for release on recognizance. I found that both officially sanctioned release criteria and "extralegal" variables were predictive of this decision.

  10. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  11. The Lack of CuZnSOD Leads to Impaired Neurotransmitter Release, Neuromuscular Junction Destabilization and Reduced Muscle Strength in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michael E.; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yiqiang; Jaramillo, Carlos A.; Macleod, Gregory T.; Van Remmen, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and ROS-dependent protein damage is a common observation in the pathogenesis of many muscle wasting disorders, including sarcopenia. However, the contribution of elevated ROS levels to –a breakdown in neuromuscular communication and muscle atrophy remains unknown. In this study, we examined a copper zinc superoxide dismutase [CuZnSOD (Sod1)] knockout mouse (Sod1−/−), a mouse model of elevated oxidative stress that exhibits accelerated loss of muscle mass, which recapitulates many phenotypes of sarcopenia as early as 5 months of age. We found that young adult Sod1−/− mice display a considerable reduction in hind limb skeletal muscle mass and strength when compared to age-matched wild-type mice. These changes are accompanied by gross alterations in neuromuscular junction (NMJ) morphology, including reduced occupancy of the motor endplates by axons, terminal sprouting and axon thinning and irregular swelling. Surprisingly however, the average density of acetylcholine receptors in endplates is preserved. Using in vivo electromyography and ex vivo electrophysiological studies of hind limb muscles in Sod1−/− mice, we found that motor axons innervating the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and gastrocnemius muscles release fewer synaptic vesicles upon nerve stimulation. Recordings from individually identified EDL NMJs show that reductions in neurotransmitter release are apparent in the Sod1−/− mice even when endplates are close to fully innervated. However, electrophysiological properties, such as input resistance, resting membrane potential and spontaneous neurotransmitter release kinetics (but not frequency) are similar between EDL muscles of Sod1−/− and wild-type mice. Administration of the potassium channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine, which broadens the presynaptic action potential, improves both neurotransmitter release and muscle strength. Together, these results suggest that ROS-associated motor

  12. A mesoporous silica nanosphere-based carrier system with chemically removable CdS nanoparticle caps for stimuli-responsive controlled release of neurotransmitters and drug molecules.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cheng-Yu; Trewyn, Brian G; Jeftinija, Dusan M; Jeftinija, Ksenija; Xu, Shu; Jeftinija, Srdija; Lin, Victor S-Y

    2003-04-16

    An MCM-41 type mesoporous silica nanosphere-based (MSN) controlled-release delivery system has been synthesized and characterized using surface-derivatized cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals as chemically removable caps to encapsulate several pharmaceutical drug molecules and neurotransmitters inside the organically functionalized MSN mesoporous framework. We studied the stimuli-responsive release profiles of vancomycin- and adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-loaded MSN delivery systems by using disulfide bond-reducing molecules, such as dithiothreitol (DTT) and mercaptoethanol (ME), as release triggers. The biocompatibility and delivery efficiency of the MSN system with neuroglial cells (astrocytes) in vitro were demonstrated. In contrast to many current delivery systems, the molecules of interest were encapsulated inside the porous framework of the MSN not by adsorption or sol-gel types of entrapment but by capping the openings of the mesoporous channels with size-defined CdS nanoparticles to physically block the drugs/neurotransmitters of certain sizes from leaching out. We envision that this new MSN system could play a significant role in developing new generations of site-selective, controlled-release delivery nanodevices.

  13. Acetylcholine from the mesopontine tegmental nuclei differentially affects methamphetamine induced locomotor activity and neurotransmitter levels in the mesolimbic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Lauren K.; Mark, Gregory P.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases dopamine (DA) levels within the mesolimbic pathway and acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter known to increase DA cell firing and release and mediate reinforcement, within the ventral tegmental area (VTA). The laterodorsal tegmental (LDT) and pedunculopontine tegmental (PPT) nuclei provide cholinergic input to the VTA; however, the contribution of LDT- and PPT-derived ACh to MA-induced DA and ACh levels and locomotor activation remains unknown. The first experiment examined the role of LDT-derived ACh in MA locomotor activation by reversibly inhibiting these neurons with bilateral intra-LDT microinjections of the M2 receptor agonist oxotremorine (OXO). Male C57BL/6 J mice were given a bilateral 0.1 µl OXO (0, 1, or 10 nM/side) microinjection immediately prior to IP saline or MA (2 mg/kg). The highest OXO concentration significantly inhibited both saline-and MA-primed locomotor activity. In a second set of experiments we characterized the individual contributions of ACh originating in the LDT or pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) to MA-induced levels of ACh and DA by administering intra-LDT or PPT OXO and performing in vivo microdialysis in the VTA and NAc. Intra-LDT OXO dose-dependently attenuated the MA-induced increase in ACh within the VTA but had no effect on DA in NAc. Intra-PPT OXO had no effect on ACh or DA levels within the VTA or NAc, respectively. We conclude that LDT, but not PPT, ACh is important in locomotor behavior and the cholinergic, but not dopaminergic, response to systemic MA. PMID:21945297

  14. Mechanistic insights into neurotransmitter release and presynaptic plasticity from the crystal structure of Munc13-1 C1C2BMUN

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junjie; Camacho, Marcial; Xu, Yibin; Esser, Victoria; Liu, Xiaoxia; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Pan, Yun-Zu; Ma, Cong; Tomchick, Diana R; Rosenmund, Christian; Rizo, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Munc13–1 acts as a master regulator of neurotransmitter release, mediating docking-priming of synaptic vesicles and diverse presynaptic plasticity processes. It is unclear how the functions of the multiple domains of Munc13–1 are coordinated. The crystal structure of a Munc13–1 fragment including its C1, C2B and MUN domains (C1C2BMUN) reveals a 19.5 nm-long multi-helical structure with the C1 and C2B domains packed at one end. The similar orientations of the respective diacyglycerol- and Ca2+-binding sites of the C1 and C2B domains suggest that the two domains cooperate in plasma-membrane binding and that activation of Munc13–1 by Ca2+ and diacylglycerol during short-term presynaptic plasticity are closely interrelated. Electrophysiological experiments in mouse neurons support the functional importance of the domain interfaces observed in C1C2BMUN. The structure imposes key constraints for models of neurotransmitter release and suggests that Munc13–1 bridges the vesicle and plasma membranes from the periphery of the membrane-membrane interface. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22567.001 PMID:28177287

  15. Plasma membrane ordering agent pluronic F-68 (PF-68) reduces neurotransmitter uptake and release and produces learning and memory deficits in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Prendergast, M. A.; Terry, A. V. Jr

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence indicates that aged-related changes in the fluidity and lipid composition of the plasma membrane contribute to cellular dysfunction in humans and other mammalian species. In the CNS, reductions in neuronal plasma membrane order (PMO) (i.e., increased plasma membrane fluidity) have been attributed to age as well as the presence of the beta-amyloid peptide-25-35, known to play an important role in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These PMO increases may influence neurotransmitter synthesis, receptor binding, and second messenger systems as well as signal transduction pathways. The effects of neuronal PMO on learning and memory processes have not been adequately investigated, however. Based on the hypothesis that an increase in PMO may alter a number of aspects of synaptic transmission, we investigated several neurochemical and behavioral effects of the membrane ordering agent, PF-68. In cell culture, PF-68 (nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein) reduced [3H]norepinephrine (NE) uptake into differentiated PC-12 cells as well as reduced nicotine stimulated [3H]NE release. The compound (800-2400 microg/kg, i.p., resulting in nmoles/mg SDS extractable protein in the brain) decreased step-through latencies and increased the frequencies of crossing into the unsafe side of the chamber in inhibitory avoidance training. In the Morris water maze, PF-68 increased the latencies and swim distances required to locate a hidden platform and reduced the time spent and distance swam in the previous target quadrant during transfer (probe) trials. PF-68 did not impair performance of a well-learned working memory task, the rat delayed stimulus discrimination task (DSDT), however. Studies with 14C-labeled PF-68 indicated that significant (pmoles/mg wet tissue) levels of the compound entered the brain from peripheral (i.p.) injection. No PF-68 related changes were observed in swim speeds or in visual acuity tests in water maze experiments, rotorod

  16. Validation of a robust and sensitive method for detecting hydroxyl radical formation together with evoked neurotransmitter release in brain microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Freinbichler, Wolfhardt; Colivicchi, Maria A; Fattori, Manuela; Ballini, Chiara; Tipton, Keith F; Linert, Wolfgang; Della Corte, Laura

    2008-05-01

    Sodium terephthalate was shown to be a new robust and sensitive chemical trap for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), which lacks the drawbacks of the salicylic acid method. Reaction of the almost non-fluorescent terephthalate (TA2-) with hydroxyl radicals or ferryl-oxo species resulted in the stoichiometric formation of the brilliant fluorophor, 2-hydroxyterephthalate (OH-TA). Neither hydrogen peroxide nor superoxide reacts in this system. This procedure was validated for determining hROS formation during microdialysis under in vivo conditions as well as by in vitro studies. The detection limit of OH-TA in microdialysis samples was 0.5 fmol/muL. Derivatization of samples with o-phthalaldehyde, for amino acid detection, had no effect on OH-TA fluorescence, which could easily be resolved from the amino acid derivatives by HPLC, allowing determination in a single chromatogram. Use of terephthalate in microdialysis experiments showed the neurotoxin kainate to evoke hROS formation in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of TA2- in the perfusion fluid did not affect basal or evoked release of aspartate, glutamate, taurine and GABA. Assessment of cell death 'ex vivo' showed TA2- to be non-toxic at concentrations up to 1 mM. The in vitro results in the Fenton system (Fe2+ + H2O2) indicate a mechanism whereby TA2- forms a primary complex with Fe2+ followed by an intramolecular hydroxylation accompanied by intramolecular electron transfer.

  17. Presynaptic functional trkB receptors mediate the release of excitatory neurotransmitters from primary afferent terminals in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa) of postnatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Adalberto; Bardoni, Rita; Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Ferrini, Francesco; Prandini, Massimiliano; Zonta, Micaela; Gustincich, Stefano; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2008-03-01

    A subset of primary sensory neurons produces BDNF, which is implicated in control of nociceptive neurotransmission. We previously localized full-length trkB receptors on their terminals within lamina II. To functionally study these receptors, we here employed patch-clamp recordings, calcium imaging and immunocytochemistry on slices from 8-12 days post-natal rats. In this preparation, BDNF (100-500 ng/mL) enhances the release of sensory neurotransmitters (glutamate, substance P, CGRP) in lamina II by acting on trkB receptors expressed by primary afferent fibers of the peptidergic nociceptive type (PN-PAFs). Effect was blocked by trk antagonist K252a or anti-trkB antibody clone 47. A pre-synaptic mechanism was demonstrated after (i) patch-clamp recordings where the neurotrophin induced a significant increase in frequency, but not amplitude, of AMPA-mediated mEPSCs, (ii) real time calcium imaging, where sustained application of BDNF evoked an intense response in up to 57% lamina II neurons with a significant frequency rise. Antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors and NK(1) receptors completely inhibited the calcium response to BDNF. Reduction of CGRP (a specific marker of PN-PAFs) and substance P content in dorsal horn following BDNF preincubation, and analysis of the calcium response after depletion with capsaicin, confirmed that the neurotrophin presynaptically enhanced neurotransmitter release from PN-PAFs. This is the first demonstration that trkB receptors expressed by PN-PAF terminals in lamina II are functional during postnatal development. Implications of this finding are discussed considering that BDNF can be released by these same terminals and microglia, a fraction of which (as shown here) contains BDNF also in unactivated state.

  18. Cav2-type calcium channels encoded by cac regulate AP-independent neurotransmitter release at cholinergic synapses in adult Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Iniguez, Jorge; Su, Hailing; Hoang, Andy An; Lavian, Monica; Sun, Xicui; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels containing alpha1 subunits encoded by Ca(v)2 family genes are critical in regulating release of neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In Drosophila, cac is the only Ca(v)2-type gene. Cacophony (CAC) channels are localized in motor neuron terminals where they have been shown to mediate evoked, but not AP-independent, release of glutamate at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Cultured embryonic neurons also express CAC channels, but there is no information about the properties of CAC-mediated currents in adult brain nor how these channels regulate transmission in central neural circuits where fast excitatory synaptic transmission is predominantly cholinergic. Here we report that wild-type neurons cultured from late stage pupal brains and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) examined in adult brains, express calcium currents with two components: a slow-inactivating current sensitive to the spider toxin Plectreurys toxin II (PLTXII) and a fast-inactivating PLTXII-resistant component. CAC channels are the major contributors to the slow-inactivating PLTXII-sensitive current based on selective reduction of this component in hypomorphic cac mutants (NT27 and TS3). Another characteristic of cac mutant neurons both in culture and in whole brain recordings is a reduced cholinergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency that is mimicked in wild-type neurons by acute application of PLTXII. These data demonstrate that cac encoded Ca(v)2-type calcium channels regulate action potential (AP)-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses in the adult brain, a function not predicted from studies at the larval NMJ.

  19. The Role of TM5 in Na2 Release and the Conformational Transition of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters toward the Inward-Open State.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Li, Zheng; Quick, Matthias; Malinauskaite, Lina; Nissen, Poul; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Shi, Lei

    2017-03-20

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) terminate neurotransmission by the reuptake of released neurotransmitters. This active accumulation of substrate against its concentration gradient is driven by the transmembrane Na+ gradient and requires that the transporter traverses several conformational states. LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homolog, has been crystallized in outward-open, outward-occluded and inward-open states. Two crystal structures of another prokaryotic NSS homolog, the multi-hydrophobic amino acid transporter (MhsT) from Bacillus halodurans have been resolved in novel inward-occluded states, with the extracellular vestibule closed and the intracellular portion of TM5 (TM5i) in either an unwound or a helical conformation. We have investigated the potential involvement of TM5i in binding and unbinding of Na2, i.e. the Na(+) bound in the Na2 site, by carrying out comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the models derived from the two MhsT structures. We find that the helical TM5i conformation is associated with a higher propensity for Na2 release, which leads to the repositioning of the N terminus (NT) and transition to an inward-open state. By using comparative interaction network analysis, we also identify allosteric pathways connecting TM5i and the Na2 binding site to the extracellular and intracellular regions. Based on our combined computational and mutagenesis studies of MhsT and LeuT, we propose that TM5i plays a key role in Na2 binding and release associated with the conformational transition toward the inward-open state, a role that is likely to be shared across the NSS family.

  20. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD.

  1. Neurotransmitter release evoked by nerve impulses without Ca2+ entry through Ca2+ channels in frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Silinsky, E M; Watanabe, M; Redman, R S; Qiu, R; Hirsh, J K; Hunt, J M; Solsona, C S; Alford, S; MacDonald, R C

    1995-01-01

    1. The requirement for extracellular Ca2+ in the process of evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release by nerve impulses was tested at endplates in frog skeletal muscle. Ca(2+)-containing lipid vesicles (Ca2+ liposomes) were used to elevate cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations under conditions in which Ca2+ entry from the extracellular fluid was prevented. 2. In an extracellular solution containing no added Ca2+ and 1 mM Mg2+ ('Ca(2+)-free' solution), Ca2+ liposomes promoted the synchronous release of ACh quanta, reflected electrophysiologically as endplate potentials (EPPs), in response to temporally isolated nerve impulses. 3. Motor nerve stimulation generated EPPs during superfusion with Ca2+ liposomes in Ca(2+)-free solutions containing the Ca2+ channel blocker Co2+ (1 mM), and the Ca2+ chelator EGTA (2 mM). As a physiological control for Ca2+ leakage from the liposomes to the extracellular fluid, the effect of Ca2+ liposomes on asynchronous evoked ACh release mediated by Ba2+ was examined. In contrast to the effects of 0.2-0.3 mM extracellular Ca2+, which generated EPPs but antagonized Ba(2+)-mediated asynchronous ACh release, Ca2+ liposomes generated EPPs but did not reduce asynchronous release mediated by Ba2+. The effects of Ca2+ liposomes were thus not due to leakage of Ca2+ from the liposome to the extracellular fluid. 4. Morphological studies using fluorescently labelled liposomes in conjunction with a confocal microscope demonstrate that lipid is transferred from the liposomes to nerve endings and liposomal contents are delivered to the nerve terminal cytoplasm. 5. The results suggest that when intracellular Ca2+ is elevated using liposomes as a vehicle, evoked ACh release can occur in the absence of Ca2+ entry via Ca2+ channels. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7738845

  2. In vitro screening of major neurotransmitter systems possibly involved in the mechanism of action of antibodies to S100 protein in released-active form

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunov, Evgeniy A; Ertuzun, Irina A; Kachaeva, Evgeniya V; Tarasov, Sergey A; Epstein, Oleg I

    2015-01-01

    Experimentally and clinically, it was shown that released-active form of antibodies to S100 protein (RAF of Abs to S100) exerts a wide range of pharmacological activities: anxiolytic, antiasthenic, antiaggressive, stress-protective, antihypoxic, antiischemic, neuroprotective, and nootropic. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of RAF of Abs to S100 on major neurotransmitter systems (serotoninergic, GABAergic, dopaminergic, and on sigma receptors as well) which are possibly involved in its mechanism of pharmacological activity. Radioligand binding assays were used for assessment of the drug influence on ligand–receptor interaction. [35S]GTPγS binding assay, cyclic adenosine monophosphate HTRF™, cellular dielectric spectroscopy assays, and assays based on measurement of intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ions were used for assessment of agonist or antagonist properties of the drug toward receptors. RAF of Abs to S100 increased radioligand binding to 5-HT1F, 5-HT2B, 5-HT2Cedited, 5-HT3, and to D3 receptors by 142.0%, 131.9%, 149.3%, 120.7%, and 126.3%, respectively. Also, the drug significantly inhibited specific binding of radioligands to GABAB1A/B2 receptors by 25.8%, and to both native and recombinant human sigma1 receptors by 75.3% and 40.32%, respectively. In the functional assays, it was shown that the drug exerted antagonism at 5-HT1B, D3, and GABAB1A/B2 receptors inhibiting agonist-induced responses by 23.24%, 32.76%, and 30.2%, respectively. On the contrary, the drug exerted an agonist effect at 5-HT1A receptors enhancing receptor functional activity by 28.0%. The pharmacological profiling of RAF of Abs to S100 among 27 receptor provides evidence for drug-related modification of major neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26604768

  3. Immunoglobulin Fc gamma receptor promotes immunoglobulin uptake, immunoglobulin-mediated calcium increase, and neurotransmitter release in motor neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamed, Habib A.; Mosier, Dennis R.; Zou, Ling L.; Siklos, Laszlo; Alexianu, Maria E.; Engelhardt, Jozsef I.; Beers, David R.; Le, Wei-dong; Appel, Stanley H.

    2002-01-01

    Receptors for the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcgammaRs) facilitate IgG uptake by effector cells as well as cellular responses initiated by IgG binding. In earlier studies, we demonstrated that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patient IgG can be taken up by motor neuron terminals and transported retrogradely to the cell body and can alter the function of neuromuscular synapses, such as increasing intracellular calcium and spontaneous transmitter release from motor axon terminals after passive transfer. In the present study, we examined whether FcgammaR-mediated processes can contribute to these effects of ALS patient immunoglobulins. F(ab')(2) fragments (which lack the Fc portion) of ALS patient IgG were not taken up by motor axon terminals and were not retrogradely transported. Furthermore, in a genetically modified mouse lacking the gamma subunit of the FcR, the uptake of whole ALS IgG and its ability to enhance intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release were markedly attenuated. These data suggest that FcgammaRs appear to participate in IgG uptake into motor neurons as well as IgG-mediated increases in intracellular calcium and acetylcholine release from motor axon terminals. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Hdac Activity is Required for Bdnf to Increase Quantal Neurotransmitter Release and Dendritic Spine Density in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Chapleau, Christopher A.; Campbell, Susan; Inoue, Takafumi; Morse, Sarah J.; Lubin, Farah D.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in the strengthening and formation of synapses include the activation and repression of specific genes or subsets of genes by epigenetic modifications that do not alter the genetic code itself. Chromatin modifications mediated by histone acetylation have been shown to be critical for synaptic plasticity at hippocampal excitatory synapses and hippocampal-dependent memory formation. Considering that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in synaptic plasticity and behavioral adaptations, it is not surprising that regulation of this gene is subject to histone acetylation changes during synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent memory formation. Whether the effects of BDNF on dendritic spines and quantal transmitter release require histone modifications remains less known. By using two different inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC), we describe here that their activity is required for BDNF to increase dendritic spine density and excitatory quantal transmitter release onto CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slice cultures. These results suggest that histone acetylation/deacetylation is a critical step in the modulation of hippocampal synapses by BDNF. Thus, mechanisms of epigenetic modulation of synapse formation and function are novel targets to consider for the amelioration of symptoms of intellectual disabilities and neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive and memory deficits. PMID:22161912

  5. Altered properties of quantal neurotransmitter release at endplates of mice lacking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S.; Jun, Kisun; Shin, Hee-Sup; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.; Tsien, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Transmission at the mouse neuromuscular junction normally relies on P/Q-type channels, but became jointly dependent on both N- and R-type Ca2+ channels when the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was deleted. R-type channels lay close to Ca2+ sensors for exocytosis and IK(Ca) channel activation, like the P/Q-type channels they replaced. In contrast, N-type channels were less well localized, but abundant enough to influence secretion strongly, particularly when action potentials were prolonged. Our data suggested that active zone structures may select among multiple Ca2+ channels in the hierarchy P/Q>R>N. The α1A−/− neuromuscular junction displayed several other differences from wild-type: lowered quantal content but greater ability to withstand reductions in the Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, and little or no paired-pulse facilitation, the latter findings possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms at individual release sites. Changes in presynaptic function were also associated with a significant reduction in the size of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor clusters. PMID:12624181

  6. Contamination and restoration of an estuary affected by phosphogypsum releases.

    PubMed

    Villa, M; Mosqueda, F; Hurtado, S; Mantero, J; Manjón, G; Periañez, R; Vaca, F; García-Tenorio, R

    2009-12-15

    The Huelva Estuary in Huelva, Spain, has been one of the most studied environmental compartments in the past years from the point of view of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) releases. It has been historically affected by waste releases, enriched in radionuclides from the U-decay series, from factories located in the area devoted to the production of phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizers. Nevertheless, changes in national regulations forced a new waste management practice in 1998, prohibiting releases of phosphogypsum into the rivers. The input of natural radionuclides from phosphate factories to rivers was drastically reduced. Because of this there was a unique opportunity for the study of the response of a contaminated environmental compartment, specifically an estuary affected by tidal influences, after the cessation of the contaminant releases to, in this case, the Huelva Estuary (henceforth referred to as the Estuary). To investigate the environmental response to this new discharge regime, the specific activities of radionuclides 226Ra and 210Pb in water and sediment samples collected in four campaigns (from 1999 to 2005) were determined and compared with pre-1998 values. From this study it is possible to infer the most effective mechanisms of decontamination for the Estuary. Decontamination rates of 210Pb and 226Ra in the sediments and water have been calculated using exponential fittings and corresponding half-lives have been deduced from them. The cleaning half-life in the whole area of the Estuary is about 6 and 3.5 years for 226Ra and 210Pb respectively. The observed trend clearly shows that contamination of the Estuary by natural radionuclides is now decreasing and radioactive levels in waters and sediments are approaching the natural background references. This work attempts to evaluate whether it can be expected that the decontamination of the enhanced levels of natural radioactivity in the Estuary can be performed via natural

  7. Hemodynamic and cardiac neurotransmitter-releasing effects in conscious dogs of attention- and wake-promoting agents: a comparison of d-amphetamine, atomoxetine, modafinil, and a novel quinazolinone H3 inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph; Regan, Christopher; Stump, Gary; Tannenbaum, Pamela; Stevens, Joanne; Bone, Ashleigh; Gilberto, David; Johnson, Colena; Fujino, Naoko; Takenaga, Norihiro; Tokita, Shigeru; Nagase, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Nagaaki; Renger, John

    2009-01-01

    Conscious coronary sinus-cannulated dogs were used to assess the hemodynamic effects and local cardiac norepinephrine (NE) and histamine (HA) release of 4 mechanistically diverse agents either clinically approved or representing a potential novel mechanism for the promotion of wakefulness or attention. Dosing regimens were based on reported or concurrently determined wake-promoting activities in canine models. The central nervous system stimulant, d-amphetamine [0.1 mg x kg(-1) x 10 min intravenous (IV)], significantly elevated mean arterial pressure (+30%) and increased coronary sinus and peripheral venous NE concentrations, indicative of cardiac neurotransmitter release. The selective NE reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine (2.0 mg x kg(-1) x 10 min(-1) IV) and modafinil (30.0 mg x kg(-1) x 10 min(-1) IV) also significantly elevated mean arterial pressure (+15% and +30%, respectively), but with no effect on coronary sinus or peripheral NE concentration, suggesting central mechanisms underlying the hemodynamic effects. The preclinical demonstrations of pressor effects with d-amphetamine, atomoxetine, and modafinil are consistent with clinically reported hemodynamic effects with these agents. The quinazolinone HA receptor subtype H3 inverse agonist 5r (0.3 mg x kg(-1) x 10 min(-1) IV) displayed no effect on hemodynamics or on coronary sinus or peripheral NE and HA concentrations. These data suggest the potential for therapeutic effect with the latter mechanism in the absence of peripheral cardiac neurotransmitter release or obvious changes in cardiovascular function.

  8. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the gonadotropin releasing hormone neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Johanna K; Heger, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals have been shown to alter the pubertal process. The controlling levels of the Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) network involve GnRH itself, KiSS1, and the transcriptional regulators enhanced at puberty 1 (EAP1), Thyroid Transcription Factor 1 (TTF1), and Yin Yang 1 (YY1). While Genistein and Bisphenol A (BPA) have been shown to advance the advent of puberty, exposure to Dioxin delayed pubertal onset. Utilizing in vitro approaches, we observed that Genistein and BPA suppress inhibitory and activate stimulatory components of the GnRH network, while Dioxin exhibit an inhibitory effect at all regulatory hierarchical levels of the GnRH network. It repressed KiSS1, Gnrh, Ttf1 and Yy1 transcription via the xenobiotic response element (XRE), while EAP1 was not affected. Therefore, EDCs alter the neuroendocrine GnRH regulatory network at all hierarchical levels.

  9. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The type of solvent and volume of the solvent used to load pheromone/volatile components onto rubber septa had significant effects on release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ...

  10. An Update of the Classical and Novel Methods Used for Measuring Fast Neurotransmitters During Normal and Brain Altered Function

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes Castro, Victor Hugo; López Valenzuela, Carmen Lucía; Salazar Sánchez, Juan Carlos; Peña, Kenia Pardo; López Pérez, Silvia J.; Ibarra, Jorge Ortega; Villagrán, Alberto Morales

    2014-01-01

    To understand better the cerebral functions, several methods have been developed to study the brain activity, they could be related with morphological, electrophysiological, molecular and neurochemical techniques. Monitoring neurotransmitter concentration is a key role to know better how the brain works during normal or pathological conditions, as well as for studying the changes in neurotransmitter concentration with the use of several drugs that could affect or reestablish the normal brain activity. Immediate response of the brain to environmental conditions is related with the release of the fast acting neurotransmission by glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and acetylcholine (ACh) through the opening of ligand-operated ion channels. Neurotransmitter release is mainly determined by the classical microdialysis technique, this is generally coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Detection of neurotransmitters can be done by fluorescence, optical density, electrochemistry or other detection systems more sophisticated. Although the microdialysis method is the golden technique to monitor the brain neurotransmitters, it has a poor temporal resolution. Recently, with the use of biosensor the drawback of temporal resolution has been improved considerably, however other inconveniences have merged, such as stability, reproducibility and the lack of reliable biosensors mainly for GABA. The aim of this review is to show the important advances in the different ways to measure neurotransmitter concentrations; both with the use of classic techniques as well as with the novel methods and alternant approaches to improve the temporal resolution. PMID:25977677

  11. Ca2+–Calmodulin regulates SNARE assembly and spontaneous neurotransmitter release via v-ATPase subunit V0a1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Epstein, Daniel; Khalaf, Ossama; Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Williamson, W. Ryan; Fayyazuddin, Amir; Quiocho, Florante A.

    2014-01-01

    Most chemical neurotransmission occurs through Ca2+-dependent evoked or spontaneous vesicle exocytosis. In both cases, Ca2+ sensing is thought to occur shortly before exocytosis. In this paper, we provide evidence that the Ca2+ dependence of spontaneous vesicle release may partly result from an earlier requirement of Ca2+ for the assembly of soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. We show that the neuronal vacuolar-type H+-adenosine triphosphatase V0 subunit a1 (V100) can regulate the formation of SNARE complexes in a Ca2+–Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent manner. Ca2+–CaM regulation of V100 is not required for vesicle acidification. Specific disruption of the Ca2+-dependent regulation of V100 by CaM led to a >90% loss of spontaneous release but only had a mild effect on evoked release at Drosophila melanogaster embryo neuromuscular junctions. Our data suggest that Ca2+–CaM regulation of V100 may control SNARE complex assembly for a subset of synaptic vesicles that sustain spontaneous release. PMID:24733584

  12. Neurotransmitter release: vacuolar ATPase V0 sector c-subunits in possible gene or cell therapies for Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Tsuji, Chiharu; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2017-01-01

    We overview the 16-kDa proteolipid mediatophore, the transmembrane c-subunit of the V0 sector of the vacuolar proton ATPase (ATP6V0C) that was shown to mediate the secretion of acetylcholine. Acetylcholine, serotonin, and dopamine (DA) are released from cell soma and/or dendrites if ATP6V0C is expressed in cultured cells. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of ATP6V0C into the caudate putamen enhanced the depolarization-induced overflow of endogenous DA in Parkinson-model mice. Motor impairment was ameliorated in hemiparkinsonian model mice when ATP6V0C was expressed with DA-synthesizing enzymes. The review discusses application in the future as a potential tool for gene therapy, cell transplantation therapy, and inducible pluripotent stem cell therapy in neurological diseases, from the view point of recent findings regarding vacuolar ATPase.

  13. Measure your septa release ratios: pheromone release ratio variability affected by rubber septa and solvent.

    PubMed

    Kuenen, L P S; Siegel, Joel P

    2015-03-01

    The type of solvent and the volume used to load pheromone components onto rubber septa had significant effects on pheromone release ratios, the variability of those release ratios, and the recoverability of the volatile components during subsequent extraction with hexane. Volatile release ratios of synthetic Oriental fruit moth (OFM) pheromone and additional volatile compounds were determined using a gas chromatograph column as a volatile trap for rapid (≤1 hr) analysis from individual rubber septa. Volatile compound solutions were prepared in hexane, pentane, CH2Cl2, and methyl tert-butyl ether, and a 10, 33, or 100 μl aliquot of each solution was applied to rubber septa. Septa loaded with 100 μl of CH2Cl2 emitted significantly (P < 0.05) higher alcohol: acetate (OH:Ac) ratios than septa loaded with the other solvents, which were all similar. Release ratios of the alcohol and acetate components of the OFM pheromone components were assessed over a 3 week period using septa loaded with each solvent. Regardless of loading solvent, the OFM OH:Ac ratios declined logarithmically over 3 weeks; however, the decay slope from septa loaded with CH2Cl2 solutions was different from those of the other three solvents, which were nearly all the same. A high variability in OH:Ac release ratios was measured overall, regardless of the solvent used or the volume it was applied in. Four compounds of near-equal mass: 1-dodecanol, 1-dodecanal, methyl decanoate, and tridecane emitted different release ratios dependent on the solvent, hexane or CH2Cl2, with which a septum was loaded. The more polar and the greater the mass of the test compound, the slower it was emitted from a septum regardless of solvent. These combined results plus comparisons to earlier reports, suggest that researchers should empirically assess the release ratios from septa to be used in bioassays rather than just reporting the type of septum, ratios of compounds applied and solvent used to prepare them.

  14. Neurotransmitters act as paracrine signals to regulate insulin secretion from the human pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Rayner; Menegaz, Danusa; Caicedo, Alejandro

    2014-08-15

    In this symposium review we discuss the role of neurotransmitters as paracrine signals that regulate pancreatic islet function. A large number of neurotransmitters and their receptors has been identified in the islet, but relatively little is known about their involvement in islet biology. Interestingly, neurotransmitters initially thought to be present in autonomic axons innervating the islet are also present in endocrine cells of the human islet. These neurotransmitters can thus be released as paracrine signals to help control hormone release. Here we propose that the role of neurotransmitters may extend beyond controlling endocrine cell function to work as signals modulating vascular flow and immune responses within the islet.

  15. Atypical Neurotransmitters and the Neurobiology of Depression.

    PubMed

    Joca, Samia Regiane; Moreira, Fabricio Araujo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report that the mechanism of action of antidepressants involves the facilitation of monoaminergic neurotransmission in the brain in the 1960s, the leading hypothesis about the neurobiology of depression has been the so called "monoaminergic hypothesis". However, a growing body of evidence from the last two decades also supports important involvement of non-monoaminergic mechanisms in the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant action. The discovery of nitric oxide (NO) and endocannabinoid signaling in the brain during the 1990s challenged the wellestablished criteria of classical neurotransmission. These transmitters are synthesized and released on demand by the postsynaptic neurons, and may act as a retrograde messenger on the presynaptic terminal, modulating neurotransmitter release. These unconventional signaling mechanisms and the important role as neural messengers have classified NO and endocannabinoids as atypical neurotransmitters. They are able to modulate neural signaling mediated by the main conventional neurotransmitters systems in the brain, including the monoaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling systems. This review aims at discussing the fundamental aspects of NO- and endocannabinoid-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the involvement of these atypical neurotransmitters in the neurobiology of depression, and in the antidepressant effects are presented here. The evidence is discussed on basis of their ability to modulate different neurotransmitter systems in the brain, including monoaminergic and glutamatergic ones. A better comprehension of NO and endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms in the neurobiology depression could provide new avenues for the development of novel non-monoamine based antidepressants.

  16. Orquestic regulation of neurotransmitters on reward-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area is strongly associated with the reward system. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex as a result of rewarding experiences such as food, sex, and neutral stimuli that become associated with them. Electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area or its output pathways can itself serve as a potent reward. Different drugs that increase dopamine levels are intrinsically rewarding. Although the dopaminergic system represent the cornerstone of the reward system, other neurotransmitters such as endogenous opioids, glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, adenosine, endocannabinoids, orexins, galanin and histamine all affect this mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Consequently, genetic variations of neurotransmission are thought influence reward processing that in turn may affect distinctive social behavior and susceptibility to addiction. Here, we discuss current evidence on the orquestic regulation of different neurotranmitters on reward-seeking behavior and its potential effect on drug addiction. PMID:25061480

  17. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  18. Factors affecting ferulic acid release from Brewer's spent grain by Fusarium oxysporum enzymatic system.

    PubMed

    Xiros, Charilaos; Moukouli, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the factors affecting ferulic acid (FA) release from Brewer's spent grain (BSG), by the crude enzyme extract of Fusarium oxysporum were investigated. In order to evaluate the importance of the multienzyme preparation on FA release, the synergistic action of feruloyl esterase (FAE, FoFaeC-12213) and xylanase (Trichoderma longibrachiatum M3) monoenzymes was studied. More than double amount of FA release (1 mg g(-1) dry BSG) was observed during hydrolytic reactions by the crude enzyme extract compared to hydrolysis by the monoenzymes (0.37 mg g(-1) dry BSG). The protease content of the crude extract and the inhibitory effect of FA as an end-product were also evaluated concerning their effect on FA release. The protease treatment prior to hydrolysis by monoenzymes enhanced FA release about 100%, while, for the first time in literature, FA in solution found to have a significant inhibitory effect on FAE activity and on total FA release.

  19. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive-compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dennis L; Moya, Pablo R; Fox, Meredith A; Rubenstein, Liza M; Wendland, Jens R; Timpano, Kiara R

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders.

  20. Anxiety and affective disorder comorbidity related to serotonin and other neurotransmitter systems: obsessive–compulsive disorder as an example of overlapping clinical and genetic heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis L.; Moya, Pablo R.; Fox, Meredith A.; Rubenstein, Liza M.; Wendland, Jens R.; Timpano, Kiara R.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) have also been shown to have comorbid lifetime diagnoses of major depressive disorder (MDD; rates greater than 70%), bipolar disorder (rates greater than 10%) and other anxiety disorders (e.g. panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)). In addition, overlap exists in some common genetic variants (e.g. the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene), and rare variants in genes/chromosomal abnormalities (e.g. the 22q11 microdeletion syndrome) found across the affective/anxiety disorder spectrums. OCD has been proposed as a possible independent entity for DSM-5, but by others thought best retained as an anxiety disorder subtype (its current designation in DSM-IV), and yet by others considered best in the affective disorder spectrum. This review focuses on OCD, a well-studied but still puzzling heterogeneous disorder, regarding alterations in serotonergic, dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in addition to other systems involved, and how related genes may be involved in the comorbidity of anxiety and affective disorders. OCD resembles disorders such as depression, in which gene × gene interactions, gene × environment interactions and stress elements coalesce to yield OC symptoms and, in some individuals, full-blown OCD with multiple comorbid disorders. PMID:23440468

  1. [Neurotransmitters, calcium signalling and neuronal communication].

    PubMed

    Eguiagaray, J G; Egea, J; Bravo-Cordero, J J; García, A G

    2004-04-01

    In this article we show some recent findings that constitute a great progress in the molecular knowledge of synaptic dynamics. To communicate, neurons use a code that includes electrical (action potentials) and chemical signals (neurotransmitters, neuromodulators). At the moment a great variety of molecules are known, whose neurotransmitter function in brain and the peripheral nervous system are out of question. Monoamines like acetylcholine, dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, histamine, serotonin, glutamate, aspartate, glycine, ATP and GABA are good examples. Opioid neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neurokinines (substance P), somatostatin, neurotensin, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinine, vasopressin or oxitocin have been related to the control of the stress response, sexual behaviour, food intake, pain, learning and memory, qualities that are also related to nitric oxide (NO). A great part of the molecular structure of the secretory machinery is known to be responsible for fast neurotransmitter release at the synapse, in response to action potentials. Proteins like sinaptobrevin (located in the membrane of the synaptic vesicle), sintaxin and SNAP-25 (both located at the presynaptic plasma membrane) constitute a trimeric complex which is responsible of the vesicular docking at the active sites for exocytosis. From this strategic location, vesicles release their neurotransmitter within few milliseconds, when the action potential invades the nerve terminal and activates the opening of the different subtypes of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. The asymmetric geographical distribution of each type of channel, in different neurons, rose the hypothesis that Ca2+ that enters through each subtype of channel is compartmentalised, thus favouring the generation of Ca2+ microdomains, in the cytosol and the nucleus, involved in different cellular functions. This great biochemical synaptic heterogeneity is facilitating the selection of many biological targets

  2. Quantifying the effect size of changing environmental controls on carbon release from permafrost-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedel, C.; Bader, M. K. F.; Schuur, E. A. G.; Bracho, R. G.; Capek, P.; De Baets, S. L.; Diakova, K.; Ernakovich, J. G.; Hartley, I. P.; Iversen, C. M.; Kane, E. S.; Knoblauch, C.; Lupascu, M.; Natali, S.; Norby, R. J.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Santruckova, H.; Shaver, G. R.; Sloan, V. L.; Treat, C. C.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    High-latitude surface air temperatures are rising twice as fast as the global mean, causing permafrost to thaw and thereby exposing large quantities of previously frozen organic carbon (C) to microbial decomposition. Increasing temperatures in high latitude ecosystems not only increase C emissions from previously frozen C in permafrost but also indirectly affect the C cycle through changes in regional and local hydrology. Warmer temperatures increase thawing of ice-rich permafrost, causing land surface subsidence where soils become waterlogged, anoxic conditions prevail and C is released in form of anaerobic CO2 and CH4. Although substrate quality, physical protection, and nutrient availability affect C decomposition, increasing temperatures and changes in surface and sub-surface hydrology are likely the dominant factors affecting the rate and form of C release from permafrost; however, their effect size on C release is poorly quantified. We have compiled a database of 24 incubation studies with soils from active layer and permafrost from across the entire permafrost zone to quantify a) the effect size of increasing temperatures and b) the changes from aerobic to anaerobic environmental soil conditions on C release. Results from two different meta-analyses show that a 10°C increase in temperature increased C release by a factor of two in boreal forest, peatland and tundra ecosystems. Under aerobic incubation conditions, soils released on average three times more C than under anaerobic conditions with large variation among the different ecosystems. While peatlands showed similar amounts of C release under aerobic and anaerobic soil conditions, tundra and boreal forest ecosystems released up to 8 times more C under anoxic conditions. This pan-arctic synthesis shows that boreal forest and tundra soils will have a larger impact on climate change when newly thawed permafrost C decomposes in an aerobic environment compared to an anaerobic environment even when

  3. Neurotransmitters of the suprachiasmatic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Reghunandanan, Vallath; Reghunandanan, Rajalaxmy

    2006-01-01

    There has been extensive research in the recent past looking into the molecular basis and mechanisms of the biological clock, situated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. Neurotransmitters are a very important component of SCN function. Thorough knowledge of neurotransmitters is not only essential for the understanding of the clock but also for the successful manipulation of the clock with experimental chemicals and therapeutical drugs. This article reviews the current knowledge about neurotransmitters in the SCN, including neurotransmitters that have been identified only recently. An attempt was made to describe the neurotransmitters and hormonal/diffusible signals of the SCN efference, which are necessary for the master clock to exert its overt function. The expression of robust circadian rhythms depends on the integrity of the biological clock and on the integration of thousands of individual cellular clocks found in the clock. Neurotransmitters are required at all levels, at the input, in the clock itself, and in its efferent output for the normal function of the clock. The relationship between neurotransmitter function and gene expression is also discussed because clock gene transcription forms the molecular basis of the clock and its working. PMID:16480518

  4. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions.

  5. Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model system to study neurotransmitter transporters

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ciara A.; Krantz, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The model genetic organism Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, uses many of the same neurotransmitters as mammals and very similar mechanisms of neurotransmitter storage, release and recycling. This system offers a variety of powerful molecular-genetic methods for the study of transporters, many of which would be difficult in mammalian models. We review here progress made using Drosophila to understand the function and regulation of neurotransmitter transporters and discuss future directions for its use. PMID:24704795

  6. Setting radon-specific release criteria and demonstrating compliance for land affected by NORM.

    PubMed

    García-Talavera, M; Martínez, M; Matarranz, J L M; Ramos, L

    2008-11-01

    Residues from industrial activities involving naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) may cause radiation exposures to members of the public, particularly when NORM-affected land is brought into residential use. To provide an adequate protection against radiation in such situations, the following limiting criteria are currently required in Spain for releasing NORM-affected land: (i) no more than a 300 microSv yr(-1) increase (excluding radon doses) over the natural background; (ii) (222)Rn concentrations in hypothetical future dwellings lower than 200 Bq m(-3); and (iii) reduction of all radiation exposures to as low as reasonable achievable. This paper addresses some of the problems encountered in translating the (222)Rn criterion into site-specific release limits and in demonstrating compliance with them.

  7. Neurotransmitter signaling in the pathophysiology of microglia

    PubMed Central

    Domercq, María; Vázquez-Villoldo, Nuria; Matute, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Microglial cells are the resident immune cells of the central nervous system. In the resting state, microglia are highly dynamic and control the environment by rapidly extending and retracting motile processes. Microglia are closely associated with astrocytes and neurons, particularly at the synapses, and more recent data indicate that neurotransmission plays a role in regulating the morphology and function of surveying/resting microglia, as they are endowed with receptors for most known neurotransmitters. In particular, microglia express receptors for ATP and glutamate, which regulate microglial motility. After local damage, the release of ATP induces microgliosis and activated microglial cells migrate to the site of injury, proliferate, and phagocytose cells, and cellular compartments. However, excessive activation of microglia could contribute to the progression of chronic neurodegenerative diseases, though the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Microglia have the capacity to release a large number of substances that can be detrimental to the surrounding neurons, including glutamate, ATP, and reactive oxygen species. However, how altered neurotransmission following acute insults or chronic neurodegenerative conditions modulates microglial functions is still poorly understood. This review summarizes the relevant data regarding the role of neurotransmitter receptors in microglial physiology and pathology. PMID:23626522

  8. Factors Affecting Release of Heat-Labile Enterotoxin by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven L.; Robertson, Donald C.

    1979-01-01

    Various conditions affecting the release of heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli have been examined. The pH of a defined medium containing three amino acids, M-9 salts, and 0.5% glucose decreased to less than 7.0 in early log phase of growth, and no extracellular LT was detected. Adjustment of the pH at 8 h from 6.0 to 8.0 resulted in a concomitant increase in LT activity in culture supernatants. The release of cell-associated LT was significantly reduced by preincubation with protease inhibitors and increased by preincubation with trypsin. Cell-associated LT was not released by pH adjustment of cells grown at 21°C; however, polymyxin B treatment released a toxin species active in only the pigeon erythrocyte lysate (PEL) assay system. As the growth temperature was increased, polymyxin B released toxin species which exhibited both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell activity. Polymyxin B extracts of enterotoxigenic E. coli in early log phase grown at 37°C possessed only PEL activity, whereas extracts from cells in late-log and stationary phases had biological activity in both assay systems. Also, LT released by pH adjustment from mid-log to stationary phase was active in both PEL and Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assays. Gel electrophoresis of polymyxin B extracts revealed at least three molecular weight species active in either the PEL (22,000 daltons and 30,000 daltons) or both the PEL and the Y-1 adrenal tumor cell assay (72,000 daltons), depending on the growth temperature. These observations may help to explain the chemical and biological heterogeneity of most LT preparations and facilitate purification of LT by increasing the yield of enterotoxin. PMID:37162

  9. THE PURINERGIC NEUROTRANSMITTER REVISITED: A SINGLE SUBSTANCE OR MULTIPLE PLAYERS?

    PubMed Central

    Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.; Durnin, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    The past half century has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of extracellular purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic neurotransmission, in particular, has emerged as a key contributor in the efficient control mechanisms in the nervous system. The identity of the purine neurotransmitter, however, remains controversial. Identifying it is difficult because purines are present in all cell types, have a large variety of cell sources, and are released via numerous pathways. Moreover, studies on purinergic neurotransmission have relied heavily on indirect measurements of integrated postjunctional responses that do not provide direct information for neurotransmitter identity. This paper discusses experimental support for adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) as a neurotransmitter and recent evidence for possible contribution of other purines, in addition to or instead of ATP, in chemical neurotransmission in the peripheral, enteric and central nervous systems. Sites of release and action of purines in model systems such as vas deferens, blood vessels, urinary bladder and chromaffin cells are discussed. This is preceded by a brief discussion of studies demonstrating storage of purines in synaptic vesicles. We examine recent evidence for cell type targets (e.g., smooth muscle cells, interstitial cells, neurons and glia) for purine neurotransmitters in different systems. This is followed by brief discussion of mechanisms of terminating the action of purine neurotransmitters, including extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and possible salvage and reuptake in the cell. The significance of direct neurotransmitter release measurements is highlighted. Possibilities for involvement of multiple purines (e.g., ATP, ADP, NAD+, ADP-ribose, adenosine, and diadenosine polyphosphates) in neurotransmission are considered throughout. PMID:24887688

  10. Chemosterilization of male sea lampreys (Petromyzon marinus) does not affect sex pheromone release

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siefkes, Michael J.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Twohey, Michael B.; Li, Weiming

    2003-01-01

    Release of males sterilized by injection with bisazir is an important experimental technique in management of sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an invasive, nuisance species in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Sea lampreys are semelparous and sterilization can theoretically eliminate a male's reproductive capacity and, if the ability to obtain mates is not affected, waste the sex products of females spawning with him. It has been demonstrated that spermiating males release a sex pheromone that attracts ovulating females. We demonstrated that sterilized, spermiating males also released the pheromone and attracted ovulating females. In a two-choice maze, ovulating females increased searching behavior and spent more time in the side of the maze containing chemical stimuli from sterilized, spermiating males. This attraction response was also observed in spawning stream experiments. Also, electro-olfactograms showed that female olfactory organs were equally sensitive to chemical stimuli from sterilized and nonsterilized, spermiating males. Finally, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry showed that extracts from water conditioned with sterilized and nonsterilized, spermiating males contained the same pheromonal molecule at similar levels. We concluded that injection of bisazir did not affect the efficacy of sex pheromone in sterilized males.

  11. Neurotransmitters: The Critical Modulators Regulating Gut-Brain Axis.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Debs, Luca H; Patel, Amit P; Nguyen, Desiree; Patel, Kunal; O'Connor, Gregory; Grati, M'hamed; Mittal, Jeenu; Yan, Denise; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia; Liu, Xue Zhong

    2016-08-11

    Neurotransmitters including catecholamines and serotonin play a crucial role in maintaining homeostasis in the human body. Studies on these neurotransmitters mainly revolved around their role in the "fight or flight" response, transmitting signals across a chemical synapse and modulating blood flow throughout the body. However, recent research has demonstrated that neurotransmitters can play a significant role in the gastrointestinal (GI) physiology. Norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), dopamine (DA), and serotonin have recently been a topic of interest because of their roles in the gut physiology and their potential roles in gastrointestinal and central nervous system pathophysiology. These neurotransmitters are able to regulate and control not only blood flow, but also affect gut motility, nutrient absorption, gastrointestinal innate immune system, and the microbiome. Furthermore, in pathological states such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and Parkinson's disease, the levels of these neurotransmitters are dysregulated, therefore causing a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms. Research in this field has shown that exogenous manipulation of catecholamine serum concentrations can help in decreasing symptomology and/or disease progression. In this review article, we discuss the current state-of-the-art research and literature regarding the role of neurotransmitters in regulation of normal gastrointestinal physiology, their impact on several disease processes, and novel work focused on the use of exogenous hormones and/or psychotropic medications to improve disease symptomology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. The lipid habitats of neurotransmitter receptors in brain.

    PubMed

    Borroni, María Virginia; Vallés, Ana Sofía; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors, the macromolecules specialized in decoding the chemical signals encrypted in the chemical signaling mechanism in the nervous system, occur either at the somatic cell surface of chemically excitable cells or at specialized subcellular structures, the synapses. Synapses have lipid compositions distinct from the rest of the cell membrane, suggesting that neurotransmitter receptors and their scaffolding and adaptor protein partners require specific lipid habitats for optimal operation. In this review we discuss some paradigmatic cases of neurotransmitter receptor-lipid interactions, highlighting the chemical nature of the intervening lipid species and providing examples of the receptor mechanisms affected by interaction with lipids. The focus is on the effects of cholesterol, glycerophospholipids and covalent fatty acid acylation on neurotransmitter receptors. We also briefly discuss the role of lipid phase states involving lateral heterogeneities of the host membrane known to modulate membrane transport, protein sorting and signaling. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors by lipids occurs at multiple levels, affecting a wide span of activities including their trafficking, sorting, stability, residence lifetime at the cell surface, endocytosis, and recycling, among other important functional properties at the synapse.

  13. Low doses of estradiol partly inhibit release of GH in sheep without affecting basal levels.

    PubMed

    Hudmon, A; Davenport, G; Coleman, E S; Sartin, J L

    2009-10-01

    Estradiol increases basal growth hormone (GH) concentrations in sheep and cattle. This study sought to determine the effects of estradiol on GH-releasing hormone (GRH)-stimulated GH release in sheep. Growth hormone secretory characteristics, the GH response to GRH, and steady-state GH mRNA concentrations were determined in castrated male lambs treated with 2 different doses of estradiol 17-beta for a 28-d experimental period. Although no differences between treatments in mean GH, basal GH, or GH pulse number were observed after 28 d of estradiol treatment, GH pulse amplitude was greater (P < 0.05) in the 2.00-cm implant-treated animals than in the control and 0.75-cm implant group. The effect of estradiol treatment on GRH-stimulated GH release revealed differences between the control and estradiol-treated animals (P < 0.05). The 15-min GH responses to 0.075 microg/kg hGRH in the control, 0.75-cm, and 2.00-cm implant groups, respectively, were 76 +/- 10, 22.6 +/- 2.1, and 43.6 +/- 15.0 ng/mL. Growth hormone mRNA content was determined for pituitary glands from the different treatment groups, and no differences in steady-state GH mRNA levels were observed. There were no differences in the mean plasma concentrations of IGF-I, cortisol, T(3), or T(4) from weekly samples. Growth hormone release from cultured ovine pituitary cells from control sheep was not affected by estradiol after 72 h or in a subsequent 3-h incubation with estradiol combined with GRH. These data suggest that estradiol has differing actions on basal and GRH-stimulated GH concentrations in plasma, but the increase in pulse amplitude does not represent an increased pituitary sensitivity to GRH.

  14. Is Aspartate an Excitatory Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Bruce E.; Silm, Katlin

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has resurrected the idea that the amino acid aspartate, a selective NMDA receptor agonist, is a neurotransmitter. Using a mouse that lacks the glutamate-selective vesicular transporter VGLUT1, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for the activation of NMDA receptors at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus. This excludes a role for aspartate and, by extension, a recently proposed role for the sialic acid transporter sialin in excitatory transmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It has been proposed that the amino acid aspartate serves as a neurotransmitter. Although aspartate is a selective agonist for NMDA receptors, we find that glutamate alone fully accounts for neurotransmission at excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, excluding a role for aspartate. PMID:26180193

  15. Neurotransmitters in the vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Balaban, C D

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal networks that are linked to the peripheral vestibular system contribute to gravitoinertial sensation, balance control, eye movement control, and autonomic function. Ascending connections to the limbic system and cerebral cortex are also important for motion perception and threat recognition, and play a role in comorbid balance and anxiety disorders. The vestibular system also shows remarkable plasticity, termed vestibular compensation. Activity in these networks is regulated by an interaction between: (1) intrinsic neurotransmitters of the inner ear, vestibular nerve, and vestibular nuclei; (2) neurotransmitters associated with thalamocortical and limbic pathways that receive projections originating in the vestibular nuclei; and (3) locus coeruleus and raphe (serotonergic and nonserotonergic) projections that influence the latter components. Because the ascending vestibular interoceptive and thalamocortical pathways include networks that influence a broad range of stress responses (endocrine and autonomic), memory consolidation, and cognitive functions, common transmitter substrates provide a basis for understanding features of acute and chronic vestibular disorders.

  16. Construction of cell-based neurotransmitter fluorescently engineered reporters (CNiFERs) for optical detection of neurotransmitters in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lacin, Emre; Muller, Arnaud; Fernando, Marian; Kleinfeld, David; Slesinger, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based neurotransmitter fluorescent engineered reporters (CNiFERs) provide a new tool for neuroscientists to optically detect the release of neurotransmitters in the brain in vivo. A specific CNiFER is created from a human embryonic kidney cell that stably expresses a specific G protein-coupled receptor, which couples to Gq/11 G proteins, and a FRET-based Ca2+-detector, TN-XXL – activation of the receptor leads to an increase in the FRET signal. Because a CNiFER clone utilizes the native receptor for a particular neurotransmitter (e.g. D2R for dopamine), it has nanomolar sensitivity and a temporal response of seconds. CNiFERs are directly implanted into the brain, enabling them to sense neurotransmitter release with a spatial resolution of less than one hundred micrometers, making them ideal to measure volume transmission in vivo. CNiFERs can also be used to screen other drugs for potential cross-reactivity in vivo. We recently expanded the family of CNiFERs to include GPCRs that couple to Gi/o G proteins. CNiFERs are available for detecting acetylcholine (ACh), dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE). Given that any GPCR can be used to create a novel CNiFER and that there are approximately 800 GPCRs in the human genome, we describe here the general procedure to design, realize, and test any type of CNiFER. PMID:27214050

  17. Brefeldin A inhibits pestivirus release from infected cells, without affecting its assembly and infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Macovei, Alina; Zitzmann, Nicole; Lazar, Catalin; Dwek, Raymond A.; Branza-Nichita, Norica . E-mail: nichita@biochim.ro

    2006-08-04

    The enveloped bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a member of the Pestivirus genus within the Flaviviridae family. While considerable information has been gathered on virus entry into the host cell, genome structure and protein function, little is known about pestivirus morphogenesis and release from cells. Here, we analyzed the intracellular localization, N-glycan processing and secretion of BVDV using brefeldin A (BFA), which blocks protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and causes disruption of the Golgi complex with subsequent fusion of its cis and medial cisternae with the ER. BFA treatment of infected cells resulted in complete inhibition of BVDV secretion and increased co-localization of the envelope glycoproteins with the cis-Golgi marker GM 130. Processing of the N-linked glycans was affected by BFA, however, virus assembly was not perturbed and intracellular virions were fully infectious, suggesting that trafficking beyond the cis-Golgi is not a prerequisite for pestivirus infectivity.

  18. The Salicylic Acid-Mediated Release of Plant Volatiles Affects the Host Choice of Bemisia tabaci

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaobin; Chen, Gong; Tian, Lixia; Peng, Zhengke; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) causes serious crop losses worldwide by transmitting viruses. We have previously shown that salicylic acid (SA)-related plant defenses directly affect whiteflies. In this study, we applied exogenous SA to tomato plants in order to investigate the interaction between SA-induced plant volatiles and nonviruliferous B. tabaci B and Q or B- and Q-carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The results showed that exogenous SA caused plants to repel nonviruliferous whiteflies, but the effect was reduced when the SA concentration was low and when the whiteflies were viruliferous. Exogenous SA increased the number and quantity of plant volatiles—especially the quantity of methyl salicylate and δ-limonene. In Y-tube olfactometer assays, methyl salicylate and δ-limonene repelled the whiteflies, but the repellency was reduced for viruliferous Q. We suggest that the release of plant volatiles as mediated by SA affects the interaction between whiteflies, plants, and viruses. Further studies are needed to determine why viruliferous Q is less sensitive than nonviruliferous Q to repellent plant volatiles. PMID:27376280

  19. Acute Exposure to Pacific Ciguatoxin Reduces Electroencephalogram Activity and Disrupts Neurotransmitter Metabolic Pathways in Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gajendra; Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Lei, Elva Ngai Yu; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Lam, Michael Hon Wah; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-09-10

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a common human food poisoning caused by consumption of ciguatoxin (CTX)-contaminated fish affecting over 50,000 people worldwide each year. CTXs are classified depending on their origin from the Pacific (P-CTXs), Indian Ocean (I-CTXs), and Caribbean (C-CTXs). P-CTX-1 is the most toxic CTX known and the major source of CFP causing an array of neurological symptoms. Neurological symptoms in some CFP patients last for several months or years; however, the underlying electrophysiological properties of acute exposure to CTXs remain unknown. Here, we used CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced in the Pacific Ocean (P-CTX-1). Delta and theta electroencephalography (EEG) activity was reduced remarkably in 2 h and returned to normal in 6 h after a single exposure. However, second exposure to P-CTX-1 induced not only a further reduction in EEG activities but also a 2-week delay in returning to baseline EEG values. Ciguatoxicity was detected in the brain hours after the first and second exposure by mouse neuroblastoma assay. The spontaneous firing rate of single motor cortex neuron was reduced significantly measured by single-unit recording with high spatial resolution. Expression profile study of neurotransmitters using targeted profiling approach based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in the motor cortex. Our study provides a possible link between the brain oscillations and neurotransmitter release after acute exposure to P-CTX-1. Identification of EEG signatures and major metabolic pathways affected by P-CTX-1 provides new insight into potential biomarker development and therapeutic interventions.

  20. Early toxic effect of 6-hydroxydopamine on extracellular concentrations of neurotransmitters in the rat striatum: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Tobón-Velasco, Julio César; Silva-Adaya, Daniela; Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana; García, Esperanza; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Santamaría, Abel

    2010-12-01

    The early effects of 6-OHDA as a Parkinsonian model in rodents are relevant since pharmacological and toxicological points of view, as they can explain the acute and chronic deleterious events occurring in the striatum. In this study, we focused our attention on the neurochemical and motor dysfunction produced after a pulse infusion of 6-OHDA, paying special attention to the capacity of this molecule to induce neurotransmitter release and behavioural alterations. Extracellular levels of dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, glycine and GABA were all assessed in striatal dialysates in freely moving rats immediately after exposed to a single pulse of 6-OHDA in dorsal striatum, and major behavioural markers of motor alterations were simultaneously explored. Enhanced release of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine was found immediately after 6-OHDA pulse. Delayed glutamate and glycine release were detected and a biphasic effect on GABA was observed. Mostly serotonin and dopamine outflow, followed by glutamate, correlated with wet dog shakes and other behavioural qualitative alterations. Early dopamine release, accompanied by other neurotransmitters, can generate an excitatory environment affecting the striatal neurons with immediate consequences for behavioural performance. In turn, these changes might be accounting for later features of toxicity described in this model.

  1. A neurotransmitter transporter encoded by the Drosophila inebriated gene

    PubMed Central

    Soehnge, Holly; Huang, Xi; Becker, Marie; Whitley, Penn; Conover, Diana; Stern, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies on mutants defective in the Drosophila inebriated (ine) gene demonstrated increased excitability of the motor neuron. In this paper, we describe the cloning and sequence analysis of ine. Mutations in ine were localized on cloned DNA by restriction mapping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) mapping of ine mutants. DNA from the ine region was then used to isolate an ine cDNA. In situ hybridization of ine transcripts to developing embryos revealed expression of this gene in several cell types, including the posterior hindgut, Malpighian tubules, anal plate, garland cells, and a subset of cells in the central nervous system. The ine cDNA contains an open reading frame of 658 amino acids with a high degree of sequence similarity to members of the Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family. Members of this family catalyze the rapid reuptake of neurotransmitters released into the synapse and thereby play key roles in controlling neuronal function. We conclude that ine mutations cause increased excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron by causing the defective reuptake of the substrate neurotransmitter of the ine transporter and thus overstimulation of the motor neuron by this neurotransmitter. From this observation comes a unique opportunity to perform a genetic dissection of the regulation of excitability of the Drosophila motor neuron. PMID:8917579

  2. Macrocyclic Gd(3+) complexes with pendant crown ethers designed for binding zwitterionic neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Oukhatar, Fatima; Meudal, Hervé; Landon, Céline; Logothetis, Nikos K; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Angelovski, Goran; Tóth, Éva

    2015-07-27

    A series of Gd(3+) complexes exhibiting a relaxometric response to zwitterionic amino acid neurotransmitters was synthesized. The design concept involves ditopic interactions 1) between a positively charged and coordinatively unsaturated Gd(3+) chelate and the carboxylate group of the neurotransmitters and 2) between an azacrown ether appended to the chelate and the amino group of the neurotransmitters. The chelates differ in the nature and length of the linker connecting the cyclen-type macrocycle that binds the Ln(3+) ion and the crown ether. The complexes are monohydrated, but they exhibit high proton relaxivities (up to 7.7 mM(-1)  s(-1) at 60 MHz, 310 K) due to slow molecular tumbling. The formation of ternary complexes with neurotransmitters was monitored by (1) H relaxometric titrations of the Gd(3+) complexes and by luminescence measurements on the Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) analogues at pH 7.4. The remarkable relaxivity decrease (≈80 %) observed on neurotransmitter binding is related to the decrease in the hydration number, as evidenced by luminescence lifetime measurements on the Eu(3+) complexes. These complexes show affinity for amino acid neurotransmitters in the millimolar range, which can be suited to imaging concentrations of synaptically released neurotransmitters. They display good selectivity over non-amino acid neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, serotonin, and noradrenaline) and hydrogenphosphate, but selectivity over hydrogencarbonate was not achieved.

  3. Are vesicular neurotransmitter transporters potential treatment targets for temporal lobe epilepsy?

    PubMed Central

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Massie, Ann; Portelli, Jeanelle; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Smolders, Ilse

    2013-01-01

    The vesicular neurotransmitter transporters (VNTs) are small proteins responsible for packing synaptic vesicles with neurotransmitters thereby determining the amount of neurotransmitter released per vesicle through fusion in both neurons and glial cells. Each transporter subtype was classically seen as a specific neuronal marker of the respective nerve cells containing that particular neurotransmitter or structurally related neurotransmitters. More recently, however, it has become apparent that common neurotransmitters can also act as co-transmitters, adding complexity to neurotransmitter release and suggesting intriguing roles for VNTs therein. We will first describe the current knowledge on vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1/2/3), the vesicular excitatory amino acid transporter (VEAT), the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT1/2), the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) and the vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT) in the brain. We will focus on evidence regarding transgenic mice with disruptions in VNTs in different models of seizures and epilepsy. We will also describe the known alterations and reorganizations in the expression levels of these VNTs in rodent models for temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in human tissue resected for epilepsy surgery. Finally, we will discuss perspectives on opportunities and challenges for VNTs as targets for possible future epilepsy therapies. PMID:24009559

  4. Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators controlling the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Y; Fujisawa, Y; Matsuura, M; Ikeda, T

    1991-01-01

    1. The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis is innervated by at least two kinds of nerves, excitatory and relaxing nerves. The principal neurotransmitters released from these nerves have been shown to be acetylcholine and serotonin, respectively. 2. Some other monoamines, such as dopamine and octopamine, and various peptides, such as FMRFamide-related peptides, Mytilus inhibitory peptides, SCP-related peptides and a catch-relaxing peptide, may also be involved in the regulation of the muscle as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. 3. The ABRM seems to be typical of invertebrate muscles controlled by multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators.

  5. Amino acid neurotransmitters in the retina: a functional overview.

    PubMed

    Wu, S M; Maple, B R

    1998-05-01

    Physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic synapses in the tiger salamander retina were studied. We used immunocytochemical and autoradiographic methods to study localizations of these neurotransmitters and their uptake transporters; and electrophysiological methods (intracellular, extracellular and whole cell patch electrode recordings) to study the light responses, miniature postsynaptic currents and neurotransmitter-induced postsynaptic currents in various retinal neurons. Our results are consistent with the following scheme: Glutamate is used by the photoreceptor and bipolar cell output synapses and the release of glutamate is largely mediated by calcium-dependent vesicular processes. The postsynaptic glutamate receptors in DBCs are L-AP4 receptors, in HBCs, HCs and ganglion cells are the kainate/AMPA and NMDA receptors. Subpopulations of HCs make GABAergic synapses on cones and gate chloride condunctance through GABAA receptors. GABAergic HCs do not make feedforward synapses on bipolar cell dendrites and the neurotransmitter identity of the HCs making feedforward synapses is unknown. Subpopulations of amacrine cells make GABAergic synapses on bipolar cell synaptic terminals, other amacrine cells and ganglion cells and GABA gates chloride conductances in theses cells. Glycinergic amacrine cells make synapses on bipolar cell synaptic terminals, other amacrine cells and ganglion cells and glycine opens postsynaptic chloride channels. Glycinergic interplexiform cells make synapses on bipolar cells in the outer retina and glycine released from these cells open chloride channels in bipolar cell dendrites.

  6. High dose sapropterin dihydrochloride therapy improves monoamine neurotransmitter turnover in murine phenylketonuria (PKU).

    PubMed

    Winn, Shelley R; Scherer, Tanja; Thöny, Beat; Harding, Cary O

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) deficiencies of the monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin, have been implicated in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric dysfunction in phenylketonuria (PKU). Increased brain phenylalanine concentration likely competitively inhibits the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), the rate limiting steps in dopamine and serotonin synthesis respectively. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for TH and TPH activity. Our hypothesis was that treatment of hyperphenylalaninemic Pah(enu2/enu2) mice, a model of human PKU, with sapropterin dihydrochloride, a synthetic form of BH4, would stimulate TH and TPH activities leading to improved dopamine and serotonin synthesis despite persistently elevated brain phenylalanine. Sapropterin (20, 40, or 100mg/kg body weight in 1% ascorbic acid) was administered daily for 4 days by oral gavage to Pah(enu2/enu2) mice followed by measurement of brain biopterin, phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan and monoamine neurotransmitter content. A significant increase in brain biopterin content was detected only in mice that had received the highest sapropterin dose, 100mg/kg. Blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations were unchanged by sapropterin therapy. Sapropterin therapy also did not alter the absolute amounts of dopamine and serotonin in brain but was associated with increased homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dopamine and serotonin metabolites respectively, in both wild type and Pah(enu2/enu2) mice. Oral sapropterin therapy likely does not directly affect central nervous system monoamine synthesis in either wild type or hyperphenylalaninemic mice but may stimulate synaptic neurotransmitter release and subsequent metabolism.

  7. Secondary neurotransmitter deficiencies in epilepsy caused by voltage-gated sodium channelopathies: A potential treatment target?

    PubMed

    Horvath, Gabriella A; Demos, Michelle; Shyr, Casper; Matthews, Allison; Zhang, Linhua; Race, Simone; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Van Allen, Margot I; Mancarci, Ogan; Toker, Lilah; Pavlidis, Paul; Ross, Colin J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Trump, Natalie; Heales, Simon; Pope, Simon; Cross, J Helen; van Karnebeek, Clara D M

    2016-01-01

    We describe neurotransmitter abnormalities in two patients with drug-resistant epilepsy resulting from deleterious de novo mutations in sodium channel genes. Whole exome sequencing identified a de novo SCN2A splice-site mutation (c.2379+1G>A, p.Glu717Gly.fs*30) resulting in deletion of exon 14, in a 10-year old male with early onset global developmental delay, intermittent ataxia, autism, hypotonia, epileptic encephalopathy and cerebral/cerebellar atrophy. In the cerebrospinal fluid both homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased; extensive biochemical and genetic investigations ruled out primary neurotransmitter deficiencies and other known inborn errors of metabolism. In an 8-year old female with an early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy, developmental regression, and progressive cerebellar atrophy, a previously unreported de novo missense mutation was identified in SCN8A (c.5615G>A; p.Arg1872Gln), affecting a highly conserved residue located in the C-terminal of the Nav1.6 protein. Aside from decreased homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate was also found to be low. We hypothesize that these channelopathies cause abnormal synaptic mono-amine metabolite secretion/uptake via impaired vesicular release and imbalance in electrochemical ion gradients, which in turn aggravate the seizures. Treatment with oral 5-hydroxytryptophan, l-Dopa/Carbidopa, and a dopa agonist resulted in mild improvement of seizure control in the male case, most likely via dopamine and serotonin receptor activated signal transduction and modulation of glutamatergic, GABA-ergic and glycinergic neurotransmission. Neurotransmitter analysis in other sodium channelopathy patients will help validate our findings, potentially yielding novel treatment opportunities.

  8. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  9. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a novel neurotransmitter system

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth S.; Greer, Christina L.; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N.; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M.; Nguyen, Bac T.; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven; Krantz, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Storage and release of classical and amino acid neurotransmitters requires vesicular transporters. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male’s position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Since prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning. PMID:22017990

  10. Foods and food constituents that affect the brain and human behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently, it was generally believed that brain function was usually independent of day-to-day metabolic changes associated with consumption of food. Although it was acknowledged that peripheral metabolic changes associated with hunger or satiety might affect brain function, other effects of foods on the brain were considered unlikely. However, in 1971, Fernstrom and Wurtman discovered that under certain conditions, the protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of a meal could affect the concentration of a particular brain neurotransmitter. That neurotransmitter, serotonin, participates in the regulation of a variety of central nervous system (CNS) functions including sleep, pain sensitivity, aggression, and patterns of nutrient selection. The activity of other neurotransmitter systems has also been shown to be, under certain conditions, affected by dietary constituents which are given either as ordinary foods or in purified form. For example, the CNS turnover of two catecholamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and norepinephrine, can be altered by ingestion of their amino acid precursor, tyrosine, when neurons that release these monoamines are firing frequently. Similarly, lecithin, a dietary source of choline, and choline itself have been shown to increase the synthesis of acetylcholine when cholinergic neurons are very active. It is possible that other neurotransmitters could also be affected by precursor availability or other, as yet undiscovered peripheral factors governed by food consumption. The effects of food on neurotransmitters and behavior are discussed.

  11. Evidence for histamine as a neurotransmitter in the cardiac sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingkai; Hu, Jing; Chen, Zhong; Meng, Jia; Wang, Haifang; Ma, Xue; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2006-07-01

    The colocalization of histamine (HA) and norepinephrine (NE) immunoreactivities was identified within the superior cervical ganglia neurons of the guinea pig. HA and NE immunoreactivity levels were significantly attenuated after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Coexistence of NE and HA was also visualized in the cardiac sympathetic axon and varicosities labeled with anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine. Depolarization of cardiac sympathetic nerve endings (synaptosomes) with 50 mM potassium stimulated endogenous HA release, which was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA or a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitor reserpine pretreatments. Compound 48/80, a mast cell releaser, did not affect cardiac synaptosome HA exocytosis. Furthermore, K+ -evoked HA release was abolished by the N-type Ca2+ -channel blocker omega-conotoxin but was not affected by the L-type Ca2+ -channel blocker lacidipine. Cardiac synaptosome HA exocytosis was augmented by the enhanced synthesis of HA or the inhibition of HA metabolism. HA H3-receptor activation by (R)-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited high K+ -evoked histamine release. The HA H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide enhanced K+ -evoked HA release and blocked the (R)-alpha-methylhistamine effect. The K+ -evoked endogenous NE release was attenuated by preloading the cardiac synaptosomes with L-histidine or quinacrine. These inhibitory effects were reversed by thioperamide or antagonized by alpha-fluoromethylhistidine. Our findings indicate that high K+ -evoked corelease of NE and HA may be inhibited by endogenous HA via activation of presynaptic HA H3-receptors. The H3-receptor may function as an autoreceptor, rather than a heteroreceptor, in the regulation of sympathetic neurotransmission and HA may be a novel sympathetic neurotransmitter.

  12. Platelet-Rich Plasma: The Choice of Activation Method Affects the Release of Bioactive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Carola; Mariani, Erminia; Pratelli, Loredana; Merli, Giulia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) is a low-cost procedure to deliver high concentrations of autologous growth factors (GFs). Platelet activation is a crucial step that might influence the availability of bioactive molecules and therefore tissue healing. Activation of PRP from ten voluntary healthy males was performed by adding 10% of CaCl2, 10% of autologous thrombin, 10% of a mixture of CaCl2 + thrombin, and 10% of collagen type I. Blood derivatives were incubated for 15 and 30 minutes and 1, 2, and 24 hours and samples were evaluated for the release of VEGF, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, IL-1β, and TNF-α. PRP activated with CaCl2, thrombin, and CaCl2/thrombin formed clots detected from the 15-minute evaluation, whereas in collagen-type-I-activated samples no clot formation was noticed. Collagen type I produced an overall lower GF release. Thrombin, CaCl2/thrombin, and collagen type I activated PRPs showed an immediate release of PDGF and TGF-β1 that remained stable over time, whereas VEGF showed an increasing trend from 15 minutes up to 24 hours. CaCl2 induced a progressive release of GFs from 15 minutes and increasing up to 24 hours. The method chosen to activate PRP influences both its physical form and the releasate in terms of GF amount and release kinetic. PMID:27672658

  13. Parameters affecting drug release from inert matrices. 1: Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Rafael; Viquez, Hugo; Hernández, Beatriz; Ganem, Adriana; Melgoza, Luz María; Young, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the use of Monte Carlo simulation for the determination of release properties from cubic inert matrices. Specifically, the study has focused on factors including porosity, surface area and tortuosity. The release platform was formed by simulating matrices with different ratios of drug and excipient, which undergo drug release in a uni-directional (two-face) or omni-directional (six-face) process. Upon completion of each simulation the matrix 'carcass' was examined and porosity and tortuosity of the medium evaluated. The tortuosity of the medium was evaluated directly by a blind random walk algorithm. These parameters as well as the release profile were then studied with respect to common mathematical models describing drug diffusion (the square-root, power and Weibull models). It was found that, depending on their composition, the matrices systems were either homogeneous or heterogeneous in nature. Furthermore, it was found that the physical parameters could be successfully fitted to the a and b constants of the Weibull model. This approach allows the prediction of drug release from an inert matrix system with the knowledge of a few physical parameters.

  14. Formulation parameters affecting the performance of coated gelatin capsules with pulsatile release profiles.

    PubMed

    Bussemer, T; Bodmeier, R

    2003-11-28

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a rupturable pulsatile drug delivery system based on soft gelatin capsules with or without a swelling layer and an external water-insoluble but -permeable polymer coating, which released the drug after a lag time (rupturing of the external polymer coating). The swelling of the gelatin capsule itself was insufficient to rupture the external polymer coating, an additional swelling layer was applied between the capsule and the polymer coating. Croscarmellose sodium (Ac-Di-Sol) was more effective as a swelling agent than low and high molecular weight hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC; E5 or K100M). Brittle polymers, such as ethyl cellulose (EC) and cellulose acetate propionate (CAPr), led to a better rupturing and therefore more complete drug release than the flexible polymer coating, Eudragit RS. The lag time of the release system increased with higher polymer coating levels and decreased with the addition of a hydrophilic pore-former, HPMC E5 and also with an increasing amount of the intermediate swelling layer. The water uptake of the capsules was linear until rupture and was higher with CAPr than with EC. Soft gelatin capsule-based systems showed shorter lag times compared to hard gelatin capsules because of the higher hardness/filling state of the soft gelatin capsules. The swelling pressure was therefore more directed to the external polymer coating with the soft gelatin capsules. Typical pulsatile drug release profiles were obtained at lower polymer coating levels, while the release was slower and incomplete at the higher coating levels. CAPr-coated capsules resulted in a more complete release than EC-coated capsules.

  15. RNA interference of the period gene affects the rhythm of sperm release in moths.

    PubMed

    Kotwica, Joanna; Bebas, Piotr; Gvakharia, Barbara O; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2009-02-01

    The period (per) gene is 1 of the core elements of the circadian clock mechanism in animals from insects to mammals. In clock cells of Drosophila melanogaster, per mRNA and PER protein oscillate in daily cycles. Consistent with the molecular clock model, PER moves to cell nuclei and acts as a repressor of positive clock elements. Homologs of per are known in many insects; however, specific roles of per in generating output rhythms are not known for most species. The aim of this article was to determine whether per is functionally involved in the circadian rhythm of sperm release in the moth, Spodoptera littoralis. In this species, as in other moths, rhythmic release of sperm bundles from the testis into the upper vas deferens occurs only in the evening, and this rhythm continues in the isolated reproductive system. S. littoralis was used to investigate the expression of per mRNA and protein in the 2 types of cells involved in sperm release: the cyst cells surrounding sperm bundles in the testes, and the barrier cells separating testicular follicles from the vas deferens. In cyst cells, PER showed a nuclear rhythm in light/dark (LD) cycles but was constitutively cytoplasmic in constant darkness (DD). In barrier cells, nuclear cycling of PER was observed in both LD and DD. To determine the role of PER in rhythmic sperm release in moths, testes-sperm duct complexes were treated in vitro with double-stranded fragments of per mRNA (dsRNA). This treatment significantly lowered per mRNA and protein in cyst cells and barrier cells and caused a delay of sperm release. These data demonstrate that a molecular oscillator involving the period gene plays an essential role in the regulation of rhythmic sperm release in this species.

  16. [Suspension-sedimentation of sediment and release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu affected by wind].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yan, Run-run; Yu, Zhong-bo; Li, Yi-ping; Li, Rui-ling

    2008-09-01

    The water quality in Meiliang Bay of the Taihu Lake was totally tested five times in the four seasons. The suspension samples were obtained by using a sediment trap. The sediment settling flux and resuspended flux were calculated according to the observation data by using Gansith formula, and the relationships between these fluxes and wind speeds were established. Seven experiments were conducted in Laboratory for hydrostatic settling behavior of suspended matter affected by different wind speeds in Lake Taihu. The hydrostatic settling fluxes of suspended matter were calculated and the relationships between the fluxes and suspended matter concentrations were established. Base on these works, the suspension-sedimentation process was decomposed and generalized according to the critical wind speed of 3.7 m/s. Daily sediment resuspended amount and settling amount of the year 2005 was calculated and annual average release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu was estimated using the wind data of nearly 10 years. The results indicate that daily release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu significantly influenced by wind and have the same trend of change with wind, while the release amount of different nutrients in the same condition are different. The Lake Taihu has an annual average release amount of internal load with COD 49,600 t, TN 7773.0 t and TP 275.5 t, of which summer has the markedly highest release amount than other seasons.

  17. A putative vesicular transporter expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies that mediates sexual behavior may define a neurotransmitter system.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth S; Greer, Christina L; Romero-Calderón, Rafael; Serway, Christine N; Grygoruk, Anna; Haimovitz, Jasmine M; Nguyen, Bac T; Najibi, Rod; Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven; Krantz, David E

    2011-10-20

    Vesicular transporters are required for the storage of all classical and amino acid neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles. Some neurons lack known vesicular transporters, suggesting additional neurotransmitter systems remain unidentified. Insect mushroom bodies (MBs) are critical for several behaviors, including learning, but the neurotransmitters released by the intrinsic Kenyon cells (KCs) remain unknown. Likewise, KCs do not express a known vesicular transporter. We report the identification of a novel Drosophila gene portabella (prt) that is structurally similar to known vesicular transporters. Both larval and adult brains express PRT in the KCs of the MBs. Additional PRT cells project to the central complex and optic ganglia. prt mutation causes an olfactory learning deficit and an unusual defect in the male's position during copulation that is rescued by expression in KCs. Because prt is expressed in neurons that lack other known vesicular transporters or neurotransmitters, it may define a previously unknown neurotransmitter system responsible for sexual behavior and a component of olfactory learning.

  18. [Mitigation effect of several controlled-release N fertilizers on ammonia volatilization and related affecting factors].

    PubMed

    Sun, Kejun; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qiming; Jia, Aiping; Liao, Zongwen

    2004-12-01

    By using static absorption and soil column leaching methods, this paper studied the behaviors of several controlled-release N fertilizers in soil under laboratory conditions. The results showed that under the application rate of 450 mg x kg(-1), total ammonia volatilization from three controlled-release fertilizers decreased by 49.7%, 28.0% and 71.2%, respectively, in comparing with common urea. When the application rate was 600 mg x kg(-1), total ammonia volatilization decreased by 34.6%, 12.3%, 69.9%, respectively. Controlled-release fertilizers could markedly reduce total ammonia volatilization from soil and decrease environment pollution via fertilization. The results also indicated that total ammonia volatilization correlated significantly with soil urease activity, pH value and N leaching rate. The correlation coefficient between total ammonia volatilization and accumulated N leaching rate was 0.9533, and that between total ammonia volatilization and soil urease activity and pH value was 0.9533 and 0.9908, respectively.

  19. Stress, neurotransmitters, corticosterone and body-brain integration.

    PubMed

    Mora, Francisco; Segovia, Gregorio; Del Arco, Alberto; de Blas, Marta; Garrido, Pedro

    2012-10-02

    Stress can be defined as a brain-body reaction towards stimuli arising from the environment or from internal cues that are interpreted as a disruption of homeostasis. The organization of the response to a stressful situation involves not only the activity of different types of neurotransmitter systems in several areas of the limbic system, but also the response of neurons in these areas to several other chemicals and hormones, chiefly glucocorticoids, released from peripheral organs and glands. Thus, stress is probably the process through which body-brain integration plays a major role. Here we review first the responses to an acute stress in terms of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA in areas of the brain involved in the regulation of stress responses. These areas include the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens and the interaction among those areas. Then, we consider the role of glucocorticoids and review some recent data about the interaction of these steroids with several neurotransmitters in those same areas of the brain. Also the actions of other substances (neuromodulators) released from peripheral organs such as the pancreas, liver or gonads (insulin, IGF-1, estrogens) are reviewed. The role of an environmental enrichment on these same responses is also discussed. Finally a section is devoted to put into perspective all these environmental-brain-body-brain interactions during stress and their consequences on aging. It is concluded that the integrative perspective framed in this review is relevant for better understanding of how the organism responds to stressful challenges and how this can be modified through different environmental conditions during the process of aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration.

  20. How the 'slow' Ca(2+) buffer parvalbumin affects transmitter release in nanodomain-coupling regimes.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Jonas, Peter

    2011-12-04

    Parvalbumin is thought to act in a manner similar to EGTA, but how a slow Ca(2+) buffer affects nanodomain-coupling regimes at GABAergic synapses is unclear. Direct measurements of parvalbumin concentration and paired recordings in rodent hippocampus and cerebellum revealed that parvalbumin affects synaptic dynamics only when expressed at high levels. Modeling suggests that, in high concentrations, parvalbumin may exert BAPTA-like effects, modulating nanodomain coupling via competition with local saturation of endogenous fixed buffers.

  1. Silver nanoparticles temporarily retard NO2 - production without significantly affecting N2 O release by Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Michels, Camila; Yang, Yu; Moreira Soares, Hugo; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2015-10-01

    Nitrifying bacteria are highly susceptible to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the effect of sublethal exposure to AgNPs after their release of nitrogenous compounds of environmental concern (e.g., the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide [N2 O] and the common water pollutant nitrite [NO2 -]) has not been systematically investigated. The present study reports the effect of AgNPs (and potentially released silver ions [Ag(+) ]) on NO2 - and N2 O production by Nitrosomonas europaea, and on the transcription of the associated genes. The release of NO2 - was more negatively affected than the production of N2 O. For example, exposure to AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L temporarily enhanced N2 O production (by 12%) without affecting nitrite release, whereas higher AgNP concentrations (>0.25 mg/L) inhibited NO2 - release (by >12%) but not N2 O production. Transcriptomic analyses corroborated these trends; AgNPs at 0.075 mg/L increased the expression of the nitric oxide reductase gene (norQ) associated with N2 O production (by 5.3-fold to 12.8-fold), whereas both 0.075 mg/L of Ag(+) and 0.75 mg/L of AgNPs down-regulated the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA2; by 0.08-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.64-fold, respectively), the nitrite reductase gene (nirK; by 0.01-fold to 0.02-fold and 0.22-fold to 0.44-fold, respectively), and norQ (by 0.11-fold to 0.15-fold and 0.32-fold to 0.57-fold, respectively). These results suggest that AgNP release to sewage treatment plants and land application of AgNP-containing biosolids should be minimized because of their potential temporary stimulation of N2 O release and interference with nitrification. Environ Toxicol Chem 2015;34:2231-2235. © 2015 SETAC.

  2. Endogenous cannabinoid release within prefrontal-limbic pathways affects memory consolidation of emotional training.

    PubMed

    Morena, Maria; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Ratano, Patrizia; Peloso, Andrea; Hauer, Daniela; Atsak, Piray; Trabace, Luigia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; McGaugh, James L; Schelling, Gustav; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2014-12-23

    Previous studies have provided extensive evidence that administration of cannabinoid drugs after training modulates the consolidation of memory for an aversive experience. The present experiments investigated whether the memory consolidation is regulated by endogenously released cannabinoids. The experiments first examined whether the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are released by aversive training. Inhibitory avoidance training with higher footshock intensity produced increased levels of AEA in the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) shortly after training in comparison with levels assessed in rats trained with lower footshock intensity or unshocked controls exposed only to the training apparatus. In contrast, 2-AG levels were not significantly elevated. The additional finding that posttraining infusions of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which selectively increases AEA levels at active synapses, administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), hippocampus, or mPFC enhanced memory strongly suggests that the endogenously released AEA modulates memory consolidation. Moreover, in support of the view that this emotional training-associated increase in endocannabinoid neurotransmission, and its effects on memory enhancement, depends on the integrity of functional interactions between these different brain regions, we found that disruption of BLA activity blocked the training-induced increases in AEA levels as well as the memory enhancement produced by URB597 administered into the hippocampus or mPFC. Thus, the findings provide evidence that emotionally arousing training increases AEA levels within prefrontal-limbic circuits and strongly suggest that this cannabinoid activation regulates emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation.

  3. Mesocosm experiments to assess factors affecting phosphorus retention and release in an extended Wisconsin wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.; Manion, B.J.; Goddard, G.L.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorus retention by wetland sediments and vegetation was investigated in Jackson Creek wetland, an extension of an existing prairie marsh in southeastern Wisconsin. The extended wetland construction was undertaken in 1992-93 to help reduce the phosphorus loading to a downstream eutrophic lake. Two approaches were used to study potential and actual phosphorus retention in the system. Mesocosm experiments of 20-40 days duration indicated that retention of total and dissolved reactive phosphorus in mesocosm cells containing macrophytes and/or sediments was reduced by factors of 2-20 relative to cells containing only water or a copper algicide to suppress metabolic activity. In contrast to the nutrient trapping function, these results show a potential for net phosphorus release that can be associated with increased biological richness. Measurements of water flow and nutrient loads at the wetland's inflow and outflow points demonstrated 9-39% net uptake of phosphorus on an annual scale but frequent occurrences of net phosphorus release over shorter (one-month) time scales. These episodes of release are most likely during the summer months. Thus, the wetland role in phosphorus cycling is not one of a true source or sink, although the annual budget data alone suggest substantial net retention. Effective management of the wetland for its nutrient trapping potential can be hindered by this oversimplification. The system is instead subject to relatively short-term alternation between net import and export. The periodic phosphorus export, although representing a small fraction of net annual import, could be critical for growth of macrophyte and algal communities downstream.

  4. The effect of motivation and positive affect on ego depletion: Replenishment versus release mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ze; Li, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Li, Ye; Zhang, Houcan

    2015-11-12

    In this study, 2 experiments were conducted to investigate whether motivation and positive affect can alleviate ego depletion and to elucidate their possible mechanisms. In Experiment 1, a crossing-out-letter task was adapted to reach an ego depletion state for Chinese participants. Participants were then randomly assigned to the extrinsic motivation group, the positive affect group or the depletion control group. After the experimental treatment, a dumbbell task was used to measure participants' remaining self-regulatory resources. The results showed that participants in the motivation and positive affect groups performed better on the dumbbell task than participants in the depletion control group. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants were asked to perform an additional unexpected dumbbell task after a neutral video following the above procedure. The results of Experiment 1 were replicated; however, participants' performance on the additional dumbbell task differed. The positive affect group performed better than the depletion control group, indicating an increase in self-regulatory resources and thus supporting the replenishment effect of positive affect. No significant difference was found between the motivation group and the depletion control group.

  5. Radioactive impact in sediments from an estuarine system affected by industrial wastes releases.

    PubMed

    Bolívar, Juan Pedro; García-Tenorio, Rafael; Mas, José Luis; Vaca, Federico

    2002-03-01

    A big fertilizer industrial complex and a vast extension of phosphogypsum piles (12 km2), sited in the estuary formed by the Odiel and Tinto river mouths (southwest of Spain), are producing an unambiguous radioactive impact in their surrounding aquatic environment through radionuclides from the U-series. The levels and distribution of radionuclides in sediments from this estuarine system have been determined. The analyses of radionuclide concentrations and activity ratios have provided us with an interesting information to evaluate the extension, degree and routes of the radioactive impact, as well as for the knowledge of the different pathways followed for the radioactive contamination to disturb this natural system. The obtained results indicate that the main pathway of radioactive contamination of the estuary is through the dissolution in its waters of the radionuclides released by the industrial activities and their later fixation on the particulate materials. Tidal activity also plays an important role in the transport and homogenization along the estuary of the radioactivity released from the fertilizer plants.

  6. Protease Inhibitors Extracted from Caesalpinia echinata Lam. Affect Kinin Release during Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Silva, Ilana; Praxedes-Garcia, Priscila; Tanaka, Aparecida Sadae; Shimamoto, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is an essential process in many pulmonary diseases in which kinins are generated by protease action on kininogen, a phenomenon that is blocked by protease inhibitors. We evaluated kinin release in an in vivo lung inflammation model in rats, in the presence or absence of CeKI (C. echinata kallikrein inhibitor), a plasma kallikrein, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 inhibitor, and rCeEI (recombinant C. echinata elastase inhibitor), which inhibits these proteases and also neutrophil elastase. Wistar rats were intravenously treated with buffer (negative control) or inhibitors and, subsequently, lipopolysaccharide was injected into their lungs. Blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissue were collected. In plasma, kinin release was higher in the LPS-treated animals in comparison to CeKI or rCeEI groups. rCeEI-treated animals presented less kinin than CeKI-treated group. Our data suggest that kinins play a pivotal role in lung inflammation and may be generated by different enzymes; however, neutrophil elastase seems to be the most important in the lung tissue context. These results open perspectives for a better understanding of biological process where neutrophil enzymes participate and indicate these plant inhibitors and their recombinant correlates for therapeutic trials involving pulmonary diseases. PMID:28044105

  7. Maternally Administered Sustained-Release Naltrexone in Rats Affects Offspring Neurochemistry and Behaviour in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Krstew, Elena V.; Tait, Robert J.; Hulse, Gary K.

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone is not recommended during pregnancy. However, sustained-release naltrexone implant use in humans has resulted in cases of inadvertent foetal exposure. Here, we used clinically relevant dosing to examine the effects of maternally administered sustained-release naltrexone on the rat brain by examining offspring at birth and in adulthood. Maternal treatment (naltrexone or placebo implant) started before conception and ceased during gestation, birth or weaning. Morphometry was assessed in offspring at birth and adulthood. Adult offspring were evaluated for differences in locomotor behaviour (basal and morphine-induced, 10 mg/kg, s.c.) and opioid neurochemistry, propensity to self-administer morphine and cue-induced drug-seeking after abstinence. Blood analysis confirmed offspring exposure to naltrexone during gestation, birth and weaning. Naltrexone exposure increased litter size and reduced offspring birth-weight but did not alter brain morphometry. Compared to placebo, basal motor activity of naltrexone-exposed adult offspring was lower, yet they showed enhanced development of psychomotor sensitization to morphine. Developmental naltrexone exposure was associated with resistance to morphine-induced down-regulation of striatal preproenkephalin mRNA expression in adulthood. Adult offspring also exhibited greater operant responding for morphine and, in addition, cue-induced drug-seeking was enhanced. Collectively, these data show pronounced effects of developmental naltrexone exposure, some of which persist into adulthood, highlighting the need for follow up of humans that were exposed to naltrexone in utero. PMID:23300784

  8. A transsynaptic nanocolumn aligns neurotransmitter release to receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ai-Hui; Chen, Haiwen; Li, Tuo P.; Metzbower, Sarah R.; MacGillavry, Harold D.; Blanpied, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is maintained by a delicate, subsynaptic molecular architecture, and even mild alterations in synapse structure drive functional changes during experience-dependent plasticity and pathological disorder1,2. Key to this architecture is how the distribution of presynaptic vesicle fusion sites corresponds to the position of receptors in the postsynaptic density. However, despite long recognition that this spatial relationship modulates synaptic strength3, it has not been precisely described, due in part to the limited resolution of light microscopy. Using localization microscopy, we report here that key proteins mediating vesicle priming and fusion are mutually co-enriched within nanometer-scaled subregions of the presynaptic active zone. Through development of a new method to map vesicle fusion positions within single synapses, we found that action potential evoked fusion was guided by this protein gradient and occurred preferentially in confined areas with higher local density of RIM within the active zones. These presynaptic RIM nanoclusters closely aligned with concentrated postsynaptic receptors and scaffolding proteins4–6, suggesting a transsynaptic molecular “nanocolumn.” Thus, we propose that the nanoarchitecture of the active zone directs action potential evoked vesicle fusion to occur preferentially at sites directly opposing postsynaptic receptor-scaffold ensembles. Remarkably, NMDA receptor activation triggered distinct phases of plasticity in which postsynaptic reorganization was followed by transsynaptic nanoscale realignment. This architecture thus suggests a simple organizational principle of CNS synapses to maintain and modulate synaptic efficiency. PMID:27462810

  9. Mimicking subsecond neurotransmitter dynamics with femtosecond laser stimulated nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takashi; Chin, Catherine; Myint, David Mo Aung; Tan, Eng Wui; Hale, Peter John; Krishna M., Bala Murali; Reynolds, John N. J.; Wickens, Jeff; Dani, Keshav M.

    2014-06-01

    Existing nanoscale chemical delivery systems target diseased cells over long, sustained periods of time, typically through one-time, destructive triggering. Future directions lie in the development of fast and robust techniques capable of reproducing the pulsatile chemical activity of living organisms, thereby allowing us to mimic biofunctionality. Here, we demonstrate that by applying programmed femtosecond laser pulses to robust, nanoscale liposome structures containing dopamine, we achieve sub-second, controlled release of dopamine - a key neurotransmitter of the central nervous system - thereby replicating its release profile in the brain. The fast delivery system provides a powerful new interface with neural circuits, and to the larger range of biological functions that operate on this short timescale.

  10. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Post-Operative Outcome of Patients Undergoing Carpal Tunnel Release?

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Mortazavi, Sahameddin; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include repetitive use of hand and wrist, advanced age, obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Decompression of the median nerve is the last treatment of choice usually indicated when negative results to conservative treatments remain for three months. In this study, we aimed to find out whether hypothyroid patients would respond to CTS surgical decompression differently in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods This case control study was conducted on patients with CTS in need of surgical release who were refered to Shahid Faghihi hospital, International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from January 2013 to January 2015. Twenty-five hypothyroid and 22 euthyroid patients were recruited. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and serum TSH level. All patients were followed for three weeks after surgery and a Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) was completed for them pre and post operation. An electrophysiological study was performed during the same follow up period. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results The CTS grade reported by electrophysiological study, decreased significantly 3 weeks after operation in comparison with preoperative grades (p<0.001). A significant decrease was observed in the immediate postoperative BCTQ scores compared to preoperative (p<0.001). Also a decrease was detected in the three weeks of postoperative follow up compared to immediate postoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001) and preoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001). Postoperative BCTQ scores of euthyroid patients decreased more in comparison to hypothyroid patients (p<0.001). Conclusion It seems that, hypothyroidism has an effect on postoperative outcome of carpal tunnel release. PMID:27790353

  11. Neurotransmitter properties of the newborn human retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hollyfield, J.G.; Frederick, J.M.; Rayborn, M.E.

    1983-07-01

    Human retinal tissue from a newborn was examined autoradiographically for the presence of high-affinity uptake and localization of the following putative neurotransmitters: dopamine, glycine, GABA, aspartate, and glutamate. In addition, the dopamine content of this newborn retina was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. Our study reveals that specific uptake mechanisms for /sup 3/H-glycine, /sup 3/H-dopamine, and /sup 3/H-GABA are present at birth. However, the number and distribution of cells labeled with each of these /sup 3/H-transmitters are not identical to those observed in adult human retinas. Furthermore, the amount of endogenous dopamine in the newborn retina is approximately 1/20 the adult level. Photoreceptor-specific uptake of /sup 3/H-glutamate and /sup 3/H-aspartate are not observed. These findings indicate that, while some neurotransmitter-specific properties are present at birth, significant maturation of neurotransmitter systems occurs postnatally.

  12. Controls on methane released through ebullition in peatlands affected by permafrost degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klapstein, Sara J.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer W.; Czimczik, C.I.; Xu, Xiaomei; Chanton, J.P.; Waddington, James Michael

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost thaw in peat plateaus leads to the flooding of surface soils and the formation of collapse scar bogs, which have the potential to be large emitters of methane (CH4) from surface peat as well as deeper, previously frozen, permafrost carbon (C). We used a network of bubble traps, permanently installed 20 cm and 60 cm beneath the moss surface, to examine controls on ebullition from three collapse bogs in interior Alaska. Overall, ebullition was dominated by episodic events that were associated with changes in atmospheric pressure, and ebullition was mainly a surface process regulated by both seasonal ice dynamics and plant phenology. The majority (>90%) of ebullition occurred in surface peat layers, with little bubble production in deeper peat. During periods of peak plant biomass, bubbles contained acetate-derived CH4 dominated (>90%) by modern C fixed from the atmosphere following permafrost thaw. Post-senescence, the contribution of CH4 derived from thawing permafrost C was more variable and accounted for up to 22% (on average 7%), in the most recently thawed site. Thus, the formation of thermokarst features resulting from permafrost thaw in peatlands stimulates ebullition and CH4 release both by creating flooded surface conditions conducive to CH4 production and bubbling as well as by exposing thawing permafrost C to mineralization.

  13. Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field affects proliferation, tissue-specific gene expression, and cytokines release of human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Stanco, D; Galliera, E; Viganò, M; Colombini, A; Setti, S; Vianello, E; Corsi Romanelli, M M; Sansone, V

    2013-07-01

    Low frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has proven to be effective in the modulation of bone and cartilage tissue functional responsiveness, but its effect on tendon tissue and tendon cells (TCs) is still underinvestigated. PEMF treatment (1.5 mT, 75 Hz) was assessed on primary TCs, harvested from semitendinosus and gracilis tendons of eight patients, under different experimental conditions (4, 8, 12 h). Quantitative PCR analyses were conducted to identify the possible effect of PEMF on tendon-specific gene transcription (scleraxis, SCX and type I collagen, COL1A1); the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was also assessed. Our findings show that PEMF exposure is not cytotoxic and is able to stimulate TCs' proliferation. The increase of SCX and COL1A1 in PEMF-treated cells was positively correlated to the treatment length. The release of anti-inflammatory cytokines in TCs treated with PEMF for 8 and 12 h was significantly higher in comparison with untreated cells, while the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was not affected. A dramatically higher increase of VEGF-A mRNA transcription and of its related protein was observed after PEMF exposure. Our data demonstrated that PEMF positively influence, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation, tendon-specific marker expression, and release of anti-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factor in a healthy human TCs culture model.

  14. Production of bromoform and dibromomethane by Giant Kelp: Factors affecting release and comparison to anthropogenic bromine sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodwin, K.D.; North, W.J.; Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-01-01

    Macrocystis pyrifera (Giant Kelp), a dominant macroalgal species in southern California, produced 171 ng per g fresh wt (gfwt) per day of CHBr3 and 48 ng gfwt-1 d-1 of CH2Br2 during laboratory incubations of whole blades. Comparable rates were measured during in situ incubations of intact fronds. Release of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 by M. pyrifera was affected by light and algal photosynthetic activity, suggesting that environmental factors influencing kelp physiology can affect halomethane release to the atmosphere. Data from H2O2 additions suggest that brominated methane production during darkness is limited by bromide oxidant supply. A bromine budget constructed for a region of southern California indicated that bromine emitted from the use of CH3Br as a fumigant (1 x 108 g Br yr-1) dominates macroalgal sources (3 x 106 g Br yr-1). Global projections, however, suggest that combined emissions of marine algae (including microalgae) contribute substantial amounts of bromine to the global cycle, perhaps on the same order of magnitude as anthropogenic sources.

  15. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection). PMID:19575473

  16. Emissions from Electronic Cigarettes: Key Parameters Affecting the Release of Harmful Chemicals.

    PubMed

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Logue, Jennifer M; Montesinos, V Nahuel; Russell, Marion L; Litter, Marta I; Gundel, Lara A; Destaillats, Hugo

    2016-09-06

    Use of electronic cigarettes has grown exponentially over the past few years, raising concerns about harmful emissions. This study quantified potentially toxic compounds in the vapor and identified key parameters affecting emissions. Six principal constituents in three different refill "e-liquids" were propylene glycol (PG), glycerin, nicotine, ethanol, acetol, and propylene oxide. The latter, with mass concentrations of 0.4-0.6%, is a possible carcinogen and respiratory irritant. Aerosols generated with vaporizers contained up to 31 compounds, including nicotine, nicotyrine, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glycidol, acrolein, acetol, and diacetyl. Glycidol is a probable carcinogen not previously identified in the vapor, and acrolein is a powerful irritant. Emission rates ranged from tens to thousands of nanograms of toxicants per milligram of e-liquid vaporized, and they were significantly higher for a single-coil vs a double-coil vaporizer (by up to an order of magnitude for aldehydes). By increasing the voltage applied to a single-coil device from 3.3 to 4.8 V, the mass of e-liquid consumed doubled from 3.7 to 7.5 mg puff(-1) and the total aldehyde emission rates tripled from 53 to 165 μg puff(-1), with acrolein rates growing by a factor of 10. Aldehyde emissions increased by more than 60% after the device was reused several times, likely due to the buildup of polymerization byproducts that degraded upon heating. These findings suggest that thermal degradation byproducts are formed during vapor generation. Glycidol and acrolein were primarily produced by glycerin degradation. Acetol and 2-propen-1-ol were produced mostly from PG, while other compounds (e.g., formaldehyde) originated from both. Because emissions originate from reaction of the most common e-liquid constituents (solvents), harmful emissions are expected to be ubiquitous when e-cigarette vapor is present.

  17. Salvinorin A exerts opposite presynaptic controls on neurotransmitter exocytosis from mouse brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Massimo; Neri, Elisa; Zappettini, Stefania; Massa, Francesca; Bisio, Angela; Romussi, Giovanni; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effects of salvinorin A on the basal and the 12 mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]noradenaline ([(3)H]NA) and [(3)H]serotonin ([(3)H]5-HT) from mouse hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), as well as on the basal and 12mM K(+)-evoked release of preloaded [(3)H]dopamine ([(3)H]DA) from mouse striatal and prefrontal cortex (PFc) synaptosomes. Salvinorin A (0.1-1000 nM) failed to affect the basal release of amines, but inhibited the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA. At the same concentration, salvinorin A facilitated the 12 mM K(+)-evoked, Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of [(3)H]NA. These effects could not be observed in pertussis toxin (PTx) entrapped synaptosomes. The broad spectrum kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI, 1-100 nM) antagonized the inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA exocytosis as well as the facilitation of [(3)H]NA overflow induced by 100 nM salvinorin A. The KOR agonist U69593 (1-100 nM) mimicked salvinorin A in inhibiting [(3)H]5-HT and of [(3)H]DA exocytosis, its effect being prevented by norBNI, but leaving unchanged the K(+)-evoked release of [(3)H]NA. The effects of Salvinorin A on neurotransmitter exocytosis were not prevented by the selective mu opioid (MOR) receptor antagonist CTAP (10-100 nM), whereas facilitation of [(3)H]NA exocytosis, but not inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT and [(3)H]DA K(+)-evoked release, was counteracted by the delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist naltrindole (1-100 nM). We conclude that salvinorin A presynaptically modulates central NA, 5-HT, and DA exocytosis evoked by a mild depolarizing stimulus by acting at presynaptic opioid receptors having different pharmacological profiles.

  18. Neurotransmitter, peptide and cytokine processes in relation to depressive disorder: comorbidity between depression and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul; Hayley, Shawn

    2008-05-01

    Given the array of biological changes induced by stressors, it is not surprising that these experiences may provoke a variety of illnesses. Among others things, stressors promote functional changes of neuropeptide and classical neurotransmitter systems. The peptidergic changes, for instance, include alterations of corticotropin releasing hormone, arginine vasopressin, and bombesin-like peptides at specific brain sites. Similarly some of the neurotransmitter systems influenced by stressors include GABAergic and monoamine functioning. Variations of these processes may limit neurogenesis (and dysregulation of growth factors such as BDNF) and influence cellular viability (through NFkappaB and MAP kinase pathways). As well, stressors activate the inflammatory immune system, notably the release of signaling molecules (cytokines), which may provoke many of the same neuropeptide (and other neurotransmitter) changes. By virtue of their actions on neuronal functioning, inflammatory processes may influence stress-related illness, such as depression, and may be a common denominator for the comorbidity that exists between depression and neurological conditions, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, as well as cardiovascular-related pathology. The present report provides an overview of biological endophenotypes associated with stressors that are thought to be related to major depressive disorder and related comorbid conditions. The view is taken that synergy between stressors and inflammatory factors may promote pathological outcomes through their actions on neuropeptides and several neurotransmitters. As well, stressful events may result in the sensitization of neurochemical and cytokine processes, so that later re-exposure to these stimuli may promote rapid and exaggerated responses that favor illness recurrence.

  19. Mapping neurotransmitter networks with PET: an example on serotonin and opioid systems.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lauri; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Raitakari, Olli; Hietala, Jarmo

    2014-05-01

    All functions of the human brain are consequences of altered activity of specific neural pathways and neurotransmitter systems. Although the knowledge of "system level" connectivity in the brain is increasing rapidly, we lack "molecular level" information on brain networks and connectivity patterns. We introduce novel voxel-based positron emission tomography (PET) methods for studying internal neurotransmitter network structure and intercorrelations of different neurotransmitter systems in the human brain. We chose serotonin transporter and μ-opioid receptor for this analysis because of their functional interaction at the cellular level and similar regional distribution in the brain. Twenty-one healthy subjects underwent two consecutive PET scans using [(11)C]MADAM, a serotonin transporter tracer, and [(11)C]carfentanil, a μ-opioid receptor tracer. First, voxel-by-voxel "intracorrelations" (hub and seed analyses) were used to study the internal structure of opioid and serotonin systems. Second, voxel-level opioid-serotonin intercorrelations (between neurotransmitters) were computed. Regional μ-opioid receptor binding potentials were uniformly correlated throughout the brain. However, our analyses revealed nonuniformity in the serotonin transporter intracorrelations and identified a highly connected local network (midbrain-striatum-thalamus-amygdala). Regionally specific intercorrelations between the opioid and serotonin tracers were found in anteromedial thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left parietal cortex, i.e., in areas relevant for several neuropsychiatric disorders, especially affective disorders. This methodology enables in vivo mapping of connectivity patterns within and between neurotransmitter systems. Quantification of functional neurotransmitter balances may be a useful approach in etiological studies of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in drug development as a biomarker-based rationale for targeted

  20. Classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides involved in major depression in a multi-neurotransmitter system: a focus on antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Werner, Felix-Martin; Coveñas, R

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the alterations of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and the corresponding subreceptors involved in major depression. Neuronal circuits in the brainstem, hippocampus and hypothalamus are developed, since they can be used to derive a multimodal pharmacotherapy. In this sense, serotonin hypoactivity could occur through a strong presynaptic inhibition of glutaminergic neurons via the subtype 5 of metabotropic glutaminergic receptors, and noradrenaline hypoactivity could be due to an enhanced presynaptic inhibition of GABAergic neurons via GABAB receptors. In the hippocampus, dopamine hypoactivity leads to a decreased positive effect. In clinical trials, the antidepressant effect of drugs interfering with the mentioned subreceptors, for example the triple reuptake inhibitor amitifadine, is being investigated. Moreover, the alterations of neuropeptides, such as corticotropin-releasing hormone, neuropeptide Y and galanin are pointed out. The additional antidepressant effect of analogs, agonists and antagonists of the mentioned neuropeptides should be examined.

  1. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  2. The reverse operation of Na+/Cl−-coupled neurotransmitter transporters–why amphetamines take two to tango

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sodium-chloride coupled neurotransmitter transporters achieve reuptake of their physiological substrate by exploiting the pre-existing sodium-gradient across the cellular membrane. This terminates the action of previously released substrate in the synaptic cleft. However, a change of the transmembrane ionic gradients or specific binding of some psychostimulant drugs to these proteins, like amphetamine and its derivatives, induce reverse operation of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters. This effect eventually leads to an increase in the synaptic concentration of non-exocytotically released neurotransmitters [and – in the case of the norepinephrine transporters, underlies the well-known indirect sympathomimetic activity]. While this action has long been appreciated, the underlying mechanistic details have been surprisingly difficult to understand. Some aspects can be resolved by incorporating insights into the oligomeric nature of transporters, into the nature of the accompanying ion fluxes, and changes in protein kinase activities. PMID:19891736

  3. Eukaryotic release factor 1-2 affects Arabidopsis responses to glucose and phytohormones during germination and early seedling development

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangjun; Cooke, Peter; Li, Li

    2010-01-01

    Germination and early seedling development are coordinately regulated by glucose and phytohormones such as ABA, GA, and ethylene. However, the molecules that affect plant responses to glucose and phytohormones remain to be fully elucidated. Eukaryotic release factor 1 (eRF1) is responsible for the recognition of the stop codons in mRNAs during protein synthesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that eRF1 functions in other processes in addition to translation termination. The physiological role of eRF1-2, a member of the eRF1 family, in Arabidopsis was examined here. The eRF1-2 gene was found to be specifically induced by glucose. Arabidopsis plants overexpressing eRF1-2 were hypersensitive to glucose during germination and early seedling development. Such hypersensitivity to glucose was accompanied by a dramatic reduction of the expression of glucose-regulated genes, chlorophyll a/b binding protein and plastocyanin. The hypersensitive response was not due to the enhanced accumulation of ABA. In addition, the eRF1-2 overexpressing plants showed increased sensitivity to paclobutrazol, an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, and exogenous GA restored their normal growth. By contrast, the loss-of-function erf1-2 mutant exhibited resistance to paclobutrazol, suggesting that eRF1-2 may exert a negative effect on the GA signalling pathway. Collectively, these data provide evidence in support of a novel role of eRF1-2 in affecting glucose and phytohormone responses in modulating plant growth and development. PMID:19939886

  4. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hosein, W. K.; Yorita, A. M.; Tolosa, V. M.

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  5. Hydrostatic pressure and shear stress affect endothelin-1 and nitric oxide release by endothelial cells in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Vozzi, Federico; Bianchi, Francesca; Ahluwalia, Arti; Domenici, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Abundant experimental evidence demonstrates that endothelial cells are sensitive to flow; however, the effect of fluid pressure or pressure gradients that are used to drive viscous flow is not well understood. There are two principal physical forces exerted on the blood vessel wall by the passage of intra-luminal blood: pressure and shear. To analyze the effects of pressure and shear independently, these two stresses were applied to cultured cells in two different types of bioreactors: a pressure-controlled bioreactor and a laminar flow bioreactor, in which controlled levels of pressure or shear stress, respectively, can be generated. Using these bioreactor systems, endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO) release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells were measured under various shear stress and pressure conditions. Compared to the controls, a decrease of ET-1 production by the cells cultured in both bioreactors was observed, whereas NO synthesis was up-regulated in cells under shear stress, but was not modulated by hydrostatic pressure. These results show that the two hemodynamic forces acting on blood vessels affect endothelial cell function in different ways, and that both should be considered when planning in vitro experiments in the presence of flow. Understanding the individual and synergic effects of the two forces could provide important insights into physiological and pathological processes involved in vascular remodeling and adaptation.

  6. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  7. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  8. Mechanism of the association between Na+ binding and conformations at the intracellular gate in neurotransmitter:sodium symporters

    DOE PAGES

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; ...

    2015-04-13

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. Here we describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two differentmore » perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Furthermore, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. Lastly, that the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.« less

  9. Mechanism of the Association between Na+ Binding and Conformations at the Intracellular Gate in Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J; Javitch, Jonathan A; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-05-29

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na(+)-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na(+)-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. We describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na(+) binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na(+) with Li(+) or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na(+) cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na(+) dependence. Thus, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na(+) binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. That the AIN between the Na(+) binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  10. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    PubMed Central

    Kantcheva, Adriana K.; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Nissen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding. PMID:23641004

  11. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Kantcheva, Adriana K; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A; Nissen, Poul

    2013-05-21

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion in the Na1 site organize a connection between their coordinating residues and the extracellular gate of LeuT through a continuous H-bond network. The specific insights from the structures, combined with results from substrate binding studies and molecular dynamics simulations, reveal an anion-dependent occlusion mechanism for NSS and shed light on the functional role of chloride binding.

  12. What Affects Reintegration of Female Drug Users after Prison Release? Results of a European Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurhold, Heike; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Sanclemente, Cristina; Schmied, Gabriele; Shewan, David; Verthein, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this follow-up study is to explore factors influencing the success or failure of women in reintegrating after their release from prison. Female drug users in five European cities were tracked after being released from prison. Out of 234 female prisoners contacted in prisons, 59 were included in the follow-up study. Structured…

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog therapy for central precocious puberty and other childhood disorders affecting growth and puberty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Peter A; Houk, Christopher P

    2006-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog therapy relies primarily on the ability of these compounds to bind to and modulate GnRH-receptor activity. GnRH analogs have been used in pediatric patients where endogenous gonadotropin release is undesirable or potentially harmful, such as in: (i) patients with central precocious puberty (CPP); (ii) healthy short children where pubertal delay would provide an opportunity to supplement pre-pubertal linear growth; and (iii) children with malignancies and other disorders where treatment requires the use of gonadotoxic compounds. In the first two groups of patients, GnRH agonists may be used alone or in conjunction with somatropin (growth hormone [GH]) to prevent early skeletal maturation and increase the subsequent adult height, while in the latter case, GnRH agonists are used alone or in conjunction with GnRH antagonists in an attempt to preserve gonadal function.In children and adolescents with CPP, timely use of GnRH agonists alone can result in an adult height within the genetic potential of the individual (target height); however, minimal height is gained when GnRH agonist therapy is commenced after a marked advancement of skeletal age. This provides the rationale for combined therapy with GnRH agonists and somatropin in such patients, and studies have shown improved growth with this approach compared with GnRH agonists alone. Combination therapy with GnRH agonists and somatropin has also been shown to increase adult heights to a greater extent than GnRH agonists alone in pediatric patients with concomitant CPP and GH deficiency, those with idiopathic short stature, and those born small for gestational age; however, such combination therapy has shown no increased benefit over somatropin alone in pediatric patients with GH deficiency. Limited results in children and adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and chronic primary hypothyroidism have also shown increased growth rates, while no growth benefit was

  14. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  15. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²⁺ release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function.

  16. Studies of two naturally occurring compounds which effect release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes. [Leptinotarsa decemlineata

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as (/sup 3/H)choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelled neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca/sup 2 +/ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca/sup 2 +/ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists.

  17. Secondary Abnormalities of Neurotransmitters in Infants with Neurological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Cazorla, A.; Serrano, M.; Perez-Duenas, B.; Gonzalez, V.; Ormazabal, A.; Pineda, M.; Fernandez-Alvarez, E.; Campistol, J. M. D.; Artuch, R. M. D.

    2007-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are essential in young children for differentiation and neuronal growth of the developing nervous system. We aimed to identify possible factors related to secondary neurotransmitter abnormalities in pediatric patients with neurological disorders. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and biogenic amine metabolites in 56 infants…

  18. Impaired learning of predators and lower prey survival under elevated CO2 : a consequence of neurotransmitter interference.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Douglas P; McCormick, Mark I; Nilsson, Göran E; Munday, Philip L; Watson, Sue-Ann; Meekan, Mark G; Mitchell, Matthew D; Corkill, Katherine C; Ferrari, Maud C O

    2014-02-01

    Ocean acidification is one of the most pressing environmental concerns of our time, and not surprisingly, we have seen a recent explosion of research into the physiological impacts and ecological consequences of changes in ocean chemistry. We are gaining considerable insights from this work, but further advances require greater integration across disciplines. Here, we showed that projected near-future CO2 levels impaired the ability of damselfish to learn the identity of predators. These effects stem from impaired neurotransmitter function; impaired learning under elevated CO2 was reversed when fish were treated with gabazine, an antagonist of the GABA-A receptor - a major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptor in the brain of vertebrates. The effects of CO2 on learning and the link to neurotransmitter interference were manifested as major differences in survival for fish released into the wild. Lower survival under elevated CO2 , as a result of impaired learning, could have a major influence on population recruitment.

  19. Presynaptic Membrane Potential Affects Transmitter Release in an Identified Neuron in Aplysia by Modulating the Ca2+ and K+ Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Eli; Castellucci, Vincent F.; Kandel, Eric R.

    1980-01-01

    We have examined the relationships between the modulation of transmitter release and of specific ionic currents by membrane potential in the cholinergic interneuron L10 of the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. The presynaptic cell body was voltage-clamped under various pharmacological conditions and transmitter release from the terminals was assayed simultaneously by recording the synaptic potentials in the postsynaptic cell. When cell L10 was voltage-clamped from a holding potential of -60 mV in the presence of tetrodotoxin, graded transmitter release was evoked by depolarizing command pulses in the membrane voltage range (-35 mV to +10 mV) in which the Ca2+ current was also increasing. Depolarizing the holding potential of L10 results in increased transmitter output. Two ionic mechanisms contribute to this form of plasticity. First, depolarization inactivates some K+ channels so that depolarizing command pulses recruit a smaller K+ current. In unclamped cells the decreased K+ conductance causes spike-broadening and increased influx of Ca2+ during each spike. Second, small depolarizations around resting potential (-55 mV to -35 mV) activate a steady-state Ca2+ current that also contributes to the modulation of transmitter release, because, even with most presynaptic K+ currents blocked pharmacologically, depolarizing the holding potential still increases transmitter release. In contrast to the steady-state Ca2+ current, the transient inward Ca2+ current evoked by depolarizing clamp steps is relatively unchanged from various holding potentials.

  20. REM Sleep at its Core – Circuits, Neurotransmitters, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Fraigne, Jimmy J.; Torontali, Zoltan A.; Snow, Matthew B.; Peever, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain, and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC) or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC cells activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus as well as melanin-concentrating hormone neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie narcolepsy/cataplexy and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD. PMID:26074874

  1. Calcitonin gene related peptide as inhibitory neurotransmitter in the ureter.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Giuliani, S; Meini, S; Santicioli, P

    1995-07-01

    A dense plexus of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) containing nerve fibres is present in the mammalian ureter, from which CGRP is released by depolarizing stimuli, including chemical normally present in the urine. CGRP exerts a profound, receptor-mediated, inhibitory effect on the evoked motility of the ureter by suppressing latent pacemakers in the smooth muscle. This effect is largely glibenclamide sensitive, indicating the activation of potassium (K) channels in its genesis. Electrical stimulation of intramural nerves in the guinea-pig ureter produces a transient membrane hyperpolarization, which is blocked by glibenclamide or by capsaicin pretreatment, enhanced in a low-K medium, and inhibited by a CGRP receptor antagonist. Thus endogenous CGRP acts as a neurotransmitter K channel opener in the ureter. The refractory period of the guinea-pig ureter is markedly and similarly reduced by capsaicin pretreatment or administration of a CGRP receptor antagonist, indicating that endogenous CGRP can modulate the maximal frequency of ureteral peristalsis. Using a three-chamber organ bath that enabled the separate perfusion of the renal, middle, and bladder regions of the organ, evidence was obtained that CGRP blocks propagation of impulses along the ureter through a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism. These findings indicate a role of CGRP in the local regulation of ureteral motility and peristalsis.

  2. Impact of Synaptic Neurotransmitter Concentration Time Course on the Kinetics and Pharmacological Modulation of Inhibitory Synaptic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Andrea; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of synaptic currents is a crucial determinant of rapid signaling between neurons. Traditionally, the mechanisms underlying the shape of synaptic signals are classified as pre- and post-synaptic. Over the last two decades, an extensive body of evidence indicated that synaptic signals are critically shaped by the neurotransmitter time course which encompasses several phenomena including pre- and post-synaptic ones. The agonist transient depends on neurotransmitter release mechanisms, diffusion within the synaptic cleft, spill-over to the extra-synaptic space, uptake, and binding to post-synaptic receptors. Most estimates indicate that the neurotransmitter transient is very brief, lasting between one hundred up to several hundreds of microseconds, implying that post-synaptic activation is characterized by a high degree of non-equilibrium. Moreover, pharmacological studies provide evidence that the kinetics of agonist transient plays a crucial role in setting the susceptibility of synaptic currents to modulation by a variety of compounds of physiological or clinical relevance. More recently, the role of the neurotransmitter time course has been emphasized by studies carried out on brain slice models that revealed a striking, cell-dependent variability of synaptic agonist waveforms ranging from rapid pulses to slow volume transmission. In the present paper we review the advances on studies addressing the impact of synaptic neurotransmitter transient on kinetics and pharmacological modulation of synaptic currents at inhibitory synapses. PMID:21734864

  3. Mutations in ampG and Lytic Transglycosylase Genes Affect the Net Release of Peptidoglycan Monomers from Vibrio fischeri▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Goldman, William E.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2009-01-01

    The light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri releases N-acetylglucosaminyl-1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramylalanyl-γ-glutamyldiaminopimelylalanine, a disaccharide-tetrapeptide component of peptidoglycan that is referred to here as “PG monomer.” In contrast, most gram-negative bacteria recycle PG monomer efficiently, and it does not accumulate extracellularly. PG monomer can stimulate normal light-organ morphogenesis in the host squid Euprymna scolopes, resulting in regression of ciliated appendages similar to that triggered by infection with V. fischeri. We examined whether the net release of PG monomers by V. fischeri resulted from lytic transglycosylase activity or from defects in AmpG, the permease through which PG monomers enter the cytoplasm for recycling. An ampG mutant displayed a 100-fold increase in net PG monomer release, indicating that AmpG is functional. The ampG mutation also conferred the uncharacteristic ability to induce light-organ morphogenesis even when placed in a nonmotile flaJ mutant that cannot infect the light-organ crypts. We targeted five potential lytic transglycosylase genes singly and in specific combinations to assess their role in PG monomer release. Combinations of mutations in ltgA, ltgD, and ltgY decreased net PG monomer release, and a triple mutant lacking all three of these genes had little to no accumulation of PG monomers in culture supernatants. This mutant colonized the host as well as the wild type did; however, the mutant-infected squid were more prone to later superinfection by a second V. fischeri strain. We propose that the lack of PG monomer release by this mutant results in less regression of the infection-promoting ciliated appendages, leading to this propensity for superinfection. PMID:19074387

  4. Production of corticotrophin releasing hormone by the isolated hypothalamus of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, J C; Hodges, J R

    1977-01-01

    1. The ability of the rat hypothalamus to produce corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) in vitro was studied in the presence and absence of neurotransmitter substances, angiotensin and corticosterone. 2. Acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and angiotensin II increased hypothalamic CRH release and content. 3. Noradrenaline and glycine decreased the spontaneous release of CRH from the hypothalamus but neither of these substances affected hypothalamic CRH content. 4. Dopamine, GABA, adrenaline, melatonin, histamine, glutamic acid and corticosterone did not affect the basal CRH activity of the hypothalamus in vitro. 5. Noradrenaline, GABA and corticosterone reduced the acetylcholine- and 5-HT-induced increases in the release of CRH from the hypothalamus. The rises in CRH content induced by acetylcholine and 5-HT were also reduced by noradrenaline and GABA but increased by corticosterone. 6. The physiological significance of the results and the potential value of the technique are discussed. PMID:304104

  5. Copper at synapse: Release, binding and modulation of neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosi, Nadia; Rossi, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, a piece of the research studying copper role in biological systems was devoted to unravelling a still elusive, but extremely intriguing, aspect that is the involvement of copper in synaptic function. These studies were prompted to provide a rationale to the finding that copper is released in the synaptic cleft upon depolarization. The copper pump ATP7A, which mutations are responsible for diseases with a prominent neurodegenerative component, seems to play a pivotal role in the release of copper at synapses. Furthermore, it was found that, when in the synaptic cleft, copper can control, directly or indirectly, the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA, AMPA, GABA, P2X receptors), thus affecting excitability. In turn, neurotransmission can affect copper trafficking and delivery in neuronal cells. Furthermore, it was reported that copper can also modulate synaptic vesicles trafficking and the interaction between proteins of the secretory pathways. Interestingly, proteins with a still unclear role in neuronal system though associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (the amyloid precursor protein, APP, the prion protein, PrP, α-synuclein, α-syn) show copper-binding domains. They may act as copper buffer at synapses and participate in the interplay between copper and the neurotransmitters receptors. Given that copper dysmetabolism occurs in several diseases affecting central and peripheral nervous system, the findings on the contribution of copper in synaptic transmission, beside its more consolidate role as a neuronal enzymes cofactor, may open new insights for therapy interventions.

  6. Does chronic nicotine alter neurotransmitter receptors involved in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, M.A.; Lapin, E.P.; Lajtha, A.; Maker, H.S.

    1986-03-05

    Cigarette smokers are fewer in number among Parkinson's Disease (PD) patients than among groups of persons who do not have PD. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this observation. One which must be tested is the possibility that some pharmacologic agent present in cigarette smoke may interact with some central nervous system component involved in PD. To this end, they have investigated the effect of chronic nicotine administration on receptors for some of the neurotransmitters that are affected in PD. Rats were injected for six weeks with saline or nicotine 0.8 mg/kg S.C., then killed and brains removed and dissected. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-ketanserin to serotonin receptors in frontal cortex and of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone to dopamine receptors in caudate was not affected. However, the binding of (/sup 3/H)-domperidone in nucleus accumbens was altered: the K/sub d/ increased from 0.16 +/- 0.02 nM to 0.61 +/- 0.07 nM, and the B/sub max/ increased from 507 +/- 47 fmol/mg protein to 910 +/- 43 fmol/mg (p < 0.001 for both comparisons). These values are based on three ligand concentrations. Additional studies are in progress to substantiate the data. It is concluded that chronic nicotine administration may alter dopamine receptors in nucleus accumbens.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 affects differently the release of inflammatory mediators from resident macrophages by LPS and muramyl tripeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter, P; Hempel, U; Kamionka, S; Kolada, A; Malessa, B; Fitzke, E; Tran-Thi, T A

    1999-01-01

    LPS and MTP-PE (liposome-encapsulated N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-L-alanine-2-:[1',2'dipalmitoyl -sni-glycero-3-(hydroxy-phosphoryl-oxyl)] etylamide) induce in liver macrophages a synthesis and release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and prostanoids. Both agents induce an expression of mRNA's encoding TNF-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and of corresponding proteins. LPS and MTP-PE induce a rapid activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) isoenzymes-1 and -2. Inhibition of map kinase isoenzymes leads to a decreased release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and prostaglandin (PG) E2 after both agents. The transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 are strongly activated by LPS within 30 minutes. MTP-PE induces a weak activation of both transcription factors only after 5 hours. Inhibition of NF-kappaB inhibits the LPS- but not the MTP-PE-induced release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and PGE2. PGE2 release after LPS is higher than after MTP-PE. Exogenously added PGE2 inhibits the activation of map kinase and TNF-alpha release by LPS, but not by MTP-PE. Release of nitric oxide after LPS and MTP-PE is enhanced after prior addition of PGE2. PGD2 is without any effect. MTP-PE, but not LPS, induces a cytotoxicity of Kupffer cells against P815 tumor target cells. The MTP-PE-induced cytotoxicity is reduced by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies, indicating the involvement of TNF-alpha. Thus our results suggest that the different potencies of LPS and MTP-PE as immunomodulators probably result from different actions on Kupffer cells, resulting in differences in the amounts and kinetics of released TNF-alpha and PGE2, and that PGE2 plays an important regulatory role in the action of LPS, but not in the actions of MTP-PE. PMID:10815618

  8. Investigation of some factors affecting on release of radon-222 from phosphogypsum waste associated with phosphate ore processing.

    PubMed

    Hilal, M A; El Afifi, E M; Nayl, A A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is oriented to investigate the influence of some physicochemical factors such as radium distribution, grain size, moisture content and chemical constituents on releases of radon-222 from the accumulated phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The emanation fraction, activity concentration in the pore and the surface exhalation rate of radon-222 in the bulk PG waste are 34.5 ± 0.3%, 238.6 ± 7.8 kBq m(-3) and 213 ± 6.9 mBq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. These values were varied and enhanced slightly in the fine grain sizes (F1 < 0.125 mm) by a factor of 1.05 folds compared to the bulk residue. It was also found that release of radon from residue PG waste was controlled positively by radium (Ra-226), calcium (CaSO4) and strontium (SrO). About 67% of radon release attributed to the grain size below 0.5 mm, while 33% due to the large grain size above 0.5 mm. The emanation fraction of Rn-222 is increased with moisture content and the maximum emanation is ∼43% of moisture of 3-8%. It reduced slowly with the continuous increase in moisture till 20%. Due to PG waste in situ can be enhancing the background to the surround workers and/or public. Therefore, the environmental negative impacts due to release of Rn-222 can be minimized by legislation to restrict its civil uses, or increasing its moisture to ∼10%, or by the particle size separation of the fine fraction containing the high levels of Ra-226 followed by a suitable chemical treatment or disposal; whereas the low release amount can be diluted and used in cement industry, roads or dam construction.

  9. Dirty electricity, chronic stress, neurotransmitters and disease.

    PubMed

    Milham, Samuel; Stetzer, David

    2013-12-01

    Dirty electricity, also called electrical pollution, is high-frequency voltage transients riding along the 50 or 60 Hz electricity provided by the electric utilities. It is generated by arcing, by sparking and by any device that interrupts current flow, especially switching power supplies. It has been associated with cancer, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans. Epidemiological evidence also links dirty electricity to most of the diseases of civilization including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and suicide, beginning at the turn of the twentieth century. The dirty electricity level in a public library was reduced from over 10 000 Graham/Stetzer (G/S) units to below 50 G/S units by installing plug-in capacitive filters. Before cleanup, the urinary dopamine level of only one of seven volunteers was within normal levels, while four of seven phenylethylamine levels were normal. After an initial decline, over the next 18 weeks the dopamine levels gradually increased to an average of over 215 μg/g creatinine, which is well above 170 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Average phenylethylamine levels also rose gradually to slightly above 70 μg/g creatinine, the high normal level for the lab. Neurotransmitters may be biomarkers for dirty electricity and other electromagnetic field exposures. We believe that dirty electricity is a chronic stressor of electrified populations and is responsible for many of their disease patterns.

  10. Cytoplasmic permeation pathway of neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Gary

    2011-09-06

    Ion-coupled solute transporters are responsible for transporting nutrients, ions, and signaling molecules across a variety of biological membranes. Recent high-resolution crystal structures of several transporters from protein families that were previously thought to be unrelated show common structural features indicating a large structural family representing transporters from all kingdoms of life. This review describes studies that led to an understanding of the conformational changes required for solute transport in this family. The first structure in this family showed the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is homologous to neurotransmitter transporters, in an extracellularly oriented conformation with a molecule of leucine occluded at the substrate site. Studies with the mammalian serotonin transporter identified positions, buried in the LeuT structure, that defined a potential pathway leading from the cytoplasm to the substrate binding site. Modeling studies utilized an inverted structural repeat within the LeuT crystal structure to predict the conformation of LeuT in which the cytoplasmic permeation pathway, consisting of positions identified in SERT, was open for diffusion of the substrate to the cytoplasm. From the difference between the model and the crystal structures, a simple "rocking bundle" mechanism was proposed, in which a four-helix bundle changed its orientation with respect to the rest of the protein to close the extracellular pathway and open the cytoplasmic one. Subsequent crystal structures from structurally related proteins provide evidence supporting this model for transport.

  11. Sympathetic Neurotransmitters Modulate Osteoclastogenesis and Osteoclast Activity in the Context of Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Muschter, Dominique; Schäfer, Nicole; Stangl, Hubert; Straub, Rainer H.; Grässel, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Excessive synovial osteoclastogenesis is a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Concomitantly, local synovial changes comprise neuronal components of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Here, we wanted to analyze if collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) alters bone marrow-derived macrophage (BMM) osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, and how sympathetic neurotransmitters participate in this process. Therefore, BMMs from Dark Agouti rats at different CIA stages were differentiated into osteoclasts in vitro and osteoclast number, cathepsin K activity, matrix resorption and apoptosis were analyzed in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh), noradrenaline (NA) vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and assay-dependent, adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477. We observed modulation of neurotransmitter receptor mRNA expression in CIA osteoclasts without affecting protein level. CIA stage-dependently altered marker gene expression associated with osteoclast differentiation and activity without affecting osteoclast number or activity. Neurotransmitter stimulation modulated osteoclast differentiation, apoptosis and activity. VIP, NA and adenylyl cyclase activator NKH477 inhibited cathepsin K activity and osteoclastogenesis (NKH477, 10-6M NA) whereas ACh mostly acted pro-osteoclastogenic. We conclude that CIA alone does not affect metabolism of in vitro generated osteoclasts whereas stimulation with NA, VIP plus specific activation of adenylyl cyclase induced anti-resorptive effects probably mediated via cAMP signaling. Contrary, we suggest pro-osteoclastogenic and pro-resorptive properties of ACh mediated via muscarinic receptors. PMID:26431344

  12. Challenges and recent advances in mass spectrometric imaging of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, Erin; Chen, Bingming; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that grants the ability to investigate a broad mass range of molecules, from small molecules to large proteins, by creating detailed distribution maps of selected compounds. To date, MSI has demonstrated its versatility in the study of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides of different classes toward investigation of neurobiological functions and diseases. These studies have provided significant insight in neurobiology over the years and current technical advances are facilitating further improvements in this field. neurotransmitters, focusing specifically on the challenges and recent Herein, we advances of MSI of neurotransmitters. PMID:24568355

  13. How did the neurotransmitter cross the bilayer? A closer view.

    PubMed

    Sonders, Mark S; Quick, Matthias; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2005-06-01

    Plasma membrane neurotransmitter transporters for monoamines, GABA, glycine and excitatory amino acids are homologous to two sizable families of bacterial amino acid transporters. Recently, a high resolution structure was determined for a thermophilic glutamate transporter. Also, a bacterial tryptophan transporter related to the family of biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters was functionally expressed. Structural insights from these and other bacterial transporters will help to rationalize the mechanisms for the increasingly complex functions that have been described for mammalian transporters, in addition to their modes of regulation. We touch on recent insights into the functions of neurotransmitter transporters in their physiological contexts.

  14. Operational level for unconditional release of contaminated property from affected areas around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-12-01

    This paper focuses on the surface contamination control of slightly contaminated property after the Fukushima nuclear accident. The operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties is calculated in counts per minute (cpm) to enable the use of a typical Geiger-Muller (GM) survey meter with a 50-mm bore, on the basis of the surficial clearance level of 10 Bq cm(-2) for (134)Cs and (137)Cs derived in the previous studies of the authors. By applying a factor for the conversion of the unit surface contamination to the count rate of a survey meter widely used after the Fukushima accident, the operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties was calculated to be 2300 cpm on average and 23 000 cpm at the highest-contamination part. The calculated numerical values of the operational levels are effective as long as the typical GM survey meter is used in the radiation measurement.

  15. Operational level for unconditional release of contaminated property from affected areas around Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the surface contamination control of slightly contaminated property after the Fukushima nuclear accident. The operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties is calculated in counts per minute (cpm) to enable the use of a typical Geiger-Muller (GM) survey meter with a 50-mm bore, on the basis of the surficial clearance level of 10 Bq cm−2 for 134Cs and 137Cs derived in the previous studies of the authors. By applying a factor for the conversion of the unit surface contamination to the count rate of a survey meter widely used after the Fukushima accident, the operational level for the unconditional release of contaminated properties was calculated to be 2300 cpm on average and 23 000 cpm at the highest-contamination part. The calculated numerical values of the operational levels are effective as long as the typical GM survey meter is used in the radiation measurement. PMID:23778575

  16. Factors Affecting the Design of Slow Release Formulations of Herbicides Based on Clay-Surfactant Systems. A Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Galán-Jiménez, María del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  17. Factors affecting the design of slow release formulations of herbicides based on clay-surfactant systems. A methodological approach.

    PubMed

    Galán-Jiménez, María Del Carmen; Mishael, Yael-Golda; Nir, Shlomo; Morillo, Esmeralda; Undabeytia, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    A search for clay-surfactant based formulations with high percentage of the active ingredient, which can yield slow release of active molecules is described. The active ingredients were the herbicides metribuzin (MZ), mesotrione (MS) and flurtamone (FL), whose solubilities were examined in the presence of four commercial surfactants; (i) neutral: two berols (B048, B266) and an alkylpolyglucoside (AG6202); (ii) cationic: an ethoxylated amine (ET/15). Significant percent of active ingredient (a.i.) in the clay/surfactant/herbicide formulations could be achieved only when most of the surfactant was added as micelles. MZ and FL were well solubilized by berols, whereas MS by ET/15. Sorption of surfactants on the clay mineral sepiolite occurred mostly by sorption of micelles, and the loadings exceeded the CEC. Higher loadings were determined for B266 and ET/15. The sorption of surfactants was modeled by using the Langmuir-Scatchard equation which permitted the determination of binding coefficients that could be used for further predictions of the sorbed amounts of surfactants under a wide range of clay/surfactant ratios. A possibility was tested of designing clay-surfactant based formulations of certain herbicides by assuming the same ratio between herbicides and surfactants in the formulations as for herbicides incorporated in micelles in solution. Calculations indicated that satisfactory FL formulations could not be synthesized. The experimental fractions of herbicides in the formulations were in agreement with the predicted ones for MS and MZ. The validity of this approach was confirmed in in vitro release tests that showed a slowing down of the release of a.i. from the designed formulations relative to the technical products. Soil dissipation studies with MS formulations also showed improved bioactivity of the clay-surfactant formulation relative to the commercial one. This methodological approach can be extended to other clay-surfactant systems for encapsulation and

  18. Possible ecological risks of transgenic organism release when transgenes affect mating success: Sexual selection and the Trojan gene hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Muir, William M.; Howard, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Widespread interest in producing transgenic organisms is balanced by concern over ecological hazards, such as species extinction if such organisms were to be released into nature. An ecological risk associated with the introduction of a transgenic organism is that the transgene, though rare, can spread in a natural population. An increase in transgene frequency is often assumed to be unlikely because transgenic organisms typically have some viability disadvantage. Reduced viability is assumed to be common because transgenic individuals are best viewed as macromutants that lack any history of selection that could reduce negative fitness effects. However, these arguments ignore the potential advantageous effects of transgenes on some aspect of fitness such as mating success. Here, we examine the risk to a natural population after release of a few transgenic individuals when the transgene trait simultaneously increases transgenic male mating success and lowers the viability of transgenic offspring. We obtained relevant life history data by using the small cyprinodont fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model. Our deterministic equations predict that a transgene introduced into a natural population by a small number of transgenic fish will spread as a result of enhanced mating advantage, but the reduced viability of offspring will cause eventual local extinction of both populations. Such risks should be evaluated with each new transgenic animal before release. PMID:10570162

  19. The molecular basis of memory. Part 3: tagging with “emotive” neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Gerard; Gilon, Chaim

    2014-01-01

    Many neurons of all animals that exhibit memory (snails, worms, flies, vertebrae) present arborized shapes with many varicosities and boutons. These neurons, release neurotransmitters and contain ionotropic receptors that produce and sense electrical signals (ephaptic transmission). The extended shapes maximize neural contact with the surrounding neutrix [defined as: neural extracellular matrix (nECM) + diffusible (neurometals and neurotransmitters)] as well as with other neurons. We propose a tripartite mechanism of animal memory based on the dynamic interactions of splayed neurons with the “neutrix.” Their interactions form cognitive units of information (cuinfo), metal-centered complexes within the nECM around the neuron. Emotive content is provided by NTs, which embody molecular links between physiologic (body) responses and psychic feelings. We propose that neurotransmitters form mixed complexes with cuinfo used for tagging emotive memory. Thus, NTs provide encoding option not available to a Turing, binary-based, device. The neurons employ combinatorially diverse options, with >10 NMs and >90 NTs for encoding (“flavoring”) cuinfo with emotive tags. The neural network efficiently encodes, decodes and consolidates related (entangled) sets of cuinfo into a coherent pattern, the basis for emotionally imbued memory, critical for determining a behavioral choice aimed at survival. The tripartite mechanism with tagging of NTs permits of a causal connection between physiology and psychology. PMID:24778616

  20. Neurotransmitter receptors as targets for pesticides.

    PubMed

    Eldefrawi, M E; Eldefrawi, A T

    1983-01-01

    Nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors have been identified biochemically by means of their specific binding of [3H] alpha-bungarotoxin ([3H]alpha-BGT) and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate, respectively. There are some differences in the drug specificities, and sensitivities to active group reagents, of these receptors in insects when compared to those in vertebrates. Also, insect brain contains more nicotinic than muscarinic receptors, while the reverse is found in mammalian brain. Insect brain contains a third kind of putative ACh-receptor that is relatively soluble and is both nicotinic and muscarinic in its pharmacology but does not bind alpha-BGT. Toxic nicotine and analogs bind to it with high affinities. Several organophosphorus and carbamate insecticides and nereistoxin bind with high affinities to the nicotinic ACh-receptor of the electric organ of Torpedo. A few chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides and derivatives interact with Torpedo nicotinic ACh-receptors, not at their 'receptor' sites but at their allosteric or 'channel' sites (which are identified by their specific binding of [3H]perhydrohistrionicotoxin). A few also bind to mammalian brain muscarinic receptors. The most potent on both receptors is the acaricide chlorobenzilate. Pyrethrins and synthetic pyrethroids also bind with high affinities to the channel sites of the Torpedo nicotinic ACh-receptor, though not to its receptor sites. Another group that binds to ACh-receptors is the organic and inorganic mercury compounds, which interact with both the Torpedo nicotinic and rat brain muscarinic receptors. Thus, neurotransmitter receptors act as molecular targets, primary or secondary for different pesticides.

  1. Mechanism for alternating access in neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Jacobs, Miriam T; Gesmonde, Joan; Xie, Li; Honig, Barry H; Rudnick, Gary

    2008-07-29

    Crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters, show a molecule of bound substrate that is essentially exposed to the extracellular space but occluded from the cytoplasm. Thus, there must exist an alternate conformation for LeuT in which the substrate is accessible to the cytoplasm and a corresponding mechanism that switches accessibility from one side of the membrane to the other. Here, we identify the cytoplasmic accessibility pathway of the alternate conformation in a mammalian serotonin transporter (SERT) (a member of the same transporter family as LeuT). We also propose a model for the cytoplasmic-facing state that exploits the internal pseudosymmetry observed in the crystal structure. LeuT contains two structurally similar repeats (TMs1-5 and TMs 6-10) that are inverted with respect to the plane of the membrane. The conformational differences between them result in the formation of the extracellular pathway. Our model for the cytoplasm-facing state exchanges the conformations of the two repeats and thus exposes the substrate and ion-binding sites to the cytoplasm. The conformational change that connects the two states primarily involves the tilting of a 4-helix bundle composed of transmembrane helices 1, 2, 6, and 7. Switching the tilt angle of this bundle is essentially equivalent to switching the conformation of the two repeats. Extensive mutagenesis of SERT and accessibility measurements, using cysteine reagents, are accommodated by our model. These observations may be of relevance to other transporter families, many of which contain internal inverted repeats.

  2. How the ‘slow’ Ca2+ buffer parvalbumin affects transmitter release in nanodomain-coupling regimes

    PubMed Central

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Jonas, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Parvalbumin is thought to act in a manner similar to EGTA, but how a slow Ca2+ buffer affects nanodomain-coupling regimes at GABAergic synapses is unclear. Direct measurements of parvalbumin concentration and paired recordings in rodent hippocampus and cerebellum revealed that parvalbumin affects synaptic dynamics only when expressed at high levels. Modeling suggests that, in high concentrations, parvalbumin may exert BAPTA-like effects, modulating nanodomain coupling via competition with local saturation of endogenous fixed buffers. PMID:22138646

  3. Electrochemical nanoprobes for the chemical detection of neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, acting as chemical messengers, play an important role in neurotransmission, which governs many functional aspects of nervous system activity. Electrochemical probes have proven a very useful technique to study neurotransmission, especially to quantify and qualify neurotransmitters. With the emerging interests in probing neurotransmission at the level of single cells, single vesicles, as well as single synapses, probes that enable detection of neurotransmitters at the nanometer scale become vitally important. Electrochemical nanoprobes have been successfully employed in nanometer spatial resolution imaging of single nanopores of Si membrane and single Au nanoparticles, providing both topographical and chemical information, thus holding great promise for nanometer spatial study of neurotransmission. Here we present the current state of electrochemical nanoprobes for chemical detection of neurotransmitters, focusing on two types of nanoelectrodes, i.e. carbon nanoelectrode and nano-ITIES pipet electrode. PMID:26327927

  4. Methane emissions and contaminant degradation rates at sites affected by accidental releases of denatured fuel-grade ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sihota, Natasha J.; Mayer, K. Ulrich; Toso, Mark A.; Atwater, Joel F.

    2013-08-01

    The recent increase in the use of denatured fuel-grade ethanol (DFE) has enhanced the probability of its environmental release. Due to the highly labile nature of ethanol (EtOH), it is expected to rapidly biodegrade, increasing the potential for inducing methanogenic conditions in the subsurface. As environmental releases of DFE can be expected to occur at the ground surface or in the vadose zone (e.g., due to surficial spills from rail lines or tanker trucks and leaking underground storage tanks), the potential for methane (CH4) generation at DFE spill sites requires evaluation. An assessment is needed because high CH4 generation rates may lead to CH4 fluxes towards the ground surface, which is of particular concern if spills are located close to human habitation—related to concerns of soil vapor intrusion (SVI). This work demonstrates, for the first time, the measurement of surficial gas release rates at large volume DFE spill sites. Two study sites, near Cambria and Balaton, in MN are investigated. Total carbon emissions at the ground surface (summing carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 emissions) are used to quantify depth-integrated DFE degradation rates. Results from both sites demonstrate that substantial CO2 and CH4 emissions do occur—even years after a spill. However, large total carbon fluxes, and CH4 emissions in particular, were restricted to a localized area within the DFE source zone. At the Balaton site, estimates of total DFE carbon losses in the source zone ranged between 5 and 174 μmol m- 2 s- 1, and CH4 effluxes ranged between non-detect and 9 μmol m- 2 s- 1. At the Cambria site estimates of total DFE carbon losses in the source zone ranged between 8 and 500 μmol m- 2 s- 1, and CH4 effluxes ranged between non-detect and 393 μmol m- 2 s- 1. Substantial CH4 accumulation, coupled with oxygen (O2) depletion, measured in samples collected from custom-designed gas collection chambers at the Cambria site suggests that the development of explosion or

  5. Methane emissions and contaminant degradation rates at sites affected by accidental releases of denatured fuel-grade ethanol.

    PubMed

    Sihota, Natasha J; Mayer, K Ulrich; Toso, Mark A; Atwater, Joel F

    2013-08-01

    The recent increase in the use of denatured fuel-grade ethanol (DFE) has enhanced the probability of its environmental release. Due to the highly labile nature of ethanol (EtOH), it is expected to rapidly biodegrade, increasing the potential for inducing methanogenic conditions in the subsurface. As environmental releases of DFE can be expected to occur at the ground surface or in the vadose zone (e.g., due to surficial spills from rail lines or tanker trucks and leaking underground storage tanks), the potential for methane (CH4) generation at DFE spill sites requires evaluation. An assessment is needed because high CH4 generation rates may lead to CH4 fluxes towards the ground surface, which is of particular concern if spills are located close to human habitation-related to concerns of soil vapor intrusion (SVI). This work demonstrates, for the first time, the measurement of surficial gas release rates at large volume DFE spill sites. Two study sites, near Cambria and Balaton, in MN are investigated. Total carbon emissions at the ground surface (summing carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 emissions) are used to quantify depth-integrated DFE degradation rates. Results from both sites demonstrate that substantial CO2 and CH4 emissions do occur-even years after a spill. However, large total carbon fluxes, and CH4 emissions in particular, were restricted to a localized area within the DFE source zone. At the Balaton site, estimates of total DFE carbon losses in the source zone ranged between 5 and 174 μmol m(-2) s(-1), and CH4 effluxes ranged between non-detect and 9 μmol m(-2) s(-1). At the Cambria site estimates of total DFE carbon losses in the source zone ranged between 8 and 500 μmol m(-2) s(-1), and CH4 effluxes ranged between non-detect and 393 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Substantial CH4 accumulation, coupled with oxygen (O2) depletion, measured in samples collected from custom-designed gas collection chambers at the Cambria site suggests that the development of explosion

  6. Fetal growth-retardation and brain-sparing by malnutrition are associated to changes in neurotransmitters profile.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, C; Valent, D; Vázquez-Gómez, M; Arroyo, L; Isabel, B; Astiz, S; Bassols, A; Gonzalez-Bulnes, A

    2017-04-01

    The present study assesses possible changes in the levels of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines) in fetuses affected by nutrient shortage. Hence, we determined the concentration of catecholamines and indoleamines at the hypothalamus of 56 swine fetuses obtained at both 70 and 90days of pregnancy (n=33 and 23 fetuses, respectively). The degree of fetal development and the fetal sex affected the neurotransmitters profile at both stages. At Day 70, there were found higher mean concentrations of l-DOPA in both female and male fetuses with severe IUGR; male fetuses with severe IUGR also showed higher concentrations of TRP than normal male littermates. At Day 90 of pregnancy, the differences between sexes were more evident. There were no significant effects from either severe IUGR on the neurotransmitter profile in male fetuses. However, in the females, a lower body-weight was related to lower concentrations of l-DOPA and TRP and those female fetuses affected by severe IUGR evidenced lower HVA concentration. In conclusion, the fetal synthesis and use of neurotransmitters increase with time of pregnancy but, in case of IUGR, both catecholamines and indoleamines pathways are affected by sex-related effects.

  7. Quantification of Amino Acid Neurotransmitters in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, José Augusto; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background : Neurocysticercosis is a parasitic disease that affects the central nervous system. Its main clinical manifestations are epileptic seizures. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the different evolutive forms of neurocysticercosis with or without seizures. Methods : Neurotransmitter concentrations (Aspartate, Glutamate, GABA, Glutamine, Glycine, Taurine) were determined in CSF samples from 42 patients with neurocysticercosis divided into patients with the active cystic form (n = 24, 12 with and 12 without seizures) and patients with calcified form (n = 18, 12 with and 6 without seizures), and a control group consisting of 59 healthy subjects. Results : Alterations in amino acid concentration were observed in all patients with neurocysticercosis. Conclusion : We conclude that disturbances in amino acid metabolism accompany the presentation of neurocysticercosis. Replacement of the terms inactive cyst by reactive inactive cyst and calcification by reactive calcification is suggested. PMID:26157521

  8. Selected hormonal and neurotransmitter mechanisms regulating feed intake in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sartin, J L; Daniel, J A; Whitlock, B K; Wilborn, R R

    2010-11-01

    Appetite control is a major issue in normal growth and in suboptimal growth performance settings. A number of hormones, in particular leptin, activate or inhibit orexigenic or anorexigenic neurotransmitters within the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, where feed intake regulation is integrated. Examples of appetite regulatory neurotransmitters are the stimulatory neurotransmitters neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP), orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone and the inhibitory neurotransmitter, melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH). Examination of messenger RNA (using in situ hybridization and real-time PCR) and proteins (using immunohistochemistry) for these neurotransmitters in ruminants has indicated that physiological regulation occurs in response to fasting for several of these critical genes and proteins, especially AgRP and NPY. Moreover, intracerebroventricular injection of each of the four stimulatory neurotransmitters can increase feed intake in sheep and may also regulate either growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, cortisol or other hormones. In contrast, both leptin and MSH are inhibitory to feed intake in ruminants. Interestingly, the natural melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonist, AgRP, as well as NPY can prevent the inhibition of feed intake after injection of endotoxin (to model disease suppression of appetite). Thus, knowledge of the mechanisms regulating feed intake in the hypothalamus may lead to mechanisms to increase feed intake in normal growing animals and prevent the wasting effects of severe disease in animals.

  9. Radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.

    1991-01-01

    The study of neurotransmitter systems is one of the major thrusts in emission tomography today. The current generation of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) radiotracers examines neurotransmitter properties from a number of different perspectives including their pre and post synaptic sites and the activity of the enzymes which regulate their concentration. Although the dopamine system has been the most extensively investigated, other neurotransmitter systems including the acetylcholine muscarine, serotonin, benzodiazepine, opiate, NMDA and others are also under intensive development. Enzymes involved in the synthesis and regulation of neurotransmitter concentration, for example monoamine oxidase and amino acid decarboxylase has also been probed in vivo. Medical applications range from the study of normal function and the characterization of neurotransmitter activity in neurological and psychiatric diseases and in heart disease and cancer to the study of the binding of therapeutic drugs and substances of abuse. This chapter will provide an overview of the current generation of radiotracers for PET and SPECT studies of neurotransmitter systems including radiotracer design, synthesis localization mechanisms and applications in emission tomography. 60 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Single-walled carbon nanotube release affects the microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds in nature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    The question how microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds (LMCs) are affected by the release of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) into the environment remains to be addressed at the molecular level. We have, therefore concentrated the effects of SWCNT on some important properties associated with enzyme activity and function during microbial oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, acenaphthene and anthracene), LMCs (2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol and veratryl alcohol) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane, including the behaviour of water molecules, hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions (HYs) between ligand and the enzyme, and conformational dynamics in N- and C-terminus. Our study revealed that SWCNT significantly affected the behaviour of water molecules within 5 Å of both these substrates and their respective enzymes during oxidation (p < 0.01), by increasing or decreasing the water number near them. SWCNT tended to significantly enhance or reduce the stability of atom pairs that formed the HBs and HYs (p < 0.01). N- and C-terminus conformations underwent transitions between positive and negative states or between positive state or between negative state in all analyzed complexes. Significant conformational transitions were found for all C-terminus, but only for a part of N-terminus after the inclusion of the SWCNT. These results showed that SWCNT release would significantly affect the microbial enzyme-catalyzed processes of organic pollutants and LMCs in nature.

  11. Synaptic Release at Mammalian Bipolar Cell Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qun-Fang; Heidelberger, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar cells play a vital role in the transfer of visual information across the vertebrate retina. The synaptic output of these neurons is regulated by factors that are extrinsic and intrinsic. Relatively little is known about the intrinsic factors that regulate neurotransmitter exocytosis. Much of what we know about intrinsic presynaptic mechanisms that regulate glutamate release has come from the study of the unusually large and accessible synaptic terminal of the goldfish rod-dominant bipolar cell, the Mb1 bipolar cell. However, over the past several years, examination of presynaptic mechanisms governing neurotransmitter release has been extended to the mammalian rod bipolar cell. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of synaptic vesicle dynamics and neurotransmitter release in rodent rod bipolar cells and consider how these properties help shape the synaptic output of the mammalian retina. PMID:21272392

  12. Mechanism of the association between Na+ binding and conformations at the intracellular gate in neurotransmitter:sodium symporters

    SciTech Connect

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Chunfeng; Gotfryd, Kamil; Khelashvili, George; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Noskov, Sergei; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2015-04-13

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) terminate neurotransmission by Na+-dependent reuptake of released neurotransmitters. Previous studies suggested that Na+-binding reconfigures dynamically coupled structural elements in an allosteric interaction network (AIN) responsible for function-related conformational changes, but the intramolecular pathway of this mechanism has remained uncharted. Here we describe a new approach for the modeling and analysis of intramolecular dynamics in the bacterial NSS homolog LeuT. From microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations and cognate experimental verifications in both LeuT and human dopamine transporter (hDAT), we apply the novel method to identify the composition and the dynamic properties of their conserved AIN. In LeuT, two different perturbations disrupting Na+ binding and transport (i.e. replacing Na+ with Li+ or the Y268A mutation at the intracellular gate) affect the AIN in strikingly similar ways. In contrast, other mutations that affect the intracellular gate (i.e. R5A and D369A) do not significantly impair Na+ cooperativity and transport. Our analysis shows these perturbations to have much lesser effects on the AIN, underscoring the sensitivity of this novel method to the mechanistic nature of the perturbation. Notably, this set of observations holds as well for hDAT, where the aligned Y335A, R60A, and D436A mutations also produce different impacts on Na+ dependence. Furthermore, the detailed AIN generated from our method is shown to connect Na+ binding with global conformational changes that are critical for the transport mechanism. Lastly, that the AIN between the Na+ binding sites and the intracellular gate in bacterial LeuT resembles that in eukaryotic hDAT highlights the conservation of allosteric pathways underlying NSS function.

  13. Chronic alcohol exposure differentially affects activation of female locus coeruleus neurons and the subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Retson, T A; Reyes, B A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2015-01-02

    Understanding the neurobiological bases for sex differences in alcohol dependence is needed to help guide the development of individualized therapies for alcohol abuse disorders. In the present study, alcohol-induced adaptations in (1) anxiety-like behavior, (2) patterns of c-Fos activation and (3) subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons was investigated in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats that were chronically exposed to ethanol using a liquid diet. Results confirm and extend reports by others showing that chronic ethanol exposure produces an anxiogenic-like response in both male and female subjects. Ethanol-induced sex differences were observed with increased c-Fos expression in LC neurons of female ethanol-treated subjects compared to controls or male subjects. Results also reveal sex differences in the subcellular distribution of the CRFr in LC-noradrenergic neurons with female subjects exposed to ethanol exhibiting a higher frequency of plasmalemmal CRFrs. These adaptations have implications for LC neuronal activity and its neural targets across the sexes. Considering the important role of the LC in ethanol-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the present results indicate important sex differences in feed-forward regulation of the HPA axis that may render alcohol dependent females more vulnerable to subsequent stress exposure.

  14. Does catch and release affect the mating system and individual reproductive success of wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)?

    PubMed

    Richard, Antoine; Dionne, Mélanie; Wang, Jinliang; Bernatchez, Louis

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we documented the breeding system of a wild population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) by genetically sampling every returning adult and assessed the determinants of individual fitness. We then quantified the impacts of catch and release (C&R) on mating and reproductive success. Both sexes showed high variance in individual reproductive success, and the estimated standardized variance was higher for males (2.86) than for females (0.73). We found a weak positive relationship between body size and fitness and observed that fitness was positively correlated with the number of mates, especially in males. Mature male parr sired 44% of the analysed offspring. The impact of C&R on the number of offspring was size dependent, as the reproductive success of larger fish was more impaired than smaller ones. Also, there was an interactive negative effect of water temperature and air exposure time on reproductive success of C&R salmon. This study improves our understanding of the complex reproductive biology of the Atlantic salmon and is the first to investigate the impact of C&R on reproductive success. Our study expands the management toolbox of appropriate C&R practices that promote conservation of salmon populations and limit negative impacts on mating and reproductive success.

  15. Sex and intrauterine growth restriction modify brain neurotransmitters profile of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, M; Valent, D; García-Contreras, C; Arroyo, L; Óvilo, C; Isabel, B; Bassols, A; González-Bulnes, A

    2016-12-01

    The current study aimed to determine, using a swine model of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), whether short- and long-term neurological deficiencies and interactive dysfunctions of Low Birth-Weight (LBW) offspring might be related to altered pattern of neurotransmitters. Hence, we compared the quantities of different neurotransmitters (catecholamines and indoleamines), which were determined by HPLC, at brain structures related to the limbic system (hippocampus and amygdala) in 14 LBW and 10 Normal Body-Weight (NBW) newborn piglets. The results showed, firstly, significant effects of sex on the NBW newborns, with females having higher dopamine (DA) concentrations than males. The IUGR processes affected DA metabolism, with LBW piglets having lower concentrations of noradrenaline at the hippocampus and higher concentrations of the DA metabolites, homovanillic acid (HVA), at both the hippocampus and the amygdala than NBW neonates. The effects of IUGR were modulated by sex; there were no significant differences between LBW and NBW females, but LBW males had higher HVA concentration at the amygdala and higher concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, the serotonin metabolite, at the hippocampus than NBW males. In conclusion, the present study shows that IUGR is mainly related to changes, modulated by sex, in the concentrations of catecholamine neurotransmitters, which are related to adaptation to physical activity and to essential cognitive functions such as learning, memory, reward-motivated behavior and stress.

  16. Modulation of monoamine neurotransmitters in fighting fish Betta splendens exposed to waterborne phytoestrogens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; McNitt, Meredith M; Carpenter, Russ E; Summers, Cliff H

    2010-12-01

    Endogenous estrogens are known to affect the activity of monoamine neurotransmitters in vertebrate animals, but the effects of exogenous estrogens on neurotransmitters are relatively poorly understood. We exposed sexually mature male fighting fish Betta splendens to environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses of three phytoestrogens that are potential endocrine disruptors in wild fish populations: genistein, equol, and β-sitosterol. We also exposed fish to two doses of the endogenous estrogen 17β-estradiol, which we selected as a positive control because phytoestrogens are putative estrogen mimics. Our results were variable, but the effects were generally modest. Genistein increased dopamine levels in the forebrains of B. splendens at both environmentally relevant and pharmacological doses. The environmentally relevant dose of equol increased dopamine levels in B. splendens forebrains, and the pharmacological dose decreased norepinephrine (forebrain), dopamine (hindbrain), and serotonin (forebrain) levels. The environmentally relevant dose of β-sitosterol decreased norepinephrine and dopamine in the forebrain and hindbrain, respectively. Our results suggest that sources of environmental phytoestrogens, such as runoff or effluent from agricultural fields, wood pulp mills, and sewage treatment plants, have the potential to modulate neurotransmitter activity in free-living fishes in a way that could interfere with normal behavioral processes.

  17. Biochemical and Neurotransmitters Changes Associated with Tramadol in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ezzeldin, Essam; Souror, Wafaa A. H.; El-Nahhas, Toqa; Soudi, Abdel Nasser M. M.; Shahat, Abdelaaty A.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide. Chronic neuropathic pain occurs in approximately 25% of diabetic patients. Tramadol, an atypical analgesic with a unique dual mechanism of action, is used in the management of painful diabetic neuropathy. It acts on monoamine transporters to inhibit the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), and dopamine (DA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of diabetes on the brain neurotransmitter alterations induced by tramadol in rats, and to study the hepatic and renal toxicities of the drug. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two sets: the normal set and the diabetic set. Diabetes was induced in rats. Tramadol was administered orally once daily for 28 days. The levels of DA, NE, and 5-HT in cerebral cortex, thalamus/hypothalamus, midbrain, and brainstem were evaluated in rats. In addition, the renal toxicity and histopathological effects of the drug were assessed. The induction of diabetes altered neurotransmitter levels. Oral administration of tramadol significantly decreased the neurotransmitter levels. Diabetes significantly altered the effects of tramadol in all brain regions. Tramadol affected function and histology of the liver and kidney. The clinical effects of tramadol in diabetic patients should be stressed. PMID:24971322

  18. Changes in mediobasal hypothalamic dopamine and GABA release: a possible mechanism underlying taurine-induced prolactin secretion.

    PubMed

    Arias, P; Jarry, H; Convertini, V; Ginzburg, M; Wuttke, W; Moguilevsky, J

    1998-01-01

    Taurine (Tau), a putative inhibitory amino acid neurotransmitter, has been shown to stimulate prolactin (PRL) release. Using ovariectomized, estrogen-replaced adult rats we investigated initially the effect of this amino acid, injected by different routes, on PRL secretion in vivo. Tau (100-500 mg/kg) had no effect on PRL release when given i.p.; 15 min after i.c.v. injection of Tau (3 mumoles), a significant increase in serum PRL levels was observed (78 +/- 9 ng/ml over basal levels, p < 0.01 vs. controls). In vitro (cultured anterior pituitary cells) PRL release was not affected by a 5 h incubation with Tau (10(-3)-10(-8) M). Basal dopamine (DA) or gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) output from superfused mediobasal hypothalamic fragments (MBH) was not affected by Tau (10(-3) M or 10(-5) M). However, during stimulation with KCl (50 mM), Tau (10(-3) M) significantly lowered DA release, and increased GABA output. It is concluded that Tau acts at a central level to increase PRL secretion, most probably by modulating the hypothalamic release of neurotransmitters controlling lactotroph function.

  19. Changes in cerebral neurotransmitters and metabolites induced by acute donepezil and memantine administrations: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Shearman, E; Rossi, S; Szasz, B; Juranyi, Z; Fallon, S; Pomara, N; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    2006-03-31

    ventral tegmental area. Our results suggest both region and drug specific neurotransmitter effects of these agents as well as some similarities. We conclude that drugs influencing cognitive mechanisms induce changes in a number of neurotransmitters with the changes being both region and drug specific. Release and metabolism are altered and extracellular neurotransmitter levels can be increased or decreased by the drugs. Other studies are in progress to determine the pharmacological effects associated with chronic treatment with these compounds, which may be more pertinent to the clinical situation in which patients take these medications for months or years.

  20. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2), glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6), cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4) and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4), adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c), adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b), glycinergic (Glra), purinergic (P2rx7), and serotonergic (Htr1b) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas), adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5), protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb) protein kinase C (Prkca) and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation. PMID:27774052

  1. Parvalbumin Interneurons of Central Amygdala Regulate the Negative Affective States and the Expression of Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone During Morphine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Shen, Minjie; Jiang, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a crucial component of the neuronal circuitry mediating aversive emotion. Its role in the negative affective states during drug withdrawal includes changes in opioidergic, GABAergic, and corticotropin-releasing factor neurotransmission. However, the modulation of the neurobiological interconnectivity in the CeA and its effects in the negative reinforcement of drug dependents are poorly understood. Method: We performed electrophysiological recordings to assess the membrane excitability of parvalbumin (PV)+ interneurons in the CeA during chronic morphine withdrawal. We tested the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive (assessed by conditioned place aversion), anxiety (assessed by elevated plus maze), and anhedonic-like (assessed by saccharin preference test) behaviors, as well as the mRNA level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) via optogenetic inhibition or activation of PV+ interneurons in the CeA. Result: Chronic morphine withdrawal increased the firing rate of CeA PV+ interneurons. Optogenetic inhibition of the activity of CeA PV+ interneurons attenuated the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive, anxiety, and anhedonic-like behaviors, while direct activation of CeA PV+ interneurons could trigger those negative affective-like behaviors. Optogenetic inhibition of the CeA PV+ interneurons during the morphine withdrawal significantly attenuated the elevated CRH mRNA level in the CeA. Conclusion: The activity of PV+ interneurons in the CeA was up-regulated during chronic morphine withdrawal. The activation of PV+ interneurons during morphine withdrawal was crucial for the induction of the negative emotion and the up-regulation of CRH mRNA levels in the CeA. PMID:27385383

  2. Genistein prevents calcium mobilization evoked by platelet-derived growth factor without affecting calcium release by cadmium or bradykinin

    SciTech Connect

    Rong-Ming Lyu; Barnes, S.; Smith, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Cadmium (Cd) strikingly increases ({sup 3}H)inositol trisphosphate and evokes a spike in cytosolic free Ca (Ca{sub i}) in human dermal fibroblasts as described previously. Cd apparently activates a membrane receptor by binding to a zinc site in its external domain. Two classes of receptors are known to induce inositol phosphate formation and release stored Ca: those that are coupled to phospholipase C via GTP-binding proteins, e.g., the bradykinin (BK) receptor; and those that are tyrosine kinases, e.g. the receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Cd, 100 nM BK, and 10 ng/ml PDGF increased Ca{sub i} from 142 {plus minus} 24 nM to 809 {plus minus} 36, 964 {plus minus} 74, and 401 {plus minus} 52 nM (n = 5), respectively. Cd and BK immediately increased Ca{sub i}, however, there was a lag between the addition of PDGF compared to 15 {plus minus} 1 sec for Cd and 9 {plus minus} 1 sec for BK (all n = 10). Genistein (40 {mu}M, 40 min), which selectively inhibits tyrosine kinases, had no significant effect on the Ca{sub i} spike evoked by Cd or BK. In the presence of genistein Cd and BK increased Ca{sub i} from 165 {plus minus} 14 nM to 726 {plus minus} 23 and 876 {plus minus} 31 nM (n = 4), respectively. In contrast to Cd and BK, PDGF only slightly increased Ca{sub i} in the presence of 40 {mu}M genistein. The concentration of genistein that inhibited the Ca{sub i} response to PDGF by 50% was 8 {mu}M. These findings suggest that the Cd triggers a G protein-coupled receptor rather than a tyrosine kinase.

  3. Temperature Sensitivity Caused by Mutant Release Factor 1 Is Suppressed by Mutations That Affect 16S rRNA Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Kaczanowska, Magdalena; Rydén-Aulin, Monica

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of slow termination on the protein synthesizing machinery, we isolated suppressors to a temperature-sensitive release factor 1 (RF1). Of 26 independent clones, five complementation groups have been identified, two of which are presented here. The first mutation disrupts a base pair in the transcription terminator stem for the rplM-rpsI operon, which encodes ribosomal proteins L13 and S9. We have found that this leads to readthrough of the terminator and that lower levels of transcript (compared to the results seen with the wild type) are found in the cell. This probably leads to decreased expression of the two proteins. The second mutation is a small deletion of the yrdC open reading frame start site, and it is not likely that the protein is expressed. Both mutant strains show an increased accumulation of 17S rRNA (immature 16S rRNA). Maturation of 16S rRNA is dependent on proper assembly of the ribosomal proteins, a process that is disturbed when proteins are missing. The function of the YrdC protein is not known, but it is able to bind to double-stranded RNA; therefore, we suggest that it is an assembly factor important for 30S subunit biogenesis. On the basis of our findings, we propose that lesser amounts of S9 or a lack of YrdC causes the maturation defect. We have shown that as a consequence of the maturation defect, fewer 70S ribosomes and polysomes are formed. This and other results suggest that it is the lowered concentration of functional ribosomes that suppresses the temperature sensitivity caused by the mutant RF1. PMID:15126466

  4. Measurement of 210Pb and its Application to Evaluate Contamination in an Area Affected by NORM Releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosqueda, F.; Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; Absi, A.; Manjón, G.; Vaca, F.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is an easy and straightforward technique, and combined with its low limit of detection, makes it a powerful tool for both routine and low level measurements that can be applied to 210Pb low level counting in environmental samples. 210Pb can be easily measured following a sulphate co-precipitation method; the addition of a carrier and the weighing of the recovered amount is a widespread technique to evaluate radiochemical yield, however, this evaluation of the recovery is sometimes questioned. The samples employed in this work were recollected in 1999 and 2005 from the estuary of the Odiel and Tinto rivers (SW of Spain), which were affected by phosphogypsum (pg.) discharges until 1998. Phosphogypsum contains most of the 210Pb from the treated raw material, for that reason analysed riverbed sediments have enhanced 210Pb activity concentrations and hence, enhanced activity concentration of its daughter 210Po, both in secular equilibrium after two years.

  5. Imaging neurotransmitter uptake and depletion in astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W. |; Haydon, P.G.; Yeung, E.S.

    1997-08-01

    An ultraviolet (UV) laser-based optical microscope and charge-coupled device (CCD) detection system was used to obtain chemical images of biological cells. Subcellular structures can be easily seen in both optical and fluorescence images. Laser-induced native fluorescence detection provides high sensitivity and low limits of detection, and it does not require coupling to fluorescent dyes. We were able to quantitatively monitor serotonin that has been taken up into and released from individual astrocytes on the basis of its native fluorescence. Different regions of the cells took up different amounts of serotonin with a variety of uptake kinetics. Similarly, we observed different serotonin depletion dynamics in different astrocyte regions. There were also some astrocyte areas where no serotonin uptake or depletion was observed. Potential applications include the mapping of other biogenic species in cells as well as the ability to image their release from specific regions of cells in response to external stimuli. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  6. 'Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering ('Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called 'full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of 'full fusion'.

  7. `Full fusion' is not ineluctable during vesicular exocytosis of neurotransmitters by endocrine cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is an essential and ubiquitous process in neurons and endocrine cells by which neurotransmitters are released in synaptic clefts or extracellular fluids. It involves the fusion of a vesicle loaded with chemical messengers with the cell membrane through a nanometric fusion pore. In endocrine cells, unless it closes after some flickering (`Kiss-and-Run' events), this initial pore is supposed to expand exponentially, leading to a full integration of the vesicle membrane into the cell membrane-a stage called `full fusion'. We report here a compact analytical formulation that allows precise measurements of the fusion pore expansion extent and rate to be extracted from individual amperometric spike time courses. These data definitively establish that, during release of catecholamines, fusion pores enlarge at most to approximately one-fifth of the radius of their parent vesicle, hence ruling out the ineluctability of `full fusion'.

  8. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  9. Acute effects of tianeptine on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Hernández, Gerardo; Orozco, Beatriz; Rodríguez, Simon; Baez, Scarlet

    2006-03-01

    Tianeptine is a serotonin-uptake enhancer drug whose antidepressant effectiveness is based on its ability to reduce rather than increase serotonin availability at the synaptic cleft. This paradoxical neuropharmacological mechanism has raised doubt among neuropharmacologists and psychiatrists as to the role of tianeptine as a trusty-reliable antidepressant drug. This controversial issue led us to investigate the acute effects of a single, oral dose (12.5 mg) of this drug on circulating neurotransmitters and cardiovascular parameters in 50 healthy subjects. The drug provoked a striking and significant reduction of plasma noradrenaline (NA) and plasma serotonin (f-5-HT) while it increased plasma dopamine (DA) and platelet serotonin (p-5-HT) concentrations within the 4-h study period. No adrenaline (Ad) changes were registered. The NA/Ad ratio and the f-5-HT/p-5-HT ratio showed significant reduction throughout the test. Finally, although diastolic blood pressure (DBP) showed significant decrease, neither systolic blood pressure (SBP) nor heart rate (HR) showed significant change. These findings are consistent with the postulation that tianeptine reduces both neural sympathetic activity and parasympathetic activity without affecting adrenal sympathetic activity, enabling us to discuss the possible mechanisms involved in the antidepressant effects of tianeptine. The well-known fact that major depressed patients always show raised NA plus lower than normal p-5-HT levels, both disorders which are normalized by tianeptine, gives neurochemical support to the clinical improvement triggered by the drug in these patients. Summarizing, the results presented in this study demonstrate that tianeptine triggers significant reduction of circulating noradrenaline and plasma serotonin while increasing circulating dopamine and platelet serotonin. Other possible neuropharmacological effects are also discussed.

  10. Hippocampal release of dopamine and norepinephrine encodes novel contextual information.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Pérez-Ortega, Rodrigo; Violante-Soria, Valeria; Balderas, Israela; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2017-02-08

    The detection and processing of novel information encountered in our environment is crucial for proper adaptive behavior and learning. Hippocampus is a prime structure for novelty detection that receives high-level inputs including context information. It is of our interest to understand the mechanisms by which the hippocampus processes contextual information. For this, we performed in vivo microdyalisis in order to monitor extracellular changes in neurotransmitter levels during Object Location Memory (OLM), a behavioral protocol developed to evaluate contextual information processing in recognition memory. Neurotransmitter release was evaluated in the dorsal hippocampus and insular cortex during OLM in 3-month-old B6129SF2/J mice. We found a simultaneous release of dopamine and norepinephrine in hippocampus during OLM, while neurochemical activity remained unaltered in the cortex. Additionally, we administered 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxic compound selective to dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons, in the dorsal hippocampus in a different group of mice. Depletion of catecholaminergic terminals in the hippocampus by 6-OHDA impaired OLM but did not affect novel object recognition. Our results support the relevance of hippocampal catecholaminergic neurotransmission in recognition memory. The significance of catecholaminergic function may be extended to the clinical field as it has been reported that innervation of hippocampus by the noradrenergic and dopaminergic system is reduced and atrophied in aging and Alzheimer's disease brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ion fluxes and neurotransmitters signaling in neural development.

    PubMed

    Andäng, Michael; Lendahl, Urban

    2008-06-01

    The brain develops and functions in a complex ionic milieu, which is a prerequisite for neurotransmitter function and neuronal signaling. Neurotransmitters and ion fluxes are, however, important not only in neuronal signaling, but also in the control of neural differentiation, and in this review, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of how the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter and ion fluxes are relevant for cell cycle control and neural differentiation. Conversely, proteins previously associated with ion transport across membranes have been endowed with novel ion-independent functions, and we discuss this in the context of gap junctions in cell adhesion and of the neuron-specific K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter KCC2 in dendritic spine development. Collectively, these findings provide a richer and more complex picture of when ion fluxes are needed in neural development and when they are not.

  12. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  13. Shedding of neurexin 3β ectodomain by ADAM10 releases a soluble fragment that affects the development of newborn neurons

    PubMed Central

    Borcel, Erika; Palczynska, Magda; Krzisch, Marine; Dimitrov, Mitko; Ulrich, Giorgio; Toni, Nicolas; Fraering, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Neurexins are transmembrane synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in the development and maturation of neuronal synapses. In the present study, we report that Nrxn3β is processed by the metalloproteases ADAM10, ADAM17, and by the intramembrane-cleaving protease γ-secretase, producing secreted neurexin3β (sNrxn3β) and a single intracellular domain (Nrxn3β-ICD). We further completed the full characterization of the sites at which Nrxn3β is processed by these proteases. Supporting the physiological relevance of the Nrxn3β processing, we demonstrate in vivo a significant effect of the secreted shedding product sNrxn3β on the morphological development of adult newborn neurons in the mouse hippocampus. We show that sNrxn3β produced by the cells of the dentate gyrus increases the spine density of newborn neurons whereas sNrxn3β produced by the newborn neuron itself affects the number of its mossy fiber terminal extensions. These results support a pivotal role of sNrxn3β in plasticity and network remodeling during neuronal development. PMID:27991559

  14. Measurement of {sup 210}Pb and its Application to Evaluate Contamination in an Area Affected by NORM Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Mosqueda, F.; Vaca, F.; Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; Absi, A.; Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-07

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is an easy and straightforward technique, and combined with its low limit of detection, makes it a powerful tool for both routine and low level measurements that can be applied to {sup 210}Pb low level counting in environmental samples. {sup 210}Pb can be easily measured following a sulphate co-precipitation method; the addition of a carrier and the weighing of the recovered amount is a widespread technique to evaluate radiochemical yield, however, this evaluation of the recovery is sometimes questioned. The samples employed in this work were recollected in 1999 and 2005 from the estuary of the Odiel and Tinto rivers (SW of Spain), which were affected by phosphogypsum (pg.) discharges until 1998. Phosphogypsum contains most of the {sup 210}Pb from the treated raw material, for that reason analysed riverbed sediments have enhanced {sup 210}Pb activity concentrations and hence, enhanced activity concentration of its daughter {sup 210}Po, both in secular equilibrium after two years.

  15. Stimulation of nitrogen turnover due to nutrients release from aggregates affected by freeze-thaw in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Zou, Yuanchun; Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei

    2017-02-01

    The freeze-thaw phenomenon will occur more frequently in mid-high latitude ecosystems under climate change which has a remarkable effect on biogeochemical processes in wetland soils. Here, we used a wet sieving procedure and a barometric process separation (BaPS) technique to examine the responses of wetland soil aggregates and related carbon and nitrogen turnover affected by the freeze-thaw treatment. Wetland soil samples were divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group was incubated at temperatures fluctuating from 10 °C to -10 °C, whereas the control group was incubated at the constant temperature of 10 °C. A 24 h process was set as the total freeze-thaw cycle, and the experiment had 20 continuous freeze-thaw cycles. In our results, the freeze-thaw process caused great destruction to the >2 mm water-stable aggregates (WSA) fraction and increased the <0.053 mm WSA fraction. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was stimulated during the initial freeze-thaw cycles followed by a rapid decline, and then still increased during subsequent freeze-thaw cycles, which was mainly determined by the soil organic carbon (SOC). The NH4+ and NO3- content, respiration rate and gross nitrification rate were all significantly improved by the freeze-thaw effect. Because the amount of NH4+ and NO3- expressed prominent negative responses to the content of >2 mm WSA fraction and the gross nitrification rate can be stimulated at the initial freeze-thaw cycles, nutrients and substrates may play a leading role in the freeze-thaw treatment regardless of the minimal influences on microbial biomass pools.

  16. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    SciTech Connect

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  17. Functional significance and control of release of pulmonary surfactant in the lizard lung.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S

    1995-10-01

    The amount of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs of the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) increases with increasing body temperature. This increase coincides with a decrease in lung compliance. The relationship between surfactant and lung compliance and the principal stimuli for surfactant release and composition (temperature, ventilatory pattern, and autonomic neurotransmitters) were investigated. We chose to investigate ventilatory pattern (which causes mechanical deformation of the type II cells) and adrenergic agents, because they are the major stimuli for surfactant release in mammals. To examine the effects of body temperature and ventilatory pattern, isolated lungs were ventilated at either 18 or 37 degrees C at different ventilatory regimens. An isolated perfused lung preparation at 27 degrees C was used to analyze the effects of autonomic neurotransmitters. Ventilatory pattern did not affect surfactant release, composition, or lung compliance at either 18 or 37 degrees C. An increase in temperature increased phospholipid reuptake and disproportionately increased cholesterol degradation/uptake. Epinephrine and acetylcholine stimulated phospholipid but not cholesterol release. Removal of surfactant caused a decrease in compliance, regardless of the experimental temperature. Temperature appears to be the principal determinant of lung compliance in the bearded dragon, acting directly to increase the tone of the smooth muscle. Increasing the ambient temperature may result in greater surfactant turnover by increasing cholesterol reuptake/degradation directly and by increasing circulating epinephrine, thereby indirectly increasing phospholipid secretion. We suggest that changing ventilatory pattern may be inadequate as a mechanism for maintaining surfactant homeostasis, given the discontinuous, highly variable reptilian breathing pattern.

  18. Noncovalent Complexation of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Related Ammonium Ions by Tetramethoxy Tetraglucosylcalix[4]arene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvinen, Mika; Kalenius, Elina; Sansone, Francesco; Casnati, Alessandro; Jänis, Janne

    2012-02-01

    The noncovalent complexation of monoamine neurotransmitters and related ammonium and quaternary ammonium ions by a conformationally flexible tetramethoxy glucosylcalix[4]arene was studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI-FTICR) mass spectrometry. The glucosylcalixarene exhibited highest binding affinity towards serotonin, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine. Structural properties of the guests, such as the number, location, and type of hydrogen bonding groups, length of the alkyl spacer between the ammonium head-group and the aromatic ring structure, and the degree of nitrogen substitution affected the complexation. Competition experiments and guest-exchange reactions indicated that the hydroxyl groups of guests participate in intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the glucocalixarene.

  19. Environment- and activity-dependent dopamine neurotransmitter plasticity in the adult substantia nigra.

    PubMed

    Aumann, Tim D

    2016-04-01

    The ability of neurons to change the amount or type of neurotransmitter they use, or 'neurotransmitter plasticity', is an emerging new form of adult brain plasticity. For example, it has recently been shown that neurons in the adult rat hypothalamus up- or down-regulate dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in response to the amount of light the animal receives (photoperiod), and that this in turn affects anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors (Dulcis et al., 2013). In this Chapter I consolidate recent evidence from my laboratory suggesting neurons in the adult mouse substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) also undergo DA neurotransmitter plasticity in response to persistent changes in their electrical activity, including that driven by the mouse's environment or behavior. Specifically, we have shown that the amounts of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in DA synthesis) gene promoter activity, TH mRNA and TH protein in SNc neurons increases or decreases after ∼20h of altered electrical activity. Also, infusion of ion-channel agonists or antagonists into the midbrain for 2 weeks results in ∼10% (∼500 neurons) more or fewer TH immunoreactive (TH+) SNc neurons, with no change in the total number of SNc neurons (TH+ and TH-). Targeting ion-channels mediating cell-autonomous pacemaker activity in, or synaptic input and afferent pathways to, SNc neurons are equally effective in this regard. In addition, exposing mice to different environments (sex pairing or environment enrichment) for 1-2 weeks induces ∼10% more or fewer TH+ SNc (and ventral tegmental area or VTA) neurons and this is abolished by concurrent blockade of synaptic transmission in midbrain. Although further research is required to establish SNc (and VTA) DA neurotransmitter plasticity, and to determine whether it alters brain function and behavior, it is an exciting prospect because: (1) It may play important roles in movement, motor learning, reward, motivation, memory and cognition; and (2

  20. Theanine, gamma-glutamylethylamide, a unique amino acid in tea leaves, modulates neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain striatum interstitium in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Terashima, T; Kawano, S; Furuno, R; Okubo, T; Juneja, L R; Yokogoshi, H

    2009-01-01

    Theanine (gamma-glutamylethylamide) is one of the major amino acid components in green tea and can pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies suggest that theanine affects the mammalian central nervous system; however, the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of theanine on neurotransmission in the brain striatum by in vivo brain microdialysis. Theanine injection into the rat brain striatum did not increase the concentration of excitatory neurotransmitters in the perfusate. On the other hand, theanine injection increased the concentration of glycine in the perfusate. Because it has been reported that theanine promotes dopamine release in the rat striatum, we investigated the glycine and dopamine concentrations in the perfusate. Co-injection of glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine, reduced theanine-induced changes in dopamine. Moreover, AMPA receptor antagonist, which regulates glycine and GABA release from glia cells, inhibited these effects of theanine and this result was in agreement with the known inhibitory effect of theanine at AMPA receptors.

  1. Neurotransmitter/sodium symporter orthologue LeuT has a single high-affinity substrate site.

    PubMed

    Piscitelli, Chayne L; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-12-23

    Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs) couple the uptake of neurotransmitter with one or more sodium ions, removing neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft. NSSs are essential to the function of chemical synapses, are associated with multiple neurological diseases and disorders, and are the targets of therapeutic and illicit drugs. LeuT, a prokaryotic orthologue of the NSS family, is a model transporter for understanding the relationships between molecular mechanism and atomic structure in a broad range of sodium-dependent and sodium-independent secondary transporters. At present there is a controversy over whether there are one or two high-affinity substrate binding sites in LeuT. The first-reported crystal structure of LeuT, together with subsequent functional and structural studies, provided direct evidence for a single, high-affinity, centrally located substrate-binding site, defined as the S1 site. Recent binding, flux and molecular simulation studies, however, have been interpreted in terms of a model where there are two high-affinity binding sites: the central, S1, site and a second, the S2 site, located within the extracellular vestibule. Furthermore, it was proposed that the S1 and S2 sites are allosterically coupled such that occupancy of the S2 site is required for the cytoplasmic release of substrate from the S1 site. Here we address this controversy by performing direct measurement of substrate binding to wild-type LeuT and to S2 site mutants using isothermal titration calorimetry, equilibrium dialysis and scintillation proximity assays. In addition, we perform uptake experiments to determine whether the proposed allosteric coupling between the putative S2 site and the S1 site manifests itself in the kinetics of substrate flux. We conclude that LeuT harbours a single, centrally located, high-affinity substrate-binding site and that transport is well described by a simple, single-substrate kinetic mechanism.

  2. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    van der Doelen, Rick H A; Arnoldussen, Ilse A; Ghareh, Hussein; van Och, Liselot; Homberg, Judith R; Kozicz, Tamás

    2015-02-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene × Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid release upon exposure to stress. Both endophenotypes are regulated by the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or hormone, which is expressed by the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the central amygdala (CeA). Therefore, we hypothesized that altered regulation of the expression of CRF in these areas represents a major neurobiological mechanism underlying the interaction of early life stress and 5-HTT gene variation. The programming of gene transcription by Gene × Environment interactions has been proposed to involve epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. In this study, we report that early life stress and 5-HTT genotype interact to affect DNA methylation of the Crf gene promoter in the CeA of adult male rats. Furthermore, we found that DNA methylation of a specific site in the Crf promoter significantly correlated with CRF mRNA levels in the CeA. Moreover, CeA CRF mRNA levels correlated with stress coping behavior in a learned helplessness paradigm. Together, our findings warrant further investigation of the link of Crf promoter methylation and CRF expression in the CeA with behavioral changes that are relevant for psychopathology.

  3. Low concentrations of the organophosphate VX affect spontaneous and evoked transmitter release from hippocampal neurons: toxicological relevance of cholinesterase-independent actions.

    PubMed

    Rocha, E S; Santos, M D; Chebabo, S R; Aracava, Y; Albuquerque, E X

    1999-08-15

    In the present study, the patch-clamp technique was applied to cultured hippocampal neurons to evaluate the effects of the nerve agent VX on evoked and spontaneous postsynaptic currents mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. At 0.01 nM, VX reduced the amplitude of evoked GABAergic currents, and only at concentrations >1 nM did it decrease the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic currents. The effect of VX on GABAergic currents, which was partially reversible upon washing of the neurons with VX-free external solution, could be prevented by the muscarinic antagonist atropine. In contrast, the effect of VX on glutamatergic currents, which was not reversible upon washing, appears to be related to the VX-induced reduction of the amplitude and frequency of repetitively firing by action potentials. In the presence of the Na(+)-channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), VX (>/=10 nM) increased the frequency of GABA- and glutamate-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (MPSCs). This effect of VX was unrelated to cholinesterase inhibition and was Ca(2+) dependent. The lack of effect of VX on MPSC kinetics indicates that VX-induced alterations of evoked and spontaneous currents are exclusively due to alterations of the transmitter release processes. The ability of VX to affect transmitter release in the brain may underlie some of its neurotoxic effects and may provide the basis for the development of therapeutic countermeasures to treat and/or prevent VX-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Silencing of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene expression affects both the contents and the amounts of extracellular microvesicles released from HPV-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Anja; Leitz, Jenny; Bulkescher, Julia; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2013-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes play a crucial role in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, the authors investigated whether silencing of endogenous HPV E6/E7 expression may influence the contents or amounts of extracellular microvesicles (eMVs) released from HPV-positive cancer cells. It was found that eMVs secreted from HeLa cells are enriched for Survivin protein. RNA interference studies revealed that maintenance of both intracellular and microvesicular Survivin amounts was strongly dependent on continuous E6/E7 expression. This indicates that intracellular HPV activities are translated into visible alterations of protein contents in eMVs. Besides Survivin, eMVs from HeLa cells contain additional members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, c-IAP1 and Livin). In contrast, no evidence for the presence of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in eMVs was obtained. Moreover, it was found that silencing of HPV E6/E7 expression led to a significant increase of exosomes-representing eMVs of endocytic origin-released from HeLa cells. This effect was associated with the reinduction of p53, stimulation of the p53 target genes TSAP6 and CHMP4C that can enhance exosome production and induction of senescence. Taken together, these results show that silencing of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression profoundly affects both the composition and amounts of eMVs secreted by HPV-positive cancer cells. This indicates that HPVs can induce molecular signatures in eMVs that may affect intercellular communication and could be explored for diagnostic purposes.

  5. Neurotransmitters, psychotropic drugs and microglia: clinical implications for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Kato, T A; Yamauchi, Y; Horikawa, H; Monji, A; Mizoguchi, Y; Seki, Y; Hayakawa, K; Utsumi, H; Kanba, S

    2013-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders have long and dominantly been regarded to be induced by disturbances of neuronal networks including synapses and neurotransmitters. Thus, the effects of psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics and antidepressants have been understood to modulate synaptic regulation via receptors and transporters of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. Recently, microglia, immunological/inflammatory cells in the brain, have been indicated to have positive links to psychiatric disorders. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and postmortem studies have revealed microglial activation in the brain of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and autism. Animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders have revealed the underlying microglial pathologies. In addition, various psychotropic drugs have been suggested to have direct effects on microglia. Until now, the relationship between microglia, neurotransmitters and psychiatric disorders has not been well understood. Therefore, in this review, at first, we summarize recent findings of interaction between microglia and neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, acetylcholine and glutamate. Next, we introduce up-to-date knowledge of the effects of psychotropic drugs such as antipsychotics, antidepressants and antiepileptics on microglial modulation. Finally, we propose the possibility that modulating microglia may be a key target in the treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Further investigations and clinical trials should be conducted to clarify this perspective, using animal in vivo studies and imaging studies with human subjects.

  6. Bound to be different: neurotransmitter transporters meet their bacterial cousins.

    PubMed

    Henry, L Keith; Meiler, Jens; Blakely, Randy D

    2007-12-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, including the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GAT), norepinephrine (NET), serotonin (SERT) and dopamine (DAT) transporters are extremely important drug targets of great clinical relevance. These Na+, Cl(-)-dependent transporters primarily function following neurotransmission to reset neuronal signaling by transporting neurotransmitter out of the synapse and back into the pre-synaptic neuron. Recent studies have tracked down an elusive binding site for Cl(-) that facilitates neurotransmitter transport using structural differences evident with bacterial family members (e.g., the Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter LeuT Aa) that lack Cl(-) dependence. Additionally, the crystal structures of antidepressant-bound LeuT Aa reveals a surprising mode of drug interaction that may have relevance for medication development. The study of sequence and structural divergence between LeuT Aa and human SLC6 family transporters can thus inform us as to how and why neurotransmitter transporters evolved a reliance on extracellular Cl(-) to propel the transport cycle; what residue changes and helical rearrangements give rise to recognition of different substrates; and how drugs such as antidepressants, cocaine, and amphetamines halt (or reverse) the transport process.

  7. Mechanism of chloride interaction with neurotransmitter:sodium symporters.

    PubMed

    Zomot, Elia; Bendahan, Annie; Quick, Matthias; Zhao, Yongfang; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kanner, Baruch I

    2007-10-11

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS) have a critical role in regulating neurotransmission and are targets for psychostimulants, anti-depressants and other drugs. Whereas the non-homologous glutamate transporters mediate chloride conductance, in the eukaryotic NSS chloride is transported together with the neurotransmitter. In contrast, transport by the bacterial NSS family members LeuT, Tyt1 and TnaT is chloride independent. The crystal structure of LeuT reveals an occluded binding pocket containing leucine and two sodium ions, and is highly relevant for the neurotransmitter transporters. However, the precise role of chloride in neurotransmitter transport and the location of its binding site remain elusive. Here we show that introduction of a negatively charged amino acid at or near one of the two putative sodium-binding sites of the GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) transporter GAT-1 from rat brain (also called SLC6A1) renders both net flux and exchange of GABA largely chloride independent. In contrast to wild-type GAT-1, a marked stimulation of the rate of net flux, but not of exchange, was observed when the internal pH was lowered. Equivalent mutations introduced in the mouse GABA transporter GAT4 (SLC6A11) and the human dopamine transporter DAT (SLC6A3) also result in chloride-independent transport, whereas the reciprocal mutations in LeuT and Tyt1 render substrate binding and/or uptake by these bacterial NSS chloride dependent. Our data indicate that the negative charge, provided either by chloride or by the transporter itself, is required during binding and translocation of the neurotransmitter, probably to counterbalance the charge of the co-transported sodium ions.

  8. Effect of champagne compared to still white wine on peripheral neurotransmitter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Bancel, Etiennette; Perray, Pascale Fabbro; Pouderoux, Philippe; Balmes, Jean-Louis; Bali, Jean-Pierre

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate how the peripheral release of neurotransmitters such as serotonin, dopamine, cholecystokinin, and beta-endorphin is involved in drinking behavior, blood concentrations of these neurotransmitters were followed in 40 healthy young volunteers during the first hour after ingestion of a moderate dose of some common alcoholic beverages (champagne, still white wine) as compared to water. Concerning serotonin levels, two groups of subjects are statistically distinct: one with low basal serotonin levels (< 620 nmol/L) which responded with an increase in serotonin (52% in 10 minutes), and a second group with higher basal serotonin levels (> 620 nmol/L) which responded with a decrease ( 190% in 60 minutes). Variations in serotonin concentrations appear to depend upon the alcoholic content of the beverage. A rapid increase in plasma dopamine concentrations after consumption of champagne seems to be due to the nonalcoholic content of the beverage. Cholecystokinin values were not significantly different between the three beverages: the observed increase can be explained by a moderate gastric distention. Beta-endorphin levels didn't change significantly after drinking. In conclusion, some significant blood variations of serotonin and dopamine appeared even after moderately dose of champagne or still white wine. These changes might be partially responsible for the different drinking behavior.

  9. Effect of Dimerization on the Dynamics of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters.

    PubMed

    Gur, Mert; Cheng, Mary Hongying; Zomot, Elia; Bahar, Ivet

    2017-02-07

    Dimerization is a common feature among the members of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins. Yet, the effect of dimerization on the mechanism of action of NSS members is not fully understood. In this study, we examined the collective dynamics of two members of the family, leucine transporter (LeuT) and dopamine transporter (DAT), to assess the significance of dimerization in modulating the functional motions of the monomers. We used to this aim the anisotropic network model (ANM), an efficient and robust method for modeling the intrinsic motions of proteins and their complexes. Transporters belonging to the NSS family are known to alternate between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing (IF) states, which enables the uptake and release of their substrate (neurotransmitter) respectively, as the substrate is transported from the exterior to the interior of the cell. In both LeuT and DAT, dimerization is found to alter the collective motions intrinsically accessible to the individual monomers in favor of the functional transitions (OF ↔ IF), suggesting that dimerization may play a role in facilitating transport.

  10. The Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Hamamelitannin Increases Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms by Affecting Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis and eDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Breyne, Koen; De Rycke, Riet; Vermote, Arno; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Meyer, Evelyne; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly challenging due to the rapid emergence and dissemination of methicillin-resistant strains. In addition, S. aureus reside within biofilms at the site of infection. Few novel antibacterial agents have been developed in recent years and their bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity results in selective pressure, inevitably inducing antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, innovative antimicrobials with other modes of action are urgently needed. One alternative approach is targeting the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system. Hamamelitannin (2′,5-di-O-galloyl-d-hamamelose; HAM) was previously suggested to block QS through the TraP QS system and was shown to increase S. aureus biofilm susceptibility towards vancomycin (VAN) although mechanistic insights are still lacking. In the present study we provide evidence that HAM specifically affects S. aureus biofilm susceptibility through the TraP receptor by affecting cell wall synthesis and extracellular DNA release of S. aureus. We further provide evidence that HAM can increase the susceptibility of S. aureus biofilms towards different classes of antibiotics in vitro. Finally, we show that HAM increases the susceptibility of S. aureus to antibiotic treatment in in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse mammary gland infection models. PMID:26828772

  11. Tyrosine administration enhances dopamine synthesis and release in light-activated rat retina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, C. J.; Watkins, C. J.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Exposure of dark-adapted albino rats to light (350 lux) significantly elevated retinal levels of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid during the next hour; their return to a dark environment caused dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid levels to fall. Retinal dopamine levels were increased slightly by light exposure, suggesting that the increase in dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid reflected accelerated dopamine synthesis. Administration of tyrosine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) further elevated retinal dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid among light-exposed animals, but failed to affect dopamine release among animals in the dark. These observations show that a physiological stimulus - light exposure - can cause catecholaminergic neurons to become tyrosine-dependent; they also suggest that food consumption may affect neurotransmitter release within the retina.

  12. GnRH dose reduction decreases pituitary LH release and ovulatory response but does not affect corpus luteum (CL) development and function in llamas.

    PubMed

    Silva, M E; Colazo, M G; Ratto, M H

    2012-06-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) is commonly used in llamas to induce ovulation; however, the consequence of reduced doses of GnRH on luteinizing hormone (LH) release, ovulatory response, and subsequent corpus luteum (CL) development and function have apparently not been investigated. Hence, we examined the effect of gradual reduction of gonadorelin acetate (GnRH) dosage on pituitary LH release, ovulatory response, CL development, and plasma progesterone concentrations in llamas. Non-pregnant, non-lactating adult llamas were examined once daily by transrectal ultrasonography, and those with a follicle ≥8 mm in diameter that had grown for three consecutive days were randomly assigned to receive 50 (GnRH50, n = 23), 25 (GnRH25, n = 29), 12.5 (GnRH12.5, n = 29), or 6.25 μg (GnRH6.25, n = 29) of GnRH, or 0.5 mL of PBS (Control group, n = 16) im. In a subset (7 or 8 animals/group), intense blood sampling was done to measure LH concentrations. All females were examined by ultrasonography every 12 h from treatment (Day 0) to Day 2 to determinate ovulation, and thereafter on alternate days until Day 16 to evaluate CL development (9-13 animals/group). Also, blood samples for progesterone determination were taken (9 or 10 animals/group) on alternate days from Days 0-16. Ovulatory response (%) was highest (P < 0.05) in the GnRH50 (82.6), intermediate in the GnRH25 (72.3) and GnRH12.5 (75.9) groups, and lowest in the GnRH6.25 group (48.3). No ovulations were detected in the Control group. Mean peak LH concentrations (ng/mL) were highest (P < 0.05) for GnRH50 (6.2), intermediate for GnRH25 (4.4) and GnRH12.5 (2.9), and lowest for GnRH6.25 (2.2) groups. In addition, based on regression analysis, llamas with an LH peak <4 ng/mL were less likely to ovulate. Llamas given 50 μg of GnRH released more (P < 0.05) pituitary LH and had an LH surge of longer duration than those given 25, 12.5, or 6.25 μg. However, in those that ovulated, neither GnRH treatment nor treatment by

  13. Role of neurotransmitters in palate development and teratologic implications.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, E F

    1985-01-01

    It is hypothesized that neuropharmacologic agents are more teratogenic to humans. Since many neuropharmacologic agents function through neurotransmitter mechanisms, then neurotransmitters should function to regulate embryonic development. Evidence has been obtained that neurotransmitters do indeed function as biological signals in palate development. It has been shown that palate reorientation is modulated by neurotransmitters with a wide range of diversity, similar to the CNS. Thus serotonin and acetylcholine stimulate and GABA inhibits the reorientation process. Spatial diversity is also observed: serotonin functions at the anterior and acetylcholine at the posterior end, and GABA functions more efficiently at either end in different inbred strains. Many criteria for functioning neurotransmitters have been obtained. Both serotonin and GABA have been measured in the palate and developmental changes observed. Physiologic responses to serotonin have been monitored. Serotonin has been shown to stimulate palate cell motility as well as protein carboxyl methylation and cyclic GMP. The serotonin effects on protein carboxyl methylation and cyclic GMP could function to stimulate palate reorientation by modulating cell contractility and protein secretion. Further support for the hypothesis that neuropharmacologic agents could be teratogenic by perturbation of neurotransmitter mechanisms comes from studying GABA and diazepam. Evidence has been obtained that diazepam induces cleft palate by mimicking GABA in a functional GABAergic system in palate development. A significant finding is that genetic differences in both diazepam teratogenesis and in a GABAergic system have been observed. Comparing the SWV and AJ strains, the SWV mouse showed (1) a greater sensitivity to diazepam-induced cleft palate, (2) a greater sensitivity to GABA and diazepam inhibition of palate reorientation in embryo culture, (3) a greater concentration of palatal GABA and (4) a more efficient GABA

  14. The low synaptic release probability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borst, J Gerard G

    2010-06-01

    The release probability, the average probability that an active zone of a presynaptic terminal releases one or more vesicles following an action potential, is tightly regulated. Measurements in cultured neurons or in slices indicate that this probability can vary greatly between synapses, but on average it is estimated to be as high as 0.5. In vivo, however, the size of synaptic potentials is relatively independent of recent history, suggesting that release probability is much lower. Possible causes for this discrepancy include maturational differences, a higher spontaneous activity, a lower extracellular calcium concentration and more prominent tonic inhibition by ambient neurotransmitters during in vivo recordings. Existing evidence thus suggests that under physiological conditions in vivo, presynaptic action potentials trigger the release of neurotransmitter much less frequently than what is observed in in vitro preparations.

  15. Release of endogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine from the myenteric plexus of the guinea-pig isolated small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, P.; Skofitsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    The presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in, and the release of these substances from, the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle (MPLM) layer of the guinea-pig isolated small intestine were investigated. 5-HT and 5-HIAA were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection. Freshly prepared MPLM contained measurable amounts of 5-HT and 5-HIAA. For the release experiments, the MPLM was incubated in a medium containing the 5-HT uptake inhibitor fluoxetine and the monoamine oxidase inhibitor nialamide; this led to a decrease in the 5-HIAA content of the MPLM whereas the 5-HT content remained unchanged. There was a spontaneous release of 5-HT and 5-HIAA from the MPLM. The release of 5-HT was so small that it was just detectable; it seemed equivalent to about 0.8% of the tissue stores released per min. Depolarization of the tissue by increasing the [K+] or by exposing it to veratridine enhanced the release of 5-HT in a Ca2+-dependent manner whereas the release of 5-HIAA was not increased. Tetrodotoxin inhibited the veratridine-evoked release of 5-HT but did not affect the K+-evoked release of 5-HT. The presence of 5-HT in myenteric neurones and the characteristics of the release of 5-HT from these neurones strongly support the hypothesis that 5-HT is an enteric neurotransmitter. PMID:6200171

  16. Effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and blood-brain barrier in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Yi, Meishuang; Chen, Xueping; Muhammad, Ishfaq; Liu, Fangping; Li, Rui; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2016-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is one of the major potential side effects of colistin therapy. However, the mechanistic aspects of colistin-induced neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of colistin on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and amino acid neurotransmitters in the cerebral cortex of mouse. Mice were divided into four groups (n=5) and were administrated intravenously with 15mg/kg/day of colistin sulfate for 1, 3 and 7days successively while the control group was administrated intravenously with saline solution. The permeability and ultrastructure of the BBB were detected using the Evans blue (EB) dye and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the expression of Claudin-5 were determined by real-time PCR examination and western blotting. The brain uptake of colistin was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of colistin on amino acid neurotransmitters and their receptors were also examined by HPLC and real-time PCR. The results of EB extravasation, TEM and expression of Claudin-5 showed that colistin treatment did not affect the BBB integrity. In addition, multiple doses of colistin could induce accumulation of this compound in the brain parenchyma although there was poor brain uptake of colistin. Moreover, colistin exposure significantly increased the contents of glutamate (Glu) and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and enhanced the mRNA expression levels of gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR), gamma aminobutyric acid type B receptor (GABABR), N-methyl-d-aspartate 1 receptor (NR1), N-methyl-d-aspartate 2A receptor (NR2A) and N-methyl-d-aspartate 2B receptor (NR2B) in the cerebral cortex. Our data demonstrate that colistin is able to accumulate in the mouse brain and elevate the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters. These findings may be associated with colistin-induced neurotoxicity.

  17. Differential effects of ethanol on regional glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmitter pathways in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Subramaniam, Vaidyanathan; Patel, Anant Bahadur

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effects of ethanol on neuronal and astroglial metabolism using (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of [1,6-(13)C2]/[1-(13)C]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate, respectively. A three-compartment metabolic model was fitted to the (13)C turnover of GluC3 , GluC4, GABAC 2, GABAC 3, AspC3 , and GlnC4 from [1,6-(13)C2 ]glucose to determine the rates of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. The ratio of neurotransmitter cycle to TCA cycle fluxes for glutamatergic and GABAegic neurons was obtained from the steady-state [2-(13)C]acetate experiment and used as constraints during the metabolic model fitting. (1)H MRS measurement suggests that depletion of ethanol from cerebral cortex follows zero order kinetics with rate 0.18 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min. Acute exposure of ethanol reduces the level of glutamate and aspartate in cortical region. GlnC4 labeling was found to be unchanged from a 15 min infusion of [2-(13)C]acetate suggesting that acute ethanol exposure does not affect astroglial metabolism in naive mice. Rates of TCA and neurotransmitter cycle associated with glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons were found to be significantly reduced in cortical and subcortical regions. Acute exposure of ethanol perturbs the level of neurometabolites and decreases the excitatory and inhibitory activity differentially across the regions of brain. Depletion of ethanol and its effect on brain functions were measured using (1)H and (1)H-[(13)C]-NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with infusion of (13)C-labeled substrates. Ethanol depletion from brain follows zero order kinetics. Ethanol perturbs level of glutamate, and the excitatory and inhibitory activity in mice brain.

  18. Does preoperative abduction value affect functional outcome of combined muscle transfer and release procedures in obstetrical palsy patients with shoulder involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Atakan; Ozkan, Turker; Onel, Defne

    2004-01-01

    Background Obstetric palsy is the injury of the brachial plexus during delivery. Although many infants with plexopathy recover with minor or no residual functional deficits, some children don't regain sufficient limb function because of functional limitations, bony deformities and joint contractures. Shoulder is the most frequently affected joint with internal rotation contracture causing limitation of abduction, external rotation. The treatment comprises muscle release procedures such as posterior subscapularis sliding or anterior subscapularis tendon lengtening and muscle transfers to restore the missing external rotation and abduction function. Methods We evaluated whether the preoperative abduction degree affects functional outcome. Between 1998 and 2002, 46 children were operated on to restore shoulder abduction and external rotation. The average age at surgery was 7.6 years and average follow up was 40.8 months. We compared the postoperative results of the patients who had preoperative abduction less than 90° (Group I: n = 37) with the patients who had preoperative abduction greater than 90° (Group II: n = 9), in terms of abduction and external rotation function with angle measurements and Mallet classification. We inquired whether patients in Group I needed another muscle transfer along with latissimus dorsi and teres major transfers. Results In Group I the average abduction improved from 62.5° to 131.4° (a 68.9° ± 22.9°gain) and the average external rotation improved from 21.4° to 82.6° (a 61.1° ± 23°gain). In Group II the average abduction improved from 99.4°to 140°(a40.5° ± 16°gain) and the average external rotation improved from 33.2°to 82.7° (a 49.5° ± 23.9° gain). Although there was a significant difference between Group I and II for preoperative abduction (p = 0.000) and abduction gain in degrees (p = 0.001), the difference between postoperative values of both groups was not significant (p = 0.268). There was also no significant

  19. Imaging Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Neurotransmitters: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Perez, Gustavo A.; Takei, Shiro; Yao, Ikuko

    2014-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a toolbox of versatile techniques that enable us to investigate analytes in samples at molecular level. In recent years, IMS, and especially matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI), has been used to visualise a wide range of metabolites in biological samples. Simultaneous visualisation of the spatial distribution of metabolites in a single sample with little tissue disruption can be considered as one important advantage of MALDI over other techniques. However, several technical hurdles including low concentrations and rapid degradation rates of small molecule metabolites, matrix interference of signals and poor ionisation, need to be addressed before MALDI can be considered as a reliable tool for the analysis of metabolites such as neurotransmitters in brain tissues from different sources including humans. In the present review we will briefly describe current MALDI IMS techniques used to study neurotransmitters and discuss their current status, challenges, as well as future prospects. PMID:26819893

  20. Physiological and chemical analysis of neurotransmitter candidates at a fast excitatory synapse in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter A V; Trapido-Rosenthal, H G

    2009-12-01

    Motor nerve net (MNN) neurons in the jellyfish Cyanea capillata communicate with one another by way of fast, bidirectional excitatory chemical synapses. As is the case with almost all identified chemical synapses in cnidarians, the identity of the neurotransmitter at these synapses is unclear. MNN neurons are large enough for stable intracellular recordings. This, together with the fact that they can be exposed, providing unlimited access to them and to their synapses, prompted a study of the action of a variety of neurotransmitter candidates, including those typically associated with fast synapses in higher animals. Only the amino acids taurine and beta-alanine produced physiological responses consistent with those of the normal EPSP in these cells. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that both taurine and beta-alanine are present in the neurons and released by depolarization. These various findings strongly suggest that either or both of these amino acids, or a closely related compound is the neurotransmitter at the fast chemical synapses between MNN neurons.

  1. Metabolically active extracellular vesicles released from hepatocytes under drug-induced liver-damaging conditions modify serum metabolome and might affect different pathophysiological processes.

    PubMed

    Royo, Felix; Palomo, Laura; Mleczko, Justyna; Gonzalez, Esperanza; Alonso, Cristina; Martínez, Ibon; Pérez-Cormenzana, Miriam; Castro, Azucena; Falcon-Perez, Juan M

    2017-02-15

    Hepatocytes are involved in the endogenous and drug metabolism; many of the enzymes involved in those processes are incorporated into extracellular vesicles and secreted into the bloodstream. Liver-damaging conditions modify the molecular cargo of those vesicles significantly. However, no information about the effect of these hepatic vesicles on the extracellular environment is available. Drug-induced liver damage increases the number of circulating extracellular vesicles and affects the release and content of hepatocyte-derived vesicles. In this work, we evaluated the metabolic effect of these vesicles on the composition of the serum. We performed a targeted ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS) metabolomics analysis of serum samples. The samples had been first incubated with hepatic extracellular vesicles from hepatocytes challenged with acetaminophen or diclofenac. The incubation affected the serum levels of 67 metabolites, such as amino acids and different species of lipids. The metabolites included various species of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines. These compounds are the components of biological membranes; our observations suggest that the vesicles might take part in remodelling and maintenance of the membranes. Alterations in the levels of some other serum metabolites might have deleterious consequences, for example, the tetracosanoic acid with its cardiovascular effects. However, some of the metabolites whose levels were increased, including alpha-linoleic and tauroursodeoxycholic acids, have been reported to have a protective effect. Our targeted metabolomics analysis indicated that the hepatic extracellular vesicles act as nano-metabolic machines supplying the extracellular environment with the means to integrate diverse tissue responses. In conclusion, we show that the hepatic extracellular vesicles are metabolically active and might play a role in the physiopathological response to hepatic insults

  2. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration.

  3. Electrochemical techniques for subsecond neurotransmitter detection in live rodents.

    PubMed

    Hascup, Kevin N; Hascup, Erin R

    2014-08-01

    Alterations in neurotransmission have been implicated in numerous neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. Unfortunately, few techniques support the measurement of real-time changes in neurotransmitter levels over multiple days, as is essential for ethologic and pharmacodynamic testing. Microdialysis is commonly used for these research paradigms, but its poor temporal and spatial resolution make this technique inadequate for measuring the rapid dynamics (milliseconds to seconds) of fast signaling neurotransmitters, such as glutamate and acetylcholine. Enzymatic microelectrode arrays (biosensors) coupled with electrochemical recording techniques have demonstrated fast temporal resolution (less than 1 s), excellent spatial resolution (micron-scale), low detection limits (≤200 nM), and minimal damage (50 to 100 μm) to surrounding brain tissue. Here we discuss the benefits, methods, and animal welfare considerations of using platinum microelectrodes on a ceramic substrate for enzyme-based electrochemical recording techniques for real-time in vivo neurotransmitter recordings in both anesthetized and awake, freely moving rodents.

  4. Metabolic depression during warm torpor in the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus) does not affect mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide release.

    PubMed

    Grimpo, Kirsten; Kutschke, Maria; Kastl, Anja; Meyer, Carola W; Heldmaier, Gerhard; Exner, Cornelia; Jastroch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Small mammals actively decrease metabolism during daily torpor and hibernation to save energy. Recently, depression of mitochondrial substrate oxidation in isolated liver mitochondria was observed and associated to hypothermic/hypometabolic states in Djungarian hamsters, mice and hibernators. We aimed to clarify whether hypothermia or hypometabolism causes mitochondrial depression during torpor by studying the Golden spiny mouse (Acomys russatus), a desert rodent which performs daily torpor at high ambient temperatures of 32°C. Notably, metabolic rate but not body temperature is significantly decreased under these conditions. In isolated liver, heart, skeletal muscle or kidney mitochondria we found no depression of respiration. Moderate cold exposure lowered torpor body temperature but had minor effects on minimal metabolic rate in torpor. Neither decreased body temperature nor metabolic rate impacted mitochondrial respiration. Measurements of mitochondrial proton leak kinetics and determination of P/O ratio revealed no differences in mitochondrial efficiency. Hydrogen peroxide release from mitochondria was not affected. We conclude that interspecies differences of mitochondrial depression during torpor do not support a general relationship between mitochondrial respiration, body temperature and metabolic rate. In Golden spiny mice, reduction of metabolic rate at mild temperatures is not triggered by depression of substrate oxidation as found in liver mitochondria from other cold-exposed rodents.

  5. Does pre-treatment with micronized progesterone affect the ovarian response to a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist flare-up protocol?

    PubMed

    Loutradis, D; Stefanidis, K; Drakakis, P; Kallianidis, K; El Sheikh, A; Milingos, S; Siskos, K; Michalas, S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ovarian response and the receptivity of the endometrium in women pre-treated with micronized progesterone. Eighty-two normogonodotropic women undergoing in vitro fertilization were studied. Thirty received micronized progesterone 1500 mg/day from day 21 of the cycle for a minimum of 2 weeks, and 52 did not receive micronized progesterone (control group). A gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) was administered to all the patients in the follicular phase (flare-up). Twenty-five cycles were cancelled for fertilization failure due to male factor, 12 (40%) in the progesterone group and 13 (25%) in the control group (p = 0.271). There was no difference in the number of oocytes retrieved (7.3 +/- 5 vs. 8.2 +/- 4), fertilization rate (50.8% vs. 65%), clinical pregnancy rate (16.6% vs. 25%) or implantation rate (8% vs. 14%). In the progesterone group cases without fertilization, we performed two biopsies to evaluate the receptivity of the endometrium. Pinopode expression was noted 7 days after oocyte retrieval. It seems that the administration of micronized progesterone in the previous cycle does not affect the ovarian response to the combination of follicular phase GnRH-a and gonadotropins, nor the receptivity of the endometrium.

  6. How LeuT shapes our understanding of the mechanisms of sodium-coupled neurotransmitter transporters.

    PubMed

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters are ion-coupled symporters that drive the uptake of neurotransmitters from neural synapses. In the past decade, the structure of a bacterial amino acid transporter, leucine transporter (LeuT), has given valuable insights into the understanding of architecture and mechanism of mammalian neurotransmitter transporters. Different conformations of LeuT, including a substrate-free state, inward-open state, and competitive and non-competitive inhibitor-bound states, have revealed a mechanistic framework for the transport and transport inhibition of neurotransmitters. The current review integrates our understanding of the mechanistic and pharmacological properties of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters obtained through structural snapshots of LeuT.

  7. Nicotine induces self-renewal of pancreatic cancer stem cells via neurotransmitter-driven activation of sonic hedgehog signalling.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Banerjee, Jheelam; Al-Wadei, Hussein A N; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2016-01-01

    A small subpopulation of pancreatic cancer cells with characteristics of stem cells drive tumour initiation, progression and metastasis. A better understanding of the regulation of cancer stem cells may lead to more effective cancer prevention and therapy. We have shown that the proliferation and migration of pancreatic cancer cell lines is activated by the nicotinic receptor-mediated release of stress neurotransmitters, responses reversed by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). However, the observed cancer inhibiting effects of GABA will only succeed clinically if GABA inhibits pancreatic cancer stem cells (PCSCs) in addition to the more differentiated cancer cells that comprise the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines. Using PCSCs isolated from two pancreatic cancer patients by cell sorting and by spheroid formation assay from pancreatic cancer cell line Panc-1, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine induces the self-renewal of PCSCs. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) α3, α4, α5 and α7 were expressed and chronic exposure to nicotine increased the protein expression of these receptors. Immunoassays showed that PCSCs produced the stress neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine and the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Chronic nicotine significantly increased the production of stress neurotransmitters and sonic hedgehog (SHH) while inducing Gli1 protein and decreasing GABA. GABA treatment inhibited the induction of SHH and Gli1. Spheroid formation and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide assays showed significant nicotine-induced increases in self renewal and cell proliferation, responses blocked by GABA. Our data suggest that nicotine increases the SHH-mediated malignant potential of PCSCs and that GABA prevents these effects.

  8. Coupled global and local changes direct substrate translocation by neurotransmitter-sodium symporter ortholog LeuT.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Bahar, Ivet

    2013-08-06

    Significant advances have been made in recent years in characterizing neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family structure and function. Yet, many time-resolved events and intermediates that control the various stages of transport cycle remain to be elucidated. Whether NSSs harbor one or two sites for binding their substrates (neurotransmitters or amino acids), and what the role of the secondary site S2 is, if any, are still unresolved. Using molecular modeling and simulations for LeuT, a bacterial NSS, we present a comprehensive account of substrate-binding and -stabilization events, and subsequently triggered interactions leading to substrate (alanine) release. LeuT instantaneous conformation as it reconfigures from substrate-receiving (outward-facing) to -releasing (inward-facing) state appears to be a determinant of its affinity to bind substrate at site S2. In the outward-facing state, S1 robustly binds alanine and regulates subsequent redistribution of interactions to trigger extracellular gate closure; whereas S2 is only a transient binding site. The substrate-binding affinity at S2 increases in an intermediate close to inward-facing state. LeuT harbors the two substrate-binding sites, and small displacements of second substrate near S2 are observed to induce concerted small translocations in the substrate bound to primary site S1, although complete release requires collective structural rearrangements that fully expose the intracellular vestibule to the cytoplasm.

  9. Cholesterol Alters the Dynamics of Release in Protein Independent Cell Models for Exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafinobar, Neda; Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Dunevall, Johan; Angerer, Tina B.; Fletcher, John S.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-09-01

    Neurons communicate via an essential process called exocytosis. Cholesterol, an abundant lipid in both secretory vesicles and cell plasma membrane can affect this process. In this study, amperometric recordings of vesicular dopamine release from two different artificial cell models created from a giant unilamellar liposome and a bleb cell plasma membrane, show that with higher membrane cholesterol the kinetics for vesicular release are decelerated in a concentration dependent manner. This reduction in exocytotic speed was consistent for two observed modes of exocytosis, full and partial release. Partial release events, which only occurred in the bleb cell model due to the higher tension in the system, exhibited amperometric spikes with three distinct shapes. In addition to the classic transient, some spikes displayed a current ramp or plateau following the maximum peak current. These post spike features represent neurotransmitter release from a dilated pore before constriction and show that enhancing membrane rigidity via cholesterol adds resistance to a dilated pore to re-close. This implies that the cholesterol dependent biophysical properties of the membrane directly affect the exocytosis kinetics and that membrane tension along with membrane rigidity can influence the fusion pore dynamics and stabilization which is central to regulation of neurochemical release.

  10. Cholesterol Alters the Dynamics of Release in Protein Independent Cell Models for Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Najafinobar, Neda; Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Dunevall, Johan; Angerer, Tina B.; Fletcher, John S.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Neurons communicate via an essential process called exocytosis. Cholesterol, an abundant lipid in both secretory vesicles and cell plasma membrane can affect this process. In this study, amperometric recordings of vesicular dopamine release from two different artificial cell models created from a giant unilamellar liposome and a bleb cell plasma membrane, show that with higher membrane cholesterol the kinetics for vesicular release are decelerated in a concentration dependent manner. This reduction in exocytotic speed was consistent for two observed modes of exocytosis, full and partial release. Partial release events, which only occurred in the bleb cell model due to the higher tension in the system, exhibited amperometric spikes with three distinct shapes. In addition to the classic transient, some spikes displayed a current ramp or plateau following the maximum peak current. These post spike features represent neurotransmitter release from a dilated pore before constriction and show that enhancing membrane rigidity via cholesterol adds resistance to a dilated pore to re-close. This implies that the cholesterol dependent biophysical properties of the membrane directly affect the exocytosis kinetics and that membrane tension along with membrane rigidity can influence the fusion pore dynamics and stabilization which is central to regulation of neurochemical release. PMID:27650365

  11. Genetic variants of neurotransmitter-related genes and miRNAs in Egyptian autistic patients.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed M; Ismail, Samira; Zarouk, Waheba A; Abdul Baky, Olwya; Sayed, Ahmed A; Abd El-Hamid, Sawsan; Salem, Sohair

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with indisputable evidence for a genetic component. This work studied the association of autism with genetic variations in neurotransmitter-related genes, including MAOA uVNTR, MAOB rs1799836, and DRD2 TaqI A in 53 autistic patients and 30 healthy individuals. The study also analyzed sequence variations of miR-431 and miR-21. MAOA uVNTR was genotyped by PCR, MAOB and DRD2 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-based RFLP, and miR-431 and miR-21 were sequenced. Low expressing allele of MAOA uVNTR was frequently higher in female patients compared to that in controls (OR = 2.25). MAOB G allele frequency was more significantly increased in autistic patients than in controls (P < 0.001 for both males and females). DRD2 A1+ genotype increased autism risk (OR = 5.1). Severity of autism tends to be slightly affected by MAOA/B genotype. Plasma MAOB activity was significantly reduced in G than in A allele carrying males. There was no significant difference in patients and maternal plasma MAOA/B activity compared to controls. Neither mutations nor SNPs in miR-431 and miR-21 were found among studied patients. This study threw light on some neurotransmitter-related genes suggesting their potential role in Autism pathogenesis that warrants further studies and much consideration.

  12. Deletion of mouse FXR gene disturbs multiple neurotransmitter systems and alters neurobehavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Wang, Tingting; Lan, Yunyi; Yang, Li; Pan, Weihong; Zhu, Yonghui; Lv, Boyang; Wei, Yuting; Shi, Hailian; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jie; Duan, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhibi; Wu, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear hormone receptor involved in bile acid synthesis and homeostasis. Dysfunction of FXR is involved in cholestasis and atherosclerosis. FXR is prevalent in liver, gallbladder, and intestine, but it is not yet clear whether it modulates neurobehavior. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that mouse FXR deficiency affects a specific subset of neurotransmitters and results in an unique behavioral phenotype. The FXR knockout mice showed less depressive-like and anxiety-related behavior, but increased motor activity. They had impaired memory and reduced motor coordination. There were changes of glutamatergic, GABAergic, serotoninergic, and norepinephrinergic neurotransmission in either hippocampus or cerebellum. FXR deletion decreased the amount of the GABA synthesis enzyme GAD65 in hippocampus but increased GABA transporter GAT1 in cerebral cortex. FXR deletion increased serum concentrations of many bile acids, including taurodehydrocholic acid, taurocholic acid, deoxycholic acid (DCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), tauro-α-muricholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). There were also changes in brain concentrations of taurocholic acid, taurodehydrocholic acid, tauro-ω-muricholic acid, tauro-β-muricholic acid, deoxycholic acid, and lithocholic acid (LCA). Taken together, the results from studies with FXR knockout mice suggest that FXR contributes to the homeostasis of multiple neurotransmitter systems in different brain regions and modulates neurobehavior. The effect appears to be at least partially mediated by bile acids that are known to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) inducing potential neurotoxicity. PMID:25870546

  13. Modulatory action of taurine on the release of GABA in cerebellar slices of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Namima, M; Okamoto, K; Sakai, Y

    1983-01-01

    For the purpose of demonstrating the action of taurine as a neuromodulator in addition to its suggested neurotransmitter function, the effects of taurine and muscimol on the depolarization-induced Ca-dependent release of [3H] gamma-aminobutyric acid ([3H]GABA) and L-[3H]glutamate in cerebellar slices from guinea pigs were investigated. The release of [3H]GABA was found to be greatly decreased by a GABA agonist, muscimol, and by taurine, but not by glycine. The release of L-[3H]glutamate was little affected by taurine. The release of [3H]GABA, was enhanced by bicuculline and strychnine, but not by picrotoxin, and the suppressive action of muscimol on the GABA release was antagonized by bicuculline, picrotoxin, and strychnine, suggesting the possible existence of presynaptic autoreceptors for GABA in the cerebellum. The suppressive action of taurine on the release of [3H]GABA, on the other hand, was blocked only by bicuculline. These results suggest that taurine reduced the release of [3H]GABA from cerebellar slices by acting on the GABA autoreceptors or, more likely, on other types of receptors that are sensitive to bicuculline. As a possible mechanism for this modulatory action of taurine, the blockade by this amino acid of the influx of Ca2+ into cerebellar tissues was tentatively suggested.

  14. Release-dependent feedback inhibition by a presynaptically localized ligand-gated anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi-Kiya, Seika; Zhou, Keming; Jin, Yishi

    2016-01-01

    Presynaptic ligand-gated ion channels (LGICs) have long been proposed to affect neurotransmitter release and to tune the neural circuit activity. However, the understanding of their in vivo physiological action remains limited, partly due to the complexity in channel types and scarcity of genetic models. Here we report that C. elegans LGC-46, a member of the Cys-loop acetylcholine (ACh)-gated chloride (ACC) channel family, localizes to presynaptic terminals of cholinergic motor neurons and regulates synaptic vesicle (SV) release kinetics upon evoked release of acetylcholine. Loss of lgc-46 prolongs evoked release, without altering spontaneous activity. Conversely, a gain-of-function mutation of lgc-46 shortens evoked release to reduce synaptic transmission. This inhibition of presynaptic release requires the anion selectivity of LGC-46, and can ameliorate cholinergic over-excitation in a C. elegans model of excitation-inhibition imbalance. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of presynaptic negative feedback in which an anion-selective LGIC acts as an auto-receptor to inhibit SV release. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21734.001 PMID:27782882

  15. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal

  16. Effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.A.; Lamm, M.C.; Taljaard, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ethanol (10-200 mM) transiently increased tritium overflow from superfused rat nucleus accumbens slices previously incubated with (/sup 3/H)dopamine (DA) and (/sup 14/C)choline. The effect was greater in striatal tissue and did not appear to be a non-specific membrane effect since (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine (ACh) release was not affected. Lack of antagonism by picrotoxin suggested that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were not involved. Calcium was not a requirement and the DA uptake blocker, nomifensine, was without effect. Ethanol appeared to be causing (/sup 3/H)DA release into the cytoplasm. K+ -stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)DA and (/sup 14/C)ACh from nucleus accumbens and striatal slices was not affected. Clonidine-mediated inhibition of the K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)DA remained unaltered. Ethanol attenuated the isoproterenol-induced enhancement of (/sup 3/H)DA release. Ethanol therefore appeared to interact with components of the DA terminal causing a transient increase in the release of neurotransmitter without impairing K+-evoked release but apparently interfering with the isoproterenol-induced effect.

  17. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  18. Name that neurotransmitter: using music to teach psychopharmacology concepts.

    PubMed

    Hermanns, Melinda; Lilly, Mary LuAnne; Wilson, Kathy; Russell, Nathan Andrew

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of music (i.e., two original songs, "Neurotransmitter Twitter" and "Parkinson's Shuffle") to teach aspects of psychopharmacology to students in the course Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing. Songs were incorporated in both the clinical and classroom settings. This innovative teaching method allowed students the opportunity to revisit the information through multiple exposures of the content for reinforcement and enhancement of student learning in a fun, creative approach. Brain-based research will be discussed, along with the process of development.

  19. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  1. Neurotransmitters regulating acid secretion in the proventriculus of the Houbara bustard (Chlamydotis undulata): a morphological viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Mensah-Brown, E P; Lawrence, P A

    2001-05-01

    Endocrine cells containing somatostatin (Som), gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and nerve fibers containing choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), galanin (Gal), substance P (SP), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were immunolocalized in the proventriculus of the Houbara bustard, Chlamydotis undulata. While GRP-immunoreactive (GRP-IR) cells occur in the inner zone, somatostatin (Som-IR) and polyclonal nNOS (nNOS-IR) immunoreactive cells were localized mainly in the peripheral zone of submucosal glands. GRP-IR, Som-IR, and nNOS-IR cells were occasionally observed in the walls of the gastric glands. Endocrine cells are of the closed variety and usually possess apical processes extending along the basal surfaces of adjacent nonreactive cells. Ultrastructural features of these cells are typical. ChAT, Gal, SP, VIP, and TH were immunolocalized in nerve fibers and terminals in the walls of arterioles and capillaries at the periphery of submucosal glands. Immunoreactivity to monoclonal nNOS occurred mainly in neuronal cell bodies in ganglia located around the submucosal glands. ChAT and TH immunoreactive cell bodies were also occasionally seen around the submucosal glands in the peripheral region. Immunoreactivity to Gal, SP, and VIP, but not ChAT or TH, was discernible around the walls of gastric glands. It was concluded that the distribution of neurotransmitters in neuronal structures is similar, but that of the endocrine cells varies from that of some avian species. The roles of these neurotransmitters in the regulation of acid secretion are discussed.

  2. Vesicle-membrane fusion. Observation of simultaneous membrane incorporation and content release.

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, D J; Hall, J E

    1988-01-01

    Vesicle fusion, the central process of neurotransmitter release and hormonal secretion, is a complex process culminating in simultaneous incorporation of vesicle membrane into the plasma membrane and release of the vesicular contents extracellularly. This report describes simultaneous observation of membrane incorporation and content release using a model system composed of a planar bilayer and dye-filled vesicles. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:2462925

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of the effects of vesicle geometry on calcium microdomains and neurotransmitter release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limsakul, Praopim; Modchang, Charin

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the effects of synaptic vesicle geometry on Ca2+ diffusion dynamics in presynaptic terminals using MCell, a realistic Monte Carlo algorithm that tracks individual molecules. By modeling the vesicle as a sphere and an oblate or a prolate spheroid with a reflective boundary, we measure the Ca2+ concentration at various positions relative to the vesicle. We find that the presence of a vesicle as a diffusion barrier modifies the shape of the [Ca2+] microdomain in the vicinity of the vesicle. Ca2+ diffusion dynamics also depend on the distance between the vesicle and the voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and on the shape of the vesicle. The oblate spheroidal vesicle increases the [Ca2+] up to six times higher than that in the absence of a vesicle, while the prolate spheroidal vesicle can increase the [Ca2+] only 1.4 times. Our results also show that the presence of vesicles that have different geometries can maximally influence the [Ca2+] microdomain when the vesicle is located less than 50 nm from VGCCs.

  4. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Presynaptic NMDARs Enhances Neurotransmitter Release at Neocortical Synapses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Wen, Jing A.; Parekh, Puja K.; Barth, Alison L.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory experience can selectively alter excitatory synaptic strength at neocortical synapses. The rapid increase in synaptic strength induced by selective whisker stimulation (single-row experience/SRE, where all but one row of whiskers has been removed from the mouse face) is due, at least in part, to the trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs)…

  5. Fluorescent false neurotransmitter reveals functionally silent dopamine vesicle clusters in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniela B.; Schmitz, Yvonne; Mészáros, József; Merchant, Paolomi; Hu, Gang; Li, Shu; Henke, Adam; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Karpowicz, Richard J.; Morgenstern, Travis J.; Sonders, Mark S.; Kanter, Ellen; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Mosharov, Eugene V.; Sames, Dalibor; Sulzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmission at dopaminergic synapses has been studied with techniques that provide high temporal resolution but cannot resolve individual synapses. To elucidate the spatial dynamics and heterogeneity of individual dopamine boutons, we developed fluorescent false neurotransmitter 200 (FFN200), a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) substrate that is the first probe to selectively trace monoamine exocytosis in both neuronal cell culture and brain tissue. By monitoring electrically-evoked Ca2+ transients with GCaMP3 and FFN200 release simultaneously, we find that only a small fraction of dopamine boutons that exhibit Ca2+ influx engage in exocytosis, a result confirmed with activity-dependent loading of the endocytic probe FM 1-43. Thus, only a low fraction of striatal dopamine axonal sites with uptake-competent VMAT2 vesicles are capable of transmitter release. This is consistent with the presence of functionally “silent” dopamine vesicle clusters and represents a first report suggestive of presynaptically silent neuromodulatory synapses. PMID:26900925

  6. Long-Term Culture of Astrocytes Attenuates the Readily Releasable Pool of Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Kakazu, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Yuta; Kubo, Natsuko; Kubo, Masafumi; Okuda, Hideto; Takasaki, Kotaro; Kubota, Kaori; Mishima, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Harata, N. Charles; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    The astrocyte is a major glial cell type of the brain, and plays key roles in the formation, maturation, stabilization and elimination of synapses. Thus, changes in astrocyte condition and age can influence information processing at synapses. However, whether and how aging astrocytes affect synaptic function and maturation have not yet been thoroughly investigated. Here, we show the effects of prolonged culture on the ability of astrocytes to induce synapse formation and to modify synaptic transmission, using cultured autaptic neurons. By 9 weeks in culture, astrocytes derived from the mouse cerebral cortex demonstrated increases in β-galactosidase activity and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, both of which are characteristic of aging and glial activation in vitro. Autaptic hippocampal neurons plated on these aging astrocytes showed a smaller amount of evoked release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, and a lower frequency of miniature release of glutamate, both of which were attributable to a reduction in the pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles. Other features of synaptogenesis and synaptic transmission were retained, for example the ability to induce structural synapses, the presynaptic release probability, the fraction of functional presynaptic nerve terminals, and the ability to recruit functional AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors to synapses. Thus the presence of aging astrocytes affects the efficiency of synaptic transmission. Given that the pool of readily releasable vesicles is also small at immature synapses, our results are consistent with astrocytic aging leading to retarded synapse maturation. PMID:23110166

  7. Detection and Monitoring of Neurotransmitters - a Spectroscopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Lee, Kendall; Durrer, William; Bennet, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    In this work we demonstrate the capability of confocal Raman mapping spectroscopy for simultaneously and locally detecting important compounds in neuroscience such as dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine. The Raman results show shifting of the characteristic vibrations of the compounds, observations consistent with previous spectroscopic studies. Although some vibrations are common in these neurotransmitters, Raman mapping was achieved by detecting non-overlapping characteristic spectral signatures of the compounds, as follows: for dopamine the vibration attributed to C-O stretching, for serotonin the indole ring stretching vibration, and for adenosine the adenine ring vibrations. Without damage, dyeing, or preferential sample preparation, confocal Raman mapping provided positive detection of each neurotransmitter, allowing association of the high-resolution spectra with specific micro-scale image regions. Such information is particularly important for complex, heterogeneous samples, where modification of the chemical or physical composition can influence the neurotransmission processes. We also report an estimated dopamine diffusion coefficient two orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated by the flow-injection method.

  8. Release probability-dependent scaling of the postsynaptic responses at single hippocampal GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Biró, Agota A; Holderith, Noémi B; Nusser, Zoltan

    2006-11-29

    The amount of neurotransmitter released after the arrival of an action potential affects the strength and the trial-to-trial variability of postsynaptic responses. Most studies examining the dependence of synaptic neurotransmitter concentration on the release probability (P(r)) have focused on glutamatergic synapses. Here we asked whether univesicular or multivesicular release characterizes transmission at hippocampal GABAergic synapses. We used multiple probability functional analysis to derive quantal parameters at inhibitory connections between cannabinoid receptor- and cholecystokinin (CCK)-expressing interneurons and CA3 pyramidal cells. After the recordings, the cells were visualized and reconstructed at the light-microscopic level, and the number of boutons mediating the IPSCs was determined using electron microscopy (EM). The number of active zones (AZs) per CCK-immunopositive bouton was determined from three-dimensional EM reconstructions, thus allowing the calculation of the total number of AZs for each pair. Our results reveal an approximate fivefold discrepancy between the numbers of functionally determined release sites (17.4 +/- 3.2) and structurally identified AZs (3.7 +/- 0.9). Channel modeling predicts that a fivefold to sevenfold increase in the peak synaptic GABA concentration is required for the fivefold enhancement of the postsynaptic responses. Kinetic analysis of the unitary IPSCs indicates that the increase in synaptic GABA concentration is most likely attributable to multivesicular release. This change in the synaptic GABA concentration transient together with extremely low postsynaptic receptor occupancy permits a P(r)-dependent scaling of the postsynaptic response generated at a single hippocampal GABAergic synaptic contact.

  9. Identification of coffee components that stimulate dopamine release from pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12).

    PubMed

    Walker, J; Rohm, B; Lang, R; Pariza, M W; Hofmann, T; Somoza, V

    2012-02-01

    Coffee and caffeine are known to affect the limbic system, but data on the influence of coffee and coffee constituents on neurotransmitter release is limited. We investigated dopamine release and Ca(2+)-mobilization in pheochromocytoma cells (PC-12 cells) after stimulation with two lyophilized coffee beverages prepared from either Coffea arabica (AR) or Coffea canephora var. robusta (RB) beans and constituents thereof. Both coffee lyophilizates showed effects in dilutions between 1:100 and 1:10,000. To identify the active coffee compound, coffee constituents were tested in beverage and plasma representative concentrations. Caffeine, trigonelline, N-methylpyridinium, chlorogenic acid, catechol, pyrogallol and 5-hydroxytryptamides increased calcium signaling and dopamine release, although with different efficacies. While N-methylpyridinium stimulated the Ca(2+)-mobilization most potently (EC(200): 0.14±0.29μM), treatment of the cells with pyrogallol (EC(200): 48±14nM) or 5-hydroxytryptamides (EC(200): 10±3nM) lead to the most pronounced effect on dopamine release. In contrast, no effect was seen for the reconstituted biomimetic mixture. We therefore conclude that each of the coffee constituents tested stimulated the dopamine release in PC-12 cells. Since no effect was found for their biomimetic mixture, we hypothesize other coffee constituents being responsible for the dopamine release demonstrated for AR and RB coffee brews.

  10. Amino Acid Neurotransmitters and High Pressure Nervous Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-07

    labeled compounds from astroglial cells: Astroglial cells release taurine and adenine-labeled compounds when stimulated with )3-adrenergic agonists ...mechanism responsible for taurine release from astroglia differs from that responsible for transmitter release from neurons because (a) A- agonists do not...swelling. Although 3- agonist -stimulated taurine release is a cAMP-mediated process, it also is exquisitely sensitive to the osmolality of the medium; it

  11. Evidence that tachykinins are the main NANC excitatory neurotransmitters in the guinea-pig common bile duct

    PubMed Central

    Patacchini, Riccardo; De Giorgio, Roberto; Barthó, Lorand; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Alberto Maggi, Carlo

    1998-01-01

    -azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 30 μM). PPADS (30 μM) selectively blocked (75±9 and 50±7% inhibition, n=4 each) the contractile responses produced by 100 and 300 μM ATP. Tachykinin-containing nerve fibres were detected by using immunohistochemical techniques in all parts of the bile duct, being distributed to the muscle layer and lamina propria of mucosa. In the terminal part of the duct (ampulla) some labelled ganglion cells were observed. In conclusion, this study shows that in the guinea-pig terminal biliary tract tachykinins, released from intrinsic neuronal elements, are the main NANC excitatory neurotransmitters, which act by stimulating tachykinin NK2 (and possibly NK1) receptors. ATP is also involved as excitatory neurotransmitter. Nitric oxide and opioids act as inhibitory mediators/modulators in this preparation. PMID:9756387

  12. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  13. Substrate-modulated gating dynamics in a Na+-coupled neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongfang; Terry, Daniel S; Shi, Lei; Quick, Matthias; Weinstein, Harel; Blanchard, Scott C; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2011-06-02

    Neurotransmitter/Na(+) symporters (NSSs) terminate neuronal signalling by recapturing neurotransmitter released into the synapse in a co-transport (symport) mechanism driven by the Na(+) electrochemical gradient. NSSs for dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin are targeted by the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamine, as well as by antidepressants. The crystal structure of LeuT, a prokaryotic NSS homologue, revealed an occluded conformation in which a leucine (Leu) and two Na(+) are bound deep within the protein. This structure has been the basis for extensive structural and computational exploration of the functional mechanisms of proteins with a LeuT-like fold. Subsequently, an 'outward-open' conformation was determined in the presence of the inhibitor tryptophan, and the Na(+)-dependent formation of a dynamic outward-facing intermediate was identified using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging has been used to reveal reversible transitions to an inward-open LeuT conformation, which involve the movement of transmembrane helix TM1a away from the transmembrane helical bundle. We investigated how substrate binding is coupled to structural transitions in LeuT during Na(+)-coupled transport. Here we report a process whereby substrate binding from the extracellular side of LeuT facilitates intracellular gate opening and substrate release at the intracellular face of the protein. In the presence of alanine, a substrate that is transported ∼10-fold faster than leucine, we observed alanine-induced dynamics in the intracellular gate region of LeuT that directly correlate with transport efficiency. Collectively, our data reveal functionally relevant and previously hidden aspects of the NSS transport mechanism that emphasize the functional importance of a second substrate (S2) binding site within the extracellular vestibule. Substrate binding in this S2 site appears to act cooperatively

  14. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong M.; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q.; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J.-C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations. PMID:26404311

  15. Attenuation of forgetting by pharmacological stimulation of aminergic neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Quartermain, D; Judge, M E; Leo, P

    1988-05-01

    Mice were trained in one-way active avoidance to a criterion of 3/4 avoidances and tested under extinction conditions one week later when substantial forgetting had occurred. Thirty min prior to testing animals were injected with either saline or different doses of drugs which activate the noradrenergic (phenylephrine, salbutamol, clonidine) dopaminergic (L-dopa(Sinemet) transdihydrolisuride, apomorphine) and serotonergic (fluoxetine, 5-methoxy DMT) neurotransmitter systems. Results showed that all agents alleviated forgetting in a dose dependent fashion. Untrained mice treated with the most effective dose of representative drugs from each class did not exhibit avoidance behavior at testing indicating that the improved performance of trained animals was probably not the result of increased activity or other non-memorial effects of the drugs. It was concluded that pharmacological agents which stimulate monoamine systems may improve memory retrieval by activating a non-specific neural system which controls arousal, attention and motor readiness.

  16. Terahertz identification and quantification of neurotransmitter and neurotrophy mixture

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yan; Yuan, Xiaorong; Zou, Xiang; Chen, Wanqing; Huang, Hui; Zhao, Hongwei; Song, Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been widely used for investigating the fingerprint spectrum of different substances. For cancerous tissues, the greatest difficulty is the absorption peaks of various substances contained in tissues overlap with each other, which are hard to identify and quantitative analyze. As a result, it is very hard to measure the presence of cancer cell and then to diagnose accurately. In this paper, we select three typical neurotransmitters (γ-aminobutyric acid, L-glutamic acid, dopamine hydrochloride) and two typical metabolites (inositol and creatine) in neurons to measure their terahertz spectra with different mixture ratios. By choosing characteristic absorption peaks, removing baseline and using the least square method, we can identify the components and proportions of each mixture, where the goodness of fit to practical situation is up to 94%. These results provide important evidences for identifying nerve substances and obtaining exact quantitative analysis. PMID:27895988

  17. Teaching medical students basic neurotransmitter pharmacology using primary research resources.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Amy C; Devonshire, Ian M; Greenfield, Susan A; Dommett, Eleanor J

    2010-12-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We designed a seminar where small groups of students worked on different neurotransmitters before contributing information to a plenary session. Student feedback suggested that when the information was largely novel, students learned considerably more. Crucially, this improvement in knowledge was seen even when they had not directly studied a particular transmitter in their work groups, suggesting a shared learning experience. Moreover, the majority of students reported that using primary research papers was easy and useful, with over half stating that they would use them in future study.

  18. Wireless Power Transfer for Autonomous Wearable Neurotransmitter Sensors.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Kota, Pavan Kumar; Nguyen, Minh Q; Dubey, Souvik; Rao, Smitha; Mays, Jeffrey; Chiao, J-C

    2015-09-23

    In this paper, we report a power management system for autonomous and real-time monitoring of the neurotransmitter L-glutamate (L-Glu). A low-power, low-noise, and high-gain recording module was designed to acquire signal from an implantable flexible L-Glu sensor fabricated by micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS)-based processes. The wearable recording module was wirelessly powered through inductive coupling transmitter antennas. Lateral and angular misalignments of the receiver antennas were resolved by using a multi-transmitter antenna configuration. The effective coverage, over which the recording module functioned properly, was improved with the use of in-phase transmitter antennas. Experimental results showed that the recording system was capable of operating continuously at distances of 4 cm, 7 cm and 10 cm. The wireless power management system reduced the weight of the recording module, eliminated human intervention and enabled animal experimentation for extended durations.

  19. Nutrients affecting brain composition and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    This review examines the changes in brain composition and in various brain functions, including behavior, that can follow the ingestion of particular foods or nutrients. It details those that are best understood: the increases in serotonin, catecholamine, or acetylcholine synthesis that can occur subsequent to food-induced increases in brain levels of tryptophan, tyrosine, or choline; it also discusses the various processes that must intervene between the mouth and the synapse, so to speak, in order for a nutrient to affect neurotransmission, and it speculates as to additional brain chemicals that may ultimately be found to be affected by changes in the availability of their nutrient precursors. Because the brain chemicals best known to be nutrient dependent overlap with those thought to underlie the actions of most of the drugs used to treat psychiatric diseases, knowledge of this dependence may help the psychiatrist to understand some of the pathologic processes occurring in his/her patients, particularly those with appetitive symptoms. At the very least, such knowledge should provide the psychiatrist with objective criteria for judging when to take seriously assertions that particular foods or nutrients do indeed affect behavior (e.g., in hyperactive children). If the food can be shown to alter neurotransmitter release, it may be behaviorally-active; however, if it lacks a discernible neurochemical effect, the likelihood that it really alters behavior is small.

  20. Endocrinological disorders affecting neurosurgical patients: An intensivists perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Haldar, Rudrashish

    2014-01-01

    Management of critically ill neurosurgical patients is often complicated by the presence or development of endocrinological ailments which complicate the clinical scenario and adversely affect the prognosis of these patients. The anatomical proximity to the vital centers regulating the endocrinological physiology and alteration in the neurotransmitter release causes disturbances in the hormonal homeostasis. This paves the way for development of diverse disorders where single or multiple hormones may be involved which can have deleterious effect on the different organ system. Understanding and awareness of these disorders is important for the treating intensivist to recognize these changes early in their course, so that appropriate and timely therapeutic measures can be initiated along with the treatment of the primary malady. PMID:25364671

  1. Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William; Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

    2010-11-01

    Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

  2. Inhibition of stimulated dopamine release and hemodynamic response in the brain through electrical stimulation of rat forepaw.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Iris; Ren, Jiaqian; Wang, Fu-Nien; Xu, Haibo; Mandeville, Joseph B; Kim, Young; Rosen, Bruce R; Jenkins, Bruce G; Hui, Kathleen KS; Kwong, Kenneth K

    2008-01-01

    The subcortical response to peripheral somatosensory stimulation is not well studied. Prior literature suggests that somatosensory stimulation can affect dopaminergic tone. We studied the effects of electrical stimulation near the median nerve on the response to an amphetamine induced increase in synaptic dopamine. We applied the electrical stimulation close to the median nerve 20 minutes after administration of 3mg/kg amphetamine. We used fMRI and microdialysis to measure markers of DA release, together with the release of associated neurotransmitters of striatal Glutamate (Glu) and GABA. Result 1) Changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV), a marker used in fMRI, indicate that electrical stimulation significantly attenuated increased DA release (due to AMPH) in the striatum, thalamus, medial prefrontal and cingulate cortices. 2) Microdialysis showed that electrical stimulation increased Glu and GABA release and attenuated the AMPH-enhanced DA release. The striatal DA dynamics correlated with the CBV response. Conclusion These results demonstrate that electrical stimulation near the median nerve activates Glu/GABA release which subsequently attenuate excess striatal DA release. These data provide evidence for physiologic modulation caused by electroacupuncture at points near the median nerve. PMID:18178315

  3. Predator Exposure/Psychosocial Stress Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Modulates Neurotransmitters in the Rat Hippocampus and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C. Brad; Ebenezer, Philip J.; McLaughlin, Leslie D.; Francis, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can develop in response to a traumatic event involving a threat to life. To date, no diagnostic biomarkers have been identified for PTSD. Recent research points toward physiological abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, sympathoadrenal medullary and immune system that may be implicated in the disorder. The modulation of neurotransmitters is another possible mechanism, but their role in the progression of PTSD is poorly understood. Low serotonin (5-HT) may be a factor, but it may not be the only neurotransmitter affected as modulation affects levels of other neurotransmitters. In this study, we hypothesized the predator exposure/psychosocial stress rodent model of PTSD may alter levels of 5-HT and other neurotransmitters in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this experiment. We induced PTSD via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress model, whereby rats were placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of the 31-day experiment. Rats also received psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. On day 32, the rats were sacrificed and the brains dissected to remove the hippocampus and PFC. Norepinephrine (NE), 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), homovanillic acid (HVA), dopamine (DA), and 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and 5-HT levels in the hippocampus and PFC were measured with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the hippocampus, 5-HT and HVA were lower, while NE and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. In the PFC, only 5-HT was lower, while NE, DA, and DOPAC were higher, in the PTSD group vs. controls. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also examined and confirmed our findings. These results demonstrate that the predator exposure/psychosocial stress model of PTSD produces neurotransmitter changes similar to those seen in human patients and may cause a

  4. Regulatory role of intracellular sodium ions in neurotransmitter secretion.

    PubMed

    Melinek, R; Lev-Tov, A; Meiri, H; Erulkar, S D; Rahamimoff, R

    1982-01-01

    Calcium ions are the main inducer of quantal transmitter release of the frog neuromuscular junction; but even in their virtual absence from the extracellular medium, nerve stimulation causes a prolonged augmentation of transmitter release. These facts led to the hypothesis that an accumulation of intracellular sodium can serve as a slow secondary regulator of neurosecretion. Three lines of evidence presented in this article substantiate this hypothesis: firstly, veratridine, which is known to increase sodium fluxes through the voltage-dependent sodium channels, increases transmitter release after nerve stimulation. Secondly, monensin, which was shown to induce sodium transport through nerve membranes, increases evoked transmitter release, tetanic potentiation and posttetanic potentiation. Thirdly, sodium-filled phosphatidylcholine liposomes increase transmitter release. These effects of sodium are probably not due to a direct effect on the transmitter release mechanism, but are caused by sodium-induced calcium translocation from intracellular stores.

  5. RESEARCH PAPERDrp1 is dispensable for apoptotic cytochrome c release in primed MCF10A and fibroblast cells but affects Bcl-2 antagonist-induced respiratory changes

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, P; Ge, S X; Hwang, H; Waddell, J; Roelofs, B A; Karbowski, M; Sesaki, H; Polster, B M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) mediates mitochondrial fission and is thought to promote Bax/Bak-induced cytochrome c release during apoptosis. Conformationally active Bax, Bak and Bax/Bak-activating BH3-only proteins, such as Bim, are restrained by anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in cells that are ‘primed for death’. Inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w by the antagonist ABT-737 causes rapid apoptosis of primed cells. Hence, we determined whether Drp1 is required for cytochrome c release, respiratory alterations and apoptosis of cells that are already primed for death. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We tested the Drp1 inhibitor mdivi-1 for inhibition of cytochrome c release in MCF10A cells primed by Bcl-2 overexpression. We measured ATP synthesis-dependent,-independent and cytochrome c-limited maximal oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) and cell death of immortalized wild-type (WT) and Drp1 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) treated with ABT-737. KEY RESULTS Mdivi-1 failed to attenuate ABT-737-induced cytochrome c release. ABT-737 decreased maximal OCR measured in the presence of uncoupler in both WT and Drp1 KO MEF, consistent with respiratory impairment due to release of cytochrome c. However, Drp1 KO MEF were slightly less sensitive to this ABT-737-induced respiratory inhibition compared with WT, and were resistant to an initial ABT-737-induced increase in ATP synthesis-independent O2 consumption. Nevertheless, caspase-dependent cell death was not reduced. Pro-apoptotic Bax was unaltered, whereas Bak was up-regulated in Drp1 KO MEF. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The findings indicate that once fibroblast cells are primed for death, Drp1 is not required for apoptosis. However, Drp1 may contribute to ABT-737-induced respiratory changes and the kinetics of cytochrome c release. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http

  6. Oral Administration of Methylphenidate (Ritalin) Affects Dopamine Release Differentially Between the Prefrontal Cortex and Striatum: A Microdialysis Study in the Monkey.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tohru; Kojima, Takashi; Honda, Yoshiko; Hosokawa, Takayuki; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Watanabe, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH; trade name Ritalin) is a widely used drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and is often used as a cognitive enhancer. Because MPH increases dopamine (DA) release by blocking the DA transporter in the human striatum, MPH is supposed to work on attention and cognition through a DA increase in the striatum. However, ADHD patients show impaired prefrontal cortex (PFC) function and MPH administration is associated with increased neural activity in the PFC. Although MPH is indicated to increase DA release in the rat PFC, there has been no study to examine MPH-induced DA changes in the human PFC because of technical difficulties associated with the low level of PFC DA receptors. Using the microdialysis technique, we examined the effects of oral administration of MPH on DA release in both the PFC and striatum in the monkey. We also tested the effect of MPH on cognitive task performance. As in human studies, in the striatum, both high and low doses of MPH induced consistent increases in DA release ∼30 min after their administrations. In the PFC, a consistent increase in DA release was observed 1 h after a high dose, but not low doses, of MPH. Low doses of MPH improved cognitive task performance, but a high dose of MPH made the monkey drowsy. Therefore, low-dose MPH-induced cognitive enhancement is supported by striatum DA increase.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Methylphenidate (MPH) is a widely used drug for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is often used as a cognitive enhancer. Although human positron emission tomography studies suggest that MPH works on attention and cognition through dopamine (DA) changes in the striatum, there has been no study to examine MPH-induced DA changes in the human prefrontal cortex (PFC). Using the microdialysis technique in monkeys, we found, for the first time, that low doses of MPH consistently increased DA release in the striatum but did not in the PFC

  7. Design of calcium phosphate ceramics for drug delivery applications in bone diseases: A review of the parameters affecting the loading and release of the therapeutic substance.

    PubMed

    Parent, Marianne; Baradari, Hiva; Champion, Eric; Damia, Chantal; Viana-Trecant, Marylène

    2017-02-21

    Effective treatment of critical-size defects is a key challenge in restorative surgery of bone. The strategy covers the implantation of biocompatible, osteoconductive, bioactive and biodegradable devices which (1) well interact with native tissue, mimic multi-dimensional and hierarchical structure of bone and (2) are able to enhance bone repair, treating post implantation pathologies or bone diseases by local delivery of therapeutic agents. Among different options, calcium phosphate biomaterials are found to be attractive choices, due to their excellent biocompatibility, customisable bioactivity and biodegradability. Several approaches have been established to enhance this material ability to be loaded with a therapeutic agent, in order to obtain an in situ controlled release that meets the clinical needs. This article reviews the most important factors influencing on both drug loading and release capacity of porous calcium phosphate bone substitutes. Characteristics of the carrier, drug/carrier interactions, experimental conditions of drug loading and evaluation of drug delivery are considered successively.

  8. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN BIOMEDICINE.

    PubMed

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-05-03

    Neurotransmitters are important biological molecules that are essential to many neurophysiological processes including memory, cognition, and behavioral states. The development of analytical methodologies to accurately detect neurotransmitters is of great importance in neurological and biological research. Specifically designed microelectrodes or microbiosensors have demonstrated potential for rapid, real-time measurements with high spatial resolution. Such devices can facilitate study of the role and mechanism of action of neurotransmitters and can find potential uses in biomedicine. This paper reviews the current status and recent advances in the development and application of electrochemical sensors for the detection of small-molecule neurotransmitters. Measurement challenges and opportunities of electroanalytical methods to advance study and understanding of neurotransmitters in various biological models and disease conditions are discussed.

  9. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ELECTROCHEMICAL SENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS FOR APPLICATIONS IN BIOMEDICINE

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are important biological molecules that are essential to many neurophysiological processes including memory, cognition, and behavioral states. The development of analytical methodologies to accurately detect neurotransmitters is of great importance in neurological and biological research. Specifically designed microelectrodes or microbiosensors have demonstrated potential for rapid, real-time measurements with high spatial resolution. Such devices can facilitate study of the role and mechanism of action of neurotransmitters and can find potential uses in biomedicine. This paper reviews the current status and recent advances in the development and application of electrochemical sensors for the detection of small-molecule neurotransmitters. Measurement challenges and opportunities of electroanalytical methods to advance study and understanding of neurotransmitters in various biological models and disease conditions are discussed. PMID:26973348

  10. Complex N acquisition by soil diazotrophs: how the ability to release exoenzymes affects N fixation by terrestrial free-living diazotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Jeffrey S; Friesen, Maren L

    2017-01-01

    Terrestrial systems support a variety of free-living soil diazotrophs, which can fix nitrogen (N) outside of plant associations. However, owing to the metabolic costs associated with N fixation, free-living soil diazotrophs likely rely on soil N to satisfy the majority of cellular N demand and only fix atmospheric N under certain conditions. Culture-based studies and genomic data show that many free-living soil diazotrophs can access high-molecular weight organic soil N by releasing N-acquiring enzymes such as proteases and chitinases into the extracellular environment. Here, we formally propose a N acquisition strategy used by free-living diazotrophs that accounts for high-molecular weight N acquisition through exoenzyme release by these organisms. We call this the ‘LAH N-acquisition strategy' for the preferred order of N pools used once inorganic soil N is limiting: (1) low-molecular weight organic N, (2) atmospheric N and (3) high-molecular weight organic N. In this framework, free-living diazotrophs primarily use biological N fixation (BNF) as a short-term N acquisition strategy to offset the cellular N lost in exoenzyme excretion as low-molecular weight N becomes limiting. By accounting for exoenzyme release by free-living diazotrophs within a cost–benefit framework, investigation of the LAH N acquisition strategy will contribute to a process-level understanding of BNF in soil environments. PMID:27898052

  11. Kinetics of acetylcholine quanta release at the neuromuscular junction during high-frequency nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kovyazina, Irina V; Tsentsevitsky, Andrei N; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Bukharaeva, Ellya A

    2010-11-01

    The effects of high-frequency nerve stimulation (10-100 Hz) on the kinetics of evoked acetylcholine quanta secretion from frog motor nerve endings were studied. The amplitude and temporal parameters of uni- and multiquantal endplate currents were analysed to estimate the possible changes in the degree of synchrony of quantal release. The frog neuromuscular synapse is unusually long and we have placed special emphasis on evaluating the velocity of propagation of excitation along the nonmyelinated nerve ending as this might influence the synchrony of release from the whole terminal and hence affect the time course of postsynaptic currents. The data show that high-frequency firing leads to the desynchronization of acetylcholine release from motor nerve endings governed by at least two independent factors, namely a reduction of nerve pulse propagation velocity in the nonmyelinated parts of the axon and a change of secretion kinetics at single active zones. A computer reconstruction of the multiquantal synaptic response was performed to estimate any contribution of each of the above factors to the total rate of release and amplitude and time characteristics of the endplate currents. The results indicate that modification of the kinetics of neurotransmitter quanta release during high-frequency firing should be taken into account when mechanisms underlying the plasticity of chemical synapses are under investigation.

  12. Mechanical tension contributes to clustering of neurotransmitter vesicles at presynaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Siechen, Scott; Yang, Shengyuan; Chiba, Akira; Saif, Taher

    2009-01-01

    Memory and learning in animals are mediated by neurotransmitters that are released from vesicles clustered at the synapse. As a synapse is used more frequently, its neurotransmission efficiency increases, partly because of increased vesicle clustering in the presynaptic neuron. Vesicle clustering has been believed to result primarily from biochemical signaling processes that require the connectivity of the presynaptic terminal with the cell body, the central nervous system, and the postsynaptic cell. Our in vivo experiments on the embryonic Drosophila nervous system show that vesicle clustering at the neuromuscular presynaptic terminal depends on mechanical tension within the axons. Vesicle clustering vanishes upon severing the axon from the cell body, but is restored when mechanical tension is applied to the severed end of the axon. Clustering increases when intact axons are stretched mechanically by pulling the postsynaptic muscle. Using micro mechanical force sensors, we find that embryonic axons that have formed neuromuscular junctions maintain a rest tension of ≈1 nanonewton. If the rest tension is perturbed mechanically, axons restore the rest tension either by relaxing or by contracting over a period of ≈15 min. Our results suggest that neuromuscular synapses employ mechanical tension as a signal to modulate vesicle accumulation and synaptic plasticity. PMID:19620718

  13. LeuT: a prokaryotic stepping stone on the way to a eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporter structure.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satinder K

    2008-01-01

    Ion-coupled secondary transport is utilized by a broad range of integral membrane proteins to catalyze the energetically unfavorable movement of solute molecules across a lipid bilayer. Members of the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family, present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, are sodium-coupled symporters that play crucial roles in processes as diverse as nutrient uptake and neurotransmitter clearance. The crystal structure of LeuT, a bacterial member of this family, provided the first atomic-level glimpse into overall architecture, pinpointed the substrate and sodium binding sites and implicated candidate helices and residues in the "gating" conformational changes that accompany ion binding and release. The structure is consistent with a wealth of elegant biochemical data on the eukaryotic counterparts and has for the first time permitted the construction of accurate homology models that can be directly tested experimentally. Sequence identity is especially high near the substrate and sodium binding sites and, thus, molecular insights within these regions have been substantial. However, there are several topics relevant to transport mechanism, inhibition and regulation that structure/function studies of LeuT cannot adequately address, suggesting the need for a eukaryotic transporter crystal structure.

  14. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog.

    PubMed

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-15

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na(+) stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na(+) binding sites contributes to Na(+)-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na(+), suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na(+) responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na(+)-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na(+) and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na(+) binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening.

  15. Two Na+ Sites Control Conformational Change in a Neurotransmitter Transporter Homolog*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoulari, Sotiria; Margheritis, Eleonora; Nagarajan, Anu; DeWitt, David C.; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Rosado, Edwin; Ravera, Silvia; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Forrest, Lucy R.; Rudnick, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In LeuT, a prokaryotic homolog of neurotransmitter transporters, Na+ stabilizes outward-open conformational states. We examined how each of the two LeuT Na+ binding sites contributes to Na+-dependent closure of the cytoplasmic pathway using biochemical and biophysical assays of conformation. Mutating either of two residues that contribute to the Na2 site completely prevented cytoplasmic closure in response to Na+, suggesting that Na2 is essential for this conformational change, whereas Na1 mutants retained Na+ responsiveness. However, mutation of Na1 residues also influenced the Na+-dependent conformational change in ways that varied depending on the position mutated. Computational analyses suggest those mutants influence the ability of Na1 binding to hydrate the substrate pathway and perturb an interaction network leading to the extracellular gate. Overall, the results demonstrate that occupation of Na2 stabilizes outward-facing conformations presumably through a direct interaction between Na+ and transmembrane helices 1 and 8, whereas Na+ binding at Na1 influences conformational change through a network of intermediary interactions. The results also provide evidence that N-terminal release and helix motions represent distinct steps in cytoplasmic pathway opening. PMID:26582198

  16. Efficient measurement of endogenous neurotransmitters in small localized regions of central nervous systems in vitro with HPLC.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuesi M; Feldman, Jack L

    2007-03-15

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is widely used to determine neurotransmitter concentrations in the central nervous system (CNS). Finding the optimal methods to sample from CNS tissue poses a challenge for neuroscientists. Here, we describe a method that allows assay of neurotransmitters (or other chemicals) in small regions (down to 180mum in diameter) in in vitro preparations concurrently with electrophysiological recordings. The efficiency for measuring small amounts of chemicals is enhanced by a sample collecting pipette with filter paper at the tip that makes close contact with the target region in CNS tissue. With a wire plunger in the calibrated pipette controlled by a microsyringe pump, there is virtually no dead volume. Samples in a volume of 10muL (taken, e.g., at 2muL/min over 5min) can be injected into a HPLC machine with microbore columns. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method by measuring acetylcholine (ACh) in the ventral horn and its surrounding areas of the spinal cord in en bloc brainstem-spinal cord preparations. In control conditions, endogenous ACh levels in these regions were detectable. Application of neostigmine (an inhibitor of acetylcholinesterases (AChEs)) increased ACh concentrations, and at the same time, induced tonic/seizure-like activity in efferent motor output recorded from cervical ventral nerve roots. Higher ACh concentrations in the ventral horn were differentiated from nearby regions: the lateral and midline aspects of the ventral spinal cord. In addition, ACh in the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) and the hypoglossal nucleus in medullary slice preparations can also be measured. Our results indicate that the method proposed in this study can be used to measure neurotransmitters in small and localized CNS regions. Correlation between changes in neurotransmitters in target regions and the neuronal activities can be revealed in vitro. Our data also suggest that there is endogenous ACh release in spinal

  17. [Preliminary research on multi-neurotransmitters' change regulation in 120 depression patients' brains].

    PubMed

    Chi, Ming; Qing, Xue-Mei; Pan, Yan-Shu; Xu, Feng-Quan; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Zhen-Hua

    2014-04-01

    In view of the effective traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of clinical depression, the mechanism is not clear, this study attempts to research the cause of depression in a complex situation to lay the foundation for the next step of TCM curative effect evaluation. Based on the brain wave of 120 depression patients and 40 ordinary person, the change regulation of acetylcholine, dopamine, norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters in the whole and various encephalic regions' multi-neurotransmitters of depression patients-serotonin are analysed by search of encephalo-telex (SET) system, which lays the foundation for the diagnosis of depression. The result showed that: contrased with the normal person group, the mean value of the six neurotransmitters in depression patients group are: (1) in the whole encephalic region of depression patients group the dopamine fall (P < 0.05), and in the double centralregions, right temporal region and right parietal region distinct fall (P < 0.01); (2) in the right temporal region of depression patients group the serotonin rise (P < 0.05); (3) in the right central region, left parietal region of depression patients group the acetylcholine fall (P < 0.05), left rear temporal region fall obviously (P < 0.01). The correlation research between antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters and neurotransmitters: (1) the three antagonizing pairs of neurotransmitters-serotonin and dopamine, acetylcholine and norepinephrine, depression neurotransmitters and excited neurotransmitters, in ordinary person group and depression patients group are characterizeed by middle or strong negative correlation. Serotonin and dopamine, which are characterized by weak negative correlation in the right rear temporal region of ordinary person group, are characterized by strong negative correlation in the other encephalic regions and the whole encephalic (ordinary person group except the right rear temporal region

  18. Neurotransmitter regulation of circadian structural changes in the fly's visual system.

    PubMed

    Meinertzhagen, I A; Pyza, E

    1999-04-15

    The visual system of the fly's compound eye undergoes a number of cyclical day/night changes that have a circadian basis. Such responses are seen in the synaptic terminals of the photoreceptors and in their large monopolar-cell interneurons in the first optic neuropile, or lamina. These changes include, in the photoreceptor terminals, rhythms in the numbers of synapses and the vertical migration of screening pigment; and, in the monopolar cells L1 and L2, a rhythm in the transients of the electroretinogram and in the cyclical swelling of L1 and L2 lamina axons, as well as of the epithelial glia that surround these. Some of these changes are seen in both the housefly and the fruit fly, but the time-course of such changes differs between the two species. Many of the changes are influenced by the injection of various transmitter candidates, in a direction that can be reconciled with the possibility of normal endogenous release of two substances, 5HT from the neurites of 5HT-immunoreactive neurons, and pigment dispersing factor peptide from the neurites of PDH cells. Consistent with this interpretation, the immunoreactive varicosities of PDH cells exhibit size changes attributable to their cyclical release of peptide, or to its cyclical synthesis and/or transport from the PDH cell somata. Thus, neurotransmitter substances not only have rapid electrophysiological actions in the optic lobe, but also longer-lasting, presumably indirect, neuromodulatory actions, which are manifest as structural changes among the lamina's neurons and synapses. These actions involve an interplay between aminergic and peptidergic systems, but the exact role and especially the site of action of each has still to be elucidated.

  19. Molecular dissection of Phaseolus vulgaris polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 2 reveals the presence of hold/release domains affecting protein trafficking toward the cell wall

    PubMed Central

    De Caroli, Monica; Lenucci, Marcello S.; Manualdi, Francesca; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Piro, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    The plant endomembrane system is massively involved in the synthesis, transport and secretion of cell wall polysaccharides and proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying trafficking toward the apoplast are largely unknown. Besides constitutive, the existence of a regulated secretory pathway has been proposed. A polygalacturonase inhibitor protein (PGIP2), known to move as soluble cargo and reach the cell wall through a mechanism distinguishable from default, was dissected in its main functional domains (A, B, C, D), and C sub-fragments (C1–10), to identify signals essential for its regulated targeting. The secretion patterns of the fluorescent chimeras obtained by fusing different PGIP2 domains to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) were analyzed. PGIP2 N-terminal and leucine-rich repeat domains (B and C, respectively) seem to operate as holding/releasing signals, respectively, during PGIP2 transit through the Golgi. The B domain slows down PGIP2 secretion by transiently interacting with Golgi membranes. Its depletion leads, in fact, to the secretion via default (Sp2-susceptible) of the ACD-GFP chimera faster than PGIP2. Depending on its length (at least the first 5 leucine-rich repeats are required), the C domain modulates B interaction with Golgi membranes allowing the release of chimeras and their extracellular secretion through a Sp2 independent pathway. The addition of the vacuolar sorting determinant Chi to PGIP2 diverts the path of the protein from cell wall to vacuole, suggesting that C domain is a releasing rather than a cell wall sorting signal. PMID:26379688

  20. Phytosiderophore release by wheat genotypes differing in zinc deficiency tolerance grown with Zn-free nutrient solution as affected by salinity.

    PubMed

    Daneshbakhsh, Bahareh; Khoshgoftarmanesh, Amir Hossein; Shariatmadari, Hossein; Cakmak, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    There is limited information concerning the effect of salinity on phytosiderophores exudation from wheat roots. The aim of this hydroponic experiment was to investigate the effect of salinity on phytosiderophore release by roots of three bread wheat genotypes differing in Zn efficiency (Triticum aestivum L. cvs. Rushan, Kavir, and Cross) under Zn deficiency conditions. Wheat seedlings were transferred to Zn-free nutrient solutions and exposed to three salinity levels (0, 60, and 120 mM NaCl). The results indicated that Cross and Rushan genotypes exuded more phytosiderophore than did the Kavir genotype. Our findings suggest that the adaptive capacity of Zn-efficient 'Cross' and 'Rushan' wheat genotypes to Zn deficiency is due partly to the higher amounts of phytosiderophore release. Only 15 days of Zn deficiency stress was sufficient to distinguish between Zn-efficient (Rushan and Cross) and Zn-inefficient (Kavir) genotypes, with the former genotypes exuding more phytosiderophore than the latter. Higher phytosiderophore exudation under Zn deficiency conditions was accompanied by greater Fe transport from root to shoot. The maximum amount of phytosiderophore was exuded at the third week in 'Cross' and at the fourth week in 'Kavir' and 'Rushan'. For all three wheat genotypes, salinity stress resulted in higher amounts of phytosiderophore exuded by the roots. In general, for 'Kavir', the largest amount of phytosiderophore was exuded from the roots at the highest salinity level (120mM NaCl), while for 'Cross' and 'Rushan', no significant difference was found in phytosiderophore exudation between the 60 and 120 mM NaCl treatments. More investigation is needed to fully understand the physiology of elevated phytosiderophore release by Zn-deficient wheat plants under salinity conditions.

  1. Neurotransmitter-based strategies for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Das, Devsmita; Phillips, Cristy; Hsieh, Wayne; Sumanth, Krithika; Dang, Van; Salehi, Ahmad

    2014-10-03

    Down syndrome (DS) is a multisystem disorder affecting the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, neurological, hematopoietic, and musculoskeletal systems and is characterized by significant cognitive disability and a possible common pathogenic mechanism with Alzheimer's disease. During the last decade, numerous studies have supported the notion that the triplication of specific genes on human chromosome 21 plays a significant role in cognitive dysfunction in DS. Here we reviewed studies in trisomic mouse models and humans, including children and adults with DS. In order to identify groups of genes that contribute to cognitive disability in DS, multiple mouse models of DS with segmental trisomy have been generated. Over-expression of these particular genes in DS can lead to dysfunction of several neurotransmitter systems. Therapeutic strategies for DS have either focused on normalizing the expression of triplicated genes with important roles in DS or restoring the function of these systems. Indeed, our extensive review of studies on the pathogenesis of DS suggests that one plausible strategy for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction is to target the cholinergic, serotonergic, GABA-ergic, glutamatergic, and norepinephrinergic system. However, a fundamental strategy for treatment of cognitive dysfunction in DS would include reducing to normal levels the expression of specific triplicated genes in affected systems before the onset of neurodegeneration.

  2. Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Mark A; Sage, Rufus; Madden, Joah R

    2015-11-01

    Behavioural and physiological deficiencies are major reasons why reintroduction programmes suffer from high mortality when captive animals are used. Mitigation of these deficiencies is essential for successful reintroduction programmes. Our study manipulated early developmental diet to better replicate foraging behaviour in the wild. Over 2 years, we hand-reared 1800 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), from 1 day old, for 7 weeks under different dietary conditions. In year one, 900 pheasants were divided into three groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb, (ii) crumb plus 1% live mealworm or (iii) crumb plus 5% mixed seed and fruit. In year two, a further 900 pheasants were divided into two groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb or (ii) crumb plus a combination of 1% mealworm and 5% mixed seed and fruit. In both years, the commercial chick crumb acted as a control treatment, whilst those with live prey and mixed seeds and fruits mimicking a more naturalistic diet. After 7 weeks reared on these diets, pheasants were released into the wild. Postrelease survival was improved with exposure to more naturalistic diets prior to release. We identified four mechanisms to explain this. Pheasants reared with more naturalistic diets (i) foraged for less time and had a higher likelihood of performing vigilance behaviours, (ii) were quicker at handling live prey items, (iii) were less reliant on supplementary feed which could be withdrawn and (iv) developed different gut morphologies. These mechanisms allowed the pheasants to (i) reduce the risk of predation by reducing exposure time whilst foraging and allowing more time to be vigilant; (ii) be better at handling and discriminating natural food items and not be solely reliant on supplementary feed; and (iii) have a better gut system to cope with the natural forage after the cessation of supplementary feeding in the spring. Learning food discrimination, preference and handling skills by the provision of a more

  3. Flavonoid nutraceuticals and ionotropic receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Graham A R

    2015-10-01

    Flavonoids that are found in nutraceuticals have many and varied effects on the activation of ionotropic receptors for GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in our brains. They can act as positive or negative modulators enhancing or reducing the effect of GABA. They can act as allosteric agonists. They can act to modulate the action of other modulators. There is considerable evidence that these flavonoids are able to enter the brain to influence brain function. They may have a range of effects including relief of anxiety, improvement in cognition, acting as neuroprotectants and as sedatives. All of these effects are sought after in nutraceuticals. A number of studies have likened flavonoids to the widely prescribed benzodiazepines as 'a new family of benzodiazepine receptor ligands'. They are much more than that with many flavonoid actions on ionotropic GABA receptors being insensitive to the classic benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil and thus independent of the classic benzodiazepine actions. It is time to consider flavonoids in their own right as important modulators of these vital receptors in brain function. Flavonoids are rarely consumed as a single flavonoid except as dietary supplements. The effects of mixtures of flavonoids and other modulators on GABAA receptors need to be more thoroughly investigated.

  4. Neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention for detoxified heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dingyan; Liu, Yan; He, Wulong; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Zengzhen

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the effects of combined administration of tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) on heroin withdrawal syndromes and mental symptoms in detoxified heroin addicts. In the cluster-randomized placebo-controlled trial, 83 detoxified heroin addicts were recruited from a detoxification treatment center in Wuhan, China. Patients in the intervention group (n=41) were given the combined treatment with tyrosine, lecithin, L-glutamine and 5-HTP and those in the control group (n=42) were administered the placebo. The sleep status and the withdrawal symptoms were observed daily throughout the study, and the mood states were monitored pre- and post-intervention. The results showed that the insomnia and withdrawal scores were significantly improved over time in participants in the intervention group as compared with those in the control group. A greater reduction in tension-anxiety, depression-dejection, anger-hostility, fatigue-inertia and total mood disturbance, and a greater increase in their vigor-activity symptoms were found at day 6 in the intervention group than in the control group (all P<0.05). It was concluded that the neurotransmitter-precursor-supplement intervention is effective in alleviating the withdrawal and mood symptoms and it may become a supplementary method for patients' recovery from heroin addiction.

  5. Glucagon-related peptide 1 (GLP-1): hormone and neurotransmitter.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Philip J; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-06-15

    The interest in glucagon-like petide-1 (GLP-1) and other pre-proglucagon derived peptides has risen almost exponentially since seminal papers in the early 1990s proposed to use GLP-1 agonists as therapeutic agents for treatment of type 2 diabetes. A wealth of interesting studies covering both normal and pathophysiological role of GLP-1 have been published over the last two decades and our understanding of GLP-1 action has widened considerably. In the present review, we have tried to cover our current understanding of GLP-1 actions both as a peripheral hormone and as a central neurotransmitter. From an initial focus on glycaemic control, GLP-1 research has been diverted to study its role in energy homeostasis, neurodegeneration, cognitive functions, anxiety and many more functions. With the upcoming introduction of GLP-1 agonists on the pharmaceutical venue, we have witnessed an outstanding example of how initial ideas from basic science laboratories have paved their way to become a novel therapeutic strategy to fight diabetes.

  6. The neurotransmitter dopamine modulates vascular permeability in the endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Resham; Sinha, Sutapa; Yang, Su-Ping; Patra, Chittaranjan; Dutta, Shamit; Wang, Enfeng; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2008-01-01

    Background Vascular permeability factor/Vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF), a multifunctional cytokine, is a potent inducer of vascular permeability, an important early step in angiogenesis. It is known that the neurotransmitter dopamine can inhibit VPF/VEGF mediated angiogenesis, in particular microvascular permeability, but the effectors of this action remain unclear. Results Here, we define the signaling pathway modulated by dopamine that inhibits VPF/VEGF induced vascular permeability in endothelial cells. Signals from VPF/VEGF lead to changes in the phosphorylation of tight junction protein zonula occludens (ZO-1) and adherens junction proteins like VE-cadherin and associated catenins, thus weakening endothelial cell-cell adhesion and increasing vascular permeability. We found VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) to be part of a multi-protein complex involving ZO-1, VE-cadherin and β-catenin. VPF/VEGF induced phosphorylations of VE-cadherin, β-catenin and ZO-1 were inhibited by dopamine treatment. Association of occludin with ZO-1 and ZO-1 with VE-cadherin were significantly inhibited by dopamine in VEGF treated cells. Furthermore, we identified Src as an important target for dopamine-mediated inhibition of VPF/VEGF induced permeability. Conclusion Taken together, our results provide molecular insights of dopamine function in the vascular endothelium and suggest a central role of Src in regulating key molecules that control vascular permeability. PMID:18662404

  7. Polyethylenimine Carbon Nanotube Fiber Electrodes for Enhanced Detection of Neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based microelectrodes have been investigated as alternatives to carbon-fiber microelectrodes for the detection of neurotransmitters because they are sensitive, exhibit fast electron transfer kinetics, and are more resistant to surface fouling. Wet spinning CNTs into fibers using a coagulating polymer produces a thin, uniform fiber that can be fabricated into an electrode. CNT fibers formed in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) have been used as microelectrodes to detect dopamine, serotonin, and hydrogen peroxide. In this study, we characterize microelectrodes with CNT fibers made in polyethylenimine (PEI), which have much higher conductivity than PVA-CNT fibers. PEI-CNT fibers have lower overpotentials and higher sensitivities than PVA-CNT fiber microelectrodes, with a limit of detection of 5 nM for dopamine. The currents for dopamine were adsorption controlled at PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes, independent of scan repetition frequency, and stable for over 10 h. PEI-CNT fiber microelectrodes were resistant to surface fouling by serotonin and the metabolite interferant 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). No change in sensitivity was observed for detection of serotonin after 30 flow injection experiments or after 2 h in 5-HIAA for PEI-CNT electrodes. The antifouling properties were maintained in brain slices when serotonin was exogenously applied multiple times or after bathing the slice in 5-HIAA. Thus, PEI-CNT fiber electrodes could be useful for the in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals. PMID:25117550

  8. Serum posaconazole levels among haematological cancer patients taking extended release tablets is affected by body weight and diarrhoea: single centre retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Marisa H; Perissinotti, Anthony J; Kauffman, Carol A; Couriel, Daniel R

    2015-07-01

    The posaconazole extended release tablet formulation was developed to improve bioavailability relative to the oral suspension. Therapeutic drug monitoring has been used to optimise posaconazole dosing to achieve a target trough level ≥0.7 μg ml(-1). We retrospectively evaluated 28 patients with haematological malignancies who received posaconazole tablets for antifungal prophylaxis. Posaconazole serum trough levels were obtained 5 days after initiation of therapy. Mean trough level was 1.19 ± 0.63 μg ml(-1), and 71% achieved a trough level ≥0.7 μg ml(-1). Diarrhoea was associated with lower mean trough levels (0.65 ± 0.08 μg ml(-1) vs. 1.31 ± 0.13 μg ml(-1)), P = 0.002. Mean trough levels were lower in patients ≥90 kg (0.74 ± 0.09 μg ml(-1)) vs. <90 kg (1.32 ± 0.14 μg ml(-1)), P = 0.002 and in patients with body mass index (BMI) ≥30 (0.89 ± 0.13 μg ml(-1)) vs. BMI <30 (1.29 ± 0.14 μg ml(-1)), P = 0.05. Posaconazole delayed release tablets attain appropriate trough levels in most patients, but patients with a higher weight and those experiencing diarrhoea are more likely to have lower levels.

  9. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Covey, Daniel P.; Blaha, Charles D.; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M.; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Garris, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Object Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. Methods The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between −0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 μm) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ~ 100 μm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. Results The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer

  10. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-03-01

    PART I DESCRIBES IMPORTANT CONTRIBUTIONS MADE BY SOME JAPANESE PIONEERS IN THE FIELD OF NEUROTRANSMITTERS: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson's disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters.

  11. Contributions to the field of neurotransmitters by Japanese scientists, and reflections on my own research

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    Part I describes important contributions made by some Japanese pioneers in the field of neurotransmitters: (their achievements in parentheses) J. Takamine (isolation and crystallization of adrenaline); K. Shimidzu (early hint for acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter); F. Kanematsu (donation of the Kanematsu Memorial Institute in Sydney); T. Hayashi (discovery of the excitatory action of glutamate and the inhibitory action of GABA); and I. Sano (discovery of a high concentration of dopamine in striatum, its reduction in a patient with Parkinson’s disease and the treatment with DOPA). In Part II, I present some of my reflections on my research on neurotransmitters. The work of my colleagues and myself has made some significant contributions to the establishment of neurotransmitter roles played by GABA and substance P, the first amino acid and the first peptide neurotransmitters, respectively. By the early 1960s, 3 substances, i.e., acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and adrenaline, had been established as neurotransmitters. Now the number of neurotransmitters is believed to be as many as 50 or even more mainly due to the inclusion of several amino acids and a large number of peptide transmitters. PMID:24019584

  12. Estimating neurotransmitter kinetics with ntPET: a simulation study of temporal precision and effects of biased data.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Marc D; Morris, Evan D

    2008-02-01

    We recently introduced neurotransmitter PET (ntPET), an analysis technique that estimates the kinetics of stimulus-induced neurotransmitter (NT) release. Here, we evaluate two formulations of ntPET. The arterial (ART) approach measures the tracer input function (TIF) directly. The reference (REF) approach derives the TIF from reference region data. Arterial sampling is considered the gold standard in PET modeling but reference region approaches are preferred for reduced cost and complexity. If simulated PET data with unbiased TIFs were analyzed using ART or REF, temporal precision was better than 3 min provided NT concentration peaked less than 30 min into the scanning session. The consequences of biased TIFs or stimulus-induced changes in tracer delivery were also evaluated. ART TIFs were biased by the presence of uncorrected radiometabolites in the plasma whereas REF TIFs were biased by specific binding in the reference region. Simulated changes in tracer delivery emulated ethanol-induced blood flow alterations observed previously with PET. ART performance deteriorated significantly if metabolites amounted to 50% of plasma radioactivity by 60 min. The accuracy and precision of REF were preserved even if the reference region contained 40% of the receptor density of the target region. Both methods were insensitive to blood flow alterations (proportional changes in K(1) and k(2)). Our results suggest that PET data contain information--heretofore not extracted--about the timing of NT release. The REF formulation of ntPET proved to be robust to many plausible model violations and under most circumstances is an appropriate alternative to ART.

  13. Phorbol Ester Effects on Neurotransmission: Interaction with Neurotransmitters and Calcium in Smooth Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Jay M.; Gould, Robert J.; Peroutka, Stephen J.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1985-01-01

    Stimulation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle by neurotransmitters generates diacylglycerol, an activator of protein kinase C, which may regulate some forms of neurotransmission. Phorbol esters, potent inflammatory and tumorpromoting compounds, also activate protein kinase C. We demonstrate potent and selective effects of phorbol esters on smooth muscle, indicating a role for protein kinase C in neurotransmission. In rat vas deferens and dog basilar artery, phorbol esters synergize with calcium to mimic the contractile effects of neurotransmitters that act through the phosphatidylinositol cycle. In guinea pig ileum and rat uterus, phorbol esters block contractions produced by these neurotransmitters.

  14. Synaptic Assembly of the Brain in the Absence of Neurotransmitter Secretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhage, Matthijs; Maia, Ascanio S.; Plomp, Jaap J.; Brussaard, Arjen B.; Heeroma, Joost H.; Vermeer, Hendrika; Toonen, Ruud F.; Hammer, Robert E.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Missler, Markus; Geuze, Hans J.; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2000-02-01

    Brain function requires precisely orchestrated connectivity between neurons. Establishment of these connections is believed to require signals secreted from outgrowing axons, followed by synapse formation between selected neurons. Deletion of a single protein, Munc18-1, in mice leads to a complete loss of neurotransmitter secretion from synaptic vesicles throughout development. However, this does not prevent normal brain assembly, including formation of layered structures, fiber pathways, and morphologically defined synapses. After assembly is completed, neurons undergo apoptosis, leading to widespread neurodegeneration. Thus, synaptic connectivity does not depend on neurotransmitter secretion, but its maintenance does. Neurotransmitter secretion probably functions to validate already established synaptic connections.

  15. P2Y Purinergic Regulation of the Glycine Neurotransmitter Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Esperanza; Zafra, Francisco; Pérez-Sen, Raquel; Delicado, Esmerilda G.; Miras-Portugal, Maria Teresa; Aragón, Carmen; López-Corcuera, Beatriz

    2011-01-01

    The sodium- and chloride-coupled glycine neurotransmitter transporters (GLYTs) control the availability of glycine at glycine-mediated synapses. The mainly glial GLYT1 is the key regulator of the glycine levels in glycinergic and glutamatergic pathways, whereas the neuronal GLYT2 is involved in the recycling of synaptic glycine from the inhibitory synaptic cleft. In this study, we report that stimulation of P2Y purinergic receptors with 2-methylthioadenosine 5′-diphosphate in rat brainstem/spinal cord primary neuronal cultures and adult rat synaptosomes leads to the inhibition of GLYT2 and the stimulation of GLYT1 by a paracrine regulation. These effects are mainly mediated by the ADP-preferring subtypes P2Y1 and P2Y13 because the effects are partially reversed by the specific antagonists N6-methyl-2′-deoxyadenosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate and pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azo(2-chloro-5-nitrophenyl)-2,4-disulfonate and are totally blocked by suramin. P2Y12 receptor is additionally involved in GLYT1 stimulation. Using pharmacological approaches and siRNA-mediated protein knockdown methodology, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GLYT regulation. Modulation takes place through a signaling cascade involving phospholipase C activation, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production, intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, protein kinase C stimulation, nitric oxide formation, cyclic guanosine monophosphate production, and protein kinase G-I (PKG-I) activation. GLYT1 and GLYT2 are differentially sensitive to NO/cGMP/PKG-I both in brain-derived preparations and in heterologous systems expressing the recombinant transporters and P2Y1 receptor. Sensitivity to 2-methylthioadenosine 5′-diphosphate by GLYT1 and GLYT2 was abolished by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of nitric-oxide synthase. Our data may help define the role of GLYTs in nociception and pain sensitization. PMID:21245148

  16. The role of serotonin and neurotransmitters during craniofacial development.

    PubMed

    Moiseiwitsch, J R

    2000-01-01

    Several neurotransmitters, in particular serotonin (5-HT), have demonstrated multiple functions during early development and mid-gestational craniofacial morphogenesis. Early studies indicated that 5-HT is present in the oocyte, where it appears to function as a regulator of cell cleavage. Later, it has a significant role during gastrulation, during which there are significant areas of 5-HT uptake in the primitive streak. Subsequently, in association with neurulation, 5-HT uptake is seen in the floor plate of the developing neural tube. During neural crest formation and branchial arch formation, 5-HT has been demonstrated to facilitate cell migration and stimulate cell differentiation. During morphogenesis of the craniofacial structures, 5-HT stimulates dental development and may aid in cusp formation. All of the most commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs inhibit serotonin uptake, yet they do not appear to cause major craniofacial malformations in vivo. Given the wide spectrum of effects that 5-HT has during development, it is difficult to understand why these anti-depressants are not major teratogens. Redundancy within the system may allow receptor and uptake pathways to function normally even with lower than normal levels of circulating serotonin. Serotonin-binding proteins, that are expressed in most craniofacial regions at critical times during craniofacial development, may have a buffering capacity that maintains adequate 5-HT tissue concentrations over a wide range of 5-HT serum concentrations. Dental development appears to be particularly sensitive to even small fluctuations in concentrations of 5-HT. Therefore, it may be that children of patients who have received selective serotonergic re-uptake inhibitors (such as Prozac and Zoloft) or the less selective tricyclic anti-depressant drugs (such as Elavil) would be at a higher risk for developmental dental defects such as anodontia and hypodontia. In this review, the evidence supporting a role for 5-HT

  17. Neurotransmitter signaling pathways required for normal development in Xenopus laevis embryos: a pharmacological survey screen

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly G.; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitters are not only involved in brain function but are also important signaling molecules for many diverse cell types. Neurotransmitters are widely conserved, from evolutionarily ancient organisms lacking nervous systems through man. Here, we report results from a loss- and gain-of-function survey, using pharmacologic modulators of several neurotransmitter pathways to examine possible roles in normal embryogenesis. Applying reagents targeting the glutamatergic, adrenergic, and dopaminergic pathways to embryos of Xenopus laevis from gastrulation to organogenesis stages, we observed and quantified numerous malformations including craniofacial defects, hyperpigmentation, muscle mispatterning, and miscoiling of the gut. These data implicate several key neurotransmitters in new embryonic patterning roles, reveal novel earlier stages for processes involved in eye development, suggest new targets for subsequent molecular-genetic investigation, and highlight the necessity for in-depth toxicology studies of psychoactive compounds to which human embryos might be exposed during pregnancy. PMID:27060969

  18. Translational termination in Escherichia coli: three bases following the stop codon crosslink to release factor 2 and affect the decoding efficiency of UGA-containing signals.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, E S; Major, L L; Mannering, S A; Tate, W P

    1998-01-01

    The observations that the Escherichia coli release factor 2 (RF2) crosslinks with the base following the stop codon (+4 N), and that the identity of this base strongly influences the decoding efficiency of stop signals, stimulated us to determine whether there was a more extended termination signal for RF2 recognition. Analysis of the 3' contexts of the 1248 genes in the E.coli genome terminating with UGA showed a strong bias for U in the +4 position and a general bias for A and against C in most positions to +10, consistent with the concept of an extended sequence element. Site-directed crosslinking occurred to RF2 from a thio-U sited at the +4, +5 and +6 bases following the UGA stop codon but not beyond (+7 to +10). Varying the +4 to +6 bases modulated the strength of the crosslink from the +1 invariant U to RF2. A strong selection bias for particular bases in the +4 to +6 positions of certain E. coli UGANNN termination sites correlated in some cases with crosslinking efficiency to RF2 and in vivo termination signal strength. These data suggest that RF2 may recognise at least a hexanucleotide UGA-containing sequence and that particular base combinations within this sequence influence termination signal decoding efficiency. PMID:9461453

  19. Tributyltin exposure influences predatory behavior, neurotransmitter content and receptor expression in Sebastiscus marmoratus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ang; Wang, Xinli; Zuo, Zhenghong; Cai, Jiali; Wang, Chonggang

    2013-03-15

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a ubiquitous marine contaminant due to its extensive use as a biocide, fungicide and antifouling agent. However, the neurotoxic effect of TBT has not been extensively studied, especially in marine fish. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of TBT (10, 100 and 1000 ng/L) on the predatory behavior of Sebastiscus marmoratus and to look into the mechanism involved. The results showed that TBT exposure depressed predatory activity after 50 days exposure. Dopamine levels in the fish brains increased in a dose-dependent manner, while 5-hydroxytryptamine and norepinephrine levels decreased significantly in the TBT exposure group compared to the control. The mRNA levels of dopamine receptors, which have functions such as cognition, motor activity, motivation and reward, mood, attention and learning, were significantly down-regulated by TBT exposure. Although the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters, including glutamate, did not show marked alteration, the expression of the glutamatergic signaling pathway such as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, a-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, calmodulin, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases-II and cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element binding protein, was significantly reduced by TBT exposure, which indicated that central nerve activities were in a state of depression, thus affecting the predatory activities of the fish.

  20. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine.

    PubMed

    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K; Hardie, Roger C; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1-R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdc (JK910) mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdc (JK910) photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdc (JK910) photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdc (JK910) R1-R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdc (JK910) mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1-R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons.

  1. Effects of low dose endosulfan exposure on brain neurotransmitter levels in the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Preud'homme, Valérie; Milla, Sylvain; Gillardin, Virginie; De Pauw, Edwin; Denoël, Mathieu; Kestemont, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the impact of pesticides in amphibians is of growing concern to assess the causes of their decline. Among pesticides, endosulfan belongs to one of the potential sources of danger because of its wide use and known effects, particularly neurotoxic, on a variety of organisms. However, the effect of endosulfan was not yet evaluated on amphibians at levels encompassing simultaneously brain neurotransmitters and behavioural endpoints. In this context, tadpoles of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis were submitted to four treatments during 27 d: one control, one ethanol control, and two low environmental concentrations of endosulfan (0.1 and 1 μg L(-1)). Endosulfan induced a significant increase of brain serotonin level at both concentrations and a significant increase of brain dopamine and GABA levels at the lower exposure but acetylcholinesterase activity was not modified by the treatment. The gene coding for the GABA transporter 1 was up-regulated in endosulfan contaminated tadpoles while the expression of other genes coding for the neurotransmitter receptors or for the enzymes involved in their metabolic pathways was not significantly modified by endosulfan exposure. Endosulfan also affected foraging, and locomotion in links with the results of the physiological assays, but no effects were seen on growth. These results show that low environmental concentrations of endosulfan can induce adverse responses in X. laevis tadpoles. At a broader perspective, this suggests that more research using and linking multiple markers should be used to understand the complex mode of action of pollutants.

  2. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  3. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  4. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) reduces alkaline phosphatase release, CD63 expression, F-actin polymerization and chemotaxis without affecting the phagocytosis activity in bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Conejeros, I; Velásquez, Z D; Carretta, M D; Alarcón, P; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2012-01-15

    2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) interferes with the Ca(2+) influx and reduces the ROS production, gelatinase secretion and CD11b expression in bovine neutrophils. Moreover, it has been suggested that inhibition of the Ca(2+) channel involved in the store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a potential target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs in cattle, however it is unknown whether 2-APB affects neutrophil functions associated with the innate immune response. This study describes the effect of 2-APB, a putative SOCE inhibitor, on alkaline phosphatase activity a marker of secretory vesicles, CD63 a marker for azurophil granules, F-actin polymerization and in vitro chemotaxis in bovine neutrophils stimulated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). Also, we evaluated the effect of 2-APB in the phagocytic activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bioparticles. We observed that doses of 2-APB ≥10 μM significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro chemotaxis, whereas concentrations of 2-APB ≥50 μM reduced CD63 expression and F-actin polymerization. Finally, we observed that 2-APB did not affect the phagocytic activity in neutrophils incubated with E. coli and S. aureus bioparticles. We concluded that inhibition of Ca(2+) influx could be a useful strategy to reduce inflammatory process in cattle.

  5. A postweaning reduction in circulating ghrelin temporarily alters growth hormone (GH) responsiveness to GH-releasing hormone in male mice but does not affect somatic growth.

    PubMed

    Ariyasu, Hiroyuki; Iwakura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Go; Kanamoto, Naotetsu; Bando, Mika; Kohno, Kenji; Sato, Takahiro; Kojima, Masayasu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kangawa, Kenji; Akamizu, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Ghrelin was initially identified as an endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue receptor. When administrated exogenously, ghrelin stimulates GH release and food intake. Previous reports in ghrelin-null mice, which do not exhibit impaired growth nor appetite, question the physiologic role of ghrelin in the regulation of the GH/IGF-I axis. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse that expresses human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor (DTR) cDNA in ghrelin-secretion cells [ghrelin-promoter DTR-transgenic (GPDTR-Tg) mice]. Administration of DT to this mouse ablates ghrelin-secretion cells in a controlled manner. After injection of DT into GPDTR-Tg mice, ghrelin-secreting cells were ablated, and plasma levels of ghrelin were markedly decreased [nontransgenic littermates, 70.6 +/- 10.2 fmol/ml vs. GPDTR-Tg, 5.3 +/- 2.3 fmol/ml]. To elucidate the physiological roles of circulating ghrelin on GH secretion and somatic growth, 3-wk-old GPDTR-Tg mice were treated with DT twice a week for 5 wk. The GH responses to GHRH in male GPDTR-Tg mice were significantly lower than those in wild-type mice at 5 wk of age. However, those were normalized at 8 wk of age. In contrast, in female mice, there was no difference in GH response to GHRH between GPDTR-Tg mice and controls at 5 or 8 wk of age. The gender-dependent differences in response to GHRH were observed in ghrelin-ablated mice. However, GPDTR-Tg mice did not display any decreases in IGF-I levels or any growth retardation. Our results strongly suggest that circulating ghrelin does not play a crucial role in somatic growth.

  6. A single night of partial sleep loss impairs fasting insulin sensitivity but does not affect cephalic phase insulin release in young men.

    PubMed

    Cedernaes, Jonathan; Lampola, Lauri; Axelsson, Emil K; Liethof, Lisanne; Hassanzadeh, Sara; Yeganeh, Adine; Broman, Jan-Erik; Schiöth, Helgi B; Benedict, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The present study sought to investigate whether a single night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would alter fasting insulin sensitivity and cephalic phase insulin release (CPIR) in humans. A rise in circulating insulin in response to food-related sensory stimulation may prepare tissues to break down ingested glucose, e.g. by stimulating rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes. In addition, given insulin's anorexigenic properties once it reaches the brain, the CPIR may serve as an early peripheral satiety signal. Against this background, in the present study 16 men participated in two separate sessions: one night of PSD (4.25 h sleep) versus one night of full sleep (8.5 h sleep). In the morning following each sleep condition, subjects' oral cavities were rinsed with a 1-molar sucrose solution for 45 s, preceded and followed by blood sampling for repeated determination of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations (-3, +3, +5, +7, +10 and +20 min). Our main result was that PSD, compared with full sleep, was associated with significantly higher peripheral insulin resistance, as indicated by a higher fasting homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (+16%, P = 0.025). In contrast, no CPIR was observed in any of the two sleep conditions. Our findings indicate that a single night of PSD is already sufficient to impair fasting insulin sensitivity in healthy men. In contrast, brief oral cavity rinsing with sucrose solution did not change serum insulin concentrations, suggesting that a blunted CPIR is an unlikely mechanism through which acute sleep loss causes metabolic perturbations during morning hours in humans.

  7. Factors affecting the reactivation of the oligomycin-sensitive adenosine 5'-triphosphatase and the release of ATPase inhibitor protein during the re-energization of intact mitochondria from ischemic cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Rouslin, W

    1987-03-15

    In the present study we examined factors affecting the reversal of the ischemia-induced protonic inhibition of the mitochondrial ATPase described earlier (Rouslin, W. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 9657-9661). It was found that ATPase reactivation and accompanying inhibitor protein release during the re-energization of intact mitochondria isolated from 20-min ischemic canine heart muscle could be blocked completely by either carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) or nigericin but was unaffected by valinomycin at 35 mM K+. At higher K+ concentrations, valinomycin also blocked ATPase reactivation but not quite as completely as did nigericin. These observations suggest that ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release are particularly dependent upon either the trans-inner membrane pH gradient (delta pH) or possibly upon matrix pH per se and slightly less dependent upon membrane potential (delta psi) in intact cardiac muscle mitochondria. The addition of FCCP at the end of the re-energization incubations limited partially the extent of both ATPase reactivation and inhibitor protein release. This latter effect appears to have been mediated by a partial reassociation of the inhibitor protein with the enzyme, and it was accentuated (when FCCP was added at the end of the incubations) or mimicked (when FCCP was absent) by lowering the pH of the re-energization medium. A close examination of the first 10 min of the time course of enzyme activation and of inhibitor protein release revealed that while the former process was essentially finished in 1 min or less, the latter required approximately 10 min for completion. This observation led to the proposal of a two-site model of enzyme-inhibitor interaction which is discussed.

  8. Novel orthogonal liquid chromatography methods to dose neurotransmitters involved in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Roccaldo; Scorzoni, Stefania; Conte, Carmela; Lisanti, Antonella; Ianni, Federica; Natalini, Benedetto

    2014-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by a reduction of dopamine (DA) levels. The molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of disease have not yet been fully disclosed. Therefore, developing new diagnostic methods and tools to evaluate the depletion of DA and of some of its metabolites (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-methoxytyramine) is of outstanding importance for biochemical evaluations. Moreover, neurons responsible for DA release also produce the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), thus, quantitative measurements of GABA levels can have a relevant impact for a further understanding of the biochemical processes involved in the neurodegenerative event. In the present study, two HPLC methods based on the reversed-phase ion-pairing chromatography (RP-IPC) and the hydrophilic liquid interaction chromatography (HILIC) concepts were developed to allow the quantification of DA and its metabolites as well as GABA levels in mouse striatal and cortical tissue homogenates. The two fairly orthogonal HPLC methods were directly applied to the biological samples, without preliminary derivatization of the compounds of interest. A high level of selectivity was obtained for DA metabolites and GABA by running the gradient RP-IPC method with a volatile ion-pairing reagent, which makes it suitable for the quantitative assay of four out of five compounds. Matrix deriving interferences unabled the base-line separation of DA which was instead successfully achieved with the HILIC-based method. To avail of HPLC methods providing distinct selectivity profiles, makes possible the correct species quantification and allows to compensate the intrinsic limits characterizing all chromatographic methods.

  9. Nicotine-induced monoamine neurotransmitter changes in the brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Shearman, E; Fallon, S; Sershen, H; Lajtha, A

    2008-08-15

    A number of studies in various species including man indicated a greater risk of drug preference and addictive behavior in young as compared to adults. Such age dependent preference was also found with nicotine. To examine possible mechanisms for this difference in our continuing study of reward mechanisms, we compared nicotine-induced neurotransmitter changes in the brain regions of adult and young Sprague-Dawley rats, assaying the transmitters via microdialysis in conscious freely moving animals. In general, nicotine-induced changes were significantly less in the regions measured in the young. Nicotine-induced effects on dopamine in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH), prefrontal and medial temporal cortex, and superior cerebral peduncle were lower in the young than in adult, the same in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and lateral septal nucleus (LS), and somewhat higher in the nucleus accumbens shell (NAccS). Norepinephrine levels in the young were lower in all areas except in the VH where they were the same, and serotonin levels were lower except in the VTA and LS where they remained the same, and higher in the NAccS. Age-dependent differences in the metabolites measured were more mixed. We conclude that the greater nicotine preference in young is not paralleled by a greater effect of nicotine on the release of monoamines at least in most of the brain areas assayed. Thus, increases of nicotine reward are not likely due to increases of monoamines in reward and cognitive areas. The small increase of dopamine (DA) and more significant increase of serotonin (5-HT) only in the NAccS are of significance, and would indicate a more significant role of 5-HT than of DA at least in the age difference in nicotine preference. Developmental changes in receptor composition and distribution involving several transmitter systems and other components such as neuropeptides are also likely to play a role.

  10. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  11. Functional localization of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic inputs to mature neurons of the medial superior olive.

    PubMed

    Couchman, Kiri; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2012-02-01

    Neurons of the medial superior olive (MSO) code for the azimuthal location of low-frequency sound sources via a binaural coincidence detection system operating on microsecond time scales. These neurons are morphologically simple and stereotyped, and anatomical studies have indicated a functional segregation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs between cellular compartments. It is thought that this morphological arrangement holds important implications for the computational task of these cells. To date, however, there has been no functional investigation into synaptic input sites or functional receptor distributions on mature neurons of the MSO. Here, functional neurotransmitter receptor maps for amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), glycine (Gly), and ionotropic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptors (Rs) were compared and complemented by their corresponding synaptic input map. We find in MSO neurons from postnatal day 20-35 gerbils that AMPARs and their excitatory inputs target the soma and dendrites. Functional GlyRs and their inhibitory inputs are predominantly refined to the somata, although a pool of functional GlyRs is present extrasynaptically on MSO dendrites. GABA(A)R responses are present throughout the cell but lack direct synaptic contact indicating an involvement in volume transmission. NMDARs are present both synaptically and extrasynaptically with an overall distribution similar to GlyRs. Interestingly, even at physiological temperatures these functional NMDARs can be potentiated by synaptically released Gly. The functional receptor and synaptic input maps produced here led to the identification of a cross talk between transmitter systems and raises the possibility that extrasynaptic receptors could be modulating leak conductances as a homeostatic mechanism.

  12. RIM-binding protein 2 regulates release probability by fine-tuning calcium channel localization at murine hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Grauel, M. Katharina; Reddy-Alla, Suneel; Willmes, Claudia G.; Brockmann, Marisa M.; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Rosenmund, Tanja; Pangalos, Maria; Vardar, Gülçin; Stumpf, Alexander; Walter, Alexander M.; Rost, Benjamin R.; Eickholt, Britta J.; Haucke, Volker; Schmitz, Dietmar; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Rosenmund, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The tight spatial coupling of synaptic vesicles and voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (CaVs) ensures efficient action potential-triggered neurotransmitter release from presynaptic active zones (AZs). Rab-interacting molecule-binding proteins (RIM-BPs) interact with Ca2+ channels and via RIM with other components of the release machinery. Although human RIM-BPs have been implicated in autism spectrum disorders, little is known about the role of mammalian RIM-BPs in synaptic transmission. We investigated RIM-BP2–deficient murine hippocampal neurons in cultures and slices. Short-term facilitation is significantly enhanced in both model systems. Detailed analysis in culture revealed a reduction in initial release probability, which presumably underlies the increased short-term facilitation. Superresolution microscopy revealed an impairment in CaV2.1 clustering at AZs, which likely alters Ca2+ nanodomains at release sites and thereby affects release probability. Additional deletion of RIM-BP1 does not exacerbate the phenotype, indicating that RIM-BP2 is the dominating RIM-BP isoform at these synapses. PMID:27671655

  13. Activity-dependent regulation of release probability at excitatory hippocampal synapses: a crucial role of FMRP in neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Sheng; Peng, Chun-Zi; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xia, Jian; Jin, Daozhong; Dai, Yuqiao; Luo, Xue-Gang; Klyachko, Vitaly A.; Deng, Pan-Yue

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. FMRP has been suggested to play important roles in regulating neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory hippocampal and cortical synapses. However, the origins and the mechanisms of these FMRP actions remain incompletely understood, and the role of FMRP in regulating synaptic release probability and presynaptic function remains debated. Here we used variance-mean analysis and peak scaled nonstationary variance analysis to examine changes in both pre- and postsynaptic parameters during repetitive activity at excitatory CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses in a mouse model of FXS. Our analyses revealed that loss of FMRP did not affect the basal release probability or basal synaptic transmission, but caused an abnormally elevated release probability specifically during repetitive activity. These abnormalities were not accompanied by changes in EPSC kinetics, quantal size or postsynaptic AMPA receptor conductance. Our results thus indicate that FMRP regulates neurotransmission at excitatory hippocampal synapses specifically during repetitive activity via modulation of release probability in a presynaptic manner. Our study suggests that FMRP function in regulating neurotransmitter release is an activity-dependent phenomenon that may contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS. PMID:24646437

  14. Modulation of dopamine and noradrenaline release and of intracellular Ca2+ concentration by presynaptic glutamate receptors in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Malva, J O; Carvalho, A P; Carvalho, C M

    1994-12-01

    1. We studied the release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-noradrenaline (NA) from hippocampal synaptosomes induced by glutamate receptors and the associated Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ channels. The release of tritiated neurotransmitters was studied by use of superfusion system and the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was determined by a fluorimetric assay with Indo-1 as a probe for Ca2+. 2. Presynaptic glutamate receptor activation induced Ca(2+)-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-NA from rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Thus, L-glutamate induced the release of both neurotransmitters in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 = 5.62 microM), and the effect of 100 microM L-glutamate was inhibited by 83.8% in the presence of 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine (CNQX), but was not affected by 1 microM (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801). 3. Other glutamate receptor agonists also stimulated the Ca(2+)-dependent release of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-NA as follows: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), at 200 microM, released 3.65 +/- 0.23% of the total 3H catecholamines, and this effect was inhibited by 81.2% in the presence of 1 microM MK-801; quisqualate (50 microM), S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionic acid (AMPA) (100 microM) or kainate (100 microM) released 1.57 +/- 0.26%, 1.93 +/- 0.17% and 2.09 +/- 0.22%, of the total 3H catecholamines, respectively. 4. The ionotropic glutamate receptor agonist, AMPA, induced an increase in the [Ca2+]i which was inhibited by 58.6% in the presence of 10 microM CNQX. In contrast, the increase in [Ca2+]i due to stimulation by glutamate was not sensitive to CNQX or MK-801.5. Nitrendipine, at I JAM, did not inhibit the neurotransmitter release induced by AMPA, but, both 0.5 micro M -conotoxin GVIA (w-CgTx) and 100 nM w-Aga IVA reduced catecholamine release to 49.03 +/- 3.79% and 46.06 +/- 10.51% of the control, respectively. In the presence of both toxins the release was

  15. A mutation in VPS15 (PIK3R4) causes a ciliopathy and affects IFT20 release from the cis-Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Stoetzel, Corinne; Bär, Séverine; De Craene, Johan-Owen; Scheidecker, Sophie; Etard, Christelle; Chicher, Johana; Reck, Jennifer R.; Perrault, Isabelle; Geoffroy, Véronique; Chennen, Kirsley; Strähle, Uwe; Hammann, Philippe; Friant, Sylvie; Dollfus, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a group of diseases that affect kidney and retina among other organs. Here, we identify a missense mutation in PIK3R4 (phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulatory subunit 4, named VPS15) in a family with a ciliopathy phenotype. Besides being required for trafficking and autophagy, we show that VPS15 regulates primary cilium length in human fibroblasts, as well as ciliary processes in zebrafish. Furthermore, we demonstrate its interaction with the golgin GM130 and its localization to the Golgi. The VPS15-R998Q patient mutation impairs Golgi trafficking functions in humanized yeast cells. Moreover, in VPS15-R998Q patient fibroblasts, the intraflagellar transport protein IFT20 is not localized to vesicles trafficking to the cilium but is restricted to the Golgi. Our findings suggest that at the Golgi, VPS15 and GM130 form a protein complex devoid of VPS34 to ensure the IFT20-dependent sorting and transport of membrane proteins from the cis-Golgi to the primary cilium. PMID:27882921

  16. Oak Ridge Health Studies Phase 1 report, Volume 2: Part C, Dose Reconstruction Feasibility Study. Tasks 5: A summary of information concerning historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    DaMassa, C.L.; Widner, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    A significant number of information sources have been identified that are relevant to historical locations and activities of populations potentially affected by releases from the Oak Ridge Reservation. The information that has been reviewed as part of this Task 5 investigation has shown that numerous residences and farms have historically been present near the ORR boundary and that a variety of land uses and recreational activities have been practiced. Based on this information alone, it would appear that many routes of off-site exposure could have been plausible. Most of the available published information addresses demographic and land use data on a regional or county-wide basis over fairly broad time periods. The information sources that are most readily available do not support direct evaluation of potential exposure pathways at specific geographic locations near the Oak Ridge facilities at specific points in time. A number of information sources have been identified that can provide demography and land use information more specific to locations and time periods that are identified to be of interest. Examples of data sources in this category include individual USGS topographic maps, aerial photographs, lowest-level census tract data, and interviews with long-time local residents. However, specific release events and periods of interest should be identified prior to attempts to collect more specific demographic or land use information for actual dose reconstruction.

  17. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic differentiation by proteins containing complement-related domains.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Minoru; Hama, Chihiro

    2011-02-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play central roles in basic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have revealed that some transmembrane and extracellular proteins bind to neurotransmitter receptors, forming protein complexes that are required for proper synaptic localization or gating of core receptor molecules. Consequently, the components of these complexes contribute to long-term potentiation, a process that is critical for learning and memory. Here, we review factors that regulate neurotransmitter receptors, with a focus on proteins containing CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) or CCP (complement control protein) domains, which are frequently found in complement system proteins. Proteins that contain these domains are structurally distinct from TARPs (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins), and may constitute new protein families that modulate either the localization or function of neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, other CCP domain-containing proteins participate in dendritic patterning and/or synaptic differentiation, although current evidence has not identified any direct activities on neurotransmitter receptors. Some of these proteins are involved in pathologic conditions such as epileptic seizure and mental retardation. Together, these lines of information have shown that CUB and CCP domain-containing proteins contribute to a wide variety of neuronal events that ultimately establish neural circuits.

  18. Temperature dependence of electrical properties of mixture of exogenous neurotransmitters dopamine and epinephrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Mugdha; Patil, Vidya

    2016-05-01

    Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers that support the communication between the neurons. In vitro study of exogenous neurotransmitters Dopamine and Epinephrine and their mixture, carried out to learn about their electrical properties being dielectric constant and conductivity amongst others. Dielectric constant and conductivity of the selected neurotransmitters are found to increase with temperature. As a result, the time constant of the system increases with temperature. This change leads to increase in the time taken by the synapse to transport the action potential. The correlation between physical properties of exogenous neurotransmitters and psychological and physiological behaviour of human being may be understood with the help of current study. The response time of Epinephrine is in microseconds whereas response time of Dopamine is in milliseconds. The response time for both the neurotransmitters and their mixture is found to be increasing with temperature indicating the symptoms such as depression, apathy, chronic fatigue and low physical energy with no desire to exercise the body, which are observed during the fever.

  19. Recent progress and challenges in nanotechnology for biomedical applications: an insight into the analysis of neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Miura, Norio

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers exciting opportunities and unprecedented compatibilities in manipulating chemical and biological materials at the atomic or molecular scale for the development of novel functional materials with enhanced capabilities. It plays a central role in the recent technological advances in biomedical technology, especially in the areas of disease diagnosis, drug design and drug delivery. In this review, we present the recent trend and challenges in the development of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with a special emphasis on the analysis of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters are the chemical messengers which transform information and signals all over the body. They play prime role in functioning of the central nervous system (CNS) and governs most of the metabolic functions including movement, pleasure, pain, mood, emotion, thinking, digestion, sleep, addiction, fear, anxiety and depression. Thus, development of high-performance and user-friendly analytical methods for ultra-sensitive detection of neurotransmitters remain a major challenge in modern biomedical analysis. Nanostructured materials are emerging as a powerful mean for diagnosis of CNS disorders because of their unique optical, size and surface characteristics. This review provides a brief outline on the basic concepts and recent advancements of nanotechnology for biomedical applications, especially in the analysis of neurotransmitters. A brief introduction to the nanomaterials, bionanotechnology and neurotransmitters is also included along with discussions on most of the patents published in these areas.

  20. Neuronally released vasoactive intestinal polypeptide alters atrial electrophysiological properties and may promote atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yutao; Chao, Zhi-Yang James; Yan, Wen; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Yin, Xiaomeng; Mathuria, Nilesh; Patel, Mehul; Fan, Christopher; Sun, Junping; Wu, Geru; Wang, Suwei; Elayda, MacArthur; Gao, Lianjun; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Lin, Shien-Fong; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vagal hyperactivity promotes atrial fibrillation (AF), which has been almost exclusively attributed to acetylcholine. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and acetylcholine are neurotransmitters co-released during vagal stimulation. Exogenous VIP has been shown to promote AF by shortening action potential duration (APD), increasing APD spatial heterogeneity, and causing intra-atrial conduction block. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of neuronally released VIP on atrial electrophysiologic properties during vagal stimulation. METHODS We used a specific VIP antagonist (H9935) to uncover the effects of endogenous VIP released during vagal stimulation in canine hearts. RESULTS H9935 significantly attenuated (1) the vagally induced shortening of atrial effective refractory period and widening of atrial vulnerability window during stimulation of cervical vagosym-pathetic trunks (VCNS) and (2) vagal effects on APD during stimulation through fat-pad ganglion plexus (VGPS). Atropine completely abolished these vagal effects during VCNS and VGPS. In contrast, VGPS-induced slowing of local conduction velocity was completely abolished by either VIP antagonist or atropine. In pacing-induced AF during VGPS, maximal dominant frequencies and their spatial gradients were reduced significantly by H9935 and, more pronouncedly, by atropine. Furthermore, VIP release in the atria during vagal stimulation was inhibited by atropine, which may account for the concealment of VIP effects with muscarinic blockade. CONCLUSION Neuronally released VIP contributes to vagal effects on atrial electrophysiologic properties and affects the pathophysiology of vagally induced AF. Neuronal release of VIP in the atria is inhibited by muscarinic blockade, a novel mechanism by which VIP effects are concealed by atropine during vagal stimulation. PMID:25748673

  1. Evidence for Dynamic Network Regulation of Drosophila Photoreceptor Function from Mutants Lacking the Neurotransmitter Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Dau, An; Friederich, Uwe; Dongre, Sidhartha; Li, Xiaofeng; Bollepalli, Murali K.; Hardie, Roger C.; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic feedback from interneurons to photoreceptors can help to optimize visual information flow by balancing its allocation on retinal pathways under changing light conditions. But little is known about how this critical network operation is regulated dynamically. Here, we investigate this question by comparing signaling properties and performance of wild-type Drosophila R1–R6 photoreceptors to those of the hdcJK910 mutant, which lacks the neurotransmitter histamine and therefore cannot transmit information to interneurons. Recordings show that hdcJK910 photoreceptors sample similar amounts of information from naturalistic stimulation to wild-type photoreceptors, but this information is packaged in smaller responses, especially under bright illumination. Analyses reveal how these altered dynamics primarily resulted from network overload that affected hdcJK910 photoreceptors in two ways. First, the missing inhibitory histamine input to interneurons almost certainly depolarized them irrevocably, which in turn increased their excitatory feedback to hdcJK910 R1–R6s. This tonic excitation depolarized the photoreceptors to artificially high potentials, reducing their operational range. Second, rescuing histamine input to interneurons in hdcJK910 mutant also restored their normal phasic feedback modulation to R1–R6s, causing photoreceptor output to accentuate dynamic intensity differences at bright illumination, similar to the wild-type. These results provide mechanistic explanations of how synaptic feedback connections optimize information packaging in photoreceptor output and novel insight into the operation and design of dynamic network regulation of sensory neurons. PMID:27047343

  2. Protons are a neurotransmitter that regulates synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Du, Jianyang; Reznikov, Leah R; Price, Margaret P; Zha, Xiang-ming; Lu, Yuan; Moninger, Thomas O; Wemmie, John A; Welsh, Michael J

    2014-06-17

    Stimulating presynaptic terminals can increase the proton concentration in synapses. Potential receptors for protons are acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), Na(+)- and Ca(2+)-permeable channels that are activated by extracellular acidosis. Those observations suggest that protons might be a neurotransmitter. We found that presynaptic stimulation transiently reduced extracellular pH in the amygdala. The protons activated ASICs in lateral amygdala pyramidal neurons, generating excitatory postsynaptic currents. Moreover, both protons and ASICs were required for synaptic plasticity in lateral amygdala neurons. The results identify protons as a neurotransmitter, and they establish ASICs as the postsynaptic receptor. They also indicate that protons and ASICs are a neurotransmitter/receptor pair critical for amygdala-dependent learning and memory.

  3. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-12-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses.

  4. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  5. Convergent Pathways for Steroid Hormone-and Neurotransmitter-Induced Rat Sexual Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, S. K.; Allen, J. M. C.; Clark, J. H.; Blaustein, J. D.; O'Malley, B. W.

    1994-08-01

    Estrogen and progesterone modulate gene expression in rodents by activation of intracellular receptors in the hypothalamus, which regulate neuronal networks that control female sexual behavior. However, the neurotransmitter dopamine has been shown to activate certain steroid receptors in a ligand-independent manner. A dopamine receptor stimulant and a D_1 receptor agonist, but not a D_2 receptor agonist, mimicked the effects of progesterone in facilitating sexual behavior in female rats. The facilitatory effect of the neurotransmitter was blocked by progesterone receptor antagonists, a D_1 receptor antagonist, or antisense oligonucleotides to the progesterone receptor. The results suggest that in rodents neurotransmitters may regulate in vivo gene expression and behavior by means of cross-talk with steroid receptors in the brain.

  6. Effects of subchronic benzo(a)pyrene exposure on neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the rat hippocampus related with spatial learning and memory change.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chongying; Cheng, Shuqun; Xia, Yinyin; Peng, Bin; Tang, Qian; Tu, Baijie

    2011-11-18

    Exposure of laboratory rats to Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), an environmental contaminant with its high lipophilicify which is widely dispersed in the environment and can easily cross the blood brain barrier presenting in the central nervous system, is associated with impaired learning and memory. The purpose of the research was to examine whether subchronic exposure to BaP affects spatial learning and memory, and how it alters normal gene expression in hippocampus, as well as selection of candidate genes involving neurotransmitter receptor attributed to learning and memory. Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate behavioral differences between BaP-treated and vehicle-treated groups. To gain a better insight into the mechanism of BaP-induced neurotoxicity on learning and memory, we used whole genome oligo microarrays as well as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) to assess the global impact of gene expression. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with 6.25mg/kg of BaP or vehicle for 14 weeks. The results from the Morris water maze (MWM) test showed that rats treated with BaP exhibited significantly higher mean latencies as compared to vehicle controls. BaP exposure significantly decreased the number of crossing the platform and the time spent in the target area. After the hippocampus was collected from each rat, total RNA was isolated. Microarray and PCR revealed that exposure to BaP affected mRNA expression of neurotransmitter receptors. The web tool DAVID was used to analyze the significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) and KEGG pathways in the differentially expressed genes. Analysis showed that the most significantly affected gene ontology category was behavior. Furthermore, the fourth highest significantly affected gene ontology category was learning and memory. KEGG molecular pathway analysis showed that "neuroactive ligand-receptor interaction" was affected by BaP with highest statistical significance, and 9 candidate neurotransmitter receptor

  7. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH+ driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters. PMID:26909036

  8. Co-existence of Functionally Different Vesicular Neurotransmitter Transporters.

    PubMed

    Münster-Wandowski, Agnieszka; Zander, Johannes-Friedrich; Richter, Karin; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun

    2016-01-01

    The vesicular transmitter transporters VGLUT, VGAT, VMAT2 and VAChT, define phenotype and physiological properties of neuronal subtypes. VGLUTs concentrate the excitatory amino acid glutamate, VGAT the inhibitory amino acid GABA, VMAT2 monoamines, and VAChT acetylcholine (ACh) into synaptic vesicle (SV). Following membrane depolarization SV release their content into the synaptic cleft. A strict segregation of vesicular transporters is mandatory for the precise functioning of synaptic communication and of neuronal circuits. In the last years, evidence accumulates that subsets of neurons express more than one of these transporters leading to synaptic co-release of different and functionally opposing transmitters and modulation of synaptic plasticity. Synaptic co-existence of transporters may change during pathological scenarios in order to ameliorate misbalances in neuronal activity. In addition, evidence increases that transporters also co-exist on the same vesicle providing another layer of regulation. Generally, vesicular transmitter loading relies on an electrochemical gradient ΔμH(+) driven by the proton ATPase rendering the lumen of the vesicle with respect to the cytosol positive (Δψ) and acidic (ΔpH). While the activity of VGLUT mainly depends on the Δψ component, VMAT, VGAT and VAChT work best at a high ΔpH. Thus, a vesicular synergy of transporters depending on the combination may increase or decrease the filling of SV with the principal transmitter. We provide an overview on synaptic co-existence of vesicular transmitter transporters including changes in the excitatory/inhibitory balance under pathological conditions. Additionally, we discuss functional aspects of vesicular synergy of transmitter transporters.

  9. A practical guide to the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters

    PubMed Central

    Ellis-Davies, Graham C R

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for efficient chemical synthesis of dinitroindolinyl derivatives of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid. these caged neurotransmitters are currently the most chemically and photochemically efficient probes for two-photon photolysis in living brain slices. the protocol only requires basic organic synthesis equipment, and no silica gel column chromatography or NMR spectroscopy is needed at any stage. Hplc is used to purify the caged transmitters at the end of the syntheses. thus, the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters is within the scope of a modestly equipped chemistry laboratory. PMID:21372812

  10. Microfluidic platform for neurotransmitter sensing based on cyclic voltammetry and dielectrophoresis for in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Mathault, Jessy; Zamprogno, Pauline; Greener, Jesse; Miled, Amine

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new microfluidic platform that can simultaneously measure and locally modulate neurotransmitter concentration in a neuron network. This work focuses on the development of a first prototype including a potentiostat and electrode functionalization to detect several neurotransmitter's simultaneously. We tested dopamine as proof of concept to validate functionality. The system is based on 320 bidirectional electrode array for dielectrophoretic manipulation and cyclic voltammetry. Each electrode is connected to a mechanical multiplexer in order to reduce noise interference and fully isolate the electrode. The multiplexing rate is 476 kHz and each electrode can drive a signal with an amplitude of 60 V pp for dielectrophoretic manipulation.

  11. The essential oil of bergamot enhances the levels of amino acid neurotransmitters in the hippocampus of rat: implication of monoterpene hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Luigi A; Rombolà, Laura; Pelle, Cinzia; Corasaniti, Maria T; Zappettini, Simona; Paudice, Paolo; Bonanno, Giambattista; Bagetta, Giacinto

    2007-04-01

    The effects of bergamot essential oil (BEO) on the release of amino acid neurotransmitters in rat hippocampus have been studied by in vivo microdialysis and by in vitro superfusion of isolated nerve terminals. Intraperitoneal administration of BEO (100microl/kg) significantly elevated the extracellular concentration of aspartate, glycine and taurine in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. A dose-relation study generated a bell-shaped curve. When perfused into the hippocampus via the dialysis probe (20microl/20min), BEO produced a significant increase of extracellular aspartate, glycine, taurine as well as of GABA and glutamate. The augmentation of all amino acids was Ca(2+)-independent. Focally injected 1:1 diluted BEO preferentially caused extracellular increase of glutamate. Interestingly, this release appeared to be strictly Ca(2+)-dependent. BEO concentration-dependently enhanced the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from superfused hippocampal synaptosomes. Similar results were obtained by monitoring the BEO-evoked release of endogenous glutamate. At relatively high concentrations, the BEO-induced [(3)H]d-aspartate release was almost entirely prevented by the glutamate transporter blocker dl-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartic acid (DL-TBOA) and was Ca(2+)-independent. At relatively low concentrations the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was only in part ( approximately 50%) DL-TBOA-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent; the remaining portion of release was dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). Interestingly, the monoterpene hydrocarbon-free fraction of the essential oil appeared to be inactive while the bergapten-free fraction superimposed the releasing effect of BEO supporting the deduction that psoralens may not be implicated. To conclude, BEO contains into its volatile fraction still unidentified monoterpene hydrocarbons able to stimulate glutamate release by transporter reversal and/or by exocytosis, depending on the dose administered.

  12. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release. PMID:28059145

  13. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release.

  14. GABA Not Only a Neurotransmitter: Osmotic Regulation by GABAAR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cesetti, Tiziana; Ciccolini, Francesca; Li, Yuting

    2012-01-01

    Mature macroglia and almost all neural progenitor types express γ-aminobutyric (GABA) A receptors (GABAARs), whose activation by ambient or synaptic GABA, leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl−) depending on its electro-chemical gradient (ECl). Since the flux of Cl− is indissolubly associated to that of osmotically obliged water, GABAARs regulate water movements by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signaling could affect the movement of water by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. We will here review recent observations indicating that in neural cells GABAAR-mediated osmotic regulation affects the cellular volume thereby activating multiple intracellular signaling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation, and survival. In addition, we will discuss evidence that the osmotic regulation exerted by GABA may contribute to brain water homeostasis in physiological and in pathological conditions causing brain edema, in which the GABAergic transmission is often altered. PMID:22319472

  15. Multiple Forms of Endocannabinoid and Endovanilloid Signaling Regulate the Tonic Control of GABA Release

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Ledri, Marco; Tóth, Blanka; Marchionni, Ivan; Henstridge, Christopher M.; Dudok, Barna; Kenesei, Kata; Barna, László; Szabó, Szilárd I.; Renkecz, Tibor; Oberoi, Michelle; Watanabe, Masahiko; Limoli, Charles L.; Horvai, George; Soltesz, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    intracellular membrane cisternae at perisomatic GABAergic symmetrical synapses. Interestingly, neither AM251, JZL184, nor PF3845 affected CB1-positive dendritic interneuron synapses. Together, these findings are consistent with the possibility that constitutively active CB1 receptors substantially influence perisomatic GABA release probability and indicate that the synaptic effects of tonic 2-AG release are tightly controlled by presynaptic MGL activity and also by postsynaptic endovanilloid signaling and FAAH activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tonic cannabinoid signaling plays a critical role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. However, the mechanistic details of how persistent CB1 cannabinoid receptor activity inhibits neurotransmitter release have remained elusive. Therefore, electrophysiological recordings, lipid measurements, and super-resolution imaging were combined to elucidate those signaling molecules and mechanisms that underlie tonic cannabinoid signaling. The findings indicate that constitutive CB1 activity has pivotal function in the tonic control of hippocampal GABA release. Moreover, the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is continuously generated postsynaptically, but its synaptic effect is regulated strictly by presynaptic monoacylglycerol lipase activity. Finally, anandamide signaling antagonizes tonic 2-AG signaling via activation of postsynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid TRPV1 receptors. This unexpected mechanistic diversity may be necessary to fine-tune GABA release probability under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:26157003

  16. Disturbances in the secretion of neurotransmitters in IA-2/IA-2beta null mice: changes in behavior, learning and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, T; Kubosaki, A; Ito, Y; Notkins, A L

    2009-03-17

    Islet-associated protein 2 (IA-2) and IA-2beta are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes and transmembrane proteins in dense core secretory vesicles (DCV) of neuroendocrine cells. The deletion of these genes results in a decrease in insulin secretion. The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that this deletion not only affects the secretion of insulin, but has a more global effect on neuroendocrine secretion that leads to disturbances in behavior and learning. Measurement of neurotransmitters showed that norepinephrine, dopamine and 5-HT were significantly decreased in the brain of double knockout (DKO) mice (P<0.05 to <0.001). In tests evaluating anxiety-like behavior and conditioned-learning, the DKO mice showed a highly significant increase in anxiety-like behavior (P<0.01 to <0.001) and impairment of conditioned learning (P<0.01) as compared to WT mice. The DKO mice also displayed an increase in spontaneous and induced seizures (P<0.01) and age-related death. Contrary to the generally held view that IA-2 and IA-2beta are expressed exclusively in DCV, subcellular fractionation studies revealed that IA-2beta, but not IA-2, co-purifies with fractions rich in synaptic vesicles (SV), and that the secretion of dopamine, GABA and glutamate from the synaptosomes of the DKO mice was significantly decreased as was the number of SV (P<0.01). Taken together, these findings show that IA-2beta is present in both DCV and SV, and that the deletion of IA-2/IA-2beta has a global effect on the secretion of neurotransmitters. The impairment of secretion leads to behavioral and learning disturbances, seizures and reduced lifespan.

  17. Modulation of ischemia-evoked release of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids by adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Goda, H; Ooboshi, H; Nakane, H; Ibayashi, S; Sadoshima, S; Fujishima, M

    1998-09-18

    Adenosine has been reported to have beneficial effects against ischemic brain damage, although the mechanisms are not fully clarified. To examine the role of adenosine on the ischemia-evoked release of neurotransmitters, we applied a highly selective agonist for adenosine A1 receptor, 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), into the ischemic brain using in vivo brain dialysis, which directly delivered the agonist to the local brain area. Concentrations of extracellular amino acids (glutamate, aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine) and regional blood flow in the striatum of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were monitored during cerebral ischemia elicited by bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 40 min and recirculation. Striatal blood flow and basal levels of amino acids were not affected by direct perfusion of CCPA (10 microM or 100 microM). During ischemia, concentrations of glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine increased up to 37-, 30-, 96- and 31-fold, respectively, when vehicle alone was administered. Administration of CCPA did not affect the changes in regional blood flow during ischemia and reperfusion. Perfusion of CCPA (100 microM), however, significantly attenuated the ischemia-evoked release of aspartate (by 70%) and glutamate (by 73%). The ischemia-induced increase of GABA tended to be decreased by CCPA, although it was not statistically significant. In contrast, both low and high concentrations of CCPA had little effect on the release of taurine during ischemia. These results suggest that stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors selectively attenuated the ischemia-evoked release of excitatory amino acids, but not of inhibitory amino acids without affecting blood flow. This modulation of the release of amino acids by adenosine A1 receptor agonists may play a protective role against ischemic neuronal damage.

  18. Stress, Allostatic Load, Catecholamines, and Other Neurotransmitters in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—“homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:21615193

  19. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  20. Stress, Allostatic Load, Catecholamines, and Other Neurotransmitters in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—“homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:22297542

  1. Measuring endogenous 5-HT release by emission tomography: promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Louise M; Tyacke, Robin J; Nutt, David J; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-01-01

    Molecular in vivo neuroimaging techniques can be used to measure regional changes in endogenous neurotransmitters, evoked by challenges that alter synaptic neurotransmitter concentration. This technique has most successfully been applied to the study of endogenous dopamine release using positron emission tomography, but has not yet been adequately extended to other neurotransmitter systems. This review focuses on how the technique has been applied to the study of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) system. The principles behind visualising fluctuations in neurotransmitters are introduced, with reference to the dopaminergic system. Studies that aim to image acute, endogenous 5-HT release or depletion at 5-HT receptor targets are summarised, with particular attention to studies in humans. Radiotracers targeting the 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4 receptors and the serotonin reuptake transporter have been explored for their sensitivity to 5-HT fluctuations, but with mixed outcomes; tracers for these targets cannot reliably image endogenous 5-HT in humans. Shortcomings in our basic knowledge of the mechanisms underlying changes in binding potential are addressed, and suggestions are made as to how the selection of targets, radiotracers, challenge paradigms, and experimental design might be optimised to improve our chances of successfully imaging endogenous neurotransmitters in the future. PMID:20664611

  2. Autonomic Neurotransmitters Modulate Immunoglobulin A Secretion in Porcine Colonic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Lisa D.; Xie, Yonghong; Lyte, Mark; Vulchanova, Lucy; Brown, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA) plays a crucial role in mucosal surface defense. We tested the hypothesis that colonic sIgA secretion is under enteric neural control. Immunohistochemistry of the porcine distal colonic mucosa revealed presumptive cholinergic and adrenergic nerve fibers apposed to secretory component (SC)-positive crypt epithelial cells and neighboring IgA+ plasmacytes. The cholinomimetic drug carbamylcholine elicited rapid, atropine-sensitive IgA secretion into the luminal fluid bathing mucosal explants mounted in Ussing chambers. The adrenergic receptor agonist norepinephrine also increased IgA secretion, an action inhibited by phentolamine. These effects were independent of agonist-induced anion secretion. In Western blots of luminal fluid, both agonists increased the density of protein bands co-immunoreactive for IgA and SC. Mucosal exposure to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli did not affect IgA secretion, and carbamylcholine treatment did not affect mucosal adherence of this enteropathogen. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine, acting respectively through muscarinic cholinergic and alpha-adrenergic receptors in the colonic mucosa, stimulate sIgA secretion and may enhance mucosal defense in vivo. PMID:17320195

  3. Activity-dependent regulation of release probability at excitatory hippocampal synapses: a crucial role of fragile X mental retardation protein in neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Sheng; Peng, Chun-Zi; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xia, Jian; Jin, Daozhong; Dai, Yuqiao; Luo, Xue-Gang; Klyachko, Vitaly A; Deng, Pan-Yue

    2014-05-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common form of inherited intellectual disability and the leading genetic cause of autism. FMRP has been suggested to play important roles in regulating neurotransmission and short-term synaptic plasticity at excitatory hippocampal and cortical synapses. However, the origins and mechanisms of these FMRP actions remain incompletely understood, and the role of FMRP in regulating synaptic release probability and presynaptic function remains debated. Here we used variance-mean analysis and peak-scaled nonstationary variance analysis to examine changes in both presynaptic and postsynaptic parameters during repetitive activity at excitatory CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses in a mouse model of FXS. Our analyses revealed that loss of FMRP did not affect the basal release probability or basal synaptic transmission, but caused an abnormally elevated release probability specifically during repetitive activity. These abnormalities were not accompanied by changes in excitatory postsynaptic current kinetics, quantal size or postsynaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor conductance. Our results thus indicate that FMRP regulates neurotransmission at excitatory hippocampal synapses specifically during repetitive activity via modulation of release probability in a presynaptic manner. Our study suggests that FMRP function in regulating neurotransmitter release is an activity-dependent phenomenon that may contribute to the pathophysiology of FXS.

  4. Treatment with Tyrosine a Neurotransmitter Precursor Reduces Environmental Stress in Humans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    brain norepinephrine and dopamine. catecholaminergic neurotransmitters. In animals, administration of tyrosine, a food constituent and precursor of the...Profile of Mood States. Stanford Sleepiness Scale) ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSORS that have been employed to evaluate a variety of psychoactive drugs foods ... tyramine . However. Plasma tyrosine levels were significantly elevated during behav- this amine is not detectable in the plasma of animals after they

  5. Snapshot of antidepressants at work: the structure of neurotransmitter transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Cuboni, Serena; Hausch, Felix

    2014-05-12

    In the sweet spot: Cocrystal structures of engineered neurotransmitter transporters reveal the binding mode of commonly prescribed antidepressants, providing a basis for a rational drug design for this class of proteins. The picture shows the structure of the dopamine transporter of Drosophila melanogaster in complex with the antidepressant nortriptyline.

  6. 13C MRS studies of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Douglas L; De Feyter, Henk M; de Graaf, Robin A; Mason, Graeme F; Behar, Kevin L

    2011-10-01

    In the last 25 years, (13)C MRS has been established as the only noninvasive method for the measurement of glutamate neurotransmission and cell-specific neuroenergetics. Although technically and experimentally challenging, (13)C MRS has already provided important new information on the relationship between neuroenergetics and neuronal function, the energy cost of brain function, the high neuronal activity in the resting brain state and how neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling are altered in neurological and psychiatric disease. In this article, the current state of (13)C MRS as it is applied to the study of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling in humans is reviewed. The focus is predominantly on recent findings in humans regarding metabolic pathways, applications to clinical research and the technical status of the method. Results from in vivo (13)C MRS studies in animals are discussed from the standpoint of the validation of MRS measurements of neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling, and where they have helped to identify key questions to address in human research. Controversies concerning the relationship between neuroenergetics and neurotransmitter cycling and factors having an impact on the accurate determination of fluxes through mathematical modeling are addressed. We further touch upon different (13)C-labeled substrates used to study brain metabolism, before reviewing a number of human brain diseases investigated using (13)C MRS. Future technological developments are discussed that will help to overcome the limitations of (13)C MRS, with special attention given to recent developments in hyperpolarized (13)C MRS.

  7. Effect of Curare on Responses to Different Putative Neurotransmitters in Aplysia.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    The effects of curare on responses resulting from ionophoretic application of several putative neurotransmitters onto Aplysia neurons were studied...In Aplysia nervous tissue, curare appears to be a specfic blocking agent for a class of receptor-activated Na and Cl responses.

  8. Metabolomics of Neurotransmitters and Related Metabolites in Post-Mortem Tissue from the Dorsal and Ventral Striatum of Alcoholic Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Mohammed Abul; Ahmed, Selina; Sultana, Nilufa; Ahmed, Eakhlas U; Pickford, Russell; Rae, Caroline; Šerý, Omar; McGregor, Iain S; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2016-02-01

    We report on changes in neurotransmitter metabolome and protein expression in the striatum of humans exposed to heavy long-term consumption of alcohol. Extracts from post mortem striatal tissue (dorsal striatum; DS comprising caudate nucleus; CN and putamen; P and ventral striatum; VS constituted by nucleus accumbens; NAc) were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Proteomics was studied in CN by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass-spectrometry. Proteomics identified 25 unique molecules expressed differently by the alcohol-affected tissue. Two were dopamine-related proteins and one a GABA-synthesizing enzyme GAD65. Two proteins that are related to apoptosis and/or neuronal loss (BiD and amyloid-β A4 precursor protein-binding family B member 3) were increased. There were no differences in the levels of dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), serotonin (5HT), homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (HIAA), histamine, L-glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Tryp) between the DS (CN and P) and VS (NAc) in control brains. Choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (Ach) were higher and norepinephrine (NE) lower, in the VS. Alcoholic striata had lower levels of neurotransmitters except for Glu (30 % higher in the alcoholic ventral striatum). Ratios of DOPAC/DA and HIAA/5HT were higher in alcoholic striatum indicating an increase in the DA and 5HT turnover. Glutathione was significantly reduced in all three regions of alcohol-affected striatum. We conclude that neurotransmitter systems in both the DS (CN and P) and the VS (NAc) were significantly influenced by long-term heavy alcohol intake associated with alcoholism.

  9. Effects of amantadine on circulating neurotransmitters in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lechin, Fuad; van der Dijs, Bertha; Pardey-Maldonado, Betty; Rivera, Jairo E; Baez, Scarlet; Lechin, Marcel E

    2010-03-01

    Considering that glutamatergic axons innervate the C1(Ad) medullary nuclei, which are responsible for the excitation of the peripheral adrenal glands, we decided to investigate catecholamines (noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine) plus indolamines (plasma serotonin and platelet serotonin) at the blood level, before and after a small oral dose of amantadine, a selective NMDA antagonist. We found that the drug provoked a selective enhancement of noradrenaline plus a minimization of adrenaline, dopamine, plasma serotonin and platelet serotonin circulating levels. Significant enhancement of diastolic blood pressure plus reduction of systolic blood pressure and heart rate paralleled the circulating parameter changes. The above findings allow us to postulate that the drug was able to enhance the peripheral neural sympathetic activity. Minimization of both adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic activities was also registered after the amantadine challenge. The above findings supported the postulation that this drug should be a powerful therapeutic tool for treating diseases affected by adrenal sympathetic hyperactivity.

  10. Effects of weightlessness on neurotransmitter receptors in selected brain areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. D.; Murakami, D. M.; Mcmillen, B. A.; Mcconnaughey, M. M.; Williams, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The central nervous system receptor dynamics of rats exposed to 7 days of microgravity are studied. The receptor affinity and receptor number at the hippocampus, lateral frontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, corpus striatum, cerebellum and pons-medulla, and the Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity are examined. The data reveal that there is no significant change in the receptor affinity and receptor number for the lateral frontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla; however, there is an increase from 81 + or - 11 to 120 + or 5 fmole/mg protein in the receptor number for hippocampal binding, and a decrease in receptor number for the striatum from 172 + or - 14 to 143 + or - 10 fmoles/mg protein. A 9 percent decrease in Mg-dependent Na(+)/K(+)ATPase activity is observed. It is detected that the terminal mechanism may be affected by exposure to microgravity.

  11. Deep Brain Stimulation Results in Local Glutamate and Adenosine Release: Investigation into the Role of Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Chang, Su-Youne; Hitti, Frederick L.; Roberts, David W.; Leiter, James C.; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Several neurologic disorders are treated with deep brain stimulation; however, the mechanism underlying its ability to abolish oscillatory phenomena associated with diseases as diverse as Parkinson's and epilepsy remain largely unknown. In this study we sought to investigate the role of specific neurotransmitters in deep brain stimulation (DBS) and determine the role of non-neuronal cells in its mechanism of action. Methods We used the ferret thalamic slice preparation in vitro, which exhibits spontaneous spindle oscillations, in order to determine the effect of high-frequency stimulation on neurotransmitter release. We then performed experiments using an in vitro astrocyte culture to investigate the role of glial transmitter release in HFS-mediated abolishment of spindle oscillations. Results In this series of experiments we demonstrated that glutamate and adenosine release in ferret slices was able to abolish spontaneous spindle oscillations. The glutamate release was still evoked in the presence of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), but was eliminated with the vesicular H+-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, and the calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of purified primary astrocytic cultures was able to evoke intracellular calcium transients and glutamate release, and bath application of BAPTA-AM inhibited glutamate release in this setting. Conclusion These results suggest that vesicular astrocytic neurotransmitter release may be an important mechanism by which DBS is able to achieve clinical benefits. PMID:20644423

  12. Chronic paroxetine treatment: effects on other non-serotonergic neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, Paola; Manjarrez-Marmolejo, Joaquin; Franco-Perez, Javier

    2013-12-01

    Due to its efficacy and acceptability, paroxetine is situated in the top ten of drugs prescribed for the treatment of major depression and essentially all anxiety disorders. Adults under paroxetine treatment report relief after 4-6 weeks of administration; furthermore, this drug can be prescribed for periods lasting longer than one year. Therefore, paroxetine treatment has a pattern of ingestion that is mainly chronic rather than acute. There is a considerable number of reviews in the literature concerning the effects of paroxetine on the serotonergic system; however, the alterations caused by chronic ingestion of this drug in other neurotransmitter systems have received little attention. For this reason, we consider very important to review the experimental studies concerning the effects of chronic paroxetine intake on neurotransmitter levels, neuronal firing rate and the expression of receptors and transporters in different neurotransmitter systems in the brain. According to the experimental data analyzed in this work, we can establish that long-term paroxetine intake has the ability to increase GABA, glutamate, dopamine and noradrenaline levels in the brain. Furthermore, high levels of AMPA, orexine-1,2 and histamine-1 receptors have been reported in different brain regions after treatment with paroxetine over several weeks. In addition, paroxetine has differential effects on neuropeptide systems, such as galanine, opioid receptors and substance P. Available data lead us to establish that chronic ingestion of paroxetine induces changes in several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, thus illuminating how each one may contribute to the antidepressant and anxiolytic response elicited by this drug. We consider that all reported changes in the neurotransmitter systems should be further considered to individualize clinical treatment and, in the case of patients taking a drug "cocktail", to gain better control over drug interactions and adverse effects.

  13. Syndactyly Release.

    PubMed

    Braun, Tara L; Trost, Jeffrey G; Pederson, William C

    2016-11-01

    Syndactyly is one of the most common congenital hand anomalies treated by pediatric plastic surgeons. Established principles of syndactyly separation dictate the timing and order of syndactyly release, with the goals of surgery being the creation of an anatomically normal webspace, tension-free closure of soft tissue, and return of function to the fingers. Numerous surgical methods have been described, many of which involve the use of local flaps to reconstruct the commissure and full-thickness skin grafts for coverage of raw areas. Recently, reconstructive techniques without the use of skin grafts have been devised, which work well for certain indications. Special considerations are described for complete, complex, and syndromic syndactylies. Outcomes for simple syndactyly release are typically good when surgical principles are followed, whereas complex syndactyly release tends to have less-favorable outcomes and more complications.

  14. The plastic neurotransmitter phenotype of the hippocampal granule cells and of the moss in their messy fibers.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    The granule cells (GCs) and their axons, the mossy fibers (MFs), make synapses with interneurons in the hilus and CA3 area of the hippocampus and with pyramidal cells of CA3, each with distinct anatomical and functional characteristics. Many features of synaptic communication observed at the MF synapses are not usually observed in most cortical synapses, and thus have drawn the attention of many groups studying different aspects of the transmission of information. One particular aspect of the GCs, that makes their study unique, is that they express a dual glutamatergic-GABAergic phenotype and several groups have contributed to the understanding of how two neurotransmitters of opposing actions can act on a single target when simultaneously released. Indeed, the GCs somata and their mossy fibers express in a regulated manner glutamate and GABA, GAD, VGlut and VGAT, all markers of both phenotypes. Finally, their activation provokes both glutamate-R-mediated and GABA-R-mediated synaptic responses in the postsynaptic cell targets and even in the MFs themselves. The developmental and activity-dependent expression of these phenotypes seems to follow a "logical" way to maintain an excitation-inhibition balance of the dentate gyrus-to-CA3 communication.

  15. TIRFM and pH-sensitive GFP-probes to evaluate neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells: cell imaging and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Federica; Di Cairano, Eliana S; Moretti, Stefania; Piccoli, Giovanni; Perego, Carla

    2015-01-29

    Synaptic vesicles release neurotransmitters at chemical synapses through a dynamic cycle of fusion and retrieval. Monitoring synaptic activity in real time and dissecting the different steps of exo-endocytosis at the single-vesicle level are crucial for understanding synaptic functions in health and disease. Genetically-encoded pH-sensitive probes directly targeted to synaptic vesicles and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) provide the spatio-temporal resolution necessary to follow vesicle dynamics. The evanescent field generated by total internal reflection can only excite fluorophores placed in a thin layer (<150 nm) above the glass cover on which cells adhere, exactly where the processes of exo-endocytosis take place. The resulting high-contrast images are ideally suited for vesicles tracking and quantitative analysis of fusion events. In this protocol, SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells are proposed as a valuable model for studying neurotransmitter release at the single-vesicle level by TIRFM, because of their flat surface and the presence of dispersed vesicles. The methods for growing SH-SY5Y as adherent cells and for transfecting them with synapto-pHluorin are provided, as well as the technique to perform TIRFM and imaging. Finally, a strategy aiming to select, count, and analyze fusion events at whole-cell and single-vesicle levels is presented. To validate the imaging procedure and data analysis approach, the dynamics of pHluorin-tagged vesicles are analyzed under resting and stimulated (depolarizing potassium concentrations) conditions. Membrane depolarization increases the frequency of fusion events and causes a parallel raise of the net fluorescence signal recorded in whole cell. Single-vesicle analysis reveals modifications of fusion-event behavior (increased peak height and width). These data suggest that potassium depolarization not only induces a massive neurotransmitter release but also modifies the mechanism of vesicle

  16. Role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Sharma, P K; Garg, V K; Singh, A K; Mondal, S C

    2013-01-01

    This review was prepared with an aim to show role of serotonin in seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder, which is also called as winter depression or winter blues, is mood disorder in which persons with normal mental health throughout most of the year will show depressive symptoms in the winter or, less commonly, in the summer. Serotonin is an important endogenous neurotransmitter which also acts as neuromodulator. The least invasive, natural, and researched treatment of seasonal affective disorder is natural or otherwise is light therapy. Negative air ionization, which acts by liberating charged particles on the sleep environment, has also become effective in treatment of seasonal affective disorder.  

  17. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Arbilla, S; Langer, S Z

    1981-12-17

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [3H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01--1 microM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [3H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.01--1 microM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1--10 microM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1 microM) of the stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [3H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective.

  18. Euglycemia restoration by central leptin in type 1 diabetes requires STAT3 signaling but not fast-acting neurotransmitter release

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Central leptin action is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. To examine the role of intracellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathways, we used LepRs/s mice with disrupted...

  19. Toggle release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Thomas J. (Inventor); Yang, Robert A. (Inventor); Brown, Christopher W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A pyrotechnic actuated structural release device 10 which is mechanically two fault tolerant for release. The device 10 comprises a fastener plate 11 and fastener body 12, each attachable to a different one of a pair of structures to be joined. The fastener plate 11 and body 12 are fastenable by a toggle 13 supported at one end on the fastener plate and mounted for universal pivotal movement thereon. At its other end which is received in a central opening in the fastener body 12 and adapted for limited pivotal movement therein the toggle 13 is restrained by three retractable latching pins 61 symmetrically disposed in equiangular spacing about the axis of the toggle 13 and positionable in latching engagement with an end fitting on the toggle. Each pin 61 is individually retractable by combustion of a pyrotechnic charge 77, the expanding gases of which are applied to a pressure receiving face 67 on the latch pin 61 to effect its retraction from the toggle. While retraction of all three pins 62 releases the toggle, the fastener is mechanically two fault tolerant since the failure of any single one or pair of the latch pins to retract results in an asymmetrical loading on the toggle and its pivotal movement to effect a release. An annular bolt 18 is mounted on the fastener plate 11 as a support for the socket mounting 30, 37 of the toggle whereby its selective axial movement provides a means for preloading the toggle.

  20. Increased glutamate and decreased glycine release in the RVM during induction of a pre-clinical model of chronic widespread muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rajan; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    Two injections of acidic saline into the gastrocnemius muscle produce long-lasting hyperalgesia that is initiated and maintained by changes in the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM). Potential underlying mechanisms could be increased release of excitatory neurotransmitters and/or reduced release of inhibitory neurotransmitters, in the RVM. We tested this hypothesis by measuring concentrations of aspartate, glutamate and glycine in response to the first and second injection of acidic saline and compared to intramuscular injections of normal saline using microdialysis with HPLC analysis. We show a significant increase in aspartate and glutamate during the second acid-saline injection compared to normal-saline injections or the first injection of acid-saline. There were also long-lasting decreases in glycine concentrations in the RVM in response to both the first and second injection of acidic saline. It is possible that disinhibition after the first injection leads to long-lasting neuronal changes that allow a greater release of excitatory neurotransmitters after the second injection. We hypothesize that increased release of excitatory neurotransmitters in the RVM drives the release of excitatory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord, central sensitization and the consequent hyperalgesia. PMID:19429181

  1. Kinetics of noradrenaline released by sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Gonon, F; Msghina, M; Stjärne, L

    1993-10-01

    At the skeletal neuromuscular junction the released neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, is eliminated within some milliseconds. This time course is known with great precision through the electrical response of target cells. At the sympathetic neuroeffector junction the fast electrical response is not mediated by noradrenaline but by a cotransmitter: ATP. The slow electrical response and the slow component of smooth muscle contraction are principally mediated by noradrenaline. These responses are two orders of magnitude slower than the electrical response to ATP. Therefore, great uncertainty remains regarding the kinetics of noradrenaline appearance and elimination. Here, the local noradrenaline concentration at the surface of the isolated rat tail artery was electrochemically monitored in real time using a carbon fibre electrode. We have shown that the time course of the neurogenically released noradrenaline is at least one order of magnitude faster than the resulting contraction. The kinetics of noradrenaline inactivation by neuronal reuptake were also precisely measured.

  2. Introduction to the Special Issue “Pharmacotherapies for the Treatment of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence” and a Summary of Patents Targeting other Neurotransmitter Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Richard L.; Franklin, Kelle M.; Hauser, Sheketha R.; Zhou, Feng C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the Special Section: Pharmacotherapies for the Treatment of Alcohol Abuse and Dependence and provides a summary of patents targeting neurotransmitter systems not covered in the other four chapters. The World Health Organization notes that alcoholic-type drinking results in 2.5 million deaths per year, and these deaths occur to a disproportionately greater extent among adolescents and young adults. Developing a pharmacological treatment targeting alcohol abuse and dependence is complicated by (a) the heterogeneous nature of the disease(s), (b) alcohol affecting multiple neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, and (c) alcohol affecting multiple organ systems which in turn influence the function of the central nervous system. Presently, the USA Federal Drug Administration has approved three pharmacotherapies for alcoholism: disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate. This chapter provides a summary of the following systems, which are not covered in the accompanying chapters; alcohol and acetaldehyde metabolism, opioid, glycinergic, GABA-A, neurosteroid, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and endocannabinoid, as well as patents targeting these systems for the treatment of alcoholism. Finally, an overview is presented on the use of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics in tailoring treatments for certain subpopulations of alcoholics, which is expected to continue in the future. PMID:22574678

  3. Dynamic release of amino acid transmitters induced by valproate in PTZ-kindled epileptic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xu-Ying; Lu, Xiang; Zhong, Ming-Kang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2004-03-01

    In the present communication, the dynamic release of amino acid (AA) transmitters induced by valproate (VPA) in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-kindled freely moving rats hippocampus has been determined. The results showed that glutamate and aspartate release were significantly increased during the seizure/interical periods, and markedly decreased after the application of 200mg/kg valproate. In contrast, gamma-aminobutyric acid and taurine release were markedly decreased during interical period, and significantly increased during the seizure period. Glycine release was similar to the case of glutamate and aspartate release. The increase of either gamma-aminobutyric acid/taurine or glycine releases during the seizure period could be inhibited by the application of valproate likewise. The results indicate that: (a) the imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters is really involved in epilepsy; (b) the modulation of valproate on the major amino acid neurotransmitters certainly plays one of important roles on antiepilepsy efficacy; (c) the pentylenetetrazol-kindled epileptogenesis model is a fit one for approaching the mechanisms of valproate modulating amino acid neurotransmitters.

  4. PKCθ activation in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors is needed for stimulation of numerous important cellular signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Sancho, Veronica; Berna, Marc J; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, R T

    2011-12-01

    The novel PKCθ isoform is highly expressed in T-cells, brain and skeletal muscle and originally thought to have a restricted distribution. It has been extensively studied in T-cells and shown to be important for apoptosis, T-cell activation and proliferation. Recent studies showed its presence in other tissues and importance in insulin signaling, lung surfactant secretion, intestinal barrier permeability, platelet and mast-cell functions. However, little information is available for PKCθ activation by gastrointestinal (GI) hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors. In the present study we used rat pancreatic acinar cells to explore their ability to activate PKCθ and the possible interactions with important cellular mediators of their actions. Particular attention was paid to cholecystokinin (CCK), a physiological regulator of pancreatic function and important in pathological processes affecting acinar function, like pancreatitis. PKCθ-protein/mRNA was present in the pancreatic acini, and T538-PKCθ phosphorylation/activation was stimulated only by hormones/neurotransmitters activating phospholipase C. PKCθ was activated in time- and dose-related manner by CCK, mediated 30% by high-affinity CCK(A)-receptor activation. CCK stimulated PKCθ translocation from cytosol to membrane. PKCθ inhibition (by pseudostrate-inhibitor or dominant negative) inhibited CCK- and TPA-stimulation of PKD, Src, RafC, PYK2, p125(FAK) and IKKα/β, but not basal/stimulated enzyme secretion. Also CCK- and TPA-induced PKCθ activation produced an increment in PKCθ's direct association with AKT, RafA, RafC and Lyn. These results show for the first time the PKCθ presence in pancreatic acinar cells, its activation by some GI hormones/neurotransmitters and involvement in important cell signaling pathways mediating physiological responses (enzyme secretion, proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine expression, and pathological responses like pancreatitis and cancer growth).

  5. PKCθ activation in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors is needed for stimulation of numerous important cellular signaling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Veronica; Berna, Marc J.; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The novel PKCθ isoform is highly expressed in T-cells, brain and skeletal muscle and originally thought to have a restricted distribution. It has been extensively studied in T-cells and shown to be important for apoptosis, T-cell activation and proliferation. Recent studies showed its presence in other tissues and importance in insulin signaling, lung surfactant secretion, intestinal barrier permeability, platelet and mast-cell functions. However, little information is available for PKCθ activation by gastrointestinal(GI) hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors. In the present study we used rat pancreatic acinar cells to explore their ability to activate PKCθ and the possible interactions with important cellular mediators of their actions. Particular attention was paid to cholecystokinin(CCK), a physiological regulator of pancreatic function and important in pathological processes affecting acinar function, like pancreatitis. PKCθ-protein/mRNA were present in the pancreatic acini, and T538-PKCθ phosphorylation/activation was stimulated only by hormones/neurotransmitters activating phospholipase C. PKCθ was activated in time- and dose-related manner by CCK, mediated 30% by high-affinity CCKA-receptor activation. CCK stimulated PKCθ translocation from cytosol to membrane. PKCθ inhibition (by pseudostrate-inhibitor or dominant negative) inhibited CCK- and TPA-stimulation of PKD, Src, RafC, PYK2, p125FAK and IKKα/β, but not basal/stimulated enzyme secretion. Also CCK- and TPA-induced PKCθ activation produced an increment in PKCθ’s direct association with AKT, RafA, RafC and Lyn. These results show for the first time PKCθ presence in pancreatic acinar cells, its activation by some GI hormones/neurotransmitters and involvement in important cell signaling pathways mediating physiological responses (enzyme secretion, proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine expression, and pathological responses like pancreatitis and cancer growth). PMID:21810446

  6. Duck cerebellum participates in regulation of food intake via the neurotransmitters serotonin and neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua Z; Li, Xin Y; Tong, Jing J; Qiu, Zheng Y; Zhan, Han C; Sha, Jun N; Peng, Ke M

    2008-10-01

    Two important neurotransmitters, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), have been confirmed to be involved in food intake regulation. To clarify whether the cerebellum participates in modulation of food intake through these two neurotransmitters, we investigated the distribution and expression levels of 5-HT and NPY in cerebellum of the duck. Our results showed that 5-HT and NPY were distributed only at the Purkinje cell layer of the duck cerebellum. Moreover, the expression level of 5-HT in fasted (4 h) and tryptophan (100-200 mg/kg)-treated ducks was significantly higher than that in control animals (P<0.01), whereas the expression of NPY was significantly decreased (P<0.01). Therefore, our results indicated that inhibitory regulation of food intake respectively increased and decreased cerebellar 5-HT and NPY in the duck.

  7. Miniaturized and Wireless Optical Neurotransmitter Sensor for Real-Time Monitoring of Dopamine in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min H.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Choi, Sang H.; Zhao, Fei; Kim, Jongsung; Song, Kyo D.; Lee, Uhn

    2016-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of extracellular neurotransmitter concentration offers great benefits for diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders and diseases. This paper presents the study design and results of a miniaturized and wireless optical neurotransmitter sensor (MWONS) for real-time monitoring of brain dopamine concentration. MWONS is based on fluorescent sensing principles and comprises a microspectrometer unit, a microcontroller for data acquisition, and a Bluetooth wireless network for real-time monitoring. MWONS has a custom-designed application software that controls the operation parameters for excitation light sources, data acquisition, and signal processing. MWONS successfully demonstrated a measurement capability with a limit of detection down to a 100 nanomole dopamine concentration, and high selectivity to ascorbic acid (90:1) and uric acid (36:1). PMID:27834927

  8. Microfluidic in-channel multi-electrode platform for neurotransmitter sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, A.; Mathault, J.; Reitz, A.; Boisvert, M.; Tessier, F.; Greener, J.; Miled, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this project we present a microfluidic platform with in-channel micro-electrodes for in situ screening of bio/chemical samples through a lab-on-chip system. We used a novel method to incorporate electrochemical sensors array (16x20) connected to a PCB, which opens the way for imaging applications. A 200 μm height microfluidic channel was bonded to electrochemical sensors. The micro-channel contains 3 inlets used to introduce phosphate buffer saline (PBS), ferrocynide and neurotransmitters. The flow rate was controlled through automated micro-pumps. A multiplexer was used to scan electrodes and perform individual cyclic voltammograms by a custom potentiostat. The behavior of the system was linear in terms of variation of current versus concentration. It was used to detect the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and glutamate.

  9. [Detection of neurotransmitter interactions with PET and SPECT by pharmacological challenge paradigms].

    PubMed

    Schlösser, R

    2000-01-01

    Functional brain imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) enables the in vivo study of specific neurochemical processes in the context of normal regulatory mechanisms and pathophysiological alterations of the brain. By combining these methods with pharmacological challenge-paradigms, the study of functional interactions of different neurotransmitter systems is possible. This review will present data from animal and healthy volunteer studies as well as first data from investigations in different patient populations with regard to this research direction. Especially, interactions of different neurotransmitter systems with the dopaminergic and the cholinergic system will be discussed. The database acquired so far confirms existing models of neuronal feedback-circuits, and the first clinical results are consistent with the hypothesis of an increased dopaminergic responsivity in schizophrenic patients. These results open up new perspectives for a further evaluation of treatment response predictors from drug-challenge studies and for the development of new drug treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Analysis of neurotransmitter tissue content of Drosophila melanogaster in different life stages.

    PubMed

    Denno, Madelaine E; Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-01-21

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model organism for studying neurological diseases with similar neurotransmission to mammals. While both larva and adult Drosophila have central nervous systems, not much is known about how neurotransmitter tissue content changes through development. In this study, we quantified tyramine, serotonin, octopamine, and dopamine in larval, pupal, and adult fly brains using capillary electrophoresis coupled to fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Tyramine and octopamine content varied between life stages, with almost no octopamine being present in the pupa, while tyramine levels in the pupa were very high. Adult females had significantly higher dopamine content than males, but no other neurotransmitters were dependent on sex in the adult. Understanding the tissue content of different life stages will be beneficial for future work comparing the effects of diseases on tissue content throughout development.

  11. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    PubMed

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms.

  12. Probe-pin device for optical neurotransmitter sensing in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Hyuck; Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Park, Yeonjoon; Choi, Sang H.; Lee, Dae-Sung; Shin, Kyu-Sik; Hwang, Hak-In; Lee, Uhn

    2015-04-01

    Development of an optical neurotransmitter sensing device using nano-plasmonic probes and a micro-spectrometer for real time monitoring of neural signals in the brain is underway. Clinical application of this device technology is to provide autonomous closed-loop feedback control to a deep brain stimulation (DBS) system and enhance the accuracy and efficacy of DBS treatment. By far, we have developed an implantable probe-pin device based on localized field enhancement of surface plasmonic resonance on a nanostructured sensing domain which can amplify neurochemical signals from evoked neural activity in the brain. In this paper, we will introduce the details of design and sensing performance of a proto-typed microspectrometer and nanostructured probing devices for real time measurement of neurotransmitter concentrations.

  13. Carbon nanotube yarn electrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitter dynamics in live brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Andreas C; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Yuntian; Sombers, Leslie A

    2013-09-24

    This work demonstrates the potential of nanoscale carbon electrode materials for improved detection of electroactive neurotransmitter dynamics in the brain. Individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes were synthesized via chemical vapor deposition, spun into yarns, and used in the fabrication of disk microelectrodes that were subsequently characterized using scanning electron and atomic force microscopies. The carbon nanotube yarn electrodes were coupled with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and used to discriminately detect rapid neurotransmitter fluctuations in acute brain slices. The results demonstrate that the distinct structural and electronic properties of the nanotubes result in improved selectivity, sensitivity, and spatial resolution, as well as faster apparent electron transfer kinetics when compared to the conventional carbon-fiber microelectrodes typically used in vivo.

  14. Neuron-glia signaling in developing retina mediated by neurotransmitter spillover.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Juliana M; Bos, Rémi; Sack, Georgeann S; Fortuny, Cécile; Agarwal, Amit; Bergles, Dwight E; Flannery, John G; Feller, Marla B

    2015-08-14

    Neuron-glia interactions play a critical role in the maturation of neural circuits; however, little is known about the pathways that mediate their communication in the developing CNS. We investigated neuron-glia signaling in the developing retina, where we demonstrate that retinal waves reliably induce calcium transients in Müller glial cells (MCs). During cholinergic waves, MC calcium transients were blocked by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists, whereas during glutamatergic waves, MC calcium transients were inhibited by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, indicating that the responsiveness of MCs changes to match the neurotransmitter used to support retinal waves. Using an optical glutamate sensor we show that the decline in MC calcium transients is caused by a reduction in the amount of glutamate reaching MCs. Together, these studies indicate that neurons and MCs exhibit correlated activity during a critical period of retinal maturation that is enabled by neurotransmitter spillover from retinal synapses.

  15. LeuT-Desipramine Structure Reveals How Antidepressants Block Neurotransmitter Reuptake

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou,Z.; Zhen, J.; Karpowich, N.; Goetz, R.; Law, C.; Reith, M.; Wang, D.

    2007-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect -- inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine -- by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  16. LeuT-desipramine structure reveals how antidepressants block neurotransmitter reuptake.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Zhen, Juan; Karpowich, Nathan K; Goetz, Regina M; Law, Christopher J; Reith, Maarten E A; Wang, Da-Neng

    2007-09-07

    Tricyclic antidepressants exert their pharmacological effect-inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine-by directly blocking neurotransmitter transporters (SERT, NET, and DAT, respectively) in the presynaptic membrane. The drug-binding site and the mechanism of this inhibition are poorly understood. We determined the crystal structure at 2.9 angstroms of the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), a homolog of SERT, NET, and DAT, in complex with leucine and the antidepressant desipramine. Desipramine binds at the inner end of the extracellular cavity of the transporter and is held in place by a hairpin loop and by a salt bridge. This binding site is separated from the leucine-binding site by the extracellular gate of the transporter. By directly locking the gate, desipramine prevents conformational changes and blocks substrate transport. Mutagenesis experiments on human SERT and DAT indicate that both the desipramine-binding site and its inhibition mechanism are probably conserved in the human neurotransmitter transporters.

  17. Concentrations of cyclosporin A and FK506 that inhibit IL-2 induction in human T cells do not affect TGF-beta1 biosynthesis, whereas higher doses of cyclosporin A trigger apoptosis and release of preformed TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Minguillón, Jordi; Morancho, Beatriz; Kim, Seong-Jin; López-Botet, Miguel; Aramburu, José

    2005-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506 suppress T cell activation by inhibiting calcineurin and the calcineurin-dependent transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFATc), which are central regulators of T cell function. It was reported that CsA up-regulated the transcription of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) in lymphocytes and other cells and activated its promoter in A549 lung carcinoma cells, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood, and it is unclear whether calcineurin plays any role. We have studied the regulation of TGF-beta1 in normal human lymphocytes and cell lines. In Jurkat T cells, the TGF-beta1 promoter was activated by calcineurin and NFATc and inhibited by CsA and FK506. However, the promoter was insensitive to both drugs in A549 cells. In human T cells preactivated with phytohemagglutinin, biosynthesis of TGF-beta1, induced by the T cell receptor (TCR) or the TGF-beta receptor, was not substantially affected by CsA and FK506 concentrations (< or = 1 microM) that effectively inhibited interleukin-2 production. However, pretreatment of fresh lymphocytes with CsA or FK506 during primary TCR stimulation reduced their production of TGF-beta1 during secondary TCR activation. Finally, high concentrations of CsA (10 microM), in the range attained in vivo in experiments in rodents, caused apoptosis in human T cells and the release of preformed, bioactive TGF-beta1. These effects are unlikely to owe to calcineurin inhibition, as they were not observed with FK506. Our results indicate that CsA and FK506 are not general inducers of TGF-beta1 biosynthesis but can cause different effects on TGF-beta1 depending on the cell type and concentrations used.

  18. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-04-27

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation.

  19. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study.

  20. IL-4 Inhibits IL-1β-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior and Central Neurotransmitter Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Shim, Hyun-Soo; An, Kyungeh; Starkweather, Angela; Kim, Kyung Soo; Shim, Insop

    2015-01-01

    It has been known that activation of the central innate immune system or exposure to stress can disrupt balance of anti-/proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the modulation of depressive-like behaviors, the hormonal and neurotransmitter systems in rats. We investigated whether centrally administered IL-1β is associated with activation of CNS inflammatory pathways and behavioral changes and whether treatment with IL-4 could modulate IL-1β-induced depressive-like behaviors and central neurotransmitter systems. Infusion of IL-4 significantly decreased IL-1β-induced anhedonic responses and increased social exploration and total activity. Treatment with IL-4 markedly blocked IL-1β-induced increase in PGE2 and CORT levels. Also, IL-4 reduced IL-1β-induced 5-HT levels by inhibiting tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) mRNA and activating serotonin transporter (SERT) in the hippocampus, and levels of NE were increased by activating tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that IL-4 may locally contribute to the regulation of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and may inhibit IL-1β-induced behavioral and immunological changes. The present results suggest that IL-4 modulates IL-1β-induced depressive behavior by inhibiting IL-1β-induced central glial activation and neurotransmitter alterations. IL-4 reduced central and systemic mediatory inflammatory activation, as well as reversing the IL-1β-induced alterations in neurotransmitter levels. The present findings contribute a biochemical pathway regulated by IL-4 that may have therapeutic utility for treatment of IL-1β-induced depressive behavior and neuroinflammation which warrants further study. PMID:26417153

  1. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients.

  2. The role of peripheral nerve fibers and their neurotransmitters in cartilage and bone physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Grässel, Susanne G

    2014-01-01

    The peripheral nervous system is critically involved in bone metabolism, osteogenesis, and bone remodeling. Nerve fibers of sympathetic and sensory origin innervate synovial tissue and subchondral bone of diathrodial joints. They modulate vascularization and matrix differentiation during endochondral ossification in embryonic limb development, indicating a distinct role in skeletal growth and limb regeneration processes. In pathophysiological situations, the innervation pattern of sympathetic and sensory nerve fibers is altered in adult joint tissues and bone. Various resident cell types of the musculoskeletal system express receptors for sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters. Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, mesenchymal stem cells, synovial fibroblasts, and different types of chondrocytes produce distinct subtypes of adrenoceptors, receptors for vasointestinal peptide, for substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide. Many of these cells even synthesize neuropeptides such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide and are positive for tyrosine-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of catecholamines. Sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters modulate osteo-chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitor cells during endochondral ossification in limb development. In adults, sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters are critical for bone regeneration after fracture and are involved in the pathology of inflammatory diseases as rheumatoid arthritis which manifests mainly in joints. Possibly, they might also play a role in pathogenesis of degenerative joint disorders, such as osteoarthritis. All together, accumulating data imply that sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters have crucial trophic effects which are critical for proper limb formation during embryonic skeletal growth. In adults, they modulate bone regeneration, bone remodeling, and articular cartilage homeostasis in addition to their classic neurological actions.

  3. Aspects of astrocyte energy metabolism, amino acid neurotransmitter homoeostasis and metabolic compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Marko; Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes are key players in brain function; they are intimately involved in neuronal signalling processes and their metabolism is tightly coupled to that of neurons. In the present review, we will be concerned with a discussion of aspects of astrocyte metabolism, including energy-generating pathways and amino acid homoeostasis. A discussion of the impact that uptake of neurotransmitter glutamate may have on these pathways is included along with a section on metabolic compartmentation. PMID:22435484

  4. Altered levels of brain neurotransmitter from new born rabbits with intrauterine restriction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Andrade, E; Cortés-Camberos, A J; Díaz, N F; Flores-Herrera, H; García-López, G; González-Jiménez, M; Santamaría, A; Molina-Hernández, A

    2015-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction generates chronic hypoxia due to placental insufficiency. Despite the hemodynamic process of blood flow, redistributions are taking place in key organs such as the fetal brain during intrauterine growth restriction, in order to maintain oxygen and nutrients supply. The risk of short- and long-term neurological effects are still present in hypoxic offspring. Most studies previously reported the effect of hypoxia on the levels of a single neurotransmitter, making it difficult to have a better understanding of the relationship among neurotransmitter levels and the defects reported in products that suffer intrauterine growth restriction, such as motor development, coordination and execution of movement, and the learning-memory process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin in three structures of the brain related to the above-mentioned function such as the cerebral cortex, the striatum, and the hippocampus in the chronic hypoxic newborn rabbit model. Our results showed a significant increase in glutamate and dopamine levels in all studied brain structures and a significant decrease in gamma-aminobutyric acid levels but only in the striatum, suggesting that the imbalance on the levels of several neurotransmitters could be involved in new born brain damage due to perinatal hypoxia.

  5. Differential stimulation of the retina with subretinally injected exogenous neurotransmitter: A biomimetic alternative to electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Rountree, Corey M.; Inayat, Samsoon; Troy, John B.; Saggere, Laxman

    2016-01-01

    Subretinal stimulation of the retina with neurotransmitters, the normal means of conveying visual information, is a potentially better alternative to electrical stimulation widely used in current retinal prostheses for treating blindness from photoreceptor degenerative diseases. Yet, no subretinal electrical or chemical stimulation study has stimulated the OFF and ON pathways differentially through inner retinal activation. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of differentially stimulating retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) through the inner nuclear layer of the retina with glutamate, a primary neurotransmitter chemical, in a biomimetic way. We show that controlled pulsatile delivery of glutamate into the subsurface of explanted wild-type rat retinas elicits highly localized simultaneous inhibitory and excitatory spike rate responses in OFF and ON RGCs. We also present the spatiotemporal characteristics of RGC responses to subretinally injected glutamate and the therapeutic stimulation parameters. Our findings could pave the way for future development of a neurotransmitter-based subretinal prosthesis offering more naturalistic vision and better visual acuity than electrical prostheses. PMID:27929043

  6. Simultaneous analysis of multiple neurotransmitters by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tufi, Sara; Lamoree, Marja; de Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim

    2015-05-22

    Neurotransmitters are endogenous metabolites that allow the signal transmission across neuronal synapses. Their biological role is crucial for many physiological functions and their levels can be changed by several diseases. Because of their high polarity, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) is a promising tool for neurotransmitter analysis. Due to the large number of HILIC stationary phases available, an evaluation of the column performances and retention behaviors has been performed on five different commercial HILIC packing materials (silica, amino, amide and two zwitterionic stationary phases). Several parameters like the linear correlation between retention and the distribution coefficient (logD), the separation factor k and the column resolution Rs have been investigated and the column performances have been visualized with a heat map and hierarchical clustering analysis. An optimized and validated HILIC-MS/MS method based on the ZIC-cHILIC column is proposed for the simultaneous detection and quantification of twenty compounds consisting of neurotransmitters, precursors and metabolites: 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), 5-hydroxy-L-tripthophan, acetylcholine, choline, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, epinephrine, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, glutamine, histamine, histidine, L-tryptophan, L-tyrosine, norepinephrine, normetanephrine, phenylalanine, serotonin and tyramine. The method was applied to neuronal metabolite profiling of the central nervous system of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. This method is suitable to explore neuronal metabolism and its alteration in different biological matrices.

  7. Individual differences in visual motion perception and neurotransmitter concentrations in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tatsuto; Yoshimoto, Sanae; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kochiyama, Takanori; Kondo, Hirohito M

    2017-02-19

    Recent studies have shown that interindividual variability can be a rich source of information regarding the mechanism of human visual perception. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying interindividual variability in the perception of visual motion, one of the fundamental components of visual scene analysis, by measuring neurotransmitter concentrations using magnetic resonance spectroscopy. First, by psychophysically examining two types of motion phenomena-motion assimilation and contrast-we found that, following the presentation of the same stimulus, some participants perceived motion assimilation, while others perceived motion contrast. Furthermore, we found that the concentration of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate-glutamine (Glx) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 46) was positively correlated with the participant's tendency to motion assimilation over motion contrast; however, this effect was not observed in the visual areas. The concentration of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid had only a weak effect compared with that of Glx. We conclude that excitatory process in the suprasensory area is important for an individual's tendency to determine antagonistically perceived visual motion phenomena.This article is part of the themed issue 'Auditory and visual scene analysis'.

  8. The N-methyl-D-aspartate neurotransmitter receptor is a mammalian brain target for the dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida toxin.

    PubMed

    El-Nabawi, A; Quesenberry, M; Saito, K; Silbergeld, E; Vasta, G; Eldefrawi, A

    2000-11-15

    Blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida, a dinoflagellate in eastern U.S. coastal rivers, are believed to secrete toxins that kill fish and produce short-term memory loss in humans. Only one or two of Pfiesteria's multiple stages secrete the toxin, and only under certain environmental conditions. Thus, neither the presence of Pfiesteria nor fish kill alone can be indicative of toxin presence. The objective of this study was to identify the mammalian molecular brain target for the toxin that is associated with decrements in memory. Seven rat brain neurotransmitter receptors were selected to study because of their reported roles in cognitive function: receptors for nicotine, muscarine, AMPA/kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), gamma-aminobutyric acid, and dopamine 1 and 2. The effects of 17 environmental and laboratory samples on radioactive ligand binding to these receptors were studied. Of the seven receptors, binding only to the NMDA receptor was inhibited by only the two Pfiesteria-containing waters (identified by PCR) that also killed fish, and not by any of the other 15 samples tested. It is suggested that inhibition of NMDA-receptor binding is the cause of memory loss in exposed humans. Thus, it could be a useful biomarker for the toxin's presence in rivers for decisions on closures and for identification of the fractions containing the toxin during its purification. Knowledge of the toxin's molecular target, and how it affects its function, also leads to suggestions for therapeutics to use in animal models.

  9. Altered neurotransmitter function in CO2-exposed stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus): a temperate model species for ocean acidification research.

    PubMed

    Lai, Floriana; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Nilsson, Göran E

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the consequences of ocean acidification for the marine ecosystem have revealed behavioural changes in coral reef fishes exposed to sustained near-future CO2 levels. The changes have been linked to altered function of GABAergic neurotransmitter systems, because the behavioural alterations can be reversed rapidly by treatment with the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved would be greatly aided if these can be examined in a well-characterized model organism with a sequenced genome. It was recently shown that CO2-induced behavioural alterations are not confined to tropical species, but also affect the three-spined stickleback, although an involvement of the GABAA receptor was not examined. Here, we show that loss of lateralization in the stickleback can be restored rapidly and completely by gabazine treatment. This points towards a worrying universality of disturbed GABAA function after high-CO2 exposure in fishes from tropical to temperate marine habitats. Importantly, the stickleback is a model species with a sequenced and annotated genome, which greatly facilitates future studies on underlying molecular mechanisms.

  10. Basic presynaptic functions in hippocampal neurons are not affected by acute or chronic lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Lueke, Katharina; Kaiser, Tobias; Svetlitchny, Alexei; Welzel, Oliver; Wenzel, Eva M; Tyagarajan, Shiva; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W

    2014-02-01

    Lithium is an effective mood-stabilizer in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. While glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated and inositol depletion-dependent effects of lithium have been described extensively in literature, there is very little knowledge about the consequences of lithium treatment on vesicle recycling and neurotransmitter availability. In the present study we have examined acute and chronic effects of lithium on synaptic vesicle recycling using primary hippocampal neurons. We found that exocytosis of readily releasable pool vesicles as well as recycling pool vesicles was unaffected by acute and chronic treatment within the therapeutic range or at higher lithium concentrations. Consistent with this observation, we also noticed that the network activity and number of active synapses within the network were also not significantly altered after lithium treatment. Taken together, as lithium treatment does not affect synaptic vesicle release at even high concentrations, our data suggest that therapeutic effects of lithium in bipolar affective disorder are not directly related to presynaptic function.

  11. Neuronal GABA release and GABA inhibition of ACh release in guinea pig urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, M; Taniyama, K; Tanaka, C

    1984-04-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) are present in the urinary bladder of guinea pigs, and the possible correlation in regional distribution between GABA, GAD, and the number of vesical ganglion cells was studied. Electrical stimulation of the bladder strips produced an increase in the calcium-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive [3H]GABA release and contractions in the strips preloaded with [3H]GABA. Nicotine, acetylcholine chloride (ACh), and hexamethonium did not significantly alter the release of [3H]GABA. Bicuculline significantly enhanced [3H]ACh release and cholinergic components of contractions evoked by electrical stimulation of the bladder strips preloaded with [3H]choline, thereby suggesting that this compound antagonizes the effect of endogenous GABA released during stimulation. GABA and muscimol but not baclofen reduced both the [3H]ACh release and contractions evoked by nicotine. These effects of GABA were antagonized by bicuculline and furosemide but not by alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockers. These findings suggest that GABA may be a noncholinergic nonadrenergic inhibitory neurotransmitter in the urinary bladder. The motility of the urinary bladder is thus inhibited by reducing the release of ACh from the postganglionic cholinergic neurons through bicuculline-sensitive GABA receptors probably associated with the chloride ion channel.

  12. Carrier-dependent and Ca2+-dependent 5-HT and dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine, p-chloroamphetamine and (+)-fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism underlying 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine ((+)-Amph), 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) and (+)-fenfluramine ((+)-Fen) was investigated in rat brain superfused synaptosomes preloaded with the 3H neurotransmitters. Their ra