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Sample records for affect nuclear localization

  1. Phenosafranin inhibits nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 without affecting its transamidase activity.

    PubMed

    Furutani, Yutaka; Toguchi, Mariko; Shrestha, Rajan; Kojima, Soichi

    2017-03-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) localizes to the nucleus and induces apoptosis through a crosslinking inactivation of Sp1 in JHH-7 cells treated with acyclic retinoid. We screened an inhibitor suppressing transamidase activity in the nucleus without affecting transamidase activity itself. Phenosafranin was found to inhibit nuclear localization of EGFP-tagged TG2 and dose-dependently reduce nuclear transamidase activity without affecting the activity in a tube. We concluded that phenosafranin was a novel TG2 inhibitor capable of suppressing its nuclear localization.

  2. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  3. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression

    PubMed Central

    Höög, Greta; Zarrizi, Reihaneh; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Jonsson, Kristina; Alvarado-Kristensson, Maria

    2011-01-01

    We show that the centrosome- and microtubule-regulating protein γ-tubulin interacts with E2 promoter binding factors (E2Fs) to modulate E2F transcriptional activity and thereby control cell cycle progression. γ-Tubulin contains a C-terminal signal that results in its translocation to the nucleus during late G1 to early S phase. γ-Tubulin mutants showed that the C terminus interacts with the transcription factor E2F1 and that the E2F1–γ-tubulin complex is formed during the G1/S transition, when E2F1 is transcriptionally active. Furthermore, E2F transcriptional activity is altered by reduced expression of γ-tubulin or by complex formation between γ-tubulin and E2F1, E2F2, or E2F3, but not E2F6. In addition, the γ-tubulin C terminus encodes a DNA-binding domain that interacts with E2F-regulated promoters, resulting in γ-tubulin-mediated transient activation of E2Fs. Thus, we report a novel mechanism regulating the activity of E2Fs, which can help explain how these proteins affect cell cycle progression in mammalian cells.—Höög, G., Zarrizi, R., von Stedingk, K., Jonsson, K., Alvarado-Kristensson, M. Nuclear localization of γ-tubulin affects E2F transcriptional activity and S-phase progression. PMID:21788450

  4. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  5. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  6. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  7. A nuclear-localized protein, KOLD SENSITIV-1, affects the expression of cold-responsive genes during prolonged chilling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Sarah J; Bussell, John D; Nelson, David C; Villadsen, Dorthe; Smith, Steven M

    2011-02-15

    Plants respond to cold by transcriptional and metabolic responses which underlie tolerance and acclimation mechanisms, but details at the molecular level are incomplete. Here we describe KOLD SENSITIV-1 (KOS1), a new gene required for responses to cold. KOS1 protein is predicted to have coiled-coil, Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes and nuclear-targeting domains. GFP-labeled KOS1 localizes to the nucleus. Null mutants could not be isolated but two independent knockdown T-DNA mutants were obtained. Growth and development of kos1 knockdown mutant plants was comparable to wild type when grown at 21°C. However, when grown at 4°C these mutants exhibited accelerated leaf yellowing and smaller rosette size than wild type. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that in the cold kos1 mutants had reduced expression of cold-responsive transcripts COR15A, COR15B, BAM3 and AMY3. Metabolite profiling revealed that ascorbate levels were lower in the mutants in the cold relative to wild type. KOS1 therefore represents a new gene that influences the regulation of transcript and metabolite levels in response to prolonged chilling temperatures.

  8. Nuclear localization of tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Elzaouk, Lina; Laufs, Stephanie; Heerklotz, Dirk; Leimbacher, Walter; Blau, Nenad; Résibois, Annette; Thöny, Beat

    2004-01-05

    Biosynthesis of the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) cofactor, essential for catecholamines and serotonin production and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, requires the enzymes GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), 6-pyruvoyl-tetrahydropterin synthase (PTPS), and sepiapterin reductase (SR). Upon studying the distribution of GTPCH and PTPS with polyclonal immune sera in cross sections of rat brain, prominent nuclear staining in many neurons was observed besides strong staining in peri-ventricular structures. Furthermore, localization studies in transgenic mice expressing a Pts-LacZ gene fusion containing the N-terminal 35 amino acids of PTPS revealed beta-galactosidase in the nucleus of neurons. In contrast, PTPS-beta-galactosidase was exclusively cytoplasmic in the convoluted kidney tubules but nuclear in other parts of the nephron, indicating again that nuclear targeting may occur only in specific cell categories. Furthermore, the N terminus of PTPS acts as a domain able to target the PTPS-beta-galactosidase fusion protein to the nucleus. In transiently transfected COS-1 cells, which do not express GTPCH and PTPS endogenously, we found cytoplasmic and nuclear staining for GTPCH and PTPS. To further investigate nuclear localization of all three BH(4)-biosynthetic enzymes, we expressed Flag-fusion proteins in transiently transfected COS-1 cells and analyzed the distribution by immunolocalization and sub-cellular fractionation using anti-Flag antibodies and enzymatic assays. Whereas 5-10% of total GTPCH and PTPS and approximately 1% of total SR were present in the nucleus, only GTPCH was confirmed to be an active enzyme in nuclear fractions. The in vitro studies together with the tissue staining corroborate specific nuclear localization of BH(4)-biosynthetic proteins with yet unknown biological function.

  9. A Balance Between Two Nuclear Localization Sequences and a Nuclear Export Sequence Governs Extradenticle Subcellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Katherine E.; Mann, Richard S.

    2007-01-01

    During animal development, transcription factor activities are modulated by several means, including subcellular localization. The Hox cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) has a dynamic subcellular localization, such that Exd is cytoplasmic by default, but is nuclear when complexed with another homeodomain protein, Homothorax (Hth). These observations raise the question of whether dimerization with Hth simply induces Exd's nuclear localization or, alternatively, if Hth is also necessary for Exd activity. To address this question, we analyzed the nuclear transport signals in Exd, including a divergent nuclear export signal (NES) and two nuclear localization signals (NLSs). We show that, although these signals are weak compared to canonical signals, they balance each other in Exd. We also provide evidence that Exd contains an NLS mask that contributes to its cytoplasmic localization. With these signals characterized, we generated forms of Exd that are nuclear localized in the absence of Hth. Surprisingly, although these Exd forms are functional, they do not phenocopy Hth overexpression. These findings suggest that Hth is required for Exd activity, not simply for inducing its nuclear localization. PMID:17277370

  10. A mitotic nuclear envelope tether for Gle1 also affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Chemudupati, Mahesh; Osmani, Aysha H.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    During Aspergillus nidulans mitosis, peripheral nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (Nups) disperse from the core NPC structure. Unexpectedly, one predicted peripheral Nup, Gle1, remains at the mitotic nuclear envelope (NE) via an unknown mechanism. Gle1 affinity purification identified mitotic tether for Gle1 (MtgA), which tethers Gle1 to the NE during mitosis but not during interphase when Gle1 is at NPCs. MtgA is the orthologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomere-anchoring inner nuclear membrane protein Bqt4. Like Bqt4, MtgA has meiotic roles, but it is functionally distinct from Bqt4 because MtgA is not required for tethering telomeres to the NE. Domain analyses showed that MtgA targeting to the NE requires its C-terminal transmembrane domain and a nuclear localization signal. Of importance, MtgA functions beyond Gle1 mitotic targeting and meiosis and affects nuclear and nucleolar architecture when deleted or overexpressed. Deleting MtgA generates small, round nuclei, whereas overexpressing MtgA generates larger nuclei with altered nuclear compartmentalization resulting from NE expansion around the nucleolus. The accumulation of MtgA around the nucleolus promotes a similar accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein Erg24, reducing its levels in the ER. This study extends the functions of Bqt4-like proteins to include mitotic Gle1 targeting and modulation of nuclear and nucleolar architecture. PMID:27630260

  11. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  12. Dissection of a nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Hodel, M R; Corbett, A H; Hodel, A E

    2001-01-12

    The regulated process of protein import into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell is mediated by specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that are recognized by protein import receptors. This study seeks to decipher the energetic details of NLS recognition by the receptor importin alpha through quantitative analysis of variant NLSs. The relative importance of each residue in two monopartite NLS sequences was determined using an alanine scanning approach. These measurements yield an energetic definition of a monopartite NLS sequence where a required lysine residue is followed by two other basic residues in the sequence K(K/R)X(K/R). In addition, the energetic contributions of the second basic cluster in a bipartite NLS ( approximately 3 kcal/mol) as well as the energy of inhibition of the importin alpha importin beta-binding domain ( approximately 3 kcal/mol) were also measured. These data allow the generation of an energetic scale of nuclear localization sequences based on a peptide's affinity for the importin alpha-importin beta complex. On this scale, a functional NLS has a binding constant of approximately 10 nm, whereas a nonfunctional NLS has a 100-fold weaker affinity of 1 microm. Further correlation between the current in vitro data and in vivo function will provide the foundation for a comprehensive quantitative model of protein import.

  13. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  14. Mutations of amino acids in the DNA-recognition domain of Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein alter its sub-nuclear localization and affect formation of replication compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Shedd, Duane; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2008-12-20

    foci. The speckled appearance of R179A and Y180E was more regular and clearly defined in EBV-positive than in EBV-negative 293 cells. The Y180E late-mutant induced EA-D, but prevented EA-D from localizing to globular replication compartments. These results show that individual amino acids within the basic domain influence localization of the ZEBRA protein and its capacity to induce EA-D to become located in mature viral replication compartments. Furthermore, these mutant ZEBRA proteins delineate several stages in the processes of nuclear re-organization which accompany lytic EBV replication.

  15. Sumoylation of SAE2 C terminus regulates SAE nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Truong, Khue; Lee, Terry D; Li, Baozong; Chen, Yuan

    2012-12-14

    SUMOylation occurs predominantly in the nucleus, but non-nuclear proteins can also be SUMOylated. It is unclear how intracellular trafficking of the SUMOylation enzymes is regulated to catalyze SUMOylation in different cellular compartments. Here we report that the SAE2 subunit of human SUMO activation enzyme (SAE) underwent rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and its nuclear accumulation depended on SUMO modification at the C terminus. The SUMOylation sites included three Lys residues on the bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and two Lys residues outside of but adjacent to the NLS, and their SUMOylation was catalyzed by Ubc9. Because SAE2 forms a tight heterodimer with SAE1 and it controls the trafficking of the heterodimer, this study has identified the mechanism used to localize SAE to the nucleus. Similar mechanisms are likely to exist for other proteins that depend on SUMOylation for nuclear localization.

  16. Nuclear localization of the testis determining gene product SRY

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the expression of the human SRY protein (termed p27SRY) in two different cell lines by using specific antibodies. Confocal microscopy enabled us to localize p27SRY precisely in the nucleus in a discrete punctuate pattern. Furthermore, through microinjection experiments, we have demonstrated that the localization of the p27SRY protein into the nucleus was an event involving the NH2-terminal part of the high mobility group (HMG) domain. With the help of several synthetic peptides and various p27SRY mutants, we have characterized a bipartite basic motif in this part of the protein corresponding to a nuclear localization signal. This nuclear localization signal appears to be highly conserved in SRY box- and HMB box-containing proteins, suggesting common properties of nuclear targeting within the HMG box protein family. PMID:7876301

  17. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W; Wellappili, Dulani P; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast.

  18. Distinctive Nuclear Localization Signals in the Oomycete Phytophthora sojae

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yufeng; Jang, Hyo Sang; Watson, Gregory W.; Wellappili, Dulani P.; Tyler, Brett M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that target proteins to nuclei in oomycetes have not been defined, but have been assumed to be the same as in higher eukaryotes. Here, we use the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae as a model to investigate these sequences in oomycetes. By establishing a reliable in vivo NLS assay based on confocal microscopy, we found that many canonical monopartite and bipartite classical NLSs (cNLSs) mediated nuclear import poorly in P. sojae. We found that efficient localization of P. sojae nuclear proteins by cNLSs requires additional basic amino acids at distal sites or collaboration with other NLSs. We found that several representatives of another well-characterized NLS, proline-tyrosine NLS (PY-NLS) also functioned poorly in P. sojae. To characterize PY-NLSs in P. sojae, we experimentally defined the residues required by functional PY-NLSs in three P. sojae nuclear-localized proteins. These results showed that functional P. sojae PY-NLSs include an additional cluster of basic residues for efficient nuclear import. Finally, analysis of several highly conserved P. sojae nuclear proteins including ribosomal proteins and core histones revealed that these proteins exhibit a similar but stronger set of sequence requirements for nuclear targeting compared with their orthologs in mammals or yeast. PMID:28210240

  19. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  20. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  1. Cofilin nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling affects cofilin-actin rod formation during stress.

    PubMed

    Munsie, Lise Nicole; Desmond, Carly R; Truant, Ray

    2012-09-01

    Cofilin protein is involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton during typical steady state conditions, as well as during cell stress conditions where cofilin saturates F-actin, forming cofilin-actin rods. Cofilin can enter the nucleus through an active nuclear localization signal (NLS), accumulating in nuclear actin rods during stress. Here, we characterize the active nuclear export of cofilin through a leptomycin-B-sensitive, CRM1-dependent, nuclear export signal (NES). We also redefine the NLS of cofilin as a bipartite NLS, with an additional basic epitope required for nuclear localization. Using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) between cofilin moieties and actin, as well as automated image analysis in live cells, we have defined subtle mutations in the cofilin NLS that allow cofilin to bind actin in vivo and affect cofilin dynamics during stress. We further define the requirement of cofilin-actin rod formation in a system of cell stress by temporal live-cell imaging. We propose that cofilin nuclear shuttling is critical for the cofilin-actin rod stress response with cofilin dynamically communicating between the nucleus and cytoplasm during cell stress.

  2. Controlling Androgen receptor nuclear localization by dendrimer conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists, such as bicalutamide and flutamide have been used widely in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although initial treatment is effective, prostate cancer cells often acquire antiandrogen resistance with prolonged treatment. AR over-expression and AR mutations contribute to the development of antiandrogen resistant cancer. Second generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide are more effective and show reduced AR nuclear localization. In this study, derivatives of PAN52, a small molecule antiandrogen previously developed in our lab, were conjugated to the surface of generation 4 and generation 6 PAMAM dendrimers to obtain antiandrogen PAMAM dendrimer conjugates (APDC). APDCs readily enter cells and associate with AR in the cytoplasm. Due to their large size and positive charge, they can not enter the nucleus, thus retaining AR in the cytoplasm. In addition, APDCs are effective in decreasing AR mediated transcription and cell proliferation. APDC is the first AR antagonists that inhibit DHT-induced nuclear localization of AR. By inhibiting AR nuclear localization, APDC represents a new class of antiandrogens that offer an alternative approach to addressing antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer. Lysine post-translational modification of AR Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) has great impact on AR cellular localization. It is of interest to understand which modifications modulate AR translocation into the nucleus. In this study, we prepared dendrimer-based acetyltransferase mimetic (DATM), DATM is able to catalytically acetylate AR in CWR22Rv1 cells, which will be a useful tool for studying AR modification effect on AR cellular localization. Derivatives of DATM, which transfer other chemical groups to AR, can be prepared similarly, and with more dendrimer based AR modification tools prepared in future, we will be able to understand and control AR cellular localization through AR modification.

  3. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  4. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization.

  5. Intracellular localization of human cytidine deaminase. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Somasekaram, A; Jarmuz, A; How, A; Scott, J; Navaratnam, N

    1999-10-01

    The cytidine deaminases belong to the family of multisubunit enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of their substrate to a corresponding uracil product. They play a major role in pyrimidine nucleoside and nucleotide salvage. The intracellular distribution of cytidine deaminase and related enzymes has previously been considered to be cytosolic. Here we show that human cytidine deaminase (HCDA) is present in the nucleus. A highly specific, affinity purified polyclonal antibody against HCDA was used to analyze the intracellular localization of native HCDA in a variety of mammalian cells by in situ immunochemistry. Native HCDA was found to be present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm in several cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated a predominantly nuclear localization of FLAG-tagged HCDA overexpressed in these cells. We have identified an amino-terminal bipartite nuclear localization signal that is both necessary and sufficient to direct HCDA and a non-nuclear reporter protein to the nucleus. We also show HCDA binding to the nuclear import receptor, importin alpha. Similar putative bipartite nuclear localization sequences are found in other cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminases. The results presented here suggest that the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway may operate in the nucleus. This localization may have implications in the regulation of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  6. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik-Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-01-01

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington’s, Parkinson’s diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S). PMID:22504047

  7. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  8. Screening of nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii based on nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Gurung, Mamata; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Yong Seok; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-05-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins is an emerging pathogenic mechanism in bacteria. However, due to the absence of an appropriate screening system for nuclear targeting proteins, systematic approaches to nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins and subsequent host cell pathology are limited. In this study, we developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii using a combination of bioinformatic analysis based on nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system. Among 3367 open reading frames of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 34 functional or hypothetical proteins were predicted to carry the putative NLS sequences. Of the 29 clones generated by the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system, 14 proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were targeted to nuclei of host cells. Among the 14 nuclear targeting proteins, S21, L20, and L32 ribosomal proteins and transposase carried putative nuclear export signal (NES) sequences, but only transposase harbored the functional NES. After translocation to nuclei of host cells, four A. baumannii proteins induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we have developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in A. baumannii. This system may open the way to a new field of bacterial pathogenesis.

  9. Chitosan Nanoparticles for Nuclear Targeting: The Effect of Nanoparticle Size and Nuclear Localization Sequence Density.

    PubMed

    Tammam, Salma N; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Breitinger, Hans G; Lamprecht, Alf

    2015-12-07

    Many recently discovered therapeutic proteins exert their main function in the nucleus, thus requiring both efficient uptake and correct intracellular targeting. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted interest as protein delivery vehicles due to their biocompatibility and ability to escape the endosomes offering high potential for nuclear delivery. Molecular entry into the nucleus occurs through the nuclear pore complexes, the efficiency of which is dependent on NP size and the presence of nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (S-NPs ≈ 25 nm; L-NP ≈ 150 nm) were formulated, and they were modified with different densities of the octapeptide NLS CPKKKRKV (S-NPs, 0.25, 0.5, 2.0 NLS/nm(2); L-NPs, 0.6, 0.9, 2 NLS/nm(2)). Unmodified and NLS-tagged NPs were evaluated for their protein loading capacity, extent of cell association, cell uptake, cell surface binding, and finally nuclear delivery efficiency in L929 fibroblasts. To avoid errors generated with cell fractionation and nuclear isolation protocols, nuclear delivery was assessed in intact cells utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) fluorometry and microscopy. Although L-NPs showed ≈10-fold increase in protein loading per NP when compared to S-NPs, due to higher cell association and uptake S-NPs showed superior protein delivery. NLS exerts a size and density dependent effect on nanoparticle uptake and surface binding, with a general reduction in NP cell surface binding and an increase in cell uptake with the increase in NLS density (up to 8.4-fold increase in uptake of High-NLS-L-NPs (2 NLS/nm(2)) compared to unmodified L-NPs). However, for nuclear delivery, unmodified S-NPs show higher nuclear localization rates when compared to NLS modified NPs (up to 5-fold by FRET microscopy). For L-NPs an intermediate NLS density (0.9 NLS/nm(2)) seems to provide highest nuclear localization (3.7-fold increase in nuclear delivery compared to High

  10. Local acceptance of a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Lennart

    2004-06-01

    The siting of nuclear waste facilities has been very difficult in all countries. Recent experience in Sweden indicates, however, that it may be possible, under certain circumstances, to gain local support for the siting of a high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) repository. The article reports on a study of attitudes and risk perceptions of people living in four municipalities in Sweden where HLNW siting was being intensely discussed at the political level, in media, and among the public. Data showed a relatively high level of consensus on acceptability of at least further investigation of the issue; in two cases local councils have since voted in favor of a go-ahead, and in one case only a very small majority defeated the issue. Models of policy attitudes showed that these were related to attitude to nuclear power, attributes of the perceived HLNW risk, and trust. Factors responsible for acceptance are discussed at several levels. One is the attitude to nuclear power, which is becoming more positive, probably because no viable alternatives are in sight. Other factors have to do with the extensive information programs conducted in these municipalities, and with the logical nature of the conclusion that they would be good candidates for hosting the national HLNW repository.

  11. Frequency-modulated nuclear localization bursts coordinate gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Long; Dalal, Chiraj K.; Elowitz, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    In yeast, the transcription factor Crz1 is dephosphorylated and translocates into the nucleus in response to extracellular calcium. Using time-lapse microscopy, we found that Crz1 exhibited short bursts of nuclear localization (∼2 minutes) that occurred stochastically in individual cells and propagated to the expression of downstream genes. Strikingly, calcium concentration controlled the frequency, but not duration, of localization bursts. Using an analytic model, we found that this frequency modulation (FM) of bursts ensures proportional expression of multiple target genes across a wide dynamic range of expression levels, independent of promoter characteristics. We experimentally confirmed this theory with natural and synthetic Crz1 target promoters. Another stress response transcription factor, Msn2, exhibits similar, but largely uncorrelated, localization bursts under calcium stress. These results suggest that FM regulation of localization bursts may be a general control strategy utilized by the cell to coordinate multi-gene responses to external signals. PMID:18818649

  12. Nuclear localization signals for four distinct karyopherin-β nuclear import systems.

    PubMed

    Soniat, Michael; Chook, Yuh Min

    2015-06-15

    The Karyopherin-β family of proteins mediates nuclear transport of macromolecules. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic localization of proteins is often suggested by the presence of NLSs (nuclear localization signals) or NESs (nuclear export signals). Import-Karyopherin-βs or Importins bind to NLSs in their protein cargos to transport them through nuclear pore complexes into the nucleus. Until recently, only two classes of NLS had been biochemically and structurally characterized: the classical NLS, which is recognized by the Importin-α/β heterodimer and the PY-NLS (proline-tyrosine NLS), which is recognized by Karyopherin-β2 or Transportin-1. Structures of two other Karyopherin-βs, Kap121 and Transportin-SR2, in complex with their respective cargos were reported for the first time recently, revealing two new distinct classes of NLSs. The present paper briefly describes the classical NLS, reviews recent literature on the PY-NLS and provides in-depth reviews of the two newly discovered classes of NLSs that bind Kap121p and Transportin-SR respectively.

  13. Expanding the definition of the classical bipartite nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Lange, Allison; McLane, Laura M; Mills, Ryan E; Devine, Scott E; Corbett, Anita H

    2010-03-01

    Nuclear localization signals (NLSs) are amino acid sequences that target cargo proteins into the nucleus. Rigorous characterization of NLS motifs is essential to understanding and predicting pathways for nuclear import. The best-characterized NLS is the classical NLS (cNLS), which is recognized by the cNLS receptor, importin-alpha. cNLSs are conventionally defined as having one (monopartite) or two clusters of basic amino acids separated by a 9-12 aa linker (bipartite). Motivated by the finding that Ty1 integrase, which contains an unconventional putative bipartite cNLS with a 29 aa linker, exploits the classical nuclear import machinery, we assessed the functional boundaries for linker length within a bipartite cNLS. We confirmed that the integrase cNLS is a bona fide bipartite cNLS, then carried out a systematic analysis of linker length in an obligate bipartite cNLS cargo, which revealed that some linkers longer than conventionally defined can function in nuclear import. Linker function is dependent on the sequence and likely the inherent flexibility of the linker. Subsequently, we interrogated the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome to identify cellular proteins containing putative long bipartite cNLSs. We experimentally confirmed that Rrp4 contains a bipartite cNLS with a 25 aa linker. Our studies show that the traditional definition of bipartite cNLSs is too restrictive and linker length can vary depending on amino acid composition.

  14. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hooi Cheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-03-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization.

  15. PKCι regulates nuclear YAP1 localization and ovarian cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yin; Justilien, Verline; Brennan, Katharyn I.; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atypical protein kinase Cι (PKCι) is an oncogene in lung and ovarian cancer. The PKCι gene PRKCI is targeted for frequent tumor-specific copy number gain (CNG) in both lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and ovarian serous carcinoma (OSC). We recently demonstrated that in LSCC cells PRKCI CNG functions to drive transformed growth and tumorigenicity by activating PKCι-dependent cell autonomous Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Here, we assessed whether OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG exhibit similar PKCι-dependent Hh signaling. Surprisingly, we find that whereas PKCι is required for the transformed growth for OSC cells harboring PRKCI CNG, these cells do not exhibit PKCι-dependent Hh signaling or Hh-dependent proliferation. Rather, transformed growth of OSC cells is regulated by PKCι-dependent nuclear localization of the oncogenic transcription factor, YAP1. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated knock down (KD) of PKCι leads to decreased nuclear YAP1 and increased YAP1 binding to angiomotin (AMOT), which sequesters YAP1 in the cytoplasm. Biochemical analysis reveals that PKCι directly phosphorylates AMOT at a unique site, Thr750, whose phosphorylation inhibits YAP1 binding. Pharmacologic inhibition of PKCι decreases YAP1 nuclear localization and blocks OSC tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor PKCι expression and nuclear YAP1 in primary OSC tumor samples, indicating the clinical relevance of PKCι-YAP1 signaling. Our results uncover a novel PKCι-AMOT-YAP1 signaling axis that promotes OSC tumor growth, and provide a rationale for therapeutic targeting of this pathway for treatment of OSC. PMID:27321186

  16. Multiple nuclear localization signals function in the nuclear import of the transcription factor Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Melanie; Kawai, Yumiko; Yang, Jianqi; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Reddy, Sekhar P; Villalta, Fernando; Arinze, Ifeanyi J

    2008-04-04

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) mediates the transcriptional response of cells to oxidative stress and is translocated into the nucleus following, or concomitant with, its activation by electrophiles or reactive oxygen species. The mechanism of its translocation into the nucleus is not entirely elucidated. Here we have identified two novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs in murine Nrf2, one located near the N-terminal region (amino acid residues 42-53) and the other (residues 587-593) located near the C-terminal region. Imaging of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Nrf2 revealed that mutation(s) in any of these sequences resulted in decreased nuclear fluorescence intensity compared with the wild-type Nrf2 when Nrf2 activation was induced with the electrophile tert-butylhydroquinone. The mutations also impaired Nrf2-induced transactivation of antioxidant response element-driven reporter gene expression to the same extent as the Nrf2 construct bearing mutation in a previously identified bipartite NLS that maps at residues 494-511. When linked to GFP or to GFP-PEPCK-C each of the novel NLS motifs was sufficient to drive nuclear translocation of the fusion proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that importins alpha5 and beta1 associate with Nrf2, an interaction that was blocked by the nuclear import inhibitor SN50. SN50 also blocked tert-butylhydroquinone-induced nuclear fluorescence of GFP-Nrf2 in cells transfected with wild-type GFP-Nrf2. Overall these results reveal that multiple NLS motifs in Nrf2 function in its nuclear translocation in response to pro-oxidant stimuli and that the importin alpha-beta heterodimer nuclear import receptor system plays a critical role in the import process.

  17. Functional analysis of the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein: pathogenicity and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzeng; Tzfira, Tzvi; Gaba, Victor; Citovsky, Vitaly; Palukaitis, Peter; Gal-On, Amit

    2004-10-01

    The 2b protein encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been shown to be a silencing suppressor and pathogenicity determinant in solanaceous hosts, but a movement determinant in cucumber. In addition, synergistic interactions between CMV and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) have been described in several cucurbit species. Here, it was shown that deletion of the 2b gene from CMV prevented extensive systemic movement of the virus in zucchini squash, which could not be complemented by co-infection with ZYMV. Thus, ZYMV expressing a silencing suppressor with a different target could not complement the CMV 2b-specific movement function. Expression of the 2b protein from an attenuated ZYMV vector resulted in a synergistic response, largely restoring infection symptoms of wild-type ZYMV in several cucurbit species. Deletion or alteration of either of two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) did not affect nuclear localization in two assays, but did affect pathogenicity in several cucurbit species, whilst deletion of both NLSs led to loss of nuclear localization. The 2b protein interacted with an Arabidopsis thaliana karyopherin alpha protein (AtKAPalpha) in the yeast two-hybrid system, as did each of the two single NLS-deletion mutants. However, 2b protein containing a deletion of both NLSs was unable to interact with AtKAPalpha. These data suggest that the 2b protein localizes to the nucleus by using the karyopherin alpha-mediated system, but demonstrate that nuclear localization was insufficient for enhancement of the 2b-mediated pathogenic response in cucurbit hosts. Thus, the sequences corresponding to the two NLSs must have another role leading to pathogenicity enhancement.

  18. Constitutive and ligand-induced nuclear localization of oxytocin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Conan G; Bussolati, Gianni; Bosco, Martino; Kimura, Tadashi; Pizzorno, Marie C; Chernin, Mitchell I; Cassoni, Paola; Novak, Josef F

    2007-01-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) is a membrane protein known to mediate oxytocin (OT) effects, in both normal and neoplastic cells. We report here that human osteosarcoma (U2OS, MG63, OS15 and SaOS2), breast cancer (MCF7), and primary human fibroblastic cells (HFF) all exhibit OTR not only on the cell membrane, but also in the various nuclear compartments including the nucleolus. Both an OTR-GFP fusion protein and the native OTR appear to be localized to the nucleus as detected by transfection and/or confocal immunofluorescence, respectively. Treatment with oxytocin causes internalization of OTR and the resulting vesicles accumulate in the vicinity of the nucleus and some of the perinuclear OTR enters the nucleus. Western blots indicate that OTR in the nucleus and on the plasma membrane are likely to be the same biochemical and immunological entities. It appears that OTR is first visible in the nucleoli and subsequently disperses within the nucleus into 4-20 spots while some of the OTR diffuses throughout the nucleoplasm. The behaviour and kinetics of OTR-GFP and OTR are different, indicating interference by GFP in both OTR entrance into the nucleus and subsequent relocalization of OTR within the nucleus. There are important differences among the tested cells, such as the requirement of a ligand for transfer of OTR in nuclei. A constitutive internalization of OTR was found only in osteosarcoma cells, while the nuclear localization in all other tested cells was dependent on ligand binding. The amount of OTR-positive material within and in the vicinity of the nucleus increased following a treatment with oxytocin in both constitutive and ligand-dependent type of cells. The evidence of OTR compartmentalization at the cell nucleus (either ligand-dependent or constitutive) in different cell types suggests still unknown biological functions of this protein or its ligand and adds this G-protein-coupled receptor to other heptahelical receptors displaying this atypical and unexpected

  19. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Vihinen-Ranta, M; Kakkola, L; Kalela, A; Vilja, P; Vuento, M

    1997-12-01

    We investigated the abilities of synthetic peptides mimicking the potential nuclear localization signal of canine parvovirus (CPV) capsid proteins to translocate a carrier protein to the nucleus following microinjection into the cytoplasm of A72 cells. Possible nuclear localization sequences were chosen for synthesis from CPV capsid protein sequences (VP1, VP2) on the basis of the presence of clustered basic residues, which is a common theme in most of the previously identified targeting peptides. Nuclear targeting activity was found within the N-terminal residues 4-13 (PAKRARRGYK) of the VP1 capsid protein. While replacement of Arg10 with glycine did not affect the activity, replacement of Lys6, Arg7, or Arg9 with glycine abolished it. The targeting activity was found to residue in a cluster of basic residues, Lys5, Arg7, and Arg9. Nuclear import was saturated by excess of unlabelled peptide conjugates (showing that it was a receptor-mediated process). Transport into the nucleus was an energy-dependent and temperature-dependent process actively mediated by the nuclear pores and inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin.

  20. A proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) is required for the nuclear import of fission yeast PAB2, but not of human PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Pierre-Luc; Bachand, François

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play key roles in eukaryotic gene expression. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the major nuclear PABP, Pab2, functions in the maturation of small nucleolar RNAs as well as in nuclear RNA decay. Despite knowledge about its nuclear functions, nothing is known about how Pab2 is imported into the nucleus. Here, we show that Pab2 contains a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) that is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization and function. Consistent with the role of karyopherin β2 (Kapβ2)-type receptors in the import of PY-NLS cargoes, we show that the fission yeast ortholog of human Kapβ2, Kap104, binds to recombinant Pab2 and is required for Pab2 nuclear localization. The absence of arginine methylation in a basic region N-terminal to the PY-core motif of Pab2 did not affect its nuclear localization. However, in the context of a sub-optimal PY-NLS, we found that Pab2 was more efficiently targeted to the nucleus in the absence of arginine methylation, suggesting that this modification can affect the import kinetics of a PY-NLS cargo. Although a sequence resembling a PY-NLS motif can be found in the human Pab2 ortholog, PABPN1, our results indicate that neither a functional PY-NLS nor Kapβ2 activity are required to promote entry of PABPN1 into the nucleus of human cells. Our findings describe the mechanism by which Pab2 is imported into the nucleus, providing the first example of a PY-NLS import system in fission yeast. In addition, this study suggests the existence of alternative or redundant nuclear import pathways for human PABPN1.

  1. Nuclear targeting of the maize R protein requires two nuclear localization sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, M.W.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Wessler, S.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Previous genetic and structural evidence indicates that the maize R gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activating factor. In-frame carboxyl- and amino-terminal fusions of the R gene to the reporter gene encoding [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) were sufficient to direct GUS to the nucleus of the transiently transformed onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Further analysis of chimeric constructs containing regions of the R gene fused to the GUS cDNA revealed three specific nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) that were capable of redirecting the GUS protein to the nucleus. Amino-terminal NLS-A (amino acids 100-109, GDRRAAPARP) contained several arginine residues; a similar localization signal is found in only a few viral proteins. The medial NLS-M (amino acids 419-428, MSERKRREKL) is a simian virus 40 large T antigen-type NLS, and the carboxyl-terminal NLS-C (amino acids 598-610, MISESLRKAIGKR) is a mating type [alpha]2 type. NLSs M and C are independently sufficient to direct the GUS protein to the nucleus when it is fused at the amino terminus of GUS, whereas NLS-A fused to GUS partitioned between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Similar partitioning was observed when localization signals NLS-A and NLS-C were independently fused to the carboxy-terminal portion of GUS. A sequential deletion of the localization signals indicated that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal fusions of R and GUS were redirected to the nucleus only when both NLS-A and -M, or NLS-C and -M, were present. These results indicate that multiple localization signals are necessary for nuclear targeting of this protein. The conservation of the localization signals within the alleles of R and similar proteins from other organisms is also discussed. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Actin-related proteins localized in the nucleus: from discovery to novel roles in nuclear organization.

    PubMed

    Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The actin family consists of conventional actin and actin-related proteins (ARPs), and the members show moderate similarity and share the same basal structure. Following the finding of various ARPs in the cytoplasm in the 1990s, multiple subfamilies that are localized predominantly in the nucleus were identified. Consistent with these cytological observations, subsequent biochemical analyses revealed the involvement of the nuclear ARPs in ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling and histone acetyltransferase complexes. In addition to their contribution to chromatin remodeling, recent studies have shown that nuclear ARPs have roles in the organization of the nucleus that are independent of the activity of the above-mentioned complexes. Therefore, nuclear ARPs are recognized as novel key regulators of genome function, and affect not only the remodeling of chromatin but also the spatial arrangement and dynamics of chromatin within the nucleus.

  3. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    SciTech Connect

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H. . E-mail: doday@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ({sup 171}EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF{sup 195}) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues {sup 48}KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK{sup 64} that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to {sup 48}EF{sup 49} abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the {sup 48}EF{sup 49} construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

  4. Nuclear localization signal sequence is required for VACM-1/CUL5-dependent regulation of cellular growth.

    PubMed

    Willis, Angelica N; Dean, Shirley E Bradley; Habbouche, Joe A; Kempers, Brian T; Ludwig, Megan L; Sayfie, Aaron D; Lewis, Steven P; Harrier, Stephanie; DeBruine, Zachary J; Garrett, Richard; Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    VACM-1/CUL5 is a member of the cullin family of proteins involved in the E3 ligase-dependent degradation of diverse proteins that regulate cellular proliferation. The ability of VACM-1/CUL5 to inhibit cellular growth is affected by its posttranslational modifications and its localization to the nucleus. Since the mechanism of VACM-1/CUL5 translocation to the nucleus is not clear, the goal of this project was to determine the role that the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) we identified in the VACM-1/CUL5 ((640)PKLKRQ(646)) plays in the cellular localization of VACM-1/CUL5 and its effect on cellular growth. We used site-directed mutagenesis to change Lys642 and Lys644 to Gly and the mutated cDNA constructs were transfected into COS-1 cells. Mutation of the NLS in VACM-1/CUL5 significantly reduced its localization to the nucleus and compromised its effect on cellular growth. We have shown previously that the antiproliferative effect of VACM-1/CUL5 could be reversed by mutation of PKA-specific phosphorylation sequence ((S730A)VACM-1/CUL5), which was associated with its increased nuclear localization and modification by NEDD8. Thus, we examined whether these properties can be controlled by the NLS. The mutation of NLS in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 cDNA compromised its proliferative effect and reduced its localization to the nucleus. The immunocytochemistry results showed that, in cells transfected with the mutant cDNAs, the nuclear NEDD8 signal was decreased. Western blot analysis of total cell lysates, however, showed that VACM-1/CUL5 neddylation was not affected. Together, these results suggest that the presence of the NLS, both in VACM-1/CUL5 and in (S730A)VACM-1/CUL5 sequences, is critical for their control of cell proliferation.

  5. Regulation of Greatwall kinase by protein stabilization and nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tomomi M; Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A; Eckerdt, Frank D; Peng, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    Greatwall (Gwl) functions as an essential mitotic kinase by antagonizing protein phosphatase 2A. In this study we identified Hsp90, Cdc37 and members of the importin α and β families as the major binding partners of Gwl. Both Hsp90/Cdc37 chaperone and importin complexes associated with the N-terminal kinase domain of Gwl, whereas an intact glycine-rich loop at the N-terminus of Gwl was essential for binding of Hsp90/Cdc37 but not importins. We found that Hsp90 inhibition led to destabilization of Gwl, a mechanism that may partially contribute to the emerging role of Hsp90 in cell cycle progression and the anti-proliferative potential of Hsp90 inhibition. Moreover, in agreement with its importin association, Gwl exhibited nuclear localization in interphase Xenopus S3 cells, and dynamic nucleocytoplasmic distribution during mitosis. We identified KR456/457 as the locus of importin binding and the functional NLS of Gwl. Mutation of this site resulted in exclusion of Gwl from the nucleus. Finally, we showed that the Gwl nuclear localization is indispensable for the biochemical function of Gwl in promoting mitotic entry. PMID:25483093

  6. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4.

  7. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  8. Nuclear Localization of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-1 Regulates Local Immunity in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Jana; Weitnauer, Michael; Boutin, Sébastien; Küblbeck, Günter; Thiele, Sabrina; Walker, Patrick; Lasitschka, Felix; Lunding, Lars; Orinska, Zane; Vock, Christina; Arnold, Bernd; Wegmann, Michael; Dalpke, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) is a negative feedback inhibitor of cytoplasmic Janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling. SOCS1 also contains a nuclear localization sequence (NLS), yet, the in vivo importance of nuclear translocation is unknown. We generated transgenic mice containing mutated Socs1ΔNLS that fails to translocate in the cell nucleus (MGLtg mice). Whereas mice fully deficient for SOCS1 die within the first 3 weeks due to excessive interferon signaling and multiorgan inflammation, mice expressing only non-nuclear Socs1ΔNLS (Socs1−/−MGLtg mice) were rescued from early lethality. Canonical interferon gamma signaling was still functional in Socs1−/−MGLtg mice as shown by unaltered tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and whole genome expression analysis. However, a subset of NFκB inducible genes was dysregulated. Socs1−/−MGLtg mice spontaneously developed low-grade inflammation in the lung and had elevated Th2-type cytokines. Upon ovalbumin sensitization and challenge, airway eosinophilia was increased in Socs1−/−MGLtg mice. Decreased transepithelial electrical resistance in trachea epithelial cells from Socs1−/−MGLtg mice suggests disrupted epithelial cell barrier. The results indicate that nuclear SOCS1 is a regulator of local immunity in the lung and unravel a so far unrecognized function for SOCS1 in the cell nucleus. PMID:27917175

  9. Affective imagery and acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carmen; Visschers, Vivianne; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between the content of spontaneous associations with nuclear power plants and the acceptance of using new-generation nuclear power plants to replace old ones. The study also considered gender as a variable. A representative sample of the German- and French-speaking population of Switzerland (N= 1,221) was used. Log-linear models revealed significant two-way interactions between the association content and acceptance, association content and gender, and gender and acceptance. Correspondence analysis revealed that participants who were opposed to nuclear power plants mainly associated nuclear power plants with risk, negative feelings, accidents, radioactivity, waste disposal, military use, and negative consequences for health and environment; whereas participants favoring nuclear power plants mainly associated them with energy, appearance descriptions of nuclear power plants, and necessity. Thus, individuals opposing nuclear power plants had both more concrete and more diverse associations with them than people who were in favor of nuclear power plants. In addition, participants who were undecided often mentioned similar associations to those participants who were in favor. Males more often expressed associations with energy, waste disposal, and negative health effects. Females more often made associations with appearance descriptions, negative feelings, and negative environmental effects. The results further suggest that acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants was higher in the German-speaking part of the country, where all of the Swiss nuclear power plants are physically located. Practical implications for risk communication are discussed.

  10. Examining Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Nuclear Power in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tzu-Jen

    Nuclear power has become a major issue in Taiwan for several decades. The objective of the present study is to obtain evidence about the major determinants contributing to attitudes toward nuclear power, by investigating socioeconomic factors, environmental attitudes, knowledge of issues, trust, and risk perception, in shaping nuclear attitudes. A face-to-face survey was conducted using paper-based questionnaires from July 2014 to September 2014. Finally, 364 surveys were collected, of which 356 met validation requirements. The findings showed (1) knowledge of issues, trust in university scientists, trust in environmental groups, and risk perception directly influence attitudes toward nuclear power. (2) Risk perception is directly influenced by trust in nuclear authorities, trust in environmental groups, environmental attitudes, and party preference. (3) Gender, age, and party preference directly influence knowledge, trust in nuclear authorities, or trust in university scientists. The potential explanations and implications of findings are discussed.

  11. A nuclear export signal in the N-terminal regulatory domain of IκBα controls cytoplasmic localization of inactive NF-κB/IκBα complexes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tony T.; Kudo, Nobuaki; Yoshida, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shigeki

    2000-01-01

    Appropriate subcellular localization is crucial for regulation of NF-κB function. Herein, we show that latent NF-κB complexes can enter and exit the nucleus in preinduction states. The nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB) sequestered NF-κB/IκBα complexes in the nucleus. Using deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, we identified a previously uncharacterized nuclear export sequence in residues 45–54 of IκBα that was required for cytoplasmic localization of inactive complexes. This nuclear export sequence also caused nuclear exclusion of heterologous proteins in a LMB-sensitive manner. Importantly, a LMB-insensitive CRM1 mutant (Crm1-K1) abolished LMB-induced nuclear accumulation of the inactive complexes. Moreover, a cell-permeable p50 NF-κB nuclear localization signal peptide also blocked these LMB effects. These results suggest that NF-κB/IκBα complexes shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus by a nuclear localization signal-dependent nuclear import and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export. The LMB-induced nuclear complexes could not bind DNA and were inaccessible to signaling events, because LMB inhibited NF-κB activation without affecting the subcellular localization of upstream kinases IKKβ and NIK. Our findings indicate that the dominant nuclear export over nuclear import contributes to the largely cytoplasmic localization of the inactive complexes to achieve efficient NF-κB activation by extracellular signals. PMID:10655476

  12. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Zachary H.; Beasley, James C.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  13. ADP1 Affects Plant Architecture by Regulating Local Auxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  14. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs.

  15. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  16. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A; Albrecht, Urs

    2016-11-01

    REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level.

  17. REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Takashi; Chavan, Rohit; Fonseca Costa, Sara S.; Brenna, Andrea; Ripperger, Jürgen A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT REV-ERBα (encoded by Nr1d1) is a nuclear receptor that is part of the circadian clock mechanism and regulates metabolism and inflammatory processes. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR, encoded by Nr3c1) influences similar processes, but is not part of the circadian clock, although glucocorticoid signaling affects resetting of the circadian clock in peripheral tissues. Because of their similar impact on physiological processes, we studied the interplay between these two nuclear receptors. We found that REV-ERBα binds to the C-terminal portion and GR to the N-terminal portion of HSP90α and HSP90β, a chaperone responsible for the activation of proteins to ensure survival of a cell. The presence of REV-ERBα influences the stability and nuclear localization of GR by an unknown mechanism, thereby affecting expression of GR target genes, such as IκBα (Nfkbia) and alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1). Our findings highlight an important interplay between two nuclear receptors that influence the transcriptional potential of each other. This indicates that the transcriptional landscape is strongly dependent on dynamic processes at the protein level. PMID:27686098

  18. Vinculin promotes nuclear localization of TAZ to inhibit ECM stiffness-dependent differentiation into adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Mito; Wada, Hiroki; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Kioka, Noriyuki

    2017-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness regulates the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Although cells sense ECM stiffness through focal adhesions, how cells sense ECM stiffness and regulate ECM stiffness-dependent differentiation remains largely unclear. In this study, we show that the cytoskeletal focal adhesion protein vinculin plays a critical role in the ECM stiffness-dependent adipocyte differentiation of MSCs. ST2 mouse MSCs differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts in an ECM stiffness-dependent manner. We find that a rigid ECM increases the amount of cytoskeleton-associated vinculin and promotes the nuclear localization and activity of the transcriptional coactivator paralogs Yes-associated protein (YAP, also known as YAP1) and transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ, also known as WWTR1) (hereafter YAP/TAZ). Vinculin is necessary for enhanced nuclear localization and activity of YAP/TAZ on the rigid ECM but it does not affect the phosphorylation of the YAP/TAZ kinase LATS1. Furthermore, vinculin depletion promotes differentiation into adipocytes on rigid ECM, while it inhibits differentiation into osteoblasts. Finally, TAZ knockdown was less effective at promoting adipocyte differentiation in vinculin-depleted cells than in control cells. These results suggest that vinculin promotes the nuclear localization of transcription factor TAZ to inhibit the adipocyte differentiation on rigid ECM.

  19. Simultaneous assessment of NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation and nuclear localization using imaging flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Orla; O'Loughlin, Kieran; Minderman, Hans

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant activity of Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-κB) is associated with many diseases and is therapeutically targeted. Post-translational modifications, particularly phosphorylation of the RELA/p65 sub-unit, are essential for cytoplasmic to nuclear localization of NF-κB/p65 and initiation of transcription of downstream target genes. Immunoblot and phospho-flow cytometry have been used to study the relationship between phosphorylation motifs and NF-κB activation and microscopic analysis of nuclear localization of p65 is also used as a parameter for activation. The labor intensive nature of these approaches commonly limits the number of sampling points or replicates. Recent insights into the relationship between p65 phosphorylation motifs and their nuclear localization indicate that these parameters have different significances and should not be used interchangeably. In this study, we demonstrate feasibility and reproducibility of studying the relationship between p65 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation using imaging flow cytometry (IFC). TNFα- or PMA/Ionomycin-induced phosphorylation of p65 at serine 529 in cell line models and healthy donor lymphocytes served as the experimental model. IFC analysis demonstrated that expression of phosphorylated serine 529 (P-p65(s529)) increased rapidly following stimulation and that nuclear localization of P-p65(s529) followed the nuclear localization pattern of total p65. However, in the presence of tacrolimus, P-p65(s529) expression was inhibited without affecting nuclear localization of total p65. The data demonstrate the application of IFC to simultaneously assess phosphorylation of p65 and its cellular localization and the results obtained by this analysis corroborate current insights regarding the specific effect of tacrolimus on serine 529 phosphorylation.

  20. Morbillivirus nucleoprotein possesses a novel nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-independent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Munemitsu; Miura, Ryuichi; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko . E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-15

    Morbilliviruses, which belong to the Mononegavirales, replicate its RNA genome in the cytoplasm of the host cell. However, they also form characteristic intranuclear inclusion bodies, consisting of nucleoprotein (N), in infected cells. To analyze the mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic transport of N protein, we characterized the nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals of canine distemper virus (CDV) N protein by deletion mutation and alanine substitution of the protein. The NLS has a novel leucine/isoleucine-rich motif (TGILISIL) at positions 70-77, whereas the NES is composed of a leucine-rich motif (LLRSLTLF) at positions 4-11. The NLS and NES of the N proteins of other morbilliviruses, that is, measles virus (MV) and rinderpest virus (RPV), were also analyzed. The NLS of CDV-N protein is conserved at the same position in MV-N protein, whereas the NES of MV-N protein is located in the C-terminal region. The NES of RPV-N protein is also located at the same position as CDV-N protein, whereas the NLS motif is present not only at the same locus as CDV-N protein but also at other sites. Interestingly, the nuclear export of all these N proteins appears to proceed via a CRM1-independent pathway.

  1. Stem-loop RNA labeling can affect nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Stephanie; Sidler, Corinne L; Azzalin, Claus M; Weis, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    The binding of sequence-specific RNA-interacting proteins, such as the bacteriophage MS2 or PP7 coat proteins, to their corresponding target sequences has been extremely useful and widely used to visualize single mRNAs in vivo. However, introduction of MS2 stem-loops into yeast mRNAs has recently been shown to lead to the accumulation of RNA fragments, suggesting that the loops impair mRNA decay. This result was questioned, because fragment occurrence was mainly assessed using ensemble methods, and their cellular localization and its implications had not been addressed on a single transcript level. Here, we demonstrate that the introduction of either MS2 stem-loops (MS2SL) or PP7 stem-loops (PP7SL) can affect the processing and subcellular localization of mRNA. We use single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH) to determine the localization of three independent mRNAs tagged with the stem-loop labeling systems in glucose-rich and glucose starvation conditions. Transcripts containing MS2SL or PP7SL display aberrant localization in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. These defects are most prominent in glucose starvation conditions, with nuclear mRNA processing being altered and stem-loop fragments abnormally enriching in processing bodies (PBs). The mislocalization of SL-containing RNAs is independent of the presence of the MS2 or PP7 coat protein (MCP or PCP).

  2. Kem Mutations Affect Nuclear Fusion in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.; Ljungdahl, P. O.; Fink, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    We have identified mutations in three genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, KEM1, KEM2 and KEM3, that enhance the nuclear fusion defect of kar1-1 yeast during conjugation. The KEM1 and KEM3 genes are located on the left arm of chromosome VII. Kem mutations reduce nuclear fusion whether the kem and the kar1-1 mutations are in the same or in different parents (i.e., in both kem kar1-1 X wild-type and kem X kar1-1 crosses). kem1 X kem1 crosses show a defect in nuclear fusion, but kem1 X wild-type crosses do not. Mutant kem1 strains are hypersensitive to benomyl, lose chromosomes at a rate 10-20-fold higher than KEM(+) strains, and lose viability upon nitrogen starvation. In addition, kem1/kem1 diploids are unable to sporulate. Cells containing a kem1 null allele grow very poorly, have an elongated rod-shape and are defective in spindle pole body duplication and/or separation. The KEM1 gene, which is expressed as a 5.5-kb mRNA transcript, contains a 4.6-kb open reading frame encoding a 175-kD protein. PMID:2076815

  3. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  4. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-08

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import.

  5. Local people's understanding of risk from civil nuclear power in the Chinese context.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiang

    2014-04-01

    This paper analyses how people understand civil nuclear risk in the local context in China. The findings of the paper are based on six months of fieldwork research on a potential inland nuclear power project in Dapu townland in 2007 and 2008. Understanding varies greatly depending on local context, with economic, geographic and social factors influencing the way people view risks and benefits. I argue that when local people do not have enough 'scientific knowledge' to understand risk from nuclear power, they can still use their experience of everyday life to reflect rationally on the risks and benefits that they face. I conclude that when local people trust in nuclear technology and 'the government', and are unaware of nuclear risk it is partly because of their over-dependence on institutions and experts. However, despite their lack of agency, local people rationally calculate risk and benefit in accordance with their social identity and geographical location.

  6. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the polo box domain of Plk1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moon-Sing; Huang, Yi-Han; Huang, Shu-Ping; Lin, Ru-Inn; Wu, Shu-Fen; Li, Chin

    2009-10-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 plays an essential role in mitosis and cytokinesis. Expression and nuclear localization of Plk1 during the S phase are necessary for its functions. Although it was reported that a bipartite nuclear localization signal located at the N-terminal kinase domain is required for nuclear import of Plk1, Plk1 carrying mutations in the polo box I of the polo box domain exhibited increased cytoplasmic accumulation. We further showed that the polo box domain was able to confer nuclear import of beta-galactosidase in vivo and GST-EGFP in vitro. The import carriers transportin and importin alpha were found to interact with the polo box domain directly in a Ran-GTP sensitive manner. These results indicate the presence of a nuclear localization signal in the polo box domain. A 38 amino acid sequence with the function of nuclear localization signal was identified to interact with transportin. Our findings demonstrated that a transportin-dependent nuclear localization signal is present in the polo box domain of Plk1, possibly required for efficient nuclear import. Showing little similarity to the M9 sequence, the 38 amino acid sequence identified here likely represents a novel nuclear localization signal.

  7. Nuclear tropomyosin and troponin in striated muscle: new roles in a new locale?

    PubMed

    Chase, P Bryant; Szczypinski, Mark P; Soto, Elliott P

    2013-08-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin have well known Ca(2+)-regulatory functions in the striated muscle sarcomere. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that tropomyosin and troponin are localized, with as yet unidentified functional roles, in the striated muscle cell nucleus. We also apply bioinformatics approaches that predict localization of some tropomyosin and troponin to the nucleus, and that SUMOylation could be a covalent modification that modulates their nuclear localization and function. Further, we provide examples of cardiomyopathy mutations that alter the predicted likelihood of nuclear localization and SUMOylation of tropomyosin. These observations suggest novel mechanisms by which cardiomyopathy mutations in tropomyosin and troponin might alter not only cardiac contractility but also nuclear function.

  8. Factors affecting the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

  9. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  10. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  11. Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1997-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  13. Localized Hartree product treatment of multiple protons in the nuclear-electronic orbital framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Benjamin; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-01

    An approximation for treating multiple quantum nuclei within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework for molecular systems is presented. In the approximation to NEO-Hartree-Fock, the nuclear wave function is represented by a Hartree product rather than a Slater determinant, corresponding to the neglect of the nuclear exchange interactions. In the approximation to NEO-density functional theory, the nuclear exchange-correlation functional is chosen to be the diagonal nuclear exchange interaction terms, thereby eliminating the nuclear self-interaction terms. To further enhance the simplicity and computational efficiency, the nuclear molecular orbitals or Kohn-Sham orbitals are expanded in terms of localized nuclear basis sets. These approximations are valid because of the inherent localization of the nuclear orbitals and the numerical insignificance of the nuclear exchange interactions in molecular systems. Moreover, these approximations lead to substantial computational savings due to the reduction in both the number of integrals that must be calculated and the size of the matrices that must be diagonalized. These nuclear Hartree product approximation (HPA) methods scale linearly with the number of quantum protons and are highly parallelizable. Applications to a water hexamer, glycine dimer, and 32-water cluster, where all hydrogen nuclei are treated quantum mechanically, illustrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of the nuclear HPA methods. These strategies will facilitate the implementation of explicitly correlated NEO methods for molecular systems with multiple quantum protons.

  14. Nuclear localization signal-dependent and -independent movements of Drosophila melanogaster dUTPase isoforms during nuclear cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Muha, Villo; Zagyva, Imre; Venkei, Zsolt; Szabad, Janos; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2009-04-03

    Two dUTPase isoforms (23 kDa and 21 kDa) are present in the fruitfly with the sole difference of an N-terminal extension. In Drosophila embryo, both isoforms are detected inside the nucleus. Here, we investigated the function of the N-terminal segment using eYFP-dUTPase constructs. In Schneider 2 cells, only the 23 kDa construct showed nuclear localization arguing that it may contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Sequence comparisons identified a lysine-rich nonapeptide with similarity to the human c-myc NLS. In Drosophila embryos during nuclear cleavages, the 23 kDa isoform showed the expected localization shifts. Contrariwise, although the 21 kDa isoform was excluded from the nuclei during interphase, it was shifted to the nucleus during prophase and forthcoming mitotic steps. The observed dynamic localization character showed strict timing to the nuclear cleavage phases and explained how both isoforms can be present within the nuclear microenvironment, although at different stages of cell cycle.

  15. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianying; Yu, Bohai; Lin, Lexun; Zhai, Xia; Han, Yelu; Qin, Ying; Guo, Zhiwei; Wu, Shuo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Fengmin; Si, Xiaoning; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2012-11-25

    The capsid proteins of some RNA viruses can translocate to the nucleus and interfere with cellular phenotypes. In this study we found that the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) was dominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells transfected with VP1-expressing plasmid. The VP1 nuclear localization also occurred in the cells infected with CVB3. Truncation analysis indicated that the VP1 nuclear localization sequence located near the C-terminal. The substitution of His220 with threonine completely abolished its translocation. The VP1 proteins of other CVB types might have the nuclear localization potential because this region was highly conserved. Moreover, the VP1 nuclear localization induced cell cycle deregulation, including a prolonged S phase and shortened G2-M phase. Besides these findings, we also found a domain between Ala72 and Phe106 that caused the VP1 truncates dotted distributed in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest a new pathogenic mechanism of CVB. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3 can specifically localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear localization signal of coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein locates near its C-terminal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 nuclear localization of coxsackievirus B3 can deregulate cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a domain in the VP1 that determines it dotted distributed in the cytoplasm.

  16. Constitutive nuclear localization of an alternatively spliced sirtuin-2 isoform.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes G M; VanLinden, Magali R; Lutter, Timo; Aasland, Rein; Ziegler, Mathias

    2014-04-17

    Sirtuin-2 (SIRT2), the cytoplasmic member of the sirtuin family, has been implicated in the deacetylation of nuclear proteins. Although the enzyme has been reported to be located to the nucleus during G2/M phase, its spectrum of targets suggests functions in the nucleus throughout the cell cycle. While a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mechanism has been proposed for SIRT2, recent studies have indicated the presence of a constitutively nuclear isoform. Here we report the identification of a novel splice variant (isoform 5) of SIRT2 that lacks a nuclear export signal and encodes a predominantly nuclear isoform. This novel isoform 5 fails to show deacetylase activity using several assays, both in vitro and in vivo, and we are led to conclude that this isoform is catalytically inactive. Nevertheless, it retains the ability to interact with p300, a known interaction partner. Moreover, changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence upon denaturation indicate that the protein is properly folded. These data, together with computational analyses, confirm the structural integrity of the catalytic domain. Our results suggest an activity-independent nuclear function of the novel isoform.

  17. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Rosas, Maria Flora; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-09-15

    We have experimentally tested whether the MRKTKLAPT sequence in FMDV 3D protein (residues 16 to 24) can act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutants with substitutions in two basic residues within this sequence, K18E and K20E, were generated. A decreased nuclear localization was observed in transiently expressed 3D and its precursor 3CD, suggesting a role of K18 and K20 in nuclear targeting. Fusion of MRKTKLAPT to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) increased the nuclear localization of GFP, which was not observed when GFP was fused to the 3D mutated sequences. These results indicate that the sequence MRKTKLAPT can be functionally considered as a NLS. When introduced in a FMDV full length RNA replacements K18E and K20E led to production of revertant viruses that replaced the acidic residues introduced (E) by K, suggesting that the presence of lysins at positions 18 and 20 of 3D is essential for virus multiplication. - Highlights: • The FMDV 3D polymerase contains a nuclear localization signal. • Replacements K18E and K20E decrease nuclear localization of 3D and its precursor 3CD. • Fusion of the MRKTKLAPT 3D motif to GFP increases the nuclear localization of GFP. • Replacements K18E and K20E abolish the ability of MRKTKLAPT to relocate GFP. • RNAs harboring replacements K18E and K20E lead to recovery of revertant FMDVs.

  18. A nuclear localization domain in the hnRNP A1 protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) A1 protein is one of the major pre-mRNA/mRNA binding proteins in eukaryotic cells and one of the most abundant proteins in the nucleus. It is localized to the nucleoplasm and it also shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence of A1 contains two RNP motif RNA-binding domains (RBDs) at the amino terminus and a glycine-rich domain at the carboxyl terminus. This configuration, designated 2x RBD-Gly, is representative of perhaps the largest family of hnRNP proteins. Unlike most nuclear proteins characterized so far, A1 (and most 2x RBD-Gly proteins) does not contain a recognizable nuclear localization signal (NLS). We have found that a segment of ca. 40 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the protein (designated M9) is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization; attaching this segment to the bacterial protein beta- galactosidase or to pyruvate kinase completely localized these otherwise cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. The RBDs and another RNA binding motif found in the glycine-rich domain, the RGG box, are not required for A1 nuclear localization. M9 is a novel type of nuclear localization domain as it does not contain sequences similar to classical basic-type NLS. Interestingly, sequences similar to M9 are found in other nuclear RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP A2. PMID:7730395

  19. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  20. Socioeconomic factors affecting local support for black bear recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Morzillo, Anita T; Mertig, Angela G; Hollister, Jeffrey W; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species' historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict.

  1. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzillo, Anita T.; Mertig, Angela G.; Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict.

  2. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Shoji, Yutaka; Conrads, Kelly A; Stroop, Kevin D; Hamilton, Chad A; Darcy, Kathleen M; Maxwell, George L; Risinger, John I; Conrads, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors.

  3. The Oncogenic Fusion Proteins SET-Nup214 and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-Nup214 Form Dynamic Nuclear Bodies and Differentially Affect Nuclear Protein and Poly(A)+ RNA Export.

    PubMed

    Port, Sarah A; Mendes, Adélia; Valkova, Christina; Spillner, Christiane; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Kaether, Christoph; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2016-10-28

    Genetic rearrangements are a hallmark of several forms of leukemia and can lead to oncogenic fusion proteins. One example of an affected chromosomal region is the gene coding for Nup214, a nucleoporin that localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We investigated two such fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and SQSTM1 (sequestosome)-Nup214, both containing C-terminal portions of Nup214. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies containing the nuclear export receptor CRM1 were observed in the leukemia cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL. Overexpression of SET-Nup214 in HeLa cells leads to the formation of similar nuclear bodies that recruit CRM1, export cargo proteins, and certain nucleoporins and concomitantly affect nuclear protein and poly(A)(+) RNA export. SQSTM1-Nup214, although mostly cytoplasmic, also forms nuclear bodies and inhibits nuclear protein but not poly(A)(+) RNA export. The interaction of the fusion proteins with CRM1 is RanGTP-dependent, as shown in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and binding assays. Further analysis revealed that the Nup214 parts mediate the inhibition of nuclear export, whereas the SET or SQSTM1 part determines the localization of the fusion protein and therefore the extent of the effect. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies are highly mobile structures, which are in equilibrium with the nucleoplasm in interphase and disassemble during mitosis or upon treatment of cells with the CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Strikingly, we found that nucleoporins can be released from nuclear bodies and reintegrated into existing NPC. Our results point to nuclear bodies as a means of preventing the formation of potentially insoluble and harmful protein aggregates that also may serve as storage compartments for nuclear transport factors.

  4. Nucleon localization and fragment formation in nuclear fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Schuetrumpf, B.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Background: An electron localization measure was originally introduced to characterize chemical bond structures in molecules. Recently, a nucleon localization based on Hartree-Fock densities has been introduced to investigate α -cluster structures in light nuclei. Compared to the local nucleonic densities, the nucleon localization function has been shown to be an excellent indicator of shell effects and cluster correlations. Purpose: Using the spatial nucleon localization measure, we investigate the emergence of fragments in fissioning heavy nuclei. Methods: To illustrate basic concepts of nucleon localization, we employ the self-consistent energy density functional method with a quantified energy density functional optimized for fission studies. Results: We study the particle densities and spatial nucleon localization distributions along the fission pathways of 264Fm, 232Th, and 240Pu. We demonstrate that the fission fragments are formed fairly early in the evolution, well before scission. We illustrate the usefulness of the localization measure by showing how the hyperdeformed state of 232Th can be understood in terms of a quasimolecular state made of 132Sn and 100Zr fragments. Conclusions: Compared to nucleonic distributions, the nucleon localization function more effectively quantifies nucleonic clustering: its characteristic oscillating pattern, traced back to shell effects, is a clear fingerprint of cluster/fragment configurations. This is of particular interest for studies of fragment formation and fragment identification in fissioning nuclei.

  5. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  6. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  7. Nuclear Localization of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mcm2/Cdc19p Requires MCM Complex Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Pasion, Sally G.; Forsburg, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The minichromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins MCM2–MCM7 are conserved eukaryotic replication factors that assemble in a heterohexameric complex. In fission yeast, these proteins are nuclear throughout the cell cycle. In studying the mechanism that regulates assembly of the MCM complex, we analyzed the cis and trans elements required for nuclear localization of a single subunit, Mcm2p. Mutation of any single mcm gene leads to redistribution of wild-type MCM subunits to the cytoplasm, and this redistribution depends on an active nuclear export system. We identified the nuclear localization signal sequences of Mcm2p and showed that these are required for nuclear targeting of other MCM subunits. In turn, Mcm2p must associate with other MCM proteins for its proper localization; nuclear localization of MCM proteins thus requires assembly of MCM proteins in a complex. We suggest that coupling complex assembly to nuclear targeting and retention ensures that only intact heterohexameric MCM complexes remain nuclear. PMID:10588642

  8. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  9. ERK5 and Cell Proliferation: Nuclear Localization Is What Matters.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Nestor; Erazo, Tatiana; Lizcano, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    ERK5, the last MAP kinase family member discovered, is activated by the upstream kinase MEK5 in response to growth factors and stress stimulation. MEK5-ERK5 pathway has been associated to different cellular processes, playing a crucial role in cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of its kinase activity. Thus, nuclear ERK5 activates transcription factors by either direct phosphorylation or acting as co-activator thanks to a unique transcriptional activation TAD domain located at its C-terminal tail. Consequently, ERK5 has been proposed as an interesting target to tackle different cancers, and either inhibitors of ERK5 activity or silencing the protein have shown antiproliferative activity in cancer cells and to block tumor growth in animal models. Here, we review the different mechanisms involved in ERK5 nuclear translocation and their consequences. Inactive ERK5 resides in the cytosol, forming a complex with Hsp90-Cdc37 superchaperone. In a canonical mechanism, MEK5-dependent activation results in ERK5 C-terminal autophosphorylation, Hsp90 dissociation, and nuclear translocation. This mechanism integrates signals such as growth factors and stresses that activate the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. Importantly, two other mechanisms, MEK5-independent, have been recently described. These mechanisms allow nuclear shuttling of kinase-inactive forms of ERK5. Although lacking kinase activity, these forms activate transcription by interacting with transcription factors through the TAD domain. Both mechanisms also require Hsp90 dissociation previous to nuclear translocation. One mechanism involves phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of ERK5 by kinases that are activated during mitosis, such as Cyclin-dependent kinase-1. The second mechanism involves overexpression of chaperone Cdc37, an oncogene that is overexpressed in cancers such as prostate adenocarcinoma, where it collaborates with ERK5 to promote cell proliferation

  10. ERK5 and Cell Proliferation: Nuclear Localization Is What Matters

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Nestor; Erazo, Tatiana; Lizcano, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    ERK5, the last MAP kinase family member discovered, is activated by the upstream kinase MEK5 in response to growth factors and stress stimulation. MEK5-ERK5 pathway has been associated to different cellular processes, playing a crucial role in cell proliferation in normal and cancer cells by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of its kinase activity. Thus, nuclear ERK5 activates transcription factors by either direct phosphorylation or acting as co-activator thanks to a unique transcriptional activation TAD domain located at its C-terminal tail. Consequently, ERK5 has been proposed as an interesting target to tackle different cancers, and either inhibitors of ERK5 activity or silencing the protein have shown antiproliferative activity in cancer cells and to block tumor growth in animal models. Here, we review the different mechanisms involved in ERK5 nuclear translocation and their consequences. Inactive ERK5 resides in the cytosol, forming a complex with Hsp90-Cdc37 superchaperone. In a canonical mechanism, MEK5-dependent activation results in ERK5 C-terminal autophosphorylation, Hsp90 dissociation, and nuclear translocation. This mechanism integrates signals such as growth factors and stresses that activate the MEK5-ERK5 pathway. Importantly, two other mechanisms, MEK5-independent, have been recently described. These mechanisms allow nuclear shuttling of kinase-inactive forms of ERK5. Although lacking kinase activity, these forms activate transcription by interacting with transcription factors through the TAD domain. Both mechanisms also require Hsp90 dissociation previous to nuclear translocation. One mechanism involves phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of ERK5 by kinases that are activated during mitosis, such as Cyclin-dependent kinase-1. The second mechanism involves overexpression of chaperone Cdc37, an oncogene that is overexpressed in cancers such as prostate adenocarcinoma, where it collaborates with ERK5 to promote cell proliferation

  11. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Jans, David A.; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-01-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host’s primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus. PMID:27902702

  12. Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) Compounds Alter New World Alphavirus Capsid Localization and Reduce Viral Replication in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Lindsay; Pinkham, Chelsea; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Brahms, Ashwini; Shafagati, Nazly; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A; Tamir, Sharon; Kehn-Hall, Kylene

    2016-11-01

    The capsid structural protein of the New World alphavirus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), interacts with the host nuclear transport proteins importin α/β1 and CRM1. Novel selective inhibitor of nuclear export (SINE) compounds, KPT-185, KPT-335 (verdinexor), and KPT-350, target the host's primary nuclear export protein, CRM1, in a manner similar to the archetypical inhibitor Leptomycin B. One major limitation of Leptomycin B is its irreversible binding to CRM1; which SINE compounds alleviate because they are slowly reversible. Chemically inhibiting CRM1 with these compounds enhanced capsid localization to the nucleus compared to the inactive compound KPT-301, as indicated by immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Differences in extracellular versus intracellular viral RNA, as well as decreased capsid in cell free supernatants, indicated the inhibitors affected viral assembly, which led to a decrease in viral titers. The decrease in viral replication was confirmed using a luciferase-tagged virus and through plaque assays. SINE compounds had no effect on VEEV TC83_Cm, which encodes a mutated form of capsid that is unable to enter the nucleus. Serially passaging VEEV in the presence of KPT-185 resulted in mutations within the nuclear localization and nuclear export signals of capsid. Finally, SINE compound treatment also reduced the viral titers of the related eastern and western equine encephalitis viruses, suggesting that CRM1 maintains a common interaction with capsid proteins across the New World alphavirus genus.

  13. Coordinate nuclear targeting of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins via a FANCD2 nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Rebecca A; Rego, Meghan A; Azzinaro, Paul A; Mauro, Maurizio; Howlett, Niall G

    2013-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disease, characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure, and increased cancer susceptibility. FA is caused by biallelic mutation of any one of sixteen genes. The protein products of these genes function cooperatively in the FA-BRCA pathway to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). A central step in the activation of this pathway is the monoubiquitination of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins. Monoubiquitinated FANCD2 and FANCI localize to discrete chromatin regions where they function in ICL repair. Despite their critical role in ICL repair, very little is known about the structure, function, and regulation of the FANCD2 and FANCI proteins, or how they are targeted to the nucleus and chromatin. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of an amino-terminal FANCD2 nuclear localization signal (NLS). We demonstrate that the amino terminal 58 amino acids of FANCD2 can promote the nuclear expression of GFP and is necessary for the nuclear localization of FANCD2. Importantly, mutation of this FANCD2 NLS reveals that intact FANCD2 is required for the nuclear localization of a subset of FANCI. In addition, the NLS is necessary for the efficient monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and FANCI and, consequently, for their localization to chromatin. As a result, FANCD2 NLS mutants fail to rescue the ICL sensitivity of FA-D2 patient cells. Our studies yield important insight into the domain structure of the poorly characterized FANCD2 protein, and reveal a previously unknown mechanism for the coordinate nuclear import of a subset of FANCD2 and FANCI, a key early step in the cellular ICL response.

  14. Identification of a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the silkworm Masc protein.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yudai; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Ueda, Masamichi; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Shimada, Toru; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    The silkworm Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH-tandem zinc finger protein that controls both masculinization and dosage compensation. Masc protein is a nuclear protein, but the mechanism underlying the transport of this protein into the nucleus has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identified a functional bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located between residues 274 and 290 of the Masc protein. Sequence comparison revealed that this bipartite NLS is evolutionarily conserved in Masc proteins from other lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, we showed that the degree of nuclear localization is not associated with the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein.

  15. Local bacteria affect the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lehouritis, Panos; Cummins, Joanne; Stanton, Michael; Murphy, Carola T.; McCarthy, Florence O.; Reid, Gregor; Urbaniak, Camilla; Byrne, William L.; Tangney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the potential effects of bacteria on the efficacy of frequently used chemotherapies was examined. Bacteria and cancer cell lines were examined in vitro and in vivo for changes in the efficacy of cancer cell killing mediated by chemotherapeutic agents. Of 30 drugs examined in vitro, the efficacy of 10 was found to be significantly inhibited by certain bacteria, while the same bacteria improved the efficacy of six others. HPLC and mass spectrometry analyses of sample drugs (gemcitabine, fludarabine, cladribine, CB1954) demonstrated modification of drug chemical structure. The chemoresistance or increased cytotoxicity observed in vitro with sample drugs (gemcitabine and CB1954) was replicated in in vivo murine subcutaneous tumour models. These findings suggest that bacterial presence in the body due to systemic or local infection may influence tumour responses or off-target toxicity during chemotherapy. PMID:26416623

  16. Trapped energetic ion dynamics affected by localized electric field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Trapped energetic ion orbits in helical systems are numerically simulated using the Lorentz model. Simulation results of precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions are benchmarked by those of analytic solutions. The effects of the electric field perturbation localized at the rational surface on trapped energetic ions are examined, where the perturbation has an arbitrary rotation frequency and an amplitude fixed in time. It is found that the trapped energetic ions resonantly interact with the perturbation, when the rotation frequency of the perturbation is comparable to the precession drift frequencies of trapped energetic ions. The simulation results are suggestive to a mechanism of the energetic-ion-induced interchange mode, which might be associated with the fishbone mode observed in helical systems.

  17. Separate information required for nuclear and subnuclear localization: additional complexity in localizing an enzyme shared by mitochondria and nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, A M; Joyce, P B; Hopper, A K; Martin, N C

    1992-01-01

    The TRM1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for a tRNA modification enzyme, N2,N2-dimethylguanosine-specific tRNA methyltransferase (m2(2)Gtase), shared by mitochondria and nuclei. Immunofluorescent staining at the nuclear periphery demonstrates that m2(2)Gtase localizes at or near the nuclear membrane. In determining sequences necessary for targeting the enzyme to nuclei and mitochondria, we found that information required to deliver the enzyme to the nucleus is not sufficient for its correct subnuclear localization. We also determined that mislocalizing the enzyme from the nucleus to the cytoplasm does not destroy its biological function. This change in location was caused by altering a sequence similar to other known nuclear targeting signals (KKSKKKRC), suggesting that shared enzymes are likely to use the same import pathway as proteins that localize only to the nucleus. As with other well-characterized mitochondrial proteins, the mitochondrial import of the shared methyltransferase depends on amino-terminal amino acids, and removal of the first 48 amino acids prevents its import into mitochondria. While this truncated protein is still imported into nuclei, the immunofluorescent staining is uniform throughout rather than at the nuclear periphery, a staining pattern identical to that described for a fusion protein consisting of the first 213 amino acids of m2(2)Gtase in frame with beta-galactosidase. As both of these proteins together contain the entire m2(2)Gtase coding region, the information necessary for association with the nuclear periphery must be more complex than the short linear sequence necessary for nuclear localization. Images PMID:1448094

  18. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  19. Mbh 1: a novel gelsolin/severin-related protein which binds actin in vitro and exhibits nuclear localization in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Ziff, E B

    1991-01-01

    We describe the characterization of a novel cDNA, mbh1 (myc basic motif homolog-1), which was found during a search for candidate factors which might interact with the c-Myc oncoprotein. Embedded within the amino acid sequence encoded by mbh1 is a region distantly related to the basic/helix-loop-helix (B/HLH) DNA-binding motif and a potential nuclear localization signal. Mbh1 encodes a polypeptide structurally similar to the actin-severing proteins gelsolin and severin. Translation of mbh1 RNA in rabbit reticulocyte extracts produces an approximately 45 kd protein capable of binding actin-coupled agarose beads in vitro in a Ca2(+)-dependent manner. Antiserum raised to a trpE/mbh1 bacterial fusion protein recognizes an approximately 45 kb protein in murine 3T3 fibroblasts, suggesting that the cDNA encodes the complete Mbh1 protein. Examination of Mbh1 localization in 3T3 fibroblasts by indirect immunofluorescence reveals a larger cell population showing diffuse staining, and a smaller population exhibiting a distinct nuclear stain. Western analysis corroborates this intracellular localization and indicates that total cellular levels and localization of Mbh1 are not affected by the cell growth state. The data suggest that Mbh1 may play a role in regulating cytoplasmic and/or nuclear architecture through potential interactions with actin. Images PMID:1849072

  20. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) and lamins alter nuclear membrane structure without affecting phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Karsten; Ridgway, Neale D

    2011-06-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the CDP-choline pathway for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. Lipid activation of CCTα results in its translocation to the nuclear envelope and expansion of an intranuclear membrane network termed the nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) by a mechanism involving membrane deformation. Nuclear lamins are also required for stability and proliferation of the NR, but whether this unique structure, or the nuclear lamina in general, is required for PC synthesis is not known. To examine this relationship, the nuclear lamina was depleted by RNAi or disrupted by expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) mutant lamin A (progerin), and the effect on CCTα and choline metabolism was analyzed. siRNA-mediated silencing of lamin A/C or lamin B1 in CHO cells to diminish the NR had no effect on PC synthesis, while double knockdown non-specifically inhibited the pathway. Confirming this minor role in PC synthesis, only 10% of transiently overexpressed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase was detected in the NR. In CHO cells, CCTα was nucleoplasmic and co-localized with GFP-progerin in nuclear folds and invaginations; however, HGPS fibroblasts displayed an abnormal distribution of CCTα in the cytoplasm and nuclear envelope that was accompanied by a 2-fold reduction in PC synthesis. In spite of its altered localization, choline-labeling experiments showed that CCT activity was unaffected, and inhibition of PC synthesis was traced to reduced activity of a hemicholinium-sensitive choline transporter. We conclude that CCTα and lamins specifically cooperate to form the NR, but the overall structure of the nuclear envelope has a minimal impact on CCT activity and PC synthesis.

  1. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics.

  2. Nuclear localization and phosphorylation of three 25-kilodalton rat stress proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y J; Shuman, J; Sette, M; Przybyla, A

    1984-01-01

    The nuclear localization and phosphorylation of three 25-kilodalton rat myoblast stress proteins were examined. Data obtained in these analyses led to the following conclusions: (i) all three proteins become localized in the nucleus of stressed cells, (ii) two of the proteins are modified by phosphorylation, and (iii) phosphorylation occurs exclusively on serine residues. Images PMID:6717429

  3. Self-association of Coilin Reveals a Common Theme in Nuclear Body Localization

    PubMed Central

    Hebert, Michael D.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2000-01-01

    We have found that coilin, the marker protein for Cajal bodies (coiled bodies, CBs), is a self-interacting protein, and we have mapped the domain responsible for this activity to the amino-terminus. Together with a nuclear localization signal, the self-interaction domain is necessary and sufficient for localization to CBs. Overexpression of various wild-type and mutant coilin constructs in HeLa cells results in disruption of both CBs and survival motor neurons (SMN) gems. Additionally, we have identified a cryptic nucleolar localization signal (NoLS), within the coilin protein, which may be exposed in specific coilin phospho-isoforms. The implications of these findings are discussed in light of the fact that other proteins known to localize within nuclear bodies (e.g., PML, SMN and Sam68) can also self-associate. Thus protein self-interaction appears to be a general feature of nuclear body marker proteins. PMID:11102515

  4. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  5. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Boris V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the ‘acoustic CF’ could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  6. Association of Nuclear Localization of a Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 Protein in Breast Tumors with Poor Prognostic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chris R.; Normart, Robin; Yang, Qifeng; Stevenson, Elizabeth; Haffty, Bruce G.; Ganesan, Shridar; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Levine, Arnold J.; Tang, Laura H.

    2010-01-01

    Within healthy human somatic cells, retrotransposition by long interspersed nuclear element-1 (also known as LINE-1 or L1) is thought to be held in check by a variety of mechanisms, including DNA methylation and RNAi. The expression of L1-ORF1 protein, which is rarely found in normal tissue, was assayed using antibodies with a variety of clinical cancer specimens and cancer cell lines. L1-ORF1p expression was detected in nearly all breast tumors that the authors examined, and the protein was also present in a high percentage of ileal carcinoids, bladder, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, as well as in a smaller percentage of prostate and colorectal tumors. Tumors generally demonstrated cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p; however, in several breast cancers, L1-ORF1p was nuclear. Patients with breast tumors displaying nuclear L1-ORF1p had a greater incidence of both local recurrence and distal metastases and also showed poorer overall survival when compared with patients with tumors displaying cytoplasmic L1-ORF1p. These data suggest that expression of L1-ORF1p is widespread in many cancers and that redistribution from cytoplasm to nucleus could be a poor prognostic indicator during breast cancer. High expression and nuclear localization of L1-ORF1p may result in a higher rate of L1 retrotransposition, which could increase genomic instability. PMID:20948976

  7. Signal peptide peptidase-mediated nuclear localization of heme oxygenase-1 promotes cancer cell proliferation and invasion independent of its enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hsu, F-F; Yeh, C-T; Sun, Y-J; Chiang, M-T; Lan, W-M; Li, F-A; Lee, W-H; Chau, L-Y

    2015-04-30

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme-degrading enzyme anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum by a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane segment (TMS). HO-1 is highly expressed in various cancers and its nuclear localization is associated with the progression of some cancers. Nevertheless, the mechanism underlying HO-1 nuclear translocation and its pathological significance remain elusive. Here we show that the signal peptide peptidase (SPP) catalyzes the intramembrane cleavage of HO-1. Coexpression of HO-1 with wild-type SPP, but not a dominant-negative SPP, promoted the nuclear localization of HO-1 in cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of cytosolic HO-1 isolated from HeLa cells overexpressing HO-1 and SPP revealed two adjacent intramembrane cleavage sites located after S275 and F276 within the TMS. Mutations of S275F276 to A275L276 significantly hindered SPP-mediated HO-1 cleavage and nuclear localization. Nuclear HO-1 was detected in A549 and DU145 cancer cell lines expressing high levels of endogenous HO-1 and SPP. SPP knockdown or inhibition significantly reduced nuclear HO-1 localization in A549 and DU145 cells. The positive nuclear HO-1 stain was also evident in lung cancer tissues expressing high levels of HO-1 and SPP. Overexpression of a truncated HO-1 (t-HO-1) lacking the TMS in HeLa and H1299 cells promoted cell proliferation and migration/invasion. The effect of t-HO-1 was not affected by a mutation in the catalytic site. However, blockade of t-HO-1 nuclear localization abolished t-HO-1-mediated effect. The tumorigenic effect of t-HO-1 was also demonstrated in the mouse model. These findings disclose that SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage of HO-1 promotes HO-1 nuclear localization and cancer progression independent of HO-1 enzymatic activity.

  8. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  9. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  10. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kutty, R. Krishnan . E-mail: kuttyk@nei.nih.gov; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-07-14

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P{sup 27}KKRKAP{sup 276}) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting.

  11. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, Arwa; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  12. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy; Moroianu, Junona

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  13. Functional and structural basis of the nuclear localization signal in the ZIC3 zinc finger domain

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Minoru; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Disruptions in ZIC3 cause heterotaxy, a congenital anomaly of the left–right axis. ZIC3 encodes a nuclear protein with a zinc finger (ZF) domain that contains five tandem C2H2 ZF motifs. Missense mutations in the first ZF motif (ZF1) result in defective nuclear localization, which may underlie the pathogenesis of heterotaxy. Here we revealed the structural and functional basis of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of ZIC3 and investigated its relationship to the defect caused by ZF1 mutation. The ZIC3 NLS was located in the ZF2 and ZF3 regions, rather than ZF1. Several basic residues interspersed throughout these regions were responsible for the nuclear localization, but R320, K337 and R350 were particularly important. NMR structure analysis revealed that ZF1–4 had a similar structure to GLI ZF, and the basic side chains of the NLS clustered together in two regions on the protein surface, similar to classical bipartite NLSs. Among the residues for the ZF1 mutations, C253 and H286 were positioned for the metal chelation, whereas W255 was positioned in the hydrophobic core formed by ZF1 and ZF2. Tryptophan 255 was a highly conserved inter-finger connector and formed part of a structural motif (tandem CXW-C-H-H) that is shared with GLI, Glis and some fungal ZF proteins. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of Karyopherin α1/α6 impaired ZIC3 nuclear localization, and physical interactions between the NLS and the nuclear import adapter proteins were disturbed by mutations in the NLS but not by W255G. These results indicate that ZIC3 is imported into the cell nucleus by the Karyopherin (Importin) system and that the impaired nuclear localization by the ZF1 mutation is not due to a direct influence on the NLS. PMID:18716025

  14. Living with nuclear power: A Q-method study of local community perceptions.

    PubMed

    Venables, Dan; Pidgeon, Nick; Simmons, Peter; Henwood, Karen; Parkhill, Karen

    2009-08-01

    The issue of new nuclear power is once again high up on the public policy agenda in many countries, and candidate sites for new civilian stations are likely to include those that have existing nuclear facilities. A common assumption is that existing nuclear communities will be more accepting of new build because of the direct economic and other benefits nuclear power already makes to a local area. Surprisingly, there is a dearth of contemporary data on perceptions of the risks, benefits, and values associated with nuclear power within such communities. This study uses Q-methodology to investigate the perspectives on living with nuclear risk among people (n = 84) drawn from communities near to two nuclear power stations in the United Kingdom. Both stations, at Bradwell-on-Sea and Oldbury-on-Severn, had been in operation for over 40 years. The Q-analysis identified four main perspectives, or points of view, accounting for 53% of total variance. These were interpreted as: Beneficial and Safe; Threat and Distrust; Reluctant Acceptance; and There's No Point Worrying. We conclude that the "landscape of beliefs" about nuclear power in such communities is both subtle and complex, avoiding simplistic bipolar dichotomies such as "for" or "against," and that there is a need for extensive and meaningful dialogue with such communities over any new build plans. The usefulness of Q-methodology for investigating the ways in which people live with risk is highlighted, as are the implications of the results for theories of risk and trust.

  15. Noncatalytic, N-terminal Domains of DNA Polymerase Lambda Affect Its Cellular Localization and DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Anthony A; Taggart, David J; Suo, Zucai

    2017-04-13

    Specialized DNA polymerases, such as DNA polymerase lambda (Polλ), are important players in DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. Knowing how DNA polymerases are regulated and recruited to sites of DNA damage is imperative to understanding these pathways. Recent work has suggested that Polλ plays a role in several distinct DNA damage tolerance and repair pathways. In this paper, we report previously unknown roles of the N-terminal domains of human Polλ for modulating its involvement in DNA damage tolerance and repair. By using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy, and cell survival assays, we found that the BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) and proline/serine-rich (PSR) domains of Polλ affect its cellular localization and DNA damage responses. The nuclear localization signal (NLS) of Polλ was necessary to overcome the impediment of its nuclear localization caused by its BRCT and PSR domains. Induction of DNA damage resulted in recruitment of Polλ to chromatin, which was controlled by its BRCT and PSR domains. In addition, the presence of both domains was required for Polλ-mediated tolerance of oxidative DNA damage but not DNA methylation damage. These findings suggest that the N-terminal domains of Polλ are important for regulating its responses to DNA damage.

  16. Implicit attitudes toward nuclear power and mobile phone base stations: support for the affect heuristic.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Keller, Carmen; Cousin, Marie-Eve

    2006-08-01

    The implicit association test (IAT) measures automatic associations. In the present research, the IAT was adapted to measure implicit attitudes toward technological hazards. In Study 1, implicit and explicit attitudes toward nuclear power were examined. Implicit measures (i.e., the IAT) revealed negative attitudes toward nuclear power that were not detected by explicit measures (i.e., a questionnaire). In Study 2, implicit attitudes toward EMF (electro-magnetic field) hazards were examined. Results showed that cell phone base stations and power lines are judged to be similarly risky and, further, that base stations are more closely related to risk concepts than home appliances are. No differences between experts and lay people were observed. Results of the present studies are in line with the affect heuristic proposed by Slovic and colleagues. Affect seems to be an important factor in risk perception.

  17. Nuclear vs Cytoplasmic localization of Filamin A in Prostate Cancer: Immunohistochemical Correlation with Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bedolla, Roble G.; Wang, Yu; Asuncion, Alfredo; Chamie, Karim; Siddiqui, Salma; Mudryj, Maria M.; Prihoda, Thomas J.; Siddiqui, Javed; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Mehra, Rohit; deVereWhite, Ralph W.; Ghosh, Paramita M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We previously showed that nuclear localization of the actin-binding protein FilaminA (FlnA) corresponded to hormone-dependence in prostate cancer (Oncogene, 2007, 26:6061-6070). Intact FlnA (280kDa, cytoplasmic) cleaved to a 90kDa fragment which translocated to the nucleus in hormone-naïve cells, whereas in hormone-refractory cells, FlnA was phosphorylated, preventing its cleavage and nuclear translocation. We now examined whether FlnA localization determines a propensity to metastasis in advanced androgen independent prostate cancer. Experimental Design We examined, by immunohistochemistry, FlnA localization in paraffin-embedded human prostate tissue representing different stages of progression. Results were correlated with in vitro studies in a cell model of prostate cancer. Results Nuclear FlnA was significantly higher in benign prostate (0.6612±0.5888), PIN (0.6024±0.4620) and clinically localized cancers (0.69134±0.5686), compared to metastatic prostate cancers (0.3719±0.4992, p=0.0007). Cytoplasmic FlnA increased from benign prostate (0.0833±0.2677), PIN (0.1409±0.2293), localized cancers (0.3008±0.3762, p=0.0150), to metastases (0.7632±0.4414, p<0.00001). Logistic regression of metastatic vs non-metastatic tissue yielded the area-under-ROC curve as 0.67 for nuclear-FlnA, 0.79 for cytoplasmic-FlnA and 0.82 for both, indicating that metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic-to-nuclear translocation. In vitro studies showed that cytoplasmic localization of FlnA induced cell invasion whereas nuclear translocation of the protein inhibited it. FlnA dephosphorylation with the PKA inhibitor H-89 facilitated FlnA nuclear translocation, resulting in decreased invasiveness and AR transcriptional activity, and induced sensitivity to androgen withdrawal in hormone-refractory cells. Conclusions The data presented in this study indicate that in prostate cancer, metastasis correlates with cytoplasmic localization of FlnA and may be prevented by cleavage and

  18. Interfering with the connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton affects nuclear rotation, mechanotransduction and myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brosig, Michaela; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Gelman, Laurent; Chiquet, Matthias; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical stress controls a broad range of cellular functions. The cytoskeleton is physically connected to the extracellular matrix via integrin receptors, and to the nuclear lamina by the LINC complex that spans both nuclear membranes. We asked here how disruption of this direct link from the cytoskeleton to nuclear chromatin affects mechanotransduction. Fibroblasts grown on flexible silicone membranes reacted to cyclic stretch by nuclear rotation. This rotation was abolished by inhibition of actomyosin contraction as well as by overexpression of dominant-negative versions of nesprin or sun proteins that form the LINC complex. In an in vitro model of muscle differentiation, cyclic strain inhibits differentiation and induces proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interference with the LINC complex in these cells abrogated their stretch-induced proliferation, while stretch increased p38 MAPK and NFkappaB phosphorylation and the transcript levels of myogenic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. We found that the physical link from the cytoskeleton to the nuclear lamina is crucial for correct mechanotransduction, and that disruption of the LINC complex perturbs the mechanical control of cell differentiation.

  19. Nuclear omnipotent suppressors of premature termination codons in mitochondrial genes affect the 37S mitoribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Boguta, M; Mieszczak, M; Zagórski, W

    1988-02-01

    nam3 and R705, yeast nuclear omnipotent suppressors of mitochondrial mit- mutations, reverse the superimposed spectrum of trans-recessive splicing defects by affecting the protein composition of the small mitoribosomal subunit. Analysis of the suppressor's interaction suggests that suppression results from mutations in the mitoribosomal polypeptides. These data indicate an obligatory connection between mitoribosome function and splicing of introns bI2, bI4 and aI1 in yeast mitochondria.

  20. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal within the human USP22 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jianjun; Wang, Yaqin; Gong, Zhen; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • USP22 was accumulated in nucleus. • We identified of a functional USP22 NLS. • The KRRK amino acid residues are indispensable in NLS. • The KRRK motif is conserved in USP22 homologues. - Abstract: Ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22), a member of the deubiquitinase family, is over-expressed in most human cancers and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Because it is an enzymatic subunit of the human SAGA transcriptional cofactor, USP22 deubiquitylates histone H2A and H2B in the nucleus, thus participating in gene regulation and cell-cycle progression. However, the mechanisms regulating its nuclear translocation have not yet been elucidated. It was here demonstrated that USP22 is imported into the nucleus through a mechanism mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS). The bipartite NLS sequence KRELELLKHNPKRRKIT (aa152–168), was identified as the functional NLS for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, a short cluster of basic amino acid residues KRRK within this bipartite NLS plays the primary role in nuclear localization and is evolutionarily conserved in USP22 homologues. In the present study, a functional NLS and the minimal sequences required for the active targeting of USP22 to the nucleus were identified. These findings may provide a molecular basis for the mechanism underlying USP22 nuclear trafficking and function.

  1. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS.

  2. Diazepam affects the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor density and their expression levels in adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Bolaris, Stamatis; Valcana, Theony; Margarity, Marigoula

    2005-07-01

    Thyroid hormones (THs) are involved in the occurrence of anxiety and affective disorders; however, the effects following an anxiolytic benzodiazepine treatment, such as diazepam administration, on the mechanism of action of thyroid hormones has not yet been investigated. The effect of diazepam on the in vitro nuclear T3 binding, on the relative expression of the TH receptors (TRs) and on the synaptosomal TH availability were examined in adult rat cerebral hemispheres 24 h after a single intraperitoneal dose (5 mg/kg BW) of this tranquillizer. Although, diazepam did not affect the availability of TH either in blood circulation or in the synaptosomal fraction, it decreased (33%) the nuclear T3 maximal binding density (B(max)). No differences were observed in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)). The TRalpha2 variant (non-T3-binding) mRNA levels were increased by 33%, whereas no changes in the relative expression of the T3-binding isoforms of TRs (TRalpha1, TRbeta1) were observed. This study shows that a single intraperitoneal injection of diazepam affects within 24 h, the density of the nuclear TRs and their expression pattern. The latest effect occurs in an isoform-specific manner involving specifically the TRalpha2 mRNA levels in adult rat brain.

  3. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-06-02

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Voldgorn, Yana I; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Nekrasov, Evgeny D; Lavrov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  5. Cultivation and Differentiation Change Nuclear Localization of Chromosome Centromeres in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voldgorn, Yana I.; Adilgereeva, Elmira P.; Nekrasov, Evgeny D.; Lavrov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes. PMID:25775427

  6. The N-terminal domain of the androgen receptor drives its nuclear localization in castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Javid A.; Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Eisermann, Kurtis; Isharwal, Sudhir; Ai, Junkui; Pascal, Laura E.; Nelson, Joel B.; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Androgen-independent nuclear localization is required for androgen receptor (AR) transactivation in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and should be a key step leading to castration resistance. However, mechanism(s) leading to androgen-independent AR nuclear localization are poorly understood. Since the N-terminal domain (NTD) of AR plays a role in transactivation under androgen-depleted conditions, we investigated the role of NTD in AR nuclear localization in CRPC. Deletion mutagenesis was used to identify amino acid sequences in the NTD essential for its androgen-independent nuclear localization in C4-2, a widely used CRPC cell line. Deletion mutants of AR tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) at the 5`-end were generated and their signal distribution was investigated in C4-2 cells by fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that the region of a.a. 294–556 was required for androgen-independent AR nuclear localization whereas a.a. 1–293 mediates Hsp90 regulation of AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. Although a.a. 294–556 does not contain a nuclear import signal, it was able to enhance DHT-induced import of the ligand binding domain (LBD). Also, transactivation of the NTD could be uncoupled from its modulation of AR nuclear localization in C4-2 cells. These observations suggest an important role of NTD in AR intracellular trafficking and androgen-independent AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. PMID:24662325

  7. Structural basis for the regulation of nuclear import of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) by phosphorylation of the nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Ryohei; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-02-26

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is expressed in every EBV-positive tumor and is essential for the maintenance, replication, and transcription of the EBV genome in the nucleus of host cells. EBNA1 is a serine phosphoprotein, and it has been shown that phosphorylation of S385 in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of EBNA1 increases the binding affinity to the nuclear import adaptor importin-α1 as well as importin-α5, and stimulates nuclear import of EBNA1. To gain insights into how phosphorylation of the EBNA1 NLS regulates nuclear import, we have determined the crystal structures of two peptide complexes of importin-α1: one with S385-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.0 Å resolution, and one with non-phosphorylated EBNA1 NLS peptide, determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The structures show that EBNA1 NLS binds to the major and minor NLS-binding sites of importin-α1, and indicate that the binding affinity of the EBNA1 NLS to the minor NLS-binding site could be enhanced by phosphorylation of S385 through electrostatic interaction between the phosphate group of phospho-S385 and K392 of importin-α1 (corresponding to R395 of importin-α5) on armadillo repeat 8.

  8. Laminopathic mutations interfere with the assembly, localization, and dynamics of nuclear lamins.

    PubMed

    Wiesel, Naama; Mattout, Anna; Melcer, Shai; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Herrmann, Harald; Medalia, Ohad; Aebi, Ueli; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2008-01-08

    Lamins are nuclear intermediate filament proteins and the major building blocks of the nuclear lamina. Besides providing nuclear shape and mechanical stability, lamins are required for chromatin organization, transcription regulation, DNA replication, nuclear assembly, nuclear positioning, and apoptosis. Mutations in human lamins cause many different heritable diseases, affecting various tissues and causing early aging. Although many of these mutations result in nuclear deformation, their effects on lamin filament assembly are unknown. Caenorhabditis elegans has a single evolutionarily conserved lamin protein, which can form stable 10-nm-thick filaments in vitro. To gain insight into the molecular basis of lamin filament assembly and the effects of laminopathic mutations on this process, we investigated mutations in conserved residues of the rod and tail domains that are known to cause various laminopathies in human. We show that 8 of 14 mutant lamins present WT-like assembly into filaments or paracrystals, whereas 6 mutants show assembly defects. Correspondingly, expressing these mutants in transgenic animals shows abnormal distribution of Ce-lamin, abnormal nuclear shape or change in lamin mobility. These findings help in understanding the role of individual residues and domains in laminopathy pathology and, eventually, promote the development of therapeutic interventions.

  9. Local network parameters can affect inter-network phase lags in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kopell, N

    2006-01-01

    Weakly coupled phase oscillators and strongly coupled relaxation oscillators have different mechanisms for creating stable phase lags. Many oscillations in central pattern generators combine features of each type of coupling: local networks composed of strongly coupled relaxation oscillators are weakly coupled to similar local networks. This paper analyzes the phase lags produced by this combination of mechanisms and shows how the parameters of a local network, such as the decay time of inhibition, can affect the phase lags between the local networks. The analysis is motivated by the crayfish central pattern generator used for swimming, and uses techniques from geometrical singular perturbation theory.

  10. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  11. Do nuclear collisions create a locally equilibrated quark-gluon plasma?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romatschke, P.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results on azimuthal correlations in high energy nuclear collisions (nucleus-nucleus, proton-nucleus, and proton-proton) seem to be well described by viscous hydrodynamics. It is often argued that this agreement implies either local thermal equilibrium or at least local isotropy. In this note, I present arguments why this is not the case. Neither local near-equilibrium nor near-isotropy are required in order for hydrodynamics to offer a successful and accurate description of experimental results. However, I predict the breakdown of hydrodynamics at momenta of order seven times the temperature, corresponding to a smallest possible QCD liquid drop size of 0.15 fm.

  12. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  13. A novel bipartite nuclear localization signal with an atypically long linker in DOF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Jonas; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Ruzicic, Slobodan

    2010-05-01

    Large molecules require a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for translocation into the nucleus. Classical NLSs are rich in basic amino acids and they represent three groups, based on their structural features: SV40 T-antigen-type, yeast mating factor Matalpha-2-type, and bipartite NLSs. DNA-binding-with-one-finger (DOF) transcription factors play important roles in plants, and although their nuclear localization has been demonstrated in several cases, public protein localization prediction tools fail to detect NLS motifs in these proteins. Here, we demonstrate that an atypical bipartite NLS with a 17 amino acid long linker between its flanking basic regions directs Arabidopsis thaliana DOF proteins to the cell nucleus. The novel bipartite NLS is highly conserved in plant DOF transcription factors, including the single DOF protein in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  14. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  15. Cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of Nuclear LIM interactor interacting factor gene from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Ravinder, R; Goyal, N

    2017-05-05

    LIM domains are zinc-binding motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and are found in a wide variety of cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins. The nuclear LIM domain family members have a number of different functions including transcription factors, gene regulation, cell fate determination, organization of the cytoskeleton and tumour formation exerting their function through various LIM domain interacting protein partners/cofactors. Nuclear LIM domain interacting proteins/factors have not been reported in any protozoan parasites including Leishmania. Here, we report for the first time cloning, characterization and subcellular localization of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor (NLI) like protein from Leishmania donovani, the causative agent of Indian Kala-azar. Primary sequence analysis of LdNLI revealed presence of characteristic features of nuclear LIM interactor-interacting factor. However, leishmanial NLI represents a distinct kinetoplastid group, clustered in a separate branch of the phylogenic tree. The sub-cellular distribution of LdNLI revealed the discreet localization in nucleus and kinetoplast only, suggesting that the gene may have a role in parasite gene expression.

  16. [The role of Piwi nuclear localization in the differentiation and proliferation of germline stem cells].

    PubMed

    Yakushev, E Y; Mikhaleva, E A; Abramov, Y A; Sokolova, O A; Zyrianova, I M; Gvozdev, V A; Klenov, M S

    2016-01-01

    The Piwi protein and its orthologs are considered as the key components of the piRNA machinery implicated in transcriptional silencing of transposons. Неre, we show that nuclear localization of the Piwi protein is required not only for transposon repression, but also for proper differentiation of germline stem cells (GSCs). piwi^(Nt) mutation that causes loss of nuclear Piwi and its retention in the cytoplasm leads to the accumulation of undifferentiated GSC-like cells. The analysis of piwi^(Nt) mutation in combination with a bam gene mutation blocking GSC differentiation shows that the loss of nuclear Piwi decreases GSC proliferation rate. This is accompanied by the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks in GSCs that may be caused by transposition events. Here, for the first time a set of transposons repressed by Piwi in GSCs and surrounding niche cells has been identified. The present study together with our previous data show that nuclear and cytoplasmic Piwi can regulate different stages of the functioning of germinal cells: cytoplasmic Piwi is sufficient to maintain GSCs, while nuclear Piwi localization is necessary for their proper proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Acetylation directs survivin nuclear localization to repress STAT3 oncogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijuan; Holloway, Michael P; Ma, Li; Cooper, Zachary A; Riolo, Matthew; Samkari, Ayman; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Chin, Y Eugene; Altura, Rachel A

    2010-11-12

    The multiple functions of the oncofetal protein survivin are dependent on its selective expression patterns within immunochemically distinct subcellular pools. The mechanism by which survivin localizes to these compartments, however, is only partly understood. Here we show that nuclear accumulation of survivin is promoted by CREB-binding protein (CBP)-dependent acetylation on lysine 129 (129K, Lys-129). We demonstrate a mechanism by which survivin acetylation at this position results in its homodimerization, while deacetylation promotes the formation of survivin monomers that heterodimerize with CRM1 and facilitate its nuclear export. Using proteomic analysis, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 as a binding partner of nuclear survivin. We show that acetylated survivin binds to the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain of the STAT3 dimer and represses STAT3 transactivation of target gene promoters. Using multiplex PCR and DNA sequencing, we identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (A → G) at Lys-129 that exists as a homozygous mutation in a neuroblastoma cell line and corresponds with a defect in survivin nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic equilibrium between survivin acetylation and deacetylation at amino acid 129 determines its interaction with CRM1, its subsequent subcellular localization, and its ability to inhibit STAT3 transactivation, providing a potential route for therapeutic intervention in STAT3-dependent tumors.

  18. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  19. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  20. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-07

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  1. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-01

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  2. Troponin T nuclear localization and its role in aging skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Taylor, Jackson; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-04-01

    Troponin T (TnT) is known to mediate the interaction between Tn complex and tropomyosin (Tm), which is essential for calcium-activated striated muscle contraction. This regulatory function takes place in the myoplasm, where TnT binds Tm. However, recent findings of troponin I and Tm nuclear translocation in Drosophila and mammalian cells imply other roles for the Tn-Tm complex. We hypothesized that TnT plays a nonclassical role through nuclear translocation. Immunoblotting with different antibodies targeting the NH2- or COOH-terminal region uncovered a pool of fast skeletal muscle TnT3 localized in the nuclear fraction of mouse skeletal muscle as either an intact or fragmented protein. Construction of TnT3-DsRed fusion proteins led to the further observation that TnT3 fragments are closely related to nucleolus and RNA polymerase activity, suggesting a role for TnT3 in regulating transcription. Functionally, overexpression of TnT3 fragments produced significant defects in nuclear shape and caused high levels of apoptosis. Interestingly, nuclear TnT3 and its fragments were highly regulated by aging, thus creating a possible link between the deleterious effects of TnT3 and sarcopenia. We propose that changes in nuclear TnT3 and its fragments cause the number of myonuclei to decrease with age, contributing to muscle damage and wasting.

  3. Nuclear localization of the tight junction protein ZO-2 in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Islas, Socorro; Vega, Jesús; Ponce, Lissette; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2002-03-10

    The tight junction constitutes the major barrier to solute and water flow through the paracellular space of epithelia and endothelia. It is formed by transmembrane proteins and submembranous molecules such as the MAGUKs ZOs. We have previously found that several MAGUKs, including those of the tight (ZO-1, ZO-2, and ZO-3) and septate junction (tamou and Dlg), contain one or two nuclear sorting signals located at their first PDZ and GK domains. Now we show that these proteins also contain a nuclear export signal and focus our study on the nuclear membrane shuttling of ZO-2. In sparse cultures this molecule concentrates at the nucleus in clusters, where it partially colocalizes with splicing factor SC35. Nuclear staining diminishes as the monolayer acquires confluence through a process sensitive to the nuclear export inhibitor leptomycin B. Nuclear localization can be induced by impairing cell-cell contacts, by mechanical injury. ZO-2 that shuttles from the cell periphery into the nucleus is not newly synthesized but originates from a preexistent pool. The movement of this protein is mediated by the actin cytoskeleton.

  4. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  5. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  6. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  7. Bipartite nuclear localization signal of matrin 3 is essential for vertebrate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisada-Ishii, Shoji; Ebihara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Nao; Kitagawa, Yasuo . E-mail: yasuok@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Matrin 3, a nuclear matrix protein has potential (1) to withhold promiscuously edited RNAs within the nucleus in cooperation with p54{sup nrb} and PSF (2) to mediate NMDA-induced neuronal death, and (3) to modulate promoter activity of genes proximal to matrix/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR). We identified a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of chicken matrin 3 (cmatr3) at residues 583-602. By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the NLS mutant in chicken DT40 cells, we showed an essential role of the NLS for cell proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that both clusters of basic amino acids and a linker of the bipartite NLS were essential and sufficient for the nuclear import of GFP. Exogenous cmatr3 rescued the HeLa cells where human matrin 3 was suppressed by RNA interference, but cmatr3 containing deletions at either of the basic amino acid clusters or the linker could not.

  8. Nuclear localization and secretion competence is conserved amongst henipavirus matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    McLinton, Elisabeth C; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Lee, Alexander; Moseley, Gregory W; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Jans, David A; Lieu, Kim G; Netter, Hans

    2017-01-05

    Viruses of the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae are zoonotic pathogens, which have emerged in South East Asia, Australia and Africa. Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are highly virulent pathogens transmitted from bats to animals and humans, whilst the henipavirus Cedar virus (CedV) seems to be non-pathogenic in infection studies. The full replication cycle of the Paramyxoviridae occurs in the host cell's cytoplasm where viral assembly is orchestrated by the matrix (M) protein. Unexpectedly, the NiV-M protein traffics through the nucleus as an essential step to engage the plasma membrane in preparation for viral budding/release. Comparative studies were performed to assess whether M protein nuclear localization is a common feature of the henipaviruses including the recently sequenced (although not yet isolated) Ghanaian bat henipavirus (Kumasi virus, GH-M74a virus, KV) and Mojiang virus (MojV). Live-cell confocal microscopy revealed that nuclear translocation of GFP-fused M protein is conserved between henipaviruses in both human and bat-derived cell lines. However, the efficiency of M protein nuclear localization and virus-like particle budding competency varied. Additionally, CedV-, KV- and MojV-M proteins were mutated in a bipartite nuclear localization signal indicating that a key lysine residue is essential for nuclear import, export and for the induction of budding events as previously reported for NiV-M. The results of this study suggest that the M proteins of henipaviruses may utilize a similar nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathway as an essential step during viral replication in both humans and bats.

  9. Nuclear localization and shuttling of herpes simplex virus tegument protein VP13/14.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, M; Elliott, G

    2001-03-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 gene UL47 encodes the tegument proteins referred to collectively as VP13/14, which are believed to be differentially modified forms of the same protein. Here we show that the major product of the UL47 gene during transient expression is VP14, suggesting that some feature of virus infection is required to produce VP13. We have tagged VP13/14 with green fluorescent protein and have demonstrated that the protein is targeted efficiently to the nucleus, where it often localizes in numerous punctate domains. Furthermore, we show that removal of the N-terminal 127 residues of the protein abrogates nuclear accumulation, and we have identified a 14-amino-acid peptide from this region that is sufficient to function as a nuclear targeting signal and transport a heterologous protein to the nucleus. This short peptide contains two runs of four arginine residues, suggesting that the VP13/14 nuclear localization signal may behave in a manner similar to that of the arginine-rich nuclear localization signals of the retrovirus transactivator proteins Tat, Rev, and Rex. In addition, by using heterokaryon assays, we show that VP13/14 is capable of shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell, a property that may be attributed to three leucine-rich stretches in the C-terminal half of the protein that again bear similarity to the nuclear export signals of Rev and Rex. This is the first demonstration of a tegument protein that is specifically targeted to the nucleus, a feature which may be relevant both during virus entry, when VP13/14 enters the cell as a component of the tegument, and at later times, when large amounts of newly synthesized VP13/14 are present within the cell.

  10. Nuclear matter properties from local chiral interactions with Δ isobar intermediate states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logoteta, Domenico; Bombaci, Ignazio; Kievsky, Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    Using two-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions derived in the framework of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) with and without the explicit Δ isobar contributions, we calculate the energy per particle of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter in the framework of the microscopic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock approach. In particular, we present for the first time nuclear matter calculations using the new fully local in coordinate-space two-nucleon interaction at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO) of ChPT with Δ isobar intermediate states (N 3 LO Δ ) recently developed by Piarulli et al. [arXiv:1606.06335]. We find that using this N 3 LO Δ potential, supplemented with a local N2LO three-nucleon interaction with explicit Δ isobar degrees of freedom, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. For this combination of two- and three-nucleon interactions we also calculate the nuclear symmetry energy and we compare our results with the empirical constraints on this quantity obtained using the excitation energies to isobaric analog states in nuclei and using experimental data on the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei, finding a very good agreement in all the considered nucleonic density range. In addition, we find that the explicit inclusion of Δ isobars diminishes the strength of the three-nucleon interactions needed to get a good saturation point of symmetric nuclear matter. We also compare the results of our calculations with those obtained by other research groups using chiral nuclear interactions with different many-body methods, finding in many cases a very satisfactory agreement.

  11. Nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki Enomoto, Takemi

    2008-07-18

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 plays major roles in several types of homologous recombination. Here, we found that rad52-K200R mutation greatly reduced sumoylation of Rad52. The rad52-K200R mutant exhibited defects in various types of recombination, such as intrachromosomal recombination and mating-type switching. The K200 residue of Rad52 is part of the nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is important for transport into the nucleus. Indeed, the addition of a SV40 NLS to Rad52-K200R suppressed the sumoylation defect of Rad52-K200R. These findings indicate that nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation.

  12. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the mouse TET3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Peng; Zhou, Xiao-long; Zhang, Hong-xiao; Xiong, Kai; Teng, Yun; Huang, Xian-ju; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Hong-lin

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •Amino acid sequence KKRK is responsible for nuclear localization of TET3. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are capable of targeting the cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are conserved in TET3 orthologs. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation is associated with gene activation and is mediated by a family of ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenase. The TET3 protein is a 1668-amino-acid DNA demethylase that is predicted to possess five nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In this paper, we used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged and mutation constructs to identify a conserved NLS (KKRK) embedded between amino acid 1615 and 1618 of mouse TET3. The KKRK sequence facilitates the cytoplasmic protein’s translocation into the nucleus. Additionally TET3 may be imported into the nucleus by importin-α and importin-β.

  13. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  14. Local negotiation on compensation siting of the spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Matti

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the local negotiation process between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the nuclear power company Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) and the nuclear waste management company Posiva Oy. The aim of the negotiations was to find an acceptable form of compensation for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository in Olkiluoto, Finland. The paper includes background information on the siting process in Finland, the local political setting in the Municipality of Eurajoki and a description of the negotiation process. The analysis of the negotiations on compensation is important for better understanding the progress of the Finnish siting process. The paper describes the picture of the contest to host the spent nuclear fuel repository. It also provides more information on the relationship between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the power company TVO. The negotiations on compensation and the roles of various players in the negotiations have not been studied in detail because the minutes of the Vuojoki liaison group were not available before the decision of the Supreme Administrative Court in May 2006. (author)

  15. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways.

  16. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  17. Nuclear Localization Signal and p53 Binding Site in MAP/ERK Kinase Kinase 1 (MEKK1)

    PubMed Central

    Chipps, Elizabeth; Protzman, April; Muhi, M. Zubayed; Ando, Shoko; Calvet, James P.; Islam, M. Rafiq

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Mekk1 translocates to the nucleus, interacts with tumor suppressor protein p53 and co-represses PKD1 transcription via an atypical p53 binding site on the minimal PKD1 promoter (JBC 285:38818-38831, 2010). In this study, we report the mechanisms of Mekk1 nuclear transport and p53 binding. Using GFP-linked constitutively active-Mekk1 (CA-Mekk1) and a deletion strategy, we identified a nuclear localization signal (HRDVK) located at amino acid (aa) residues 1349–1353 in the C-terminal Mekk1 catalytic domain. Deletion of this sequence in CA-Mekk1 and full-length Mekk1 significantly reduced their nuclear translocation in both HEK293T and COS-1 cells. Using co-immunoprecipitation we identified an adjacent sequence (GANLID, aa 1354–1360) in Mekk1 responsible for p53 binding. Deletion of this sequence markedly reduced the interaction of Mekk1 with p53. Mekk1 does not appear to affect phosphorylation of Ser15, located in the Mdm2 interaction site, or other Ser residues in p53. However, Mekk1 mediates p53 protein stability in the presence of Mdm2 and reduces p53 ubiquitination, suggesting an interference with Mdm2-mediated degradation of p53 by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:26018553

  18. Nuclear localization of nucleoside diphosphate kinase type B (nm23-H2) in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Kraeft, S K; Traincart, F; Mesnildrey, S; Bourdais, J; Véron, M; Chen, L B

    1996-08-25

    Nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinases are metabolic enzymes found ubiquitously in cells. Recently, two known human isoforms of NDP kinase (A and B), identical to the protein products of the genes nm23-H1 and nm23-H2, respectively, have been implicated in cancer metastasis and transcriptional regulation. To date, NDP kinase has been studied extensively in tissue sections and its cellular localization was described as being cytoplasmic. However, the recently discovered role of the nm23-H2 gene product in transcriptional activation of the c-myc proto-oncogene also suggests a nuclear localization of the protein. In this study, we used isoform-specific antibodies against NDPK-B to examine the subcellular localization of the nm23-H2 gene product. The cytoplasmic fluorescence is intense and homogeneous with pronounced labeling in the centromere region. The distribution of NDPK-B in interphase nuclei exhibits a pattern of numerous uniformly dispersed fine dots with reduced staining of the nucleoli. To further characterize the nuclear localization of NDPK-B, in situ sequential extraction of nuclear components was performed. Brief exposure to Triton X-100 and subsequent treatment with RNase A do not change the nuclear staining pattern of NDPK-B. In contrast, treatment of Triton X-100-permeabilized nuclei with DNase I results in a significant loss of fluorescence. In mitotic prophase cells, the protein segregates from forming chromosomes and reappears in newly formed daughter nuclei after cell division. Taken together, the results indicate an association of NDPK-B with chromatin in interphase nuclei, supporting its proposed role in transcription.

  19. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  20. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promotes the oncogenic property of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Akira; Murata, Masaki; Takasawa, Kumi; Ono, Yusuke; Osanai, Makoto; Tanaka, Satoshi; Nojima, Masanori; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that dysregulation of tight junctions (TJs) is involved in tumor development and progression. In this study, we investigated the expression and subcellular distribution of tricellulin, which constitutes tricellular TJs, using human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. In well-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma tissues, tricellulin immunostaining was prominent in the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. In contrast, in poorly differentiated tissues, its immunostaining was predominantly observed in the nuclei and was almost absent in the plasma membrane. The distinct immunostaining of tricellulin successfully distinguished poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma from moderately and well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. Nuclear tricellulin expression significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, lymphatic invasion and poor survival. In pancreatic cancer cell lines, tricellulin localization shifted from the membrane to nucleus with decreasing differentiation status. Nuclear localization of tricellulin promoted cell proliferation and invasiveness possibly in association with MAPK and PKC pathways in pancreatic cancers. Our results provide new insights into the function of tricellulin, and its nuclear localization may become a new prognostic factor for pancreatic cancers. PMID:27641742

  1. National, State, and Local Trends: Environmental Scan of Trends and Key Issues Affecting Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Jon; Budros, Kathleen; Yoshioka, Joyce

    This document is a collection of one-page summaries, or "Trends Newsletters" (Numbers 50, 54-7, 59-60, 67-71, and 73-91), that analyze the national, state, and local trends affecting planning for the San Jose/Evergreen Community College District in California. The document is divided into two sections: External Scan and Internal Scan.…

  2. Handling missing data in transmission disequilibrium test in nuclear families with one affected offspring.

    PubMed

    Bourget, Gulhan

    2012-01-01

    The Transmission Disequilibrium Test (TDT) compares frequencies of transmission of two alleles from heterozygote parents to an affected offspring. This test requires all genotypes to be known from all members of the nuclear families. However, obtaining all genotypes in a study might not be possible for some families, in which case, a data set results in missing genotypes. There are many techniques of handling missing genotypes in parents but only a few in offspring. The robust TDT (rTDT) is one of the methods that handles missing genotypes for all members of nuclear families [with one affected offspring]. Even though all family members can be imputed, the rTDT is a conservative test with low power. We propose a new method, Mendelian Inheritance TDT (MITDT-ONE), that controls type I error and has high power. The MITDT-ONE uses Mendelian Inheritance properties, and takes population frequencies of the disease allele and marker allele into account in the rTDT method. One of the advantages of using the MITDT-ONE is that the MITDT-ONE can identify additional significant genes that are not found by the rTDT. We demonstrate the performances of both tests along with Sib-TDT (S-TDT) in Monte Carlo simulation studies. Moreover, we apply our method to the type 1 diabetes data from the Warren families in the United Kingdom to identify significant genes that are related to type 1 diabetes.

  3. How the Relativistic Motion Affect Quantum Fisher Information and Bell Non-locality for Multipartite state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun Yu; Ma, Wenchao; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the quantum fisher information (QFI) and Bell non-locality of a multipartite fermionic system are investigated. Unlike the currently existing research of QFI, we focus our attention on the differences between quantum fisher information and Bell non-locality under the relativistic framework. The results show that although the relativistic motion affects the strength of the non-locality, it does not change the physical structure of non-locality. However, unlike the case of non-locality, the relativistic motion not only influence the precision of the QFI Fϕ but also broke the symmetry of the function Fϕ. The results also show that for a special multipartite system, , the number of particles of a initial state do not affect the Fθ. Furthermore, we also find that Fθ is completely unaffected in non-inertial frame if there are inertial observers. Finally, in view of the decay behavior of QFI and non-locality under the non-inertial frame, we proposed a effective scheme to battle against Unruh effect.

  4. How the Relativistic Motion Affect Quantum Fisher Information and Bell Non-locality for Multipartite state

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chun Yu; Ma, Wenchao; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the quantum fisher information (QFI) and Bell non-locality of a multipartite fermionic system are investigated. Unlike the currently existing research of QFI, we focus our attention on the differences between quantum fisher information and Bell non-locality under the relativistic framework. The results show that although the relativistic motion affects the strength of the non-locality, it does not change the physical structure of non-locality. However, unlike the case of non-locality, the relativistic motion not only influence the precision of the QFI Fϕ but also broke the symmetry of the function Fϕ. The results also show that for a special multipartite system, , the number of particles of a initial state do not affect the Fθ. Furthermore, we also find that Fθ is completely unaffected in non-inertial frame if there are inertial observers. Finally, in view of the decay behavior of QFI and non-locality under the non-inertial frame, we proposed a effective scheme to battle against Unruh effect. PMID:28145437

  5. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6.

  6. Temporal dynamics of a local fish community are strongly affected by immigration from the surrounding metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Stoffels, Rick J; Clarke, Kenneth Robert; Linklater, Danielle S

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year time series of annual censuses was collected from a large floodplain lake to determine how dynamics of the local fish community were affected by changes in hydrological connectivity with the surrounding metacommunity. The lake was disconnected from the metacommunity for 1 year prior to our study and remained disconnected until 3 months before our third annual census, when a flood reconnected the lake to the metacommunity. We determined how changes in connectivity affected temporal dynamics of (1) local community composition and (2) the population composition, condition, and growth of catfish, to shed light on how immigration of other species might affect local population dynamics. Before reconnection, the community was likely shaped by interactions between the local environment and species traits. The reconnection caused significant immigration and change in community composition and correlated with a significant and abrupt decline in catfish condition, growth, and abundance; effects likely due to the immigration of a competitor with a similar trophic niche: carp. The community was slow to return to its preconnection state, which may be due to dispersal traits of the fishes, and a time-lag in the recovery of the local catfish population following transient intensification of species interactions. The dynamics observed were concordant with the species sorting and mass-effects perspectives of metacommunity theory. Floods cause episodic dispersal in floodplain fish metacommunities, and so, flood frequency determines the relative importance of regional and local processes. Local processes may be particularly important to certain species, but these species may need sufficient time between floods for population increase, before the next flood-induced dispersal episode brings competitors and predators that might cause population decline. Accordingly, species coexistence in these metacommunities may be facilitated by spatiotemporal storage effects, which may in

  7. Temporal dynamics of a local fish community are strongly affected by immigration from the surrounding metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Stoffels, Rick J; Clarke, Kenneth Robert; Linklater, Danielle S

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year time series of annual censuses was collected from a large floodplain lake to determine how dynamics of the local fish community were affected by changes in hydrological connectivity with the surrounding metacommunity. The lake was disconnected from the metacommunity for 1 year prior to our study and remained disconnected until 3 months before our third annual census, when a flood reconnected the lake to the metacommunity. We determined how changes in connectivity affected temporal dynamics of (1) local community composition and (2) the population composition, condition, and growth of catfish, to shed light on how immigration of other species might affect local population dynamics. Before reconnection, the community was likely shaped by interactions between the local environment and species traits. The reconnection caused significant immigration and change in community composition and correlated with a significant and abrupt decline in catfish condition, growth, and abundance; effects likely due to the immigration of a competitor with a similar trophic niche: carp. The community was slow to return to its preconnection state, which may be due to dispersal traits of the fishes, and a time-lag in the recovery of the local catfish population following transient intensification of species interactions. The dynamics observed were concordant with the species sorting and mass-effects perspectives of metacommunity theory. Floods cause episodic dispersal in floodplain fish metacommunities, and so, flood frequency determines the relative importance of regional and local processes. Local processes may be particularly important to certain species, but these species may need sufficient time between floods for population increase, before the next flood-induced dispersal episode brings competitors and predators that might cause population decline. Accordingly, species coexistence in these metacommunities may be facilitated by spatiotemporal storage effects, which may in

  8. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  9. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout.

  10. Nuclear ubiquitin proteasome degradation affects WRKY45 function in the rice defense program.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Akane; Inoue, Haruhiko; Goto, Shingo; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activator WRKY45 plays a major role in the salicylic acid/benzothiadiazole-induced defense program in rice. Here, we show that the nuclear ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in regulating the function of WRKY45. Proteasome inhibitors induced accumulation of polyubiquitinated WRKY45 and transient up-regulation of WRKY45 target genes in rice cells, suggesting that WRKY45 is constantly degraded by the UPS to suppress defense responses in the absence of defense signals. Mutational analysis of the nuclear localization signal indicated that UPS-dependent WRKY45 degradation occurs in the nuclei. Interestingly, the transcriptional activity of WRKY45 after salicylic acid treatment was impaired by proteasome inhibition. The same C-terminal region in WRKY45 was essential for both transcriptional activity and UPS-dependent degradation. These results suggest that UPS regulation also plays a role in the transcriptional activity of WRKY45. It has been reported that AtNPR1, the central regulator of the salicylic acid pathway in Arabidopsis, is regulated by the UPS. We found that OsNPR1/NH1, the rice counterpart of NPR1, was not stabilized by proteasome inhibition under uninfected conditions. We discuss the differences in post-translational regulation of salicylic acid pathway components between rice and Arabidopsis.

  11. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation.

  12. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  13. Biological significance of nuclear localization of mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1 in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-07-27

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level.

  14. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the C. elegans TRPV channel OCR-2.

    PubMed

    Ezak, Meredith J; Ferkey, Denise M

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Ca(v)1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated.

  15. A Functional Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C. elegans TRPV Channel OCR-2

    PubMed Central

    Ezak, Meredith J.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Cav1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated. PMID:21957475

  16. Biological Significance of Nuclear Localization of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1 in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Soto, Teresa; Pérez, Pilar; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways play a fundamental role in the response of eukaryotic cells to environmental changes. Also, much evidence shows that the stimulus-dependent nuclear targeting of this class of regulatory kinases is crucial for adequate regulation of distinct cellular events. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the cell integrity MAPK pathway, whose central element is the MAPK Pmk1, regulates multiple processes such as cell wall integrity, vacuole fusion, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. In non-stressed cells Pmk1 is constitutively localized in both cytoplasm and nucleus, and its localization pattern appears unaffected by its activation status or in response to stress, thus questioning the biological significance of the presence of this MAPK into the nucleus. We have addressed this issue by characterizing mutants expressing Pmk1 versions excluded from the cell nucleus and anchored to the plasma membrane in different genetic backgrounds. Although nuclear Pmk1 partially regulates cell wall integrity at a transcriptional level, membrane-tethered Pmk1 performs many of the biological functions assigned to wild type MAPK like regulation of chloride homeostasis, vacuole fusion, and cellular separation. However, we found that down-regulation of nuclear Pmk1 by MAPK phosphatases induced by the stress activated protein kinase pathway is important for the fine modulation of extranuclear Pmk1 activity. These results highlight the importance of the control of MAPK activity at subcellular level. PMID:22685296

  17. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  18. Nuclear localization of amyloid-β precursor protein-binding protein Fe65 is dependent on regulated intramembrane proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Koistinen, Niina A.; Edlund, Anna K.; Menon, Preeti K.; Ivanova, Elena V.; Bacanu, Smaranda

    2017-01-01

    Fe65 is an adaptor protein involved in both processing and signaling of the Alzheimer-associated amyloid-β precursor protein, APP. Here, the subcellular localization was further investigated using TAP-tagged Fe65 constructs expressed in human neuroblastoma cells. Our results indicate that PTB2 rather than the WW domain is important for the nuclear localization of Fe65. Electrophoretic mobility shift of Fe65 caused by phosphorylation was not detected in the nuclear fraction, suggesting that phosphorylation could restrict nuclear localization of Fe65. Furthermore, both ADAM10 and γ-secretase inhibitors decreased nuclear Fe65 in a similar way indicating an important role also of α-secretase in regulating nuclear translocation. PMID:28323844

  19. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  20. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  1. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  2. Identification of amino acid sequences in the polyomavirus capsid proteins that serve as nuclear localization signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. Jr; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The molecular mechanism participating in the transport of newly synthesized proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in mammalian cells is poorly understood. Recently, the nuclear localization signal sequences (NLS) of many nuclear proteins have been identified, and most have been found to be composed of a highly basic amino acid stretch. A genetic "subtractive" and a biochemical "additive" approach were used in our studies to identify the NLS's of the polyomavirus structural capsid proteins. An NLS was identified at the N-terminus (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) of the major capsid protein VP1 and at the C-terminus (Glu307 -Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Glu-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) of the VP2/VP3 minor capsid proteins.

  3. Cell cycle regulation of Greatwall kinase nuclear localization facilitates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Galan, Jacob A.; Normandin, Karine; Bonneil, Éric; Hickson, Gilles R.; Roux, Philippe P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cell division requires the coordination of critical protein kinases and phosphatases. Greatwall (Gwl) kinase activity inactivates PP2A-B55 at mitotic entry to promote the phosphorylation of cyclin B–Cdk1 substrates, but how Gwl is regulated is poorly understood. We found that the subcellular localization of Gwl changed dramatically during the cell cycle in Drosophila. Gwl translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in prophase. We identified two critical nuclear localization signals in the central, poorly characterized region of Gwl, which are required for its function. The Polo kinase associated with and phosphorylated Gwl in this region, promoting its binding to 14-3-3ε and its localization to the cytoplasm in prophase. Our results suggest that cyclin B–Cdk1 phosphorylation of Gwl is also required for its nuclear exclusion by a distinct mechanism. We show that the nucleo-cytoplasmic regulation of Gwl is essential for its functions in vivo and propose that the spatial regulation of Gwl at mitotic entry contributes to the mitotic switch. PMID:23857770

  4. Identification of a nuclear localization sequence in the polyomavirus capsid protein VP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the C-terminal (Glu307-Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Gln-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus minor capsid protein VP2. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of newly synthesized VP2 was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP2 (expressing full-length VP2) and pSG5 delta 3VP2 (expressing truncated VP2, lacking amino acids Glu307-Leu318). These constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and the intracellular localization of the VP2 protein was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP2 was localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP2 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. A biochemical "additive" approach was also used to determine whether this sequence could target nonnuclear proteins to the nucleus. A synthetic peptide identical to VP2 amino acids Glu307-Leu318 was cross-linked to the nonnuclear proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG). The conjugates were then labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and microinjected into the cytoplasm of NIH 3T6 cells. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus of the microinjected cells, whereas unconjugated BSA and IgG remained in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these genetic subtractive and biochemical additive approaches have identified the C-terminal sequence of polyoma-virus VP2 (containing amino acids Glu307-Leu318) as the NLS of this protein.

  5. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors.

  6. Removal of the local geomagnetic field affects reproductive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chunxiao; Wei, Shufeng; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yuxia; Chen, Chuanfang; Song, Tao

    2013-09-01

    The influence of the geomagnetic field-removed environment on Arabidopsis growth was investigated by cultivation of the plants in a near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field (45 µT) for the whole growth period under laboratory conditions. The biomass accumulation of plants in the near-null magnetic field was significantly suppressed at the time when plants were switching from vegetative growth to reproductive growth compared with that of plants grown in the local geomagnetic field, which was caused by a delay in the flowering of plants in the near-null magnetic field. At the early or later growth stage, no significant difference was shown in the biomass accumulation between the plants in the near-null magnetic field and local geomagnetic field. The average number of siliques and the production of seeds per plant in the near-null magnetic field was significantly lower by about 22% and 19%, respectively, than those of control plants. These resulted in a significant reduction of about 20% in the harvest index of plants in the near-null magnetic field compared with that of the controls. These results suggest that the removal of the local geomagnetic field negatively affects the reproductive growth of Arabidopsis, which thus affects the yield and harvest index.

  7. Localized nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ signals in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Svirin, Mikhail; Jaimovich, Enrique; Fink, Rainer H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Ca2+ is important for the regulation of several nuclear processes such as gene expression. Localized Ca2+ signals (LCSs) in skeletal muscle fibers of mice have been mainly studied as Ca2+ release events from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Their location with regard to cell nuclei has not been investigated. Our study is based on the hypothesis that LCSs associated with nuclei are present in skeletal muscle fibers of adult mice. Therefore, we carried out experiments addressing this question and we found novel Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei of skeletal muscle fibers (with possibly attached satellite cells). We measured localized nuclear and perinuclear Ca2+ signals (NLCSs and PLCSs) alongside cytosolic localized Ca2+ signals (CLCSs) during a hypertonic treatment. We also observed NLCSs under isotonic conditions. The NLCSs and PLCSs are Ca2+ signals in the range of micrometer [FWHM (full width at half maximum): 2.75 ± 0.27 μm (NLCSs) and 2.55 ± 0.17 μm (PLCSs), S.E.M.]. Additionally, global nuclear Ca2+ signals (NGCSs) were observed. To investigate which type of Ca2+ channels contribute to the Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei in skeletal muscle fibers, we performed measurements with the RyR blocker dantrolene, the DHPR blocker nifedipine or the IP3R blocker Xestospongin C. We observed Ca2+ signals associated with nuclei in the presence of each blocker. Nifedipine and dantrolene had an inhibitory effect on the fraction of fibers with PLCSs. The situation for the fraction of fibers with NLCSs is more complex indicating that RyR is less important for the generation of NLCSs compared to the generation of PLCSs. The fraction of fibers with NLCSs and PLCSs is not reduced in the presence of Xestospongin C. The localized perinuclear and intranuclear Ca2+ signals may be a powerful tool for the cell to regulate adaptive processes as gene expression. The intranuclear Ca2+ signals may be particularly interesting in this respect. PMID:26483696

  8. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  9. Nuclear localization of a putative Phytophthora sojae bZIP1 transcription factor is mediated by multiple targeting motifs.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yufeng; Tyler, Brett M

    2017-02-18

    Oomycetes are fungal-like eukaryotic microbes in the kingdom Stramenopila. We recently found that the oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses nuclear localization signals (NLSs) for translocation of proteins into the nucleus that differ from conventional well-characterized NLSs from mammals and yeast. Here we have characterized in depth the nuclear localization signals of a P. sojae basic leucine zipper transcription factor, PsbZIP1. Nuclear localization of PsbZIP1 was determined by a central conserved region overlapping the DNA binding domain. Mutational analysis of this region identified four distinct elements that contributed multiplicatively to nuclear localization, but the conserved DNA binding residues were not required. Three of the elements showed autonomous NLS activity and the fourth served as a nuclear localization enhancer. Sequences within two of the nuclear localization elements defined a new form of bipartite NLS consisting of a triplet of basic residues followed by a tail of scattered basic amino acids. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Reconstruction of local fallout composition and gamma-ray exposure in a village contaminated by the first USSR nuclear test in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kawai, Kenta; Sakaguchi, Aya; Hoshi, Masaharu; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Apsalikov, Kazbek

    2010-11-01

    After the disintegration of the USSR in end of 1991, it became possible for foreign scientists to visit Kazakhstan, in order to investigate the radiological consequences of nuclear explosions that had been conducted at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). Since the first visit in 1994, our group has been continuing expeditions for soil sampling at various areas around SNTS. The current level of local fallout at SNTS was studied through γ-spectrometry for (137)Cs as well as α-spectrometry for (239,240)Pu. Average values of soil inventory from wide areas around SNTS were 3,500 and 3,700 Bq m(-2) for (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu, respectively, as of January 1, 2000. The average level of (137)Cs is comparable to that in Japan due to global fallout, while the level of (239,240)Pu is several tens of times larger than that in Japan. Areas of strong contamination were found along the trajectories of radioactive fallout, information on which was declassified after the collapse of the USSR. Our recent efforts of soil sampling were concentrated on the area around the Dolon village heavily affected by the radioactive plume from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949 and located 110 km east from ground zero of the explosion. Using soil inventory data, retrospective dosimetry was attempted by reconstructing γ-ray exposure from fission product nuclides deposited on the ground. Adopting representative parameters for the initial (137)Cs deposition (13 kBq m(-2)), the refractory/volatile deposition ratio (3.8) and the plume arrival time after explosion (2.5 h), an absorbed dose in air of 600 mGy was obtained for the 1-year cumulative dose in Dolon village, due to the first bomb test in 1949. Considering possible ranges of the parameters, 350 and 910 mGy were estimated for high and low cases of γ-ray dose in air, respectively. It was encouraging that the deduced value was consistent with other estimations using thermal luminescence and archived monitoring data. The present

  11. Nuclear localization of the dystrophin-associated protein α-dystrobrevin through importin α2/β1 is critical for interaction with the nuclear lamina/maintenance of nuclear integrity.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Areli; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Zinker, Samuel; Jans, David A; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2015-05-01

    Although α-dystrobrevin (DB) is assembled into the dystrophin-associated protein complex, which is central to cytoskeletal organization, it has also been found in the nucleus. Here we delineate the nuclear import pathway responsible for nuclear targeting of α-DB for the first time, together with the importance of nuclear α-DB in determining nuclear morphology. We map key residues of the nuclear localization signal of α-DB within the zinc finger domain (ZZ) using various truncated versions of the protein, and site-directed mutagenesis. Pulldown, immunoprecipitation, and AlphaScreen assays showed that the importin (IMP) α2/β1 heterodimer interacts with high affinity with the ZZ domain of α-DB. In vitro nuclear import assays using antibodies to specific importins, as well as in vivo studies using siRNA or a dominant negative importin construct, confirmed the key role of IMPα2/β1 in α-DB nuclear translocation. Knockdown of α-DB expression perturbed cell cycle progression in C2C12 myoblasts, with decreased accumulation of cells in S phase and, significantly, altered localization of lamins A/C, B1, and B2 with accompanying gross nuclear morphology defects. Because α-DB interacts specifically with lamin B1 in vivo and in vitro, nuclear α-DB would appear to play a key role in nuclear shape maintenance through association with the nuclear lamina.

  12. Functional eukaryotic nuclear localization signals are widespread in terminal proteins of bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Mencía, Mario; Salas, Margarita

    2012-11-06

    A number of prokaryotic proteins have been shown to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs), although its biological role remains sometimes unclear. Terminal proteins (TPs) of bacteriophages prime DNA replication and become covalently linked to the genome ends. We predicted NLSs within the TPs of bacteriophages from diverse families and hosts and, indeed, the TPs of Φ29, Nf, PRD1, Bam35, and Cp-1, out of seven TPs tested, were found to localize to the nucleus when expressed in mammalian cells. Detailed analysis of Φ29 TP led us to identify a bona fide NLS within residues 1-37. Importantly, gene delivery into the eukaryotic nucleus is enhanced by the presence of Φ29 TP attached to the 5' DNA ends. These findings show a common feature of TPs from diverse bacteriophages targeting the eukaryotic nucleus and suggest a possible common function by facilitating the horizontal transfer of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  13. Understanding the Local Socio-political Processes Affecting Conservation Management Outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M.; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  14. Understanding the local socio-political processes affecting conservation management outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  15. Sun/shade conditions affect recruitment and local adaptation of a columnar cactus in dry forests

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Jácome, Antonio; Montaña, Carlos; Fornoni, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Facilitation among plants in water-limited environments (i.e. where evapotranspiration overcomes the availability of water during the growing season) has been considered a local adaptation to water and light conditions. Among cacti, early life-history stages can benefit from the facilitative effects of nurse plants that reduce solar radiation and water stress. However, whether light condition itself acts as an agent of selection through facilitation remains untested. The aim of this study was to determine (1) whether light conditions affect seedling recruitment, (2) whether the positive effect of shade on seedling recruitment is more intense under more stressful conditions and (3) whether shade condition (facilitation) reduces the magnitude of local adaptation on seedling recruitment relative to full sunlight conditions. Methods A reciprocal transplant experiment, coupled with the artificial manipulation of sun/shade conditions, was performed to test for the effects of local adaptation on germination, seedling survival and growth, using two demes of the columnar cactus Pilosocereus leucocephalus, representing different intensities of stressful conditions. Key Results Full sunlight conditions reduced recruitment success and supported the expectation of lower recruitment in more stressful environments. Significant local adaptation was mainly detected under full sunlight conditions, indicating that this environmental factor acts as an agent of selection at both sites. Conclusions The results supported the expectation that the magnitude of local adaptation, driven by the effects of facilitative nurse plants, is less intense under reduced stressful conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that sun/shade conditions act as a selective agent accounting for local adaptation in water-limited environments, and that facilitation provided by nurse plants in these environments can attenuate the patterns of local adaptation among plants benefiting

  16. A toolbox of endogenous and heterologous nuclear localization sequences for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Astrid; Glieder, Anton; Vogl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) are required for the import of proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotes. However many proteins from bacteria or bacteriophages are used for basic studies in molecular biology, to generate synthetic genetic circuits or for genome editing applications. Prokaryotic recombinases, CRISPR-associated proteins such as Cas9 or bacterial and viral polymerases require efficient NLSs to function in eukaryotes. The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used expression platform for heterologous protein production, but molecular tools such as NLSs are limited. Here we have characterized a set of 10 NLSs for P. pastoris, including the first endogenous NLSs (derived from P. pastoris proteins) and commonly used heterologous NLSs. The NLSs were evaluated by fusing them in N- and C-terminal position to an enhanced green fluorescent protein showing pronounced differences in fluorescence levels and nuclear targeting. Thereby we provide a set of different NLSs that can be applied to optimize the nuclear import of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris, paving the way for the establishment of intricate synthetic biology applications. PMID:26347503

  17. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kaixuan; Deng, Cuilan; Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-03-22

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy.

  18. Twist1 Enhances Hypoxia Induced Radioresistance in Cervical Cancer Cells by Promoting Nuclear EGFR Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hua; Nie, Xin; Zou, Yanmei; Gong, Chen; Li, Yang; Wu, Hua; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Lin; Zhuang, Liang; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yihua; Xiong, Huihua

    2017-01-01

    Twist1 is a crucial transcription factor that regulates epithelial mesenchymal transition and involves in metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that Twist1 plays important role in hypoxia-induced radioresistance, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we investigated the change of Twist1 expression in human cervical squamous cancer cell line SiHa after hypoxia treatment. We also explored the role of Twist1 in radioresistance by manipulating the expression level of Twist1. We observed that hypoxia treatment elevated the expression of Twist1 in SiHa cells. Knockdown of Twist1 with siRNA increased the radiosensitivity of SiHa cells under hypoxia condition, accompanied by reduced levels of nuclear Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Conversely, overexpression of Twist1 led to increased radioresistance of SiHa cells, which in turn increased nuclear EGFR localization and expression levels of nuclear DNA-PK. Moreover, concomitant high expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and Twist1 in primary tumors of cervical cancer patients correlated with the worse prognosis after irradiation treatment. Taken together, these data provide new insights into molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced radioresistance in cervical cancer cells, and suggest that Twist1 is a promising molecular target to improve the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy. PMID:28261334

  19. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  20. A toolbox of endogenous and heterologous nuclear localization sequences for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Weninger, Astrid; Glieder, Anton; Vogl, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) are required for the import of proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotes. However many proteins from bacteria or bacteriophages are used for basic studies in molecular biology, to generate synthetic genetic circuits or for genome editing applications. Prokaryotic recombinases, CRISPR-associated proteins such as Cas9 or bacterial and viral polymerases require efficient NLSs to function in eukaryotes. The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used expression platform for heterologous protein production, but molecular tools such as NLSs are limited. Here we have characterized a set of 10 NLSs for P. pastoris, including the first endogenous NLSs (derived from P. pastoris proteins) and commonly used heterologous NLSs. The NLSs were evaluated by fusing them in N- and C-terminal position to an enhanced green fluorescent protein showing pronounced differences in fluorescence levels and nuclear targeting. Thereby we provide a set of different NLSs that can be applied to optimize the nuclear import of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris, paving the way for the establishment of intricate synthetic biology applications.

  1. The second AT-hook of the architectural transcription factor HMGA2 is determinant for nuclear localization and function

    PubMed Central

    Cattaruzzi, Giacomo; Altamura, Sandro; Tessari, Michela A.; Rustighi, Alessandra; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Pucillo, Carlo; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2007-01-01

    High Mobility Group A (HMGA) is a family of architectural nuclear factors which play an important role in neoplastic transformation. HMGA proteins are multifunctional factors that associate both with DNA and nuclear proteins that have been involved in several nuclear processes including transcription. HMGA localization is exclusively nuclear but, to date, the mechanism of nuclear import for these proteins remains unknown. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for HMGA2, a member of the HMGA family. The NLS overlaps with the second of the three AT-hooks, the DNA-binding domains characteristic for this group of proteins. The functionality of this NLS was demonstrated by its ability to target a heterologous β-galactosidase/green fluorescent protein fusion protein to the nucleus. Mutations to alanine of basic residues within the second AT-hook resulted in inhibition of HMGA2 nuclear localization and impairment of its function in activating the cyclin A promoter. In addition, HMGA2 was shown to directly interact with the nuclear import receptor importin-α2 via the second AT-hook. HMGA proteins are overexpressed and rearranged in a variety of tumors; our findings can thus help elucidating their role in neoplastic transformation. PMID:17324944

  2. [Some factors affecting in vitro development of porcine embryo reconstitution from somatic cells nuclear transfer].

    PubMed

    Zhang, De Fu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yin; Wang, Kai; Schellander, Karl; Lin, Cai Lu

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, a study on reconstitution of porcine oocytes by using nuclear transfer with cumulus cells(CC) and fibroblast cells(FC) was carried out. Reconstituted oocytes which were the fusion with CC and showed a cleavage rate of 56.7%, developed to morula(11.7%) and blastocysts(6.7%) phases which were higher than those derived from the fusion with FC(p < 0.05). The results of this study also involved the effects of oocyte collection method and maturational age of recipient oocytes during the in vitro development of nuclear-transfer embryos which were reconstructed with cultured cumulus cells. The cumulus cells synchronized in G0/G1 phases through serum-starvation culture, were transferred into enucleated oocytes which were collected by aspiration or dissection method and cultured for 33 or 44 h. Reconstituted embryos were activated with a combination of calcium ionophore A23187 or electric pulsation and 6-DMAP, and cultured for 6 days. As for the oocytes collection methods, activation treatment in the presence of cytochalasin B did not affect the developmental rate of embryos reconstituted with 44-h-mature recipients. However, the development rate of reconstituted embryos with 33-h-mature recipients was significantly higher(p < 0.05) by activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP. These results suggest that reconstituted porcine embryos derived from cultured cumulus cells can develop to the blastocyst stage and that the development of the former could be improved by reconstruction with young oocyte cytoplast after the activation with the combination of electric pulsation and 6-DMAP.

  3. Mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affects fitness within species but does not contribute to fixed incompatibilities between species of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Montooth, Kristi L.; Meiklejohn, Colin D.; Abt, Dawn N.; Rand, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient mitochondrial function requires physical interactions between the proteins encoded by the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Co-evolution between these genomes may result in the accumulation of incompatibilities between divergent lineages. We test whether mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities have accumulated within the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup by combining divergent mitochondrial and nuclear lineages and quantifying the effects on relative fitness. Precise placement of nine mtDNAs from D. melanogaster, D. simulans and D. mauritiana into two D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds reveals significant mitochondrial-nuclear epistasis affecting fitness in females. Combining the mitochondrial genomes with three different D. melanogaster X chromosomes reveals significant epistasis for male fitness between X-linked and mitochondrial variation. However, we find no evidence that the more than 500 fixed differences between the mitochondrial genomes of D. melanogaster and the D. simulans species complex are incompatible with the D. melanogaster nuclear genome. Rather, the interactions of largest effect occur between mitochondrial and nuclear polymorphisms that segregate within species of the D. melanogaster species subgroup. We propose that a low mitochondrial substitution rate, resulting from a low mutation rate and/or efficient purifying selection, precludes the accumulation of mitochondrial-nuclear incompatibilities among these Drosophila species. PMID:20624176

  4. Designed inhibitor for nuclear localization signal of polo-like kinase 1 induces mitotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangjin; Zhuo, Xiaolong; Qin, Tan; Guo, Xiao; Zhang, Chuanmao; Lai, Luhua

    2016-11-24

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), a member of polo-like kinase family, regulates multiple essential steps of the cell cycle progression. Plk1 is overexpressed in multiple cancer cell lines and considered to be a prime anticancer target. Plk1 accumulates in the nucleus during S and G2 phases by its bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, which is crucial for Plk1 regulation during normal cell cycle progression. Here, through combined computational and experimental studies, we identified compound D110, which inhibits Plk1 kinase activity with an IC50 of 85 nm and blocks the nuclear localization of Plk1 during S and G2 phases. D110-treated cancer cells were arrested at mitosis with monopolar spindle, indicating the inhibition of the Plk1 kinase activity in cell. As D110 interacts with both the ATP site and the NLS in Plk1, it demonstrates good selectivity toward Plk2 and Plk3. The strategy of simultaneously inhibiting kinase activity and its subcellular translocations offers a novel approach for selective kinase inhibitor design.

  5. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-12-19

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one.

  6. A highly organized structure mediating nuclear localization of a Myb2 transcription factor in the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Lung-Chun; Hsu, Hong-Ming; Wei, Shu-Yi; Liu, Hsing-Wei; Lee, Yu; Kuo, Chung-Chi; Indra, Dharmu; Chen, Chinpan; Ong, Shiou-Jeng; Tai, Jung-Hsiang

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear proteins usually contain specific peptide sequences, referred to as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), for nuclear import. These signals remain unexplored in the protozoan pathogen, Trichomonas vaginalis. The nuclear import of a Myb2 transcription factor was studied here using immunodetection of a hemagglutinin-tagged Myb2 overexpressed in the parasite. The tagged Myb2 was localized to the nucleus as punctate signals. With mutations of its polybasic sequences, 48KKQK51 and 61KR62, Myb2 was localized to the nucleus, but the signal was diffusive. When fused to a C-terminal non-nuclear protein, the Myb2 sequence spanning amino acid (aa) residues 48 to 143, which is embedded within the R2R3 DNA-binding domain (aa 40 to 156), was essential and sufficient for efficient nuclear import of a bacterial tetracycline repressor (TetR), and yet the transport efficiency was reduced with an additional fusion of a firefly luciferase to TetR, while classical NLSs from the simian virus 40 T-antigen had no function in this assay system. Myb2 nuclear import and DNA-binding activity were substantially perturbed with mutation of a conserved isoleucine (I74) in helix 2 to proline that altered secondary structure and ternary folding of the R2R3 domain. Disruption of DNA-binding activity alone by point mutation of a lysine residue, K51, preceding the structural domain had little effect on Myb2 nuclear localization, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Myb2, which requires an ordered structural domain, is independent of its DNA binding activity. These findings provide useful information for testing whether myriad Mybs in the parasite use a common module to regulate nuclear import.

  7. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-15

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy–electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. - Highlights: • This is the first report showing LANA dots on mitotic chromosomes by fluorescent microscopy followed by electron microscopy. • LANA dots localized randomly on condensed chromosomes other than centromere/pericentromere and telomere/peritelomre. • Cellular mitotic checkpoint should not be always involved in the segregation of KSHV genomes in the latency.

  8. Nuclear localization and functional characteristics of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-05-15

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K(+) gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos.

  9. Nuclear Localization and Functional Characteristics of Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Kv1.3*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K+ gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  10. The N-terminal nuclear localization sequences of liver X receptors alpha and beta bind to importin alpha and are essential for both nuclear import and transactivating functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anna; Crumbley, Christine; Prüfer, Kirsten

    2009-04-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) alpha and beta are nuclear receptors, which form obligate heterodimers with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). The LXRs regulate both redundantly and non-redundantly the transcription of genes controlling cholesterol metabolism and transport as well as lipogenesis. Previously, we showed that mutations in putative N-terminal nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) within both LXRs inhibit nuclear import. Through in vitro studies, we show here that these NLSs bind importin alpha and are both necessary and sufficient for the nuclear import of LXRs. Imaging, transactivation, and electro-mobility shift experiments show that RXR rescues the nuclear import of the LXRalpha NLS mutant yet does not restore its transcriptional activity despite intact DNA binding. In contrast, RXR partially rescues the import of the LXRbeta NLS mutant, but has no effect on its transcriptional activity due to the loss of DNA binding. Experiments with NLS mutant RXR confirmed that RXR may dominate the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRalpha heterodimer, whereas LXRbeta dominates the nuclear import of the RXR/LXRbeta heterodimer. Intriguingly, our data indicate differences between LXRalpha and LXRbeta in their interaction with RXR and in the role their NLSs play in transactivating functions independent of nuclear import.

  11. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  12. 34 CFR 222.65 - How may a State aid program affect a local educational agency's eligibility for assistance under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How may a State aid program affect a local educational agency's eligibility for assistance under section 8003(f)? 222.65 Section 222.65 Education Regulations of... Section 8003(f) of the Act § 222.65 How may a State aid program affect a local educational...

  13. Nuclear Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein is localized to Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Dury, Alain Y; El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Rose, Timothy M; Côté, Jocelyn; De Koninck, Paul; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2013-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by loss of function of a single gene encoding the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). This RNA-binding protein, widely expressed in mammalian tissues, is particularly abundant in neurons and is a component of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complexes present within the translational apparatus. The absence of FMRP in neurons is believed to cause translation dysregulation and defects in mRNA transport essential for local protein synthesis and for synaptic development and maturation. A prevalent model posits that FMRP is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that transports its mRNA targets from the nucleus to the translation machinery. However, it is not known which of the multiple FMRP isoforms, resulting from the numerous alternatively spliced FMR1 transcripts variants, would be involved in such a process. Using a new generation of anti-FMRP antibodies and recombinant expression, we show here that the most commonly expressed human FMRP isoforms (ISO1 and 7) do not localize to the nucleus. Instead, specific FMRP isoforms 6 and 12 (ISO6 and 12), containing a novel C-terminal domain, were the only isoforms that localized to the nuclei in cultured human cells. These isoforms localized to specific p80-coilin and SMN positive structures that were identified as Cajal bodies. The Cajal body localization signal was confined to a 17 amino acid stretch in the C-terminus of human ISO6 and is lacking in a mouse Iso6 variant. As FMRP is an RNA-binding protein, its presence in Cajal bodies suggests additional functions in nuclear post-transcriptional RNA metabolism. Supporting this hypothesis, a missense mutation (I304N), known to alter the KH2-mediated RNA binding properties of FMRP, abolishes the localization of human FMRP ISO6 to Cajal bodies. These findings open unexplored avenues in search for new insights into the pathophysiology of Fragile X Syndrome.

  14. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey.

    PubMed

    Schartel, Tyler E; Schauber, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference.

  15. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey

    PubMed Central

    Schartel, Tyler E.; Schauber, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference. PMID:26978659

  16. Types and concentrations of metal ions affect local structure and dynamics of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xiao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The roles that metal ions play in the structure and dynamics of RNA molecules are long-standing problems that have been studied extensively but are still not well understood. Here we show that metal ions have distributions around RNA molecules that strongly depend on the types and concentrations of the metal ions and also the electrostatic surface of the molecule. In particular, the ion distributions may not balance all the local electronegativity of the molecule. These ion distributions do not only greatly affect local structures but also lead to different local dynamics of RNA. We studied the effects of different ion solutions on the structure and dynamics of RNA by taking the pre Q1 riboswitch aptamer domain as an illustrative example and using molecular dynamics simulations. Since the local structures and dynamics of RNAs are important to their functions, our results also indicate that the selection of proper ion conditions is necessary to model them correctly, in contrast to the use of diverse ion solutions in current molecular dynamics simulations.

  17. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  18. Characterization of PTEN mutations in brain cancer reveals that pten mono-ubiquitination promotes protein stability and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jr-M; Schiapparelli, P; Nguyen, H-N; Igarashi, A; Zhang, Q; Abbadi, S; Amzel, L M; Sesaki, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A; Iijima, M

    2017-03-06

    PTEN is a PIP3 phosphatase that antagonizes oncogenic PI3-kinase signalling. Due to its critical role in suppressing the potent signalling pathway, it is one of the most mutated tumour suppressors, especially in brain tumours. It is generally thought that PTEN deficiencies predominantly result from either loss of expression or enzymatic activity. By analysing PTEN in malignant glioblastoma primary cells derived from 16 of our patients, we report mutations that block localization of PTEN at the plasma membrane and nucleus without affecting lipid phosphatase activity. Cellular and biochemical analyses as well as structural modelling revealed that two mutations disrupt intramolecular interaction of PTEN and open its conformation, enhancing polyubiquitination of PTEN and decreasing protein stability. Moreover, promoting mono-ubiquitination increases protein stability and nuclear localization of mutant PTEN. Thus, our findings provide a molecular mechanism for cancer-associated PTEN defects and may lead to a brain cancer treatment that targets PTEN mono-ubiquitination.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.493.

  19. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3.

  20. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  1. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  2. Laughing it off? Humour, affect and emotion work in communities living with nuclear risk.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, K A; Henwood, K L; Pidgeon, N F; Simmons, P

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing number of risk researchers have recognized that risks are not simply objective hazards but that the meanings of risk are discursively negotiated, dynamic and embedded within the wider social relations that constitute everyday life. A growing interest in the complexity and nuances of risk subjectivities has alerted sociocultural researchers not only to what is said in a risk situation, but also to how it is said and to what is unsaid and even, in a particular context, unsayable; to the intangible qualities of discourse that communicate additional meanings. Humour is both an intangible and marks such intangible meanings, yet it has largely been ignored and insufficiently theorized by risk researchers. In this paper, we draw upon insights from the humour literature - suspending the belief that humour is inherently good - to analyse and theorize humour as a way of examining the meanings and functions of risk. We show how humour can both mask and carefully reveal affectively charged states about living with nuclear risk. As such, it helps risk subjects to live with risk by suppressing vulnerabilities, enabling the negotiation of what constitutes a threat, and engendering a sense of empowerment. We conclude that humorous talk can be serious talk which can enrich our understandings of the lived experience of risk and of risk subjectivities.

  3. Nuclear localization of MBNL1: splicing-mediated autoregulation and repression of repeat-derived aberrant proteins.

    PubMed

    Kino, Yoshihiro; Washizu, Chika; Kurosawa, Masaru; Oma, Yoko; Hattori, Nobutaka; Ishiura, Shoichi; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2015-02-01

    In some neurological diseases caused by repeat expansions such as myotonic dystrophy, the RNA-binding protein muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1) accumulates in intranuclear inclusions containing mutant repeat RNA. The interaction between MBNL1 and mutant RNA in the nucleus is a key event leading to loss of MBNL function, yet the details of this effect have been elusive. Here, we investigated the mechanism and significance of MBNL1 nuclear localization. We found that MBNL1 contains two classes of nuclear localization signal (NLS), a classical bipartite NLS and a novel conformational NLS. Alternative splicing of exon 7 acts as a switch between these NLS types and couples MBNL1 activity and intracellular localization. Depending on its nuclear localization, MBNL1 promoted nuclear accumulation of mutant RNA containing a CUG or CAG repeat, some of which produced proteins containing homopolymeric tracts such as polyglutamine. Furthermore, MBNL1 repressed the expression of these homopolymeric proteins including those presumably produced through repeat-associated non-ATG (RAN) translation. These results suggest that nuclear retention of expanded RNA reflects a novel role of MBNL proteins in repressing aberrant protein expression and may provide pathological and therapeutic implications for a wide range of repeat expansion diseases associated with nuclear RNA retention and/or RAN translation.

  4. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  5. Nuclear Localization of PRDM9 and Its Role in Meiotic Chromatin Modifications and Homologous Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G.; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L.; Baker, Christopher L.; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc-finger domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ-cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema, but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function, and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots. PMID:25894966

  6. Nuclear localization of PRDM9 and its role in meiotic chromatin modifications and homologous synapsis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengyun; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Reinholdt, Laura G; Hu, Jianjun; Saxl, Ruth L; Baker, Christopher L; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth; Handel, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Developmental progress of germ cells through meiotic phases is closely tied to ongoing meiotic recombination. In mammals, recombination preferentially occurs in genomic regions known as hotspots; the protein that activates these hotspots is PRDM9, containing a genetically variable zinc finger (ZNF) domain and a PR-SET domain with histone H3K4 trimethyltransferase activity. PRDM9 is required for fertility in mice, but little is known about its localization and developmental dynamics. Application of spermatogenic stage-specific markers demonstrates that PRDM9 accumulates in male germ cell nuclei at pre-leptonema to early leptonema but is no longer detectable in nuclei by late zygonema. By the pachytene stage, PRDM9-dependent histone H3K4 trimethyl marks on hotspots also disappear. PRDM9 localizes to nuclei concurrently with the deposition of meiotic cohesin complexes, but is not required for incorporation of cohesin complex proteins into chromosomal axial elements, or accumulation of normal numbers of RAD51 foci on meiotic chromatin by late zygonema. Germ cells lacking PRDM9 exhibit inefficient homology recognition and synapsis, with aberrant repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks and transcriptional abnormalities characteristic of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. Together, these results on the developmental time course for nuclear localization of PRDM9 establish its direct window of function and demonstrate the independence of chromosome axial element formation from the concurrent PRDM9-mediated activation of recombination hotspots.

  7. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  8. Valve endothelial cell-derived Tgfβ1 signaling promotes nuclear localization of Sox9 in interstitial cells associated with attenuated calcification

    PubMed Central

    Huk, Danielle J; Austin, Blair F.; Horne, Tori E.; Hinton, Robert B.; Ray, William C.; Heistad, Donald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Aortic valve disease, including calcification affects more than 2% of the human population and is caused by complex interactions between multiple risk factors including genetic mutations, the environment and biomechanics. At present, there are no effective treatments other than surgery and this is due to the limited understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the condition. Previous work has shown that valve interstitial cells (VICs) within the aortic valve cusps differentiate towards an osteoblast-like cell and deposit bone-like matrix that leads to leaflet stiffening and calcific aortic valve stenosis. However the mechanisms that promote pathological phenotypes in VICs are unknown. Approach and Results Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo tools with mouse, porcine and human tissue, we show that in VICs, reduced Sox9 expression and nuclear localization precedes the onset of calcification. In vitro, Sox9 nuclear export and calcific nodule formation is prevented by valve endothelial cells (VECs). While in vivo, loss of Tgfβ1 in the endothelium leads to reduced Sox9 expression and calcific aortic valve disease. Conclusions Together, these findings suggest that reduced nuclear localization of Sox9 in VICs is an early indicator of calcification and therefore pharmacological targeting to prevent nuclear export could serve as a novel therapeutic tool in the prevention of calcification and stenosis. PMID:26634652

  9. Perturbation of chromatin structure globally affects localization and recruitment of splicing factors.

    PubMed

    Schor, Ignacio E; Llères, David; Risso, Guillermo J; Pawellek, Andrea; Ule, Jernej; Lamond, Angus I; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure is an important factor in the functional coupling between transcription and mRNA processing, not only by regulating alternative splicing events, but also by contributing to exon recognition during constitutive splicing. We observed that depolarization of neuroblastoma cell membrane potential, which triggers general histone acetylation and regulates alternative splicing, causes a concentration of SR proteins in nuclear speckles. This prompted us to analyze the effect of chromatin structure on splicing factor distribution and dynamics. Here, we show that induction of histone hyper-acetylation results in the accumulation in speckles of multiple splicing factors in different cell types. In addition, a similar effect is observed after depletion of the heterochromatic protein HP1α, associated with repressive chromatin. We used advanced imaging approaches to analyze in detail both the structural organization of the speckle compartment and nuclear distribution of splicing factors, as well as studying direct interactions between splicing factors and their association with chromatin in vivo. The results support a model where perturbation of normal chromatin structure decreases the recruitment efficiency of splicing factors to nascent RNAs, thus causing their accumulation in speckles, which buffer the amount of free molecules in the nucleoplasm. To test this, we analyzed the recruitment of the general splicing factor U2AF65 to nascent RNAs by iCLIP technique, as a way to monitor early spliceosome assembly. We demonstrate that indeed histone hyper-acetylation decreases recruitment of U2AF65 to bulk 3' splice sites, coincident with the change in its localization. In addition, prior to the maximum accumulation in speckles, ∼20% of genes already show a tendency to decreased binding, while U2AF65 seems to increase its binding to the speckle-located ncRNA MALAT1. All together, the combined imaging and biochemical approaches support a model where chromatin

  10. Perturbation of Chromatin Structure Globally Affects Localization and Recruitment of Splicing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Guillermo J.; Pawellek, Andrea; Ule, Jernej; Lamond, Angus I.; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin structure is an important factor in the functional coupling between transcription and mRNA processing, not only by regulating alternative splicing events, but also by contributing to exon recognition during constitutive splicing. We observed that depolarization of neuroblastoma cell membrane potential, which triggers general histone acetylation and regulates alternative splicing, causes a concentration of SR proteins in nuclear speckles. This prompted us to analyze the effect of chromatin structure on splicing factor distribution and dynamics. Here, we show that induction of histone hyper-acetylation results in the accumulation in speckles of multiple splicing factors in different cell types. In addition, a similar effect is observed after depletion of the heterochromatic protein HP1α, associated with repressive chromatin. We used advanced imaging approaches to analyze in detail both the structural organization of the speckle compartment and nuclear distribution of splicing factors, as well as studying direct interactions between splicing factors and their association with chromatin in vivo. The results support a model where perturbation of normal chromatin structure decreases the recruitment efficiency of splicing factors to nascent RNAs, thus causing their accumulation in speckles, which buffer the amount of free molecules in the nucleoplasm. To test this, we analyzed the recruitment of the general splicing factor U2AF65 to nascent RNAs by iCLIP technique, as a way to monitor early spliceosome assembly. We demonstrate that indeed histone hyper-acetylation decreases recruitment of U2AF65 to bulk 3′ splice sites, coincident with the change in its localization. In addition, prior to the maximum accumulation in speckles, ∼20% of genes already show a tendency to decreased binding, while U2AF65 seems to increase its binding to the speckle-located ncRNA MALAT1. All together, the combined imaging and biochemical approaches support a model where chromatin

  11. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Local to regional emission sources affecting mercury fluxes to New York lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookman, Revital; Driscoll, Charles T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Effler, Steven W.

    Lake-sediment records across the Northern Hemisphere show increases in atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic mercury (Hg) over the last 150 years. Most of the previous studies have examined remote lakes affected by the global atmospheric Hg reservoir. In this study, we present Hg flux records from lakes in an urban/suburban setting of central New York affected also by local and regional emissions. Sediment cores were collected from the Otisco and Skaneateles lakes from the Finger Lakes region, Cross Lake, a hypereutrophic lake on the Seneca River, and Glacial Lake, a small seepage lake with a watershed that corresponds with the lake area. Sediment accumulation rates and dates were established by 210Pb. The pre-anthropogenic regional atmospheric Hg flux was estimated to be 3.0 μg m -2 yr -1 from Glacial Lake, which receives exclusively direct atmospheric deposition. Mercury fluxes peaked during 1971-2001, and were 3 to more than 30 times greater than pre-industrial deposition. Land use change and urbanization in the Otisco and Cross watersheds during the last century likely enhanced sediment loads and Hg fluxes to the lakes. Skaneateles and Glacial lakes have low sediment accumulation rates, and thus are excellent indicators for atmospheric Hg deposition. In these lakes, we found strong correlations with emission records for the Great Lakes region that markedly increased in the early 1900s, and peaked during WWII and in the early 1970s. Declines in modern Hg fluxes are generally evident in the core records. However, the decrease in sediment Hg flux at Glacial Lake was interrupted and has increased since the early 1990s probably due to the operation of new local emission sources. Assuming the global Hg reservoir tripled since the pre-industrial period, the contribution of local and regional emission sources to central New York lakes was estimated to about 80% of the total atmospheric Hg deposition.

  13. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization.

    PubMed

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks.

  14. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization

    PubMed Central

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks. PMID:25520675

  15. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  16. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells.

    PubMed

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-07-14

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light.

  17. The unlikelihood of localized corrosion of nuclear waste packages arising from deliquescent brine formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apted, M.; Arthur, R.; King, F.; Langmuir, D.; Kessler, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (NWTRB) recently postulated a scenario for the formation of a deliquescent, divalent-cation (Ca, Mg) chloride brine from wind-blown dust on the surface of an alloy 22 container designed to hold radioactive waste. The NWTRB suggested that such brines could lead to localized penetrations of waste packages at a proposed repository in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In response, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sponsored an independent analysis, specifically examining and responding to a series of decision points in the NWTRB’s scenario. Only if all of these questions could be answered affirmatively would NWTRB’s scenario result in potential noncompliance with regulatory criteria. The EPRI analysis found that none of the questions has an affirmative answer.

  18. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  19. Transverse isospin response function of asymmetric nuclear matter from a local isospin density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipparini, Enrico; Pederiva, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The time dependent local isospin density approximation (TDLIDA) has been extended to the study of the transverse isospin response function in nuclear matter with an arbitrary neutron-proton asymmetry parameter ξ . The energy density functional has been chosen in order to fit existing accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations with a density dependent potential. The evolution of the response with ξ in the Δ Tz=±1 channels is quite different. While the strength of the Δ Tz=+1 channel disappears rather quickly by increasing the asymmetry, the Δ Tz=-1 channel develops a stronger and stronger collective mode that in the regime typical of neutron star matter at β equilibrium almost completely exhausts the excitation spectrum of the system. The neutrino mean free paths obtained from the TDLIDA responses are strongly dependent on ξ and on the presence of collective modes, leading to a sizable difference with respect to the prediction of the Fermi gas model.

  20. Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.

    PubMed

    Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorzałek, A

    2007-10-01

    An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes.

  1. A mid-infrared look at the dusty nuclear environments of local active galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso Herrero, Almudena

    2016-08-01

    Active galactic nuclei are largely explained in the context of a unified theory, by which a geometrically and optically thick torus of gas and dust obscures the AGN central engine. The torus intercepts a substantial amount of flux from the central engine and and reradiates it in the infrared. There are still many open questions about the nature of the torus material and the role of nuclear (< 100 pc) starbursts in feeding and/or obscuring AGNs. Ground-based mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy on 8-10m class telescopes allow us to study the dusty environments of nearby active galactic nuclei on physical scales of less than 100pc. In this talk I will present results from a mid-infrared sub-arcsecond resolution imaging and spectroscopy survey of a sample of local AGN. The observations were mostly taken with CanariCam on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) through an ESO/GTC large programme and the CanariCam AGN guaranteed time program. I will discuss results on the torus properties of different types of AGN from the modelling of the unresolved infrared emission with the CLUMPY torus models. I will also show that the molecules responsible for the 11.3micron PAH feature survive in the vicinity of the active nucleus and thus this PAH feature can be used to study the nuclear star formation activity in AGN.

  2. Identification of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast-localized proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Nicole; Lloyd, Johnny; Sweeney, Colleen; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Meinke, David

    2011-04-01

    We describe here the diversity of chloroplast proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Interfering with certain chloroplast functions has long been known to result in embryo lethality. What has not been reported before is a comprehensive screen for embryo-defective (emb) mutants altered in chloroplast proteins. From a collection of transposon and T-DNA insertion lines at the RIKEN chloroplast function database (http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/) that initially appeared to lack homozygotes and segregate for defective seeds, we identified 23 additional examples of EMB genes that likely encode chloroplast-localized proteins. Fourteen gene identities were confirmed with allelism tests involving duplicate mutant alleles. We then queried journal publications and the SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) to establish a comprehensive dataset of 381 nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis associated with embryo-defective (119 genes), plant pigment (121 genes), gametophyte (three genes), and alternate (138 genes) phenotypes. Loci were ranked based on the level of certainty that the gene responsible for the phenotype had been identified and the protein product localized to chloroplasts. Embryo development is frequently arrested when amino acid, vitamin, or nucleotide biosynthesis is disrupted but proceeds when photosynthesis is compromised and when levels of chlorophyll, carotenoids, or terpenoids are reduced. Chloroplast translation is also required for embryo development, with genes encoding chloroplast ribosomal and pentatricopeptide repeat proteins well represented among EMB datasets. The chloroplast accD locus, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, is essential in Arabidopsis but not in Brassica napus or maize (Zea mays), where duplicated nuclear genes compensate for its absence or loss of function.

  3. Measuring natural pest suppression at different spatial scales affects the importance of local variables.

    PubMed

    Bennett, A B; Gratton, C

    2012-10-01

    The role biodiversity plays in the provision of ecosystem services is widely recognized, yet few ecological studies have identified characteristics of natural systems that support and maintain ecosystem services. The purpose of this study was to identify landscape variables correlated with natural pest suppression carried out by arthropod natural enemies, predators and parasitoids. We conducted two field experiments, one observational and one experimental, where landscape variables at broad and local scales were measured and related to natural pest suppression. The first experiment measured natural pest suppression at 16 sites across an urban to rural landscape gradient in south central Wisconsin. We found natural enemy diversity positively affected natural pest suppression, whereas flower diversity negatively affected pest suppression. No relationship was found between natural pest suppression and broad scale variables, which measured the percentage of different land cover classes in the surrounding landscape. In the second experiment, we established small (2- by 3-m) replicated plots that experimentally varied flower diversity (0, 1, or 7 species) within a plot. We found no significant relationship between natural pest suppression and the different levels of flower diversity. The fact that we only found differences in natural pest suppression in our first experiment, which measured natural pest suppression at sites separated by larger distances than our second experiment, suggests the more appropriate scale for measuring ecosystem services performed by mobile organisms like insects, is across broad spatial scales where variation in natural enemies communities and the factors that affect them become more apparent.

  4. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  5. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  6. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    SciTech Connect

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Lizano, Marcela

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  7. Aurora B–mediated localized delays in nuclear envelope formation facilitate inclusion of late-segregating chromosome fragments

    PubMed Central

    Karg, Travis; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    To determine how chromosome segregation is coordinated with nuclear envelope formation (NEF), we examined the dynamics of NEF in the presence of lagging acentric chromosomes in Drosophila neuroblasts. Acentric chromosomes often exhibit delayed but ultimately successful segregation and incorporation into daughter nuclei. However, it is unknown whether these late-segregating acentric fragments influence NEF to ensure their inclusion in daughter nuclei. Through live analysis, we show that acentric chromosomes induce highly localized delays in the reassembly of the nuclear envelope. These delays result in a gap in the nuclear envelope that facilitates the inclusion of lagging acentrics into telophase daughter nuclei. Localized delays of nuclear envelope reassembly require Aurora B kinase activity. In cells with reduced Aurora B activity, there is a decrease in the frequency of local nuclear envelope reassembly delays, resulting in an increase in the frequency of acentric-bearing, lamin-coated micronuclei. These studies reveal a novel role of Aurora B in maintaining genomic integrity by promoting the formation of a passageway in the nuclear envelope through which late-segregating acentric chromosomes enter the telophase daughter nucleus. PMID:25877868

  8. Burnout and Psychiatric Distress in Local Caregivers Two Years After the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima Nuclear Radiation Disaster.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Kenji; Carroll, Matt; Yanagisawa, Robert; Katz, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake precipitated a triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear radiation disaster. To quantify the prevalence of burnout and psychiatric distress in local healthcare providers (caregivers) more than 2 years after the disaster, this study surveyed caregivers from affected areas through interviews about topics of concerns and two questionnaires: Maslach Burnout Inventory and General Health Questionnaire. Concerns listed by respondents were primarily radiation related: additional stress, concern for children, concern for local food, and sleep difficulties. We found significant number of caregivers to have signs of emotional exhaustion, low personal accomplishment, and psychological distress. Our findings suggest that local caregivers are experiencing substantial mental health burdens, which have unfortunately remained static from the year prior, even 2 years after the fact. Therefore, long term psychological support and improvement in caregiver work conditions are essential to maintain sustainable care in rebuilding disaster stricken areas.

  9. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Edward I.; Dombrovski, Andrew K.; Swarbrick, Crystall M.D.; Raidal, Shane R.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  10. Leukocyte protease binding to nucleic acids promotes nuclear localization and cleavage of nucleic acid binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Marshall P; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron J; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-06-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. In this study, we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein targets, whereas adding RNA to recombinant RNA binding protein substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Preincubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G. During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps, which bind NE and cathepsin G. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and neutrophil extracellular traps in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high-affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation.

  11. Local, Regional and National Responses for Medical Management of a Radiological/Nuclear Incident

    PubMed Central

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Skudlarska, Beata; Albanese, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Radiological and nuclear devices may be used by terrorists or may be the source of accidental exposure. A tiered approach has been recommended for response to a terrorist event wherein local, regional, state and federal assets become involved sequentially, as the magnitude in severity of the incident increases. State-wide hospital plans have been developed and published for Connecticut, New York and California. These plans address delineation of responsibilities of various categories of health professionals, protection of healthcare providers, identification and classification of individuals who might have been exposed to and/or contaminated by radiation and, in the case of Connecticut response plan, early management of victims. Regional response programs such as the New England Regional Health Compact (consisting of 6 member states) have been developed to manage consequences of radiation injury. The Department of Homeland Security is ultimately responsible for managing both health consequences and the crisis. Multiple US national response assets may be called upon for use in radiological incidents. These include agencies and programs that have been developed by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Defense. Coordination of national, regional and state assets with local response efforts is necessary to provide a timely and efficient response. PMID:23447742

  12. Mechanisms of cellular penetration and nuclear localization of an anti-double strand DNA autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Zack, D J; Stempniak, M; Wong, A L; Taylor, C; Weisbart, R H

    1996-09-01

    An anti-dsDNA Ab, mAb 3E10, was identified that bound membranes of fixed human renal tubular cells, penetrated live murine renal tubular cells in vivo, and localized in the cell nucleus. mAb 3E10 binds both dsDNA and an extracellular matrix protein, HP8/HEVIN, expressed in high endothelial venules. Previous studies showed both shared and distinct binding determinants of mAb 3E10 VH for DNA and HP8/HEVIN. To independently assess the requirement of DNA and HP8/HEVIN in cellular penetration, site-directed mutants of mAb 3E10 VH and V kappa were studied for penetrating kidney cell lines. The results showed that residues required for binding DNA, but not HP8/HEVIN, were necessary for Ab penetration, indicating that cellular penetration required the presence of DNA or binding of Ab to a membrane determinant precisely resembling DNA. Ab Fab penetrated cells, indicating that neither the Fc nor multivalent Ab binding is necessary for cellular penetration. Ab synthesized in the cytoplasm as a result of deleting heavy and light chain signal peptides was not translocated to the nucleus, indicating a mechanism distinct from the usual protein nuclear localization signals and suggesting the need for a membrane-mediated pathway or for post-translational modification of the Ab.

  13. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee; Lin, Valerie C.L.

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  14. [Immunochemical study of nuclear matrix proteins localization in the structure of perinucleolar chromatin].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling of proteins with molecular mass of 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa obtained from serum of patients with autoimmune disease demonstrated different patterns (small clusters or granules) in interphase nuclei of pig kidney cells. It was remarkable that there was no staining inside the nucleoli, but the proteins immunoreactivity was detected around them in the regions of perinucleolar chromatin. Moreover, expression of nucleolar proteins, such as fibrillarin and B23, was found only in nucleoli. After extraction of DNA, PNA and histones, the proteins with molecular mass 27 and 38 kDa were found in the periphery of residual nucleoli, and proteins with molecular mass 40, 50 and 65 kDa had similar localization and were also present in karyoplasm of cells as small clusters. According to our data, nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, was distributed regularly throughout the whole volume of residual nucleoli. At the same time, B23 protein was revealed only at their periphery, where perinucleolar chromatin had localized before treatment. Thus, it has been revealed that the proteins of nuclear matrix with molecular mass 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa, as well as nucleolar protein B23 are the parts of perinucleolar chromatin, which could be considered as special chromosomal domain associated with the functioning of the nucleolus.

  15. Sequential expression, activity and nuclear localization of prolyl oligopeptidase protein in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Mirva J; Männistö, Pekka T; Myöhänen, Timo T

    2011-01-01

    Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine protease that hydrolyzes peptides shorter than 30-mer. Some evidence has recently been obtained that POP can generate protein-protein interactions and therefore participate in various physiological and pathological events. Several studies have reported that POP may be involved in neurogenesis since its activity increases during development and can be found in the nucleus of proliferating tissues. In cell cultures, POP has been shown to be localized in the nucleus, but only early in the development, since during maturation it is moved to the cytosol. We have now studied for the first time the expression of POP protein, its enzymatic activity and nuclear localization in vivo in the developing rat brain. We observed that enzymatic activity of POP is highest on embryonic day 18 while the protein amounts reach their peak at birth. Furthermore, POP is located in the nucleus only early in the development but is transferred to the cytosol already before parturition. Our in vivo results confirm the previous cell culture results supporting the role of POP in neurogenesis. A discordance of antenatal protein amounts and enzymatic activities is suggesting a tight regulation of POP activity and possibly even a nonhydrolytic role at that stage.

  16. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  17. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  18. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  19. Local and regional factors affecting atmospheric mercury speciation at a remote location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manolopoulos, H.; Schauer, J.J.; Purcell, M.D.; Rudolph, T.M.; Olson, M.L.; Rodger, B.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of elemental (Hg0), reactive gaseous (RGM), and particulate (PHg) mercury were measured at two remote sites in the midwestern United States. Concurrent measurements of Hg0, PHg, and RGM obtained at Devil's Lake and Mt. Horeb, located approximately 65 km apart, showed that Hg0 and PHg concentrations were affected by regional, as well as local sources, while RGM was mainly impacted by local sources. Plumes reaching the Devil's Lake site from a nearby coal-fired power plant significantly impacted SO2 and RGM concentrations at Devil's Lake, but had little impact on Hg0. Our findings suggest that traditional modeling approaches to assess sources of mercury deposited that utilize source emissions and large-scale grids may not be sufficient to predict mercury deposition at sensitive locations due to the importance of small-scale sources and processes. We suggest the use of a receptor-based monitoring to better understand mercury source-receptor relationships. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  20. Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Katzenberger, Marco; Duarte, Helder; Quintela, María; Tejedo, Miguel; Laurila, Anssi

    2015-08-01

    Although temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well-understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve and critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) and life-history (thermal developmental reaction norms) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the evolution of thermal adaptation. First, we found support for the faster-slower model, indicating an adaptive response to compensate for the thermodynamic constraint of low temperatures in colder environments. Second, we found evidence for the generalist-specialist trade-off with populations from colder and less thermally variable environments exhibiting a specialist phenotype performing at higher rates but over a narrower range of temperatures. By contrast, the local optimal temperature for locomotor performance and CTmax did not match either mean or maximum pond temperatures. These results highlight the complexity of the adaptive multiple-trait thermal responses in natural populations, and the role of local thermal variation as a selective force driving diversity in life-history and physiological traits in the presence of gene flow.

  1. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  2. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields.

  3. Nuclear localization of human spermine oxidase isoforms - possible implications in drug response and disease etiology.

    PubMed

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Wang, Yanlin; Goodwin, Andrew; Hacker, Amy; Meeker, Alan; Casero, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    The recent discovery of the direct oxidation of spermine via spermine oxidase (SMO) as a mechanism through which specific antitumor polyamine analogues exert their cytotoxic effects has fueled interest in the study of the polyamine catabolic pathway. A major byproduct of spermine oxidation is H2O2, a source of toxic reactive oxygen species. Recent targeted small interfering RNA studies have confirmed that SMO-produced reactive oxygen species are directly responsible for oxidative stress capable of inducing apoptosis and potentially mutagenic DNA damage. In the present study, we describe a second catalytically active splice variant protein of the human spermine oxidase gene, designated SMO5, which exhibits substrate specificities and affinities comparable to those of the originally identified human spermine oxidase-1, SMO/PAOh1, and, as such, is an additional source of H2O2. Importantly, overexpression of either of these SMO isoforms in NCI-H157 human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells resulted in significant localization of SMO protein in the nucleus, as determined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, cell lines overexpressing either SMO/PAOh1 or SMO5 demonstrated increased spermine oxidation in the nucleus, with accompanying alterations in individual nuclear polyamine concentrations. This increased oxidation of spermine in the nucleus therefore increases the production of highly reactive H2O2 in close proximity to DNA, as well as decreases nuclear spermine levels, thus altering the protective roles of spermine in free radical scavenging and DNA shielding, and resulting in an overall increased potential for oxidative DNA damage in these cells. The results of these studies therefore have considerable significance both with respect to targeting polyamine oxidation as an antineoplastic strategy, and in regard to the potential role of spermine oxidase in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis.

  4. Nuclear localization of human spermine oxidase isoforms – possible implications in drug response and disease etiology

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Stewart, Tracy; Wang, Yanlin; Goodwin, Andrew; Hacker, Amy; Meeker, Alan; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of the direct oxidation of spermine via spermine oxidase (SMO) as a mechanism through which specific antitumor polyamine analogues exert their cytotoxic effects has fueled interest in the study of the polyamine catabolic pathway. A major byproduct of spermine oxidation is H2O2, a source of toxic reactive oxygen species. Recent targeted small interfering RNA studies have confirmed that SMO-produced reactive oxygen species are directly responsible for oxidative stress capable of inducing apoptosis and potentially mutagenic DNA damage. In the present study, we describe a second catalytically active splice variant protein of the human spermine oxidase gene, designated SMO5, which exhibits substrate specificities and affinities comparable to those of the originally identified human spermine oxidase-1, SMO/PAOh1, and, as such, is an additional source of H2O2. Importantly, overexpression of either of these SMO isoforms in NCI-H157 human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells resulted in significant localization of SMO protein in the nucleus, as determined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, cell lines overexpressing either SMO/PAOh1 or SMO5 demonstrated increased spermine oxidation in the nucleus, with accompanying alterations in individual nuclear polyamine concentrations. This increased oxidation of spermine in the nucleus therefore increases the production of highly reactive H2O2 in close proximity to DNA, as well as decreases nuclear spermine levels, thus altering the protective roles of spermine in free radical scavenging and DNA shielding, and resulting in an overall increased potential for oxidative DNA damage in these cells. The results of these studies therefore have considerable significance both with respect to targeting polyamine oxidation as an antineoplastic strategy, and in regard to the potential role of spermine oxidase in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:18422650

  5. Analysis of the localization and topology of nurim, a polytopic protein tightly associated with the inner nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Hofemeister, Helmut; O'Hare, Peter

    2005-01-28

    Nurim is an inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein that was first isolated in a visual screen for nuclear envelope-localizing proteins. Nurim lacks an N-terminal domain characteristic of other INM proteins examined to date and may represent a class of proteins that localize to the INM by a distinct mechanism. To further characterize this protein, we constructed nurim-green fluorescent protein fusions and analyzed aspects of localization, biochemistry, and membrane topology. Results from immunoprobing and protease protection assays together with other analyses indicate that nurim (total length of 262 residues) is a six transmembrane-spanning protein and contains a hairpin turn in its C-terminal transmembrane domain, resulting in the N and C termini residing on the same side of the membrane. A loop region between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains is exposed toward the nucleoplasm and contains a region accessible for site-specific endoproteinase cleavage. In biochemical fractionation, nurim remained extremely tightly bound to nuclear fractions and was released in significant quantities only in the presence of 4 m urea. Under conditions in which nuclear lamins were completely extracted, a significant population of nurim remained resistant to solubilization. This tight binding requires the C-terminal region of the protein. DNase treatment only marginally influenced its retention characteristics in nuclei. Results from consideration of sequence alignments and identification of specific topological features of nurim indicate that it may possess enzymic function. These results are discussed with reference to the retention mechanism and possible nuclear function of nurim.

  6. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  7. Role of a Nuclear Localization Signal on the Minor Capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV Nuclear Entry

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. PMID:25463609

  8. Nuclear β-catenin localization supports homology of feathers, avian scutate scales, and alligator scales in early development.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jacob M; Wagner, Günter P; Prum, Richard O

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are an evolutionary novelty found in all extant birds. Despite recent progress investigating feather development and a revolution in dinosaur paleontology, the relationship of feathers to other amniote skin appendages, particularly reptile scales, remains unclear. Disagreement arises primarily from the observation that feathers and avian scutate scales exhibit an anatomical placode-defined as an epidermal thickening-in early development, whereas alligator and other avian scales do not. To investigate the homology of feathers and archosaur scales we examined patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization during early development of feathers and different bird and alligator scales. In birds, nuclear β-catenin is first localized to the feather placode, and then exhibits a dynamic pattern of localization in both epidermis and dermis of the feather bud. We found that asymmetric avian scutate scales and alligator scales share similar patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization with feathers. This supports the hypothesis that feathers, scutate scales, and alligator scales are homologous during early developmental stages, and are derived from early developmental stages of an asymmetric scale present in the archosaur ancestor. Furthermore, given that the earliest stage of β-catenin localization in feathers and archosaur scales is also found in placodes of several mammalian skin appendages, including hair and mammary glands, we hypothesize that a common skin appendage placode originated in the common ancestor of all amniotes. We suggest a skin placode should not be defined by anatomical features, but as a local, organized molecular signaling center from which an epidermal appendage develops.

  9. Newly identified CSP41b gene localized in chloroplasts affects leaf color in rice.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jiasong; Li, Feifei; Liu, Xuri; Hu, Guocheng; Fu, Yaping; Liu, Wenzhen

    2017-03-01

    A rice mutant with light-green leaves was discovered from a transgenic line of Oryza sativa. The mutant has reduced chlorophyll content and abnormal chloroplast morphology throughout its life cycle. Genetic analysis revealed that a single nuclear-encoded recessive gene is responsible for the mutation, here designated as lgl1. To isolate the lgl1 gene, a high-resolution physical map of the chromosomal region around the lgl1 gene was made using a mapping population consisting of 1984 mutant individuals. The lgl1 gene was mapped in the 76.5kb region between marker YG4 and marker YG5 on chromosome 12. Sequence analysis revealed that there was a 39bp deletion within the fourth exon of the candidate gene Os12g0420200 (TIGR locus Os12g23180) encoding a chloroplast stem-loop-binding protein of 41kDa b (CSP41b). The lgl1 mutation was rescued by transformation with the wild type CSP41b gene. Accordingly, the CSP41b gene is identified as the LGL1 gene. CSP41b was transcribed in various tissues and was mainly expressed in leaves. Expression of CSP41b-GFP fusion protein indicated that CSP41b is localized in chloroplasts. The expression levels of some key genes involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis and photosynthesis, such as ChlD, ChlI, Hema1, Ygl1, POR, Cab1R, Cab2R, PsaA, and rbcL, was significantly changed in the lgl1 mutant. Our results demonstrate that CSP41b is a novel gene required for normal leaf color and chloroplast morphology in rice.

  10. EGFR Signaling Regulates Maspin/SerpinB5 Phosphorylation and Nuclear Localization in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Jeffrey; Morais Freitas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Maspin (SerpinB5) is a non-inhibitory serpin (serine protease inhibitor) with very diverse biological activities including regulation of cell adhesion, migration, death, control of gene expression and oxidative stress response. Initially described as a tumor and metastasis suppressor, clinical data brought controversies to the field, as some studies reported no correlation between SerpinB5 expression and prognosis value. These data underscore the importance of understanding SerpinB5 function in a normal physiological context and the molecular mechanism involved. Several SerpinB5 phosphoforms have been detected in different cell lines, but the signaling pathways involved and the biological significance of this post-translational modification in vivo remains to be explored. In this study we investigated SerpinB5 expression, subcellular localization and phosphorylation in different stages of the mouse mammary gland development and the signaling pathway involved. Here we show that SerpinB5 is first detected in late pregnancy, reaches its highest levels in lactation and remains at constant levels during post-lactational regression (involution). Using high resolution isoelectric focusing followed but immunoblot, we found at least 8 different phosphoforms of SerpinB5 during lactation, which decreases steadily at the onset of involution. In order to investigate the signaling pathway involved in SerpinB5 phosphorylation, we took advantage of the non-transformed MCF-10A model system, as we have previously observed SerpinB5 phosphorylation in these cells. We detected basal levels of SerpinB5 phosphorylation in serum- and growth factor-starved cells, which is due to amphiregulin autocrine activity on MCF-10A cells. EGF and TGF alpha, two other EGFR ligands, promote important SerpinB5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, EGF treatment is followed by SerpinB5 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, these data indicate that SerpinB5 expression and phosphorylation are developmentally

  11. Identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal of TRIM28 that overlaps with the HP1 box.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Tetsuji; Sangel, Percival; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Obuse, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-03

    Tripartite motif-containing 28 (TRIM28) is a transcription regulator, which forms a repressor complex containing heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Here, we report identification of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the 462-494 amino acid region of TRIM28 that overlaps with its HP1 binding site, HP1 box. GST-pulldown experiments revealed the interaction of the arginine-rich TRIM28 NLS with various importin α subtypes (α1, α2 and α4). In vitro transport assay demonstrated that nuclear localization of GFP-TRIM28 NLS is mediated by importin αs, in conjunction with importin β1 and Ran. Further, we demonstrated that HP1 and importin αs compete for binding to TRIM28. Together, our findings suggest that importin α has an essential role in the nuclear delivery and preferential HP1 interaction of TRIM28.

  12. How Are Local People Driving and Affected by Forest Cover Change? Opportunities for Local Participation in REDD+ Measurement, Reporting and Verification.

    PubMed

    Bong, Indah Waty; Felker, Mary Elizabeth; Maryudi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Deforestation and forest degradation are complex and dynamic processes that vary from place to place. They are driven by multiple causes. Local communities are, to some extent, driving and also affected by some of these processes. Can their knowledge aid and add to place-specific assessment and monitoring of Deforestation and forest Degradation (DD) drivers? Our research was conducted in seven villages across three provinces of Indonesia (Papua, West Kalimantan and Central Java). Household surveys and focus group discussions were used to investigate how local community knowledge of DD drivers contributes to place-specific assessment and monitoring of DD drivers. We analyzed the link between drivers and local livelihoods to see how attempts to address deforestation and forest degradation might affect local communities and how this link might influence their participation in climate change mitigation measures such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (MRV) activities. We found that local knowledge is fundamental to capturing the variety of drivers particularly in countries like Indonesia where forest and socio-economic conditions are diverse. Better understanding of drivers and their importance for local livelihoods will not only contribute to a more locally appropriate design of REDD+ and monitoring systems but will also foster local participation.

  13. How Are Local People Driving and Affected by Forest Cover Change? Opportunities for Local Participation in REDD+ Measurement, Reporting and Verification

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Indah Waty; Felker, Mary Elizabeth; Maryudi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Deforestation and forest degradation are complex and dynamic processes that vary from place to place. They are driven by multiple causes. Local communities are, to some extent, driving and also affected by some of these processes. Can their knowledge aid and add to place-specific assessment and monitoring of Deforestation and forest Degradation (DD) drivers? Our research was conducted in seven villages across three provinces of Indonesia (Papua, West Kalimantan and Central Java). Household surveys and focus group discussions were used to investigate how local community knowledge of DD drivers contributes to place-specific assessment and monitoring of DD drivers. We analyzed the link between drivers and local livelihoods to see how attempts to address deforestation and forest degradation might affect local communities and how this link might influence their participation in climate change mitigation measures such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) and Measuring, Reporting and Verifying (MRV) activities. We found that local knowledge is fundamental to capturing the variety of drivers particularly in countries like Indonesia where forest and socio-economic conditions are diverse. Better understanding of drivers and their importance for local livelihoods will not only contribute to a more locally appropriate design of REDD+ and monitoring systems but will also foster local participation. PMID:27806044

  14. A Study of Community Leaders in a Nuclear Host Community: Local Issues, Expectations and Support and Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfman, B. H.

    As part of a continuing effort to assess the social impacts on communities of energy facility planning, construction, operation, and decommissioning, a May 1977 survey of 37 community leaders in Hartsville, Tennessee (site of a nuclear power plant) establishes major local issues (past, present, and future) which leaders feel are important to…

  15. Role of a nuclear localization signal on the minor capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV nuclear entry

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Bosard, Catherine; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. - Highlights: • Polyomaviruses must deliver their genome to the nucleus to replicate. • The minor capsid proteins have a well-conserved nuclear localization signal. • Mutation of this NLS diminishes, but does not completely inhibit, infection.

  16. Immunocytochemical localization of the major polypeptides of the nuclear pore complex-lamina fraction. Interphase and mitotic distribution

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    This laboratory has previously isolated a fraction from rat liver nuclei consisting of nuclear pore complexes associated with the proteinaceous lamina which underlies the inner nuclear membrane. Using protein eluted from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gels, we have prepared antibodies in chickens to each of the three predominant pore complex- lamina bands. Ouchterlony double diffusion analysis shows that each of these individual bands cross-reacts strongly with all three antisera. In immunofluorescence localization performed on tissue culture cells with these antibodies, we obtain a pattern of intense staining at the periphery of the interphase nucleus, with little or no cytoplasmic reaction. Electron microscope immunoperoxidase staining of rat liver nuclei with these antibodies labels exclusively the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, reaction occurs in areas which contain the lamina, but not at the pore complexes. While our isolation procedure extracts the internal contents of nuclei completely, semiquantitative Ouchterlony analysis shows that it releases negligible amounts of these lamina antigens. Considered together, our results indicate that these three bands represent major components of a peripheral nuclear lamina, and are not structural elements of an internal "nuclear protein matrix." Fluorescence microscopy shows that the perinuclear interphase localization of these lamina proteins undergoes dramatic changes during mitosis. Concomitant with nuclear envelope disassembly in prophase, these antigens assume a diffuse localization throughout the cell. This distribution persists until telophase, when the antigens become progressively and completely localized at the surface of the daughter chromosome masses. We propose that the lamina is a biological polymer which can undergo reversible disassembly during mitosis. PMID:102651

  17. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  18. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes.

  19. Atrazine exposure affects the ability of crayfish (Orconectes rusticus) to localize a food odor source.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Rachelle M; Peters, Tyler J; Sabhapathy, Gita S; Khan, Sana; Katta, Juhi; Abraham, Noor K

    2015-05-01

    Environmental pollutants, found in aquatic ecosystems, have been shown to have an effect on olfactory-mediated behaviors including feeding, mate attraction, and other important social behaviors. Crayfish are polytrophic, meaning that they feed on and become prey for all levels of the aquatic food web as well as are also important for the transfer of energy between benthic and terrestrial food webs. Because crayfish are a keystone species, it is important to investigate any factors that may affect their population size. Crayfish are active at night and rely heavily on their sensory appendages (e.g., antennulues, maxillipeds, and pereopods) to localize food sources. In this experiment, we investigated the effects of atrazine (ATR) exposure on the chemosensory responses of male and female crayfish to food odors. We exposed crayfish to environmentally relevant, sublethal levels of ATR [80 ppb (µg/L)] for 72 h and then examined the behavioral responses of both ATR-treated and control crayfish to food odor delivered from one end of a test arena. We used Noldus Ethovision XT software to measure odor localization and locomotory behaviors of crayfish in response to food (fish) odor. We found that control crayfish spent more time in the proximal region of the test arena and at the odor source compared with ATR-treated crayfish. Furthermore, there were no differences in the time spent moving and not moving, total distance travelled in the tank, and walking speed (cm/s) when control and ATR-treated crayfish were compared. Overall, this indicates that acute ATR exposure alters chemosensory abilities of crayfish, whereas overall motor function remains unchanged.

  20. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Contains Domains for ATP Binding, Nuclear Localization, and Type IV Secretion▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Vergunst, Annette C.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Ream, Walt

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  1. Breast Cancer–Associated Abraxas Mutation Disrupts Nuclear Localization and DNA Damage Response Functions

    PubMed Central

    Solyom, Szilvia; Aressy, Bernadette; Pylkäs, Katri; Patterson-Fortin, Jeffrey; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Kallioniemi, Anne; Kauppila, Saila; Nikkilä, Jenni; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Greenberg, Roger A.; Winqvist, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries and has a well-established genetic component. Germline mutations in a network of genes encoding BRCA1, BRCA2, and their interacting partners confer hereditary susceptibility to breast cancer. Abraxas directly interacts with the BRCA1 BRCT (BRCA1 carboxyl-terminal) repeats and contributes to BRCA1-dependent DNA damage responses, making Abraxas a candidate for yet unexplained disease susceptibility. Here, we have screened 125 Northern Finnish breast cancer families for coding region and splice-site Abraxas mutations and genotyped three tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the gene from 991 unselected breast cancer cases and 868 female controls for common cancer-associated variants. A novel heterozygous alteration, c.1082G>A (Arg361Gln), that results in abrogated nuclear localization and DNA response activities was identified in three breast cancer families and in one additional familial case from an unselected breast cancer cohort, but not in healthy controls (P = 0.002). On the basis of its exclusive occurrence in familial cancers, disease cosegregation, evolutionary conservation, and disruption of critical BRCA1 functions, the recurrent Abraxas c.1082G>A mutation connects to cancer predisposition. These findings contribute to the concept of a BRCA-centered tumor suppressor network and provide the identity of Abraxas as a new breast cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:22357538

  2. Thr308 determines Akt1 nuclear localization in insulin-stimulated keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Itamar; Mueller, Elke; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2008-07-18

    Here, we determined the localization and activation of protein kinase B (Akt) in acute cutaneous wound tissue in mice. Akt1 represented the major Akt isoform that was expressed and activated in wound margin keratinocytes and also in the cultured human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Mutation of Akt1 protein, exchanging the activation-essential Ser473 and Thr308 residues for inactive Ala or phosphorylation-mimicking Asp and Glu residues, revealed that phosphorylation of Ser473 represented an essential prerequisite for auto-phosphorylation of Thr308 within the Akt1 protein in keratinocytes. Moreover, cell culture experiments and transfection studies using Thr308 mutated Akt1 proteins demonstrated that phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308 appeared to selectively exclude the active kinase from the nucleus and direct the kinase to the cytoplasmic compartment in keratinocytes upon insulin stimulation. In summary, our data show that phosphorylation of Thr308 during insulin-mediated Akt1 activation is an essential prerequisite to exclude Akt1 from the nuclear compartment.

  3. Sorghum DW1 positively regulates brassinosteroid signaling by inhibiting the nuclear localization of BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ko; Kawamura, Mayuko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Fujimoto, Haruka; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujii, Akihiro; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Semi-dwarf traits have been widely introgressed into cereal crops to improve lodging resistance. In sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench), four major unlinked dwarfing genes, Dw1-Dw4, have been introduced to reduce plant height, and among them, Dw3 and Dw1 have been cloned. Dw3 encodes a gene involved in auxin transport, whereas, Dw1 was recently isolated and identified as a gene encoding a protein of unknown function. In this study, we show that DW1 is a novel component of brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Sorghum possessing the mutated allele of Dw1 (dw1), showed similar phenotypes to rice BR-deficient mutants, such as reduced lamina joint bending, attenuated skotomorphogenesis, and insensitivity against feedback regulation of BR-related genes. Furthermore, DW1 interacted with a negative regulator of BR signaling, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 2 (BIN2), and inhibited its nuclear localization, indicating that DW1 positively regulates BR signaling by inhibiting the function of BIN2. In contrast to rice and wheat breeding which used gibberellin (GA) deficiency to reduce plant height, sorghum breeding modified auxin and BR signaling. This difference may result from GA deficiency in rice and wheat does not cause deleterious side effects on plant morphology, whereas in sorghum it leads to abnormal culm bending.

  4. Localized β-adrenergic receptor blockade does not affect sweating during exercise.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Tabor, Brian; White, Ailish

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of a locally administered nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist on sweat gland function during exercise. Systemically administered propranolol has been reported to increase, decrease, or not alter sweat production during exercise. To eliminate the confounding systemic effects associated with orally administered propranolol, we used iontophoresis to deliver it to the eccrine sweat glands within a localized area on one forearm prior to exercise. This allowed for determination of the direct effect of β-adrenergic receptor blockade on sweating during exercise. Subjects (n = 14) reported to the laboratory (23 ± 1°C, 35 ± 3% relative humidity) after having refrained from exercise for ≥12 h. Propranolol (1% solution) was administered to a 5-cm(2) area of the flexor surface of one forearm via iontophoresis (1.5 mA) for 5 min. A saline solution was administered to the opposing arm via iontophoresis. Each subject then exercised on a motor-driven treadmill at 75% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate for 20 min, while sweat rate was measured simultaneously in both forearms. Immediately after cessation of exercise, the number of active sweat glands was measured by application of iodine-impregnated paper to each forearm. The sweat rate for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 0.62 ± 41 and 0.60 ± 0.44 (SD) mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively (P = 0.86). The density of active sweat glands for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 130 ± 6 and 134 ± 5 (SD) glands/cm(2), respectively, (P = 0.33). End-exercise skin temperature was 32.9 ± 0.2 and 33.1 ± 0.3°C for the control and propranolol-treated forearm, respectively (P = 0.51). Results of the current study show that when propranolol is administered locally, thus eliminating the potential confounding systemic effects of the drug, it does not directly affect sweating during the initial stages of high-intensity exercise in young, healthy

  5. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  6. The nuclear localization signal of mitotic kinesin-like protein Mklp-1: effect on Mklp-1 function during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Erikson, Raymond L

    2007-02-23

    The mitotic kinesin-like protein (Mklp-1) localizes in the nucleus during interphase due to the presence of nuclear localization signal(s) [NLS(s)] within its sequence. Here, we mapped two NLSs to be 899SRKRRSST906 and 949KRKKP953 in the tail domain of Mklp-1, and showed that ectopic expression of a mutant Mklp-1 without the NLSs leads to cell cycle arrest at cytokinesis, indicating that the NLSs are necessary for Mklp-1 to execute its normal function during cell division. Furthermore, mutation of two serine residues in the first NLS to aspartic acid, which mimics phosphorylation, attenuated its nuclear localization function, suggesting that the function of this NLS might be regulated by phosphorylation.

  7. The rate of nuclear cytoplasmic protein transport is determined by the casein kinase II site flanking the nuclear localization sequence of the SV40 T-antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Rihs, H P; Jans, D A; Fan, H; Peters, R

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated [Rihs, H.-P. and Peters, R. (1989) EMBO J., 8, 1479-1484] that the nuclear transport of recombinant proteins in which short fragments of the SV40 T-antigen are fused to the amino terminus of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase is dependent on both the nuclear localization sequence (NLS, T-antigen residues 126-132) and a phosphorylation-site-containing sequence (T-antigen residues 111-125). While the NLS determines the specificity, the rate of transport is controlled by the phosphorylation-site-containing sequence. The present study furthers this observation and examines the role of the various phosphorylation sites. Purified, fluorescently labeled recombinant proteins were injected into the cytoplasm of Vero or hepatoma (HTC) cells and the kinetics of nuclear transport measured by laser microfluorimetry. By replacing serine and threonine residues known to be phosphorylated in vivo, we identified the casein kinase II (CK-II) site S111/S112 to be the determining factor in the enhancement of the transport. Either of the residues 111 or 112 was sufficient to elicit the maximum transport enhancement. The other phosphorylation sites (S120, S123, T124) had no influence on the transport rate. Examination of the literature suggested that many proteins harboring a nuclear localization sequence also contain putative CK-II sites at a distance of approximately 10-30 amino acid residues from the NLS. CK-II has been previously implicated in the transmission of growth signals to the nucleus. Our results suggest that CK-II may exert this role by controlling the rate of nuclear protein transport. Images PMID:1848177

  8. Local seismic network for monitoring of a potential nuclear power plant area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiira, Timo; Uski, Marja; Kortström, Jari; Kaisko, Outi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a plan for seismic monitoring of a region around a potential nuclear power plant. Seismic monitoring is needed to evaluate seismic risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency has set guidelines on seismic hazard evaluation and monitoring of such areas. According to these guidelines, we have made a plan for a local network of seismic stations to collect data for seismic source characterization and seismotectonic interpretations, as well as to monitor seismic activity and natural hazards. The detection and location capability of the network were simulated using different station configurations by computing spatial azimuthal coverages and detection threshold magnitudes. Background noise conditions around Pyhäjoki were analyzed by comparing data from different stations. The annual number of microearthquakes that should be detected with a dense local network centered around Pyhäjoki was estimated. The network should be dense enough to fulfill the requirements of azimuthal coverage better than 180° and automatic event location capability down to ML ˜ 0 within a distance of 25 km from the site. A network of 10 stations should be enough to reach these goals. With this setup, the detection threshold magnitudes are estimated to be ML = -0.1 and ML = 0.1 within a radius of 25 and 50 km from Pyhäjoki, respectively. The annual number of earthquakes detected by the network is estimated to be 2 (ML ≥ ˜ -0.1) within 25 km radius and 5 (ML ≥ ˜-0.1 to ˜0.1) within 50 km radius. The location accuracy within 25 km radius is estimated to be 1-2 and 4 km for horizontal coordinates and depth, respectively. Thus, the network is dense enough to map out capable faults with horizontal accuracy of 1-2 km within 25 km radius of the site. The estimation is based on the location accuracies of five existing networks in northern Europe. Local factors, such as seismic noise sources, geology and infrastructure might limit the station configuration and detection and

  9. Local seismic network for monitoring of a potential nuclear power plant area.

    PubMed

    Tiira, Timo; Uski, Marja; Kortström, Jari; Kaisko, Outi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a plan for seismic monitoring of a region around a potential nuclear power plant. Seismic monitoring is needed to evaluate seismic risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency has set guidelines on seismic hazard evaluation and monitoring of such areas. According to these guidelines, we have made a plan for a local network of seismic stations to collect data for seismic source characterization and seismotectonic interpretations, as well as to monitor seismic activity and natural hazards. The detection and location capability of the network were simulated using different station configurations by computing spatial azimuthal coverages and detection threshold magnitudes. Background noise conditions around Pyhäjoki were analyzed by comparing data from different stations. The annual number of microearthquakes that should be detected with a dense local network centered around Pyhäjoki was estimated. The network should be dense enough to fulfill the requirements of azimuthal coverage better than 180° and automatic event location capability down to ML ∼ 0 within a distance of 25 km from the site. A network of 10 stations should be enough to reach these goals. With this setup, the detection threshold magnitudes are estimated to be ML = -0.1 and ML = 0.1 within a radius of 25 and 50 km from Pyhäjoki, respectively. The annual number of earthquakes detected by the network is estimated to be 2 (ML ≥ ∼ -0.1) within 25 km radius and 5 (ML ≥ ∼-0.1 to ∼0.1) within 50 km radius. The location accuracy within 25 km radius is estimated to be 1-2 and 4 km for horizontal coordinates and depth, respectively. Thus, the network is dense enough to map out capable faults with horizontal accuracy of 1-2 km within 25 km radius of the site. The estimation is based on the location accuracies of five existing networks in northern Europe. Local factors, such as seismic noise sources, geology and infrastructure might limit the station

  10. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  11. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: a gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Deák, P; Kasbekar, D P; Gil, D W; Hall, L M

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new gamma-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggest that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel alpha-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation.

  13. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  14. Coilin is rapidly recruited to UVA-induced DNA lesions and γ-radiation affects localized movement of Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Bártová, Eva; Foltánková, Veronika; Legartová, Soňa; Sehnalová, Petra; Sorokin, Dmitry V; Suchánková, Jana; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Cajal bodies are important nuclear structures containing proteins that preferentially regulate RNA-related metabolism. We investigated the cell-type specific nuclear distribution of Cajal bodies and the level of coilin, a protein of Cajal bodies, in non-irradiated and irradiated human tumor cell lines and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cajal bodies were localized in different nuclear compartments, including DAPI-poor regions, in the proximity of chromocenters, and adjacent to nucleoli. The number of Cajal bodies per nucleus was cell cycle-dependent, with higher numbers occurring during G2 phase. Human ES cells contained a high coilin level in the nucleoplasm, but coilin-positive Cajal bodies were also identified in nuclei of mouse and human ES cells. Coilin, but not SMN, recognized UVA-induced DNA lesions, which was cell cycle-independent. Treatment with γ-radiation reduced the localized movement of Cajal bodies in many cell types and GFP-coilin fluorescence recovery after photobleaching was very fast in nucleoplasm in comparison with GFP-coilin recovery in DNA lesions. By contrast, nucleolus-localized coilin displayed very slow fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, which indicates very slow rates of protein diffusion, especially in nucleoli of mouse ES cells.

  15. Local Water Dynamics in Coacervated Polyelectrolytes Monitored Through Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-Enhanced 1H NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kausik, Ravinath; Srivastava, Aasheesh; Korevaar, Peter A.; Stucky, Galen; Waite, J. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    We present the first study of quantifying the diffusion coefficient of interfacial water on polyelectrolyte surfaces of systems fully dispersed in bulk water under ambient conditions. Such measurements were made possible through the implementation of a recently introduced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) technique to selectively amplify the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal of hydration water that is interacting with specifically located spin labels on polyelectrolyte surfaces. The merit of this novel capability is demonstrated in this report through the measurement of solvent microvisosity on the surface of two types of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes, when freely dissolved versus when complexed to form a liquid-liquid colloidal phase called complex coacervates. These complex coacervates were formed through electrostatic complexation between the imidazole-based cationic homopolymer poly(N-vinylimidazole) (PVIm), and anionic polypeptide polyaspartate (PAsp) in the pH range of 4.5 – 6.0, under which conditions the coacervate droplets are highly fluidic yet densely packed with polyelectrolytes. We also investigated the rotational diffusion coefficients of the spin labels covalently bound to the polyelectrolyte chains for both PVIm and PAsp, showing a 5 fold change in the rotational correlation time as well as anisotropy parameter upon coacervation, which represents a surprisingly small decrease given the high polymer concentration inside the dense microdroplets. For both DNP and ESR experiments, the polymers were covalently tagged with stable nitroxide radical spin labels (∼1 wt %) to probe the local solvent and polymer segment dynamics. We found that the surface water diffusion coefficients near uncomplexed PVIm and PAsp at pH 8 differ, and are around D∼1.3×10−9 m2 / s. In contrast, inside the complex coacervate phase, the water diffusion coefficient in the immediate vicinity of either polyelectrolyte was D∼ 0.25×10−9 m2 / s, which is about

  16. The "genomic storm" induced by bacterial endotoxin is calmed by a nuclear transport modifier that attenuates localized and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Veach, Ruth Ann; Zienkiewicz, Jozef; Moore, Daniel J; Wylezinski, Lukasz S; Hutchens, Martha A; Hawiger, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent microbial virulence factor that can trigger production of proinflammatory mediators involved in the pathogenesis of localized and systemic inflammation. Importantly, the role of nuclear transport of stress responsive transcription factors in this LPS-generated "genomic storm" remains largely undefined. We developed a new nuclear transport modifier (NTM) peptide, cell-penetrating cSN50.1, which targets nuclear transport shuttles importin α5 and importin β1, to analyze its effect in LPS-induced localized (acute lung injury) and systemic (lethal endotoxic shock) murine inflammation models. We analyzed a human genome database to match 46 genes that encode cytokines, chemokines and their receptors with transcription factors whose nuclear transport is known to be modulated by NTM. We then tested the effect of cSN50.1 peptide on proinflammatory gene expression in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages stimulated with LPS. This NTM suppressed a proinflammatory transcriptome of 37 out of 84 genes analyzed, without altering expression of housekeeping genes or being cytotoxic. Consistent with gene expression analysis in primary macrophages, plasma levels of 23 out of 26 LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors were significantly attenuated in a murine model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation (lethal endotoxic shock) while the anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 10, was enhanced. This anti-inflammatory reprogramming of the endotoxin-induced genomic response was accompanied by complete protection against lethal endotoxic shock with prophylactic NTM treatment, and 75% protection when NTM was first administered after LPS exposure. In a murine model of localized lung inflammation caused by direct airway exposure to LPS, expression of cytokines and chemokines in the bronchoalveolar space was suppressed with a concomitant reduction of neutrophil trafficking. Thus, calming the LPS-triggered "genomic storm" by

  17. Proteomic analyses identify a diverse array of nuclear processes affected by small ubiquitin-like modifier conjugation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marcus J; Barrett-Wilt, Gregory A; Hua, Zhihua; Vierstra, Richard D

    2010-09-21

    The covalent attachment of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) to other intracellular proteins affects a broad range of nuclear processes in yeast and animals, including chromatin maintenance, transcription, and transport across the nuclear envelope, as well as protects proteins from ubiquitin addition. Substantial increases in SUMOylated proteins upon various stresses have also implicated this modification in the general stress response. To help understand the role(s) of SUMOylation in plants, we developed a stringent method to isolate SUMO-protein conjugates from Arabidopsis thaliana that exploits a tagged SUMO1 variant that faithfully replaces the wild-type protein. Following purification under denaturing conditions, SUMOylated proteins were identified by tandem mass spectrometry from both nonstressed plants and those exposed to heat and oxidative stress. The list of targets is enriched for factors that direct SUMOylation and for nuclear proteins involved in chromatin remodeling/repair, transcription, RNA metabolism, and protein trafficking. Targets of particular interest include histone H2B, components in the LEUNIG/TOPLESS corepressor complexes, and proteins that control histone acetylation and DNA methylation, which affect genome-wide transcription. SUMO attachment site(s) were identified in a subset of targets, including SUMO1 itself to confirm the assembly of poly-SUMO chains. SUMO1 also becomes conjugated with ubiquitin during heat stress, thus connecting these two posttranslational modifications in plants. Taken together, we propose that SUMOylation represents a rapid and global mechanism for reversibly manipulating plant chromosomal functions, especially during environmental stress.

  18. Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Beta Protects Nuclear Envelope Integrity by Controlling RCC1 Localization and Ran Activity

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Muñoz, Javier; Pérez-García, Vicente; Rodríguez, María J.; Valpuesta, José M.

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) forms a barrier between the nucleus and the cytosol that preserves genomic integrity. The nuclear lamina and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are NE components that regulate nuclear events through interaction with other proteins and DNA. Defects in the nuclear lamina are associated with the development of laminopathies. As cells depleted of phosphoinositide 3-kinase beta (PI3Kβ) showed an aberrant nuclear morphology, we studied the contribution of PI3Kβ to maintenance of NE integrity. pik3cb depletion reduced the nuclear membrane tension, triggered formation of areas of lipid bilayer/lamina discontinuity, and impaired NPC assembly. We show that one mechanism for PI3Kβ regulation of NE/NPC integrity is its association with RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation 1), the activator of nuclear Ran GTPase. PI3Kβ controls RCC1 binding to chromatin and, in turn, Ran activation. These findings suggest that PI3Kβ regulates the nuclear envelope through upstream regulation of RCC1 and Ran. PMID:25348717

  19. The Fukushima Nuclear Accident Affected Mothers' Depression but Not Maternal Confidence.

    PubMed

    Goto, Aya; Bromet, Evelyn J; Ota, Misao; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yasumura, Seiji; Fujimori, Keiya

    2017-03-01

    The Fukushima nuclear power plant accident caused widespread radiation contamination. Mothers of young children were at risk of negative emotional and mental health consequences. Using data from 2 independent prefecture-wide surveys of pregnant women, we examined the associations of disaster-related stressors with both maternal self-confidence and depressive symptoms. Two postal surveys were conducted targeting women who registered their pregnancies in Fukushima Prefecture (n = 6686 in 2012 and n = 6423 in 2013). The proportions of mothers with lower self-confidence in child rearing and with depressive symptoms were 53% and 25% in 2012 and 55% and 24% in 2013, respectively. After adjusting for maternal and infant characteristics, evacuation and concern about radiation were significantly associated with depressive symptoms but not lower maternal confidence, although these 2 outcomes were significantly associated. Mothers in Fukushima showed resilience in parenting, whereas their experiences and concerns in the aftermath of nuclear disaster were associated with depressive symptoms.

  20. The {open_quotes}Dragon of Kovachitsa{close_quotes}: Local perceptions of radioactive pollution near the Kozlodui Nuclear Power Station (Bulgaria)

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, Y.

    1995-03-01

    There is continuing uncertainty surrounding the safety of nuclear power stations in Eastern Europe, among them the one at Kozlodui, Bulgaria. It is argued in this paper that attempts on the part of the state to assert the safety of nuclear power stations are expressed in terms of an official {open_quotes}nuclear-safe{close_quotes} discourse, while the local inhabitants near the Kozlodui nuclear power station employ a vernacular mode of expression to explain possible radioactive pollution.

  1. Quantitative assessment of in situ microbial communities affecting nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |

    1996-05-01

    Microbes in the environments surrounding nuclear waste depositories pose several questions regarding the protection of the surrounding communities. microbes can facilitate microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), mobilize and facilitate the transport of nuclides as well as produce gaseous emissions which can compromise containment. We have developed an analysis of the extant microbiota that is independent of quantitative recovery and subsequent growth, based on signature biomarkers analysis (SBA).

  2. Characterization of the bipartite nuclear localization signal of protein LANA2 from Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Nombela, Cesar; Arroyo, Javier; Rivas, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    LANA2 is a nuclear latent protein detected exclusively in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected B cells. The protein inhibits p53-dependent transactivation and apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. To explore the molecular mechanisms of its nuclear localization, fusion proteins of green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and deletion constructs of LANA2 were expressed in HeLa cells. Only the fragment comprising amino acid residues 355-440 of LANA2 localized in the cell nucleus. This fragment contains two closely located basic domains and forms a putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). The putative LANA2 NLS was able to target EGFP to the nucleus consistently. Site-directed mutation analyses demonstrated that LANA2 contains a functional bipartite NLS between amino acid positions 367 and 384. In addition, analysis of cells transfected with a cytoplasmic LANA2 mutant revealed that an appropriate subcellular localization may be crucial to regulate p53 activity. PMID:12767255

  3. Disrupting Mitochondrial–Nuclear Coevolution Affects OXPHOS Complex I Integrity and Impacts Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  4. Impaired protein stability and nuclear localization of NOBOX variants associated with premature ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Ilaria; Bouilly, Justine; Beau, Isabelle; Guizzardi, Fabiana; Ferlin, Alberto; Pollazzon, Marzia; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Binart, Nadine; Persani, Luca; Rossetti, Raffaella

    2016-10-23

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a clinical syndrome defined by a loss of ovarian activity before the age of 40. Its pathogenesis is still largely unknown, but increasing evidences support a genetic basis in most cases. Among these, heterozygous mutations in NOBOX, a homeobox gene encoding a transcription factor expressed specifically by oocyte and granulosa cells within the ovary, have been reported in ∼6% of women with sporadic POI. The pivotal role of NOBOX in early folliculogenesis is supported by findings in knock-out mice. Here, we report the genetic screening of 107 European women with idiopathic POI, recruited in various settings, and the molecular and functional characterization of the identified variants to evaluate their involvement in POI onset. Specifically, we report the identification of two novel and two recurrent heterozygous NOBOX variants in 7 out of 107 patients, with a prevalence of 6.5% (upper 95% confidence limit of 11.17%). Furthermore, immunolocalization, Western Blot and transcriptional assays conducted in either HEK293T or CHO cells revealed that all the studied variants (p.R44L, p.G91W, p.G111R, p.G152R, p.K273*, p.R449* and p.D452N) display variable degrees of functional impairment, including defects in transcriptional activity, autophagosomal degradation, nuclear localization or protein instability. Several variants conserve the ability to interact with FOXL2 in intracellular aggregates. Their inability to sustain gene expression, together with their likely aberrant effects on protein stability and degradation, make the identified NOBOX mutations a plausible cause of POI onset.

  5. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  6. High expression level and nuclear localization of Sam68 are associated with progression and poor prognosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68; 68 kDa) has been implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of several human cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinicopathologic significance of Sam68 expression and its subcellular localization in colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods Sam68 expression was examined in CRC cell lines, nine matched CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting. Sam68 protein expression and localization were determined in 224 paraffin-embedded archived CRC samples using immunohistochemistry. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the clinicopathologic significance. Results Sam68 was upregulated in CRC cell lines and CRC, as compared with normal tissues; high Sam68 expression was detected in 120/224 (53.6%) of the CRC tissues. High Sam68 expression correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.033), advanced T stage (P < 0.001), N stage (P = 0.023) and distant metastasis (P = 0.033). Sam68 nuclear localization correlated significantly with poor differentiation (P = 0.002) and T stage (P =0.021). Patients with high Sam68 expression or Sam68 nuclear localization had poorer overall survival than patients with low Sam68 expression or Sam68 cytoplasmic localization. Patients with high Sam68 expression had a higher risk of recurrence than those with low Sam68 expression. Conclusions Overexpression of Sam68 correlated highly with cancer progression and poor differentiation in CRC. High Sam68 expression and Sam68 nuclear localization were associated with poorer overall survival. PMID:23937454

  7. Antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens. Has technological drift affected clinical interpretation?

    PubMed

    Lock, R J; Unsworth, D J

    2001-03-01

    Precipitating antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens are important in the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases. Disease associations are defined using gel based techniques. Alternative technologies have been introduced, including passive haemagglutination, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and western blotting. This leader contains a review of the literature on the clinical usefulness of these assays, together with knowledge gained from personal experience. Using the example of systemic lupus erythematosus, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the assays for disease is discussed, as is their differences in performance. The conclusion drawn is that disease specificity is method dependent. Validation and audit of performance of the method selected by the investigation laboratory is essential.

  8. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-08-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence {sup 916}NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG{sup 934} comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin {alpha}/{beta} mechanism employing importins {alpha}1 and {alpha}3 but not {alpha}5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTP{gamma}S. The sequence {sup 1414}SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL{sup 1433}, a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin {alpha}1/{beta} or {alpha}3/{beta} complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS.

  9. Identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal of TRIM28 that overlaps with the HP1 box

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Tetsuji; Sangel, Percival; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Obuse, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-03

    Tripartite motif-containing 28 (TRIM28) is a transcription regulator, which forms a repressor complex containing heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Here, we report identification of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the 462-494 amino acid region of TRIM28 that overlaps with its HP1 binding site, HP1 box. GST-pulldown experiments revealed the interaction of the arginine-rich TRIM28 NLS with various importin α subtypes (α1, α2 and α4). In vitro transport assay demonstrated that nuclear localization of GFP-TRIM28 NLS is mediated by importin αs, in conjunction with importin β1 and Ran. Further, we demonstrated that HP1 and importin αs compete for binding to TRIM28. Together, our findings suggest that importin α has an essential role in the nuclear delivery and preferential HP1 interaction of TRIM28. - Highlights: • TRIM28 contains an NLS within the 462-494 amino acid region. • The nuclear import of TRIM28 is mediated by importin α/importin β1. • TRIM28 NLS overlaps with HP1 Box. • HP1 and importin α compete for binding to TRIM28.

  10. ICP27-dependent resistance of herpes simplex virus type 1 to leptomycin B is associated with enhanced nuclear localization of ICP4 and ICP0

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, Joy; Strain, Anna K.; Perkins, Keith D.; Rice, Stephen A. . E-mail: ricex019@umn.edu

    2006-09-01

    It was previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is sensitive to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of nuclear export factor CRM1, and that a single methionine to threonine change at residue 50 (M50T) of viral immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 can confer LMB resistance. In this work, we show that deletion of residues 21-63 from ICP27 can also confer LMB resistance. We further show that neither the M50T mutation nor the presence of LMB affects the nuclear shuttling activity of ICP27, suggesting that another function of ICP27 determines LMB resistance. A possible clue to this function emerged when it was discovered that LMB treatment of HSV-1-infected cells dramatically enhances the cytoplasmic accumulation of two other IE proteins, ICP0 and ICP4. This effect is completely dependent on ICP27 and is reversed in cells infected with LMB-resistant mutants. Moreover, LMB-resistant mutations in ICP27 enhance the nuclear localization of ICP0 and ICP4 even in the absence of LMB, and this effect can be discerned in transfected cells. Thus, the same amino (N)-terminal region of ICP27 that determines sensitivity to LMB also enhances ICP27's previously documented ability to promote the cytoplasmic accumulation of ICP4 and ICP0. We speculate that ICP27's effects on ICP4 and ICP0 may contribute to HSV-1 LMB sensitivity.

  11. The tobamovirus Turnip Vein Clearing Virus 30-kilodalton movement protein localizes to novel nuclear filaments to enhance virus infection.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y; Lazarowitz, Sondra G

    2013-06-01

    Plant viruses overcome the barrier of the plant cell wall by encoding cell-to-cell movement proteins (MPs), which direct newly replicated viral genomes to, and across, the wall. The paradigm for how a single MP regulates and coordinates these activities is the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 30-kDa protein (MP(TMV)). Detailed studies demonstrate that TMV multiplies exclusively in the cytoplasm and have documented associations of MP(TMV) with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, microtubules, and plasmodesmata throughout the course of infection. As TMV poorly infects Arabidopsis thaliana, Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) is the tobamovirus of choice for studies in this model plant. A key problem, which has contributed to confusion in the field, is the unproven assumption that the TVCV and TMV life cycles are identical. We engineered an infectious TVCV replicon that expressed a functional fluorescence-tagged MP(TVCV) and report here the unexpected discovery that MP(TVCV), beyond localizing to ER membrane and plasmodesmata, targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent manner, where it localized to novel F-actin-containing filaments that associated with chromatin. The MP(TVCV) NLS appeared to be conserved in the subgroup 3 tobamoviruses, and our mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MP(TVCV) was necessary for efficient TVCV cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our studies identify a novel nuclear stage in TVCV infection and suggest that nuclear MP encoded by TVCV and other subgroup 3 tobamoviruses interacts with F-actin and chromatin to modulate host defenses or cellular physiology to favor virus movement and infection.

  12. Localization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II Tax protein is dependent upon a nuclear localization determinant in the N-terminal region.

    PubMed

    Turci, Marco; Romanelli, Maria Grazia; Lorenzi, Pamela; Righi, Paola; Bertazzoni, Umberto

    2006-01-03

    Human T-cell lymphotropic viruses (HTLV) types I and II are closely related oncogenic retroviruses that have been associated with lymphoproliferative and neurological disorders. The proviral genome encodes a trans-regulatory Tax protein that activates viral genes and upregulates various cellular genes involved in both cell growth and transformation. Tax proteins of HTLV-I (Tax-I) and HTLV-II (Tax-II) exhibit more than 77% aa homology and expression of either Tax-I or Tax-II is sufficient for immortalization of cultured T lymphocytes. Tax-I shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and accumulates within the nucleus, whereas Tax-II is found mainly in the cytoplasm. In the present study we have used recombinant vectors to analyze the size and structure of the nuclear localization domain within the Tax-II protein sequence. The Tax-II protein was expressed in HeLa cells either as the complete protein, or regions thereof, that were individually fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Immunoblot analysis of the fused Tax-II products confirmed their expression and size. Fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that the complete Tax-II as well as N-truncated forms presented a punctuate cytoplasmic distribution and that a nuclear localization determinant is confined to within the first 60 aa of Tax-II. Accordingly, site directed mutagenesis and deletion of specific sequences within the first 60 aa showed that the nuclear determinant lies within the first 41 residues of Tax-II. These results point to a direct involvement of the amino-terminal residues of Tax-II protein in determining its nuclear functionality.

  13. Reducing uncertainties affecting the assessment of the long-term corrosion behavior of spent nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Fanghänel, Thomas; Rondinella, Vincenzo V; Glatz, Jean-Paul; Wiss, Thierry; Wegen, Detlef H; Gouder, Thomas; Carbol, Paul; Serrano-Purroy, Daniel; Papaioannou, Dimitrios

    2013-04-01

    Reducing the uncertainties associated with extrapolation to very long term of corrosion data obtainable from laboratory tests on a relatively young spent nuclear fuel is a formidable challenge. In a geologic repository, spent nuclear fuel may come in contact with water tens or hundreds of thousands of years after repository closure. The corrosion behavior will depend on the fuel properties and on the conditions characterizing the near field surrounding the spent fuel at the time of water contact. This paper summarizes the main conclusions drawn from multiyear experimental campaigns performed at JRC-ITU to study corrosion behavior and radionuclide release from spent light water reactor fuel. The radionuclide release from the central region of a fuel pellet is higher than that from the radial periphery, in spite of the higher burnup and the corresponding structural modifications occurring at the pellet rim during irradiation. Studies on the extent and time boundaries of the radiolytic enhancement of the spent fuel corrosion rate indicate that after tens or hundreds of thousands of years have elapsed, very small or no contribution to the enhanced corrosion rate has to be expected from α radiolysis. A beneficial effect inhibiting spent fuel corrosion due to the hydrogen overpressure generated in the near field by iron corrosion is confirmed. The results obtained so far point toward a benign picture describing spent fuel corrosion in a deep geologic repository. More work is ongoing to further reduce uncertainties and to obtain a full description of the expected corrosion behavior of spent fuel.

  14. Strain-specific nuclear genetic background differentially affects mitochondria-related phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Montanari, Arianna; Francisci, Silvia; Fazzi D'Orsi, Mario; Bianchi, Michele Maria

    2014-06-01

    In the course of our studies on mitochondrial defects, we have observed important phenotypic variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suggesting that a better characterization of the genetic variability will be essential to define the relationship between the mitochondrial efficiency and the presence of different nuclear backgrounds. In this manuscript, we have extended the study of such relations by comparing phenotypic assays related to mitochondrial functions of three wild-type laboratory strains. In addition to the phenotypic variability among the wild-type strains, important differences have been observed among strains bearing identical mitochondrial tRNA mutations that could be related only to the different nuclear background of the cells. Results showed that strains exhibited an intrinsic variability in the severity of the effects of the mitochondrial mutations and that specific strains might be used preferentially to evaluate the phenotypic effect of mitochondrial mutations on carbon metabolism, stress responses, and mitochondrial DNA stability. In particular, while W303-1B and MCC123 strains should be used to study the effect of severe mitochondrial tRNA mutations, D273-10B/A1 strain is rather suitable for studying the effects of milder mutations.

  15. Recruitment of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 into specific intranuclear compartments depends on tyrosine phosphorylation that affects its DNA-binding and transactivation potential.

    PubMed Central

    Ktistaki, E; Ktistakis, N T; Papadogeorgaki, E; Talianidis, I

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) is a prominent member of the family of liver-enriched transcription factors, playing a role in the expression of a large number of liver-specific genes. We report here that HNF-4 is a phosphoprotein and that phosphorylation at tyrosine residue(s) is important for its DNA-binding activity and, consequently, for its transactivation potential both in cell-free systems and in cultured cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation did not affect the transport of HNF-4 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus but had a dramatic effect on its subnuclear localization. HNF-4 was concentrated in distinct nuclear compartments, as evidenced by in situ immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. This compartmentalization disappeared when tyrosine phosphorylation was inhibited by genistein. The correlation between the intranuclear distribution of HNF-4 and its ability to activate endogenous target genes demonstrates a phosphorylation signal-dependent pathway in the regulation of transcription factor activity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7568236

  16. Identification of nuclear localization sequence of CXCR4 in renal cell carcinoma by constructing expression plasmids of different deletants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Hui; Liu, Qian; Xu, Bin; Chen, Wei; Yang, Qing; Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2010-01-01

    We previously firstly discovered that CXCR4 nuclear localization may be responsible for metastasis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and that there was a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that induced CXCR4 to transfer to the nucleus after combining with its ligand SDF-1. Using our previously constructed pEGFP-CXCR4 as the template, corresponding objective regions were amplified. The amplified PCR products were then digested and inserted into the pMD19-T simple vector and subcloned into the pEGFP-N1 vector. A recombinant expression vector containing different regions of CXCR4 was successfully constructed. After transfecting the recombinant expression vectors to RCC A498 cells, the intracellular locations of recombinant protein were examined by confocal microscopy. It was found that nuclear localization sequence of CXCR4 was located in amino acids 90-170, which accorded with the results of bioinformatics analysis software. The present study firstly discovered the NLS region of CXCR4, which may prove valuable for seeking new strategies to inhibit metastasis of RCC.

  17. Nuclear localization of glutamate-cysteine ligase is associated with proliferation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dequanter, Didier; VAN DE Velde, Maureen; Bar, Isabelle; Nuyens, Vincent; Rousseau, Alexandre; Nagy, Nathalie; Vanhamme, Luc; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Brohée, Dany; Delrée, Paul; Boudjeltia, Karim; Lothaire, Philippe; Uzureau, Pierrick

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the keystone of the cellular response toward oxidative stress. Elevated GSH content correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck (HN) tumors. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate whether the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) accounts for the increased GSH availability observed in HN squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). For that purpose, the messenger (m)RNA levels of the modifier (M) and catalytic (C) subunits of GCL and its putative regulators (namely, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1 and nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha) were monitored in 35 surgical resections of untreated HNSCC. The localization of GCLM was evaluated using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GCLM expression was significantly increased in tumor samples, compared with normal mucosa, both at the mRNA and protein level (P=0.029), but the pathway of GCLM activation remains to be elucidated. Protein expression of GCLM was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus. GCLM and the proliferation marker Ki-67 displayed a similar distribution, being both mainly expressed at the periphery of tumor lobules. The present study reported increased expression of GCL and the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis, within HNSCC. The nuclear localization of GCLM and the concomitant expression of Ki-67 suggested that the localization of GSH synthesis contributes to the protection against oxidative stress within hotspots of cell proliferation.

  18. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  19. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Zhu, Caixia; Wei, Fang; Gao, Shujun; Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Tong, Yin; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV.

  20. Importance of nuclear localization for the apoptosis-induced activity of a fungal galectin AAL (Agrocybe aegerita lectin)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yi; Feng, Lei; Tong, Xin; Wang, Kun; Li, De Feng; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tang, Zi Jian; Liu, Hong Hong; Jiang, Shuai; Guo, Lin; Wang, Da Cheng; Sun, Hui

    2009-08-28

    Agrocybe aegerita lectin (AAL) was identified previously in our group as a novel galectin from medicinal fungi Agrocybe aegerita, and has been shown to effectively induce cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. Here, AAL was observed to translocate into the HeLa cell nucleus and induce cell apoptosis when it was predominantly in the nucleus. The N-terminus and C-terminus of AAL were required for nuclear localization. Site mutated proteins were generated based on AAL structure. Dimer interface mutant I25G, carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) mutant R63H, and loop region mutant L33A could not enter the nucleus and lost the ability to induce apoptosis. CRD mutant H59Q and loop region mutant I144G maintained nuclear localization activity, and H59Q retained residual bioability but I144G had no activity, indicating that nuclear localization is important but not sufficient for AAL to become apoptotically active. Our findings provide a novel antitumor mechanism of fungal galectin.

  1. hnRNP I, the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein: distinct nuclear localization and association with hnRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, A; Piñol-Roma, S; Michael, W M; Morandi, C; Dreyfuss, G

    1992-01-01

    Many hnRNP proteins and snRNPs interact with hnRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and affect the fate of hnRNA and its processing into mRNA. There are at least 20 abundant proteins in vertebrate cell hnRNP complexes and their structure and arrangement on specific hnRNAs is likely to be important for the processing of pre-mRNAs. hnRNP I, a basic protein of ca. 58,000 daltons by SDS-PAGE, is one of the abundant hnRNA-binding proteins. Monoclonal antibodies to hnRNP I were produced and full length cDNA clones for hnRNP I were isolated and sequenced. The sequence of hnRNP I (59,632 daltons and pI 9.86) demonstrates that it is identical to the previously described polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and shows that it is highly related to hnRNP L. The sequences of these two proteins, I and L, define a new family of hnRNP proteins within the large superfamily of the RNP consensus RNA-binding proteins. Here we describe experiments which reveal new and unique properties on the association of hnRNP I/PTB with hnRNP complexes and on its cellular localization. Micrococcal nuclease digestions show that hnRNP I, along with hnRNP S and P, is released from hnRNP complexes by nuclease digestion more readily than most other hnRNP proteins. This nuclease hypersensitivity suggests that hnRNP I is bound to hnRNA regions that are particularly exposed in the complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that hnRNP I is found in the nucleoplasm but in addition high concentrations are detected in a discrete perinucleolar structure. Thus, the PTB is one of the major proteins that bind pre-mRNAs; it is bound to nuclease-hypersensitive regions of the hnRNA-protein complexes and shows a novel pattern of nuclear localization. Images PMID:1641332

  2. Molecular crowding affects diffusion and binding of nuclear proteins in heterochromatin and reveals the fractal organization of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Huet, Sébastien; Daigle, Nathalie; Mozziconacci, Julien; Beaudouin, Joël; Ellenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The nucleus of eukaryotes is organized into functional compartments, the two most prominent being heterochromatin and nucleoli. These structures are highly enriched in DNA, proteins or RNA, and thus thought to be crowded. In vitro, molecular crowding induces volume exclusion, hinders diffusion and enhances association, but whether these effects are relevant in vivo remains unclear. Here, we establish that volume exclusion and diffusive hindrance occur in dense nuclear compartments by probing the diffusive behaviour of inert fluorescent tracers in living cells. We also demonstrate that chromatin-interacting proteins remain transiently trapped in heterochromatin due to crowding induced enhanced affinity. The kinetic signatures of these crowding consequences allow us to derive a fractal model of chromatin organization, which explains why the dynamics of soluble nuclear proteins are affected independently of their size. This model further shows that the fractal architecture differs between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and predicts that chromatin proteins use different target-search strategies in the two compartments. We propose that fractal crowding is a fundamental principle of nuclear organization, particularly of heterochromatin maintenance. PMID:19927119

  3. Molecular crowding affects diffusion and binding of nuclear proteins in heterochromatin and reveals the fractal organization of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Huet, Sébastien; Daigle, Nathalie; Mozziconacci, Julien; Beaudouin, Joël; Ellenberg, Jan

    2009-12-16

    The nucleus of eukaryotes is organized into functional compartments, the two most prominent being heterochromatin and nucleoli. These structures are highly enriched in DNA, proteins or RNA, and thus thought to be crowded. In vitro, molecular crowding induces volume exclusion, hinders diffusion and enhances association, but whether these effects are relevant in vivo remains unclear. Here, we establish that volume exclusion and diffusive hindrance occur in dense nuclear compartments by probing the diffusive behaviour of inert fluorescent tracers in living cells. We also demonstrate that chromatin-interacting proteins remain transiently trapped in heterochromatin due to crowding induced enhanced affinity. The kinetic signatures of these crowding consequences allow us to derive a fractal model of chromatin organization, which explains why the dynamics of soluble nuclear proteins are affected independently of their size. This model further shows that the fractal architecture differs between heterochromatin and euchromatin, and predicts that chromatin proteins use different target-search strategies in the two compartments. We propose that fractal crowding is a fundamental principle of nuclear organization, particularly of heterochromatin maintenance.

  4. Away-from-reactor storage of spent nuclear fuel: factors affecting demand

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, P.M.; Solomon, K.A.; Triplett, M.B.

    1980-10-01

    This report analyzes factors that affect the magnitude and timing of demand for government AFRs, relative to the demand for other storage options, to assist policymakers in predicting this demand. Past predictions of AFT demand range widely and often appear to conflict. This report helps to explain the apparent conflicts among existing demand predictions by demonstrating their sensitivity to changes in key assumptions. Specifically, the report analyzes factors affecting the demand for government AFR storage facilities; illustrates why demand estimates may vary; and identifies actions that may be undertaken by groups, within and outside the government, to influence the level and timing of demands.

  5. The Push and Pull of Standards-Based Reform: How Does It Affect Local School Districts and Students with Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raber, Suzanne; Roach, Virginia; Fraser, Katherine, Ed.

    This report discusses findings from case studies in California, Missouri, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania that examined ways in which state-level general and special education reforms interact, impact local districts, and affect the educational programs for students with disabilities. Chapter 1 reviews two major state-level priorities for education…

  6. Molecular simulations of polycation-DNA binding exploring the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence in nuclear localization sequence based polycations.

    PubMed

    Elder, Robert M; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2013-10-10

    Gene therapy relies on the delivery of DNA into cells, and polycations are one class of vectors enabling efficient DNA delivery. Nuclear localization sequences (NLS), cationic oligopeptides that target molecules for nuclear entry, can be incorporated into polycations to improve their gene delivery efficiency. We use simulations to study the effect of peptide chemistry and sequence on the DNA-binding behavior of NLS-grafted polycations by systematically mutating the residues in the grafts, which are based on the SV40 NLS (peptide sequence PKKKRKV). Replacing arginine (R) with lysine (K) reduces binding strength by eliminating arginine-DNA interactions, but placing R in a less hindered location (e.g., farther from the grafting point to the polycation backbone) has surprisingly little effect on polycation-DNA binding strength. Changing the positions of the hydrophobic proline (P) and valine (V) residues relative to the polycation backbone changes hydrophobic aggregation within the polycation and, consequently, changes the conformational entropy loss that occurs upon polycation-DNA binding. Since conformational entropy loss affects the free energy of binding, the positions of P and V in the grafts affect DNA binding affinity. The insight from this work guides synthesis of polycations with tailored DNA binding affinity and, in turn, efficient DNA delivery.

  7. A report from Fukushima: an assessment of bone health in an area affected by the Fukushima nuclear plant incident.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takeaki; Ito, Kazuo; Kato, Shigeaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Ochi, Sae; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Saito, Yasutoshi

    2013-11-01

    Bone health was assessed for inhabitants of an area affected by the Fukushima nuclear plant incident. Osteoporotic patients, who had been treated with active vitamin D3 and/or bisphosphonate at Soma Central Hospital before the Fukushima incident, were enrolled. Changes in bone turnover markers and bone mineral density were retrospectively analyzed. Serum levels of a bone resorption marker, serum type I collagen cross-linked N-telopeptide were decreased in all the treated groups, whereas those of a bone formation marker, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, were increased. Accordingly, bone mineral density, estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, was increased in the lumbar spine of all groups, but bone mass increase in the proximal femur was detected only in the group treated with the two agents in combination. From the degree of these parameter changes, the antiosteoporotic treatments looked effective and were equivalent to the expected potency of past observations. At this stage, the present study implies that the Fukushima nuclear incident did not bring an acute risk to bone health in the affected areas.

  8. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  9. Nuclear localization of heme oxygenase-1 is associated with tumor progression of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gandini, Norberto A; Fermento, María E; Salomón, Débora G; Blasco, Jorge; Patel, Vyomesh; Gutkind, J Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A; Facchinetti, María M; Curino, Alejandro C

    2012-10-01

    The expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was shown to be increased in multiple tumors compared with their surrounding healthy tissues and was also observed to be up-regulated in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC). However, conflicting results were obtained and little information is available regarding HO-1 significance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Therefore, the aim of the present study was to perform a wide screening of HO-1 expression in a large collection of human primary HNSCCs and to correlate the results with clinical and pathological parameters. For this purpose, we investigated the expression of this protein by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in tissue microarrays (TMAs) of HNSCC and in an independent cohort of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. HO-1 expression was further validated by real-time qPCR performed on selected laser capture-microdissected (LCM) oral tissue samples. Both the number of HO-1-positive samples and HO-1 immunoreactivity in the cancerous tissues were significantly higher than those in the non-tumor tissues. These results were confirmed at the mRNA level. Interestingly, HO-1 localization was observed in the nucleus, and the rate of nuclear HO-1 in HNSCC was higher than that in non-malignant tissues. Nuclear HO-1 was observed in HNSCC cell lines and increased even further following hemin treatment. Analysis of HO-1 expression and sub-cellular localization in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and in human HNSCC revealed that nuclear HO-1 increases with tumor progression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that HO-1 is up-regulated in HNSCC and that nuclear localization of HO-1 is associated with malignant progression in this tumor type.

  10. Visualization of nuclear localization of transcription factors with cyan and green fluorescent proteins in the red alga Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Uji, Toshiki; Takahashi, Megumu; Saga, Naotsune; Mikami, Koji

    2010-04-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in expression of genomic information in all organisms. The objective of our study is to analyze the function of transcription factors in red algae. One way to analyze transcription factors in eukaryotic cells is to study their nuclear localization, as reported for land plants and green algae using fluorescent proteins. There is, however, no report documenting subcellular localization of transcription factors from red algae. In the present study, using the marine red alga Porphyra yezoensis, we confirmed for the first time successful expression of humanized fluorescent proteins (ZsGFP and ZsYFP) from a reef coral Zoanthus sp. and land plant-adapted sGFP(S65T) in gametophytic cells comparable to expression of AmCFP. Following molecular cloning and characterization of transcription factors DP-E2F-like 1 (PyDEL1), transcription elongation factor 1 (PyElf1) and multiprotein bridging factor 1 (PyMBF1), we then demonstrated that ZsGFP and AmCFP can be used to visualize nuclear localization of PyElf1 and PyMBF1. This is the first report to perform visualization of subcellular localization of transcription factors as genome-encoded proteins in red algae.

  11. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies(AED)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery s...

  12. Nuclear co-localization and functional interaction of COX-2 and HIF-1α characterize bone metastasis of human breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Luzzati, Alessandro; Perrucchini, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Paola; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is to identify nuclear co-localization of COX-2 and HIF-1α in human-bone metastasis of breast cancer, index of transcriptionally activated cells and functional for gene expression. In particular, we verified whether hypoxia exerted a direct role on metastasis-gene expression or through COX-2 signaling, due to the relevance for clinical implications to individuate molecular targets for diagnosis and therapy. The experiments were performed in vitro with two metastatic clones, 1833 and MDA-231BO, and the parental MDA-MB231 cells, in vivo (1833-xenograft model), and in human-bone metastasis specimens. In 1833 cells in vitro, COX-2 signaling pathway was critical for nuclear HIF-1α-protein expression/translocation, mechanisms determining HIF-1 activity and gene expression. The data were corroborated by immunohistochemistry in human-bone metastasis specimens. COX-2 and HIF-1α showed wide co-localization in the nucleus, indicative of COX-2-nuclear import in transcriptionally activated metastatic cells and consistent with COX-2-HIF-1α functional interaction. A network of microenvironmental signals controlled COX-2 induction and HIF-1 activation downstream. In fact, hypoxia through HGF and TGF-β1 autoregulatory loops triggered a specific array of transcription factors responsible for COX-2 transactivation. The novelty was that HGF and TGF-β1 biological signals were produced by hypoxic metastatic cells and, therefore, the microenvironment seemed to be modified by metastatic-cell engraftment in the bone. In agreement, HIF-1α expression in bone marrow supportive cells occurred in metastasis-bearing animals. Altogether, the data supported the pre-metastatic-niche theory. Our observations might be useful to design therapies against bone metastasis, by affecting the phenotype changes of metastatic cells occurring at the secondary growth site through COX-2-HIF-1 interaction.

  13. Local motifs involved in the canonical structure of the ligand-binding domain in the nuclear receptor superfamily.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2014-03-01

    Structural and sequence alignment analyses have revealed the existence of class-dependent and -independent local motifs involved in the overall fold of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily. Of these local motifs, three local motifs, i.e., AF-2 fixed motifs, were involved in the agonist conformation of the activation function-2 (AF-2) region of the LBD. Receptor-agonist interactions increased the stability of these AF-2 fixed motifs in the agonist conformation. In contrast, perturbation of the AF-2 fixed motifs by a ligand or another protein molecule led the AF-2 architecture to adopt an antagonist conformation. Knowledge of this process should provide us with novel insights into the 'agonism' and 'antagonism' of NRs.

  14. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  15. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes.

  16. Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 Undergoes Transportin 1-Dependent Nuclear Localization and Remains Functional at the Nucleus of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Don-Salu-Hewage, Ayesha S.; Chan, Siu Yuen; McAndrews, Kathleen M.; Chetram, Mahandranauth A.; Dawson, Michelle R.; Bethea, Danaya A.; Hinton, Cimona V.

    2013-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), Cysteine (C)-X-C Receptor 4 (CXCR4), plays an important role in prostate cancer metastasis. CXCR4 is generally regarded as a plasma membrane receptor where it transmits signals that support transformation, progression and eventual metastasis. Due to the central role of CXCR4 in tumorigenesis, therapeutics approaches such as antagonist and monoclonal antibodies have focused on receptors that exist on the plasma membrane. An emerging concept for G-protein coupled receptors is that they may localize to and associate with the nucleus where they retain function and mediate nuclear signaling. Herein, we demonstrate that CXCR4 associated with the nucleus of malignant prostate cancer tissues. Likewise, expression of CXCR4 was detected in nuclear fractions among several prostate cancer cell lines, compared to normal prostate epithelial cells. Our studies identified a nuclear pool of CXCR4 and we defined a nuclear transport pathway for CXCR4. We reveal a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS), ‘RPRK’, within CXCR4 that contributed to nuclear localization. Additionally, nuclear CXCR4 interacted with Transportinβ1 and Transportinβ1-binding to CXCR4 promoted its nuclear translocation. Importantly, Gαi immunoprecipitation and calcium mobilization studies indicated that nuclear CXCR4 was functional and participated in G-protein signaling, revealing that the nuclear pool of CXCR4 retained function. Given the suggestion that functional, nuclear CXCR4 may be a mechanism underlying prostate cancer recurrence, increased metastatic ability and poorer prognosis after tumors have been treated with therapy that targets plasma membrane CXCR4, these studies addresses a novel mechanism of nuclear signaling for CXCR4, a novel mechanism of clinical targeting, and demonstrate an active nuclear pool that provides important new information to illuminate what has been primarily clinical reports of nuclear CXCR4. PMID:23468933

  17. Nuclear localization domains of GATA activator Gln3 are required for transcription of target genes through dephosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Numamoto, Minori; Tagami, Shota; Ueda, Yusuke; Imabeppu, Yusuke; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Maekawa, Hiromi; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    The GATA transcription activator Gln3 in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) activates transcription of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR)-sensitive genes. In cells grown in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources, Gln3 is phosphorylated in a TOR-dependent manner and localizes in the cytoplasm. In cells grown in non-preferred nitrogen medium or treated with rapamycin, Gln3 is dephosphorylated and is transported from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, thereby activating the transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. Caffeine treatment also induces dephosphorylation of Gln3 and its translocation to the nucleus and transcription of NCR-sensitive genes. However, the details of the mechanism by which phosphorylation controls Gln3 localization and transcriptional activity are unknown. Here, we focused on two regions of Gln3 with nuclear localization signal properties (NLS-K, and NLS-C) and one with nuclear export signal (NES). We constructed various mutants for our analyses: gln3 containing point mutations in all potential phosphoacceptor sites (Thr-339, Ser-344, Ser-347, Ser-355, Ser-391) in the NLS and NES regions to produce non-phosphorylatable (alanine) or mimic-phosphorylatable (aspartic acid) residues; and deletion mutants. We found that phosphorylation of Gln3 was impaired in all of these mutations and that the aspartic acid substitution mutants showed drastic reduction of Gln3-mediated transcriptional activity despite the fact that the mutations had no effect on nuclear localization of Gln3. Our observations suggest that these regions are required for transcription of target genes presumably through dephosphorylation.

  18. A nuclear localization of the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus NV protein is necessary for optimal viral growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, M.K.; Moon, C.H.; Ko, M.S.; Lee, U.-H.; Cho, W.J.; Cha, S.J.; Do, J.W.; Heo, G.J.; Jeong, S.G.; Hahm, Y.S.; Harmache, A.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.; Park, J.-W.

    2011-01-01

    The nonvirion (NV) protein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) has been previously reported to be essential for efficient growth and pathogenicity of IHNV. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the NV supports the viral growth. In this study, cellular localization of NV and its role in IHNV growth in host cells was investigated. Through transient transfection in RTG-2 cells of NV fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), a nuclear localization of NV was demonstrated. Deletion analyses showed that the 32EGDL35 residues were essential for nuclear localization of NV protein, and fusion of these 4 amino acids to GFP directed its transport to the nucleus. We generated a recombinant IHNV, rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL in which the 32EGDL35 was deleted from the NV. rIHNVs with wild-type NV (rIHNV-NV) or with the NV gene replaced with GFP (rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP) were used as controls. RTG-2 cells infected with rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL yielded 12- and 5-fold less infectious virion, respectively, than wild type rIHNV-infected cells at 48 h post-infection (p.i.). While treatment with poly I:C at 24 h p.i. did not inhibit replication of wild-type rIHNVs, replication rates of rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL were inhibited by poly I:C. In addition, both rIHNV-ΔNV and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL induced higher levels of expressions of both IFN1 and Mx1 than wild-type rIHNV. These data suggest that the IHNV NV may support the growth of IHNV through inhibition of the INF system and the amino acid residues of 32EGDL35 responsible for nuclear localization are important for the inhibitory activity of NV.

  19. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the rabies virus P protein requires a nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pasdeloup, David; Poisson, Nicolas; Raux, Helene; Gaudin, Yves; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. . E-mail: danielle.blondel@vms.cnrs-gif.fr

    2005-04-10

    Rabies virus P protein is a co-factor of the viral RNA polymerase. It has been shown previously that P mRNA directs the synthesis of four N-terminally truncated P products P2, P3, P4, and P5 due to translational initiation by a leaky scanning mechanism at internal Met codons. Whereas P and P2 are located in the cytoplasm, P3, P4, and P5 are found in the nucleus. Here, we have analyzed the molecular basis of the subcellular localization of these proteins. Using deletion mutants fused to GFP protein, we show the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal part of P (172-297). This domain contains a short lysine-rich stretch ({sup 211}KKYK{sup 214}) located in close proximity with arginine 260 as revealed by the crystal structure of P. We demonstrate the critical role of lysine 214 and arginine 260 in NLS activity. In the presence of Leptomycin B, P is retained in the nucleus indicating that it contains a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The subcellular distribution of P deletion mutants indicates that the domain responsible for export is the amino-terminal part of the protein. The use of fusion proteins that have amino terminal fragments of P fused to {beta}-galactosidase containing the NLS of SV40 T antigen allows us to identify a NES between residues 49 and 58. The localization of NLS and NES determines the cellular distribution of the P gene products.

  20. Understanding Locally, Culturally, and Contextually Relevant Mental Health Problems among Rwandan Children and Adolescents Affected by HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Rubin-Smith, Julia E.; Beardslee, William R.; Stulac, Sara N.; Fayida, Ildephonse; Safren, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the mental health of HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can aid in the selection or creation of appropriate measures. This study used qualitative methodologies (Free Listing [FL], Key Informant [KI] interviews, and Clinician Interviews [C-KIs]) to understand local perceptions of mental health problems facing HIV/AIDS-affected youth in Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Several syndrome terms were identified by participants: agahinda kenshi, kwiheba, guhangayika, ihahamuka, umushiha and uburara. While these local syndromes share some similarities with Western mood, anxiety, and conduct disorders, they also contain important culture-specific features and gradations of severity. Our findings underscore the importance of understanding local manifestations of mental health syndromes when conducting mental health assessments and when planning interventions for HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in diverse settings. PMID:21271393

  1. An insertion in the methyltransferase domain of P. falciparum trimethylguanosine synthase harbors a classical nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Babar, Prasad H; Dey, Vishakha; Jaiswar, Praveen; Patankar, Swati

    Many Plasmodium falciparum proteins do not share homology with, and are generally longer than their respective orthologs. This, to some extent, can be attributed to insertions. Here, we studied a P. falciparum RNA hypermethylase, trimethylguanosine synthase (PfTGS1) that harbors a 76 amino acid insertion in its methyltransferase domain. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that this insertion was present in TGS1 orthologs from other Plasmodium species as well. Interestingly, a classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) was predicted in the insertions of primate parasite TGS1 proteins. To check whether these predicted NLS are functional, we developed an in vivo heterologous system using S. cerevisiae. The predicted NLS when fused to dimeric GFP were able to localize the fusion protein to the nucleus in yeast indicating that it is indeed recognized by the yeast nuclear import machinery. We further showed that the PfTGS1 NLS binds to P. falciparum importin-α in vitro, confirming that the NLS is also recognized by the P. falciparum classical nuclear import machinery. Thus, in this study we report a novel function of the insertion in PfTGS1.

  2. Importin β2 Mediates the Spatio-temporal Regulation of Anillin through a Noncanonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Chen, Anan; Akhshi, Tara K; Lavoie, Brigitte D; Wilde, Andrew

    2015-05-22

    The compartmentalization of cell cycle regulators is a common mechanism to ensure the precise temporal control of key cell cycle events. For instance, many mitotic spindle assembly factors are known to be sequestered in the nucleus prior to mitotic onset. Similarly, the essential cytokinetic factor anillin, which functions at the cell membrane to promote the physical separation of daughter cells at the end of mitosis, is sequestered in the nucleus during interphase. To address the mechanism and role of anillin targeting to the nucleus in interphase, we identified the nuclear targeting motif. Here, we show that anillin is targeted to the nucleus by importin β2 in a Ran-dependent manner through an atypical basic patch PY nuclear localization signal motif. We show that although importin β2 binding does not regulate anillin's function in mitosis, it is required to prevent the cytosolic accumulation of anillin, which disrupts cellular architecture during interphase. The nuclear sequestration of anillin during interphase serves to restrict anillin's function at the cell membrane to mitosis and allows anillin to be rapidly available when the nuclear envelope breaks down to remodel the cellular architecture necessary for successful cell division.

  3. Local variations in 14C - How is bomb-pulse dating of human tissues and cells affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenström, Kristina; Skog, Göran; Nilsson, Carl Magnus; Hellborg, Ragnar; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the late 1950s and early 1960s almost doubled the amount of 14C in the atmosphere. The resulting 14C "bomb-pulse" has been shown to provide useful age information in e.g. forensic and environmental sciences, biology and the geosciences. The technique is also currently being used for retrospective cell dating in man, in order to provide insight into the rate of formation of new cells in the human body. Bomb-pulse dating relies on precise measurements of the declining 14C concentration in atmospheric CO 2 collected at clean-air sites. However, it is not always recognized that the calculations can be complicated in some cases by significant local variations in the specific activity of 14C in carbon in the air and foodstuff. This paper presents investigations of local 14C variations in the vicinities of nuclear installations and laboratories using 14C. Levels of 14C in workers using this radioisotope are also discussed.

  4. Both population size and patch quality affect local extinctions and colonizations.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2010-01-07

    Currently, the habitat of many species is fragmented, resulting in small local populations with individuals occasionally dispersing between the remaining habitat patches. In a solitary bee metapopulation, extinction probability was related to both local bee population sizes and pollen resources measured as host plant population size. Patch size, on the other hand, had no additional predictive power. The turnover rate of local bee populations in 63 habitat patches over 4 years was high, with 72 extinction events and 31 colonization events, but the pollen plant population was stable with no extinctions or colonizations. Both pollen resources and bee populations had strong and independent effects on extinction probability, but connectivity was not of importance. Colonizations occurred more frequently within larger host plant populations. For metapopulation survival of the bee, large pollen plant populations are essential, independent of current bee population size.

  5. Madness or sadness? Local concepts of mental illness in four conflict-affected African communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Concepts of ‘what constitutes mental illness’, the presumed aetiology and preferred treatment options, vary considerably from one cultural context to another. Knowledge and understanding of these local conceptualisations is essential to inform public mental health programming and policy. Methods Participants from four locations in Burundi, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, were invited to describe ‘problems they knew of that related to thinking, feeling and behaviour?’ Data were collected over 31 focus groups discussions (251 participants) and key informant interviews with traditional healers and health workers. Results While remarkable similarities occurred across all settings, there were also striking differences. In all areas, participants were able to describe localized syndromes characterized by severe behavioural and cognitive disturbances with considerable resemblance to psychotic disorders. Additionally, respondents throughout all settings described local syndromes that included sadness and social withdrawal as core features. These syndromes had some similarities with nonpsychotic mental disorders, such as major depression or anxiety disorders, but also differed significantly. Aetiological concepts varied a great deal within each setting, and attributed causes varied from supernatural to psychosocial and natural. Local syndromes resembling psychotic disorders were seen as an abnormality in need of treatment, although people did not really know where to go. Local syndromes resembling nonpsychotic mental disorders were not regarded as a ‘medical’ disorder, and were therefore also not seen as a condition for which help should be sought within the biomedical health-care system. Rather, such conditions were expected to improve through social and emotional support from relatives, traditional healers and community members. Conclusions Local conceptualizations have significant implications for the planning of mental

  6. Nuclear LSm8 affects number of cytoplasmic processing bodies via controlling cellular distribution of Like-Sm proteins

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Ivan; Podolská, Kateřina; Blažíková, Michaela; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya; Svoboda, Petr; Staněk, David

    2012-01-01

    Processing bodies (P-bodies) are dynamic cytoplasmic structures involved in mRNA degradation, but the mechanism that governs their formation is poorly understood. In this paper, we address a role of Like-Sm (LSm) proteins in formation of P-bodies and provide evidence that depletion of nuclear LSm8 increases the number of P-bodies, while LSm8 overexpression leads to P-body loss. We show that LSm8 knockdown causes relocalization of LSm4 and LSm6 proteins to the cytoplasm and suggest that LSm8 controls nuclear accumulation of all LSm2–7 proteins. We propose a model in which redistribution of LSm2–7 to the cytoplasm creates new binding sites for other P-body components and nucleates new, microscopically visible structures. The model is supported by prolonged residence of two P-body proteins, DDX6 and Ago2, in P-bodies after LSm8 depletion, which indicates stronger interactions between these proteins and P-bodies. Finally, an increased number of P-bodies has negligible effects on microRNA-mediated translation repression and nonsense mediated decay, further supporting the view that the function of proteins localized in P-bodies is independent of visible P-bodies. PMID:22875987

  7. Absence of internal radiation contamination by radioactive cesium among children affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Morita, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Amina; Gilmour, Stuart; Kami, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic internal radiation contamination accounts for a substantial fraction of long-term cumulative radiation exposure among residents in radiation-contaminated areas. However, little information is available on ongoing chronic internal radiation contamination among residents near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Using a whole body counter, internal radiation contamination levels among elementary and middle school students who commute to 22 schools located within Minamisoma city were assessed between May and July 2013 (26 to 28 mo after the disaster). Of 3,299 elementary and middle school students in the city, 3,255 individuals (98%) were screened through school health check-ups. Not a single student was detected with internal radiation contamination due to radioactive cesium. The study found no risk of chronic internal radiation exposure among residents near the crippled nuclear power plant. Current food inspection by local governments, volunteers, and farmers has been functioning well within Fukushima prefecture. However, food management by screening suspected contamination along with whole body counter screening are key public health interventions and should be continued to avoid further internal radiation exposure in radiation-contaminated areas.

  8. Characterization of the subcellular localization and nuclear import molecular mechanisms of herpes simplex virus 1 UL2.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mingsheng; Huang, Zebin; Liao, Zongmin; Chen, Tao; Wang, Ping; Jiang, Si; Chen, Daixiong; Peng, Tao; Bian, Yun; Hong, Gengde; Yang, Hang; Zeng, Zhancheng; Li, Xiaowei; Li, Meili

    2017-04-01

    As a crucial protein, the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL2 protein has been shown to take part in various stages of viral infection, nonetheless, its exact subcellular localization and transport molecular determinants are not well known thus far. In the present study, by using live cells fluorescent microscopy assay, UL2 tagged with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein was transiently expressed in live cells and showed a completely nuclear accumulation without the presence of other HSV-1 proteins. Moreover, the nuclear transport of UL2 was characterized to be assisted by multiple transport pathways through Ran-, importin α1-, α5-, α7-, β1- and transportin-1 cellular transport receptors. Consequently, these results will improve understanding of UL2-mediated biological functions in HSV-1 infection cycles.

  9. Structure of importin-α bound to a non-classical nuclear localization signal of the influenza A virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Ryohei; Hirano, Hidemi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-12

    A non-classical nuclear localization signal (ncNLS) of influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) is critical for nuclear import of viral genomic RNAs that transcribe and replicate in the nucleus of infected cells. Here we report a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of mouse importin-α1 in complex with NP ncNLS. The structure reveals that NP ncNLS binds specifically and exclusively to the minor NLS-binding site of importin-α. Structural and functional analyses identify key binding pockets on importin-α as potential targets for antiviral drug development. Unlike many other NLSs, NP ncNLS binds to the NLS-binding domain of importin-α weakly with micromolar affinity. These results suggest that a modest inhibitor with low affinity to importin-α could have anti-influenza activity with minimal cytotoxicity.

  10. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  11. Components of RNA granules affect their localization and dynamics in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Kazuhiko; Takei, Yosuke; Hirokawa, Nobutaka

    2017-04-12

    In neurons, RNA transport is important for local protein synthesis. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are transported along dendrites as large RNA granules. The localization and dynamics of Puralpha and Stau1, major components of RNA transport granules, were investigated in cultured hippocampal neurons. Puralpha-positive granules were localized in both the shafts and spines of dendrites. In contrast, Stau1-positive granules tended to be localized mainly in dendritic shafts. More than 90% of Puralpha-positive granules were positive for Stau1 in immature dendrites, while only half were positive in mature dendrites. Stau1-negative Puralpha granules tended to be stationary with fewer anterograde and retrograde movements than Stau1-positive Puralpha granules. After metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) activation, Stau-1 positive granules remained in the dendritic shafts, while Puralpha granules translocated from the shaft to the spine. The translocation of Puralpha granules was dependent on Myosin Va, an actin-based molecular motor protein. Collectively, our findings suggest the possibility that the loss of Stau1 in Puralpha-positive RNA granules might promote their activity-dependent translocation into dendritic spines, which could underlie the regulation of protein synthesis in synapses.

  12. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  13. Principals and Local School Councils: An International Comparison of Judicial Policy Affecting School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menacker, Julius

    1996-01-01

    Compares the legal reasoning and results in two cases brought to courts by principals dismissed by local school governing boards under authority granted to these community groups by school reform laws in Chicago, Illinois, and New Zealand. Observations are made regarding the need for appropriate adjustments in school-based-management reform law…

  14. Nuclear α Spectrin Differentially Affects Monoubiquitinated Versus Non-Ubiquitinated FANCD2 Function After DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan; Sridharan, Deepa; Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-03-01

    Nonerythroid α spectrin (αIISp) and the Fanconi anemia (FA) protein, FANCD2, play critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair during S phase. Both are needed for recruitment of repair proteins, such as XPF, to sites of damage and repair of ICLs. However, the relationship between them in ICL repair and whether αIISp is involved in FANCD2's function in repair is unclear. The present studies show that, after ICL formation, FANCD2 disassociates from αIISp and localizes, before αIISp, at sites of damage in nuclear foci. αIISp and FANCD2 foci do not co-localize, in contrast to our previous finding that αIISp and the ICL repair protein, XPF, co-localize and follow a similar time course for formation. Knock-down of αIISp has no effect on monoubiquitination of FANCD2 (FANCD2-Ub) or its localization to chromatin or foci, though it leads to decreased ICL repair. Studies using cells from FA patients, defective in ICL repair and αIISp, have elucidated an important role for αIISp in the function of non-Ub FANCD2. In FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells, in which FANCD2 is not monoubiquitinated and does not form damage-induced foci, we demonstrate that restoration of αIISp levels to normal, by knocking down the protease μ-calpain, leads to formation of non-Ub FANCD2 foci after ICL damage. Since restoration of αIISp levels in FA-A cells restores DNA repair and cell survival, we propose that αIISp is critical for recruitment of non-Ub FANCD2 to sites of damage, which has an important role in the repair response and ICL repair.

  15. The estrogen receptor alpha nuclear localization sequence is critical for fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Casa, Angelo J; Hochbaum, Daniel; Sreekumar, Sreeja; Oesterreich, Steffi; Lee, Adrian V

    2015-11-05

    Fulvestrant, a selective estrogen receptor down-regulator (SERD) is a pure competitive antagonist of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Fulvestrant binds ERα and reduces the receptor's half-life by increasing protein turnover, however, its mechanism of action is not fully understood. In this study, we show that removal of the ERα nuclear localization sequence (ERΔNLS) resulted in a predominantly cytoplasmic ERα that was degraded in response to 17-β-estradiol (E2) but was resistant to degradation by fulvestrant. ERΔNLS bound the ligands and exhibited receptor interaction similar to ERα, indicating that the lack of degradation was not due to disruption of these processes. Forcing ERΔNLS into the nucleus with a heterologous SV40-NLS did not restore degradation, suggesting that the NLS domain itself, and not merely receptor localization, is critical for fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. Indeed, cloning of the endogenous ERα NLS onto the N-terminus of ERΔNLS significantly restored both its nuclear localization and turnover in response to fulvestrant. Moreover, mutation of the sumoylation targets K266 and K268 within the NLS impaired fulvestrant-induced ERα degradation. In conclusion, our study provides evidence for the unique role of the ERα NLS in fulvestrant-induced degradation of the receptor.

  16. Neutralizing Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Induces β-Cell Survival by Maintaining PDX1 Protein Nuclear Localization*

    PubMed Central

    Ardestani, Amin; Sauter, Nadine S.; Paroni, Federico; Dharmadhikari, Gitanjali; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Lupi, Roberto; Marchetti, Piero; Oberholzer, José; Conte, Julie Kerr; Maedler, Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor PDX1 plays a critical role during β-cell development and in glucose-induced insulin gene transcription in adult β-cells. Acute glucose exposure leads to translocalization of PDX1 to the nucleoplasm, whereas under conditions of oxidative stress, PDX1 shuttles from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we show that cytosolic PDX1 expression correlated with β-cell failure in diabetes. In isolated islets from patients with type 2 diabetes and from diabetic mice, we found opposite regulation of insulin and PDX1 mRNA; insulin was decreased in diabetes, but PDX1 was increased. This suggests that elevated PDX1 mRNA levels may be insufficient to regulate insulin. In diabetic islets, PDX1 protein was localized in the cytosol, whereas in non-diabetic controls, PDX1 was in the nucleus. In contrast, overexpression of either IL-1 receptor antagonist or shuttling-deficient PDX1 restored β-cell survival and function and PDX1 nuclear localization. Our results show that nuclear localization of PDX1 is essential for a functional β-cell and provides a novel mechanism of the protective effect of IL-1 receptor antagonist on β-cell survival and function. PMID:21393239

  17. Characterization of amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 that play a role in Ubc9 nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhri, Palak; Tao, Tao; Kaplan, Feige; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-27

    As the sole E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, Ubc9 is predominantly nuclear. However, the underlying mechanisms of Ubc9 nuclear localization are still not well understood. Here we show that RNAi-depletion of Imp13, an importin known to mediate Ubc9 nuclear import, reduces both Ubc9 nuclear accumulation and global SUMOylation. Furthermore, Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation previously shown to interrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOs reduces the nuclear enrichment of Ubc9, suggesting that the interaction of Ubc9 with the nuclear SUMOs may enhance Ubc9 nuclear retention. Moreover, Ubc9-R17E mutation, which is known to disrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with both SUMOs and Imp13, causes a greater decrease in Ubc9 nuclear accumulation than Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation. Lastly, Ubc9-K74A/S89D mutations that perturb the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOylation-consensus motifs has no effect on Ubc9 nuclear localization. Altogether, our results have elucidated that the amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 play a pivotal role in regulation of Ubc9 nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Imp13-mediated nuclear import of Ubc9 is critical for global SUMOylation. • Ubc9 mutations disrupting Ubc9-SUMO interaction decrease Ubc9 nuclear accumulation. • N-terminal amino acid residues of Ubc9 are critical for Ubc9 nuclear enrichment.

  18. Thioredoxin (Trxo1) interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and its overexpression affects the growth of tobacco cell culture.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Aingeru; Ortiz-Espín, Ana; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Carbonero, Pilar; Pallardó, Federico Vicente; Sevilla, Francisca; Jiménez, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs), key components of cellular redox regulation, act by controlling the redox status of many target proteins, and have been shown to play an essential role in cell survival and growth. The presence of a Trx system in the nucleus has received little attention in plants, and the nuclear targets of plant Trxs have not been conclusively identified. Thus, very little is known about the function of Trxs in this cellular compartment. Previously, we studied the intracellular localization of PsTrxo1 and confirmed its presence in mitochondria and, interestingly, in the nucleus under standard growth conditions. In investigating the nuclear function of PsTrxo1 we identified proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) as a PsTrxo1 target by means of affinity chromatography techniques using purified nuclei from pea leaves. Such protein-protein interaction was corroborated by dot-blot and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays, which showed that both proteins interact in the nucleus. Moreover, PsTrxo1 showed disulfide reductase activity on previously oxidized recombinant PCNA protein. In parallel, we studied the effects of PsTrxo1 overexpression on Tobacco Bright Yellow-2 (TBY-2) cell cultures. Microscopy and flow-cytometry analysis showed that PsTrxo1 overexpression increases the rate of cell proliferation in the transformed lines, with a higher percentage of the S phase of the cell cycle at the beginning of the cell culture (days 1 and 3) and at the G2/M phase after longer times of culture (day 9), coinciding with an upregulation of PCNA protein. Furthermore, in PsTrxo1 overexpressed cells there is a decrease in the total cellular glutathione content but maintained nuclear GSH accumulation, especially at the end of the culture, which is accompanied by a higher mitotic index, unlike non-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that Trxo1 is involved in the cell cycle progression of TBY-2 cultures, possibly through its link with cellular PCNA

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance multiwindow analysis of proton local fields and magnetization distribution in natural and deuterated mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H; Pintar, M M

    1979-01-01

    The proton free-induction decays, spin-spin relaxation times, local fields in the rotating frame, and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frames, in natural and fully deuterated mouse muscle, are reported. Measurements were taken above and below freezing temperature and at two time windows on the free-induction decay. A comparative analysis show that the magnetization fractions deduced from the different experiments are in good agreement. The main conclusion is that the resolution of the (heterogeneous) muscle nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response is improved by the multiwindow analysis. PMID:262554

  20. Transcription factor co-localization patterns affect human cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cellular development requires the precise control of gene expression states. Transcription factors are involved in this regulatory process through their combinatorial binding with DNA. Information about transcription factor binding sites can help determine which combinations of factors work together to regulate a gene, but it is unclear how far the binding data from one cell type can inform about regulation in other cell types. Results By integrating data on co-localized transcription factor binding sites in the K562 cell line with expression data across 38 distinct hematopoietic cell types, we developed regression models to describe the relationship between the expression of target genes and the transcription factors that co-localize nearby. With K562 binding sites identifying the predictors, the proportion of expression explained by the models is statistically significant only for monocytic cells (p-value< 0.001), which are closely related to K562. That is, cell type specific binding patterns are crucial for choosing the correct transcription factors for the model. Comparison of predictors obtained from binding sites in the GM12878 cell line with those from K562 shows that the amount of difference between binding patterns is directly related to the quality of the prediction. By identifying individual genes whose expression is predicted accurately by the binding sites, we are able to link transcription factors FOS, TAF1 and YY1 to a sparsely studied gene LRIG2. We also find that the activity of a transcription factor may be different depending on the cell type and the identity of other co-localized factors. Conclusion Our approach shows that gene expression can be explained by a modest number of co-localized transcription factors, however, information on cell-type specific binding is crucial for understanding combinatorial gene regulation. PMID:22721266

  1. Parameters Affecting Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Structures Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment Station, Corps of Engineers 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180-6199...ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Structures Laboratory, Technical Report SL-92-9...Loads on Buried Structures Subjected to Localized Blast Effects." These analyses were performed in the Structures Laboratory (SL), U.S. Army Engineer

  2. Should triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype affect local-regional therapy decision making?

    PubMed

    Moran, Meena S

    2014-01-01

    The more aggressive biologic characteristics and the current lack of targeted therapy for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) make local-regional management decisions challenging for physicians. TNBC is associated with patients of younger age, black race and BRCA1 mutation carriers. Distinctions between BRCA1-associated and sporadic TNBC include increased lifetime risk of ipsilateral and contralateral breast cancer after breast cancer therapy (BCT) for BRCA carriers, which is not shared by sporadic TNBC. However, the presence of a BRCA mutation should not preclude a breast-conservation approach in patients who are otherwise appropriate candidates for BCT. Data suggest that local-regional relapse (LRR) at baseline after BCT appears to be comparable for TNBC and the HER2-positive subgroups, but is about 50% greater than luminal tumors. LRR appears to be similarly increased after mastectomy; thus, TNBC should not be a contra-indication for BCT. Recent hypothesis-generating data suggest less LRR after BCT (where radiation is routinely delivered) than with mastectomy for early-stage TNBC. To date, no specific local-regional guideline recommendations for TNBC exist. Level I outcome data for TNBC using accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (hWBRT) are lacking. TNBC should be treated with APBI only on clinical trials. Although hWBRT may be considered in TNBC, its association with younger age, advanced disease and use of systemic chemotherapy often precludes its use for this subtype. Until definitive treatment strategies are validated in large datasets and confirmed in randomized trials, TNBC subtype, in and of itself, should not direct local-regional management treatment decisions.

  3. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2010-07-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random-dot field paired with its spatially shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4- to 5.5-month-old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring visual-evoked potentials. Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image.

  4. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random dot field paired with its spatially-shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4–5.5 month old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs). Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image. PMID:19642888

  5. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  6. On-site storage of high level nuclear waste: Attitudes and perceptions of local residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, G.W. Jr.; Jenkins-Smith, H.C.; Silva, C.

    1996-06-01

    No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and - more generally - the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to emanate mainly from stigmatization of the region due to increased perceptions of risk. Analogous impacts from leaving waste at power plants have been either ignored or assumed to be negligible. This paper presents survey results on attitudes of residents in three countries where nuclear waste is currently stored. Topics include perceived risk, knowledge of nuclear waste and radiation, and impacts on jobs, tourism, and housing values from leaving waste on site. Results are similar to what has been reported for Nevada; the public is concerned about possible adverse effects from on-site storage of waste. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Factors Affecting Auditory Localization and Situational Awareness in the Urban Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    resolving spatial locations of several simultaneous sound sources such as various musical instruments playing together or two or more vehicles...and they can affect the perceived size of the sound source, its loudness, and its timbre (Blauert, 1999). 2.2 Elevation Sound source elevation and...occurred (Perrott & Musicant , 1977; Chandler & Grantham, 1992). 3. Acoustics of the Urban Environment When gathering data about the environment and

  8. The magnitude and dynamics of interocular suppression affected by monocular boundary contour and conflicting local features

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yong R.; He, Zijiang J.; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2010-01-01

    A monocular boundary contour (MBC) rivalry stimulus has two half-images, a homogeneous grating and the same homogeneous grating with an additional disc region. The outline/frame of the MBC disc is created by relative phase-shift, or orientation difference. We found the increment contrast threshold and reaction time to detect a monocular Gabor probe elevated on the homogeneous half-image pedestal. The interocular suppression begins as early as 80 msec upon stimulus onset. Moreover, the suppression magnitude is larger when the MBC disc is defined by orientation difference rather than phase-shift, revealing the suppression caused by competing local features in addition to MBC. PMID:20624411

  9. Adipogenesis stimulates the nuclear localization of EWS with an increase in its O-GlcNAc glycosylation in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Kamemura, Kazuo

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The majority of EWS localizes stably in the cytosol in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • Adipogenic stimuli induce the nuclear localization of EWS. • Adipogenesis promotes O-GlcNAcylation of EWS. • O-GlcNAcylation stimulates the recruitment of EWS to the nuclear periphery. - Abstract: Although the Ewing sarcoma (EWS) proto-oncoprotein is found in the nucleus and cytosol and is associated with the cell membrane, the regulatory mechanisms of its subcellular localization are still unclear. Here we found that adipogenic stimuli induce the nuclear localization of EWS in 3T3-L1 cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation in the C-terminal PY-nuclear localization signal of EWS was negative throughout adipogenesis. Instead, an adipogenesis-dependent increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) glycosylation of EWS was observed. Pharmacological inactivation of O-GlcNAcase in preadipocytes promoted perinuclear localization of EWS. Our findings suggest that the nuclear localization of EWS is partly regulated by the glycosylation.

  10. HuR and GRSF1 modulate the nuclear export and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ji Heon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Panda, Amaresh C.; Munk, Rachel; Kim, Jiyoung; Curtis, Jessica; Moad, Christopher A.; Wohler, Christina M.; Indig, Fred E.; de Paula, Wilson; Dudekula, Dawood B.; De, Supriyo; Piao, Yulan; Yang, Xiaoling; Martindale, Jennifer L.; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Some mitochondrial long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are encoded by nuclear DNA, but the mechanisms that mediate their transport to mitochondria are poorly characterized. Using affinity RNA pull-down followed by mass spectrometry analysis, we found two RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), HuR (human antigen R) and GRSF1 (G-rich RNA sequence-binding factor 1), that associated with the nuclear DNA-encoded lncRNA RMRP and mobilized it to mitochondria. In cultured human cells, HuR bound RMRP in the nucleus and mediated its CRM1 (chromosome region maintenance 1)-dependent export to the cytosol. After RMRP was imported into mitochondria, GRSF1 bound RMRP and increased its abundance in the matrix. Loss of GRSF1 lowered the mitochondrial levels of RMRP, in turn suppressing oxygen consumption rates and modestly reducing mitochondrial DNA replication priming. Our findings indicate that RBPs HuR and GRSF1 govern the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial localization of the lncRNA RMRP, which is encoded by nuclear DNA but has key functions in mitochondria. PMID:27198227

  11. hnRNP M interacts with PSF and p54{sup nrb} and co-localizes within defined nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marko, Marija; Leichter, Michael; Patrinou-Georgoula, Meropi; Guialis, Apostolia

    2010-02-01

    The abundant heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M) is able to associate with early spliceosomes and to influence splicing patterns of specific pre-mRNAs. Here, by a combination of immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we have identified PSF (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor) and p54{sup nrb}, two highly related proteins involved in transcription and RNA processing, as new binding partners of hnRNP M. HnRNP M was found to co-localize with PSF within a subset of nuclear paraspeckles and to largely co-fractionate with PSF and p54{sup nrb} in biochemical nuclear matrix preparations. In cells transfected with an alternatively spliced preprotachykinin (PPT) minigene expression of hnRNP M promoted exon skipping while expression of PSF favours exon inclusion. The latter effect was reverted specifically by co-expressing the full length hnRNP M or a deletion mutant capable of interaction with PSF and p54{sup nrb}. Together our data provide new insights and some functional implications on the hnRNP M network of interactions.

  12. Crystal structure of rice importin-α and structural basis of its interaction with plant-specific nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Wen; Couñago, Rafael Lemos Miguez; Williams, Simon J; Bodén, Mikael; Kobe, Boštjan

    2012-12-01

    In the classical nucleocytoplasmic import pathway, nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in cargo proteins are recognized by the import receptor importin-α. Importin-α has two separate NLS binding sites (the major and the minor site), both of which recognize positively charged amino acid clusters in NLSs. Little is known about the molecular basis of the unique features of the classical nuclear import pathway in plants. We determined the crystal structure of rice (Oryza sativa) importin-α1a at 2-Å resolution. The structure reveals that the autoinhibitory mechanism mediated by the importin-β binding domain of importin-α operates in plants, with NLS-mimicking sequences binding to both minor and major NLS binding sites. Consistent with yeast and mammalian proteins, rice importin-α binds the prototypical NLS from simian virus 40 large T-antigen preferentially at the major NLS binding site. We show that two NLSs, previously described as plant specific, bind to and are functional with plant, mammalian, and yeast importin-α proteins but interact with rice importin-α more strongly. The crystal structures of their complexes with rice importin-α show that they bind to the minor NLS binding site. By contrast, the crystal structures of their complexes with mouse (Mus musculus) importin-α show preferential binding to the major NLS binding site. Our results reveal the molecular basis of a number of features of the classical nuclear transport pathway specific to plants.

  13. Residues R{sup 199}H{sup 200} of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-20

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R{sup 199}H{sup 200} and R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}, but not R{sup 199}H{sup 200}, relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}. Collectively, our findings suggest that R{sup 199}H{sup 200} directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}.

  14. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminus of the adeno-associated virus Rep68/78 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, Geoffrey D.; Weitzman, Matthew D. . E-mail: weitzman@salk.edu

    2004-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replicates in the nucleus of infected cells, and therefore multiple nuclear import events are required for productive infection. We analyzed nuclear import of the viral Rep proteins and characterized a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminus. We demonstrate that basic residues in this region constitute an NLS that is transferable and mediates interaction with the nuclear import receptor importin {alpha} in vitro. Mutant Rep proteins are predominantly cytoplasmic and are severely compromised for interactions with importin {alpha}, but retain their enzymatic functions in vitro. Interestingly, mutations of the NLS had significantly less effect on importin {alpha} interaction and replication in the context of Rep78 than when incorporated into the Rep68 protein. Together, our results demonstrate that a bipartite NLS exists in the shared part of Rep68 and Rep78, and suggest that an alternate entry mechanism may also contribute to nuclear localization of the Rep78 protein.

  15. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4(K271R) mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4(K210R) mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3'-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4(K271R) was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4(K210R) was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4(K271R), but not M10-XRCC4(K210R), showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4(K271R) than in M10-XRCC4(WT), whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4(K210R) as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4.

  16. Local and serum IgE in patients affected by otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Sanz, M L; Tabar, A I; Manrique, M; Oehling, A

    1986-01-01

    Various mechanisms intervene in the etiopathogenesis of otitis media with effusion (OME), but to date it is not clear which mechanism is the most important. We studied twenty children affected with persistent otitis media with effusion (OME) inspite of the indicated treatments, and the possible incidence of atopic features, total serum IgE and in effusion, obtained by myringotomy and aspiration were evaluated. In order to evaluate the presence of atopy, an allergic history and skin tests against the different suspected allergens (inhalants and foods) were realized.

  17. Nuclear Localization of the DNA Repair Scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the Functional Role of a Bipartite NLS.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Thomas W; Gassman, Natalie R; Smith, Cassandra E; Pedersen, Lars C; Gabel, Scott A; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H; London, Robert E

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior provides a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  18. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  19. A nuclear localization for Avr2 from Fusarium oxysporum is required to activate the tomato resistance protein I-2

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lisong; Cornelissen, Ben J. C.; Takken, Frank L. W.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to promote host colonization. During infection of tomato xylem vessels, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) secretes the Avr2 effector protein. Besides being a virulence factor, Avr2 is recognized intracellularly by the tomato I-2 resistance protein, resulting in the induction of host defenses. Here, we show that AVR2 is highly expressed in root- and xylem-colonizing hyphae three days post inoculation of roots. Co-expression of I-2 with AVR2 deletion constructs using agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves revealed that, except for the N-terminal 17 amino acids, the entire AVR2 protein is required to trigger I-2-mediated cell death. The truncated Avr2 variants are still able to form homo-dimers, showing that the central region of Avr2 is required for dimerization. Simultaneous production of I-2 and Avr2 chimeras carrying various subcellular localization signals in N. benthamiana leaves revealed that a nuclear localization of Avr2 is required to trigger I-2-dependent cell death. Nuclear exclusion of Avr2 prevented its activation of I-2, suggesting that Avr2 is recognized by I-2 in the nucleus. PMID:23596453

  20. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGES

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; ...

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  1. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  2. Interaction of Sp1 zinc finger with transport factor in the nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Kitamura, Haruka; Uwatoko, Chisana; Azumano, Makiko; Itoh, Kohji; Kuwahara, Jun

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Sp1 zinc fingers themselves interact with importin {alpha}. {yields} Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a nuclear localization signal. {yields} Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates the expression of many cellular genes, but the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 is not well understood. In this study, we revealed that GST-fused Sp1 protein bound to endogenous importin {alpha} in HeLa cells via the Sp1 zinc finger domains, which comprise the DNA binding domain of Sp1. It was found that the Sp1 zinc finger domains directly interacted with a wide range of importin {alpha} including the armadillo (arm) repeat domain and the C-terminal acidic domain. Furthermore, it turned out that all three zinc fingers of Sp1 are essential for binding to importin {alpha}. Taken together, these results suggest that the Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a NLS and Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner even though it possesses no classical NLSs.

  3. Functional characterization of nuclear localization and export signals in hepatitis C virus proteins and their role in the membranous web.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A; Wozniak, Richard W; Tyrrell, D Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication.

  4. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Localization and Export Signals in Hepatitis C Virus Proteins and Their Role in the Membranous Web

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  5. Intracellular degradation and localization of NS1 of TBEV affects its protective properties.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, Yulia; Starodubova, Elizaveta; Shevtsova, Anastasia; Chernokhaeva, Lubov; Latanova, Anastasia; Preobrazhenskaia, Olga; Timofeev, Andrey; Karganova, Galina; Karpov, Vadim

    2016-12-30

    Currently many DNA vaccines against infectious diseases are in clinical trials however their efficacy is needed to be improved. Potency of DNA immunogen can be optimized by targeting technologies. In a current study to increase the efficacy of NS1encoded by plasmid the proteasome targeting was applied. NS1 variants with or without translocation sequence and with signal of proteasomal degradation of ornithine decarboxylase were tested for expression, localization, protein turnover, proteasomal degradation and protection properties. Deletion of translocation signal abrogated presentation of NS1 on the cell surface and increased proteasomal processing of NS1. Fusion with ODC signal led to increase of protein turnover and proteasome degradation rate of NS1. Immunization with NS1 variants with increased proteasome processing protected mice from viral challenge only partially, however, the survival time of infected mice was prolonged in these groups. This data can give a presupposition for formulation of specific immune therapy for infected individuals.

  6. Hepatic Microenvironment Affects Oval Cell Localization in Albumin-Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Kristin M.; Thompson, Anne W.; Sandgren, Eric P.

    2003-01-01

    Mice carrying an albumin-urokinase type plasminogen activator transgene (AL-uPA) develop liver disease secondary to uPA expression in hepatocytes. Transgene-expressing parenchyma is replaced gradually by clones of cells that have deleted transgene DNA and therefore are not subject to uPA-mediated damage. Diseased liver displays several abnormalities, including hepatocyte vacuolation and changes in nonparenchymal tissue. The latter includes increases in laminin protein within parenchyma and the appearance of cytokeratin 19-positive bile ductule-like cells (oval cells) both in portal regions and extending into the hepatic parenchyma. In this study, we subjected AL-uPA mice to two-thirds partial hepatectomy to identify the response of these livers to additional growth stimulation. We observed several changes in hepatic morphology. First, the oval cells increased in number and often formed ductules in the parenchyma. Second, this cellular change was accompanied by a further increase in laminin associated with single or clusters of oval cells. Third, desmin-positive Ito cells increased in number and maintained close association with oval cells. Fourth, these changes were localized precisely to uPA-expressing areas of liver. Regenerating clones of uPA-deficient cells appeared to be unaffected both by stromal and cellular alterations. Thus, additional growth stimulation of diseased uPA-expressing liver induces an oval cell-like response, as observed in other models of severe hepatic injury, but the localization of this response seems to be highly regulated by the hepatic microenvironment. PMID:12507902

  7. Missense mutations in Otopetrin 1 affect subcellular localization and inhibition of purinergic signaling in vestibular supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Euysoo; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Speck, Judith; Salles, Felipe T; Lundberg, Yunxia W; Goldberg, Mark P; Kachar, Bechara; Warchol, Mark E; Ornitz, David M

    2011-03-01

    Otopetrin 1 (Otop1) encodes a protein that is essential for the development of otoconia. Otoconia are the extracellular calcium carbonate containing crystals that are important for vestibular mechanosensory transduction of linear motion and gravity. There are two mutant alleles of Otop1 in mice, titled (tlt) and mergulhador (mlh), which result in non-syndromic otoconia agenesis and a consequent balance defect. Biochemically, Otop1 has been shown to modulate purinergic control of intracellular calcium in vestibular supporting cells, which could be one of the mechanisms by which Otop1 participates in the mineralization of otoconia. To understand how tlt and mlh mutations affect the biochemical function of Otop1, we examined the purinergic response of COS7 cells expressing mutant Otop1 proteins, and dissociated sensory epithelial cells from tlt and mlh mice. We also examined the subcellular localization of Otop1 in whole sensory epithelia from tlt and mlh mice. Here we show that tlt and mlh mutations uncouple Otop1 from inhibition of P2Y receptor function. Although the in vitro biochemical function of the Otop1 mutant proteins is normal, in vivo they behave as null alleles. We show that in supporting cells the apical membrane localization of the mutant Otop1 proteins is lost. These data suggest that the tlt and mlh mutations primarily affect the localization of Otop1, which interferes with its ability to interact with other proteins that are important for its cellular and biochemical function.

  8. The inter-sample structural variability of regular tissue-engineered scaffolds significantly affects the micromechanical local cell environment

    PubMed Central

    Campos Marin, A.; Lacroix, D.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid prototyping techniques have been widely used in tissue engineering to fabricate scaffolds with controlled architecture. Despite the ability of these techniques to fabricate regular structures, the consistency with which these regular structures are produced throughout the scaffold and from one scaffold to another needs to be quantified. Small variations at the pore level can affect the local mechanical stimuli sensed by the cells thereby affecting the final tissue properties. Most studies assume rapid prototyping scaffolds as regular structures without quantifying the local mechanical stimuli at the cell level. In this study, a computational method using a micro-computed tomography-based scaffold geometry was developed to characterize the mechanical stimuli within a real scaffold at the pore level. Five samples from a commercial polycaprolactone scaffold were analysed and computational fluid dynamics analyses were created to compare local velocity and shear stress values at the same scaffold location. The five samples did not replicate the computer-aided design (CAD) scaffold and velocity and shear stress values were up to five times higher than the ones calculated in the CAD scaffold. In addition high variability among samples was found: at the same location velocity and shear stress values could be up to two times higher from sample to sample. This study shows that regular scaffolds need to be thoroughly analysed in order to quantify real cell mechanical stimuli so inspection methods should be included as part of the fabrication process. PMID:25844157

  9. The absence of p53 during Human Cytomegalovirus infection leads to decreased UL53 expression, disrupting UL50 localization to the inner nuclear membrane, and thereby inhibiting capsid nuclear egress.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Man I; O'Dowd, John M; Fortunato, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Our electron microscopy study (Kuan et al., 2016) found HCMV nuclear capsid egress was significantly reduced in p53 knockout cells (p53KOs), correlating with inhibited formation of infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane (IINMs). Molecular examination of these phenomena has found p53KOs expressed UL97 and phosphorylated lamins, however the lamina failed to remodel. The nuclear egress complex (NEC) protein UL50 was expressed in almost all cells. UL50 re-localized to the inner nuclear membrane (INM) in ~90% of wt cells, but only ~35% of p53KOs. UL53 expression was significantly reduced in p53KOs, and cells lacking UL50 nuclear staining, expressed no UL53. Re-introduction of p53 into p53KOs largely recovered UL53 positivity and UL50 nuclear re-localization. Nuclear rim located UL50/53 puncta, which co-localized with the major capsid protein, were largely absent in p53KOs. We believe these puncta were IINMs. In the absence of p53, UL53 expression was inhibited, disrupting formation of the NEC/IINMs, and reducing functional virion secretion.

  10. Cell-free extract from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells can affect porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of somatic cells with undifferentiated cell extracts, such as embryonic stem cells and mammalian oocytes, is an attractive alternative method for reprogramming control. The properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are similar to those of embryonic stem cells; however, no studies have reported somatic cell nuclear reprogramming using iPSC extracts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of porcine iPSC extracts treatment on porcine ear fibroblasts and early development of porcine cloned embryos produced from porcine ear skin fibroblasts pretreated with the porcine iPSC extracts. The Chariot(TM) reagent system was used to deliver the iPSC extracts into cultured porcine ear skin fibroblasts. The iPSC extracts-treated cells (iPSC-treated cells) were cultured for 3 days and used for analyzing histone modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Compared to the results for nontreated cells, the trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine residue 9 (H3K9) in the iPSC-treated cells significantly decreased. The expression of Jmjd2b, the H3K9 trimethylation-specific demethylase gene, significantly increased in the iPSC-treated cells; conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic genes, Bax and p53, significantly decreased. When the iPSC-treated cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes, no differences were observed in blastocyst development and total cell number in blastocysts compared with the results for control cells. However, H3K9 trimethylation of pronuclear-stage-cloned embryos significantly decreased in the iPSC-treated cells. Additionally, Bax and p53 gene expression in the blastocysts was significantly lower in iPSC-treated cells than in control cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that an extracts of porcine iPSCs can affect histone modification and gene expression in porcine ear skin fibroblasts and cloned embryos.

  11. Saturation deficit and deer density affect questing activity and local abundance of Ixodes ricinus (Acari, Ixodidae) in Italy.

    PubMed

    Tagliapietra, V; Rosà, R; Arnoldi, D; Cagnacci, F; Capelli, G; Montarsi, F; Hauffe, H C; Rizzoli, A

    2011-12-29

    The wood tick Ixodes ricinus, one of the most common arthropod-borne disease vectors, is of increasing relevance for human and animal health in Europe. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of several abiotic and biotic factors potentially affecting questing activity and local abundance of I. ricinus in Italy, considering the scale at which these factors interact with the host-seeking ticks. Within EDEN, a large-scale EU collaborative project on eco-epidemiology of vector-borne diseases, we collected questing ticks for three consecutive years using a standard protocol at eleven sites in the Italian Alps and Apennines. A total of 25 447 I. ricinus were collected. All sites showed the same annual pattern of tick activity (bimodal for nymphs and unimodal for larvae and adults), although the abundance of nymphs was statistically different between sites and years. A Generalized Linear Mixed Model and a Linear Mixed Model fitted to data for nymphs, showed that while the principal variables affecting the local abundance of questing ticks were saturation deficit (an index combining temperature and relative humidity) and red deer density, the most important variable affecting questing nymph activity was saturation deficit. As for the timing of seasonal emergence, we confirmed that the threshold temperature at this latitude for larvae is 10°C (mean maximum) while that for nymphs is 8°C.

  12. 34 CFR 222.121 - How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local educational agency not be withheld? 222.121 Section 222.121 Education... § 222.121 How does the affected Indian tribe or tribes request that payments to a local...

  13. Blood flow and muscle bio-energetics by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance after local cold acclimation.

    PubMed

    Savourey, G; Clerc, L; Vallerand, A L; Leftheriotis, G; Mehier, H; Bittel, J H

    1992-01-01

    To clarify the origin of local cold adaptation and to define precisely its influence on muscle bio-energetics during local exercise, five subjects were subjected to repeated 5 degrees C cold water immersion of the right hand and forearm. The first aim of our investigation was therefore carried out by measuring local skin temperatures and peripheral blood flow during a cold hand test (5 degrees C, 5 min) followed by a 10-min recovery period. The 31P by nuclear magnetic resonance (31PNMR) muscle bio-energetic changes, indicating possible heat production changes, were measured during the recovery period. The second aim of our investigation was carried out by measuring 31PNMR muscle bioenergetics during handgrip exercise (10% of the maximal voluntary contraction for 5 min followed by a 10-min recovery period) performed both at a comfortable ambient temperature (22 degrees C; E) and after a cold hand test (EC), before and after local cold adaptation. Local cold adaptation, confirmed by warmer skin temperatures of the extremities (+30%, P less than 0.05), was related more to an increased peripheral blood flow, as shown by the smaller decrease in systolic peak [-245 (SEM 30) Hz vs -382 (SEM 95) Hz, P less than 0.05] than to a change in local heat production, because muscle bioenergetics did not vary. Acute local cold immersion decreased the inorganic phosphate:phosphocreatine (PC) ratio during EC compared to E [+0.006 (SEM 0.010) vs +0.078 (SEM 0.002) before acclimation and +0.029 (SEM 0.002) vs +0.090 (SEM 0.002) after acclimation respectively, P less than 0.05] without significant change in the PC:beta-adenosine triphosphate ratio and pH. Local adaptation did not modify these results statistically. The recovery of PC during E increased after acclimation [9.0 (SEM 0.2) min vs 3.0 (SEM 0.4) min, P less than 0.05]. These results suggested that local cold adaptation is related more to peripheral blood flow changes than to increased metabolic heat production in the muscle.

  14. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4{sup K271R} mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4{sup K210R} mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3′-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4{sup K271R} was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4{sup K210R} was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4{sup K271R}, but not M10-XRCC4{sup K210R}, showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4{sup K271R} than in M10-XRCC4{sup WT}, whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4{sup K210R} as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. - Highlights: • XRCC4{sup K271R} is defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is competent for the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K271R} is deficient in DSB repair function. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is mostly normal in DSB repair function.

  15. Identification and punctate nuclear localization of a novel noncoding RNA, Ks-1, from the honeybee brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sawata, Miyuki; Yoshino, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    We identified a novel gene, Ks-1, which is expressed preferentially in the small-type Kenyon cells of the honeybee brain. This gene is also expressed in some of the large soma neurons in the brain and in the suboesophageal ganglion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction experiments indicated that Ks-1 transcripts are enriched in the honeybee brain. cDNA cloning revealed that the consensus Ks-1 cDNA is over 17 kbp and contains no significant open reading frames. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Ks-1 transcripts are located in the nuclei of the neural cells, accumulating in some scattered spots. These findings demonstrate that Ks-1 encodes a novel class of noncoding nuclear RNA and is possibly involved in the regulation of neural functions. PMID:12088150

  16. Factors Affecting Mental Health of Local Staff Working in the Vanni Region, Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Barbara Lopes; Crawford, Carol; Petit, Pilar; Ghitis, Frida; Sivilli, Teresa I.; Scholte, Willem F.; Ager, Alastair; Eriksson, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of the civil war that extended from 1983–2009, humanitarian organizations provided aid to the conflict-affected population of the Vanni region in northern Sri Lanka. In August, 2010, a needs assessment was conducted to determine the mental-health status of Sri Lankan national humanitarian aid staff working in conditions of stress and hardship, and consider contextual and organizational characteristics influencing such status. A total of 398 staff members from nine organizations working in the Vanni area participated in the survey, which assessed stress, work characteristics, social support, coping styles, and symptoms of psychological distress. Exposure to traumatic, chronic, and secondary stressors was common. Nineteen percent of the population met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 53% of participants reported elevated anxiety symptoms, and 58% reported elevated depression symptoms. Those reporting high levels of support from their organizations were less likely to suffer depression and PTSD symptoms than those reporting lower levels of staff support (OR =.23, p < .001) and (OR =.26, p < .001), respectively. Participants who were age 55 or older were significantly less likely to suffer anxiety symptoms than those who were between 15 and 34 years of age (OR =.13, p = .011). Having experienced travel difficulties was significantly associated with more anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.35, p < .001). It was recommended that organizations provide stress-management training and increase support to their staff. PMID:27099648

  17. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  18. The sub-galactic and nuclear main sequences for local star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maragkoudakis, A.; Zezas, A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Willner, S. P.

    2017-04-01

    We describe a sub-galactic main sequence (SGMS) relating star formation rate (SFR) surface density (ΣSFR) and stellar mass density (Σ⋆) for distinct regions within star-forming galaxies, including their nuclei. We use a sample of 246 nearby star-forming galaxies from the 'Star Formation Reference Survey and demonstrate that the SGMS holds down to ∼1 kpc scales with a slope of α = 0.91 and a dispersion of 0.31 dex, similar to the well-known main sequence (MS) measured for globally integrated SFRs and stellar masses. The SGMS slope depends on galaxy morphology, with late-type galaxies (Sc-Irr) having α = 0.97 and early-type spirals (Sa-Sbc) having α = 0.81. The SGMS constructed from subregions of individual galaxies has on average the same characteristics as the composite SGMS from all galaxies. The SGMS for galaxy nuclei shows a dispersion similar to that seen for other subregions. Sampling a limited range of SFR-M⋆ space may produce either sublinearity or superlinearity of the SGMS slope. For nearly all galaxies, both SFR and stellar mass peak in the nucleus, indicating that circumnuclear clusters are among the most actively star-forming regions in the galaxy and the most massive. The nuclear SFR also correlates with total galaxy mass, forming a distinct sequence from the standard MS of star formation. The nuclear MS will be useful for studying bulge growth and for characterizing feedback processes connecting AGN and star formation.

  19. Identification of a highly conserved, functional nuclear localization signal within the N-terminal region of herpes simplex virus type 1 VP1-2 tegument protein.

    PubMed

    Abaitua, F; O'Hare, P

    2008-06-01

    VP1-2 is a large structural protein assembled into the tegument compartment of the virion, conserved across the herpesviridae, and essential for virus replication. In herpes simplex virus (HSV) and pseudorabies virus, VP1-2 is tightly associated with the capsid. Studies of its assembly and function remain incomplete, although recent data indicate that in HSV, VP1-2 is recruited onto capsids in the nucleus, with this being required for subsequent recruitment of additional structural proteins. Here we have developed an antibody to characterize VP1-2 localization, observing the protein in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments, frequently in clusters in both locations. Within the nucleus, a subpopulation of VP1-2 colocalized with VP26 and VP5, though VP1-2-positive foci devoid of these components were observed. We note a highly conserved basic motif adjacent to the previously identified N-terminal ubiquitin hydrolase domain (DUB). The DUB domain in isolation exhibited no specific localization, but when extended to include the adjacent motif, it efficiently accumulated in the nucleus. Transfer of the isolated motif to a test protein, beta-galactosidase, conferred specific nuclear localization. Substitution of a single amino acid within the motif abolished the nuclear localization function. Deletion of the motif from intact VP1-2 abrogated its nuclear localization. Moreover, in a functional assay examining the ability of VP1-2 to complement growth of a VP1-2-ve mutant, deletion of the nuclear localization signal abolished complementation. The nuclear localization signal may be involved in transport of VP1-2 early in infection or to late assembly sites within the nucleus or, considering the potential existence of VP1-2 cleavage products, in selective localization of subdomains to different compartments.

  20. Location of tumor affects local and distant immune cell type and number

    PubMed Central

    Hensel, Jonathan A.; Khattar, Vinayak; Ashton, Reading; Lee, Carnellia; Siegal, Gene P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Tumors comprise heterogeneous populations of cells, including immune infiltrates that polarize during growth and metastasis. Our preclinical studies on breast cancer (BCa) identified functional differences in myeloid‐derived suppressor cells based on tumor microenvironment (TME), prompting variations in host immune response to tumor growth, and dissemination based on tissue type. Methods In order to understand if such variations existed among other immune cells, and if such alteration occurs in response to tumor growth at the primary site or due to bone dissemination, we characterized immune cells, examining localized growth and in the tibia. In addition, immune cells from the spleen were examined from animals of both tumor locations by flow cytometry. Results The study demonstrates that location of tumor, and not simply the tumor itself, has a definitive role in regulating immune effectors. Among all immune cells characterized, macrophages were decreased and myeloid dendritic cell were increased in both tumor locations. This difference was more evident in subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, spleens from mice with subcutaneous tumors contained greater increases in both macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells than in mice with bone tumors. Furthermore, in subcutaneous tumors there was an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ T‐cell numbers, which was also observed in their spleens. Conclusions These data indicate that alterations in tumor‐reactive immune cells are more pronounced at the primary site, and exert a similar change at the major secondary lymphoid organ than in the bone TME. These findings could provide translational insight into designing therapeutic strategies that account for location of metastatic foci. PMID:28250928

  1. Tipburn in salt-affected lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants results from local oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carassay, Luciano R; Bustos, Dolores A; Golberg, Alberto D; Taleisnik, Edith

    2012-02-15

    Tipburn in lettuce is a physiological disorder expressed as a necrosis in the margins of young developing leaves and is commonly observed under saline conditions. Tipburn is usually attributed to Ca(2+) deficiencies, and there has very limited research on other mechanisms that may contribute to tipburn development. This work examines whether symptoms are mediated by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Two butter lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) varieties, Sunstar (Su) and Pontina (Po), with contrasting tipburn susceptibility were grown in hydroponics with low Ca(2+) (0.5 mM), and with or without 50 mM NaCl. Tipburn symptoms were observed only in Su, and only in the saline treatment. Tipburn incidence in response to topical treatments with Ca(2+) scavengers, Ca(2+) transport inhibitors, and antioxidants was assessed. All treatments were applied before symptom expression, and evaluated later, when symptoms were expected to occur. Superoxide presence in tissues was determined with nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) and oxidative damage as malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities were assayed. Under control and saline conditions, tipburn could be induced in both varieties by topical treatments with a Ca(2+) scavenger (EGTA) and Ca(2+) transport inhibitors (verapamil, LaCl(3)) and reduced by supplying Ca(2+) along with a ionophore (A 23187). Tipburn symptoms were associated with locally produced ROS. O(2)(·-) and oxidative damage significantly increased in leaf margins before symptom expression, while topical antioxidant applications (Tiron, DPI) reduced symptoms in treated leaves, but not in the rest of the plant. Antioxidant enzyme activity was higher in Po, and increased more in response to EGTA treatments, and may contribute to mitigating oxidative damage and tipburn expression in this variety.

  2. A Numerical Analysis on the Local Deformation of a Spacer Grid Structure for Nuclear Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Myung-Geun; Na, Geum Ju; Shin, Hyunho; Kim, Jong-Bong

    2016-08-01

    The result of a preliminary numerical investigation on local deformation characteristics of a multi-layered spacer-grid structure with five guide tubes is reported based on implicit finite element analysis. For the numerical analysis, displacements of top and bottom cross sections of each guide tube in a single-layer model were constrained while a lateral displacement was imposed on the single layer. Unlike the impact hammer test that is generally employed to characterize the deformation characteristics of the space-grid structure, the buckling phenomenon occurs locally in this study; it takes place at the inner grids around each tube and the degree of bucking is more apparent for tubes near the lateral surface where the lateral displacement was imposed.

  3. An aberrant nuclear localization of E-cadherin is a potent inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin-elicited promotion of the cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Su, Y-J; Chang, Y-W; Lin, W-H; Liang, C-L; Lee, J-L

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that Wnt signaling contributes to reprogramming and maintenance of cancer stem cell (CSC) states activated by loss of membranous E-cadherin expression. However, E-cadherin's exact role in Wnt/β-catenin-mediated promotion of the CSC phenotype remains unclear. Recently, a significant positive correlation has been observed between the expression of nuclear (an aberrant nuclear localization) E-cadherin and β-catenin in gastric and colorectal carcinomas. Here we conducted a series of in-vitro and in-vivo studies to show that the β-catenin/TCF4 interaction was abolished by E-cadherin and was correlated with its nuclear localization, and consequently decreased β-catenin/TCF4 transcriptional activity. Nuclear E-cadherin was a negative regulator of Wnt/β-Catenin-elicited promotion of the CSC phenotype. Using immunohistochemistry on lung cancer tissue microarrays, we found that changes in subcellular location of E-cadherin may be described by tumor grade and stage, suggesting cellular redistribution during lung tumorigenesis. Furthermore, nuclear E-cadherin expression was more significantly inversely correlated with CD133 (a lung CSC marker) expression (P<0.005) than total E-cadherin expression (P<0.05), suggesting that lung cancer as defined by nuclear E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High biomarkers has superior prognostic value over total E-cadherinLow/nuclear β-cateninHigh/CD133High. PMID:26075748

  4. AMUSE-Field I: NUCLEAR X-RAY PROPERTIES OF LOCAL FIELD AND GROUP SPHEROIDS ACROSS THE STELLAR MASS SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% {+-} 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L{sub X}/L{sub Edd} ratios between {approx}10{sup -4} and 10{sup -8}. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of 'Eddington incompleteness' within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M{sup 0.71{+-}0.10}{sub star}, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 {+-} 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for

  5. AMUSE-Field I: Nuclear X-Ray Properties of Local Field and Group Spheroids across the Stellar Mass Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan; Gallo, Elena; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2012-03-01

    We present the first results from AMUSE-Field, a Chandra survey designed to characterize the occurrence and intensity of low-level accretion onto supermassive black holes (SMBHs) at the center of local early-type field galaxies. This is accomplished by means of a Large Program targeting a distance-limited (<30 Mpc) sample of 103 early types spanning a wide range in stellar masses. We acquired new ACIS-S observations for 61 objects down to a limiting (0.3-10 keV) luminosity of 2.5 × 1038 erg s-1, and we include an additional 42 objects with archival (typically deeper) coverage. A nuclear X-ray source is detected in 52 out of the 103 galaxies. After accounting for potential contamination from low-mass X-ray binaries, we estimate that the fraction of accreting SMBHs within the sample is 45% ± 7%, which sets a firm lower limit on the occupation fraction within the field. The measured nuclear X-ray luminosities are invariably highly sub-Eddington, with L X/L Edd ratios between ~10-4 and 10-8. As also found in a companion survey targeting Virgo early types, the active fraction increases with increasing host galaxy stellar mass, reflective of "Eddington incompleteness" within the lower-mass objects. For the Field sample, the average nuclear X-ray luminosity scales with the host stellar mass as M 0.71 ± 0.10 star, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.73 ± 0.09 dex. Qualitatively similar results hold for morphologically homogeneous (type E) or uniform sensitivity (new observations only) subsets. A majority of the AMUSE-Field galaxies (78%) inhabit groups, enabling us to investigate the influence of group richness on nuclear activity. We see no evidence for a positive correlation between nuclear X-ray luminosity, normalized to host properties, and galaxy density. Rather, while the scatter is substantial, it appears that the Eddington-scaled X-ray luminosity of group members may be slightly lower than for isolated galaxies, and that this trend continues to cluster early types.

  6. p27 Nuclear localization and growth arrest caused by perlecan knockdown in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Katsuya; Oka, Kiyomasa; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2010-02-12

    Perlecan, a secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of the vascular basement membrane and participates in angiogenesis. Here, we used small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of perlecan expression to investigate the regulatory function of perlecan in the growth of human vascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced ERK phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged by perlecan deficiency in endothelial cells; however, perlecan deficiency inhibited the Rb protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis induced by bFGF. By contrast to cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 in control endothelial cells, p27 was localized in the nucleus and its expression increased in perlecan-deficient cells, which suggests that p27 mediates inhibition of Rb phosphorylation. In addition to the well-characterized function of perlecan as a co-receptor for heparin-binding growth factors such as bFGF, our results suggest that perlecan plays an indispensible role in endothelial cell proliferation and acts through a mechanism that involves subcellular localization of p27.

  7. Localization and spectral isolation of special nuclear material using stochastic image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, M. C.; Polack, J. K.; Poitrasson-Rivière, A.; Clarke, S. D.; Pozzi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a technique for isolating the gamma-ray and neutron energy spectra from multiple radioactive sources localized in an image. Image reconstruction algorithms for radiation scatter cameras typically focus on improving image quality. However, with scatter cameras being developed for non-proliferation applications, there is a need for not only source localization but also source identification. This work outlines a modified stochastic origin ensembles algorithm that provides localized spectra for all pixels in the image. We demonstrated the technique by performing three experiments with a dual-particle imager that measured various gamma-ray and neutron sources simultaneously. We showed that we could isolate the peaks from 22Na and 137Cs and that the energy resolution is maintained in the isolated spectra. To evaluate the spectral isolation of neutrons, a 252Cf source and a PuBe source were measured simultaneously and the reconstruction showed that the isolated PuBe spectrum had a higher average energy and a greater fraction of neutrons at higher energies than the 252Cf. Finally, spectrum isolation was used for an experiment with weapons grade plutonium, 252Cf, and AmBe. The resulting neutron and gamma-ray spectra showed the expected characteristics that could then be used to identify the sources.

  8. Neonatal local noxious insult affects gene expression in the spinal dorsal horn of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ke; Novikova, Svetlana I; He, Fang; Dubner, Ronald; Lidow, Michael S

    2005-09-22

    Neonatal noxious insult produces a long-term effect on pain processing in adults. Rats subjected to carrageenan (CAR) injection in one hindpaw within the sensitive period develop bilateral hypoalgesia as adults. In the same rats, inflammation of the hindpaw, which was the site of the neonatal injury, induces a localized enhanced hyperalgesia limited to this paw. To gain an insight into the long-term molecular changes involved in the above-described long-term nociceptive effects of neonatal noxious insult at the spinal level, we performed DNA microarray analysis (using microarrays containing oligo-probes for 205 genes encoding receptors and transporters for glutamate, GABA, and amine neurotransmitters, precursors and receptors for neuropeptides, and neurotrophins, cytokines and their receptors) to compare gene expression profiles in the lumbar spinal dorsal horn (LDH) of adult (P60) male rats that received neonatal CAR treatment within (at postnatal day 3; P3) and outside (at postnatal 12; P12) of the sensitive period. The data were obtained both without inflammation (at baseline) and during complete Freund's adjuvant induced inflammation of the neonatally injured paw. The observed changes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. This study revealed significant basal and inflammation-associated aberrations in the expression of multiple genes in the LDH of adult animals receiving CAR injection at P3 as compared to their expression levels in the LDH of animals receiving either no injections or CAR injection at P12. In particular, at baseline, twelve genes (representing GABA, serotonin, adenosine, neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, opioid, tachykinin and interleukin systems) were up-regulated in the bilateral LDH of the former animals. The baseline condition in these animals was also characterized by up-regulation of seven genes (encoding members of GABA, cholecystokinin, histamine, serotonin, and neurotensin systems) in the LDH ipsilateral to the neonatally-injured paw. The

  9. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Natalia E; Takeda, Agnes A S; Dreyer, Thiago R; Freitas, Fernanda Z; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site.

  10. The fission yeast meiotic checkpoint kinase Mek1 regulates nuclear localization of Cdc25 by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hidalgo, Livia; Moreno, Sergio; San-Segundo, Pedro A

    2008-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, fidelity in transmission of genetic information during cell division is ensured by the action of cell cycle checkpoints. Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that arrest or delay cell cycle progression when critical cellular processes are defective or when the genome is damaged. During meiosis, the so-called meiotic recombination checkpoint blocks entry into meiosis I until recombination has been completed, thus avoiding aberrant chromosome segregation and the formation of aneuploid gametes. One of the key components of the meiotic recombination checkpoint is the meiosis-specific Mek1 kinase, which belongs to the family of Rad53/Cds1/Chk2 checkpoint kinases containing forkhead-associated domains. In fission yeast, several lines of evidence suggest that Mek1 targets the critical cell cycle regulator Cdc25 to delay meiotic cell cycle progression. Here, we investigate in more detail the molecular mechanism of action of the fission yeast Mek1 protein. We demonstrate that Mek1 acts independently of Cds1 to phosphorylate Cdc25, and this phosphorylation is required to trigger cell cycle arrest. Using ectopic overexpression of mek1(+) as a tool to induce in vivo activation of Mek1, we find that Mek1 promotes cytoplasmic accumulation of Cdc25 and results in prolonged phosphorylation of Cdc2 at tyrosine 15. We propose that at least one of the mechanisms contributing to the cell cycle delay when the meiotic recombination checkpoint is activated in fission yeast is the nuclear exclusion of the Cdc25 phosphatase by Mek1-dependent phosphorylation.

  11. Identification, localization, transcription, and sequence analysis of the Choristoneura fumiferana nuclear polyhedrosis virus DNA polymerase gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, J J; Carstens, E B

    1995-06-01

    The location of the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene was determined by hybridization analysis using a probe prepared from the previously identified polymerase gene from the Autographa californica multiple nuclear polyhedrosis virus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the Choristoneura fumiferana baculovirus DNA polymerase gene consists of 2970 base pairs encoding 990 amino acids (114.2 kDa). Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that overlapping transcripts of 3.2 and 4.6 kb, first detected at 6 hr postinfection, potentially coded for the DNA polymerase gene. The major transcription starts sites, identified at 6 hr postinfection, mapped to baculovirus consensus early start sites CGTGCTCA and CAGT. The relatively low level and late initiation of the DNA polymerase gene coupled with our previous data on the temporal control of DNA replication and late gene synthesis (Liu and Carstens, 1993) suggests that the low virulence of the spruce budworm baculovirus may be related to the regulation of its gene expression at the transcriptional level.

  12. The Dense Molecular Gas and Nuclear Activity in the Local ULIRG IRAS 13120-5453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privon, George C.; Aalto, Susanne; Falstad, Niklas; Muller, Sebastien; González-Alfonso, Eduardo; Sliwa, Kazimierz; Treister, Ezequiel; Costagliola, Francesco; Armus, Lee; Evans, Aaron S.; Garcia-Burillo, Santiago; Izumi, Takuma; Sakamoto, Kazushi; van der Werf, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) are the most luminous and concentrated star-forming galaxies in the local Universe. With a galaxy's worth of gas in the central kiloparsec and star formation rates in excess of 100 solar masses per year, these systems can have infrared surface densities that approach predictions for radiation pressure-limited starbursts. We will present a case study of a local ULIRG, IRAS 13120-5453, using ALMA observations of dense gas tracers HCN and HCO+, and the 330 GHz continuum emission. We find the HCN/HCO+ ratio to be elevated above typical values for star-forming galaxies and suggest the enhancement can be explained by increased HCN abundance driven by mechanical heating from supernovae in the starburst. The 330 GHz continuum size is resolved, with a size of ~500 pc. Using this as a measure of the starburst size, we show the IR luminosity surface density is below that for a radiation pressure-limited starburst. We also find tentative evidence for non-virial motions of HCN, suggesting dense molecular gas may be entrained the molecular wind (previously detected in OH).

  13. How local and state regulations affect the child care food environment: A qualitative study of child care center directors’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd-Williams, C. E.; Camp, E. J.; Mullen, P. D.; Briley, M. E.; Hoelscher, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-third of preschoolers spend regular time in child care centers where they can consume the majority of their daily dietary intake. The child care setting influences children’s dietary intake. Thus, it is important to examine factors, such as local and state regulations, that influence the food environment at the center. This qualitative study explored directors’ perceptions of how regulations influence the foods available at child care centers. Ten directors of centers in Travis County, Texas completed semi-structured interviews. Directors reported that changes in local health department regulations (e.g., kitchen specifications) result in less-healthful foods being served (e.g., more prepackaged foods). Directors of centers that do not participate in the federal Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) said the state licensing regulations clarify the portion size and nutritional requirements for preschoolers thereby improving the nutritional quality of the food served. Directors of centers participating in CACFP said they are not affected by state mandates, because the CACFP regulations are more stringent. These findings suggest that state regulations that specify and quantify nutritional standards may beneficially impact preschoolers’ diets. However, local health department regulations enacted to improve food safety may negatively influence the nutritional value of food served in centers. PMID:26251694

  14. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  15. Novel and recurrent CIB2 variants, associated with nonsyndromic deafness, do not affect calcium buffering and localization in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Giese, Arnaud P; Shafique, Sobia; Schraders, Margit; Oonk, Anne M M; Grossheim, Mike; Oostrik, Jaap; Strom, Tim; Hegde, Rashmi; van Wijk, Erwin; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Azam, Maleeha; Yntema, Helger G; Free, Rolien H; Riazuddin, Saima; Verheij, Joke B G M; Admiraal, Ronald J; Qamar, Raheel; Ahmed, Zubair M; Kremer, Hannie

    2016-04-01

    Variants in CIB2 can underlie either Usher syndrome type I (USH1J) or nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) (DFNB48). Here, a novel homozygous missense variant c.196C>T and compound heterozygous variants, c.[97C>T];[196C>T], were found, respectively, in two unrelated families of Dutch origin. Besides, the previously reported c.272 T>C functional missense variant in CIB2 was identified in two families of Pakistani origin. The missense variants are demonstrated not to affect subcellular localization of CIB2 in vestibular hair cells in ex vivo expression experiments. Furthermore, these variants do not affect the ATP-induced calcium responses in COS-7 cells. However, based on the residues affected, the variants are suggested to alter αIIβ integrin binding. HI was nonsyndromic in all four families. However, deafness segregating with the c.272T>C variant in one Pakistani family is remarkably less severe than that in all other families with this mutation. Our results contribute to the insight in genotype-phenotype correlations of CIB2 mutations.

  16. Nuclear localization of Vpr is crucial for the efficient replication of HIV-1 in primary CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Sayuki; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Kimata, Kiyonori; Wen Zhongzhuang; Kamata, Masakazu; Isogai, Maya; Miwa, Masanao; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Aida, Yoko . E-mail: aida@riken.jp

    2004-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Vpr appears to make a substantial contribution to the replication of HIV-1 in established T cell lines when HIV-1 is present at very low multiplicities of infection. However, the role of Vpr in viral replication in primary CD4{sup +} T cells remains to be clarified. In this study, we generated a panel of viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that lacked either the ability to accumulate in the nucleus and induce G{sub 2} arrest or the ability to induce apoptosis, which has been shown to occur independently of G{sub 2} arrest of the cell cycle. We demonstrate here that the nuclear localization of Vpr and consequent G{sub 2} arrest but not the induction of apoptosis by Vpr are important for viral replication in primary CD4{sup +} T cells at both high and low multiplicities of infection. Viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that failed to be imported into the nucleus in the presence of cytoplasmic extracts from primary CD4{sup +} T cells in an in vitro nuclear import assay replicated at drastically reduced rates. Thus, Vpr might be a key regulator of the viral nuclear import process during infection in primary CD4{sup +} T cells. By contrast, a mutant form of Vpr that exhibited diffuse cytosolic staining exclusively in an immunofluorescence assay of HeLa cells and was not imported into nucleus by the cytosol from HeLa cells was effectively imported into the nucleus by cytosol from primary CD4{sup +} T cells. This Vpr mutant virus replicated well in primary CD4{sup +} T cells, indicating that cellular factors in primary CD4{sup +} T cells are indispensable for the accumulation of Vpr in the nucleus and, thus, for viral replication. Our results suggest that the nuclear import of Vpr might be a good target in efforts to block the early stages of replication of HIV-1.

  17. A conserved C-terminal domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus developmental regulator MedA is required for nuclear localization, adhesion and virulence.

    PubMed

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Lee, Mark J; Sheppard, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA(346-557), that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA(346-557) alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA(346-557) domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function.

  18. Estrogen promotes fat mass and obesity-associated protein nuclear localization and enhances endometrial cancer cell proliferation via the mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yaping; Shen, Jiaqi; Gao, Liyan; Feng, Youji

    2016-04-01

    Extensive exposure to estrogen is generally acknowledged as a risk factor for endometrial cancer. Given that the accumulation of adipocytes also contributes to the increased production of estrogen, in the present study, we evaluated the expression of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene in endometrial tumor tissues and further explored the mechanism of how estrogen facilitates FTO nuclear localization and promotes endometrial cancer cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assay was used to detect the FTO expression in endometrial tumor samples. Western blotting was performed to investigate the mechanism of estrogen-induced FTO nuclear localization. siRNA was used to knock down ERα and further explore its role in FTO nuclear localization. MTT assay was carried out to determine cell proliferation. We found that FTO was overexpressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues and served as a poor prognostic marker. Additionally, estrogen induced FTO nuclear accumulation via the mTOR signaling pathway and the nuclear localization was ERα-dependent, which contributed to enhanced proliferative activity. Therefore, the present study provides new insight into the mechanisms of estrogen-induced proliferation, implying the possibility of using FTO as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  19. A Conserved C-Terminal Domain of the Aspergillus fumigatus Developmental Regulator MedA Is Required for Nuclear Localization, Adhesion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Al Abdallah, Qusai; Choe, Se-In; Campoli, Paolo; Baptista, Stefanie; Gravelat, Fabrice N.; Lee, Mark J.; Sheppard, Donald C.

    2012-01-01

    MedA is a developmental regulator that is conserved in the genome of most filamentous fungi. In the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus MedA regulates conidiogenesis, adherence to host cells, and pathogenicity. The mechanism by which MedA governs these phenotypes remains unknown. Although the nuclear import of MedA orthologues has been reported in other fungi, no nuclear localization signal, DNA-binding domain or other conserved motifs have been identified within MedA. In this work, we performed a deletion analysis of MedA and identified a novel domain within the C-terminal region of the protein, designated MedA346–557, that is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization of MedA. We further demonstrate that MedA nuclear localization is required for the function of MedA. Surprisingly, expression of the minimal nuclear localization fragment MedA346–557 alone was sufficient to restore conidogenesis, biofilm formation and virulence to the medA mutant strain. Collectively these results suggest that MedA functions in the regulation of transcription, and that the MedA346–557 domain is both necessary and sufficient to mediate MedA function. PMID:23185496

  20. VRK3-mediated nuclear localization of HSP70 prevents glutamate excitotoxicity-induced apoptosis and Aβ accumulation via enhancement of ERK phosphatase VHR activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haengjin; Kim, Wanil; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Most of neurodegenerative disorders are associated with protein aggregation. Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and persistent extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation are also implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we found that vaccinia-related kinase 3 (VRK3) facilitates nuclear localization of glutamate-induced heat shock protein 70 (HSP70). Nuclear HSP70 leads to enhancement of vaccinia H1-related phosphatase (VHR) activity via protein-protein interaction rather than its molecular chaperone activity, thereby suppressing excessive ERK activation. Moreover, glutamate-induced ERK activation stimulates the expression of HSP70 and VRK3 at the transcriptional level. Downregulation of either VRK3 or HSP70 rendered cells vulnerable to glutamate-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of HSP70 fused to a nuclear localization signal attenuated apoptosis more than HSP70 alone. The importance of nuclear localization of HSP70 in the negative regulation of glutamate-induced ERK activation was further confirmed in VRK3-deficient neurons. Importantly, we showed a positive correlation between levels of VRK3 and HSP70 in the progression of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases in humans, and neurons with HSP70 nuclear localization exhibited less Aβ accumulation in brains from patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, HSP70 and VRK3 could potentially serve as diagnostic and therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27941812

  1. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  2. The interactions with Ro60 and La differentially affect nuclear export of hY1 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, F H; Rutjes, S A; van Venrooij, W J; Pruijn, G J

    1996-01-01

    Ro RNPs are evolutionarily conserved ribonucleoprotein particles that consist of a small RNA, known as Y RNA, associated with several proteins, such as La, Ro60, and Ro52. The Y RNAs (Y1-Y5), which are transcribed by RNA polymerase III, have been shown to reside almost exclusively in the cytoplasm as Ro RNPs. To obtain more insight into the nuclear export pathway of Y RNAs, hY1 RNA export was studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Injection of various hY1 RNA mutants showed that an intact Ro60 binding site is a prerequisite for nuclear export, whereas the presence of an intact La binding site resulted in strong nuclear retention of hY1 RNA. Competition studies with various classes of RNAs indicated that, in addition to Ro60, another titratable factor was necessary for nuclear export of hY1 RNA. This factor appears also to be involved in nuclear export of tRNA. Because export of hY1 RNA could not be blocked by a synthetic peptide containing the recently identified nuclear export signal of the HIV-1 Rev protein, nuclear export of hY1 RNA does not seem to be dependent on a Rev-like nuclear export signal. PMID:8608450

  3. Formation of Nup98-containing nuclear bodies in HeLa sublines is linked to genomic rearrangements affecting chromosome 11.

    PubMed

    Romana, Serge; Radford-Weiss, Isabelle; Lapierre, Jean-Michel; Doye, Valérie; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude

    2016-09-01

    Nup98 is an important component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and also a rare but recurrent target for chromosomal translocation in leukaemogenesis. Nup98 contains multiple cohesive Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly (GLFG) repeats that are critical notably for the formation of intranuclear GLFG bodies. Previous studies have reported the existence of GLFG bodies in cells overexpressing exogenous Nup98 or in a HeLa subline (HeLa-C) expressing an unusual elevated amount of endogenous Nup98. Here, we have analysed the presence of Nup98-containing bodies in several human cell lines. We found that HEp-2, another HeLa subline, contains GLFG bodies that are distinct from those identified in HeLa-C. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) revealed that HEp-2 cells express additional truncated forms of Nup98 fused to a non-coding region of chromosome 11q22.1. Cytogenetic analyses using FISH and array-CGH further revealed chromosomal rearrangements that were distinct from those observed in leukaemic cells. Indeed, HEp-2 cells feature a massive amplification of juxtaposed NUP98 and 11q22.1 loci on a chromosome marker derived from chromosome 3. Unexpectedly, minor co-amplifications of NUP98 and 11q22.1 loci were also observed in other HeLa sublines, but on rearranged chromosomes 11. Altogether, this study reveals that distinct genomic rearrangements affecting NUP98 are associated with the formation of GLFG bodies in specific HeLa sublines.

  4. A local criterion for cleavage fracture of a nuclear pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Bermin, F.M.

    1983-11-01

    Experiments were performed on three heats of A508 class 3 steel in order to determine the mechanical conditions for cleavage fracture. These tests were carried out on various geometries including 4-point bend specimens and axisymmetric notched tensile bars with different notch radii which have been modelized using the finite element method. In one heat, the temperature range investigated was from 77 K to 233 K. It is shown that the cleavage resistance is increased by tensile straining. Moreover, the probability of fracture obeys the Weibull statistical distribution. All the results can be accounted for in terms of a local criterion based on Weibull theory and which takes into account the effect of plastic strain. In this criterion, the parameters which were experimentally determined are found to be temperature independent over the range 77 K to 170 K. The applicability of the approach proposed for cleavage fracture at the crack tip is also examined. It is shown that the experimental results published in the literature giving the variation of fracture toughness with temperature can be explained by the proposed criterion which predicts reasonably well both the scatter in the experimental results and the K /SUB IC/ temperature dependence.

  5. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  6. CD147 mediates chemoresistance in breast cancer via ABCG2 by affecting its cellular localization and dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuangyuan; Liao, Liqiu; Chen, Chen; Zeng, Weiqi; Liu, Shuang; Su, Juan; Zhao, Shuang; Chen, Mingliang; Kuang, Yehong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Jie

    2013-09-01

    CD147 and ABCG2 both have been reported to mediate Multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. Recent study demonstrates that CD147 could form a complex with ABCG2 on the cell membrane in primary effusion lymphoma. However, whether these two molecules regulate each other in breast cancer and result in MDR is not clear. We established four MCF-7 cell lines transfected with CD147 and/or ABCG2 and found that CD147 could increase the expression and dimerization of ABCG2, affect its cellular localization and regulate its drug transporter function. The findings derived from cells were confirmed subsequently in clinic samples of chemotherapy-sensitive/resistant breast cancer.

  7. Mimicking the phosphorylation of Rsp5 in PKA site T761 affects its function and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebska, Zaneta; Kaminska, Joanna; Chelstowska, Anna; Domanska, Anna; Rzepnikowska, Weronika; Sitkiewicz, Ewa; Cholbinski, Piotr; Gourlay, Campbell; Plochocka, Danuta; Zoladek, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Rsp5 ubiquitin ligase belongs to the Nedd4 family of proteins, which affect a wide variety of processes in the cell. Here we document that Rsp5 shows several phosphorylated variants of different mobility and the migration of the phosphorylated forms of Rsp5 was faster for the tpk1Δ tpk3Δ mutant devoid of two alternative catalytic subunits of protein kinase A (PKA), indicating that PKA possibly phosphorylates Rsp5 in vivo. We demonstrated by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis of GFP-HA-Rsp5 protein using the anti-phospho PKA substrate antibody that Rsp5 is phosphorylated in PKA sites. Rsp5 contains the sequence 758-RRFTIE-763 with consensus RRXS/T in the catalytic HECT domain and four other sites with consensus RXXS/T, which might be phosphorylated by PKA. The strain bearing the T761D substitution in Rsp5 which mimics phosphorylation grew more slowly at 28°C and did not grow at 37°C, and showed defects in pre-tRNA processing and protein sorting. The rsp5-T761D strain also demonstrated a reduced ability to form colonies, an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitivity to ROS-generating agents. These results indicate that PKA may downregulate many functions of Rsp5, possibly affecting its activity. Rsp5 is found in the cytoplasm, nucleus, multivesicular body and cortical patches. The rsp5-T761D mutation led to a strongly increased cortical localization while rsp5-T761A caused mutant Rsp5 to locate more efficiently in internal spots. Rsp5-T761A protein was phosphorylated less efficiently in PKA sites under specific growth conditions. Our data suggests that Rsp5 may be phosphorylated by PKA at position T761 and that this regulation is important for its localization and function.

  8. Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation: The Role of Site Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Freed, Jack H; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-03-24

    Restricted motions in proteins (e.g., N-H bond dynamics) are studied effectively with NMR. By analogy with restricted motions in liquid crystals (LC), the local ordering has in the past been primarily represented by potentials comprising the L = 2, |K| = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, probes dissolved in LCs experience nonpolar ordering, often referred to as alignment, while protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, often referred to as orientation. In this study we investigate the role of local (site) symmetry in the context of the polarity of the local ordering. We find that potentials comprising the L = 1, |K| = 0, 1 spherical harmonics represent adequately polar ordering. It is useful to characterize potential symmetry in terms of the irreducible representations of D2h point group, which is already implicit in the definition of the rotational diffusion tensor. Thus, the relevant rhombic L = 1 potentials have B1u and B3u symmetry whereas the relevant rhombic L = 2 potentials have Ag symmetry. A comprehensive scheme where local potentials and corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) are represented in Cartesian and spherical coordinates clarifies how they are affected by polar and nonpolar ordering. The Cartesian coordinates are chosen so that the principal axis of polar axial PDF is pointing along the z-axis, whereas the principal axis of the nonpolar axial PDF is pointing along ±z. Two-term axial potentials with 1 ≤ L ≤ 3 exhibit substantial diversity; they are expected to be useful in NMR-relaxation-data-fitting. It is shown how potential coefficients are reflected in the experimental order parameters. The comprehensive scheme representing local potentials and PDFs is exemplified for the L = 2 case using experimental data from (15)N-labeled plexin-B1 and thioredoxin, (2)H-, and (13)C-labeled benzenehexa-n-alkanoates, and nitroxide-labeled T4 lysozyme. Future prospects for improved ordering analysis based on combined atomistic and

  9. Localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs of the mite Uropoda orbicularis (Parasitiformes: Mesostigmata) on Aphodius beetles (Aphodiidae) affect pedicel length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajerlein, Daria; Witaliński, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    The phoretic stage of Uropodina mites is a deutonymph with developed morphological adaptations for dispersal by insects. Phoretic deutonymphs are able to produce a pedicel, a stalk-like temporary attachment structure that connects the mite with the carrier. The aim of our study was to determine whether localization and density of phoretic deutonymphs on the carrier affect pedicel length. The study was conducted on a common phoretic mite— Uropoda orbicularis (Uropodina) and two aphodiid beetles— Aphodius prodromus and Aphodius distinctus. Our results show that pedicel length is influenced by the localization of deutonymphs on the body of the carrier. The longest pedicels are produced by deutonymphs attached to the upper part of elytra, whereas deutonymphs attached to femora and trochanters of the third pair of legs and the apex of elytra construct the shortest pedicels. In general, deutonymphs attached to more exposed parts of the carrier produce longer pedicels, whereas shorter pedicels are produced when deutonymphs are fixed to non-exposed parts of the carrier. A second factor influencing pedicel length is the density of attached deutonymphs. Mean pedicel length and deutonymph densities were highly correlated: higher deutonymph density leads to the formation of longer pedicels. The cause for this correlation is discussed, and we conclude that pedicel length variability can increase successful dispersal.

  10. G0/G1 switch gene-2 regulates human adipocyte lipolysis by affecting activity and localization of adipose triglyceride lipase.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Martina; Paar, Margret; Eder, Christina; Brandis, Janina; Moser, Elena; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Grond, Susanne; Radner, Franz P W; Cerk, Ines; Cornaciu, Irina; Oberer, Monika; Kersten, Sander; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2012-11-01

    The hydrolysis of triglycerides in adipocytes, termed lipolysis, provides free fatty acids as energy fuel. Murine lipolysis largely depends on the activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), which is regulated by two proteins annotated as comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) and G0/G1 switch gene-2 (G0S2). CGI-58 activates and G0S2 inhibits ATGL activity. In contrast to mice, the functional role of G0S2 in human adipocyte lipolysis is poorly characterized. Here we show that overexpression or silencing of G0S2 in human SGBS adipocytes decreases and increases lipolysis, respectively. Human G0S2 is upregulated during adipocyte differentiation and inhibits ATGL activity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, C-terminally truncated ATGL mutants, which fail to localize to lipid droplets, translocate to the lipid droplet upon coexpression with G0S2, suggesting that G0S2 anchors ATGL to lipid droplets independent of ATGL's C-terminal lipid binding domain. Taken together, our results indicate that G0S2 also regulates human lipolysis by affecting enzyme activity and intracellular localization of ATGL. Increased lipolysis is known to contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, and G0S2 expression has been shown to be reduced in poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients. Our data indicate that downregulation of G0S2 in adipose tissue could represent one of the underlying causes leading to increased lipolysis in the insulin-resistant state.

  11. NMDA-dependent mechanisms only affect the BOLD response in the rat dentate gyrus by modifying local signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Tiede, Regina; Krautwald, Karla; Fincke, Anja; Angenstein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The role of N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated mechanisms in the formation of a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was studied using electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. Stimulation of this fiber bundle triggered BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and in the left entorhinal cortex. The perforant pathway projects to and activates the dentate gyrus monosynaptically, activation in the contralateral entorhinal cortex is multisynaptic and requires forwarding and processing of signals. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 during stimulation had no effect on BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus, but reduced the BOLD responses in the left entorhinal cortex. In contrast, application of MK801 before the first stimulation train reduced the BOLD response in both regions. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the initial stimulation trains changed the local processing of the incoming signals in the dentate gyrus. This altered electrophysiological response was not further changed by a subsequent application of MK801, which is in agreement with an unchanged BOLD response. When MK801 was present during the first stimulation train, a dissimilar electrophysiological response pattern was observed and corresponds to an altered BOLD response, indicating that NMDA-dependent mechanisms indirectly affect the BOLD response, mainly via modifying local signal processing and subsequent propagation. PMID:22167232

  12. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes.

  13. Crystal structure of importin-α bound to the nuclear localization signal of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-LP protein.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Ryohei; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-04-06

    Epstein-Barr virus EBNA-LP protein is a transcriptional coactivator of EBNA2. Efficient nuclear localization of EBNA-LP is essential for cooperation with EBNA2. Here we report the crystal structure of the nuclear import adaptor importin-α1 bound to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of EBNA-LP that shows EBNA-LP residues 44-RRVRRR-49 binding to the major NLS-binding site at the P0-P5 positions. In contrast to previously characterized classical NLSs that invariably have a basic residue [either lysine (in the vast majority of cases) or arginine] at the P2 position, the EBNA-LP NLS is unique in that it has valine at the P2 position. The loss of the critical P2 lysine (or arginine) is compensated by arginine at the P0 position in the EBNA-LP NLS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  15. Nuclear Localization of β-Catenin in Sertoli Cell Tumors and Other Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Testis: An Immunohistochemical Study of 87 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Ulbright, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and subclassification of Sertoli cell tumors (SCT) of the testis are often challenging to general surgical pathologists because of the rarity of the tumors. Immunohistochemical study to date has limited diagnostic value. Nuclear localization of β-catenin, which correlated closely with CTNNB1 gene mutation, was recently reported in SCTs. We investigated the utility of β-catenin nuclear localization in diagnosing SCTs and differentiating them from other testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin was evaluated in 87 cases of testicular sex cord-stromal tumor: 33 SCTs, not otherwise specified (SCT-NOS) (15 with benign and 18 with malignant features), 10 sclerosing SCTs (SSCT), 5 large cell calcifying SCTs (LCCSCT), 6 Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, 10 Leydig cell tumors, 7 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 4 adult granulosa cell tumors, and 12 sex cord-stromal tumors, unclassified. Twenty-one of 33 (64%) SCT-NOS, 6 of 10 (60%) SSCTs, and 4 of 6 (67%) Sertoli-stromal cell tumors showed strong, diffuse β-catenin nuclear staining. Nuclear β-catenin positivity was more frequent in SCTs-NOS with benign features than in those with malignant features (93% and 39%, respectively, P=0.13) and, in the Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, occurred only in the Sertoli component. All 5 LCCSCTs and all other types of sex cord-stromal tumor were negative for β-catenin nuclear staining. In conclusion, SCT-NOS and SSCT frequently show β-catenin nuclear localization. Positive nuclear staining of β-catenin is specific for SCT-NOS, SSCT, and Sertoli-stromal cell tumor among testicular sex cord-stromal tumors but has limited sensitivity (63%) in this group. The similar reactivity of SCT-NOS and SSCT provides additional support that these 2 variants are not distinct entities.

  16. DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THE KINASE AND UHM DOMAINS OF KIS FOR ITS NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION AND BINDING TO SPLICING FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Manceau, Valérie; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Sobel, André; Maucuer, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Summary The protein kinase KIS is made by the juxtaposition of a unique kinase domain and a C-terminal domain with a U2AF Homology Motif (UHM), a sequence motif for protein interaction initially identified in the heterodimeric pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF. This domain of KIS is closely related to the C-terminal UHM domain of the U2AF large subunit, U2AF65. KIS phosphorylates the splicing factor SF1, which in turn enhances SF1 binding to U2AF65 and the 3′ splice site, an event known to take place at an early step of spliceosome assembly. Here, the analysis of the subcellular localization of mutated forms of KIS indicates that the kinase domain of KIS is the necessary domain for its nuclear localization. As in the case of U2AF65, the UHM containing C-terminal domain of KIS is required for binding to the splicing factors SF1 and SF3b155. The efficiency of KIS binding to SF1 and SF3b155 is similar to that of U2AF65 in pull-down assays. These results further support the functional link of KIS with splicing factors. Interestingly, when compared to other UHM containing proteins, KIS presents a different specificity for the UHM docking sites that are present in the N-terminal region of SF3b155, thus providing a new insight into the variety of interactions mediated by UHM domains. PMID:18588901

  17. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  18. Local point sources that affect ground-water quality in the East Meadow area, Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    The extent and chemical characteristics of ground water affected by three local point sources--a stormwater basin, uncovered road-salt-storage piles, and an abandoned sewage-treatment plant--were delineated during a 3-year study of the chemical characteristics and migration of a body of reclaimed wastewater that was applied to the watertable aquifer during recharge experiments from October 1982 through January 1984 in East Meadow. The timing, magnitude, and chemical quality of recharge from these point sources is highly variable, and all sources have the potential to skew determinations of the quality of ambient ground-water and of the reclaimed-wastewater plume if they are not taken into account. Ground water affected by recharge from the stormwater basin is characterized by low concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (less than 5 mg/L [milligrams per liter] as N) and sulfate (less than 40 mg/L) and is almost entirely within the upper glacial aquifer. The plume derived from road-salt piles is narrow, has high concentrations of chloride (greater than 50 mg/L) and sodium (greater than 75 mg/L), and also is limited to the upper glacial aquifer. The sodium, in high concentrations, could react with aquifer material and exchange for sorbed cations such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium. Water affected by secondary-treated sewage from the abandoned treatment plant extends 152 feet below land surface into the upper part of the Magothy aquifer and longitudinally beyond the southern edge of the study area, 7,750 feet south of the recharge site. Ground water affected by secondary-treated sewage within the study area typically contains elevated concentrations of reactive chemical constituents, such as potassium and ammonium, and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen. Conservative or minimally reactive constituents such as chloride and sodium have been transported out of the study area in the upper glacial aquifer and the intermediate (transitional) zone but remain in the less

  19. E4orf6 variants with separate abilities to augment adenovirus replication and direct nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kilodalton protein.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Joseph S; Ornelles, David A

    2002-02-01

    The E4orf6 protein of group C adenovirus is an oncoprotein that, in association with the E1B 55-kDa protein and by E1B-independent means, promotes virus replication. An arginine-faced amphipathic alpha-helix in the E4orf6 protein is required for the E4orf6 protein to direct nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kDa protein and to enhance replication of an E4 deletion virus. In this study, E4orf6 protein variants containing arginine substitutions in the amphipathic alpha-helix were analyzed. Two of the six arginine residues within the alpha-helix, arginine-241 and arginine-243, were critical for directing nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kDa protein. The four remaining arginine residues appear to provide a net positive charge for the E4orf6 protein to direct nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kDa protein. The molecular determinants of the arginine-faced amphipathic alpha-helix that were required for the functional interaction between the E4orf6 and E1B 55-kDa proteins seen in the transfected cell differed from those required to support a productive infection. Several E4orf6 protein variants with arginine-to-glutamic acid substitutions that failed to direct nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kDa protein restored replication of an E4 deletion virus. Additionally, a variant containing an arginine-to-alanine substitution at position 243 that directed nuclear localization of the E1B 55-kDa protein failed to enhance virus replication. These results indicate that the ability of the E4orf6 protein to relocalize the E1B 55-kDa protein to the nucleus can be separated from the ability of the E4orf6 protein to support a productive infection.

  20. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  1. On the Usage of Locally Dense Basis Sets in the Calculation of NMR Indirect Nuclear Spin-Spin Coupling Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Marina; Provasi, Patricio F.; Aucar, Gustavo A.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    Locally dense basis sets (nuclear spin-spin couplings in several saturated and unsaturated fluorinated hydrocarbons. We find that the choice of the basis set for each atom belonging to our studied model compounds depends on its location with respect to the coupled fluorine atoms and on the cis/trans or synperiplanar/antiperiplanar conformation of the molecule. Carbon atoms in the bonding path connecting the coupled fluorine atoms have to be described with better basis sets than the carbon atoms outside this path. For the hydrogen atoms directly connected to the coupling pathway in molecules with trans or antiperiplanar conformations and for all hydrogen atoms not directly connected to the coupling pathway one can employ a minimal basis set with only one s-function. Employing these type of LDBSs we can reduce the number of necessary basis functions by about 30% without losing more than about 1 Hz in accuracy. The analysis of the four contributions to the vicinal fluorine-fluorine coupling constants shows that the non-contact orbital paramagnetic term is the most important contribution followed by the also non-contact spin-dipolar term. The Fermi contact term is the largest contribution only in the synperiplanar conformations of 1,2-difluoroethane and -propane.

  2. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S.; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  3. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation.

  4. The methylation of the C-terminal region of hnRNPQ (NSAP1) is important for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dario O.; Quaresma, Alexandre J.C.; Kobarg, Joerg . E-mail: jkobarg@lnls.br

    2006-07-28

    Protein arginine methylation is an irreversible post-translational protein modification catalyzed by a family of at least nine different enzymes entitled PRMTs (protein arginine methyl transferases). Although PRMT1 is responsible for 85% of the protein methylation in human cells, its substrate spectrum has not yet been fully characterized nor are the functional consequences of methylation for the protein substrates well understood. Therefore, we set out to employ the yeast two-hybrid system in order to identify new substrate proteins for human PRMT1. We were able to identify nine different PRMT1 interacting proteins involved in different aspects of RNA metabolism, five of which had been previously described either as substrates for PRMT1 or as functionally associated with PRMT1. Among the four new identified possible protein substrates was hnRNPQ3 (NSAP1), a protein whose function has been implicated in diverse steps of mRNA maturation, including splicing, editing, and degradation. By in vitro methylation assays we were able to show that hnRNPQ3 is a substrate for PRMT1 and that its C-terminal RGG box domain is the sole target for methylation. By further studies with the inhibitor of methylation Adox we provide evidence that hnRNPQ1-3 are methylated in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence analysis of HeLa cells that the methylation of hnRNPQ is important for its nuclear localization, since Adox treatment causes its re-distribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

  5. Local structures of mesoporous bioactive glasses and their surface alterations in vitro: inferences from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    Gunawidjaja, Philips N.; Mathew, Renny; Lo, Andy Y. H.; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; García, Ana; Arcos, Daniel; Mattias Edén, María Vallet-Regí

    2012-01-01

    We review the benefits of using 29Si and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for probing the local structures of both bulk and surface portions of mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) of the CaO–SiO2−(P2O5) system. These mesoporous materials exhibit an ordered pore arrangement, and are promising candidates for improved bone and tooth implants. We discuss experimental MAS NMR results from three MBGs displaying different Ca, Si and P contents: the 29Si NMR spectra were recorded either directly by employing radio-frequency pulses to 29Si, or by magnetization transfers from neighbouring protons using cross polarization, thereby providing quantitative information about the silicate speciation present in the pore wall and at the MBG surface, respectively. The surface modifications were monitored for the three MBGs during their immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for intervals between 30 min and one week. The results were formulated as a reaction sequence describing the interconversions between the distinct silicate species. We generally observed a depletion of Ca2+ ions at the MBG surface, and a minor condensation of the silicate-surface network over one week of SBF soaking. PMID:22349247

  6. Localization of BEN1-LIKE protein and nuclear degradation during development of metaphloem sieve elements in Triticum aestivum L.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jingtong; Zhang, Zhihui; Zhou, Zhuqing; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Yang; Mei, Fangzhu; Zhou, Guangsheng; Wang, Likai

    2015-03-01

    Metaphloem sieve elements (MSEs) in the developing caryopsis of Triticum aestivum L. undergo a unique type of programmed cell death (PCD); cell organelles gradually degrade with the MSE differentiation while mature sieve elements keep active. This study focuses on locating BEN1-LIKE protein and nuclear degradation in differentiating MSEs of wheat. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that nuclei degraded in MSE development. First, the degradation started at 2-3 days after flowering (DAF). The degraded fragments were then swallowed by phagocytic vacuoles at 4 DAF. Finally, nuclei almost completely degraded at 5 DAF. We measured the BEN1-LIKE protein expression in differentiating MSEs. In situ hybridization showed that BEN1-LIKE mRNA was a more obvious hybridization signal at 3-4 DAF at the microscopic level. Immuno-electron microscopy further revealed that BEN1-LIKE protein was mainly localized in MSE nuclei. Furthermore, MSE differentiation was tested using a TSQ Zn2+ fluorescence probe which showed that the dynamic change of Zn2+ accumulation was similar to BEN1-LIKE protein expression. These results suggest that nucleus degradation in wheat MSEs is associated with BEN1-LIKE protein and that the expression of this protein may be regulated by Zn2+ accumulation variation.

  7. Processivity factor of KSHV contains a nuclear localization signal and binding domains for transporting viral DNA polymerase into the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yali; Ciustea, Mihai; Ricciardi, Robert P. . E-mail: ricciardi@biochem.dental.upenn.edu

    2005-09-30

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes a processivity factor (PF-8, ORF59) that forms homodimers and binds to viral DNA polymerase (Pol-8, ORF9). PF-8 is essential for stabilizing Pol-8 on template DNA so that Pol-8 can incorporate nucleotides continuously. Here, the intracellular interaction of these two viral proteins was examined by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. When individually expressed, PF-8 was observed exclusively in the nucleus, whereas Pol-8 was found only in the cytoplasm. However, when co-expressed, Pol-8 was co-translocated with PF-8 into the nucleus. Mutational analysis revealed that PF-8 contains a nuclear localization signal (NLS) as well as domains located at the N-terminus and the C-proximal regions that are required for Pol-8 binding. This study suggests that the mechanism that enables PF-8 to transport Pol-8 into the nucleus is the first critical step required for Pol-8 and PF-8 to function processively in KSHV DNA synthesis.

  8. Oxidative stress affects FET proteins localization and alternative pre-mRNA processing in cellular models of ALS.

    PubMed

    Svetoni, Francesca; Caporossi, Daniela; Paronetto, Maria Paola

    2014-10-01

    FUS/TLS, EWS and TAF15 are members of the FET family of DNA and RNA binding proteins, involved in multiple steps of DNA and RNA processing and implicated in the regulation of gene expression and cell-signaling. All members of the FET family contribute to human pathologies, as they are involved in sarcoma translocations and neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in FUS/TLS, in EWSR1 and in TAF15 genescause Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), a fatal human neurodegenerative disease that affects primarily motor neurons and is characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons and degradation of the neuromuscular junctions.ALS-associated FET mutations cause FET protein relocalization into cytoplasmic aggregates, thus impairing their normal function. Protein aggregation has been suggested as a co-opting factor during the disease pathogenesis. Cytoplasmic mislocalization of FET proteins contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may alter RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. Interestingly, oxidative stress, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of ALS, triggers the accumulation of mutant FUS in cytoplasmic stress granules where it binds and sequester wild-type FUS.In order to evaluate the role of FET proteins in ALS and their involvement in the response to oxidative stress, we have developed cellular models of ALS expressing ALS-related FET mutants in neuroblastoma cell lines. Upon treatment with sodium arsenite, cells were analysed by immunofluorescence to monitor the localization of wild-type and mutated FET proteins. Furthermore, we have characterized signal transduction pathways and cell survival upon oxidative stress in our cellular models of ALS. Interestingly, we found that EWS mutant proteins display a different localization from FUS mutants and neither wild-type nor mutated EWS protein translocate into stress granules upon oxidative stress treatment. Collectively, our data provide a new link between the oxidative stress

  9. Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Saxton, John M; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men (n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC(max)) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites (P < 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect (P > 0.05), but BT did (P > 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system.

  10. Nuclear Respiratory Factor 2β (NRF-2β) recruits NRF-2α to the nucleus by binding to importin-α:β via an unusual monopartite-type nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Rippei; Takeuchi, Nono; Ueda, Takuya

    2013-09-23

    Nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2) is a mammalian transcription factor composed of two distinct and unrelated proteins: NRF-2α, which binds to DNA through its Ets domain, and NRF-2β, which contains the transcription activation domain. The activity of NRF-2 in neurons is regulated by nuclear localization; however, the mechanism by which NRF-2 is imported into the nucleus remains unknown. By using in vitro nuclear import assays and immuno-cytofluorescence, we dissect the nuclear import pathways of NRF-2. We show that both NRF-2α and NRF-2β contain intrinsic nuclear localization signals (NLSs): the Ets domain within NRF-2α and the NLS within NRF-2β (amino acids 311/321: EEPPAKRQCIE) that is recognized by importin-α:β. When NRF-2α and NRF-2β form a complex, the nuclear import of NRF-2αβ becomes strictly dependent on the NLS within NRF-2β. Therefore, the nuclear import mechanism of NRF-2 is unique among Ets factors. The NRF-2β NLS contains only two lysine/arginine residues, unlike other known importin-α:β-dependent NLSs. Using ELISA-based binding assays, we show that it is bound by importin-α in almost the same manner and with similar affinity to that of the classical monopartite NLSs, such as c-myc and SV40 T-antigen NLSs. However, the part of the tryptophan array of importin-α that is essential for the recognition of classical monopartite NLSs by generating apolar pockets for the P3 and the P5 lysine/arginine side chains is not required for the recognition of the NRF-2β NLS. We conclude that the NRF-2β NLS is an unusual but is, nevertheless, a bona fide monopartite-type NLS.

  11. Whole genome sequencing identifies a deletion in protein phosphatase 2A that affects its stability and localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMe