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Sample records for affect nuclear localization

  1. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  2. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  3. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  4. Nuclear scission and quantum localization.

    PubMed

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2011-09-23

    We examine nuclear scission within a fully quantum-mechanical microscopic framework, focusing on the nonlocal aspects of the theory. Using (240)Pu hot fission as an example, we discuss the identification of the fragments and the calculation of their kinetic, excitation, and interaction energies, through the localization of the orbital wave functions. We show that the disentanglement of the fragment wave functions is essential to the quantum-mechanical definition of scission and the calculation of physical observables. Finally, we discuss the fragments' prescission excitation mechanisms and give a nonadiabatic description of their evolution beyond scission. PMID:22026846

  5. Local autonomic failure affecting a limb.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R H; Robinson, B J

    1987-01-01

    Three patients are described who presented with autonomic failure affecting predominantly one limb. Physiological studies revealed that there was sweating loss in the limb which appeared to be due to a preganglionic autonomic lesion and not to a sweat gland abnormality. In all three patients there was also evidence of failure of vasomotor control. There was no evidence of more generalised autonomic failure or neurological deficit. In two patients the condition appeared to be static and, according to the patients' accounts was life long. In the third the sweating loss was present for three years prior to pain loss becoming evident from C2/3 to T1 on the same side as the sweating loss. These patients, together with two recent case reports, indicate that isolated local autonomic failure, probably from a discrete cord lesion, can be a cause of presenting symptoms related to sweating loss or to change in temperature in a limb. PMID:3612155

  6. Multiple Nuclear Localization Signals Mediate Nuclear Localization of the GATA Transcription Factor AreA

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Cameron C.; Siebert, Kendra S.; Downes, Damien J.; Wong, Koon Ho; Kreutzberger, Sara D.; Fraser, James A.; Clarke, David F.; Hynes, Michael J.; Davis, Meryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans GATA transcription factor AreA activates transcription of nitrogen metabolic genes in response to nitrogen limitation and is known to accumulate in the nucleus during nitrogen starvation. Sequence analysis of AreA revealed multiple nuclear localization signals (NLSs), five putative classical NLSs conserved in fungal AreA orthologs but not in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae functional orthologs Gln3p and Gat1p, and one putative noncanonical RRX33RXR bipartite NLS within the DNA-binding domain. In order to identify the functional NLSs in AreA, we constructed areA mutants with mutations in individual putative NLSs or combinations of putative NLSs and strains expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-AreA NLS fusion genes. Deletion of all five classical NLSs individually or collectively did not affect utilization of nitrogen sources or AreA-dependent gene expression and did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of the bipartite NLS conferred the inability to utilize alternative nitrogen sources and abolished AreA-dependent gene expression likely due to effects on DNA binding but did not prevent AreA nuclear localization. Mutation of all six NLSs simultaneously prevented AreA nuclear accumulation. The bipartite NLS alone strongly directed GFP to the nucleus, whereas the classical NLSs collaborated to direct GFP to the nucleus. Therefore, AreA contains multiple conserved NLSs, which show redundancy and together function to mediate nuclear import. The noncanonical bipartite NLS is conserved in GATA factors from Aspergillus, yeast, and mammals, indicating an ancient origin. PMID:24562911

  7. Nitrogen Starvation and TorC1 Inhibition Differentially Affect Nuclear Localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 Transcription Factors Through the Rare Glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Jennifer J.; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G.

    2015-01-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase–dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors

  8. Nitrogen starvation and TorC1 inhibition differentially affect nuclear localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 transcription factors through the rare glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jennifer J; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G

    2015-02-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase-dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors. This

  9. Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Signaling Proteins by Cytokinin

    SciTech Connect

    Kieber, J.J.

    2010-05-01

    Cytokinins are a class of mitogenic plant hormones that play an important role in most aspects of plant development, including shoot and root growth, vascular and photomorphogenic development and leaf senescence. A model for cytokinin perception and signaling has emerged that is similar to bacterial two-component phosphorelays. In this model, binding of cytokinin to the extracellular domain of the Arabidopsis histidine kinase (AHKs) receptors induces autophosphorylation within the intracellular histidine-kinase domain. The phosphoryl group is subsequently transferred to cytosolic Arabidopsis histidine phosphotransfer proteins (AHPs), which have been suggested to translocate to the nucleus in response to cytokinin treatment, where they then transfer the phosphoryl group to nuclear-localized response regulators (Type-A and Type-B ARRs). We examined the effects of cytokinin on AHP subcellular localization in Arabidopsis and, contrary to expectations, the AHPs maintained a constant nuclear/cytosolic distribution following cytokinin treatment. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved phosphoacceptor histidine residue of the AHP, as well as disruption of multiple cytokinin signaling elements, did not affect the subcellular localization of the AHP proteins. Finally, we present data indicating that AHPs maintain a nuclear/cytosolic distribution by balancing active transport into and out of the nucleus. Our findings suggest that the current models indicating relocalization of AHP protein into the nucleus in response to cytokinin are incorrect. Rather, AHPs actively maintain a consistent nuclear/cytosolic distribution regardless of the status of the cytokinin response pathway.

  10. Factors Affecting the Comprehension of Global and Local Main Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Danhua

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated factors that would affect a reader's understanding of the main idea at the global level and explicit and implicit main ideas at the local level. Fifty-seven first-year university students taking a college reading course took a comprehension test on an expository text. Statistical analyses revealed that text structure had a…

  11. Mutations of amino acids in the DNA-recognition domain of Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein alter its sub-nuclear localization and affect formation of replication compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Shedd, Duane; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Miller, George

    2008-12-20

    foci. The speckled appearance of R179A and Y180E was more regular and clearly defined in EBV-positive than in EBV-negative 293 cells. The Y180E late-mutant induced EA-D, but prevented EA-D from localizing to globular replication compartments. These results show that individual amino acids within the basic domain influence localization of the ZEBRA protein and its capacity to induce EA-D to become located in mature viral replication compartments. Furthermore, these mutant ZEBRA proteins delineate several stages in the processes of nuclear re-organization which accompany lytic EBV replication.

  12. Classic nuclear localization signals and a novel nuclear localization motif are required for nuclear transport of porcine parvovirus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Boisvert, Maude; Bouchard-Lévesque, Véronique; Fernandes, Sandra; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Nuclear targeting of capsid proteins (VPs) is important for genome delivery and precedes assembly in the replication cycle of porcine parvovirus (PPV). Clusters of basic amino acids, corresponding to potential nuclear localization signals (NLS), were found only in the unique region of VP1 (VP1up, for VP1 unique part). Of the five identified basic regions (BR), three were important for nuclear localization of VP1up: BR1 was a classic Pat7 NLS, and the combination of BR4 and BR5 was a classic bipartite NLS. These NLS were essential for viral replication. VP2, the major capsid protein, lacked these NLS and contained no region with more than two basic amino acids in proximity. However, three regions of basic clusters were identified in the folded protein, assembled into a trimeric structure. Mutagenesis experiments showed that only one of these three regions was involved in VP2 transport to the nucleus. This structural NLS, termed the nuclear localization motif (NLM), is located inside the assembled capsid and thus can be used to transport trimers to the nucleus in late steps of infection but not for virions in initial infection steps. The two NLS of VP1up are located in the N-terminal part of the protein, externalized from the capsid during endosomal transit, exposing them for nuclear targeting during early steps of infection. Globally, the determinants of nuclear transport of structural proteins of PPV were different from those of closely related parvoviruses. Importance: Most DNA viruses use the nucleus for their replication cycle. Thus, structural proteins need to be targeted to this cellular compartment at two distinct steps of the infection: in early steps to deliver viral genomes to the nucleus and in late steps to assemble new viruses. Nuclear targeting of proteins depends on the recognition of a stretch of basic amino acids by cellular transport proteins. This study reports the identification of two classic nuclear localization signals in the minor capsid

  13. Sexual selection affects local extinction and turnover in bird communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doherty, P.F., Jr.; Sorci, G.; Royle, J. Andrew; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Boulinier, T.

    2003-01-01

    Predicting extinction risks has become a central goal for conservation and evolutionary biologists interested in population and community dynamics. Several factors have been put forward to explain risks of extinction, including ecological and life history characteristics of individuals. For instance, factors that affect the balance between natality and mortality can have profound effects on population persistence. Sexual selection has been identified as one such factor. Populations under strong sexual selection experience a number of costs ranging from increased predation and parasitism to enhanced sensitivity to environmental and demographic stochasticity. These findings have led to the prediction that local extinction rates should be higher for species/populations with intense sexual selection. We tested this prediction by analyzing the dynamics of natural bird communities at a continental scale over a period of 21 years (1975-1996), using relevant statistical tools. In agreement with the theoretical prediction, we found that sexual selection increased risks of local extinction (dichromatic birds had on average a 23% higher local extinction rate than monochromatic species). However, despite higher local extinction probabilities, the number of dichromatic species did not decrease over the period considered in this study. This pattern was caused by higher local turnover rates of dichromatic species, resulting in relatively stable communities for both groups of species. Our results suggest that these communities function as metacommunities, with frequent local extinctions followed by colonization. Anthropogenic factors impeding dispersal might therefore have a significant impact on the global persistence of sexually selected species.

  14. Local Perturbations Do Not Affect Stability of Laboratory Fruitfly Metapopulations

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sutirth; Joshi, Amitabh

    2007-01-01

    Background A large number of theoretical studies predict that the dynamics of spatially structured populations (metapopulations) can be altered by constant perturbations to local population size. However, these studies presume large metapopulations inhabiting noise-free, zero-extinction environments, and their predictions have never been empirically verified. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report an empirical study on the effects of localized perturbations on global dynamics and stability, using fruitfly metapopulations in the laboratory. We find that constant addition of individuals to a particular subpopulation in every generation stabilizes that subpopulation locally, but does not have any detectable effect on the dynamics and stability of the metapopulation. Simulations of our experimental system using a simple but widely applicable model of population dynamics were able to recover the empirical findings, indicating the generality of our results. We then simulated the possible consequences of perturbing more subpopulations, increasing the strength of perturbations, and varying the rate of migration, but found that none of these conditions were expected to alter the outcomes of our experiments. Finally, we show that our main results are robust to the presence of local extinctions in the metapopulation. Conclusions/Significance Our study shows that localized perturbations are unlikely to affect the dynamics of real metapopulations, a finding that has cautionary implications for ecologists and conservation biologists faced with the problem of stabilizing unstable metapopulations in nature. PMID:17311100

  15. Local dynamic nuclear polarization using quantum point contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, K.R.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; McEuen, P.L. ); van der Vaart, N.C. ); Foxon, C.T. )

    1994-08-15

    We have used quantum point contacts (QPCs) to locally create and probe dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in GaAs heterostructures in the quantum Hall regime. DNP is created via scattering between spin-polarized Landau level electrons and the Ga and As nuclear spins, and it leads to hysteresis in the dc transport characteristics. The nuclear origin of this hysteresis is demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Our results show that QPCs can be used to create and probe local nuclear spin populations, opening up new possibilities for mesoscopic NMR experiments.

  16. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Olson, Zachary H; Beasley, James C; Rhodes, Olin E

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  17. Carcass Type Affects Local Scavenger Guilds More than Habitat Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Zachary H.; Beasley, James C.; Rhodes, Olin E.

    2016-01-01

    Scavengers and decomposers provide an important ecosystem service by removing carrion from the environment. Scavenging and decomposition are known to be temperature-dependent, but less is known about other factors that might affect carrion removal. We conducted an experiment in which we manipulated combinations of patch connectivity and carcass type, and measured responses by local scavenger guilds along with aspects of carcass depletion. We conducted twelve, 1-month trials in which five raccoon (Procyon lotor), Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana), and domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus spp.) carcasses (180 trials total) were monitored using remote cameras in 21 forest patches in north-central Indiana, USA. Of 143 trials with complete data, we identified fifteen species of vertebrate scavengers divided evenly among mammalian (N = 8) and avian species (N = 7). Fourteen carcasses (9.8%) were completely consumed by invertebrates, vertebrates exhibited scavenging behavior at 125 carcasses (87.4%), and four carcasses (2.8%) remained unexploited. Among vertebrates, mammals scavenged 106 carcasses, birds scavenged 88 carcasses, and mammals and birds scavenged 69 carcasses. Contrary to our expectations, carcass type affected the assemblage of local scavenger guilds more than patch connectivity. However, neither carcass type nor connectivity explained variation in temporal measures of carcass removal. Interestingly, increasing richness of local vertebrate scavenger guilds contributed moderately to rates of carrion removal (≈6% per species increase in richness). We conclude that scavenger-specific differences in carrion utilization exist among carcass types and that reliable delivery of carrion removal as an ecosystem service may depend on robust vertebrate and invertebrate communities acting synergistically. PMID:26886299

  18. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  19. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  20. Factors affecting survivability of local Rohilkhand goats under organized farm

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, D.; Patel, B. H. M.; Sahu, S.; Gaur, G. K.; Singh, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the pattern of mortality as affected by age, season and various diseases in local goats of Rohilkhand region maintained at the Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Bareilly. Materials and Methods: Post-mortem records of 12 years (2000-01 to 2011-12) were used, and total 243 mortality data were collected and analyzed. The causes of mortality were classified into seven major classes viz. digestive disorders, respiratory disorders, cardiovascular disorders, musculoskeletal disorder, parasitic disorders, mixed disorders (combination of digestive, respiratory, parasitic, and cardiovascular disorders) and miscellaneous disorders (cold, hypoglycemia, emaciation, endometritis, traumatic injury, etc.). Results: The average mortality was 10.93%. The overall mortality was more during rainy season followed by winter and summer season. The mortality in 4-6 months of age was high (2.52%) followed by 0-1 month (2.34%) and 2-3 months (1.35%). The average mortality among adult age groups (>12 months) was 3.42%. The mortality showed declining trend with the advancement of age up to 3 months and then again increased in 4-6 months age group. The digestive diseases (3.51%) followed by respiratory diseases (1.89%) and parasitic diseases (1.48%) contributed major share to the total mortality occurred and the remaining disorders were of lesser significance in causing death in goats. There is significant (p<0.01; χ2=55.62) association between year with season and age with the season (p<0.05, χ2=16.083) found in the present study. Conclusion: This study confirms that overall mortality rate averaged 10.93% (ranged between 1.10% and 25.56%) over 12 years under semi-intensive farm condition. It was generally higher in rainy season. The mortality remains higher in kids particularly under 1 month of age. The digestive diseases contributed major share to overall mortality. PMID:27047020

  1. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E.; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P.; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  2. Nuclear localization of the dehydrin OpsDHN1 is determined by histidine-rich motif.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sánchez, Itzell E; Maruri-López, Israel; Ferrando, Alejandro; Carbonell, Juan; Graether, Steffen P; Jiménez-Bremont, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    The cactus OpsDHN1 dehydrin belongs to a large family of disordered and highly hydrophilic proteins known as Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate during the late stages of embryogenesis and in response to abiotic stresses. Herein, we present the in vivo OpsDHN1 subcellular localization by N-terminal GFP translational fusion; our results revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of the GFP::OpsDHN1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. In addition, dimer assembly of OpsDHN1 in planta using a Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) approach was demonstrated. In order to understand the in vivo role of the histidine-rich motif, the OpsDHN1-ΔHis version was produced and assayed for its subcellular localization and dimer capability by GFP fusion and BiFC assays, respectively. We found that deletion of the OpsDHN1 histidine-rich motif restricted its localization to cytoplasm, but did not affect dimer formation. In addition, the deletion of the S-segment in the OpsDHN1 protein affected its nuclear localization. Our data suggest that the deletion of histidine-rich motif and S-segment show similar effects, preventing OpsDHN1 from getting into the nucleus. Based on these results, the histidine-rich motif is proposed as a targeting element for OpsDHN1 nuclear localization. PMID:26442018

  3. Socioeconomic factors affecting local support for black bear recovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Morzillo, Anita T; Mertig, Angela G; Hollister, Jeffrey W; Garner, Nathan; Liu, Jianguo

    2010-06-01

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species' historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery strategies prior to public release of a black bear conservation and management plan for eastern Texas, United States. Data were collected from 1,006 residents living in proximity to potential recovery locations, particularly Big Thicket National Preserve. In addition to traditional logistic regression analysis, we used conditional probability analysis to statistically and visually evaluate probabilities of public support for potential black bear recovery strategies based on socioeconomic characteristics. Allowing black bears to repopulate the region on their own (i.e., without active reintroduction) was the recovery strategy with the greatest probability of acceptance. Recovery strategy acceptance was influenced by many socioeconomic factors. Older and long-time local residents were most likely to want to exclude black bears from the area. Concern about the problems that black bears may cause was the only variable significantly related to support or non-support across all strategies. Lack of personal knowledge about black bears was the most frequent reason for uncertainty about preferred strategy. In order to reduce local uncertainty about possible recovery strategies, we suggest that wildlife managers focus outreach efforts on providing local residents with general information about black bears, as well as information pertinent to minimizing the potential for human-black bear conflict. PMID:20401658

  4. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha

    PubMed Central

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E.; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  5. Alternative splicing affects the subcellular localization of Drosha.

    PubMed

    Link, Steffen; Grund, Stefanie E; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-06-20

    The RNase III enzyme Drosha is a key factor in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and as such indispensable for cellular homeostasis and developmental processes. Together with its co-factor DGCR8, it converts the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) into the precursor hairpin (pre-miRNA) in the nucleus. While the middle and the C-terminal domain are crucial for pri-miRNA processing and DGCR8 binding, the function of the N-terminus remains cryptic. Different studies have linked this region to the subcellular localization of Drosha, stabilization and response to stress. In this study, we identify alternatively spliced Drosha transcripts that are devoid of a part of the arginine/serine-rich (RS-rich) domain and expressed in a large set of human cells. In contrast to their expected habitation, we find two isoforms also present in the cytoplasm, while the other two isoforms reside exclusively in the nucleus. Their processing activity for pri-miRNAs and the binding to co-factors remains unaltered. In multiple cell lines, the endogenous mRNA expression of the Drosha isoforms correlates with the localization of endogenous Drosha proteins. The pri-miRNA processing efficiency is not significantly different between groups of cells with or without cytoplasmic Drosha expression. In summary, we discovered novel isoforms of Drosha with differential subcellular localization pointing toward additional layers of complexity in the regulation of its activity. PMID:27185895

  6. Novel Nuclear Localization Signal Regulated by Ambient Tonicity in Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min Seong; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Colla, Emanuela; Choi, Yu Jeong; Suh, Pann-Ghil; Kwon, H. Moo

    2008-01-01

    TonEBP is a Rel domain-containing transcription factor implicated in adaptive immunity, viral replication, and cancer. In the mammalian kidney, TonEBP is a central regulator of water homeostasis. Animals deficient in TonEBP suffer from life-threatening dehydration due to renal water loss. Ambient tonicity (effective osmolality) is the prominent signal for TonEBP in a bidirectional manner; TonEBP activity decreases in hypotonicity, whereas it increases in hypertonicity. Here we found that TonEBP displayed nuclear export in response to hypotonicity and nuclear import in response to hypertonicity. The nuclear export of TonEBP was not mediated by the nuclear export receptor CRM1 or discrete nuclear export signal. In contrast, a dominant nuclear localization signal (NLS) was found in a small region of 16 amino acid residues. When short peptides containing the NLS were fused to constitutively cytoplasmic proteins, the fusion proteins displayed tonicity-dependent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking like TonEBP. Thus, tonicity-dependent activation of the NLS is crucial in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of TonEBP. The novel NLS is present only in the vertebrates, indicating that it developed late in evolution. PMID:18579527

  7. Loss of nuclear localization of TET2 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuji; Wang, Guanghui; Liang, Zhonglin; Yang, Yili; Cui, Long; Liu, Chen-Ying

    2016-01-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is lost in multiple human cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). Decreased ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) messenger RNA (mRNA), but not other two TET family members, has been observed in the colorectal cancer and is crucial for colorectal cancer initiation. Here, we show that nuclear localization of TET2 was lost in a significant portion of CRC tissues, in association with metastasis. In CRC cells, nuclear expression of TET2 were absent but not TET3. Nuclear export inhibitor can increase the 5hmC level in CRC cells, probably through regulating TET2. Our results indicate a new mechanism of TET2 dysregulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:26816554

  8. Local bacteria affect the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lehouritis, Panos; Cummins, Joanne; Stanton, Michael; Murphy, Carola T.; McCarthy, Florence O.; Reid, Gregor; Urbaniak, Camilla; Byrne, William L.; Tangney, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the potential effects of bacteria on the efficacy of frequently used chemotherapies was examined. Bacteria and cancer cell lines were examined in vitro and in vivo for changes in the efficacy of cancer cell killing mediated by chemotherapeutic agents. Of 30 drugs examined in vitro, the efficacy of 10 was found to be significantly inhibited by certain bacteria, while the same bacteria improved the efficacy of six others. HPLC and mass spectrometry analyses of sample drugs (gemcitabine, fludarabine, cladribine, CB1954) demonstrated modification of drug chemical structure. The chemoresistance or increased cytotoxicity observed in vitro with sample drugs (gemcitabine and CB1954) was replicated in in vivo murine subcutaneous tumour models. These findings suggest that bacterial presence in the body due to systemic or local infection may influence tumour responses or off-target toxicity during chemotherapy. PMID:26416623

  9. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, HooiCheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-01-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization. PMID:26862730

  10. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  11. Requirements for nuclear localization of Lsm2-8p and competition between nuclear and cytoplasmic Lsm complexes

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Michael P.; Reijns, Martin A. M.; Beggs, Jean D.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lsm proteins are ubiquitous, multifunctional proteins that are involved in the processing and/or turnover of many RNAs. In eukaryotes, a hetero-heptameric complex of Lsm proteins (Lsm2-8p) affects the processing of small stable RNAs and pre-mRNAs in the nucleus, while a different hetero-heptameric complex of Lsm proteins (Lsm1-7p) promotes mRNA decapping and decay in the cytoplasm. These two complexes have six constituent proteins in common, yet localize to separate cellular compartments and perform apparently disparate functions. Little is known about the biogenesis of the Lsm complexes, or how they are recruited to different cellular compartments. We show that in yeast, the nuclear accumulation of Lsm proteins depends on complex formation and that the Lsm8p subunit plays a crucial role. The nuclear localization of Lsm8p is itself most strongly influenced by Lsm2p and Lsm4p, its presumed neighbors in the Lsm2-8p complex. Furthermore, over-expression and depletion experiments imply that Lsm1p and Lsm8p act competitively with respect to the localization of the two complexes, suggesting a potential mechanism for co-regulation of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA processing. A shift of Lsm proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm under stress conditions indicates that this competition is biologically significant. PMID:18029398

  12. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD (171EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF195) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48EF49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48EF49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium. PMID:15896312

  13. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  14. Affective imagery and acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Keller, Carmen; Visschers, Vivianne; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between the content of spontaneous associations with nuclear power plants and the acceptance of using new-generation nuclear power plants to replace old ones. The study also considered gender as a variable. A representative sample of the German- and French-speaking population of Switzerland (N= 1,221) was used. Log-linear models revealed significant two-way interactions between the association content and acceptance, association content and gender, and gender and acceptance. Correspondence analysis revealed that participants who were opposed to nuclear power plants mainly associated nuclear power plants with risk, negative feelings, accidents, radioactivity, waste disposal, military use, and negative consequences for health and environment; whereas participants favoring nuclear power plants mainly associated them with energy, appearance descriptions of nuclear power plants, and necessity. Thus, individuals opposing nuclear power plants had both more concrete and more diverse associations with them than people who were in favor of nuclear power plants. In addition, participants who were undecided often mentioned similar associations to those participants who were in favor. Males more often expressed associations with energy, waste disposal, and negative health effects. Females more often made associations with appearance descriptions, negative feelings, and negative environmental effects. The results further suggest that acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants was higher in the German-speaking part of the country, where all of the Swiss nuclear power plants are physically located. Practical implications for risk communication are discussed. PMID:21977961

  15. Nuclear localization signal receptor importin alpha associates with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, H M; Raikhel, N V

    1998-01-01

    Importin alpha is the nuclear localization signal (NLS) receptor that is involved in the nuclear import of proteins containing basic NLSs. Using importin alpha as a tool, we were interested in determining whether the cytoskeleton could function in the transport of NLS-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Double-labeling immunofluorescence studies showed that most of the cytoplasmic importin alpha coaligned with microtubules and microfilaments in tobacco protoplasts. Treatment of tobacco protoplasts with microtubule- or microfilament-depolymerizing agents disrupted the strands of importin alpha in the cytoplasm, whereas a microtubule-stabilizing agent had no effect. Biochemical analysis showed that importin alpha associated with microtubules and microfilaments in vitro in an NLS-dependent manner. The interaction of importin alpha with the cytoskeleton could be an essential element of protein transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in vivo. PMID:9811789

  16. Minimal size of prototype foamy virus integrase for nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Hyun, U; Lee, D H; Shin, C G

    2011-01-01

    We have reported previously that the prototype foamy virus (PFV) integrase (IN) has a strong nuclear localization signal (NLS) in its C-terminal domain, in particular in a region of aa 306-334 including highly karyophilic arginines or lysines at positions 308, 313, 318, 324, and 329. In this study, we used various mutants of the C-terminal domain to further analyze its karyophilic determinants. Plasmids expressing these mutants fused to maltose binding protein (MBP) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were transfected to COS-1 cells and subcellular localization of these fluorescent fusion proteins was determined by fluorescent microscopy. The results revealed that a maximum karyophilicity was exhibited by a region longer than the previously described one of 29 aa (aa 306-334), in particular by a 64 aa region (aa 289-352) with Arg341 and Lys349 as critical determinants. PMID:21692567

  17. Economic Conditions and Factors Affecting New Nuclear Power Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents work performed in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program. The report presents information and results from economic analyses to describe current electricity market conditions and those key factors that may impact the deployment of AdvSMRs or any other new nuclear power plants. Thus, this report serves as a reference document for DOE as it moves forward with its plans to develop advanced reactors, including AdvSMRs. For the purpose of this analysis, information on electricity markets and nuclear power plant operating costs will be combined to examine the current state of the nuclear industry and the process required to successfully move forward with new nuclear power in general and AdvSMRs in particular. The current electricity market is generally unfavorable to new nuclear construction, especially in deregulated markets with heavy competition from natural gas and subsidized renewables. The successful and profitable operation of a nuclear power plant (or any power plant) requires the rate at which the electricity is sold to be sufficiently greater than the cost to operate. The wholesale rates in most US markets have settled into values that provide profits for most operating nuclear power plants but are too low to support the added cost of capital recovery for new nuclear construction. There is a strong geographic dependence on the wholesale rate, with some markets currently able to support new nuclear construction. However, there is also a strong geographic dependence on pronuclear public opinion; the areas where power prices are high tend to have unfavorable views on the construction of new nuclear power plants. The use of government-backed incentives, such as subsidies, can help provide a margin to help justify construction projects that otherwise may not seem viable. Similarly, low interest rates for the project will also add a positive margin to the economic

  18. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  19. Nuclear Localization of Flavivirus RNA Synthesis in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Uchil, Pradeep Devappa; Kumar, Anil V. A.; Satchidanandam, Vijaya

    2006-01-01

    Flaviviral replication is believed to be exclusively cytoplasmic, occurring within virus-induced membrane-bound replication complexes in the host cytoplasm. Here we show that a significant proportion (20%) of the total RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity from cells infected with West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and dengue virus is resident within the nucleus. Consistent with this, the major replicase proteins NS3 and NS5 of JEV also localized within the nucleus. NS5 was found distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but NS3 was present at sites of active flaviviral RNA synthesis, colocalizing with NS5, and visible as distinct foci along the inner periphery of the nucleus by confocal and immunoelectron microscopy. Both these viral replicase proteins were also present in the nuclear matrix, colocalizing with the peripheral lamina, and revealed a well-entrenched nuclear location for the viral replication complex. In keeping with this observation, antibodies to either NS3 or NS5 coimmunoprecipitated the other protein from isolated nuclei along with newly synthesized viral RNA. Taken together these data suggest an absolute requirement for both of the replicase proteins for nucleus-localized synthesis of flavivirus RNA. Thus, we conclusively demonstrate for the first time that the host cell nucleus functions as an additional site for the presence of functionally active flaviviral replicase complex. PMID:16699025

  20. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals mediating nuclear import of liver receptor homologue-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Ming; Lin, Yu-Chi; Hu, Meng-Chun

    2011-04-01

    Liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. We characterized two functional nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in LRH-1. NLS1 (residues 117-168) overlaps the second zinc finger in the DNA binding domain. Mutagenesis showed that the zinc finger structure and two basic clusters on either side of the zinc finger loop are critical for nuclear import of NLS1. NLS2 (residues 169-204) is located in the Ftz-F1 box that contains a bipartite signal. In full-length LRH-1, mutation of either NLS1 or NLS2 had no effect on nuclear localization, but disruption of both NLS1 and NLS2 resulted in the cytoplasmic accumulation of LRH-1. Either NLS1 or NLS2 alone was sufficient to target LRH-1 to the nucleus. Both NLS1 and NLS2 mediate nuclear transport by a mechanism involving importin α/β. Finally, we showed that three crucial basic clusters in the NLSs are involved in the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of LRH-1. PMID:20853131

  1. A proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) is required for the nuclear import of fission yeast PAB2, but not of human PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Pierre-Luc; Bachand, François

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins that play key roles in eukaryotic gene expression. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the major nuclear PABP, Pab2, functions in the maturation of small nucleolar RNAs as well as in nuclear RNA decay. Despite knowledge about its nuclear functions, nothing is known about how Pab2 is imported into the nucleus. Here, we show that Pab2 contains a proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) that is necessary and sufficient for its nuclear localization and function. Consistent with the role of karyopherin β2 (Kapβ2)-type receptors in the import of PY-NLS cargoes, we show that the fission yeast ortholog of human Kapβ2, Kap104, binds to recombinant Pab2 and is required for Pab2 nuclear localization. The absence of arginine methylation in a basic region N-terminal to the PY-core motif of Pab2 did not affect its nuclear localization. However, in the context of a sub-optimal PY-NLS, we found that Pab2 was more efficiently targeted to the nucleus in the absence of arginine methylation, suggesting that this modification can affect the import kinetics of a PY-NLS cargo. Although a sequence resembling a PY-NLS motif can be found in the human Pab2 ortholog, PABPN1, our results indicate that neither a functional PY-NLS nor Kapβ2 activity are required to promote entry of PABPN1 into the nucleus of human cells. Our findings describe the mechanism by which Pab2 is imported into the nucleus, providing the first example of a PY-NLS import system in fission yeast. In addition, this study suggests the existence of alternative or redundant nuclear import pathways for human PABPN1. PMID:23279110

  2. Nuclear targeting of the maize R protein requires two nuclear localization sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, M.W.; Raikhel, N.V. ); Wessler, S.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Previous genetic and structural evidence indicates that the maize R gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activating factor. In-frame carboxyl- and amino-terminal fusions of the R gene to the reporter gene encoding [beta]-glucuronidase (GUS) were sufficient to direct GUS to the nucleus of the transiently transformed onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells. Further analysis of chimeric constructs containing regions of the R gene fused to the GUS cDNA revealed three specific nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) that were capable of redirecting the GUS protein to the nucleus. Amino-terminal NLS-A (amino acids 100-109, GDRRAAPARP) contained several arginine residues; a similar localization signal is found in only a few viral proteins. The medial NLS-M (amino acids 419-428, MSERKRREKL) is a simian virus 40 large T antigen-type NLS, and the carboxyl-terminal NLS-C (amino acids 598-610, MISESLRKAIGKR) is a mating type [alpha]2 type. NLSs M and C are independently sufficient to direct the GUS protein to the nucleus when it is fused at the amino terminus of GUS, whereas NLS-A fused to GUS partitioned between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Similar partitioning was observed when localization signals NLS-A and NLS-C were independently fused to the carboxy-terminal portion of GUS. A sequential deletion of the localization signals indicated that the amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal fusions of R and GUS were redirected to the nucleus only when both NLS-A and -M, or NLS-C and -M, were present. These results indicate that multiple localization signals are necessary for nuclear targeting of this protein. The conservation of the localization signals within the alleles of R and similar proteins from other organisms is also discussed. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Local fracture properties and dissimilar weld integrity in nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guozhen; Wang, Haitao; Xuan, Fuzhen; Tu, Shantung; Liu, Changjun

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the local fracture properties in a Alloy52M dissimilar metal welded joint (DMWJ) between A508 ferritic steel and 316 L stainless steel in nuclear power plants were investigated by using the single-edge notched bend (SENB) specimens, and their use in integrity assessment of DMWJ structures was analyzed. The results show that the local fracture resistance in the DMWJ is determined by local fracture mechanism, and which is mainly related to the microstructures and local strength mismatches of materials at the crack locations. The initial cracks always grow towards the materials with lower strength, and the crack path deviation is mainly controlled by the local strength mismatch. If the local fracture properties could not be used for cracks in the heat affected zones (HAZs), interface and near interface zones, the use of the fracture properties ( J-resistance curves) of base metals or weld metals following present codes will unavoidably produce non-conservative (unsafe) or excessive conservative assessment results. In most cases, the assessment results will be potentially unsafe. Therefore, it is recommended to obtain and use local mechanical and fracture properties in the integrity assessment of DMWJs.

  4. Factors affecting recognition of cancer risks of nuclear workers.

    PubMed Central

    Kneale, G W; Stewart, A M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To discover whether direct estimates of the risks of cancer for nuclear workers agree with indirect estimates based on survivors of the atomic bomb; whether relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer are the same for workers and survivors, and whether dosimetry standards are sufficiently uniform to allow pooling of data from different nuclear industrial sites. METHOD--Data from five nuclear sites in the United States were included in a cohort analysis that as well as controlling for all the usual factors also allowed for possible effects of three cancer modulating factors (exposure age, cancer latency, and year of exposure). This analysis was first applied to three distinct cohorts, and then to two sets of pooled data. RESULTS--From each study cohort there was evidence of a risk of cancer related to dose, and evidence that the extra radiogenic cancers had the same overall histological manifestations as naturally occurring cancers and were largely the result of exposures after 50 years of age causing deaths after 70 years. There were, however, significant differences between the five sets of risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS--Although the risks of cancer in nuclear workers were appreciably higher than estimates based on the cancer experiences of survivors of the atomic bomb, some uncertainties remained as there were non-uniform standards of dosimetry in the nuclear sites. The differences between nuclear workers and survivors of the atomic bomb were largely the result of relations between age at exposure and risk of cancer being totally different for workers and survivors and, in the occupational data, there were no signs of the special risks of leukaemia found in atomic bomb data and other studies of effects of high doses. PMID:7663636

  5. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN FRANCE AND JAPAN ON LOCAL GOVERNMENTS' INVOLVEMENT IN NUCLEAR SAFETY GOVERNANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Shin-Etsu; Shiroyama, Hideaki

    This paper shows a comparative analysis between France and Japan on the way of the local governments' involvement in nuclear safety governance through some interviews. In France, a law came into force that requires related local governments to establish "Commision Locale d'Information" (CLI), which means the local governments officially involve in nuclear regulatory activity. Meanwhile, in Japan, related local governments substantially involve in the operation of nuclear facilities through the "safety agreements" in spite of the lack of legal authority. As a result of comparative analysis, we can point out some institutional input from French cases as follows: to clarify the local governments' roles in the nuclear regulation system, to establish the official channels of communication among nuclear utilities, national regulatory authorities and local governments, and to stipulate explicitly the transparency as a purpose of safety regulation.

  6. Regression analysis of technical parameters affecting nuclear power plant performances

    SciTech Connect

    Ghazy, R.; Ricotti, M. E.; Trueco, P.

    2012-07-01

    Since the 80's many studies have been conducted in order to explicate good and bad performances of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), but yet no defined correlation has been found out to be totally representative of plant operational experience. In early works, data availability and the number of operating power stations were both limited; therefore, results showed that specific technical characteristics of NPPs were supposed to be the main causal factors for successful plant operation. Although these aspects keep on assuming a significant role, later studies and observations showed that other factors concerning management and organization of the plant could instead be predominant comparing utilities operational and economic results. Utility quality, in a word, can be used to summarize all the managerial and operational aspects that seem to be effective in determining plant performance. In this paper operational data of a consistent sample of commercial nuclear power stations, out of the total 433 operating NPPs, are analyzed, mainly focusing on the last decade operational experience. The sample consists of PWR and BWR technology, operated by utilities located in different countries, including U.S. (Japan)) (France)) (Germany)) and Finland. Multivariate regression is performed using Unit Capability Factor (UCF) as the dependent variable; this factor reflects indeed the effectiveness of plant programs and practices in maximizing the available electrical generation and consequently provides an overall indication of how well plants are operated and maintained. Aspects that may not be real causal factors but which can have a consistent impact on the UCF, as technology design, supplier, size and age, are included in the analysis as independent variables. (authors)

  7. Role of SAMHD1 nuclear localization in restriction of HIV-1 and SIVmac

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background SAMHD1 is a nuclear protein that blocks lentiviral infection before reverse transcription in macrophages and dendritic cells. The viral accessory protein Vpx overcomes the SAMHD1-mediated lentiviral block by inducing its proteasomal degradation. Results Here, we identified the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SAMHD1, and studied its contribution to restriction of HIV-1 and SIVmac. By studying the cellular distribution of different SAMHD1 variants, we mapped the nuclear localization of SAMHD1 to residues 11KRPR14. Mutagenesis of these residues changed the cellular distribution of SAMHD1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. SAMHD1 mutants that lost nuclear localization restricted HIV-1 and SIV as potently as the wild type protein. Interestingly, SAMHD1 mutants that localized to the cytoplasm were not degraded by nuclear Vpx alleles. Therefore, nuclear Vpx alleles require nuclear localization of SAMHD1 in order to induce its degradation. In agreement, SIVmac viruses encoding Vpx did not overcome the restriction imposed by the cytoplasmic variants of SAMHD1. Conclusions We mapped the NLS of SAMHD1 to residues 11KRPR14 and studied the contribution of SAMHD1 nuclear localization to restriction of HIV-1 and SIV. These experiments demonstrate that cytoplasmic variants of SAMHD1 potently block lentiviral infection and are resistant to Vpx-mediated degradation. The nuclear Vpx alleles studied here are only capable of degrading a nuclearly localized SAMHD1 suggesting that Vpx-mediated degradation of SAMHD1 is initiated in the nucleus. PMID:22691373

  8. Mutations in the C-terminal region affect subcellular localization of crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) GPCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Gui, Lang; Chen, Zong-Yan; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are known as seven transmembrane domain receptors and consequently can mediate diverse biological functions via regulation of their subcellular localization. Crucian carp herpesvirus (CaHV) was recently isolated from infected fish with acute gill hemorrhage. CaHV GPCR of 349 amino acids (aa) was identified based on amino acid identity. A series of variants with truncation/deletion/substitution mutation in the C-terminal (aa 315-349) were constructed and expressed in fathead minnow (FHM) cells. The roles of three key C-terminal regions in subcellular localization of CaHV GPCR were determined. Lysine-315 (K-315) directed the aggregation of the protein preferentially at the nuclear side. Predicted N-myristoylation site (GGGWTR, aa 335-340) was responsible for punctate distribution in periplasm or throughout the cytoplasm. Predicted phosphorylation site (SSR, aa 327-329) and GGGWTR together determined the punctate distribution in cytoplasm. Detection of organelles localization by specific markers showed that the protein retaining K-315 colocalized with the Golgi apparatus. These experiments provided first evidence that different mutations of CaHV GPCR C-terminals have different affects on the subcellular localization of fish herpesvirus-encoded GPCRs. The study provided valuable information and new insights into the precise interactions between herpesvirus and fish cells, and could also provide useful targets for antiviral agents in aquaculture. PMID:27059239

  9. Reassessment of selected factors affecting siting of Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.E.; Hanson, A.L.; Mubayi, V.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1997-02-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has performed a series of probabilistic consequence assessment calculations for nuclear reactor siting. This study takes into account recent insights into severe accident source terms and examines consequences in a risk based format consistent with the quantitative health objectives (QHOs) of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy. Simplified severe accident source terms developed in this study are based on the risk insights of NUREG-1150. The results of the study indicate that both the quantity of radioactivity released in a severe accident as well as the likelihood of a release are lower than those predicted in earlier studies. The accident risks using the simplified source terms are examined at a series of generic plant sites, that vary in population distribution, meteorological conditions, and exclusion area boundary distances. Sensitivity calculations are performed to evaluate the effects of emergency protective action assumptions on the risk of prompt fatality and latent cancers fatality, and population relocation. The study finds that based on the new source terms the prompt and latent fatality risks at all generic sites meet the QHOs of the NRC`s Safety Goal Policy by margins ranging from one to more than three orders of magnitude. 4 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. Morbillivirus nucleoprotein possesses a novel nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-independent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Hiroki; Masuda, Munemitsu; Miura, Ryuichi; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko . E-mail: ckai@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-08-15

    Morbilliviruses, which belong to the Mononegavirales, replicate its RNA genome in the cytoplasm of the host cell. However, they also form characteristic intranuclear inclusion bodies, consisting of nucleoprotein (N), in infected cells. To analyze the mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic transport of N protein, we characterized the nuclear localization (NLS) and nuclear export (NES) signals of canine distemper virus (CDV) N protein by deletion mutation and alanine substitution of the protein. The NLS has a novel leucine/isoleucine-rich motif (TGILISIL) at positions 70-77, whereas the NES is composed of a leucine-rich motif (LLRSLTLF) at positions 4-11. The NLS and NES of the N proteins of other morbilliviruses, that is, measles virus (MV) and rinderpest virus (RPV), were also analyzed. The NLS of CDV-N protein is conserved at the same position in MV-N protein, whereas the NES of MV-N protein is located in the C-terminal region. The NES of RPV-N protein is also located at the same position as CDV-N protein, whereas the NLS motif is present not only at the same locus as CDV-N protein but also at other sites. Interestingly, the nuclear export of all these N proteins appears to proceed via a CRM1-independent pathway.

  11. Temporal dynamics of a local fish community are strongly affected by immigration from the surrounding metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Stoffels, Rick J; Clarke, Kenneth Robert; Linklater, Danielle S

    2015-01-01

    A 5-year time series of annual censuses was collected from a large floodplain lake to determine how dynamics of the local fish community were affected by changes in hydrological connectivity with the surrounding metacommunity. The lake was disconnected from the metacommunity for 1 year prior to our study and remained disconnected until 3 months before our third annual census, when a flood reconnected the lake to the metacommunity. We determined how changes in connectivity affected temporal dynamics of (1) local community composition and (2) the population composition, condition, and growth of catfish, to shed light on how immigration of other species might affect local population dynamics. Before reconnection, the community was likely shaped by interactions between the local environment and species traits. The reconnection caused significant immigration and change in community composition and correlated with a significant and abrupt decline in catfish condition, growth, and abundance; effects likely due to the immigration of a competitor with a similar trophic niche: carp. The community was slow to return to its preconnection state, which may be due to dispersal traits of the fishes, and a time-lag in the recovery of the local catfish population following transient intensification of species interactions. The dynamics observed were concordant with the species sorting and mass-effects perspectives of metacommunity theory. Floods cause episodic dispersal in floodplain fish metacommunities, and so, flood frequency determines the relative importance of regional and local processes. Local processes may be particularly important to certain species, but these species may need sufficient time between floods for population increase, before the next flood-induced dispersal episode brings competitors and predators that might cause population decline. Accordingly, species coexistence in these metacommunities may be facilitated by spatiotemporal storage effects, which may in

  12. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  13. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  14. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Domanović, D; Kitchen, A; Politis, C; Panagiotopoulos, T; Bluemel, J; Van Bortel, W; Overbosch, D; Lieshout-Krikke, R; Fabra, C; Facco, G; Zeller, H

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria in Greece started in 2009 and peaked in 2011. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing transmission of malaria raised questions of how to define spatial boundaries of such an area and when to trigger any specific blood safety measures, including whether and which blood donation screening strategy to apply. To provide scientific advice the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) organised expert meetings in 2013. The outcomes of these consultations are expert opinions covering spatial targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria and blood donation screening strategy for evidence of malaria infection in these areas. Opinions could help EU national blood safety authorities in developing a preventive strategy during malaria outbreaks. PMID:27238883

  15. Plectin isoform 1-dependent nuclear docking of desmin networks affects myonuclear architecture and expression of mechanotransducers

    PubMed Central

    Staszewska, Ilona; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin is a highly versatile cytoskeletal protein that acts as a mechanical linker between intermediate filament (IF) networks and various cellular structures. The protein is crucial for myofiber integrity. Its deficiency leads to severe pathological changes in skeletal muscle fibers of patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD). Skeletal muscle fibers express four major isoforms of plectin which are distinguished solely by alternative, relatively short, first exon-encoded N-terminal sequences. Each one of these isoforms is localized to a different subcellular compartment and plays a specific role in maintaining integrity and proper function(s) of myofibers. The unique role of individual isoforms is supported by distinct phenotypes of isoform-specific knockout mice and recently discovered mutations in first coding exons of plectin that lead to distinct, tissue-specific, pathological abnormalities in humans. In this study, we demonstrate that the lack of plectin isoform 1 (P1) in myofibers of mice leads to alterations of nuclear morphology, similar to those observed in various forms of MD. We show that P1-mediated targeting of desmin IFs to myonuclei is essential for maintenance of their typically spheroidal architecture as well as their proper positioning and movement along the myofiber. Furthermore, we show that P1 deficiency affects chromatin modifications and the expression of genes involved in various cellular functions, including signaling pathways mediating mechanotransduction. Mechanistically, P1 is shown to specifically interact with the myonuclear membrane-associated (BAR domain-containing) protein endophilin B. Our results open a new perspective on cytoskeleton-nuclear crosstalk via specific cytolinker proteins. PMID:26487297

  16. Role of zinc finger structure in nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Azumano, Makiko; Uwatoko, Chisana; Itoh, Kohji Kuwahara, Jun

    2009-02-27

    Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates gene expression. Our previous study demonstrated that the carboxyl terminal region of Sp1 containing 3-zinc finger region as DNA binding domain can also serve as nuclear localization signal (NLS). However, the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 has not been well understood. In this study, we performed a gene expression study on mutant Sp1 genes causing a set of amino acid substitutions in zinc finger domains to elucidate nuclear import activity. Nuclear localization of the GFP-fused mutant Sp1 proteins bearing concomitant substitutions in the first and third zinc fingers was highly inhibited. These mutant Sp1 proteins had also lost the binding ability as to the GC box sequence. The results suggest that the overall tertiary structure formed by the three zinc fingers is essential for nuclear localization of Sp1 as well as dispersed basic amino acids within the zinc fingers region.

  17. Characterization of a baculovirus nuclear localization signal domain in the late expression factor 3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Victoria; Yu Mei; Carstens, Eric B.

    2009-03-01

    The baculovirus Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) single-stranded DNA binding protein LEF-3 is a multi-functional protein that is required to transport the helicase protein P143 into the nucleus of infected cells where they function to replicate viral DNA. The N-terminal 56 amino acid region of LEF-3 is required for nuclear transport. In this report, we analyzed the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of LEF-3 on its intracellular distribution. Fluorescence microscopy of expression plasmid-transfected cells demonstrated that the residues 28 to 32 formed the core nuclear localization signal, but other adjacent positively-charged residues augmented these sequences. Comparison with other group I Alphabaculoviruses suggested that this core region functionally duplicated residues including 18 and 19. This was demonstrated by the loss of nuclear localization when the equivalent residues (18 to 20) in Choristoneura fumiferana nucleopolyhedrovirus (CfMNPV) LEF-3 were mutated. The AcMNPV LEF-3 nuclear localization domain was also shown to drive nuclear transport in mammalian cells indicating that the protein nuclear import systems in insect and mammalian cells are conserved. We also demonstrated by mutagenesis that two conserved cysteine residues located at 82 and 106 were not essential for nuclear localization or for interaction with P143. However, by using a modified construct of P143 that localized on its own to the nucleus, we demonstrated that a functional nuclear localization domain on LEF-3 was required for interaction between LEF-3 and P143.

  18. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS(SV40)) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS(SV40) in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS(SV40) formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS(SV40) likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS(SV40) can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. PMID:26032495

  19. Importin α1 Mediates Yorkie Nuclear Import via an N-terminal Non-canonical Nuclear Localization Signal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shimin; Lu, Yi; Yin, Meng-Xin; Wang, Chao; Wu, Wei; Li, Jinhui; Wu, Wenqing; Ge, Ling; Hu, Lianxin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway controls organ size by orchestrating cell proliferation and apoptosis. When the Hippo pathway was inactivated, the transcriptional co-activator Yorkie translocates into the nucleus and forms a complex with transcription factor Scalloped to promote the expression of Hippo pathway target genes. Therefore, the nuclear translocation of Yorkie is a critical step in Hippo signaling. Here, we provide evidence that the N-terminal 1-55 amino acids of Yorkie, especially Arg-15, were essential for its nuclear localization. By mass spectrometry and biochemical analyses, we found that Importin α1 can directly interact with the Yorkie N terminus and drive Yorkie into the nucleus. Further experiments show that the upstream component Hippo can inhibit Importin α1-mediated Yorkie nuclear import. Taken together, we identified a potential nuclear localization signal at the N-terminal end of Yorkie as well as a critical role for Importin α1 in Yorkie nuclear import. PMID:26887950

  20. A functional nuclear localization sequence in the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tianying; Yu, Bohai; Lin, Lexun; Zhai, Xia; Han, Yelu; Qin, Ying; Guo, Zhiwei; Wu, Shuo; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yan; Tong, Lei; Zhang, Fengmin; Si, Xiaoning; Zhao, Wenran; Zhong, Zhaohua

    2012-11-25

    The capsid proteins of some RNA viruses can translocate to the nucleus and interfere with cellular phenotypes. In this study we found that the VP1 capsid protein of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) was dominantly localized in the nucleus of the cells transfected with VP1-expressing plasmid. The VP1 nuclear localization also occurred in the cells infected with CVB3. Truncation analysis indicated that the VP1 nuclear localization sequence located near the C-terminal. The substitution of His220 with threonine completely abolished its translocation. The VP1 proteins of other CVB types might have the nuclear localization potential because this region was highly conserved. Moreover, the VP1 nuclear localization induced cell cycle deregulation, including a prolonged S phase and shortened G2-M phase. Besides these findings, we also found a domain between Ala72 and Phe106 that caused the VP1 truncates dotted distributed in the cytoplasm. Our results suggest a new pathogenic mechanism of CVB. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 protein of coxsackievirus B3 can specifically localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear localization signal of coxsackievirus B3 VP1 protein locates near its C-terminal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The VP1 nuclear localization of coxsackievirus B3 can deregulate cell cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is a domain in the VP1 that determines it dotted distributed in the cytoplasm.

  1. Understanding the local socio-political processes affecting conservation management outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level. PMID:24522894

  2. Understanding the Local Socio-political Processes Affecting Conservation Management Outcomes in Corbett Tiger Reserve, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Archi; Hickey, Gordon M.; Badola, Ruchi; Hussain, Syed Ainul

    2014-05-01

    Several measures have been recommended to guarantee a sustainable population of tigers: sufficient inviolate spaces for a viable population, sufficient prey populations, trained and skilled manpower to guard against poaching and intrusion, banning trade in tiger products to reduce poaching, and importantly, the political will to precipitate these recommendations into implementation. Of these, the creation of sufficient inviolate spaces (generally in the form of protected areas) has created the most issues with local resource-dependent communities, often resulting in significant challenges for tiger conservation policy and management. Very little empirical research has, however, been done to understand and contextualize the local-level socio-political interactions that may influence the efficacy of tiger conservation in India. In this paper, we present the results of exploratory research into the ways in which local-stakeholder groups affect the management of Corbett Tiger Reserve (CTR). Using a combined grounded theory-case study research design, and the Institutional Analysis and Development framework for analysis, we identify the socio-political processes through which local-stakeholder groups are able to articulate their issues and elicit desirable actions from the management of CTR. Increasing our awareness of these processes can help inform the design and implementation of more effective tiger conservation management and policy strategies that have the potential to create more supportive coalitions of tiger conservation stakeholders at the local level.

  3. Sun/shade conditions affect recruitment and local adaptation of a columnar cactus in dry forests

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Jácome, Antonio; Montaña, Carlos; Fornoni, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Facilitation among plants in water-limited environments (i.e. where evapotranspiration overcomes the availability of water during the growing season) has been considered a local adaptation to water and light conditions. Among cacti, early life-history stages can benefit from the facilitative effects of nurse plants that reduce solar radiation and water stress. However, whether light condition itself acts as an agent of selection through facilitation remains untested. The aim of this study was to determine (1) whether light conditions affect seedling recruitment, (2) whether the positive effect of shade on seedling recruitment is more intense under more stressful conditions and (3) whether shade condition (facilitation) reduces the magnitude of local adaptation on seedling recruitment relative to full sunlight conditions. Methods A reciprocal transplant experiment, coupled with the artificial manipulation of sun/shade conditions, was performed to test for the effects of local adaptation on germination, seedling survival and growth, using two demes of the columnar cactus Pilosocereus leucocephalus, representing different intensities of stressful conditions. Key Results Full sunlight conditions reduced recruitment success and supported the expectation of lower recruitment in more stressful environments. Significant local adaptation was mainly detected under full sunlight conditions, indicating that this environmental factor acts as an agent of selection at both sites. Conclusions The results supported the expectation that the magnitude of local adaptation, driven by the effects of facilitative nurse plants, is less intense under reduced stressful conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that sun/shade conditions act as a selective agent accounting for local adaptation in water-limited environments, and that facilitation provided by nurse plants in these environments can attenuate the patterns of local adaptation among plants benefiting

  4. Characterization of a nuclear localization signal in the foot-and-mouth disease virus polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Rosas, Maria Flora; Sobrino, Francisco

    2013-09-15

    We have experimentally tested whether the MRKTKLAPT sequence in FMDV 3D protein (residues 16 to 24) can act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Mutants with substitutions in two basic residues within this sequence, K18E and K20E, were generated. A decreased nuclear localization was observed in transiently expressed 3D and its precursor 3CD, suggesting a role of K18 and K20 in nuclear targeting. Fusion of MRKTKLAPT to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) increased the nuclear localization of GFP, which was not observed when GFP was fused to the 3D mutated sequences. These results indicate that the sequence MRKTKLAPT can be functionally considered as a NLS. When introduced in a FMDV full length RNA replacements K18E and K20E led to production of revertant viruses that replaced the acidic residues introduced (E) by K, suggesting that the presence of lysins at positions 18 and 20 of 3D is essential for virus multiplication. - Highlights: • The FMDV 3D polymerase contains a nuclear localization signal. • Replacements K18E and K20E decrease nuclear localization of 3D and its precursor 3CD. • Fusion of the MRKTKLAPT 3D motif to GFP increases the nuclear localization of GFP. • Replacements K18E and K20E abolish the ability of MRKTKLAPT to relocate GFP. • RNAs harboring replacements K18E and K20E lead to recovery of revertant FMDVs.

  5. Localized Hartree product treatment of multiple protons in the nuclear-electronic orbital framework.

    PubMed

    Auer, Benjamin; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2010-02-28

    An approximation for treating multiple quantum nuclei within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework for molecular systems is presented. In the approximation to NEO-Hartree-Fock, the nuclear wave function is represented by a Hartree product rather than a Slater determinant, corresponding to the neglect of the nuclear exchange interactions. In the approximation to NEO-density functional theory, the nuclear exchange-correlation functional is chosen to be the diagonal nuclear exchange interaction terms, thereby eliminating the nuclear self-interaction terms. To further enhance the simplicity and computational efficiency, the nuclear molecular orbitals or Kohn-Sham orbitals are expanded in terms of localized nuclear basis sets. These approximations are valid because of the inherent localization of the nuclear orbitals and the numerical insignificance of the nuclear exchange interactions in molecular systems. Moreover, these approximations lead to substantial computational savings due to the reduction in both the number of integrals that must be calculated and the size of the matrices that must be diagonalized. These nuclear Hartree product approximation (HPA) methods scale linearly with the number of quantum protons and are highly parallelizable. Applications to a water hexamer, glycine dimer, and 32-water cluster, where all hydrogen nuclei are treated quantum mechanically, illustrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of the nuclear HPA methods. These strategies will facilitate the implementation of explicitly correlated NEO methods for molecular systems with multiple quantum protons. PMID:20192293

  6. Identification and functional characterization of a novel bipartite nuclear localization sequence in ARID1A.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Shoji, Yutaka; Conrads, Kelly A; Stroop, Kevin D; Hamilton, Chad A; Darcy, Kathleen M; Maxwell, George L; Risinger, John I; Conrads, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    AT-rich interactive domain-containing protein 1A (ARID1A) is a recently identified nuclear tumor suppressor frequently altered in solid tumor malignancies. We have identified a bipartite-like nuclear localization sequence (NLS) that contributes to nuclear import of ARID1A not previously described. We functionally confirm activity using GFP constructs fused with wild-type or mutant NLS sequences. We further show that cyto-nuclear localized, bipartite NLS mutant ARID1A exhibits greater stability than nuclear-localized, wild-type ARID1A. Identification of this undescribed functional NLS within ARID1A contributes vital insights to rationalize the impact of ARID1A missense mutations observed in patient tumors. PMID:26614907

  7. Local 24-h hyperglycemia does not affect endothelium-dependent or -independent vasoreactivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Houben, A J; Schaper, N C; de Haan, C H; Huvers, F C; Slaaf, D W; de Leeuw, P W; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, C

    1996-06-01

    Hyperglycemia induces regional hemodynamic changes, as suggested by animal studies. These hemodynamic changes may play an initiating role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute local hyperglycemia for 24 h on basal human forearm muscle and skin blood flow and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasoreactivity. Local hyperglycemia (approximately 15 mM) was induced by infusion of 5% glucose into the brachial artery of the nondominant arm. In control experiments, the same individual amount of glucose was infused intravenously in the dominant arm to correct for possible systemic effects of the infused glucose. Vasoreactivity of the forearm vasculature was evaluated by local infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and norepinephrine (NE) into the brachial artery. Regional hemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 h of local hyperglycemia. Median (with interquartile range) basal forearm (muscle) blood flow (FBF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [infused-to-contralateral arm FBF ratio for glucose 1.32 (1.16-1.64) vs. control 1.54 (1.34-1.69)]. Skin microcirculatory blood flow (laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [LDF ratio for glucose 1.00 (0.62-1.56) vs control 0.80 (0.58-1.14)]. In addition, the vasoreactivity of both muscle and skin (not shown) vasculature to ACh [percent change in FBF ratio for glucose 167% (81-263) vs. control 148% (94-211)], SNP [for glucose 486% (178-586) vs. control 293% (196-454)], L-NMMA [for glucose -36% (-56 to -22) vs. control -41% (-51 to -24)], and NE [for glucose -48% (-72 to -41) vs. control -66% (-79 to -33)] was also not affected by the local hyperglycemia. Thus, in contrast to animal studies, our results suggest that a moderate-to-severe hyperglycemia does not affect the regulation of basal blood flow or

  8. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey

    PubMed Central

    Schartel, Tyler E.; Schauber, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference. PMID:26978659

  9. Relative Preference and Localized Food Affect Predator Space Use and Consumption of Incidental Prey.

    PubMed

    Schartel, Tyler E; Schauber, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Abundant, localized foods can concentrate predators and their foraging efforts, thus altering both the spatial distribution of predation risk and predator preferences for prey that are encountered incidentally. However, few investigations have quantified the spatial scale over which localized foods affect predator foraging behavior and consumption of incidental prey. In spring 2010, we experimentally tested how point-source foods altered how generalist predators (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus) utilized space and depredated two incidental prey items: almonds (Prunus dulcis; highly profitable) and maple seeds (Acer saccharum; less profitable). We estimated mouse population densities with trapping webs, quantified mouse consumption rates of these incidental prey items, and measured local mouse activity with track plates. We predicted that 1) mouse activity would be elevated near full feeders, but depressed at intermediate distances from the feeder, 2) consumption of both incidental prey would be high near feeders providing less-preferred food and, 3) consumption of incidental prey would be contingent on predator preference for prey relative to feeders providing more-preferred food. Mouse densities increased significantly from pre- to post-experiment. Mean mouse activity was unexpectedly greatest in control treatments, particularly <15 m from the control (empty) feeder. Feeders with highly preferred food (sunflower seeds) created localized refuges for incidental prey at intermediate distances (15 to 25m) from the feeder. Feeders with less-preferred food (corn) generated localized high risk for highly preferred almonds <10 m of the feeder. Our findings highlight the contingent but predictable effects of locally abundant food on risk experienced by incidental prey, which can be positive or negative depending on both spatial proximity and relative preference. PMID:26978659

  10. Discrimination between NL1- and NL2-Mediated Nuclear Localization of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Joanne G. A.; Hsu, Brian; Laquian, Ian R.; Giffin, Ward; Reich, Terry; Haché, Robert J. G.; Lefebvre, Yvonne A.

    1999-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) cycles between a free liganded form that is localized to the nucleus and a heat shock protein (hsp)-immunophilin-complexed, unliganded form that is usually localized to the cytoplasm but that can also be nuclear. In addition, rapid nucleocytoplasmic exchange or shuttling of the receptor underlies its localization. Nuclear import of liganded GR is mediated through a well-characterized sequence, NL1, adjacent to the receptor DNA binding domain and a second, uncharacterized motif, NL2, that overlaps with the ligand binding domain. In this study we report that rapid nuclear import (half-life [t1/2] of 4 to 6 min) of agonist- and antagonist-treated GR and the localization of unliganded, hsp-associated GRs to the nucleus in G0 are mediated through NL1 and correlate with the binding of GR to pendulin/importin α. By contrast, NL2-mediated nuclear transfer of GR occurred more slowly (t1/2 = 45 min to 1 h), was agonist specific, and appeared to be independent of binding to importin α. Together, these results suggest that NL2 mediates the nuclear import of GR through an alternative nuclear import pathway. Nuclear export of GR was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that the transfer of GR to the cytoplasm is mediated through the CRM1-dependent pathway. Inhibition of GR nuclear export by leptomycin B enhanced the nuclear localization of both unliganded, wild-type GR and hormone-treated NL1− GR. These results highlight that the subcellular localization of both liganded and unliganded GRs is determined, at least in part, by a flexible equilibrium between the rates of nuclear import and export. PMID:9891038

  11. Nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of lamin A and progerin reveal insights into lamin A processing and emerin targeting.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Flannery, Andrew R; Cai, Helen; Ko, Eunae; Cao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a major component of the lamina, which creates a dynamic network underneath the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the lamin A gene (LMNA) cause severe genetic disorders, one of which is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease triggered by a dominant mutant named progerin. Unlike the wild-type lamin A, whose farnesylated C-terminus is excised during post-translational processing, progerin retains its farnesyl tail and accumulates on the nuclear membrane, resulting in abnormal nuclear morphology during interphase. In addition, membrane-associated progerin forms visible cytoplasmic aggregates in mitosis. To examine the potential effects of cytoplasmic progerin, nuclear localization signal (NLS) deleted progerin and lamin A (PGΔNLS and LAΔNLS, respectively) have been constructed. We find that both ΔNLS mutants are farnesylated in the cytosol and associate with a sub-domain of the ER via their farnesyl tails. While the farnesylation on LAΔNLS can be gradually removed, which leads to its subsequent release from the ER into the cytoplasm, PGΔNLS remains permanently farnesylated and membrane-bounded. Moreover, both ΔNLS mutants dominantly affect emerin's nuclear localization. These results reveal new insights into lamin A biogenesis and lamin A-emerin interaction. PMID:24637396

  12. Nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of lamin A and progerin reveal insights into lamin A processing and emerin targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; Flannery, Andrew R; Cai, Helen; Ko, Eunae; Cao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a major component of the lamina, which creates a dynamic network underneath the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the lamin A gene (LMNA) cause severe genetic disorders, one of which is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease triggered by a dominant mutant named progerin. Unlike the wild-type lamin A, whose farnesylated C-terminus is excised during post-translational processing, progerin retains its farnesyl tail and accumulates on the nuclear membrane, resulting in abnormal nuclear morphology during interphase. In addition, membrane-associated progerin forms visible cytoplasmic aggregates in mitosis. To examine the potential effects of cytoplasmic progerin, nuclear localization signal (NLS) deleted progerin and lamin A (PGΔNLS and LAΔNLS, respectively) have been constructed. We find that both ΔNLS mutants are farnesylated in the cytosol and associate with a sub-domain of the ER via their farnesyl tails. While the farnesylation on LAΔNLS can be gradually removed, which leads to its subsequent release from the ER into the cytoplasm, PGΔNLS remains permanently farnesylated and membrane-bounded. Moreover, both ΔNLS mutants dominantly affect emerin’s nuclear localization. These results reveal new insights into lamin A biogenesis and lamin A-emerin interaction. PMID:24637396

  13. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  14. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  15. Crack arrest toughness of a heat-affected zone containing local brittle zones

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, L.; Pussegoda, L.N.; Graville, B.A.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    The awareness of the presence of local brittle zones (LBZs) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds has led to the requirements for minimum initiation toughness for the HAZ for critical applications. A fracture control philosophy that is proposed to be an attractive alternative for heat-affected zones containing LBZs is the prevention of crack propagation rather than of crack initiation. Such an approach would be viable if it could be demonstrated that cracks initiated in the LBZs will be arrested without causing catastrophic failure, notwithstanding the low initiation (CTOD) toughness resulting from the presence of LBZs. Unstable propagation of a crack initiating from an LBZ requires the rupture of tougher microstructural regions surrounding the LBZ in HAZ, and therefore the CTOD value reflecting the presence of LBZ is unlikely to provide a true indication of the potential for fast fracture along the heat-affected zone. Base metal specifications usually ensure that small unstable cracks propagating from the weld zone into the base metal would be arrested. To investigate the likelihood of fast fracture within the HAZ, a test program has been carried out that involved performing compact plane strain and plane stress crack arrest tests on a heat-affected zone that contained LBZs, and thus exhibited unacceptable low CTOD toughness for resistance to brittle fracture initiation. The results indicated that the crack arrest toughness was little influenced by the presence of local brittle zones. Instead, the superior toughness of the larger proportion of finer-grain HAZ surrounding the LBZ present along the crack path has a greater influence on the crack arrest toughness.

  16. Atypical nuclear localization of VIP receptors in glioma cell lines and patients

    SciTech Connect

    Barbarin, Alice; Séité, Paule; Godet, Julie; Bensalma, Souheyla; Muller, Jean-Marc; Chadéneau, Corinne

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • The VIP receptor VPAC1 contains a putative NLS signal. • VPAC1 is predominantly nuclear in GBM cell lines but not VPAC2. • Non-nuclear VPAC1/2 protein expression is correlated with glioma grade. • Nuclear VPAC1 is observed in 50% of stage IV glioma (GBM). - Abstract: An increasing number of G protein-coupled receptors, like receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), are found in cell nucleus. As VIP receptors are involved in the regulation of glioma cell proliferation and migration, we investigated the expression and the nuclear localization of the VIP receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 in this cancer. First, by applying Western blot and immunofluorescence detection in three human glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines, we observed a strong nuclear staining for the VPAC1 receptor and a weak nuclear VPAC2 receptor staining. Second, immunohistochemical staining of VPAC1 and VPAC2 on tissue microarrays (TMA) showed that the two receptors were expressed in normal brain and glioma tissues. Expression in the non-nuclear compartment of the two receptors significantly increased with the grade of the tumors. Analysis of nuclear staining revealed a significant increase of VPAC1 staining with glioma grade, with up to 50% of GBM displaying strong VPAC1 nuclear staining, whereas nuclear VPAC2 staining remained marginal. The increase in VPAC receptor expression with glioma grades and the enhanced nuclear localization of the VPAC1 receptors in GBM might be of importance for glioma progression.

  17. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) and lamins alter nuclear membrane structure without affecting phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, Karsten; Ridgway, Neale D

    2011-06-01

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) is a nuclear enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the CDP-choline pathway for phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis. Lipid activation of CCTα results in its translocation to the nuclear envelope and expansion of an intranuclear membrane network termed the nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR) by a mechanism involving membrane deformation. Nuclear lamins are also required for stability and proliferation of the NR, but whether this unique structure, or the nuclear lamina in general, is required for PC synthesis is not known. To examine this relationship, the nuclear lamina was depleted by RNAi or disrupted by expression of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) mutant lamin A (progerin), and the effect on CCTα and choline metabolism was analyzed. siRNA-mediated silencing of lamin A/C or lamin B1 in CHO cells to diminish the NR had no effect on PC synthesis, while double knockdown non-specifically inhibited the pathway. Confirming this minor role in PC synthesis, only 10% of transiently overexpressed choline/ethanolamine phosphotransferase was detected in the NR. In CHO cells, CCTα was nucleoplasmic and co-localized with GFP-progerin in nuclear folds and invaginations; however, HGPS fibroblasts displayed an abnormal distribution of CCTα in the cytoplasm and nuclear envelope that was accompanied by a 2-fold reduction in PC synthesis. In spite of its altered localization, choline-labeling experiments showed that CCT activity was unaffected, and inhibition of PC synthesis was traced to reduced activity of a hemicholinium-sensitive choline transporter. We conclude that CCTα and lamins specifically cooperate to form the NR, but the overall structure of the nuclear envelope has a minimal impact on CCT activity and PC synthesis. PMID:21504799

  18. Identification of an unconventional nuclear localization signal in human ribosomal protein S2

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.; Reimers, K.; Wirz, W.; Gressner, A.M.; Mueller, R.; Kiefer, P. . E-Mail: pkiefer@ukaachen.de

    2005-09-16

    Ribosomal proteins must be imported into the nucleus after being synthesized in the cytoplasm. Since the rpS2 amino acid sequence does not contain a typical nuclear localization signal, we used deletion mutant analysis and rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeric proteins to identify the nuclear targeting domains in rpS2. Nuclear rpS2 is strictly localized in the nucleoplasm and is not targeted to the nucleoli. Subcellular localization analysis of deletion mutants of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase chimeras identified a central domain comprising 72 amino acids which is necessary and sufficient to target the chimeric {beta}-galactosidase to the nucleus. The nuclear targeting domain shares no significant similarity to already characterized nuclear localization signals in ribosomal proteins or other nuclear proteins. Although a Nup153 fragment containing the importin{beta} binding site fused to VP22 blocks nuclear import of rpS2-{beta}-galactosidase fusion proteins, nuclear uptake of rpS2 could be mediated by several import receptors since it binds to importin{alpha}/{beta} and transportin.

  19. Transcription-dependent nucleolar cap localization and possible nuclear function of DExH RNA helicase RHAU

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, Fumiko; Stadler, Michael; Chalupnikova, Katerina; Oakeley, Edward; Nagamine, Yoshikuni

    2008-04-01

    RHAU (RNA helicase associated with AU-rich element) is a DExH protein originally identified as a factor accelerating AU-rich element-mediated mRNA degradation. The discovery that RHAU is predominantly localized in the nucleus, despite mRNA degradation occurring in the cytoplasm, prompted us to consider the nuclear functions of RHAU. In HeLa cells, RHAU was found to be localized throughout the nucleoplasm with some concentrated in nuclear speckles. Transcriptional arrest altered the localization to nucleolar caps, where RHAU is closely localized with RNA helicases p68 and p72, suggesting that RHAU is involved in transcription-related RNA metabolism in the nucleus. To see whether RHAU affects global gene expression transcriptionally or posttranscriptionally, we performed microarray analysis using total RNA from RHAU-depleted HeLa cell lines, measuring both steady-state mRNA levels and mRNA half-lives by actinomycin D chase. There was no change in the half-lives of most transcripts whose steady-state levels were affected by RHAU knockdown, suggesting that these transcripts are subjected to transcriptional regulation. We propose that RHAU has a dual function, being involved in both the synthesis and degradation of mRNA in different subcellular compartments.

  20. The SAP motif and C-terminal RS- and RD/E-rich region influences the sub-nuclear localization of Acinus isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Wendling, Karen S; Soprano, Kenneth J; Soprano, Dianne Robert

    2014-12-01

    Acinus has been reported to function in apoptosis, RNA processing and regulation of gene transcription including RA-dependent transcription. There are three different isoforms of Acinus termed Acinus-L, Acinus-S', and Acinus-S. The isoforms of Acinus differ in their N-terminus while the C-terminus is consistent in all isoforms. The sub-nuclear localization of Acinus-L and Acinus-S' was determined using fluorescence microscopy. Acinus-S' colocalizes with SC35 in nuclear speckles while Acinus-L localizes diffusely throughout the nucleoplasm. RA treatment has little effect on the sub-nuclear localization of Acinus-L and Acinus-S'. The domains/regions necessary for the distinct sub-nuclear localization of Acinus-L and Acinus-S' were identified. The speckled sub-nuclear localization of Acinus-S' is dependent on its C-terminal RS- and RD/E-rich region but is independent of the phosphorylation status of Ser-453 and Ser-604 within this region. The unique N-terminal SAP motif of Acinus-L is responsible for its diffuse localization in the nucleus. Moreover, the sub-nuclear localization of Acinus isoforms is affected by each other, which is determined by the combinatorial effect of the more potent SAP motif of Acinus-L and the C-terminal RS- and RD/E-rich region in all Acinus isoforms. The C-terminal RS- and RD/E-rich region of Acinus mediates the colocalization of Acinus isoforms as well as with its interacting protein RNPS1. In conclusion, the SAP motif is responsible for the difference in the nuclear localization between Acinus-L and Acinus-S'. This difference in the nuclear localization of Acinus-S' and Acinus-L may suggest that these two isoforms have different functional roles. PMID:25079509

  1. Overlapping signal sequences control nuclear localization and endoplasmic reticulum retention of GRP58

    SciTech Connect

    Adikesavan, Anbu Karani; Unni, Emmanual; Jaiswal, Anil K.

    2008-12-12

    Glucose-regulated GRP58 has shown clinical applications to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cancer. GRP58 is localized in the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and nucleus. Twenty-four amino acids at the N-terminal hydrophobic region are known to target GRP58 to ER for synthesis at the ER membrane and translocation into the ER lumen. In addition, GRP58 contains putative nuclear localization (494KPKKKKK500) and ER retention (502QEDL505) signals. However, the role of these signals in nuclear import and ER retention of GRP58 remains unknown. Present studies investigated the signals that control nuclear localization and ER retention of GRP58. Deletion/mutation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) abrogated nuclear import of GRP58. NLS attached to EGFP localized EGFP in the nucleus. However, deletion/mutation of putative ER retention signal alone did not alter ER retention of GRP58. Interestingly, a combined deletion/mutation of NLS and ER retention signals blocked the GRP58 retention in the ER. These results concluded that overlapping NLS and ER retention signal sequences regulate nuclear localization and ER retention of GRP58.

  2. Nuclear localization signal-dependent and -independent movements of Drosophila melanogaster dUTPase isoforms during nuclear cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Muha, Villo; Zagyva, Imre; Venkei, Zsolt; Szabad, Janos; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2009-04-03

    Two dUTPase isoforms (23 kDa and 21 kDa) are present in the fruitfly with the sole difference of an N-terminal extension. In Drosophila embryo, both isoforms are detected inside the nucleus. Here, we investigated the function of the N-terminal segment using eYFP-dUTPase constructs. In Schneider 2 cells, only the 23 kDa construct showed nuclear localization arguing that it may contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Sequence comparisons identified a lysine-rich nonapeptide with similarity to the human c-myc NLS. In Drosophila embryos during nuclear cleavages, the 23 kDa isoform showed the expected localization shifts. Contrariwise, although the 21 kDa isoform was excluded from the nuclei during interphase, it was shifted to the nucleus during prophase and forthcoming mitotic steps. The observed dynamic localization character showed strict timing to the nuclear cleavage phases and explained how both isoforms can be present within the nuclear microenvironment, although at different stages of cell cycle.

  3. The effect of local and large-scale environments on nuclear activity and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argudo-Fernández, M.; Shen, S.; Sabater, J.; Duarte Puertas, S.; Verley, S.; Yang, X.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are one of the main drivers for the transition from star-forming disk to passive spheroidal galaxies, however, the role of large-scale environment versus one-on-one interactions in triggering different types of AGN is still uncertain. We present a statistical study of the prevalence of the nuclear activity in isolated galaxies and physically bound isolated pairs. Aims: For the purpose of this study we considered optically and radio selected nuclear activity types. We aim to assess the effect of one-on-one interaction on the fraction of AGN and the role of their large-scale environment. Methods: To study the effect of one-on-one interaction on the fraction of AGN in isolated galaxy pairs, we compare these AGN with a sample of isolated galaxies homogeneously selected under the same isolation criterion. We examine the effect of the large-scale environment by comparing isolated systems with control samples of single galaxies and galaxy pairs. We use the tidal strength parameter to quantify the effects of local and large-scale environments. Results: In general we found no difference in the prevalence of optical AGN for the considered samples. For massive galaxies, the fraction of optical AGN in isolated galaxies is slightly higher than that in the control samples. Also, the fraction of passives in high mass isolated galaxies is smaller than in any other sample. Generally, there is no dependence on optical nuclear activity with local environment. On the other hand, we found evidence that radio AGN are strongly affected by the local environment. Conclusions: The optical AGN phenomenon is related to cold gas accretion, while radio AGN are related to hot gas accretion. In this context, there is more cold gas, fuelling the central optical AGN, in isolated systems. Our results are in agreement with a scenario where cold gas accretion by secular evolution is the main driver of optical AGN, while hot gas accretion and one

  4. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Boris V

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the 'acoustic CF' could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  5. Identification of a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the silkworm Masc protein.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yudai; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Ueda, Masamichi; Fujimoto, Masaru; Tsutsumi, Nobuhiro; Shimada, Toru; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    The silkworm Masculinizer (Masc) gene encodes a CCCH-tandem zinc finger protein that controls both masculinization and dosage compensation. Masc protein is a nuclear protein, but the mechanism underlying the transport of this protein into the nucleus has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identified a functional bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) located between residues 274 and 290 of the Masc protein. Sequence comparison revealed that this bipartite NLS is evolutionarily conserved in Masc proteins from other lepidopteran insects. Furthermore, we showed that the degree of nuclear localization is not associated with the masculinizing activity of the Masc protein. PMID:27277067

  6. Attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affects rapid scene categorization.

    PubMed

    Brand, John; Johnson, Aaron P

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we investigated how attention to local and global levels of hierarchical Navon figures affected the selection of diagnostic spatial scale information used in scene categorization. We explored this issue by asking observers to classify hybrid images (i.e., images that contain low spatial frequency (LSF) content of one image, and high spatial frequency (HSF) content from a second image) immediately following global and local Navon tasks. Hybrid images can be classified according to either their LSF, or HSF content; thus, making them ideal for investigating diagnostic spatial scale preference. Although observers were sensitive to both spatial scales (Experiment 1), they overwhelmingly preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we demonstrated that LSF based hybrid categorization was faster following global Navon tasks, suggesting that LSF processing associated with global Navon tasks primed the selection of LSFs in hybrid images. In Experiment 4, replicating Experiment 3 but suppressing the LSF information in Navon letters by contrast balancing the stimuli examined this hypothesis. Similar to Experiment 3, observers preferred to classify hybrids based on LSF content; however and in contrast, LSF based hybrid categorization was slower following global than local Navon tasks. PMID:25520675

  7. Characterization of the nuclear localization signals of duck circovirus replication proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wu, Z; Xiang, Q; Li, Z; Zhang, R; Chen, J; Xia, L; Lin, S; Yu, W; Ma, Z; Xie, Z; Jiang, S

    2015-12-01

    Duck circovirus (DuCV) possess a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for its replication. Based on the viral genotype, there are two categories of Rep proteins: Rep1 and Rep2. To characterize the nuclear localization signals (NLSs) conferring the nuclear localization of the Rep proteins, defined coding regions of the rep gene of two genotypes of DuCV were cloned and co-expressed with the red fluorescent protein DsRed2. The results showed that deleting the putative N-terminal NLS located at amino acid residues 10-37 of Rep1 and Rep2 abrogated nuclear translocation, while deleting the putative C-terminal NLS located at residues 244-274 of Rep1 did not significantly alter its subcellular localization, confirming that only the NLS located at residues 10-37 in the N-termini of the Rep proteins had nuclear targeting activity. PMID:26666192

  8. Immunological and biochemical evidence for nuclear localization of annexin in peas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. B.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    Immunofluorescent localization of annexins using an anti-pea annexin polyclonal antibody (anti-p35) in pea (Pisum sativum) leaf and stem epidermal peels showed staining of the nuclei and the cell periphery. Nuclear staining was also seen in cell teases prepared from pea plumules. The amount of nuclear stain was reduced both by fixation time and by dehydration and organic solvent treatment. Observation with confocal microscopy demonstrated that the anti-p35 stain was diffusely distributed throughout the nuclear structure. Immunoblots of purified nuclei, nuclear envelope matrix, nucleolar, and chromatin fractions showed a cross-reactive protein band of 35 kDa. These data are the first to show annexins localized in plant cell nuclei where they may play a role in nuclear function.

  9. Local Cattle and Badger Populations Affect the Risk of Confirmed Tuberculosis in British Cattle Herds

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Flavie; Johnston, W. Thomas; Donnelly, Christl A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The control of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a priority on the public health agenda in Great Britain, after launching in 1998 the Randomised Badger Culling Trial (RBCT) to evaluate the effectiveness of badger (Meles meles) culling as a control strategy. Our study complements previous analyses of the RBCT data (focusing on treatment effects) by presenting analyses of herd-level risks factors associated with the probability of a confirmed bTB breakdown in herds within each treatment: repeated widespread proactive culling, localized reactive culling and no culling (survey-only). Methodology/Principal Findings New cases of bTB breakdowns were monitored inside the RBCT areas from the end of the first proactive badger cull to one year after the last proactive cull. The risk of a herd bTB breakdown was modeled using logistic regression and proportional hazard models adjusting for local farm-level risk factors. Inside survey-only and reactive areas, increased numbers of active badger setts and cattle herds within 1500 m of a farm were associated with an increased bTB risk. Inside proactive areas, the number of M. bovis positive badgers initially culled within 1500 m of a farm was the strongest predictor of the risk of a confirmed bTB breakdown. Conclusions/Significance The use of herd-based models provide insights into how local cattle and badger populations affect the bTB breakdown risks of individual cattle herds in the absence of and in the presence of badger culling. These measures of local bTB risks could be integrated into a risk-based herd testing programme to improve the targeting of interventions aimed at reducing the risks of bTB transmission. PMID:21464920

  10. NEK8 mutations affect ciliary and centrosomal localization and may cause nephronophthisis.

    PubMed

    Otto, Edgar A; Trapp, Melissa L; Schultheiss, Ulla T; Helou, Juliana; Quarmby, Lynne M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2008-03-01

    Nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive kidney disease, is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in the first 3 decades of life. Causative mutations in 8 genes (NPHP1-8) have been identified, and homologous mouse models for NPHP2/INVS and NPHP3 have been described. The jck mouse is another model of recessive cystic kidney disease, and this mouse harbors a missense mutation, G448V, in the highly conserved RCC1 domain of Nek8. We hypothesized that mutations in NEK8 might cause nephronophthisis in humans, so we performed mutational analysis in a worldwide cohort of 588 patients. We identified 3 different amino acid changes that were conserved through evolution (L330F, H425Y, and A497P) and that were absent from at least 80 ethnically matched controls. All 3 mutations were within RCC1 domains, and the mutation H425Y was positioned within the same RCC1 repeat as the mouse jck mutation. To test the functional significance of these mutations, we introduced them into full-length mouse Nek8 GFP-tagged cDNA constructs. We transiently overexpressed the constructs in inner medullary collecting duct cells (IMCD-3 cell line) and compared the subcellular localization of mutant Nek8 to wild-type Nek8. All mutant forms of Nek8 showed defects in ciliary localization to varying degrees; the H431Y mutant (human H425Y) was completely absent from cilia and the amount localized to centrosomes was decreased. Overexpression of these mutants did not affect overall ciliogenesis, mitosis, or centriole number. Our genetic and functional data support the assumption that mutations in NEK8 cause nephronophthisis (NPHP9), adding another link between proteins mutated in cystic kidney disease and their localization to cilia and centrosomes. PMID:18199800

  11. To the non-local theory of cold nuclear fusion

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Boris V.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit the cold fusion (CF) phenomenon using the generalized Bolzmann kinetics theory which can represent the non-local physics of this CF phenomenon. This approach can identify the conditions when the CF can take place as the soliton creation under the influence of the intensive sound waves. The vast mathematical modelling leads to affirmation that all parts of soliton move with the same velocity and with the small internal change of the pressure. The zone of the high density is shaped on the soliton's front. It means that the regime of the ‘acoustic CF’ could be realized from the position of the non-local hydrodynamics. PMID:26064528

  12. Nuclear Import of the Retrotransposon Tf1 Is Governed by a Nuclear Localization Signal That Possesses a Unique Requirement for the FXFG Nuclear Pore Factor Nup124p

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Van-Dinh; Levin, Henry L.

    2000-01-01

    Retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus, that infect nondividing cells generate integration precursors that must cross the nuclear envelope to reach the host genome. As a model for retroviruses, we investigated the nuclear entry of Tf1, a long-terminal-repeat-containing retrotransposon of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Because the nuclear envelope of yeasts remains intact throughout the cell cycle, components of Tf1 must be transported through the envelope before integration can occur. The nuclear localization of the Gag protein of Tf1 is different from that of other proteins tested in that it has a specific requirement for the FXFG nuclear pore factor, Nup124p. Using extensive mutagenesis, we found that Gag contained three nuclear localization signals (NLSs) which, when included individually in a heterologous protein, were sufficient to direct nuclear import. In the context of the intact transposon, mutations in the NLS that mapped to the first 10 amino acid residues of Gag significantly impaired Tf1 retrotransposition and abolished nuclear localization of Gag. Interestingly, this NLS activity in the heterologous protein was specifically dependent upon the presence of Nup124p. Deletion analysis of heterologous proteins revealed the surprising result that the residues in Gag with the NLS activity were independent from the residues that conveyed the requirement for Nup124p. In fact, a fragment of Gag that lacked NLS activity, residues 10 to 30, when fused to a heterologous protein, was sufficient to cause the classical NLS of simian virus 40 to require Nup124p for nuclear import. Within the context of the current understanding of nuclear import, these results represent the novel case of a short amino acid sequence that specifies the need for a particular nuclear pore complex protein. PMID:11003674

  13. Altered Subcellular Localization of Tumor-Specific Cyclin E Isoforms Affects Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Complex Formation and Proteasomal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delk, Nikki A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2009-01-01

    In tumors, alternative translation and posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of full-length cyclin E (EL) produces tumorigenic low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms that lack a portion of the EL amino-terminus containing a nuclear localization sequence. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMW-E isoforms have altered subcellular localization. To explore our hypothesis, we compared EL versus LMW-E localization in cell lysates and in vivo using fractionation and protein complementation assays. Our results reveal that LMW-E isoforms preferentially accumulate in the cytoplasm where they bind the cyclin E kinase partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), and have associated kinase activity. The nuclear ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 targets Cdk2-bound cyclin E for degradation; thus, we examined if altered subcellular localization affected LMW-E degradation. We found that cytoplasmic LMW-E/Cdk2 was less susceptible to Fbw7-mediated degradation. One implication of our findings is that altered LMW-E and LMW-E/Cdk2 subcellular localization may lead to aberrant LMW-E protein interactions, regulation, and activity, ultimately contributing to LMW-E tumorigenicity. PMID:19318554

  14. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  15. Chromatin binding of RCC1 during mitosis is important for its nuclear localization in interphase.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Maiko; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-15

    RCC1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the small GTPase Ran, plays various roles throughout the cell cycle. However, the functions of RCC1 in biological processes in vivo are still unclear. In particular, although RCC1 has multifunctional domains, the biological significance of each domain is unclear. To examine each domain of RCC1, we established an RCC1 conditional knockout chicken DT40 cell line and introduced various RCC1 mutants into the knockout cells. We found that nuclear reformation did not occur properly in RCC1-deficient cells and examined whether specific RCC1 mutants could rescue this phenotype. Surprisingly, we found that neither the nuclear localization signal nor the chromatin-binding domain of RCC1 is essential for its function. However, codisruption of these domains resulted in defective nuclear reformation, which was rescued by artificial nuclear localization of RCC1. Our data indicate that chromatin association of RCC1 during mitosis is crucial for its proper nuclear localization in the next interphase. Moreover, proper nuclear localization of RCC1 in interphase is essential for its function through its nucleotide exchange activity. PMID:26564799

  16. A conformational change in PBX1A is necessary for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Huang, H; Green, N C; Featherstone, M S

    2000-10-10

    The fly homeodomain (HD) protein EXTRADENTICLE (EXD) is dependent on a second HD protein, HOMOTHORAX (HTH), for nuclear localization. We show here that in insect cells the mammalian homolog of EXD, PBX1A, shows a similar dependence on the HTH homologs MEIS1, 2, and 3 and the MEIS-like protein PREP1. Paradoxically, removal of residues N-terminal to the PBX1A HD abolishes interactions with MEIS/PREP but allows nuclear accumulation of PBX1A. We use deletion mapping and fusion to green fluorescent protein to map two cooperative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in the PBX HD. The results of DNA-binding assays and pull-down experiments are consistent with a model whereby the PBX N-terminus binds to the HD and masks the two NLSs. In support of the model, a mutation in the PBX HD that disrupts contact with the N-terminus leads to constitutive nuclear localization. The HD mutation also increases sensitivity to protease digestion, consistent with a change in conformation. We propose that MEIS family proteins induce a conformational change in PBX that unmasks the NLS, leading to nuclear localization and increased DNA-binding activity. Consistent with this, PBX1 is nuclear only where Meis1 is expressed in the mouse limb bud. PMID:11010815

  17. Chromatin binding of RCC1 during mitosis is important for its nuclear localization in interphase

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Maiko; Hori, Tetsuya; Fukagawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    RCC1, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor of the small GTPase Ran, plays various roles throughout the cell cycle. However, the functions of RCC1 in biological processes in vivo are still unclear. In particular, although RCC1 has multifunctional domains, the biological significance of each domain is unclear. To examine each domain of RCC1, we established an RCC1 conditional knockout chicken DT40 cell line and introduced various RCC1 mutants into the knockout cells. We found that nuclear reformation did not occur properly in RCC1-deficient cells and examined whether specific RCC1 mutants could rescue this phenotype. Surprisingly, we found that neither the nuclear localization signal nor the chromatin-binding domain of RCC1 is essential for its function. However, codisruption of these domains resulted in defective nuclear reformation, which was rescued by artificial nuclear localization of RCC1. Our data indicate that chromatin association of RCC1 during mitosis is crucial for its proper nuclear localization in the next interphase. Moreover, proper nuclear localization of RCC1 in interphase is essential for its function through its nucleotide exchange activity. PMID:26564799

  18. The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 transactivator and repressor proteins use different nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Skiadopoulos, M H; McBride, A A

    1996-02-01

    The E2 gene of bovine papillomavirus type 1 encodes at least three nuclear phosphoproteins that regulate viral transcription and DNA replication. All three proteins have a common C-terminal domain that has DNA-binding and dimerization activities. A basic region in this domain forms an alpha helix which makes direct contact with the DNA target. In this study, it is shown that in addition to its role in DNA binding, this basic region functions as a nuclear localization signal both in the E2 DNA-binding domain and in a heterologous protein. Deletion of this signal sequence resulted in increased accumulation of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins in the cytoplasm, but nuclear localization was not eliminated. In the full-length transactivator protein, another signal, present in the N-terminal transactivation domain, is used for transport to the nucleus, and the C-terminal nuclear localization signal(s) are masked. The use of different nuclear localization signals could potentially allow differential regulation of the subcellular localization of the E2 transactivator and repressor proteins at some stage in the viral life cycle. PMID:8551571

  19. Local and regional factors affecting atmospheric mercury speciation at a remote location

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manolopoulos, H.; Schauer, J.J.; Purcell, M.D.; Rudolph, T.M.; Olson, M.L.; Rodger, B.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of elemental (Hg0), reactive gaseous (RGM), and particulate (PHg) mercury were measured at two remote sites in the midwestern United States. Concurrent measurements of Hg0, PHg, and RGM obtained at Devil's Lake and Mt. Horeb, located approximately 65 km apart, showed that Hg0 and PHg concentrations were affected by regional, as well as local sources, while RGM was mainly impacted by local sources. Plumes reaching the Devil's Lake site from a nearby coal-fired power plant significantly impacted SO2 and RGM concentrations at Devil's Lake, but had little impact on Hg0. Our findings suggest that traditional modeling approaches to assess sources of mercury deposited that utilize source emissions and large-scale grids may not be sufficient to predict mercury deposition at sensitive locations due to the importance of small-scale sources and processes. We suggest the use of a receptor-based monitoring to better understand mercury source-receptor relationships. ?? 2007 NRC Canada.

  20. Do the Concentration and Volume of Local Anesthetics Affect the Onset and Success of Infraclavicular Anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Mosaffa, Faramarz; Gharaei, Babak; Qoreishi, Mohammad; Razavi, Sajjad; Safari, Farhad; Fathi, Mohammad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Elyasi, Hedayatollah; Hosseini, Fahimeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although local anesthesia is a suitable method for upper limb surgeries, there is debate regarding the effects of appropriate dosing. Objectives: In the current study, we investigated the effects of the concentration and volume of a local anesthetic on the beginning and quality of anesthesia during upper limb orthopedic surgeries. Patients and Methods: This double-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients aged between 18 and 85 years candidated for upper limb orthopedic operations. The patients were equally and randomly distributed into two groups (n = 30). Under ultrasound imaging guidance, the first group received 7 mL of 2% lidocaine and the second group 10 mL of 1.3% lidocaine into the brachial plexus cords. The onset of block and the level of sensory and motor block were documented for each nerve territory. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly shorter in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group (P ≤ 0.05). The success rate of sensory and motor block was not different. The quality (completeness) of sensory block for the musculocutaneous nerve and that of motor block for the radial nerve were significantly better in the 1.3% lidocaine group than in the 2% lidocaine group. Conclusions: The volume of the injected anesthetic accelerated the onset of sensory and motor block without affecting the rate of success in our patients. PMID:26473102

  1. Polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the localization and signaling of PIP3/AKT in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhennan; Wu, Jiansheng; Wang, Shihua; Suburu, Janel; Chen, Haiqin; Thomas, Michael J; Shi, Lihong; Edwards, Iris J; Berquin, Isabelle M; Chen, Yong Q

    2013-09-01

    AKT is a serine-threonine protein kinase that plays important roles in cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis. It is activated after binding to phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs) with phosphate groups at positions 3,4 and 3,4,5 on the inositol ring. In spite of extensive research on AKT, one aspect has been largely overlooked, namely the role of the fatty acid chains on PIPs. PIPs are phospholipids composed of a glycerol backbone with fatty acids at the sn-1 and sn-2 position and inositol at the sn-3 position. Here, we show that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) modify phospholipid content. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an ω3 PUFA, can replace the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone, thereby changing the species of phospholipids. DHA also inhibits AKT(T308) but not AKT(S473) phosphorylation, alters PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) and phospho-AKT(S473) protein localization, decreases pPDPK1(S241)-AKT and AKT-BAD interaction and suppresses prostate tumor growth. Our study highlights a potential novel mechanism of cancer inhibition by ω3 PUFA through alteration of PIP3 and AKT localization and affecting the AKT signaling pathway. PMID:23633519

  2. Local divergence of thermal reaction norms among amphibian populations is affected by pond temperature variation.

    PubMed

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Katzenberger, Marco; Duarte, Helder; Quintela, María; Tejedo, Miguel; Laurila, Anssi

    2015-08-01

    Although temperature variation is known to cause large-scale adaptive divergence, its potential role as a selective factor over microgeographic scales is less well-understood. Here, we investigated how variation in breeding pond temperature affects divergence in multiple physiological (thermal performance curve and critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) and life-history (thermal developmental reaction norms) traits in a network of Rana arvalis populations. The results supported adaptive responses to face two main constraints limiting the evolution of thermal adaptation. First, we found support for the faster-slower model, indicating an adaptive response to compensate for the thermodynamic constraint of low temperatures in colder environments. Second, we found evidence for the generalist-specialist trade-off with populations from colder and less thermally variable environments exhibiting a specialist phenotype performing at higher rates but over a narrower range of temperatures. By contrast, the local optimal temperature for locomotor performance and CTmax did not match either mean or maximum pond temperatures. These results highlight the complexity of the adaptive multiple-trait thermal responses in natural populations, and the role of local thermal variation as a selective force driving diversity in life-history and physiological traits in the presence of gene flow. PMID:26118477

  3. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  4. Local Navon letter processing affects skilled behavior: a golf-putting experiment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael B; Dawkins, Gemma

    2015-04-01

    Expert or skilled behaviors (for example, face recognition or sporting performance) are typically performed automatically and with little conscious awareness. Previous studies, in various domains of performance, have shown that activities immediately prior to a task demanding a learned skill can affect performance. In sport, describing the to-be-performed action is detrimental, whereas in face recognition, describing a face or reading local Navon letters is detrimental. Two golf-putting experiments are presented that compare the effects that these three tasks have on experienced and novice golfers. Experiment 1 found a Navon effect on golf performance for experienced players. Experiment 2 found, for experienced players only, that performance was impaired following the three tasks described above, when compared with reading or global Navon tasks. It is suggested that the three tasks affect skilled performance by provoking a shift from automatic behavior to a more analytic style. By demonstrating similarities between effects in face recognition and sporting behavior, it is hoped to better understand concepts in both fields. PMID:25102927

  5. Interfering with the connection between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton affects nuclear rotation, mechanotransduction and myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brosig, Michaela; Ferralli, Jacqueline; Gelman, Laurent; Chiquet, Matthias; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical stress controls a broad range of cellular functions. The cytoskeleton is physically connected to the extracellular matrix via integrin receptors, and to the nuclear lamina by the LINC complex that spans both nuclear membranes. We asked here how disruption of this direct link from the cytoskeleton to nuclear chromatin affects mechanotransduction. Fibroblasts grown on flexible silicone membranes reacted to cyclic stretch by nuclear rotation. This rotation was abolished by inhibition of actomyosin contraction as well as by overexpression of dominant-negative versions of nesprin or sun proteins that form the LINC complex. In an in vitro model of muscle differentiation, cyclic strain inhibits differentiation and induces proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts. Interference with the LINC complex in these cells abrogated their stretch-induced proliferation, while stretch increased p38 MAPK and NFkappaB phosphorylation and the transcript levels of myogenic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin. We found that the physical link from the cytoskeleton to the nuclear lamina is crucial for correct mechanotransduction, and that disruption of the LINC complex perturbs the mechanical control of cell differentiation. PMID:20621196

  6. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spatial localization in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2006-08-01

    The ability to select a discrete region within the body for signal acquisition is a fundamental requirement of in vivo NMR spectroscopy. Ideally, it should be possible to tailor the selected volume to coincide exactly with the lesion or tissue of interest, without loss of signal from within this volume or contamination with extraneous signals. Many techniques have been developed over the past 25 years employing a combination of RF coil properties, static magnetic field gradients and pulse sequence design in an attempt to meet these goals. This review presents a comprehensive survey of these techniques, their various advantages and disadvantages, and implications for clinical applications. Particular emphasis is placed on the reliability of the techniques in terms of signal loss, contamination and the effect of nuclear relaxation and J-coupling. The survey includes techniques based on RF coil and pulse design alone, those using static magnetic field gradients, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Although there is an emphasis on techniques currently in widespread use (PRESS, STEAM, ISIS and MRSI), the review also includes earlier techniques, in order to provide historical context, and techniques that are promising for future use in clinical and biomedical applications.

  7. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  8. Identification of the nuclear localization and export signals of high risk HPV16 E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Alixandra A.; McManus, Patrick M.; Bockstall, Katy; Moroianu, Junona

    2009-01-05

    The E7 oncoprotein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) binds and inactivates the retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins. Our previous studies suggested that HPV16 E7 enters the nucleus via a novel Ran-dependent pathway independent of the nuclear import receptors (Angeline, M., Merle, E., and Moroianu, J. (2003). The E7 oncoprotein of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16 enters the nucleus via a nonclassical Ran-dependent pathway. Virology 317(1), 13-23.). Here, analysis of the localization of specific E7 mutants revealed that the nuclear localization of E7 is independent of its interaction with pRB or of its phosphorylation by CKII. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and 2xEGFP fusions with E7 and E7 domains in HeLa cells revealed that E7 contains a novel nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the N-terminal domain (aa 1-37). Interestingly, treatment of transfected HeLa cells with two specific nuclear export inhibitors, Leptomycin B and ratjadone, changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear. These data suggest the presence of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) and a second NLS in the C-terminal domain of E7 (aa 38-98). Mutagenesis of critical amino acids in the putative NES sequence ({sub 76}IRTLEDLLM{sub 84}) changed the localization of 2xEGFP-E7{sub 38-98} from cytoplasmic to mostly nuclear suggesting that this is a functional NES. The presence of both NLSs and an NES suggests that HPV16 E7 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus which is consistent with E7 having functions in both of these cell compartments.

  9. Nuclear localization of DMP1 proteins suggests a role in intracellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Siyam, Arwa; Wang, Suzhen; Qin, Chunlin; Mues, Gabriele; Stevens, Roy; D'Souza, Rena N.; Lu, Yongbo

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of DMP1 in various cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-synchronized cells show either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of DMP1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear DMP1 is restricted to the nucleoplasm but absent in the nucleolus. -- Abstract: Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is highly expressed in odontoblasts and osteoblasts/osteocytes and plays an essential role in tooth and bone mineralization and phosphate homeostasis. It is debatable whether DMP1, in addition to its function in the extracellular matrix, can enter the nucleus and function as a transcription factor. To better understand its function, we examined the nuclear localization of endogenous and exogenous DMP1 in C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal cells, MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and 17IIA11 odontoblast-like cells. RT-PCR analyses showed the expression of endogenous Dmp1 in all three cell lines, while Western-blot analysis detected a major DMP1 protein band corresponding to the 57 kDa C-terminal fragment generated by proteolytic processing of the secreted full-length DMP1. Immunofluorescent staining demonstrated that non-synchronized cells presented two subpopulations with either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of endogenous DMP1. In addition, cells transfected with a construct expressing HA-tagged full-length DMP1 also showed either nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of the exogenous DMP1 when examined with an antibody against the HA tag. Furthermore, nuclear DMP1 was restricted to the nucleoplasm but was absent in the nucleolus. In conclusion, these findings suggest that, apart from its role as a constituent of dentin and bone matrix, DMP1 might play a regulatory role in the nucleus.

  10. Functional and structural basis of the nuclear localization signal in the ZIC3 zinc finger domain

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Minoru; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Aruga, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Disruptions in ZIC3 cause heterotaxy, a congenital anomaly of the left–right axis. ZIC3 encodes a nuclear protein with a zinc finger (ZF) domain that contains five tandem C2H2 ZF motifs. Missense mutations in the first ZF motif (ZF1) result in defective nuclear localization, which may underlie the pathogenesis of heterotaxy. Here we revealed the structural and functional basis of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of ZIC3 and investigated its relationship to the defect caused by ZF1 mutation. The ZIC3 NLS was located in the ZF2 and ZF3 regions, rather than ZF1. Several basic residues interspersed throughout these regions were responsible for the nuclear localization, but R320, K337 and R350 were particularly important. NMR structure analysis revealed that ZF1–4 had a similar structure to GLI ZF, and the basic side chains of the NLS clustered together in two regions on the protein surface, similar to classical bipartite NLSs. Among the residues for the ZF1 mutations, C253 and H286 were positioned for the metal chelation, whereas W255 was positioned in the hydrophobic core formed by ZF1 and ZF2. Tryptophan 255 was a highly conserved inter-finger connector and formed part of a structural motif (tandem CXW-C-H-H) that is shared with GLI, Glis and some fungal ZF proteins. Furthermore, we found that knockdown of Karyopherin α1/α6 impaired ZIC3 nuclear localization, and physical interactions between the NLS and the nuclear import adapter proteins were disturbed by mutations in the NLS but not by W255G. These results indicate that ZIC3 is imported into the cell nucleus by the Karyopherin (Importin) system and that the impaired nuclear localization by the ZF1 mutation is not due to a direct influence on the NLS. PMID:18716025

  11. Characterization of a beta-catenin nuclear localization defect in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Cara; Mills, Kate M; Lui, Christina; Semaan, Crystal; Molloy, Mark P; Sharma, Manisha; Forwood, Jade K; Henderson, Beric R

    2016-02-15

    Beta-catenin plays a key role in transducing Wnt signals from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Here we characterize an unusual subcellular distribution of beta-catenin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, wherein beta-catenin localizes to the cytoplasm and membrane but atypically did not relocate to the nucleus after Wnt treatment. The inability of Wnt or the Wnt agonist LiCl to induce nuclear localization of beta-catenin was not due to defective nuclear transport, as the transport machinery was intact and ectopic GFP-beta-catenin displayed rapid nuclear entry in living cells. The mislocalization is explained by a shift in the retention of beta-catenin from nucleus to cytoplasm. The reduced nuclear retention is caused by unusually low expression of lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) transcription factors. The reconstitution of LEF-1 or TCF4 expression rescued nuclear localization of beta-catenin in Wnt treated cells. In the cytoplasm, beta-catenin accumulated in recycling endosomes, golgi and beta-COP-positive coatomer complexes. The peripheral association with endosomes diminished after Wnt treatment, potentially releasing β-catenin into the cytoplasm for nuclear entry. We propose that in MCF-7 and perhaps other breast cancer cells, beta-catenin may contribute to cytoplasmic functions such as ER-golgi transport, in addition to its transactivation role in the nucleus. PMID:26844628

  12. Prostaglandins regulate nuclear localization of Fascin and its function in nucleolar architecture

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Christopher M.; Jayo, Asier; Parsons, Maddy; Tootle, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Fascin, a highly conserved actin-bundling protein, localizes and functions at new cellular sites in both Drosophila and multiple mammalian cell types. During Drosophila follicle development, in addition to being cytoplasmic, Fascin is in the nuclei of the germline-derived nurse cells during stages 10B–12 (S10B–12) and at the nuclear periphery during stage 13 (S13). This localization is specific to Fascin, as other actin-binding proteins, Villin and Profilin, do not exhibit the same subcellular distribution. In addition, localization of fascin1 to the nucleus and nuclear periphery is observed in multiple mammalian cell types. Thus the regulation and function of Fascin at these new cellular locations is likely to be highly conserved. In Drosophila, loss of prostaglandin signaling causes a global reduction in nuclear Fascin and a failure to relocalize to the nuclear periphery. Alterations in nuclear Fascin levels result in defects in nucleolar morphology in both Drosophila follicles and cultured mammalian cells, suggesting that nuclear Fascin plays an important role in nucleolar architecture. Given the numerous roles of Fascin in development and disease, including cancer, our novel finding that Fascin has functions within the nucleus sheds new light on the potential roles of Fascin in these contexts. PMID:25808493

  13. Optical pump-probe measurements of local nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Sanada, H; Kondo, Y; Matsuzaka, S; Morita, K; Hu, C Y; Ohno, Y; Ohno, H

    2006-02-17

    We demonstrate local manipulation and detection of nuclear spin coherence in semiconductor quantum wells by an optical pump-probe technique combined with pulse rf NMR. The Larmor precession of photoexcited electron spins is monitored by time-resolved Kerr rotation (TRKR) as a measure of nuclear magnetic field. Under the irradiation of resonant pulsed rf magnetic fields, Rabi oscillations of nuclear spins are traced by TRKR signals. The intrinsic coherence time evaluated by a spin-echo technique reveals the dependence on the orientation of the magnetic field with respect to the crystalline axis as expected by the nearest neighbor dipole-dipole interaction. PMID:16606048

  14. Atypical nuclear localization of CD133 plasma membrane glycoprotein in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nunukova, Alena; Neradil, Jakub; Skoda, Jan; Jaros, Josef; Hampl, Ales; Sterba, Jaroslav; Veselska, Renata

    2015-07-01

    CD133 (also known as prominin-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that is widely used for the identification of stem cells. Furthermore, its glycosylated epitope, AC133, has recently been discussed as a marker of cancer stem cells in various human malignancies. During our recent experiments on rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS), we unexpectedly identified an atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a relatively stable subset of cells in five RMS cell lines established in our laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, this atypical localization of CD133 has not yet been proven or analyzed in detail in cancer cells. In the present study, we verified the nuclear localization of CD133 in RMS cells using three independent anti-CD133 antibodies, including both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy followed by software cross-section analysis, transmission electron microscopy and cell fractionation with immunoblotting were also employed, and all the results undeniably confirmed the presence of CD133 in the nuclei of stable minor subpopulations of all five RMS cell lines. The proportion of cells showing an exclusive nuclear localization of CD133 ranged from 3.4 to 7.5%, with only minor differences observed among the individual anti-CD133 antibodies. Although the role of CD133 in the cell nucleus remains unclear, these results clearly indicate that this atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a minor subpopulation of cancer cells is a common phenomenon in RMS cell lines. PMID:25977066

  15. Phylogenetic isolation of host trees affects assembly of local Heteroptera communities

    PubMed Central

    Vialatte, A.; Bailey, R. I.; Vasseur, C.; Matocq, A.; Gossner, M. M.; Everhart, D.; Vitrac, X.; Belhadj, A.; Ernoult, A.; Prinzing, A.

    2010-01-01

    A host may be physically isolated in space and then may correspond to a geographical island, but it may also be separated from its local neighbours by hundreds of millions of years of evolutionary history, and may form in this case an evolutionarily distinct island. We test how this affects the assembly processes of the host's colonizers, this question being until now only invoked at the scale of physically distinct islands or patches. We studied the assembly of true bugs in crowns of oaks surrounded by phylogenetically more or less closely related trees. Despite the short distances (less than 150 m) between phylogenetically isolated and non-isolated trees, we found major differences between their Heteroptera faunas. We show that phylogenetically isolated trees support smaller numbers and fewer species of Heteroptera, an increasing proportion of phytophages and a decreasing proportion of omnivores, and proportionally more non-host-specialists. These differences were not due to changes in the nutritional quality of the trees, i.e. species sorting, which we accounted for. Comparison with predictions from meta-community theories suggests that the assembly of local Heteroptera communities may be strongly driven by independent metapopulation processes at the level of the individual species. We conclude that the assembly of communities on hosts separated from their neighbours by long periods of evolutionary history is qualitatively and quantitatively different from that on hosts established surrounded by closely related trees. Potentially, the biotic selection pressure on a host might thus change with the evolutionary proximity of the surrounding hosts. PMID:20335208

  16. Localized β-adrenergic receptor blockade does not affect sweating during exercise.

    PubMed

    Buono, Michael J; Tabor, Brian; White, Ailish

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of a locally administered nonselective β-adrenergic antagonist on sweat gland function during exercise. Systemically administered propranolol has been reported to increase, decrease, or not alter sweat production during exercise. To eliminate the confounding systemic effects associated with orally administered propranolol, we used iontophoresis to deliver it to the eccrine sweat glands within a localized area on one forearm prior to exercise. This allowed for determination of the direct effect of β-adrenergic receptor blockade on sweating during exercise. Subjects (n = 14) reported to the laboratory (23 ± 1°C, 35 ± 3% relative humidity) after having refrained from exercise for ≥12 h. Propranolol (1% solution) was administered to a 5-cm(2) area of the flexor surface of one forearm via iontophoresis (1.5 mA) for 5 min. A saline solution was administered to the opposing arm via iontophoresis. Each subject then exercised on a motor-driven treadmill at 75% of their age-predicted maximal heart rate for 20 min, while sweat rate was measured simultaneously in both forearms. Immediately after cessation of exercise, the number of active sweat glands was measured by application of iodine-impregnated paper to each forearm. The sweat rate for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 0.62 ± 41 and 0.60 ± 0.44 (SD) mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively (P = 0.86). The density of active sweat glands for the control and propranolol-treated forearm was 130 ± 6 and 134 ± 5 (SD) glands/cm(2), respectively, (P = 0.33). End-exercise skin temperature was 32.9 ± 0.2 and 33.1 ± 0.3°C for the control and propranolol-treated forearm, respectively (P = 0.51). Results of the current study show that when propranolol is administered locally, thus eliminating the potential confounding systemic effects of the drug, it does not directly affect sweating during the initial stages of high-intensity exercise in young, healthy

  17. Genetic analysis of polyomavirus large T nuclear localization: nuclear localization is required for productive association with pRb family members.

    PubMed Central

    Howes, S H; Bockus, B J; Schaffhausen, B S

    1996-01-01

    Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) is a multifunctional nuclear protein. LT has two nuclear localization signals (NLS2), one spanning residues 189 to 195 (NLS1) and another spanning residues 280 to 286 (NLS2). Site-directed mutagenesis showed that each signal contains at least two critical residues. The possibility of connections between NLSs and adjacent phosphorylations has attracted much attention. Cytoplasmic LT (CyT) mutants were underphosphorylated, particularly at sites adjacent to NLS2. However, since a nuclear LT bearing an inactivated NLS2 was phosphorylated normally at adjacent sites, the signal was not directly required for phosphorylation. Conversely, LT could be translocated to the nucleus via NLS2 even when the adjacent phosphorylation sites were deleted. CyT was examined to probe the importance of LT localization. CyT was unable to perform LT functions related to interactions with retinoblastoma susceptibility gene (pRb) family members. Hence, CyT was unable to immortalize primary cells or to transactivate an E2F-responsive promoter. Consistent with these findings, CyT, though capable of binding pRb in vitro, did not cause relocalization of pRb in cells. Assays of transactivation of the simian virus 40 late promoter and of the human c-fos promoter showed that defects of CyT were not limited to functions dependent on pRb interactions. PMID:8648692

  18. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  19. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akorli, Jewelna; Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K; Wilson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  20. Floral resources and habitat affect the composition of hummingbirds at the local scale in tropical mountaintops.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L C; Rodrigues, M

    2015-01-01

    Hummingbird communities tend to respond to variation in resources, having a positive relationship between abundance and diversity of food resources and the abundance and/or diversity of hummingbirds. Here we examined the influence of floral resource availability, as well as seasonality and type of habitat on the composition of hummingbird species. The study was carried out in two habitats of eastern Brazilian mountaintops. A gradient representative of the structure of hummingbird community, based on species composition, was obtained by the ordination of samples using the method of non-metric multidimensional scaling. The composition of hummingbird species was influenced by the type of habitat and floral resource availability, but not by seasonality. Hummingbird communities differ between habitats mainly due to the relative abundance of hummingbird species. The variation in composition of hummingbird species with the variation in floral resource availability may be related to differences in feeding habits of hummingbirds. Hummingbird species with the longest bills visited higher proportions of ornithophilous species, while hummingbirds with shorter bills visited higher proportions of non-ornithophilous species. The results demonstrate that at local-scale the composition of hummingbird species is affected by the type of habitat and floral resources availability, but not by seasonality. PMID:25945619

  1. Cytogenetic and molecular localization of tipE: A gene affecting sodium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, G.; Deak, P.; Hall, L.M.

    1995-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive sodium channels play a key role in nerve cells where they are responsible for the increase in sodium permeability during the rising phase of action potentials. In Drosophila melanogaster a subset of temperature-sensitive paralytic mutations affect sodium channel function. One such mutation is temperature-induced paralysis locus E (tipE), which has been shown by electrophysiology and ligand binding studies to reduce sodium channel numbers. Three new {gamma}-ray-induced tipE alleles associated with either visible deletions in 64AB or a translocation breakpoint within 64B2 provide landmarks for positional cloning of tipE. Beginning with the flanking cloned gene Ras2, a 140-kb walk across the translocation breakpoint was completed. Germline transformation using a 42-kb cosmid clone and successively smaller subclones localized the tipE gene within a 7.4-kb genomic DNA segment. Although this chromosome region is rich in transcripts, only three overlapping mRNAs (5.4, 4.4, and 1.7 kb) lie completely within the smallest rescuing construct. The small sizes of the rescuing construct and transcripts suggests that tipE does not encode a standard sodium channel {alpha}-subunit with four homologous repeats. Sequencing these transcripts will elucidate the role of the tipE gene product in sodium channel functional regulation. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 protein IE63 affects the nuclear export of virus intron-containing transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, A; Dunlop, J; Clements, J B

    1996-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization labelling methods, we have determined that the herpes simplex virus type 1 immediate-early protein IE63 (ICP27) affects the cellular localization of virus transcripts. Intronless transcripts from the IE63, UL38, and UL44 genes are rapidly exported to and accumulate in the cytoplasm throughout infection, in either the presence or absence of IE63 expression. The intron-containing transcripts from the IE110 and UL15 genes, while initially cytoplasmic, are increasingly retained in the nucleus in distinct clumps as infection proceeds, and the clumps colocalize with the redistributed small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles. Infections with the IE63 mutant virus 27-lacZ demonstrated that in the absence of IE63 expression, nuclear retention of intron-containing transcripts was lost. The nuclear retention of UL15 transcripts, which demonstrated both nuclear and cytoplasmic label, was not as pronounced as that of the IE110 transcripts, and we propose that this is due to the late expression of UL15. Infections with the mutant virus 110C1, in which both introns of IE110 have been precisely removed (R.D. Everett, J. Gen. Virol. 72:651-659, 1991), demonstrated IE110 transcripts in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm; thus, exon definition sequences which regulate viral RNA transport are present in the IE110 transcript. By in situ hybridization a stable population of polyadenylated RNAs was found to accumulate in the nucleus in spots, most of which were separate from the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle clumps. The IE63 protein has an involvement, either direct or indirect, in the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic transport of viral transcripts, a function which contrasts with the recently proposed role of herpes simplex virus type 1 Us11 in promoting the nuclear export of partially spliced or unspliced transcripts (J.-J. Diaz, M. Duc Dodon, N. Schaerer-Uthurraly, D. Simonin, K. Kindbeiter, L. Gazzolo, and J.-J. Madjar, Nature [London] 379

  3. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal within the human USP22 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Jianjun; Wang, Yaqin; Gong, Zhen; Liu, Jianyun; Li, Weidong

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • USP22 was accumulated in nucleus. • We identified of a functional USP22 NLS. • The KRRK amino acid residues are indispensable in NLS. • The KRRK motif is conserved in USP22 homologues. - Abstract: Ubiquitin-specific processing enzyme 22 (USP22), a member of the deubiquitinase family, is over-expressed in most human cancers and has been implicated in tumorigenesis. Because it is an enzymatic subunit of the human SAGA transcriptional cofactor, USP22 deubiquitylates histone H2A and H2B in the nucleus, thus participating in gene regulation and cell-cycle progression. However, the mechanisms regulating its nuclear translocation have not yet been elucidated. It was here demonstrated that USP22 is imported into the nucleus through a mechanism mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS). The bipartite NLS sequence KRELELLKHNPKRRKIT (aa152–168), was identified as the functional NLS for its nuclear localization. Furthermore, a short cluster of basic amino acid residues KRRK within this bipartite NLS plays the primary role in nuclear localization and is evolutionarily conserved in USP22 homologues. In the present study, a functional NLS and the minimal sequences required for the active targeting of USP22 to the nucleus were identified. These findings may provide a molecular basis for the mechanism underlying USP22 nuclear trafficking and function.

  4. Nuclear localization of Formyl-Peptide Receptor 2 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Fioretti, Tiziana; Sarnataro, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Ammendola, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    Current models of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signaling describe binding of external agonists to cell surface receptors which, in turn, trigger several biological responses. New paradigms indicate that GPCRs localize to and signal at the nucleus, thus regulating distinct signaling cascades. The formyl-peptide receptor FPR2 belongs to the GPCR super-family and is coupled to PTX-sensitive Gi proteins. We show by western blot analysis, immunofluorescence experiments and radioligand binding assays that FPR2 is expressed at nuclear level in CaLu-6 and AGS cells. Nuclear FPR2 is a functional receptor, since it participates in intra-nuclear signaling, as assessed by decreased G protein-FPR2 association and enhanced ERK2, c-Jun and c-Myc phosphorylation upon stimulation of intact nuclei with the FPR2 agonist, WKYMVm. We analyzed FPR2 sequence for the search of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and we found a stretch of basic aminoacids (227-KIHKK-231) in the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor. We performed single (K230A) and multiple (H229A/K230A/K231A) mutagenesis of NLS. The constructs were individually overexpressed in HEK293 cells and immunofluorescence and western blot analysis showed that nuclear localization or translocation of FPR2 depends on the integrity of the H(229) and K(231) residues within the NLS. PMID:27177968

  5. Living with nuclear power: A Q-method study of local community perceptions.

    PubMed

    Venables, Dan; Pidgeon, Nick; Simmons, Peter; Henwood, Karen; Parkhill, Karen

    2009-08-01

    The issue of new nuclear power is once again high up on the public policy agenda in many countries, and candidate sites for new civilian stations are likely to include those that have existing nuclear facilities. A common assumption is that existing nuclear communities will be more accepting of new build because of the direct economic and other benefits nuclear power already makes to a local area. Surprisingly, there is a dearth of contemporary data on perceptions of the risks, benefits, and values associated with nuclear power within such communities. This study uses Q-methodology to investigate the perspectives on living with nuclear risk among people (n = 84) drawn from communities near to two nuclear power stations in the United Kingdom. Both stations, at Bradwell-on-Sea and Oldbury-on-Severn, had been in operation for over 40 years. The Q-analysis identified four main perspectives, or points of view, accounting for 53% of total variance. These were interpreted as: Beneficial and Safe; Threat and Distrust; Reluctant Acceptance; and There's No Point Worrying. We conclude that the "landscape of beliefs" about nuclear power in such communities is both subtle and complex, avoiding simplistic bipolar dichotomies such as "for" or "against," and that there is a need for extensive and meaningful dialogue with such communities over any new build plans. The usefulness of Q-methodology for investigating the ways in which people live with risk is highlighted, as are the implications of the results for theories of risk and trust. PMID:19619217

  6. Implications for proteasome nuclear localization revealed by the structure of the nuclear proteasome tether protein Cut8

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Kojiro; Tonthat, Nam K.; Glover, Tiffany; Xu, Weijun; Koonin, Eugene V.; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Schumacher, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of nuclear proteins by the 26S proteasome is essential for cell viability. In yeast, the nuclear envelope protein Cut8 mediates nuclear proteasomal sequestration by an uncharacterized mechanism. Here we describe structures of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cut8, which shows that it contains a unique, modular fold composed of an extended N-terminal, lysine-rich segment that when ubiquitinated binds the proteasome, a dimer domain followed by a six-helix bundle connected to a flexible C tail. The Cut8 six-helix bundle shows structural similarity to 14-3-3 phosphoprotein-binding domains, and binding assays show that this domain is necessary and sufficient for liposome and cholesterol binding. Moreover, specific mutations in the 14-3-3 regions corresponding to putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus motifs abrogate cholesterol binding. In vivo studies confirmed that the 14-3-3 region is necessary for Cut8 membrane localization and that dimerization is critical for its function. Thus, the data reveal the Cut8 organization at the nuclear envelope. Reconstruction of Cut8 evolution suggests that it was present in the last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes and accordingly that nuclear proteasomal sequestration is an ancestral eukaryotic feature. The importance of Cut8 for cell viability and its absence in humans suggests it as a possible target for the development of specific chemotherapeutics against invasive fungal infections. PMID:21976488

  7. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  8. The Nuclear Family: Correspondence in Cognitive and Affective Reactions to the Threat of Nuclear War among Older Adolescents and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Scott B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    In order to assess the relationship between family members' cognitive and affective responses to nuclear war issues, 317 college students and their parents independently completed a multifaceted questionnaire that included items concerning personal reactions, predictions, opinions, and attitudes about nuclear war. (Author/LMO)

  9. Mechanisms of progesterone receptor export from nuclei: role of nuclear localization signal, nuclear export signal, and ran guanosine triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, R K; Amazit, L; Lescop, P; Milgrom, E; Guiochon-Mantel, A

    1998-11-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are, in most cases, mainly nuclear proteins that undergo a continuous nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The mechanism of the nuclear export of these proteins remains largely unknown. To approach this problem experimentally in vivo, we have prepared cell lines permanently coexpressing the wild-type nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) and a cytoplasmic receptor mutant deleted of its nuclear localization signal (NLS) [(deltaNLS)PR]. Each receptor species was deleted from the epitope recognized by a specific monoclonal antibody, thus allowing separated observation of the two receptor forms in the same cells. Administration of hormone provoked formation of heterodimers during nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and import of (deltaNLS)PR into the nucleus. Washing out of the hormone allowed us to follow the export of (deltaNLS)PR into the cytoplasm. Microinjection of BSA coupled to a NLS inhibited the export of (deltaNLS)PR. On the contrary, microinjection of BSA coupled to a nuclear export signal (NES) was without effect. Moreover, leptomycin B, which inhibits NES-mediated export, was also without effect. tsBN2 cells contain a thermosensitive RCC1 protein (Ran GTP exchange protein). At the nonpermissive temperature, the nuclear export of (deltaNLS)PR could be observed, whereas the export of NES-BSA was suppressed. Microinjection of GTPgammaS confirmed that the export of (deltaNLS)PR was not dependent on GTP hydrolysis. These experiments show that the nuclear export of PR is not NES mediated but probably involves the NLS. It does not involve Ran GTP, and it is not dependent on the hydrolysis of GTP. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of steroid hormone receptors thus appears to utilize mechanisms different from those previously described for some viral, regulatory, and heterogeneous ribonuclear proteins. PMID:9817595

  10. Nuclear import mechanism of neurofibromin for localization on the spindle and function in chromosome congression.

    PubMed

    Koliou, Xeni; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Kalpachidou, Theodora; Mangoura, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF-1) is caused by mutations in the tumor suppressor gene NF1; its protein product neurofibromin is a RasGTPase-activating protein, a property that has yet to explain aneuploidy, most often observed in astrocytes in NF-1. Here, we provide a mechanistic model for the regulated nuclear import of neurofibromin during the cell cycle and for a role in chromosome congression. Specifically, we demonstrate that neurofibromin, phosphorylated on Ser2808, a residue adjacent to a nuclear localization signal in the C-terminal domain (CTD), by Protein Kinase C-epsilon (PKC-ε), accumulates in a Ran-dependent manner and through binding to lamin in the nucleus at G2 in glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, we identify CTD as a tubulin-binding domain and show that a phosphomimetic substitution of its Ser2808 results in a predominantly nuclear localization. Confocal analysis shows that endogenous neurofibromin localizes on the centrosomes at interphase, as well as on the mitotic spindle, through direct associations with tubulins, in glioblastoma cells and primary astrocytes. More importantly, analysis of mitotic phenotypes after siRNA-mediated depletion shows that acute loss of this tumor suppressor protein leads to aberrant chromosome congression at the metaphase plate. Therefore, neurofibromin protein abundance and nuclear import are mechanistically linked to an error-free chromosome congression. Concerned with neurofibromin's, a tumor suppressor, mechanism of action, we demonstrate in astrocytic cells that its synthesis, phosphorylation by Protein Kinase C-ε on Ser2808 (a residue adjacent to a nuclear localization sequence), and nuclear import are cell cycle-dependent, being maximal at G2. During mitosis, neurofibromin is an integral part of the spindle, while its depletion leads to aberrant chromosome congression, possibly explaining the development of chromosomal instability in Neurofibromatosis type-1. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on page

  11. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  12. Oscillator strengths, first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for local ADC(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Schütz, Martin

    2015-06-07

    We describe theory and implementation of oscillator strengths, orbital-relaxed first-order properties, and nuclear gradients for the local algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order. The formalism is derived via time-dependent linear response theory based on a second-order unitary coupled cluster model. The implementation presented here is a modification of our previously developed algorithms for Laplace transform based local time-dependent coupled cluster linear response (CC2LR); the local approximations thus are state specific and adaptive. The symmetry of the Jacobian leads to considerable simplifications relative to the local CC2LR method; as a result, a gradient evaluation is about four times less expensive. Test calculations show that in geometry optimizations, usually very similar geometries are obtained as with the local CC2LR method (provided that a second-order method is applicable). As an exemplary application, we performed geometry optimizations on the low-lying singlet states of chlorophyllide a.

  13. Acetylation regulates subcellular localization of the Wnt signaling nuclear effector POP-1

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Frédérique; Calvo, Dominica; Lo, Miao-Chia; Ceron, Julian; Maduro, Morris; Lin, Rueyling; Shi, Yang

    2003-01-01

    Lymphoid enhancer factor/T-cell factor (LEF/TCF) are transcription factors that mediate the Wnt signaling pathway, and have crucial roles during embryonic development in various organisms. Here we report that acetylation enhances nuclear retention of POP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans LEF/TCF homolog, through increasing nuclear import and blocking nuclear export. We identify three lysines that are acetylated in vivo, and demonstrate their essential requirement for proper nuclear localization and biological activity of POP-1 during C. elegans embryogenesis. The conservation of these lysines among other LEF/TCF family members suggests that acetylation may be an important, evolutionarily conserved mechanism regulating subcellular distribution of LEF/TCF factors. PMID:12651889

  14. Thermalization and many-body localization in systems under dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Andrea; Rodríguez-Arias, Inés; Müller, Markus; Rosso, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We study the role of dipolar interactions in the standard protocol used to achieve dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP). We point out that a critical strength of interactions is required to obtain significant nuclear hyperpolarization. Otherwise, the electron spins do not thermalize among each other, due to the incipient many-body localization transition in the electron spin system. Only when the interactions are sufficiently strong, in the so-called spin-temperature regime, they establish an effective thermodynamic behavior in the out-of-equilibrium stationary state. The highest polarization is reached at a point where the spin temperature is just not able to establish itself anymore. We provide numerical predictions for the level of nuclear hyperpolarization and present an analytical technique to estimate the spin temperature as a function of interaction strength and quenched disorder. We show that, at sufficiently strong coupling, nuclear spins perfectly equilibrate to the spin temperature that establishes among the spins of radicals.

  15. Studies with GFP-Vpr fusion proteins: induction of apoptosis but ablation of cell-cycle arrest despite nuclear membrane or nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Waldhuber, Megan G; Bateson, Michael; Tan, Judith; Greenway, Alison L; McPhee, Dale A

    2003-08-15

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr protein is known to arrest the cell cycle in G(2)/M and induce apoptosis following arrest. The functions of Vpr relative to its location in the cell remain unresolved. We now demonstrate that the location and function of Vpr are dependent on the makeup of fusion proteins and that the functions of G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis are separable. Using green fluorescence protein mutants (EGFP or EYFP), we found that fusion at either the N- or C-terminus compromised the ability of Vpr to arrest cell cycling, relative to that of His-Vpr or wild-type protein. Additionally, utilizing the ability to specifically identify cells expressing the fusion proteins, we confirm that Vpr can induce apoptosis, but appears to be independent of cell-cycle arrest in G(2)/M. Both N- and C-terminal Vpr/EYFP fusion proteins induced apoptosis but caused minimal G(2)/M arrest. These studies with Vpr fusion proteins indicate that the functions of Vpr leading to G(2)/M arrest and apoptosis are separable and that fusion of Vpr to EGFP or EYFP affected the localization of the protein. Our findings suggest that nuclear membrane localization and nuclear import and export are strongly governed by modification of the N-terminus of Vpr. PMID:12951024

  16. Subsurface mass transport affects the radioxenon signatures that are used to identify clandestine nuclear tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinert, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Underground nuclear tests produce anthropogenic isotopes that provide the only definitive means by which to determine whether a nuclear explosion has taken place. Verification of a suspected test under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty often relies on ratios of radioxenon isotopes. Gas samples are gathered either on-site or off-site with certain ranges of xenon isotope ratios considered to be a signature of a weapons test. It is well established that below ground transport can affect the rate at which Noble gasses will reach the surface. However, the relative abundance of anthropogenic isotopes is has long been assumed to rely solely on fission yield and decay rate. By including in subsurface transport models the effects of mass dependent diffusion, and a time dependent source term for the decay of radioiodine precursors, we show here that this assumption is not true. In fact, certain combinations of geology and atmospheric conditions can alter xenon isotope ratios sufficiently for a weapons test going unconfirmed under the current standards.

  17. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  18. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of high risk HPV16 E2 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Klucevsek, Kristin; Wertz, Mary; Lucchi, John; Leszczynski, Anna; Moroianu, Junona . E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu

    2007-03-30

    The E2 protein of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) contains an amino-terminal (N) domain, a hinge (H) region and a carboxyl-terminal (C) DNA-binding domain. Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fusions with full length E2 and E2 domains in transfection assays in HeLa cells, we found that the C domain is responsible for the nuclear localization of E2 in vivo, whereas the N and H domains do not contain additional nuclear localization signals (NLSs). Deletion analysis of EGFP-E2 and EGFP-cE2 determined that the C domain contains an {alpha} helix cNLS that overlaps with the DNA-binding region. Mutational analysis revealed that the arginine and lysine residues in this cNLS are essential for nuclear localization of HPV16 E2. Interestingly, these basic amino acid residues are well conserved among the E2 proteins of BPV-1 and some high risk HPV types but not in the low risk HPV types, suggesting that there are differences between the NLSs and corresponding nuclear import pathways between these E2 proteins.

  19. Nuclear localization sequence of FUS and induction of stress granules by ALS mutants

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Jozsef; Zhang, Jiayu; Kwinter, David M.; Zhai, Jianjun; Jia, Hongge; Jia, Jianhang; Zhu, Haining

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in FUS have been reported to cause a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases. Wild-type FUS is mostly localized in the nuclei of neurons, but the ALS mutants are partly mislocalized in the cytoplasm and can form inclusions. Little is known about the regulation of FUS subcellular localization or how the ALS mutations alter FUS function. Here we demonstrate that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of FUS constitute an effective nuclear localization sequence (NLS) as it targeted beta-galactosidase (LacZ, 116 kDa) to the nucleus. Deletion of or the ALS point mutations within the NLS caused cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS. Moreover, we identified the poly-A binding protein (PABP1), a stress granule marker, as an interacting partner of FUS. PABP1 formed large cytoplasmic foci that co-localized with the mutant FUS inclusions. No such foci, which resemble stress granules, were observed in the presence of wild-type FUS. In addition, processing bodies, which are functionally related to stress granules, were adjacent to but not co-localized with the mutant FUS inclusions. Our results suggest that the ALS mutations in the C-terminal NLS of FUS can impair FUS nuclear localization and induce cytoplasmic mislocalization, inclusion formation, and potential perturbation of RNA metabolism. PMID:20674093

  20. Nuclear localization of coactivator RAC3 is mediated by a bipartite NLS and importin {alpha}3

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, Percy Luk; Zhang, Aihua; Chen, J. Don . E-mail: chenjd@umdnj.edu

    2006-09-15

    The nuclear receptor coactivator RAC3 (also known as SRC-3/ACTR/AIB1/p/CIP/TRAM-1) belongs to the p160 coactivator family, which are involved in several physiological processes and diseases. Here we have investigated how RAC3 is translocated into the nucleus and show that it is mediated through a bipartite NLS and importin {alpha}3. This bipartite NLS is located within the conserved bHLH domain, and its mutation abolished nuclear localization. The NLS is also sufficient to cause nuclear import of EGFP, and the activity requires basic amino acids within the NLS. RAC3 binds strongly to importin {alpha}3, which also depends on the basic amino acids. Functionally, RAC3 cytoplasmic mutant loses its ability to enhance transcription, suggesting that nuclear localization is essential for coactivator function. Together, these results reveal a previous unknown mechanism for nuclear translocation of p160 coactivators and a critical function of the conserved bHLH within the coactivator.

  1. Optogenetic Control of Nuclear Protein Import in Living Cells Using Light-Inducible Nuclear Localization Signals (LINuS).

    PubMed

    Wehler, Pierre; Niopek, Dominik; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Many biological processes are regulated by the timely import of specific proteins into the nucleus. The ability to spatiotemporally control the nuclear import of proteins of interest therefore allows study of their role in a given biological process as well as controlling this process in space and time. The light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) was developed based on a natural plant photoreceptor that reversibly triggers the import of proteins of interest into the nucleus with blue light. Each LINuS is a small, genetically encoded domain that is fused to the protein of interest at the N or C terminus. These protocols describe how to carry out initial microscopy-based screening to assess which LINuS variant works best with a protein of interest. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27258691

  2. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E. . E-mail: methompson@mmc.edu

    2007-05-15

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin {beta}1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin {beta}1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin {beta}1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling enhances nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of BRCA1

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Cimona V.; Fitzgerald, Latricia D.; Thompson, Marilyn E.

    2007-01-01

    Signaling pathways involved in regulating nuclear-cytoplasmic distribution of BRCA1 have not been previously reported. Here, we provide evidence that heregulin β1-induced activation of the Akt pathway increases the nuclear content of BRCA1. First, treatment of T47D breast cancer cells with heregulin β1 results in a two-fold increase in nuclear BRCA1 as assessed by FACS analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. This heregulin-induced increase in nuclear BRCA1 is blocked by siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Akt. Second, mutation of threonine 509 in BRCA1, the site of Akt phosphorylation, to an alanine, attenuates the ability of heregulin to induce BRCA1 nuclear accumulation. These data suggest that Akt-catalyzed phosphorylation of BRCA1 is required for the heregulin-regulated nuclear concentration of BRCA1. Because most functions ascribed to BRCA1 occur within the nucleus, we postulated that phosphorylation-dependent nuclear accumulation of BRCA1 would result in enhanced nuclear activity, specifically transcriptional activity, of BRCA1. This postulate is affirmed by our observation that the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate GADD45 promoter constructs was enhanced in T47D cells treated with heregulin β1. Furthermore, the heterologous expression of BRCA1 in HCC1937 human breast cancer cells, which have constitutively active Akt, also induces GADD45 promoter activity, whereas the expression of BRCA1 in which threonine 509 has been mutated to an alanine is able to only minimally induce promoter activity. These findings implicate Akt in upstream events leading to BRCA1 nuclear localization and function. PMID:17428466

  4. The algal metabolite yessotoxin affects heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Clifford; Truman, Penelope; Boucher, Magalie; Keyzers, Robert A; Northcote, Peter; Jordan, T William

    2009-05-01

    The dinoflagellate metabolite yessotoxin (YTX) is produced by several species of algae and accumulates in marine food chains, leading to concerns about possible affects on aquaculture industries and human health. In mice used for toxicity testing, YTX is lethal by the intraperitoneal route, but is considerably less toxic when orally administered. The mode of action of YTX and its potential effect on humans is unclear and we therefore conducted the first proteomic analysis of the effects of this compound. We used 2-DE to examine protein changes in HepG2 cell cultures exposed to 1.4 microM YTX for 3, 12.5, 18 and 24 h. After selecting proteins that changed more than three-fold after YTX exposure, 55 spots were deemed significantly affected by the toxin (p<0.05). Major groups of affected proteins include members from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), lamin, cathepsin and heat shock protein families that often are associated with apoptosis. We therefore confirmed apoptosis using Annexin-V-FLUOS staining of phosphatidylserine exposed at the surface of apoptotic cells. Ingenuity pathways analysis also indicated effects on pathways involved in protein processing, cell cycling and cell death. PMID:19343718

  5. Hyperketonemia during lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis affects systemic and local intramammary metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, M; Wellnitz, O; van Dorland, H A; Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperketonemia interferes with the metabolic regulation in dairy cows. It is assumed that metabolic and endocrine changes during hyperketonemia also affect metabolic adaptations during inflammatory processes. We therefore studied systemic and local intramammary effects of elevated plasma β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) before and during the response to an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Thirteen dairy cows received intravenously either a Na-DL-β-OH-butyrate infusion (n = 5) to achieve a constant plasma BHBA concentration (1.7 ± 0.1 mmol/L), with adjustments of the infusion rates made based on immediate measurements of plasma BHBA every 15 min, or an infusion with a 0.9% NaCl solution (control; n = 8) for 56 h. Infusions started at 0900 h on d 1 and continued until 1700 h 2 d later. Two udder quarters were challenged with 200 μg of Escherichia coli LPS and 2 udder quarters were treated with 0.9% saline solution as control quarters at 48 h after the start of infusion. Blood samples were taken at 1 wk and 2h before the start of infusions as reference samples and hourly during the infusion. Mammary gland biopsies were taken 1 wk before, and 48 and 56 h (8h after LPS challenge) after the start of infusions. The mRNA abundance of key factors related to BHBA and fatty acid metabolism, and glucose transporters was determined in mammary tissue biopsies. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma glucose, BHBA, nonesterified fatty acid, urea, insulin, glucagon, and cortisol concentrations. Differences were not different for effects of BHBA infusion on the mRNA abundance of any of the measured target genes in the mammary gland before LPS challenge. Intramammary LPS challenge increased plasma glucose, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin concentrations in both groups but increases in plasma glucose and glucagon concentration were less pronounced in the Na-DL-β-OH-butyrate infusion group than in controls. In response to LPS challenge, plasma BHBA concentration decreased

  6. Nuclear materials transportation workshops: USDOE outreach to local governments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-28

    To provide direct outreach to local governments, the Transportation Management Division of the United States Department of Energy asked the Urban Consortium and its Energy Task Force to assemble representatives for two workshops focusing on the transport of nuclear materials. The first session, for jurisdictions east of the Mississippi River, was held in New Orleans on May 5--6, 1988; the second was conducted on June 6--7, 1988 in Denver for jurisdictions to the west. Twenty local government professionals with management or operational responsibility for hazardous materials transportation within their jurisdictions were selected to attend each workshop. The discussions identified five major areas of concern to local government professionals; coordination; training; information resources; marking and placarding; and responder resources. Integrated federal, state, and local levels of government emerged as a priority coordination issue along with the need for expanded availability of training and training resources for first-reponders.

  7. Nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of APC regulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and turnover.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B R

    2000-09-01

    Mutational inactivation of the APC gene is a key early event in the development of familial adenomatous polyposis and colon cancer. APC suppresses tumour progression by promoting degradation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator beta-catenin. APC gene mutations can lead to abnormally high levels of beta-catenin in the nucleus, and the consequent activation of transforming genes. Here, we show that APC is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and that it can function as a beta-catenin chaperone. APC contains two active nuclear export sequences (NES) at the amino terminus, and mutagenesis of these conserved motifs blocks nuclear export dependent on the CRM1 export receptor. Treatment of cells with the CRM1-specific export inhibitor leptomycin B shifts APC from cytoplasm to nucleus. beta-catenin localization is also regulated by CRM1, but in an APC-dependent manner. Transient expression of wild-type APC in SW480 (APCmut/mut) colon cancer cells enhances nuclear export and degradation of beta-catenin, and these effects can be blocked by mutagenesis of the APC NES. These findings suggest that wild-type APC controls the nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin by a combination of nuclear export and cytoplasmic degradation. PMID:10980707

  8. The C175R mutation alters nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of the nephronophthisis NPHP7 gene product

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Haribaskar; Yakulov, Toma A; Engel, Christina; Müller, Barbara; Walz, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is a rare autosomal ciliopathy, but the leading cause for hereditary end-stage renal disease in children. Most NPH family members form large protein networks, which appear to participate in structural elements of the cilium and/or function to restrict access of molecules to the ciliary compartment. The zinc-finger protein GLIS2/NPHP7 represents an exception as it has been implicated in transcriptional regulation; only two families with GLIS2/NPHP7 mutations and typical NPH manifestations have been identified so far. We describe here that the recently identified GLIS2/NPHP7C175R point mutation abolished the nuclear localization of GLIS2/NPHP7. Forced nuclear import did not rescue the transcriptional defects of GLIS2/NPHP7C175R, indicating additional defects as DNA-binding protein. We further observed that wild type, but not GLIS2/NPHP7C175R, prevented the cyst formation caused by depletion of nphp7 in zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our findings indicate that the C175R mutation affects both localization and function of GLIS2/NPHP7, supporting a role of this mutation in NPH, but questioning the direct involvement of GLIS2/NPHP7 in ciliary functions. PMID:26374130

  9. Nuclear Localization Signal and p53 Binding Site in MAP/ERK Kinase Kinase 1 (MEKK1).

    PubMed

    Chipps, Elizabeth; Protzman, April; Muhi, M Zubayed; Ando, Shoko; Calvet, James P; Islam, M Rafiq

    2015-12-01

    Previously, we showed that Mekk1 translocates to the nucleus, interacts with tumor suppressor protein p53, and co-represses PKD1 transcription via an atypical p53 binding site on the minimal PKD1 promoter (JBC 285:38,818-38,831, 2010). In this study, we report the mechanisms of Mekk1 nuclear transport and p53 binding. Using GFP-linked constitutively active-Mekk1 (CA-Mekk1) and a deletion strategy, we identified a nuclear localization signal (HRDVK) located at amino acid (aa) residues 1,349-1,353 in the C-terminal Mekk1 catalytic domain. Deletion of this sequence in CA-Mekk1 and full-length Mekk1 significantly reduced their nuclear translocation in both HEK293T and COS-1 cells. Using co-immunoprecipitation, we identified an adjacent sequence (GANLID, aa 1,354-1,360) in Mekk1 responsible for p53 binding. Deletion of this sequence markedly reduced the interaction of Mekk1 with p53. Mekk1 does not appear to affect phosphorylation of Ser15, located in the Mdm2 interaction site, or other Ser residues in p53. However, Mekk1 mediates p53 protein stability in the presence of Mdm2 and reduces p53 ubiquitination, suggesting an interference with Mdm2-mediated degradation of p53 by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. PMID:26018553

  10. Regulation of COP1 nuclear localization by the COP9 signalosome via direct interaction with CSN1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiping; Li, Wenjun; Piqueras, Raquel; Cao, Kaiming; Deng, Xing Wang; Wei, Ning

    2009-05-01

    COP1 and COP9 signalosome (CSN) are key regulators of plant light responses and development. Deficiency in either COP1 or CSN causes a constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. Through coordinated actions of nuclear- and cytoplasmic-localization signals, COP1 can respond to light signals by differentially partitions between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Previous genetic analysis in Arabidopsis indicated that the nuclear localization of COP1 requires CSN, an eight-subunit heteromeric complex. However the mechanism underlying the functional relationship between COP1 and CSN is unknown. We report here that COP1 weakly associates with CSN in vivo. Furthermore, we report on the direct interaction involving the coiled-coil domain of COP1 and the N-terminal domain of the CSN1 subunit. In onion epidermal cells, expression of CSN1 can stimulate nuclear localization of GUS-COP1, and the N-terminal domain of CSN1 is necessary and sufficient for this function. Moreover, CSN1-induced COP1 nuclear localization requires the nuclear-localization sequences of COP1, as well as its coiled-coil domain, which contains both the cytoplasmic localization sequences and the CSN1 interacting domain. We also provide genetic evidence that the CSN1 N-terminal domain is specifically required for COP1 nuclear localization in Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells. This study advances our understanding of COP1 localization, and the molecular interactions between COP1 and CSN. PMID:19175768

  11. Nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Takashi; Seki, Masayuki Enomoto, Takemi

    2008-07-18

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad52 plays major roles in several types of homologous recombination. Here, we found that rad52-K200R mutation greatly reduced sumoylation of Rad52. The rad52-K200R mutant exhibited defects in various types of recombination, such as intrachromosomal recombination and mating-type switching. The K200 residue of Rad52 is part of the nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is important for transport into the nucleus. Indeed, the addition of a SV40 NLS to Rad52-K200R suppressed the sumoylation defect of Rad52-K200R. These findings indicate that nuclear localization of Rad52 is pre-requisite for its sumoylation.

  12. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the mouse TET3 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Peng; Zhou, Xiao-long; Zhang, Hong-xiao; Xiong, Kai; Teng, Yun; Huang, Xian-ju; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yi; Liu, Hong-lin

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •Amino acid sequence KKRK is responsible for nuclear localization of TET3. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are capable of targeting the cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. •Amino acid sequence KKRK are conserved in TET3 orthologs. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation is associated with gene activation and is mediated by a family of ten-eleven translocation (TET) dioxygenase. The TET3 protein is a 1668-amino-acid DNA demethylase that is predicted to possess five nuclear localization signals (NLSs). In this paper, we used a series of green fluorescent protein-tagged and mutation constructs to identify a conserved NLS (KKRK) embedded between amino acid 1615 and 1618 of mouse TET3. The KKRK sequence facilitates the cytoplasmic protein’s translocation into the nucleus. Additionally TET3 may be imported into the nucleus by importin-α and importin-β.

  13. Serine phosphorylation by SYK is critical for nuclear localization and transcription factor function of Ikaros

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, Fatih M.; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Jian; Ozer, Zahide; Dovat, Sinisa; Mao, Cheney; Ishkhanian, Rita; Goodman, Patricia; Qazi, Sanjive

    2012-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger-containing DNA-binding protein that plays a pivotal role in immune homeostasis through transcriptional regulation of the earliest stages of lymphocyte ontogeny and differentiation. Functional deficiency of Ikaros has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common form of childhood cancer. Therefore, a stringent regulation of Ikaros activity is considered of paramount importance, but the operative molecular mechanisms responsible for its regulation remain largely unknown. Here we provide multifaceted genetic and biochemical evidence for a previously unknown function of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) as a partner and posttranslational regulator of Ikaros. We demonstrate that SYK phoshorylates Ikaros at unique C-terminal serine phosphorylation sites S358 and S361, thereby augmenting its nuclear localization and sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Mechanistically, we establish that SYK-induced Ikaros activation is essential for its nuclear localization and optimal transcription factor function. PMID:23071339

  14. Impact of Nucleoporin-Mediated Chromatin Localization and Nuclear Architecture on HIV Integration Site Selection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Richard W; Mamede, João I; Hope, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    It has been known for a number of years that integration sites of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA show a preference for actively expressed chromosomal locations. A number of viral and cellular proteins are implicated in this process, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. Two recent breakthrough publications advance our understanding of HIV integration site selection by focusing on the localization of the preferred target genes of integration. These studies reveal that knockdown of certain nucleoporins and components of nucleocytoplasmic trafficking alter integration site preference, not by altering the trafficking of the viral genome but by altering the chromatin subtype localization relative to the structure of the nucleus. Here, we describe the link between the nuclear basket nucleoporins (Tpr and Nup153) and chromatin organization and how altering the host environment by manipulating nuclear structure may have important implications for the preferential integration of HIV into actively transcribed genes, facilitating efficient viral replication. PMID:26136574

  15. Mechanisms Directing the Nuclear Localization of the CtBP Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Verger, Alexis; Quinlan, Kate G. R.; Crofts, Linda A.; Spanò, Stefania; Corda, Daniela; Kable, Eleanor P. W.; Braet, Filip; Crossley, Merlin

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) family includes four proteins (CtBP1 [CtBP1-L], CtBP3/BARS [CtBP1-S], CtBP2, and RIBEYE) which are implicated both in transcriptional repression and in intracellular trafficking. However, the precise mechanisms by which different CtBP proteins are targeted to different subcellular regions remains unknown. Here, we report that the nuclear import of the various CtBP proteins and splice isoforms is differentially regulated. We show that CtBP2 contains a unique nuclear localization signal (NLS) located within its N-terminal region, which contributes to its nuclear accumulation. Using heterokaryon assays, we show that CtBP2 is capable of shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm of the cell. Moreover, CtBP2 can heterodimerize with CtBP1-L and CtBP1-S and direct them to the nucleus. This effect strongly depends on the CtBP2 NLS. PXDLS motif-containing transcription factors, such as BKLF, that bind CtBP proteins can also direct them to the nucleus. We also report the identification of a splice isoform of CtBP2, CtBP2-S, that lacks the N-terminal NLS and localizes to the cytoplasm. Finally, we show that mutation of the CtBP NADH binding site impairs the ability of the proteins to dimerize and to associate with BKLF. This reduces the nuclear accumulation of CtBP1. Our results suggest a model in which the nuclear localization of CtBP proteins is influenced by the CtBP2 NLS, by binding to PXDLS motif partner proteins, and through the effect of NADH on CtBP dimerization. PMID:16782877

  16. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  17. Bipartite nuclear localization signal of matrin 3 is essential for vertebrate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hisada-Ishii, Shoji; Ebihara, Mizuki; Kobayashi, Nao; Kitagawa, Yasuo . E-mail: yasuok@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-02

    Matrin 3, a nuclear matrix protein has potential (1) to withhold promiscuously edited RNAs within the nucleus in cooperation with p54{sup nrb} and PSF (2) to mediate NMDA-induced neuronal death, and (3) to modulate promoter activity of genes proximal to matrix/scaffold attachment region (MAR/SAR). We identified a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) of chicken matrin 3 (cmatr3) at residues 583-602. By expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) fused to the NLS mutant in chicken DT40 cells, we showed an essential role of the NLS for cell proliferation. Furthermore, we showed that both clusters of basic amino acids and a linker of the bipartite NLS were essential and sufficient for the nuclear import of GFP. Exogenous cmatr3 rescued the HeLa cells where human matrin 3 was suppressed by RNA interference, but cmatr3 containing deletions at either of the basic amino acid clusters or the linker could not.

  18. Red Light-Regulated Reversible Nuclear Localization of Proteins in Mammalian Cells and Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Hannes M; Juillot, Samuel; Herbst, Kathrin; Samodelov, Sophia L; Müller, Konrad; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Römer, Winfried; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc; Strähle, Uwe; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-09-18

    Protein trafficking in and out of the nucleus represents a key step in controlling cell fate and function. Here we report the development of a red light-inducible and far-red light-reversible synthetic system for controlling nuclear localization of proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish. First, we synthetically reconstructed and validated the red light-dependent Arabidopsis phytochrome B nuclear import mediated by phytochrome-interacting factor 3 in a nonplant environment and support current hypotheses on the import mechanism in planta. On the basis of this principle we next regulated nuclear import and activity of target proteins by the spatiotemporal projection of light patterns. A synthetic transcription factor was translocated into the nucleus of mammalian cells and zebrafish to drive transgene expression. These data demonstrate the first in vivo application of a plant phytochrome-based optogenetic tool in vertebrates and expand the repertoire of available light-regulated molecular devices. PMID:25803699

  19. Characterization of the nuclear localization signal of the hepatitis delta virus antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Carolina; Freitas, Natalia; Cunha, Celso

    2008-01-05

    The delta antigen (HDAg) is the only protein encoded by the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) RNA genome. The HDAg contains an RNA binding domain, a dimerization domain, and a nuclear localization signal (NLS). The nuclear import of HDV RNPs is thought to be one of the first tasks of the HDAg during the HDV replication cycle. Using c-myc-PK fusions with several regions of the HDAg in transfection assays in Huh7 cells, we found that the HDAg NLS consists of a single stretch of 10 amino acids, EGAPPAKRAR, located in positions 66-75. Deletion and mutation analysis of this region showed that both the acidic glutamic acid residue at position 66 and the basic arginine residue at position 75 are essential for promoting nuclear import.

  20. A novel function for the Caenorhabditis elegans torsin OOC-5 in nucleoporin localization and nuclear import

    PubMed Central

    VanGompel, Michael J. W.; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Hall, David H.; Dauer, William T.; Rose, Lesilee S.

    2015-01-01

    Torsin proteins are AAA+ ATPases that localize to the endoplasmic reticular/nuclear envelope (ER/NE) lumen. A mutation that markedly impairs torsinA function causes the CNS disorder DYT1 dystonia. Abnormalities of NE membranes have been linked to torsinA loss of function and the pathogenesis of DYT1 dystonia, leading us to investigate the role of the Caenorhabditis elegans torsinA homologue OOC-5 at the NE. We report a novel role for torsin in nuclear pore biology. In ooc-5–mutant germ cell nuclei, nucleoporins (Nups) were mislocalized in large plaques beginning at meiotic entry and persisted throughout meiosis. Moreover, the KASH protein ZYG-12 was mislocalized in ooc-5 gonads. Nups were mislocalized in adult intestinal nuclei and in embryos from mutant mothers. EM analysis revealed vesicle-like structures in the perinuclear space of intestinal and germ cell nuclei, similar to defects reported in torsin-mutant flies and mice. Consistent with a functional disruption of Nups, ooc-5–mutant embryos displayed impaired nuclear import kinetics, although the nuclear pore-size exclusion barrier was maintained. Our data are the first to demonstrate a requirement for a torsin for normal Nup localization and function and suggest that these functions are likely conserved. PMID:25739455

  1. Local negotiation on compensation siting of the spent nuclear fuel repository in Finland

    SciTech Connect

    Kojo, Matti

    2007-07-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyse the local negotiation process between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the nuclear power company Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) and the nuclear waste management company Posiva Oy. The aim of the negotiations was to find an acceptable form of compensation for siting a spent nuclear fuel repository in Olkiluoto, Finland. The paper includes background information on the siting process in Finland, the local political setting in the Municipality of Eurajoki and a description of the negotiation process. The analysis of the negotiations on compensation is important for better understanding the progress of the Finnish siting process. The paper describes the picture of the contest to host the spent nuclear fuel repository. It also provides more information on the relationship between the Municipality of Eurajoki and the power company TVO. The negotiations on compensation and the roles of various players in the negotiations have not been studied in detail because the minutes of the Vuojoki liaison group were not available before the decision of the Supreme Administrative Court in May 2006. (author)

  2. O-GlcNAc-glycosylation of {beta}-catenin regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sayat, Ria; Leber, Brian; Grubac, Vanja; Wiltshire, Lesley; Persad, Sujata

    2008-09-10

    {beta}-catenin plays a role in intracellular adhesion and regulating gene expression. The latter role is associated with its oncogenic properties. Phosphorylation of {beta}-catenin controls its intracellular expression but mechanism/s that regulates the nuclear localization of {beta}-catenin is unknown. We demonstrate that O-GlcNAc glycosylation (O-GlcNAcylation) of {beta}-catenin negatively regulates its levels in the nucleus. We show that normal prostate cells (PNT1A) have significantly higher amounts of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin compared to prostate cancer (CaP) cells. The total nuclear levels of {beta}-catenin are higher in the CaP cells than PNT1A but only a minimal fraction of the nuclear {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells are O-GlcNAcylated. Increasing the levels of O-GlcNAcylated {beta}-catenin in the CaP cells with PUGNAc (O- (2-acetamido-2-deoxy-D-gluco-pyranosylidene) amino-N-phenylcarbamate) treatment is associated with a progressive decrease in the levels of {beta}-catenin in the nucleus. TOPFlash reporter assay and mRNA expressions of {beta}-catenin's target genes indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of {beta}-catenin results in a decrease in its transcriptional activity. We define a novel modification of {beta}-catenin that regulates its nuclear localization and transcriptional function.

  3. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching; Yen, Pauline H.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  4. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2

    PubMed Central

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2–Emerin–MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1–Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing. PMID:26744419

  5. TRX-1 Regulates SKN-1 Nuclear Localization Cell Non-autonomously in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McCallum, Katie C; Liu, Bin; Fierro-González, Juan Carlos; Swoboda, Peter; Arur, Swathi; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Garsin, Danielle A

    2016-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans oxidative stress response transcription factor, SKN-1, is essential for the maintenance of redox homeostasis and is a functional ortholog of the Nrf family of transcription factors. The numerous levels of regulation that govern these transcription factors underscore their importance. Here, we add a thioredoxin, encoded by trx-1, to the expansive list of SKN-1 regulators. We report that loss of trx-1 promotes nuclear localization of intestinal SKN-1 in a redox-independent, cell non-autonomous fashion from the ASJ neurons. Furthermore, this regulation is not general to the thioredoxin family, as two other C. elegans thioredoxins, TRX-2 and TRX-3, do not play a role in this process. Moreover, TRX-1-dependent regulation requires signaling from the p38 MAPK-signaling pathway. However, while TRX-1 regulates SKN-1 nuclear localization, classical SKN-1 transcriptional activity associated with stress response remains largely unaffected. Interestingly, RNA-Seq analysis revealed that loss of trx-1 elicits a general, organism-wide down-regulation of several classes of genes; those encoding for collagens and lipid transport being most prevalent. Together, these results uncover a novel role for a thioredoxin in regulating intestinal SKN-1 nuclear localization in a cell non-autonomous manner, thereby contributing to the understanding of the processes involved in maintaining redox homeostasis throughout an organism. PMID:26920757

  6. Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Local Support for Black Bear Recovery Strategies(AED)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is global interest in recovering locally extirpated carnivore species. Successful efforts to recover Louisiana black bear in Louisiana have prompted interest in recovery throughout the species’ historical range. We evaluated support for three potential black bear recovery s...

  7. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. PMID:23948303

  8. Understanding Locally, Culturally, and Contextually Relevant Mental Health Problems among Rwandan Children and Adolescents Affected by HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Rubin-Smith, Julia E.; Beardslee, William R.; Stulac, Sara N.; Fayida, Ildephonse; Safren, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the mental health of HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can aid in the selection or creation of appropriate measures. This study used qualitative methodologies (Free Listing [FL], Key Informant [KI] interviews, and Clinician Interviews [C-KIs]) to understand local perceptions of mental health problems facing HIV/AIDS-affected youth in Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Several syndrome terms were identified by participants: agahinda kenshi, kwiheba, guhangayika, ihahamuka, umushiha and uburara. While these local syndromes share some similarities with Western mood, anxiety, and conduct disorders, they also contain important culture-specific features and gradations of severity. Our findings underscore the importance of understanding local manifestations of mental health syndromes when conducting mental health assessments and when planning interventions for HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in diverse settings. PMID:21271393

  9. A Wnt-kinase network alters nuclear localization of TCF-1 in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Najdi, Rani; Syed, Adeela; Arce, Laura; Theisen, Heidi; Ting, Ju-Hui T.; Atcha, Fawzia; Nguyen, Anthony V.; Martinez, Micaela; Holcombe, Randall F.; Edwards, Robert A.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Waterman, Marian L.

    2009-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway has been implicated as the primary cause of colon cancer. However, the major transducers of Wnt signaling in the intestine, TCF-1 and TCF-4, have opposing functions. Knock-out of TCF-4 suppresses growth and maintenance of crypt stem cells, while knock-out of TCF-1 leads to adenomas. These phenotypes suggest that TCF-4 is Wnt-promoting while TCF-1 acts like a tumor suppressor. Our study of TCF expression in human colon crypts reveals a mechanistic basis for this paradox. In normal colon cells, a dominant negative isoform of TCF-1 (dnTCF-1) is expressed that is equally distributed between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. In colon cancer cells, TCF-1 is predominantly cytoplasmic. Localization is due to active nuclear export and is directed by an autocrine-acting Wnt ligand that requires CaMKII activity for secretion and a downstream step in the export pathway. TCF-4 remains nuclear; its unopposed activity is accompanied by downregulation of dnTCF-1 and increased expression of full-length isoforms. Thus, the dnTCF-1, TCF-4 balance is corrupted in cancer by two mechanisms, a Wnt/CaMKII kinase signal for nuclear export, and decreased dnTCF-1 expression. We propose that dnTCF-1 provides homeostatic regulation of Wnt signaling and growth in normal colon and alterations in nuclear export and promoter usage contribute to aberrant Wnt activity in colon cancer. PMID:19749792

  10. Alimentary Tract Absorption (f1 Values) for Radionuclides in Local and Regional Fallout from Nuclear Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Shawki; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g. local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the ICRP (e.g. iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively. The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  11. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout. PMID:20622554

  12. Two Nuclear Localization Signals in USP1 Mediate Nuclear Import of the USP1/UAF1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Santisteban, Iraia; Zorroza, Kerman; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The human deubiquitinase USP1 plays important roles in cancer-related processes, such as the DNA damage response, and the maintenance of the undifferentiated state of osteosarcoma cells. USP1 deubiquitinase activity is critically regulated by its interaction with the WD40 repeat-containing protein UAF1. Inhibiting the function of the USP1/UAF1 complex sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy, suggesting that this complex is a relevant anticancer target. Intriguingly, whereas UAF1 has been reported to locate in the cytoplasm, USP1 is a nuclear protein, although the sequence motifs that mediate its nuclear import have not been functionally characterized. Here, we identify two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) in USP1 and show that these NLSs mediate the nuclear import of the USP1/UAF1 complex. Using a cellular relocation assay based on these results, we map the UAF1-binding site to a highly conserved 100 amino acid motif in USP1. Our data support a model in which USP1 and UAF1 form a complex in the cytoplasm that subsequently translocates to the nucleus through import mediated by USP1 NLSs. Importantly, our findings have practical implications for the development of USP1-directed therapies. First, the UAF1-interacting region of USP1 identified here might be targeted to disrupt the USP1/UAF1 interaction with therapeutic purposes. On the other hand, we describe a cellular relocation assay that can be easily implemented in a high throughput setting to search for drugs that may dissociate the USP1/UAF1 complex. PMID:22701671

  13. Localization of latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) on mitotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rahayu, Retno; Ohsaki, Eriko; Omori, Hiroko; Ueda, Keiji

    2016-09-01

    In latent infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), viral gene expression is extremely limited and copy numbers of viral genomes remain constant. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is known to have a role in maintaining viral genome copy numbers in growing cells. Several studies have shown that LANA is localized in particular regions on mitotic chromosomes, such as centromeres/pericentromeres. We independently examined the distinct localization of LANA on mitotic chromosomes during mitosis, using super-resolution laser confocal microscopy and correlative fluorescence microscopy-electron microscopy (FM-EM) analyses. We found that the majority of LANA were not localized at particular regions such as telomeres/peritelomeres, centromeres/pericentromeres, and cohesion sites, but at the bodies of condensed chromosomes. Thus, LANA may undergo various interactions with the host factors on the condensed chromosomes in order to tether the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes and realize faithful viral genome segregation during cell division. PMID:27254595

  14. Both population size and patch quality affect local extinctions and colonizations.

    PubMed

    Franzén, Markus; Nilsson, Sven G

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the habitat of many species is fragmented, resulting in small local populations with individuals occasionally dispersing between the remaining habitat patches. In a solitary bee metapopulation, extinction probability was related to both local bee population sizes and pollen resources measured as host plant population size. Patch size, on the other hand, had no additional predictive power. The turnover rate of local bee populations in 63 habitat patches over 4 years was high, with 72 extinction events and 31 colonization events, but the pollen plant population was stable with no extinctions or colonizations. Both pollen resources and bee populations had strong and independent effects on extinction probability, but connectivity was not of importance. Colonizations occurred more frequently within larger host plant populations. For metapopulation survival of the bee, large pollen plant populations are essential, independent of current bee population size. PMID:19793747

  15. Madness or sadness? Local concepts of mental illness in four conflict-affected African communities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Concepts of ‘what constitutes mental illness’, the presumed aetiology and preferred treatment options, vary considerably from one cultural context to another. Knowledge and understanding of these local conceptualisations is essential to inform public mental health programming and policy. Methods Participants from four locations in Burundi, South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, were invited to describe ‘problems they knew of that related to thinking, feeling and behaviour?’ Data were collected over 31 focus groups discussions (251 participants) and key informant interviews with traditional healers and health workers. Results While remarkable similarities occurred across all settings, there were also striking differences. In all areas, participants were able to describe localized syndromes characterized by severe behavioural and cognitive disturbances with considerable resemblance to psychotic disorders. Additionally, respondents throughout all settings described local syndromes that included sadness and social withdrawal as core features. These syndromes had some similarities with nonpsychotic mental disorders, such as major depression or anxiety disorders, but also differed significantly. Aetiological concepts varied a great deal within each setting, and attributed causes varied from supernatural to psychosocial and natural. Local syndromes resembling psychotic disorders were seen as an abnormality in need of treatment, although people did not really know where to go. Local syndromes resembling nonpsychotic mental disorders were not regarded as a ‘medical’ disorder, and were therefore also not seen as a condition for which help should be sought within the biomedical health-care system. Rather, such conditions were expected to improve through social and emotional support from relatives, traditional healers and community members. Conclusions Local conceptualizations have significant implications for the planning of mental

  16. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuta; Fujino, Kaien; Ogawa, Kana; Masuda, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1) and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1. PMID:24616728

  17. Radiation doses to local populations near nuclear weapons test sites worldwide.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear weapons testing was conducted in the atmosphere at numerous sites worldwide between 1946 and 1980, which resulted in exposures to local populations as a consequence of fallout of radioactive debris. The nuclear tests were conducted by five nations (United States, Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France, and China) primarily at 16 sites. The 16 testing sites, located in nine different countries on five continents (plus Oceania) contributed nearly all of the radioactive materials released to the environment by atmospheric testing; only small amounts were released at a fewother minor testing sites. The 16 sites discussed here are Nevada Test Site, USA (North American continent), Bikini and Enewetak, Marshall Islands (Oceania); Johnston Island, USA (Oceania), Christmas and Malden Island, Kiribati (Oceania); Emu Field, Maralinga, and Monte Bello Islands, Australia (Australian continent); Mururoa and Fangataufa, French Polynesia (Oceania), Reggane, Algeria (Africa), Novaya Zemlya and Kapustin Yar, Russia (Europe), Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan (Asia), and Lop Nor, China (Asia). There were large differences in the numbers of tests conducted at each location and in the total explosive yields. Those factors, as well as differences in population density, lifestyle, environment, and climate at each site, led to large differences in the doses received by local populations. In general, the tests conducted earliest led to the highest individual and population exposures, although the amount of information available for a few of these sites is insufficient to provide any detailed evaluation of radiation exposures. The most comprehensive information for any site is for the Nevada Test Site. The disparities in available information add difficulty to determining the radiation exposures of local populations at each site. It is the goal of this paper to summarize the available information on external and internal doses received by the public living in the regions near each of the

  18. A theory of local and global processes which affect solar wind electrons. 2: Experimental support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, J. D.; Olbert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The microscopic characteristics of the Coulomb cross section show that there are three natural subpopulations for plasma electrons: the subthermals with local kinetic energy E kT sub c; the transthermals with kT sub c E 7 kT sub c and the extrathermals E 7 kT sub c. Data from three experimental groups on three different spacecraft in the interplanetary medium over a radial range are presented to support the five interrelations projected between solar wind electron properties and changes in the interplanetary medium: (1) subthermals respond primarily to local changes (compression and rarefactions) in stream dynamics; (2) the extrathermal fraction of the ambient electron density should be anti-correlated with the asymptotic bulk speed; (3) the extrathermal "temperature" should be anti-correlated with the local wind speed at 1 AU; (4) the heat flux carried by electrons should be anti-correlated with the local bulk speed; and (5) the extrathermal differential 'temperature' should be nearly independent of radius within 1 AU.

  19. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  20. Does the restoration of an inner-city stream in Seoul affect local thermal environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.-H.; Ryoo, S.-B.; Baik, J.-J.; Park, I.-S.; Koo, H.-J.; Nam, J.-C.

    2008-05-01

    Changes in local thermal environment associated with the restoration of an inner-city stream in Seoul, Korea, are investigated using observational data. The stream, called the Cheonggye stream, which had been hidden and covered with cement/asphalt for 46 years, runs 5.8 km eastward through a central region of Seoul. Intensive observations were made in the stream area for a number of summertime periods before, during, and after the stream restoration to detect the effects of the stream on local environment and to quantify them. It is estimated that after the stream restoration the near-surface temperature averaged over the stream area dropped by 0.4 °C, with the largest local temperature drop being 0.9 °C. However, it cannot be stated that this 0.4 °C temperature drop is due entirely to the stream effect only, because synoptic-scale and local-scale weather conditions during the two periods were inevitably not identical. The stream effect on air temperature is also evident in the temperature distribution along a street traversing the stream. In the daytime after the stream restoration, the sensible heat flux was greatly reduced and the ratio of sensible heat flux to net radiative flux dramatically decreased. These first-time results of the restored-stream effects on urban thermal environment could contribute to the scientific basis of urban planning which aims to make a large city comfortable to live in and nature- and environment-friendly.

  1. Unsteady behavior of locally strained diffusion flames affected by curvature and preferential diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kenji; Takagi, Toshimi

    1999-07-01

    Experimental and numerical studies are made of transient H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}--air counterflow diffusion flames unsteadily strained by an impinging micro jet. Two-dimensional temperature measurements by laser Rayleigh scattering method and numerical computations taking into account detailed chemical kinetics are conducted paying attention to transient local extinction and reignition in relation to the unsteadiness, flame curvature and preferential diffusion effects. The results are as follows. (1) Transient local flame extinction is observed where the micro jet impinges. But, the transient flame can survive instantaneously in spite of quite high stretch rate where the steady flame cannot exist. (2) Reignition is observed after the local extinction due to the micro air jet impingement. The temperature after reignition becomes significantly higher than that of the original flame. This high temperature is induced by the concentration of H{sub 2} species due to the preferential diffusion in relation to the concave curvature. The predicted behaviors of the local transient extinction and reignition are well confirmed by the experiments. (3) The reignition is induced after the formation of combustible premixed gas mixture and the consequent flame propagation. (4) The reignition is hardly observed after the extinction by micro fuel jet impingement. This is due to the dilution of H{sub 2} species induced by the preferential diffusion in relation to the convex curvature. (5) The maximum flame temperature cannot be rationalized by the stretch rate but changes widely depending on the unsteadiness and the flame curvature in relation with preferential diffusion.

  2. Membrane anchoring domain of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gB is sufficient for nuclear envelope localization.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, R; Ghosh, K; Rasile, L; Ghosh, H P

    1994-01-01

    We have used the glycoprotein gB of herpes simplex virus type 1 (gB-1), which buds from the inner nuclear membrane, as a model protein to study localization of membrane proteins in the nuclear envelope. To determine whether specific domains of gB-1 glycoprotein are involved in localization in the nuclear envelope, we have used deletion mutants of gB-1 protein as well as chimeric proteins constructed by replacing the domains of the cell surface glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus with the corresponding domains of gB. Mutant and chimeric proteins expressed in COS cells were localized by immunoelectron microscopy. A chimeric protein (gB-G) containing the ectodomain of gB and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of G did not localize in the nuclear envelope. When the ectodomain of G was fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of gB, however, the resulting chimeric protein (G-gB) was localized in the nuclear envelope. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of G with the 69 hydrophobic amino acids containing the membrane anchoring domain of gB allowed the hybrid protein (G-tmgB) to be localized in the nuclear envelope, suggesting that residues 721 to 795 of gB can promote retention of proteins in the nuclear envelope. Deletion mutations in the hydrophobic region further showed that a transmembrane segment of 21 hydrophobic amino acids, residues 774 to 795 of gB, was sufficient for localization in the nuclear envelope. Since wild-type gB and the mutant and chimeric proteins that were localized in the nuclear envelope were also retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, the membrane spanning segment of gB could also influence retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Images PMID:8139012

  3. A Functional Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C. elegans TRPV Channel OCR-2

    PubMed Central

    Ezak, Meredith J.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to modulate gene expression in response to sensory experience is critical to the normal development and function of the nervous system. Calcium is a key activator of the signal transduction cascades that mediate the process of translating a cellular stimulus into transcriptional changes. With the recent discovery that the mammalian Cav1.2 calcium channel can be cleaved, enter the nucleus and act as a transcription factor to control neuronal gene expression, a more direct role for the calcium channels themselves in regulating transcription has begun to be appreciated. Here we report the identification of a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C. elegans transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channel OCR-2. TRPV channels have previously been implicated in transcriptional regulation of neuronal genes in the nematode, although the precise mechanism remains unclear. We show that the NLS in OCR-2 is functional, being able to direct nuclear accumulation of a synthetic cargo protein as well as the carboxy-terminal cytosolic tail of OCR-2 where it is endogenously found. Furthermore, we discovered that a carboxy-terminal portion of the full-length channel can localize to the nucleus of neuronal cells. These results suggest that the OCR-2 TRPV cation channel may have a direct nuclear function in neuronal cells that was not previously appreciated. PMID:21957475

  4. Divergent Evolution of Nuclear Localization Signal Sequences in Herpesvirus Terminase Subunits.

    PubMed

    Sankhala, Rajeshwer S; Lokareddy, Ravi K; Cingolani, Gino

    2016-05-20

    The tripartite terminase complex of herpesviruses assembles in the cytoplasm of infected cells and exploits the host nuclear import machinery to gain access to the nucleus, where capsid assembly and genome-packaging occur. Here we analyzed the structure and conservation of nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences previously identified in herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) large terminase and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) small terminase. We found a monopartite NLS at the N terminus of large terminase, flanking the ATPase domain, that is conserved only in α-herpesviruses. In contrast, small terminase exposes a classical NLS at the far C terminus of its helical structure that is conserved only in two genera of the β-subfamily and absent in α- and γ-herpesviruses. In addition, we predicted a classical NLS in the third terminase subunit that is partially conserved among herpesviruses. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that both location and potency of NLSs in terminase subunits evolved more rapidly than the rest of the amino acid sequence despite the selective pressure to keep terminase gene products active and localized in the nucleus. We propose that swapping NLSs among terminase subunits is a regulatory mechanism that allows different herpesviruses to regulate the kinetics of terminase nuclear import, reflecting a mechanism of virus:host adaptation. PMID:27033706

  5. Identification and characterization of multiple conserved nuclear localization signals within adenovirus E1A

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kris S.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Greg J.; Todorovic, Biljana; King, Cason R.; Yousef, Ahmed F.; Zhang, Zhiying; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-04-15

    The human adenovirus 5 (HAdV-5) E1A protein has a well defined canonical nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at its C-terminus. We used a genetic assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to demonstrate that the canonical NLS is present and functional in the E1A proteins of each of the six HAdV species. This assay also detects a previously described non-canonical NLS within conserved region 3 and a novel active NLS within the N-terminal/conserved region 1 portion of HAdV-5 E1A. These activities were also present in the E1A proteins of each of the other five HAdV species. These results demonstrate that, despite substantial differences in primary sequence, HAdV E1A proteins are remarkably consistent in that they contain one canonical and two non-canonical NLSs. By utilizing independent mechanisms, these multiple NLSs ensure nuclear localization of E1A in the infected cell. - Highlights: • HAdV E1A uses multiple mechanisms for nuclear import. • We identified an additional non-canonical NLS in the N-terminal/CR1 portion of E1A. • The new NLS does not contact importin-alpha directly. • All NLSs are functionally conserved in the E1A proteins of all 6 HAdV species.

  6. The BRCA1-binding protein BRAP2 can act as a cytoplasmic retention factor for nuclear and nuclear envelope-localizing testicular proteins.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rebecca G; Wagstaff, Kylie M; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Loveland, Kate L; Jans, David A

    2013-12-01

    Regulation of nuclear protein import is central to many cellular processes such as development, with a key mechanism being factors that retain cargoes in the cytoplasm that normally localize in the nucleus. The breast cancer antigen BRCA1-binding protein BRAP2 has been reported as a novel negative regulator of nuclear import of various nuclear localization signal (NLS)-containing viral and cellular proteins, but although implicated in differentiation pathways and highly expressed in tissues including testis, the gamut of targets for BRAP2 action in a developmental context is unknown. As a first step towards defining the BRAP2 interactome, we performed a yeast-2-hybrid screen to identify binding partners of BRAP2 in human testis. Here we report characterization for the first time of three of these: the high mobility group (HMG)-box-domain-containing chromatin component HMG20A, nuclear mitotic apparatus protein NuMA1 and synaptic nuclear envelope protein SYNE2. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate association of BRAP2 with HMG20A, NuMA1, and SYNE2 in testis, underlining the physiological relevance of the interactions, with immunohistochemistry showing that where BRAP2 is co-expressed with HMG20A and NuMA1, both are present in the cytoplasm, in contrast to their nuclear localization in other testicular cell types. Importantly, quantitative confocal microscopic analysis of cultured cells indicates that ectopic expression of BRAP2 inhibits nuclear localization of HMG20A and NuMA1, and prevents nuclear envelope accumulation of SYNE2, the first report of BRAP2 altering localization of a non-nuclear protein. These results imply for the first time that BRAP2 may have an important role in modulating subcellular localization during testicular development. PMID:23707952

  7. Inhibitors of oxygen sensing prolyl hydroxylases regulate nuclear localization of the transcription factors Smad2 and YAP/TAZ involved in CTGF synthesis.

    PubMed

    Preisser, Felix; Giehl, Klaudia; Rehm, Margot; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of oxygen sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs) has been shown to preserve renal structure and function in various models of kidney disease. Since transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) is one of the major mediators of kidney injury, we investigated if inhibition of PHDs with subsequent stabilization of hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIF) might interfere with TGFβ-1 signaling with special emphasis on its target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Overnight incubation of human renal tubular cells, primary cells and cell lines, with the PDH inhibitor DMOG increased Smad3 expression, but barely affected Smad2. Both Smads were translocated into the nucleus upon activation of the cells with TGFβ-1. Interestingly, Smad3 nuclear localization was enhanced upon pretreatment of the cells with DMOG for several hours, whereas nuclear Smad2 was reduced. This differential localization was independent of Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Reduced nuclear Smad2 correlated with impaired CTGF secretion in DMOG-treated cells and transient downregulation of Smad2 interfered with TGFβ-1-induced CTGF synthesis. Furthermore, YAP was confirmed as indispensable transcription factor involved in CTGF synthesis. Nuclear localization of YAP and TAZ was reduced in DMOG-treated cells. Our data thus provide evidence for DMOG-mediated reduction of CTGF expression by regulating the nuclear localization of the transcription factors Smad2, YAP and TAZ. Prolonged inhibition of PHDs was necessary to achieve alterations in cellular localization suggesting an indirect HIF-mediated effect. This mechanism might be extended to other transcription factors and target genes, and may thus represent a novel mechanism of negative regulation of gene expression by PHD inhibition. PMID:27155083

  8. Prognostic factors affecting local control of hepatic tumors treated by stereotactic body radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with real-time tumor tracking has shown encouraging results for hepatic tumors with good efficacy and low toxicity. We studied the factors associated with local control of primary or secondary hepatic lesions post-SBRT. Methods and materials Since 2007, 153 stereotactic liver treatments were administered to 120 patients using the CyberKnife® System. Ninety-nine liver metastases (72 patients), 48 hepatocellular carcinomas (42 patients), and six cholangiocarcinomas were treated. On average, three to four sessions were delivered over 12 days. Twenty-seven to 45 Gy was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. Margins consisted of 5 to 10 mm for clinical target volume (CTV) and 3 mm for planning target volume (PTV). Results Median size was 33 mm (range, 5–112 mm). Median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 32.38 cm3 (range, 0.2–499.5 cm3). Median total dose was 45 Gy in three fractions. Median minimum dose was 27 Gy in three fractions. With a median follow-up of 15.0 months, local control rates at one and two years were 84% and 74.6%, respectively. The factors associated with better local control were lesion size < 50 mm (p = 0.019), GTV volume (p < 0.05), PTV volume (p < 0.01) and two treatment factors: a total dose of 45 Gy and a dose–per-fraction of 15 Gy (p = 0.019). Conclusions Dose, tumor diameter and volume are prognostic factors for local control when a stereotactic radiation therapy for hepatic lesions is considered. These results should be considered in order to obtain a maximum therapeutic efficacy. PMID:23050794

  9. Rotational Mobility of Single Molecules Affects Localization Accuracy in Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Matthew D.; Backlund, Mikael P.; Moerner, W. E.

    2013-01-01

    The asymmetric nature of single-molecule (SM) dipole emission patterns limits the accuracy of position determination in localization-based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. The degree of mislocalization depends highly on the rotational mobility of SMs; only for SMs rotating within a cone half angle α > 60° can mislocalization errors be bounded to ≤ 10 nm. Simulations demonstrate how low or high rotational mobility can cause resolution degradation or distortion in super-resolution reconstructions. PMID:23360306

  10. Identification of a nuclear localization sequence in the polyomavirus capsid protein VP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the C-terminal (Glu307-Glu-Asp-Gly-Pro-Gln-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Arg-Leu318) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus minor capsid protein VP2. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of newly synthesized VP2 was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP2 (expressing full-length VP2) and pSG5 delta 3VP2 (expressing truncated VP2, lacking amino acids Glu307-Leu318). These constructs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and the intracellular localization of the VP2 protein was determined by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP2 was localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP2 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. A biochemical "additive" approach was also used to determine whether this sequence could target nonnuclear proteins to the nucleus. A synthetic peptide identical to VP2 amino acids Glu307-Leu318 was cross-linked to the nonnuclear proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG). The conjugates were then labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate and microinjected into the cytoplasm of NIH 3T6 cells. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus of the microinjected cells, whereas unconjugated BSA and IgG remained in the cytoplasm. Taken together, these genetic subtractive and biochemical additive approaches have identified the C-terminal sequence of polyoma-virus VP2 (containing amino acids Glu307-Leu318) as the NLS of this protein.

  11. Ubc9 Mediates Nuclear Localization and Growth Suppression of BRCA1 and BRCA1a Proteins

    PubMed Central

    QIN, YUNLONG; XU, JINGYAO; AYSOLA, KARTIK; BEGUM, NURJAHAN; REDDY, VAISHALI; CHAI, YULI; GRIZZLE, WILLIAM E.; PARTRIDGE, EDWARD E.; REDDY, E. SHYAM P.; RAO, VEENA N.

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 gene mutations are responsible for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. In sporadic breast tumors, BRCA1 dysfunction or aberrant subcellular localization is thought to be common. BRCA1 is a nuclear–cytoplasm shuttling protein and the reason for cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 in young breast cancer patients is not yet known. We have previously reported BRCA1 proteins unlike K109R and cancer-predisposing mutant C61G to bind Ubc9 and modulate ER-α turnover. In the present study, we have examined the consequences of altered Ubc9 binding and knockdown on the subcellular localization and growth inhibitory function of BRCA1 proteins. Our results using live imaging of YFP, GFP, RFP-tagged BRCA1, BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins show enhanced cytoplasmic localization of K109 R and C61G mutant BRCA1 proteins in normal and cancer cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of Ubc9 in MCF-7 cells using Ubc9 siRNA resulted in enhanced cytoplasmic localization of BRCA1 protein and exclusive cytoplasmic retention of BRCA1a and BRCA1b proteins. These mutant BRCA1 proteins were transforming and impaired in their capacity to inhibit growth of MCF-7 and CAL51 breast cancer cells. Interestingly, cytoplasmic BRCA1a mutants showed more clonogenicity in soft agar and higher levels of expression of Ubc9 than parental MCF7 cells. This is the first report demonstrating the physiological link between cytoplasmic mislocalization of mutant BRCA1 proteins, loss of ER-α repression, loss of ubiquitin ligase activity and loss of growth suppression of BRCA1 proteins. Thus, binding of BRCA1 proteins to nuclear chaperone Ubc9 provides a novel mechanism for nuclear import and control of tumor growth. PMID:21344391

  12. Brain parcellation choice affects disease-related topology differences increasingly from global to local network levels.

    PubMed

    Lord, Anton; Ehrlich, Stefan; Borchardt, Viola; Geisler, Daniel; Seidel, Maria; Huber, Stefanie; Murr, Julia; Walter, Martin

    2016-03-30

    Network-based analyses of deviant brain function have become extremely popular in psychiatric neuroimaging. Underpinning brain network analyses is the selection of appropriate regions of interest (ROIs). Although ROI selection is fundamental in network analysis, its impact on detecting disease effects remains unclear. We investigated the impact of parcellation choice when comparing results from different studies. We investigated the effects of anatomical (AAL) and literature-based (Dosenbach) parcellation schemes on comparability of group differences in 35 female patients with anorexia nervosa and 35 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Global and local network properties, including network-based statistics (NBS), were assessed on resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at 3T. Parcellation schemes were comparably consistent on global network properties, while NBS and local metrics differed in location, but not metric type. Location of local metric alterations varied for AAL (parietal and cingulate cortices) versus Dosenbach (insula, thalamus) parcellation approaches. However, consistency was observed for the occipital cortex. Patient-specific global network properties can be robustly observed using different parcellation schemes, while graph metrics characterizing impairments of individual nodes vary considerably. Therefore, the impact of parcellation choice on specific group differences varies depending on the level of network organization. PMID:27000302

  13. Connecting the dots: how local structure affects global integration in infants

    PubMed Central

    Palomares, Melanie; Pettet, Mark; Vildavski, Vladimir; Hou, Chuan; Norcia, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Glass patterns are moirés created from a sparse random dot field paired with its spatially-shifted copy. Because discrimination of these patterns is not based on local features, they have been used extensively to study global integration processes. Here, we investigated whether 4–5.5 month old infants are sensitive to the global structure of Glass patterns by measuring Visual Evoked Potentials (VEPs). Although we found strong responses to the appearance of the constituent dots, we found sensitivity to the global structure of the Glass patterns in the infants only over a very limited range of spatial separation. In contrast, we observed robust responses in the infants when we connected the dot pairs of the Glass pattern with lines. Moreover, both infants and adults showed differential responses to exchanges between line patterns portraying different global structures. A control study varying luminance contrast in adults suggests that infant sensitivity to global structure is not primarily limited by reduced element visibility. Together our results suggest that the insensitivity to structure in conventional Glass patterns is due to inefficiencies in extracting the local orientation cues generated by the dot pairs. Once the local orientations are made unambiguous or when the interpolation span is small, infants can integrate these signals over the image. PMID:19642888

  14. Identification of novel residues involved in nuclear localization of a baculovirus polyhedrin protein.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, S; Deng, D X; Zhou, C L; Iwanaga, M; Noguchi, Y; Kobayashi, M; Maeda, S

    2000-10-01

    A baculovirus polyhedrin protein has proven to possess a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence and a domain required for supramolecular assembly. Here we investigated five Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) mutants that did not produce polyhedra. Two of five mutants were generated during routine baculoviral expression vector screening, and three were isolated by treatment with the mutagen 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU). Marker rescue mapping and nucleotide sequence analysis showed that mutations in the polyhedrin gene caused the altered phenotype of these mutants. Biochemical fractionation indicated that cells infected with these mutants exhibited polyhedrin protein in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Electron microscopic observation revealed that polyhedrin produced by these mutants ocurred in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but did not form a crystalline lattice. Despite the incompleteness of polyhedrin nuclear localization, the NLSs of the five mutants were unchanged, although some of the mutations occurred within residues just outside of the domain reported to be required for polyhedron assembly (4). This result suggests that (a) the polyhedrin NLS directs polyhedrin to the nucleus, but the efficiency of this localization is regulated by regions other than the NLS (probably, polyhedrin conformation and its association with the nucleus are also involved), and (b) formation of a crystalline lattice may also be determined by several domains within polyhedrin. PMID:11129641

  15. Cell cycle regulation of Greatwall kinase nuclear localization facilitates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Galan, Jacob A.; Normandin, Karine; Bonneil, Éric; Hickson, Gilles R.; Roux, Philippe P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Cell division requires the coordination of critical protein kinases and phosphatases. Greatwall (Gwl) kinase activity inactivates PP2A-B55 at mitotic entry to promote the phosphorylation of cyclin B–Cdk1 substrates, but how Gwl is regulated is poorly understood. We found that the subcellular localization of Gwl changed dramatically during the cell cycle in Drosophila. Gwl translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in prophase. We identified two critical nuclear localization signals in the central, poorly characterized region of Gwl, which are required for its function. The Polo kinase associated with and phosphorylated Gwl in this region, promoting its binding to 14-3-3ε and its localization to the cytoplasm in prophase. Our results suggest that cyclin B–Cdk1 phosphorylation of Gwl is also required for its nuclear exclusion by a distinct mechanism. We show that the nucleo-cytoplasmic regulation of Gwl is essential for its functions in vivo and propose that the spatial regulation of Gwl at mitotic entry contributes to the mitotic switch. PMID:23857770

  16. The defective nuclear lamina in Hutchinson-gilford progeria syndrome disrupts the nucleocytoplasmic Ran gradient and inhibits nuclear localization of Ubc9.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Joshua B; Datta, Sutirtha; Snow, Chelsi J; Chatterjee, Mandovi; Ni, Li; Spencer, Adam; Yang, Chun-Song; Cubeñas-Potts, Caelin; Matunis, Michael J; Paschal, Bryce M

    2011-08-01

    The mutant form of lamin A responsible for the premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (termed progerin) acts as a dominant negative protein that changes the structure of the nuclear lamina. How the perturbation of the nuclear lamina in progeria is transduced into cellular changes is undefined. Using patient fibroblasts and a variety of cell-based assays, we determined that progerin expression in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome inhibits the nucleocytoplasmic transport of several factors with key roles in nuclear function. We found that progerin reduces the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration of the Ran GTPase and inhibits the nuclear localization of Ubc9, the sole E2 for SUMOylation, and of TPR, the nucleoporin that forms the basket on the nuclear side of the nuclear pore complex. Forcing the nuclear localization of Ubc9 in progerin-expressing cells rescues the Ran gradient and TPR import, indicating that these pathways are linked. Reducing nuclear SUMOylation decreases the nuclear mobility of the Ran nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 in vivo, and the addition of SUMO E1 and E2 promotes the dissociation of RCC1 and Ran from chromatin in vitro. Our data suggest that the cellular effects of progerin are transduced, at least in part, through reduced function of the Ran GTPase and SUMOylation pathways. PMID:21670151

  17. Sperm Nuclear Architecture Is Locally Modified in Presence of a Robertsonian Translocation t(13;17)

    PubMed Central

    Acloque, Hervé; Bonnet-Garnier, Amélie; Mompart, Florence; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, the non-random organization of the sperm nucleus supports an early function during embryonic development. Altering this organization may interfere with the zygote development and reduce fertility or prolificity. Thus, rare studies on sperm cells from infertile patients described an altered nuclear organization that may be a cause or a consequence of their respective pathologies. Thereby, chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy can be studied not only for their adverse effects on production of normal/balanced gametes at meiosis but also for their possible impact on sperm nuclear architecture and the epigenetic consequences of altered chromosome positioning. We decided to compare the global architecture of sperm nuclei from boars, either with a normal chromosome composition or with a Robertsonian translocation involving chromosomes 13 and 17. We hypothesized that the fusion between these chromosomes may change their spatial organization and we examined to what extend it could also modify the global sperm nuclear architecture. Analysis of telomeres, centromeres and gonosomes repartition does not support a global nuclear disorganization. But specific analysis of chromosomes 13 and 17 territories highlights an influence of chromosome 17 for the positioning of the fused chromosomes within the nucleus. We also observed a specific clustering of centromeres depending of the chromosome subtypes. Altogether our results showed that chromosome fusion does not significantly alter sperm nucleus architecture but suggest that centromere remodelling after chromosome fusion locally impacts chromosome positioning. PMID:24205066

  18. Prognostic Factors Affecting Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer and Clinical Significance of Hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk Kuhn, Hildegard; Schultze, Juergen; Homann, Nils; Brandenburg, Bernd; Schulte, Rainer; Krull, Andreas; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate potential prognostic factors, including hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy, for associations with survival and local control in patients with unirradiated locally recurrent rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Ten potential prognostic factors were investigated in 94 patients receiving radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer: age ({<=}68 vs. {>=}69 years), gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0-1 vs. 2-3), American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage ({<=}II vs. III vs. IV), grading (G1-2 vs. G3), surgery, administration of chemotherapy, radiation dose (equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions: {<=}50 vs. >50 Gy), and hemoglobin levels before (<12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) and during (majority of levels: <12 vs. {>=}12 g/dL) radiotherapy. Multivariate analyses were performed, including hemoglobin levels, either before or during radiotherapy (not both) because these are confounding variables. Results: Improved survival was associated with better performance status (p < 0.001), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.023), surgery (p = 0.011), chemotherapy (p = 0.003), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL both before (p = 0.031) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, performance status, AJCC stage, and hemoglobin levels during radiotherapy maintained significance. Improved local control was associated with better performance status (p = 0.040), lower AJCC stage (p = 0.010), lower grading (p = 0.012), surgery (p < 0.001), chemotherapy (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin levels {>=}12 g/dL before (p < 0.001) and during (p < 0.001) radiotherapy. On multivariate analyses, chemotherapy, grading, and hemoglobin levels before and during radiotherapy remained significant. Subgroup analyses of the patients having surgery demonstrated the extent of resection to be significantly associated with local control (p = 0.011) but not with survival (p = 0.45). Conclusion: Predictors for outcome in patients who received radiotherapy for

  19. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-05

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome.

  20. Nuclear-localized CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α regulates phosphatidylcholine synthesis required for lipid droplet biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, Adam J.; Arsenault, Daniel J.; Ridgway, Neale D.

    2015-01-01

    The reversible association of CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase α (CCTα) with membranes regulates the synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by the CDP-choline (Kennedy) pathway. Based on results with insect CCT homologues, translocation of nuclear CCTα onto cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs) is proposed to stimulate the synthesis of PC that is required for LD biogenesis and triacylglycerol (TAG) storage. We examined whether this regulatory mechanism applied to LD biogenesis in mammalian cells. During 3T3-L1 and human preadipocyte differentiation, CCTα expression and PC synthesis was induced. In 3T3-L1 cells, CCTα translocated from the nucleoplasm to the nuclear envelope and cytosol but did not associate with LDs. The enzyme also remained in the nucleus during human adipocyte differentiation. RNAi silencing in 3T3-L1 cells showed that CCTα regulated LD size but did not affect TAG storage or adipogenesis. LD biogenesis in nonadipocyte cell lines treated with oleate also promoted CCTα translocation to the nuclear envelope and/or cytoplasm but not LDs. In rat intestinal epithelial cells, CCTα silencing increased LD size, but LD number and TAG deposition were decreased due to oleate-induced cytotoxicity. We conclude that CCTα increases PC synthesis for LD biogenesis by translocation to the nuclear envelope and not cytoplasmic LDs. PMID:26108622

  1. The yeast Ess1 prolyl isomerase controls Swi6 and Whi5 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Atencio, David; Barnes, Cassandra; Duncan, Thomas M; Willis, Ian M; Hanes, Steven D

    2014-03-01

    The Ess1 prolyl isomerase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its human ortholog, Pin1, play critical roles in transcription by regulating RNA polymerase II. In human cells, Pin1 also regulates a variety of signaling proteins, and Pin1 misexpression is linked to several human diseases. To gain insight into Ess1/Pin1 function, we carried out a synthetic genetic array screen to identify novel targets of Ess1 in yeast. We identified potential targets of Ess1 in transcription, stress, and cell-cycle pathways. We focused on the cell-cycle regulators Swi6 and Whi5, both of which show highly regulated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling during the cell cycle. Surprisingly, Ess1 did not control their transcription but instead was necessary for their nuclear localization. Ess1 associated with Swi6 and Whi5 in vivo and bound directly to peptides corresponding to their nuclear localization sequences in vitro. Binding by Ess1 was significant only if the Swi6 and Whi5 peptides were phosphorylated at Ser-Pro motifs, the target sites of cyclin-dependent kinases. On the basis of these results, we propose a model in which Ess1 induces a conformational switch (cis-trans isomerization) at phospho-Ser-Pro sites within the nuclear targeting sequences of Swi6 and Whi5. This switch would promote nuclear entry and/or retention during late M and G1 phases and might work by stimulating dephosphorylation at these sites by the Cdc14 phosphatase. This is the first study to identify targets of Ess1 in yeast other than RNA polymerase II. PMID:24470217

  2. Heterozygosity for Nuclear Factor One X Affects Hippocampal-Dependent Behaviour in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Richards, Linda J.; Burne, Thomas H. J.; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix+/−), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix+/− mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix−/− mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix+/− mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  3. Heterozygosity for nuclear factor one x affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lachlan; Dixon, Chantelle; Cato, Kathleen; Heng, Yee Hsieh Evelyn; Kurniawan, Nyoman D; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Janke, Andrew L; Gronostajski, Richard M; Richards, Linda J; Burne, Thomas H J; Piper, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the genes that regulate the development and subsequent functioning of the hippocampus is pivotal to understanding the role of this cortical structure in learning and memory. One group of genes that has been shown to be critical for the early development of the hippocampus is the Nuclear factor one (Nfi) family, which encodes four site-specific transcription factors, NFIA, NFIB, NFIC and NFIX. In mice lacking Nfia, Nfib or Nfix, aspects of early hippocampal development, including neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus, are delayed. However, due to the perinatal lethality of these mice, it is not clear whether this hippocampal phenotype persists to adulthood and affects hippocampal-dependent behaviour. To address this we examined the hippocampal phenotype of mice heterozygous for Nfix (Nfix (+/-)), which survive to adulthood. We found that Nfix (+/-) mice had reduced expression of NFIX throughout the brain, including the hippocampus, and that early hippocampal development in these mice was disrupted, producing a phenotype intermediate to that of wild-type mice and Nfix(-/-) mice. The abnormal hippocampal morphology of Nfix (+/-) mice persisted to adulthood, and these mice displayed a specific performance deficit in the Morris water maze learning and memory task. These findings demonstrate that the level of Nfix expression during development and within the adult is essential for the function of the hippocampus during learning and memory. PMID:23776487

  4. Laughing it off? Humour, affect and emotion work in communities living with nuclear risk.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, K A; Henwood, K L; Pidgeon, N F; Simmons, P

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing number of risk researchers have recognized that risks are not simply objective hazards but that the meanings of risk are discursively negotiated, dynamic and embedded within the wider social relations that constitute everyday life. A growing interest in the complexity and nuances of risk subjectivities has alerted sociocultural researchers not only to what is said in a risk situation, but also to how it is said and to what is unsaid and even, in a particular context, unsayable; to the intangible qualities of discourse that communicate additional meanings. Humour is both an intangible and marks such intangible meanings, yet it has largely been ignored and insufficiently theorized by risk researchers. In this paper, we draw upon insights from the humour literature - suspending the belief that humour is inherently good - to analyse and theorize humour as a way of examining the meanings and functions of risk. We show how humour can both mask and carefully reveal affectively charged states about living with nuclear risk. As such, it helps risk subjects to live with risk by suppressing vulnerabilities, enabling the negotiation of what constitutes a threat, and engendering a sense of empowerment. We conclude that humorous talk can be serious talk which can enrich our understandings of the lived experience of risk and of risk subjectivities. PMID:21631461

  5. An impact source localization technique for a nuclear power plant by using sensors of different types.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Chul; Park, Jin-Ho; Choi, Kyoung-Sik

    2011-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, a loose part monitoring system (LPMS) provides information on the location and the mass of a loosened or detached metal impacted onto the inner surface of the primary pressure boundary. Typically, accelerometers are mounted on the surface of a reactor vessel to localize the impact location caused by the impact of metallic substances on the reactor system. However, in some cases, the number of accelerometers is not sufficient to estimate the impact location precisely. In such a case, one of useful methods is to utilize other types of sensor that can measure the vibration of the reactor structure. For example, acoustic emission (AE) sensors are installed on the reactor structure to detect leakage or cracks on the primary pressure boundary. However, accelerometers and AE sensors have a different frequency range. The frequency of interest of AE sensors is higher than that of accelerometers. In this paper, we propose a method of impact source localization by using both accelerometer signals and AE signals, simultaneously. The main concept of impact location estimation is based on the arrival time difference of the impact stress wave between different sensor locations. However, it is difficult to find the arrival time difference between sensors, because the primary frequency ranges of accelerometers and AE sensors are different. To overcome the problem, we used phase delays of an envelope of impact signals. This is because the impact signals from the accelerometer and the AE sensor are similar in the whole shape (envelope). To verify the proposed method, we have performed experiments for a reactor mock-up model and a real nuclear power plant. The experimental results demonstrate that we can enhance the reliability and precision of the impact source localization. Therefore, if the proposed method is applied to a nuclear power plant, we can obtain the effect of additional installed sensors. PMID:20851393

  6. Molecular mechanism by which acyclic retinoid induces nuclear localization of transglutaminase 2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, R; Tatsukawa, H; Shrestha, R; Ishibashi, N; Matsuura, T; Kagechika, H; Kose, S; Hitomi, K; Imamoto, N; Kojima, S

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear accumulation of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is an important step in TG2-dependent cell death. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for nuclear translocation of TG2 are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that acyclic retinoid (ACR) induced nuclear accumulation of TG2 in JHH-7 cells, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) leading to their apoptosis. We further demonstrated molecular mechanism in nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of TG2 and an effect of ACR on it. We identified a novel 14-amino acid nuclear localization signal (NLS) 466AEKEETGMAMRIRV479 in the ‘C' domain and a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) 657LHMGLHKL664 in the ‘D' domain that allowed TG2 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic milieu. Increased nuclear import of GAPDH myc-HIS fused with the identified NLS was observed, confirming its nuclear import ability. Leptomycin B, an inhibitor of exportin-1 as well as point mutation of all leucine residues to glutamine residues in the NES of TG2 demolished its nuclear export. TG2 formed a trimeric complex with importin-α and importin-β independently from transamidase activity which strongly suggested the involvement of a NLS-based translocation of TG2 to the nucleus. ACR accelerated the formation of the trimeric complex and that may be at least in part responsible for enhanced nuclear localization of TG2 in HCC cells treated with ACR. PMID:26633708

  7. Tuning nano electric field to affect restrictive membrane area on localized single cell nano-electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Tuhin Subhra; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Chang, Hwan-You; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-12-01

    Interaction of electric field with biological cells is an important phenomenon for field induced drug delivery system. We demonstrate a selective and localized single cell nano-electroporation (LSCNEP) by applying an intense electric field on a submicron region of the single cell membrane, which can effectively allow high efficient molecular delivery but low cell damage. The delivery rate is controlled by adjusting transmembrane potential and manipulating membrane status. Thermal and ionic influences are deteriorated from the cell membrane by dielectric passivation. Either reversible or irreversible by LSCNEP can fully controlled with potential applications in medical diagnostics and biological studies.

  8. Isotropic proton-detected local-field nuclear magnetic resonancein solids

    SciTech Connect

    Havlin, Robert H.; Walls, Jamie D.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-08-04

    A new nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method is presented which produces linear, isotropic proton-detected local-field spectra for InS spin systems in powdered samples. The method, HETeronuclear Isotropic Evolution (HETIE), refocuses the anisotropic portion of the heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies by evolving the system under a series of specially designed Hamiltonians and evolution pathways. The theory behind HETIE is represented along with experimental studies conducted on a powdered sample of ferrocene, demonstrating the methodology outlined in this paper. Applications of HETIE for structural determination in solid-state NMR are discussed.

  9. Nonmyofilament-Associated Troponin T3 Nuclear and Nucleolar Localization Sequence and Leucine Zipper Domain Mediate Muscle Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tan; Birbrair, Alexander; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Troponin T (TnT) plays a major role in striated muscle contraction. We recently demonstrated that the fast skeletal muscle TnT3 isoform is localized in the muscle nucleus, and either its full-length or COOH-terminus leads to muscle cell apoptosis. Here, we further explored the mechanism by which it enters the nucleus and promotes cytotoxicity. Amino acid truncation and substitution showed that its COOH-terminus contains a dominant nuclear/nucleolar localization sequence (KLKRQK) and the basic lysine and arginine residues might play an important role in the nuclear retention and nucleolar enrichment of KLKRQK-DsRed fusion proteins. Deleting this domain or substituting lysine and arginine residues (KLAAQK) resulted in a dramatic loss of TnT3 nuclear and nucleolar localization. In contrast, the GATAKGKVGGRWK domain-DsRed construct localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, indicating that a nuclear exporting sequence is possibly localized in this region. Additionally, we identified a classical DNA-binding Leucine Zipper Domain (LZD) which is conserved among TnT isoforms and species. Deletion of LZD or KLKRQK sequence significantly reduced cell apoptosis compared to full-length TnT3. We conclude that TnT3 contains both a nuclear localization signal and a DNA binding domain, which may mediate nuclear/nucleolar signaling and muscle cell apoptosis. PMID:23378072

  10. Functional eukaryotic nuclear localization signals are widespread in terminal proteins of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Holguera, Isabel; Mencía, Mario; Salas, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    A number of prokaryotic proteins have been shown to contain nuclear localization signals (NLSs), although its biological role remains sometimes unclear. Terminal proteins (TPs) of bacteriophages prime DNA replication and become covalently linked to the genome ends. We predicted NLSs within the TPs of bacteriophages from diverse families and hosts and, indeed, the TPs of Φ29, Nf, PRD1, Bam35, and Cp-1, out of seven TPs tested, were found to localize to the nucleus when expressed in mammalian cells. Detailed analysis of Φ29 TP led us to identify a bona fide NLS within residues 1–37. Importantly, gene delivery into the eukaryotic nucleus is enhanced by the presence of Φ29 TP attached to the 5′ DNA ends. These findings show a common feature of TPs from diverse bacteriophages targeting the eukaryotic nucleus and suggest a possible common function by facilitating the horizontal transfer of genes between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. PMID:23091024

  11. Cell surface localization of importin α1/KPNA2 affects cancer cell proliferation by regulating FGF1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Tsujii, Akira; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Ikuno, Yudai; Shiromizu, Takashi; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Importin α1 is involved in nuclear import as a receptor for proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS). Here, we report that importin α1 is localized to the cell surface in several cancer cell lines and detected in their cultured medium. We also found that exogenously added importin α1 is associated with the cell membrane via interaction with heparan sulfate. Furthermore, we revealed that the cell surface importin α1 recognizes cNLS-containing substrates. More particularly, importin α1 bound directly to FGF1 and FGF2, secreted cNLS-containing growth factors, and addition of exogenous importin α1 enhanced the activation of ERK1/2, downstream targets of FGF1 signalling, in FGF1-stimulated cancer cells. Additionally, anti-importin α1 antibody treatment suppressed the importin α1−FGF1 complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, resulting in decreased cell growth. This study provides novel evidence that functional importin α1 is located at the cell surface, where it accelerates the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26887791

  12. Local variations in 14C - How is bomb-pulse dating of human tissues and cells affected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenström, Kristina; Skog, Göran; Nilsson, Carl Magnus; Hellborg, Ragnar; Svegborn, Sigrid Leide; Georgiadou, Elisavet; Mattsson, Sören

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the late 1950s and early 1960s almost doubled the amount of 14C in the atmosphere. The resulting 14C "bomb-pulse" has been shown to provide useful age information in e.g. forensic and environmental sciences, biology and the geosciences. The technique is also currently being used for retrospective cell dating in man, in order to provide insight into the rate of formation of new cells in the human body. Bomb-pulse dating relies on precise measurements of the declining 14C concentration in atmospheric CO 2 collected at clean-air sites. However, it is not always recognized that the calculations can be complicated in some cases by significant local variations in the specific activity of 14C in carbon in the air and foodstuff. This paper presents investigations of local 14C variations in the vicinities of nuclear installations and laboratories using 14C. Levels of 14C in workers using this radioisotope are also discussed.

  13. ColE1 plasmid incompatibility: localization and analysis of mutations affecting incompatibility.

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, T; Inselburg, J

    1979-01-01

    Deletion mutants of plasmid ColE1 that involve the replication origin and adjacent regions of the plasmid have been studied to determine the mechanism by which those mutations affect the expression of plasmid incompatibility. It was observed that (i) a region of ColE1 that is involved in the expression of plasmid incompatibility lies between base pairs -185 and -684; (ii) the integrity of at least part of the region of ColE1 DNA between base pairs -185 and -572 is essential for the expression of ColE1 incompatibility; (iii) the expression of incompatibility is independent of the ability of the ColE1 genome to replicate autonomously; (iv) plasmid incompatibility is affected by plasmid copy number; and (v) ColE1 plasmid-mediated DNA replication of the lambda phage-ColE1 chimera lambda imm434 Oam29 Pam3 ColE1 is inhibited by ColE1-incompatible but not by ColE1-compatible plasmids. Images PMID:378980

  14. Posttranslational Modifications of GLUT4 Affect Its Subcellular Localization and Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Jessica B. A.; Bryant, Nia J.; Gould, Gwyn W.; Welburn, Cassie R.

    2013-01-01

    The facilitative glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) is expressed in adipose and muscle and plays a vital role in whole body glucose homeostasis. In the absence of insulin, only ~1% of cellular GLUT4 is present at the plasma membrane, with the vast majority localizing to intracellular organelles. GLUT4 is retained intracellularly by continuous trafficking through two inter-related cycles. GLUT4 passes through recycling endosomes, the trans Golgi network and an insulin-sensitive intracellular compartment, termed GLUT4-storage vesicles or GSVs. It is from GSVs that GLUT4 is mobilized to the cell surface in response to insulin, where it increases the rate of glucose uptake into the cell. As with many physiological responses to external stimuli, this regulated trafficking event involves multiple posttranslational modifications. This review outlines the roles of posttranslational modifications of GLUT4 on its function and insulin-regulated trafficking. PMID:23665900

  15. Local hindlimb antioxidant infusion does not affect muscle glucose uptake during in situ contractions in rat.

    PubMed

    Merry, T L; Dywer, R M; Bradley, E A; Rattigan, S; McConell, G K

    2010-05-01

    There is evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to the regulation of skeletal muscle glucose uptake during highly fatiguing ex vivo contraction conditions via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this study we investigated the role of ROS in the regulation of glucose uptake and AMPK signaling during low-moderate intensity in situ hindlimb muscle contractions in rats, which is a more physiological protocol and preparation. Male hooded Wistar rats were anesthetized, and then N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was infused into the epigastric artery (125 mg.kg(-1).h(-1)) of one hindlimb (contracted leg) for 15 min before this leg was electrically stimulated (0.1-ms impulse at 2 Hz and 35 V) to contract at a low-moderate intensity for 15 min. The contralateral leg did not receive stimulation or local NAC infusion (rest leg). NAC infusion increased (P<0.05) plasma cysteine and cystine (by approximately 360- and 1.4-fold, respectively) and muscle cysteine (by 1.5-fold, P=0.001). Although contraction did not significantly alter muscle tyrosine nitration, reduced (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content, S-glutathionylation of protein bands at approximately 250 and 150 kDa was increased (P<0.05) approximately 1.7-fold by contraction, and this increase was prevented by NAC. Contraction increased (P<0.05) skeletal muscle glucose uptake 20-fold, AMPK phosphorylation 6-fold, ACCbeta phosphorylation 10-fold, and p38 MAPK phosphorylation 60-fold, and the muscle fatigued by approximately 30% during contraction and NAC infusion had no significant effect on any of these responses. This was despite NAC preventing increases in S-glutathionylation with contraction. In conclusion, unlike during highly fatiguing ex vivo contractions, local NAC infusion during in situ low-moderate intensity hindlimb contractions in rats, a more physiological preparation, does not attenuate increases in skeletal muscle glucose uptake or AMPK signaling. PMID:20203065

  16. Distensibility in human veins as affected by 5 weeks of repeated elevations of local transmural pressure.

    PubMed

    Kölegård, Roger; Eiken, Ola

    2011-12-01

    The objectives were to investigate the effects of repeated increments in local intravascular pressure (pressure training; PT) on (1) distensibility in two arm veins, and (2) pain in the arm induced by markedly increased intravascular pressure. Elevation of venous distending pressure (DP) in an arm was induced by placing the subject (n = 8) in a pressure chamber with one arm protruding to the outside via a port in the chamber door, and increasing chamber pressure. During 5 weeks, venous DP in one arm was repeatedly (3 × 40 min/week) increased (65-105 mmHg). Pressure-distension relationships were determined in the brachial and cephalic veins by measuring diameter changes by ultrasonography during stepwise increments in DP to 180 mmHg. In the brachial vein, the diameter change in response to an increase in DP from 30 to 180 mmHg (distensibility) was reduced (P < 0.05) in the pressure-trained arm (11%) compared to that in the control arm before (23%) and after (21%) PT. The cephalic vein showed a similar response with a reduced (P < 0.05) distensibility in the pressure-trained arm (20%) compared to that in the control arm before (29%) and after (25%) PT. At any given DP, arm pain was less (P < 0.05) in the pressure-trained arm than in the control arm before and after PT, presumably reflecting the reduced venous distensibility in the pressure-trained arm. The results support the concept that the distensibility of venous walls adapts to meet the demands imposed by the prevailing local transmural pressures. PMID:21461927

  17. Reconstruction of local fallout composition and gamma-ray exposure in a village contaminated by the first USSR nuclear test in the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Kawai, Kenta; Sakaguchi, Aya; Hoshi, Masaharu; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Apsalikov, Kazbek

    2010-11-01

    After the disintegration of the USSR in end of 1991, it became possible for foreign scientists to visit Kazakhstan, in order to investigate the radiological consequences of nuclear explosions that had been conducted at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site (SNTS). Since the first visit in 1994, our group has been continuing expeditions for soil sampling at various areas around SNTS. The current level of local fallout at SNTS was studied through γ-spectrometry for (137)Cs as well as α-spectrometry for (239,240)Pu. Average values of soil inventory from wide areas around SNTS were 3,500 and 3,700 Bq m(-2) for (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu, respectively, as of January 1, 2000. The average level of (137)Cs is comparable to that in Japan due to global fallout, while the level of (239,240)Pu is several tens of times larger than that in Japan. Areas of strong contamination were found along the trajectories of radioactive fallout, information on which was declassified after the collapse of the USSR. Our recent efforts of soil sampling were concentrated on the area around the Dolon village heavily affected by the radioactive plume from the first USSR atomic bomb test in 1949 and located 110 km east from ground zero of the explosion. Using soil inventory data, retrospective dosimetry was attempted by reconstructing γ-ray exposure from fission product nuclides deposited on the ground. Adopting representative parameters for the initial (137)Cs deposition (13 kBq m(-2)), the refractory/volatile deposition ratio (3.8) and the plume arrival time after explosion (2.5 h), an absorbed dose in air of 600 mGy was obtained for the 1-year cumulative dose in Dolon village, due to the first bomb test in 1949. Considering possible ranges of the parameters, 350 and 910 mGy were estimated for high and low cases of γ-ray dose in air, respectively. It was encouraging that the deduced value was consistent with other estimations using thermal luminescence and archived monitoring data. The present

  18. Affective behavior in patients with localized cortical excisions: role of lesion site and side.

    PubMed

    Kolb, B; Taylor, L

    1981-10-01

    The perception of emotion in verbal and facial expression, and the spontaneous production of conversational speech were studied in patients with unilateral focal excisions of frontal, temporal, or parieto-occipital cortex. Lesions of the left hemisphere impaired the matching of verbal descriptions to appropriate verbal categories of emotional states, whereas with lesions of the right hemisphere, the matching of different faces displaying similar emotional states was impaired. The effects of lesions of both left and right hemisphere occurred regardless of the locus of the lesion. On the other hand, frontal-lobe lesions had differential effects upon unsolicited talking; lesions of the left frontal lobe virtually abolished this behavior, whereas lesions of the right frontal lobe produced excessive talking. These data suggest that the nature of the behavioral stimulus as well as the locus and side of damage must be considered in the study of the neural basis of affective behavior. PMID:7280683

  19. The nuclear localization of low risk HPV11 E7 protein mediated by its zinc binding domain is independent of nuclear import receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Piccioli, Zachary; McKee, Courtney H.; Leszczynski, Anna; Onder, Zeynep; Hannah, Erin C.; Mamoor, Shahan; Crosby, Lauren; Moroianu, Junona

    2010-11-10

    We investigated the nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 protein using 1) transfection assays in HeLa cells with EGFP fusion plasmids containing 11E7 and its domains and 2) nuclear import assays in digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells with GST fusion proteins containing 11E7 and its domains. The EGFP-11E7 and EGFP-11cE7{sub 39-98} localized mostly to the nucleus. The GST-11E7 and GST-11cE7{sub 39-98} were imported into the nuclei in the presence of either Ran-GDP or RanG19V-GTP mutant and in the absence of nuclear import receptors. This suggests that 11E7 enters the nucleus via a Ran-dependent pathway, independent of nuclear import receptors, mediated by a nuclear localization signal located in its C-terminal domain (cNLS). This cNLS contains the zinc binding domain consisting of two copies of Cys-X-X-Cys motif. Mutagenesis of Cys residues in these motifs changed the localization of the EGFP-11cE7/-11E7 mutants to cytoplasmic, suggesting that the zinc binding domain is essential for nuclear localization of 11E7.

  20. Nuclear import of influenza B virus nucleoprotein: Involvement of an N-terminal nuclear localization signal and a cleavage-protection motif

    SciTech Connect

    Wanitchang, Asawin; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Jongkaewwattana, Anan

    2013-08-15

    The nucleoprotein of influenza B virus (BNP) shares several characteristics with its influenza A virus counterpart (ANP), including localization in the host's nucleus. However, while the nuclear localization signal(s) (NLS) of ANP are well characterized, little is known about those of BNP. In this study, we showed that the fusion protein bearing the BNP N-terminus fused with GFP (N70–GFP) is exclusively nuclear, and identified a highly conserved KRXR motif spanning residues 44–47 as a putative NLS. In addition, we demonstrated that residues 3–15 of BNP, though not an NLS, are also crucial for nuclear import. Results from mutational analyses of N70–GFP and the full-length BNP suggest that this region may be required for protection of the N-terminus from proteolytic cleavage. Altogether, we propose that the N-terminal region of BNP contains the NLS and cleavage-protection motif, which together drive its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • The N-terminal region of BNP is required for nuclear accumulation. • The conserved motif at position 44–47 is a putative nuclear localization signal. • The first 15 amino acids of BNP may function as a cleavage-protection motif. • BNP may get access to the nucleus via a mechanism distinct from ANP.

  1. Protein Sub-Nuclear Localization Based on Effective Fusion Representations and Dimension Reduction Algorithm LDA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shunfang; Liu, Shuhui

    2015-01-01

    An effective representation of a protein sequence plays a crucial role in protein sub-nuclear localization. The existing representations, such as dipeptide composition (DipC), pseudo-amino acid composition (PseAAC) and position specific scoring matrix (PSSM), are insufficient to represent protein sequence due to their single perspectives. Thus, this paper proposes two fusion feature representations of DipPSSM and PseAAPSSM to integrate PSSM with DipC and PseAAC, respectively. When constructing each fusion representation, we introduce the balance factors to value the importance of its components. The optimal values of the balance factors are sought by genetic algorithm. Due to the high dimensionality of the proposed representations, linear discriminant analysis (LDA) is used to find its important low dimensional structure, which is essential for classification and location prediction. The numerical experiments on two public datasets with KNN classifier and cross-validation tests showed that in terms of the common indexes of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and MCC, the proposed fusing representations outperform the traditional representations in protein sub-nuclear localization, and the representation treated by LDA outperforms the untreated one. PMID:26703574

  2. Mod5 protein binds to tRNA gene complexes and affects local transcriptional silencing

    PubMed Central

    Pratt-Hyatt, Matthew; Pai, Dave A.; Haeusler, Rebecca A.; Wozniak, Glenn G.; Good, Paul D.; Miller, Erin L.; McLeod, Ian X.; Yates, John R.; Hopper, Anita K.; Engelke, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The tRNA gene-mediated (tgm) silencing of RNA polymerase II promoters is dependent on subnuclear clustering of the tRNA genes, but genetic analysis shows that the silencing requires additional mechanisms. We have identified proteins that bind tRNA gene transcription complexes and are required for tgm silencing but not required for gene clustering. One of the proteins, Mod5, is a tRNA modifying enzyme that adds an N6-isopentenyl adenosine modification at position 37 on a small number of tRNAs in the cytoplasm, although a subpopulation of Mod5 is also found in the nucleus. Recent publications have also shown that Mod5 has tumor suppressor characteristics in humans as well as confers drug resistance through prion-like misfolding in yeast. Here, we show that a subpopulation of Mod5 associates with tRNA gene complexes in the nucleolus. This association occurs and is required for tgm silencing regardless of whether the pre-tRNA transcripts are substrates for Mod5 modification. In addition, Mod5 is bound to nuclear pre-tRNA transcripts, although they are not substrates for the A37 modification. Lastly, we show that truncation of the tRNA transcript to remove the normal tRNA structure also alleviates silencing, suggesting that synthesis of intact pre-tRNAs is required for the silencing mechanism. These results are discussed in light of recent results showing that silencing near tRNA genes also requires chromatin modification. PMID:23898186

  3. Nucleolar and nuclear localization properties of a herpesvirus bZIP oncoprotein, MEQ.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J L; Lee, L F; Ye, Y; Qian, Z; Kung, H J

    1997-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is one of the most oncogenic herpesviruses and induces T lymphomas in chickens within weeks after infection. Only a limited number of viral transcripts are detected in MDV tumor samples and cell lines. One of the major transcripts encodes MEQ, a 339-amino-acid bZIP protein which is homologous to the Jun/Fos family of transcription factors. The C-terminal half of MEQ contains proline-rich repeats and, when fused to the DNA-binding domain of a yeast transcription factor, Gal4 (residues 1 to 147), exhibits transactivation function. MEQ can dimerize with itself and with c-Jun. The MEQ-c-Jun heterodimers bind to an AP-1-like enhancer within the MEQ promoter region with greater affinity than do homodimers of either protein, and they transactivate MEQ expression. Here we show that MEQ is expressed in the nucleus but, interestingly, with a predominant fraction in the nucleoli and coiled bodies. This makes MEQ the first bZIP protein to be identified in the nucleoli. MEQ contains two stretches of basic residues, designated basic region 1 (BR1) and basic region 2 (BR2). Using a series of deletion mutants, we have mapped the primary nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the sole nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) to the BR2 region. BR1 was shown to provide an auxiliary signal in nuclear translocation. To demonstrate that BR2 is an authentic NoLS, BR2 was fused to cytoplasmic v-Raf (delta gag) kinase. The BR2-Raf fusion protein was observed to migrate into the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus. The BR2 region can be further divided into two long arginine-lysine stretches, BR2N and BR2C, which are separated by the five amino acids Asn-Arg-Asp-Ala-Ala (NRDAA). We provide evidence that the requirement for nuclear translocation is less stringent than that for nucleolar translocation, as either BR2N or BR2C alone is sufficient to translocate the cytoplasmic v-Raf (delta gag) into the nucleus, but only in combination can they translocate v-Raf (delta gag

  4. Higher-order oligomerization promotes localization of SPOP to liquid nuclear speckles.

    PubMed

    Marzahn, Melissa R; Marada, Suresh; Lee, Jihun; Nourse, Amanda; Kenrick, Sophia; Zhao, Huaying; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Kolaitis, Regina-Maria; Peters, Jennifer L; Pounds, Stanley; Errington, Wesley J; Privé, Gilbert G; Taylor, J Paul; Sharon, Michal; Schuck, Peter; Ogden, Stacey K; Mittag, Tanja

    2016-06-15

    Membrane-less organelles in cells are large, dynamic protein/protein or protein/RNA assemblies that have been reported in some cases to have liquid droplet properties. However, the molecular interactions underlying the recruitment of components are not well understood. Herein, we study how the ability to form higher-order assemblies influences the recruitment of the speckle-type POZ protein (SPOP) to nuclear speckles. SPOP, a cullin-3-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) substrate adaptor, self-associates into higher-order oligomers; that is, the number of monomers in an oligomer is broadly distributed and can be large. While wild-type SPOP localizes to liquid nuclear speckles, self-association-deficient SPOP mutants have a diffuse distribution in the nucleus. SPOP oligomerizes through its BTB and BACK domains. We show that BTB-mediated SPOP dimers form linear oligomers via BACK domain dimerization, and we determine the concentration-dependent populations of the resulting oligomeric species. Higher-order oligomerization of SPOP stimulates CRL3(SPOP) ubiquitination efficiency for its physiological substrate Gli3, suggesting that nuclear speckles are hotspots of ubiquitination. Dynamic, higher-order protein self-association may be a general mechanism to concentrate functional components in membrane-less cellular bodies. PMID:27220849

  5. Subcellular localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity during nuclear maturation in Bufo arenarum oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Inés; Cisint, Susana B; Crespo, Claudia A; Medina, Marcela F; Fernández, Silvia N

    2009-08-01

    The localization of calcium and Ca-ATPase activity in Bufo arenarum oocytes was investigated by ultracytochemical techniques during progesterone-induced nuclear maturation, under in vitro conditions. No Ca2+ deposits were detected in either control oocytes or progesterone-treated ones for 1-2 h. At the time when nuclear migration started, electron dense deposits of Ca2+ were visible in vesicles, endoplasmic reticulum cisternae and in the space between the annulate lamellae membranes. Furthermore, Ca-ATPase activity was also detected in these membrane structures. As maturation progressed, the cation deposits were observed in the cytomembrane structures, which underwent an important reorganization and redistribution. Thus, they moved from the subcortex and became located predominantly in the oocyte cortex area when nuclear maturation ended. Ca2+ stores were observed in vesicles surrounding or between the cortical granules, which are aligned close to the plasma membrane. The positive Ca-ATPase reaction in these membrane structures could indicate that the calcium deposit is an ATP-dependent process. Our results suggest that during oocyte maturation calcium would be stored in membrane structures where it remains available for release at the time of fertilization. Data obtained under our experimental conditions indicate that calcium from the extracellular medium would be important for the oocyte maturation process. PMID:19397840

  6. Nuclear localization of Lyn tyrosine kinase mediated by inhibition of its kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kikuko; Nakayama, Yuji; Togashi, Yuuki; Obata, Yuuki; Kuga, Takahisa; Kasahara, Kousuke; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Src-family kinases, cytoplasmic enzymes that participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also subcellular compartments, such as the nucleus, the Golgi apparatus and late endosomes/lysosomes. Lyn, a member of the Src-family kinases, is known to play a role in DNA damage response and cell cycle control in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear how the localization of Lyn to the nucleus is regulated. Here, we investigated the mechanism of the distribution of Lyn between the cytoplasm and the nucleus in epitheloid HeLa cells and hematopoietic THP-1 cells. Lyn was definitely detected in purified nuclei by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. Nuclear accumulation of Lyn was enhanced upon treatment of cells with leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of Crm1-mediated nuclear export. Moreover, Lyn mutants lacking the sites for lipid modification were highly accumulated in the nucleus upon LMB treatment. Intriguingly, inhibition of the kinase activity of Lyn by SU6656, Csk overexpression, or point mutation in the ATP-binding site induced an increase in nuclear Lyn levels. These results suggest that Lyn being imported into and rapidly exported from the nucleus preferentially accumulates in the nucleus by inhibition of the kinase activity and lipid modification.

  7. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy. PMID:26885617

  8. A toolbox of endogenous and heterologous nuclear localization sequences for the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weninger, Astrid; Glieder, Anton; Vogl, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) are required for the import of proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotes. However many proteins from bacteria or bacteriophages are used for basic studies in molecular biology, to generate synthetic genetic circuits or for genome editing applications. Prokaryotic recombinases, CRISPR-associated proteins such as Cas9 or bacterial and viral polymerases require efficient NLSs to function in eukaryotes. The yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used expression platform for heterologous protein production, but molecular tools such as NLSs are limited. Here we have characterized a set of 10 NLSs for P. pastoris, including the first endogenous NLSs (derived from P. pastoris proteins) and commonly used heterologous NLSs. The NLSs were evaluated by fusing them in N- and C-terminal position to an enhanced green fluorescent protein showing pronounced differences in fluorescence levels and nuclear targeting. Thereby we provide a set of different NLSs that can be applied to optimize the nuclear import of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris, paving the way for the establishment of intricate synthetic biology applications. PMID:26347503

  9. Nuclear localization of TEF3-1 promotes cell cycle progression and angiogenesis in cancer.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kaixuan; Deng, Cuilan; Xu, Jie; Men, Qiuxu; Lei, Tao; Di, Da; Liu, Ting; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Xin

    2016-03-22

    TEF3-1 (transcriptional enhancer factor 3 isoform 1), also known as TEAD4 (TEA domain family member 4), was recently revealed as an oncogenic character in cancer development. However, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms remain undefined. In this paper, we investigated nuclear TEF3-1 could promote G1/S transition in HUVECs, and the expression levels of cyclins and CDKs were upregulated. Additionally, if TEF3-1 was knocked down, the expression of cyclins and CDKs was downregulated while the expression of P21, a negative regulator of the cell cycle, was upregulated. A microarray analysis also confirmed that TEF3-1 overexpression upregulates genes that are related to cell cycle progression and the promotion of angiogenesis. Moreover, we observed that nuclear TEF3-1 was highly expressed during the formation of vascular structures in gastric cancer (GC). Finally, tumor xenograft experiments indicated that, when TEF3-1 was knocked down, tumor growth and angiogenesis were also suppressed. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that TEF3-1 localization to the nucleus stimulates the cell cycle progression in HUVECs and specifically contributes to tumor angiogenesis. Nuclear TEF3-1 in HUVECs may serve as an oncogenic biomarker, and the suppression of TEF3-1 may be a potential target in anti-tumor therapy. PMID:26885617

  10. Recruitment and post-recruit immigration affect the local population size of coral reef fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, A. R.

    1997-07-01

    This study quantifies the contributions of larval recruitment and post-recruit (juvenile and adult) immigration to net increases in population size for 150 species of fishes found on ten isolated coral patches or `bommies' (108-267 m2) within a typical reef of the Great Barrier Reef system. At least one third of the total number of recruits and immigrants to all bommies were post-recruit fishes, and movement between bommies in 136 species was detected at some time during the 22 month sampling period. The relative numbers of recruits and post-recruit immigrants per species varied widely within the assemblage, and between the replicate bommies. Populations of 95 species received both types of immigrants, 41 species had only post-recruit immigrants, and 14 species received only larval recruitment. In most species, recruitment occurred over the austral summer between October and February, while post-recruit movements occurred in both summer and winter. Rates of post-recruit immigration varied temporally within bommies, and pulses of post-recruits were less temporally concordant between bommies than pulses of recruits. This study is further evidence that post-settlement processes can have a significant effect on the local population size of reef fishes.

  11. Lamin A precursor induces barrier-to-autointegration factor nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Capanni, Cristina; Cenni, Vittoria; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Squarzoni, Stefano; Schüchner, Stefan; Ogris, Egon; Novelli, Giuseppe; Maraldi, Nadir; Lattanzi, Giovanna

    2010-07-01

    Lamin A, a protein component of the nuclear lamina, is synthesized as a precursor named prelamin A, whose multi-step maturation process involves different protein intermediates. As demonstrated in laminopathies such as familial partial lipodystrophy, mandibuloacral dysplasia, Werner syndrome, Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and restrictive dermopathy, failure of prelamin A processing results in the accumulation of lamin A protein precursors inside the nucleus which dominantly produces aberrant chromatin structure. To understand if nuclear lamina components may be involved in prelamin A chromatin remodeling effects, we investigated barrier-to-autointegration factor (BAF) localization and expression in prelamin A accumulating cells. BAF is a DNA-binding protein that interacts directly with histones, lamins and LEM-domain proteins and has roles in chromatin structure, mitosis and gene regulation. In this study, we show that the BAF heterogeneous localization between nucleus and cytoplasm observed in HEK293 cycling cells changes in response to prelamin A accumulation. In particular, we observed that the accumulation of lamin A, non-farnesylated prelamin A and farnesylated carboxymethylated lamin A precursors induce BAF nuclear translocation. Moreover, we show that the treatment of human fibroblasts with prelamin A interfering drugs results in similar changes. Finally, we report that the accumulation of progerin, a truncated form of farnesylated and carboxymethylated prelamin A identified in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells, induces BAF recruitment in the nucleus. These findings are supported by coimmunoprecipitation of prelamin A or progerin with BAF in vivo and suggest that BAF could mediate prelamin A-induced chromatin effects. PMID:20581439

  12. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  13. Factors Affecting Mental Health of Local Staff Working in the Vanni Region, Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, Barbara Lopes; Crawford, Carol; Petit, Pilar; Ghitis, Frida; Sivilli, Teresa I.; Scholte, Willem F.; Ager, Alastair; Eriksson, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    In the aftermath of the civil war that extended from 1983–2009, humanitarian organizations provided aid to the conflict-affected population of the Vanni region in northern Sri Lanka. In August, 2010, a needs assessment was conducted to determine the mental-health status of Sri Lankan national humanitarian aid staff working in conditions of stress and hardship, and consider contextual and organizational characteristics influencing such status. A total of 398 staff members from nine organizations working in the Vanni area participated in the survey, which assessed stress, work characteristics, social support, coping styles, and symptoms of psychological distress. Exposure to traumatic, chronic, and secondary stressors was common. Nineteen percent of the population met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), 53% of participants reported elevated anxiety symptoms, and 58% reported elevated depression symptoms. Those reporting high levels of support from their organizations were less likely to suffer depression and PTSD symptoms than those reporting lower levels of staff support (OR =.23, p < .001) and (OR =.26, p < .001), respectively. Participants who were age 55 or older were significantly less likely to suffer anxiety symptoms than those who were between 15 and 34 years of age (OR =.13, p = .011). Having experienced travel difficulties was significantly associated with more anxiety symptoms (OR = 3.35, p < .001). It was recommended that organizations provide stress-management training and increase support to their staff. PMID:27099648

  14. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1) occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1) nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  15. DNA Topoisomerase III Localizes to Centromeres and Affects Centromeric CENP-A Levels in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Durand-Dubief, Mickaël; Prasad, Punit; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-ACnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-ACnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-ACnp1 nucleosomes. PMID:23516381

  16. Similar local and landscape processes affect both a common and a rare newt species.

    PubMed

    Denoël, Mathieu; Perez, Amélie; Cornet, Yves; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although rare species are often the focus of conservation measures, more common species may experience similar decline and suffer from the same threatening processes. We tested this hypothesis by examining, through an information-theoretic approach, the importance of ecological processes at multiple scales in the great crested newt Triturus cristatus, regionally endangered and protected in Europe, and the more common smooth newt, Lissotriton vulgaris. Both species were similarly affected by the same processes, i.e. suitability of aquatic and terrestrial components of their habitat at different scales, connectivity among breeding sites, and the presence of introduced fish. T. cristatus depended more on water depth and aquatic vegetation than L. vulgaris. The results show that environmental pressures threaten both common and rare species, and therefore the more widespread species should not be neglected in conservation programs. Because environmental trends are leading to a deterioration of aquatic and terrestrial habitat features required by newt populations, populations of the common species may follow the fate of the rarest species. This could have substantial conservation implications because of the numerical importance of common species in ecosystems and because commonness could be a transient state moving towards rarity. On the other hand, in agreement with the umbrella species concept, targeting conservation efforts on the most demanding species would also protect part of the populations of the most common species. PMID:23658765

  17. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  18. Burnout and Psychiatric Distress in Local Caregivers Two Years After the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima Nuclear Radiation Disaster.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Kenji; Carroll, Matt; Yanagisawa, Robert; Katz, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake precipitated a triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami and nuclear radiation disaster. To quantify the prevalence of burnout and psychiatric distress in local healthcare providers (caregivers) more than 2 years after the disaster, this study surveyed caregivers from affected areas through interviews about topics of concerns and two questionnaires: Maslach Burnout Inventory and General Health Questionnaire. Concerns listed by respondents were primarily radiation related: additional stress, concern for children, concern for local food, and sleep difficulties. We found significant number of caregivers to have signs of emotional exhaustion, low personal accomplishment, and psychological distress. Our findings suggest that local caregivers are experiencing substantial mental health burdens, which have unfortunately remained static from the year prior, even 2 years after the fact. Therefore, long term psychological support and improvement in caregiver work conditions are essential to maintain sustainable care in rebuilding disaster stricken areas. PMID:26303904

  19. Nuclear Localization and Functional Characteristics of Voltage-gated Potassium Channel Kv1.3*

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-01-01

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K+ gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  20. Nuclear localization and functional characteristics of voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Byun, Jun Kyu; Jeon, Won-Il; Choi, Seon Young; Park, Jin; Lee, Bo Hyung; Yang, Ji Eun; Park, Jin Bong; O'Grady, Scott M; Kim, Dae-Yong; Ryu, Pan Dong; Joo, Sang-Woo; Lee, So Yeong

    2015-05-15

    It is widely known that ion channels are expressed in the plasma membrane. However, a few studies have suggested that several ion channels including voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels also exist in intracellular organelles where they are involved in the biochemical events associated with cell signaling. In the present study, Western blot analysis using fractionated protein clearly indicates that Kv1.3 channels are expressed in the nuclei of MCF7, A549, and SNU-484 cancer cells and human brain tissues. In addition, Kv1.3 is located in the plasma membrane and the nucleus of Jurkat T cells. Nuclear membrane hyperpolarization after treatment with margatoxin (MgTX), a specific blocker of Kv1.3 channels, provides evidence for functional channels at the nuclear membrane of A549 cells. MgTX-induced hyperpolarization is abolished in the nuclei of Kv1.3 silenced cells, and the effects of MgTX are dependent on the magnitude of the K(+) gradient across the nuclear membrane. Selective Kv1.3 blockers induce the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and c-Fos activation. Moreover, Kv1.3 is shown to form a complex with the upstream binding factor 1 in the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay reveals that Sp1 transcription factor is directly bound to the promoter region of the Kv1.3 gene, and the Sp1 regulates Kv1.3 expression in the nucleus of A549 cells. These results demonstrate that Kv1.3 channels are primarily localized in the nucleus of several types of cancer cells and human brain tissues where they are capable of regulating nuclear membrane potential and activation of transcription factors, such as phosphorylated CREB and c-Fos. PMID:25829491

  1. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Shiheido, Hirokazu; Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND356-58, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. PMID:25600804

  2. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  3. Does the volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affect short-term prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0-29 mL, 30-60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  4. Does the Volume and Localization of Intracerebral Hematoma Affect Short-Term Prognosis of Patients with Intracerebral Hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Salihović, Denisa; Smajlović, Dževdet; Ibrahimagić, Omer Ć.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether volume and localization of intracerebral hematoma affects the six-month prognosis of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Patients and Methods. The study included 75 patients with ICH of both sex and all age groups. ICH, based on CT scan findings, was divided in the following groups: lobar, subcortical, infratentorial, intraventricular haemorrhage and multiple hematomas. Volume of intracerebral hematoma was calculated according to formula V = 0.5 × a × b × c. Intracerebral hematomas, according to the volume, are divided in three groups (0–29 mL, 30–60 mL, and >60 mL). Results. The highest mortality rate was recorded in the group with multiple hematomas (41%), while the lowest in infratentorial (12.8%). The best six-month survival was in patients with a volume up to 29 mL, 30 of them (64%) survived. The highest mortality rate was recorded in patients with the hematoma volume >60 mL (85%). Kaplan-Meier's analysis showed that there was statistical significance between the size of the hematoma and the six-month survival (P < 0.0001). More than half of patients (61.1%) who survived 6 months after ICH were functionally independent (Rankin scale ≤2). Conclusion The volume of hematoma significantly affects six-month prognosis in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while localization does not. PMID:24967309

  5. Function of steroidogenic factor 1 domains in nuclear localization, transactivation, and interaction with transcription factor TFIIB and c-Jun.

    PubMed

    Li, L A; Chiang, E F; Chen, J C; Hsu, N C; Chen, Y J; Chung, B C

    1999-09-01

    Normal endocrine development and function require nuclear hormone receptor SF-1 (steroidogenic factor 1). To understand the molecular mechanism of SF-1 action, we have investigated its domain function by mutagenesis and functional analyses. Our mutant studies show that the putative AF2 (activation function 2) helix located at the C-terminal end is indispensable for gene activation. SF-1 does not have an N-terminal AF1 domain. Instead, it contains a unique FP region, composed of the Ftz-F1 box and the proline cluster, after the zinc finger motif. The FP region interacts with transcription factor IIB (TFIIB) in vitro. This interaction requires residues 178-201 of TFIIB, a domain capable of binding several transcription factors. The FP region also mediates physical interaction with c-Jun, and this interaction greatly enhances SF-1 activity. The putative SF-1 ligand, 25-hydroxycholesterol, has no effects on these bindings. In addition, the Ftz-F1 box contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). Removing the basic residues at either end of the key nuclear localization sequence NLS2.2 abolishes the nuclear transport. Expression of mutants containing only the FP region or lacking the AF2 domain blocks wild-type SF-1 activity in cells. By contrast, the mutant having a truncated nuclear localization signal lacks this dominant negative effect. These results delineate the importance of the FP and AF2 regions in nuclear localization, protein-protein interaction, and transcriptional activation. PMID:10478848

  6. Co-localization of the amyloid precursor protein and the Notch intracellular domains in nuclear transcription factories

    PubMed Central

    Konietzko, Uwe; Goodger, Zoë V.; Meyer, Michelle; Kohli, Bernhard M.; Bosset, Jérôme; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Nitsch, Roger M.

    2009-01-01

    The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) plays a major role in Alzheimer’s disease. The APP intracellular domain (AICD), together with Fe65 and Tip60, localizes to spherical nuclear AFT complexes that might represent sites of transcription. We now show that endogenous AICD is targeted to similar nuclear spots. AFT complexes were closely associated with Cajal and PML bodies but did not localize to nucleoli or splicing speckles. Live imaging revealed that AFT complexes were highly mobile within nuclei. Following pharmacological inhibition of transcription AFT complexes merged into a few large assemblies. We have previously shown that AICD regulates the expression of its own precursor APP. Transfection of APP promoter plasmids as substrates resulted in cytosolic AFT complex formation at the labeled APP promoter plasmids. In addition, identification of chromosomal APP or KAI1 gene loci by fluorescence in situ hybridization showed their close association with nuclear AFT complexes. The transcriptional activator Notch intracellular domain (NICD) localized to the same nuclear spots as occupied by AFT complexes, suggesting that these nuclear compartments correspond to transcription factories. Fe65 and Tip60 also co-localized with APP in the neurites of primary neurons. Pre-assembled AFT complexes may serve to assist fast nuclear signaling upon endoproteolytic APP cleavage. PMID:18403052

  7. Molecular analyses of nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions affecting plant growth and yield. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, K.J.

    1998-11-01

    Mitochondria have a central role in the production of cellular energy. The biogenesis and functioning of mitochondria depends on the expression of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes. One approach to investigating the role of nuclear-mitochondrial cooperation in plant growth and development is to identify combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes that result in altered but sublethal phenotypes. Plants that have certain maize nuclear genotypes in combination with cytoplasmic genomes from more distantly-related teosintes can exhibit incompatible phenotypes, such as reduced plant growth and yield and cytoplasmic male sterility, as well as altered mitochondrial gene expression. The characterization of these nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions was the focus of this grant. The authors were investigating the effects of two maize nuclear genes, RcmI and Mct, on mitochondrial function and gene expression. Plants with the teosinte cytoplasms and homozygous for the recessive rcm allele are small (miniature) and-slow-growing and the kernels are reduced in size. The authors mapped this locus to molecular markers on chromosome 7 and attempted to clone this locus by transposon tagging. The effects of the nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein profiles were also studied.

  8. Anomalous organic magnetoresistance from competing carrier-spin-dependent interactions with localized electronic and nuclear spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatté, Michael E.

    Transport of carriers through disordered electronic energy landscapes occurs via hopping or tunneling through various sites, and can enhance the effects of carrier spin dynamics on the transport. When incoherent hopping preserves the spin orientation of carriers, the magnetic-field-dependent correlations between pairs of spins influence the charge conductivity of the material. Examples of these phenomena have been identified in hopping transport in organic semiconductors and colloidal quantum dots, as well as tunneling through oxide barriers in complex oxide devices, among other materials. The resulting room-temperature magnetic field effects on the conductivity or electroluminescence require external fields of only a few milliTesla. These magnetic field effects can be dramatically modified by changes in the local spin environment. Recent theoretical and experimental work has identified a regime for low-field magnetoresistance in organic semiconductors in which the spin-relaxing effects of localized nuclear spins and electronic spins interfere1. The regime is studied experimentally by the controlled addition of localized electronic spins, through the addition of a stable free radical (galvinoxyl) to a material (MEH-PPV) that exhibits substantial room-temperature magnetoresistance (20 initially suppressed by the doping, as the localized electronic spin mixes one of the two spins whose correlation controls the transport. At intermediate doping, when one spin is fully decohered but the other is not, there is a regime where the magnetoresistance is insensitive to the doping level. For much greater doping concentrations the magnetoresistance is fully suppressed as both spins that control the charge conductivity of the material are mixed. The behavior is described within a theoretical model describing the effect of carrier spin dynamics on the current. Generalizations to amorphous and other disordered crystalline semiconductors will also be described. This work was

  9. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  10. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  11. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticles coupled with nuclear localization signal peptide for cell-nucleus targeting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G; Chin, Y Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2008-03-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  12. [GnRH analogues containing SV-40 virus T-antigen nuclear localization sequence].

    PubMed

    Burov, S V; Iablokova, T V; Dorosh, M Iu; Kriviziuk, E V; Efremov, A M; Orlov, S V

    2010-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of anticancer drugs due to their delivery to intracellular targets a set of GnRH analogues containing nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SV-40 virus large T-antigen have been synthesized. NLS was attached to the parent molecule via ε-amino group of D-Lysine in position 1 or 6 of peptide sequence using orthogonal protection strategy. The biological activity studies revealed that incorporation of NLS moiety significantly increases cytotoxic activity of palmitoyl-containing GnRH analogues in vitro. The influence of tested peptides on tumor cells does not accompanied by the destruction of cell membrane, as confirmed in experiments with normal fibroblasts, used as a control. PMID:21063449

  13. GD3 nuclear localization after apoptosis induction in HUT-78 cells.

    PubMed

    Tempera, Italo; Buchetti, Barbara; Lococo, Emanuela; Gradini, Roberto; Mastronardi, Annalisa; Mascellino, Maria Teresa; Sale, Patrizio; Mosca, Luciana; d'Erme, Maria; Lenti, Luisa

    2008-04-11

    Glycosphingolipids are essential components of plasma membrane and act as antigens, mediators of cell adhesion, and modulators of signal transduction. Following activation of the Fas receptor, gangliosides are recuited in various intracellular compartments. We have evaluated whether the pro-apoptotic anti-CD95 antibody induces a nuclear localization of GD3 in HUT-78 cells. Our data shows that GD3 translocation from cytosol to nuclei is strongly correlated to concomitant rapid phosphorylation of histone H1 shortly after induction of apoptosis. This work advances the hypothesis that GD3 induces a post-translational modification of histone H1 thus influencing the apoptosis process through transcriptional activation/repression of specific genes. PMID:18261989

  14. GD3 nuclear localization after apoptosis induction in HUT-78 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tempera, Italo; Buchetti, Barbara; Lococo, Emanuela; Gradini, Roberto; Mastronardi, Annalisa; Mascellino, Maria Teresa; Sale, Patrizio; Mosca, Luciana; D'Erme, Maria Lenti, Luisa

    2008-04-11

    Glycosphingolipids are essential components of plasma membrane and act as antigens, mediators of cell adhesion, and modulators of signal transduction. Following activation of the Fas receptor, gangliosides are recuited in various intracellular compartments. We have evaluated whether the pro-apoptotic anti-CD95 antibody induces a nuclear localization of GD3 in HUT-78 cells. Our data shows that GD3 translocation from cytosol to nuclei is strongly correlated to concomitant rapid phosphorylation of histone H1 shortly after induction of apoptosis. This work advances the hypothesis that GD3 induces a post-translational modification of histone H1 thus influencing the apoptosis process through transcriptional activation/repression of specific genes.

  15. Effect of nuclear mass on carrier-envelope-phase-controlled electron localization in dissociating molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Xu, Tian-Yu; He, Feng; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    We explore the effect of nuclear mass on the laser-driven electron localization process. We dissociate a mixed H2 and D2 target with intense, carrier-envelope-phase (CEP) stable 6 fs laser pulses and detect the products in a reaction microscope. We observe a very strong CEP-dependent asymmetry in proton and deuteron emission for low dissociation energy channels. This asymmetry is stronger for H2 than for D2. We also observe a large CEP offset between the asymmetry spectra for H2 and D2. Our theoretical simulations, based on a one-dimensional two-channel model, agree very well with the asymmetry spectra, but fail to account properly for the phase difference between the two isotopes.

  16. Novel and recurrent CIB2 variants, associated with nonsyndromic deafness, do not affect calcium buffering and localization in hair cells.

    PubMed

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Giese, Arnaud P; Shafique, Sobia; Schraders, Margit; Oonk, Anne M M; Grossheim, Mike; Oostrik, Jaap; Strom, Tim; Hegde, Rashmi; van Wijk, Erwin; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Azam, Maleeha; Yntema, Helger G; Free, Rolien H; Riazuddin, Saima; Verheij, Joke B G M; Admiraal, Ronald J; Qamar, Raheel; Ahmed, Zubair M; Kremer, Hannie

    2016-04-01

    Variants in CIB2 can underlie either Usher syndrome type I (USH1J) or nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) (DFNB48). Here, a novel homozygous missense variant c.196C>T and compound heterozygous variants, c.[97C>T];[196C>T], were found, respectively, in two unrelated families of Dutch origin. Besides, the previously reported c.272 T>C functional missense variant in CIB2 was identified in two families of Pakistani origin. The missense variants are demonstrated not to affect subcellular localization of CIB2 in vestibular hair cells in ex vivo expression experiments. Furthermore, these variants do not affect the ATP-induced calcium responses in COS-7 cells. However, based on the residues affected, the variants are suggested to alter αIIβ integrin binding. HI was nonsyndromic in all four families. However, deafness segregating with the c.272T>C variant in one Pakistani family is remarkably less severe than that in all other families with this mutation. Our results contribute to the insight in genotype-phenotype correlations of CIB2 mutations. PMID:26173970

  17. ALS mutant FUS disrupts nuclear localization and sequesters wild-type FUS within cytoplasmic stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Caroline; Scotter, Emma L.; Nishimura, Agnes L.; Troakes, Claire; Mitchell, Jacqueline C.; Kathe, Claudia; Urwin, Hazel; Manser, Catherine; Miller, Christopher C.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Dragunow, Mike; Rogelj, Boris; Shaw, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. FUS is a predominantly nuclear DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is involved in RNA processing. Large FUS-immunoreactive inclusions fill the perikaryon of surviving motor neurons of ALS patients carrying mutations at post-mortem. This sequestration of FUS is predicted to disrupt RNA processing and initiate neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that C-terminal ALS mutations disrupt the nuclear localizing signal (NLS) of FUS resulting in cytoplasmic accumulation in transfected cells and patient fibroblasts. FUS mislocalization is rescued by the addition of the wild-type FUS NLS to mutant proteins. We also show that oxidative stress recruits mutant FUS to cytoplasmic stress granules where it is able to bind and sequester wild-type FUS. While FUS interacts with itself directly by protein–protein interaction, the recruitment of FUS to stress granules and interaction with PABP are RNA dependent. These findings support a two-hit hypothesis, whereby cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS protein, followed by cellular stress, contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may sequester FUS, disrupt RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. PMID:23474818

  18. ALS mutant FUS disrupts nuclear localization and sequesters wild-type FUS within cytoplasmic stress granules.

    PubMed

    Vance, Caroline; Scotter, Emma L; Nishimura, Agnes L; Troakes, Claire; Mitchell, Jacqueline C; Kathe, Claudia; Urwin, Hazel; Manser, Catherine; Miller, Christopher C; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Dragunow, Mike; Rogelj, Boris; Shaw, Christopher E

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. FUS is a predominantly nuclear DNA- and RNA-binding protein that is involved in RNA processing. Large FUS-immunoreactive inclusions fill the perikaryon of surviving motor neurons of ALS patients carrying mutations at post-mortem. This sequestration of FUS is predicted to disrupt RNA processing and initiate neurodegeneration. Here, we demonstrate that C-terminal ALS mutations disrupt the nuclear localizing signal (NLS) of FUS resulting in cytoplasmic accumulation in transfected cells and patient fibroblasts. FUS mislocalization is rescued by the addition of the wild-type FUS NLS to mutant proteins. We also show that oxidative stress recruits mutant FUS to cytoplasmic stress granules where it is able to bind and sequester wild-type FUS. While FUS interacts with itself directly by protein-protein interaction, the recruitment of FUS to stress granules and interaction with PABP are RNA dependent. These findings support a two-hit hypothesis, whereby cytoplasmic mislocalization of FUS protein, followed by cellular stress, contributes to the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates that may sequester FUS, disrupt RNA processing and initiate motor neuron degeneration. PMID:23474818

  19. Modulation of nuclear localization of the influenza virus nucleoprotein through interaction with actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Digard, P; Elton, D; Bishop, K; Medcalf, E; Weeds, A; Pope, B

    1999-03-01

    The influenza virus genome is transcribed in the nuclei of infected cells but assembled into progeny virions in the cytoplasm. This is reflected in the cellular distribution of the virus nucleoprotein (NP), a protein which encapsidates genomic RNA to form ribonucleoprotein structures. At early times postinfection NP is found in the nucleus, but at later times it is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. NP contains several sequences proposed to act as nuclear localization signals (NLSs), and it is not clear how these are overridden to allow cytoplasmic accumulation of the protein. We find that NP binds tightly to filamentous actin in vitro and have identified a cluster of residues in NP essential for the interaction. Complexes containing RNA, NP, and actin could be formed, suggesting that viral ribonucleoproteins also bind actin. In cells, exogenously expressed NP when expressed at a high level partitioned to the cytoplasm, where it associated with F-actin stress fibers. In contrast, mutants unable to bind F-actin efficiently were imported into the nucleus even under conditions of high-level expression. Similarly, nuclear import of NLS-deficient NP molecules was restored by concomitant disruption of F-actin binding. We propose that the interaction of NP with F-actin causes the cytoplasmic retention of influenza virus ribonucleoproteins. PMID:9971805

  20. Identification of two functional nuclear localization signals in the capsid protein of duck circovirus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qi-Wang; Zou, Jin-Feng; Wang, Xin; Sun, Ya-Ni; Gao, Ji-Ming; Xie, Zhi-Jing; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Yan-Li; Jiang, Shi-Jin

    2013-02-01

    The capsid protein (CP) of duck circovirus (DuCV) is the major immunogenic protein and has a high proportion of arginine residues concentrated at the N terminus of the protein, which inhibits efficient mRNA translation in prokaryotic expression systems. In this study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of DuCV CP expressed via recombinant baculoviruses in Sf9 cells and the DNA binding activities of the truncated recombinant DuCV CPs. The results showed that two independent bipartite nuclear localization signals (NLSs) situated at N-terminal 1-17 and 18-36 amino acid residue of the CP. Moreover, two expression level regulatory signals (ELRSs) and two DNA binding signals (DBSs) were also mapped to the N terminus of the protein and overlapped with the two NLSs. The ability of CP to bind DNA, coupled with the karyophilic nature of this protein, strongly suggests that it may be responsible for nuclear targeting of the viral genome. PMID:23174505

  1. Distinct nuclear localization patterns of DNA methyltransferases in developing and mature mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Nasonkin, Igor O; Lazo, Kevin; Hambright, Dustin; Brooks, Matthew; Fariss, Robert; Swaroop, Anand

    2011-07-01

    DNA methyltransferases--DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b--produce methylation patterns that dynamically regulate chromatin remodeling and gene expression. The vertebrate retina provides an ideal model to elucidate molecular control of neurogenesis as all neuronal cell types and Müller glia are generated in a conserved order from common pools of progenitor cells. As a prelude to exploring epigenetic regulation of mammalian retinal development, we investigated the expression of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, and Dnmt3b in the mouse retina from embryonic day (E) 10.5 to 10 months of age. High levels of transcripts for all three Dnmt genes were observed in early stages of retinal differentiation, with significantly reduced expression after birth. Although DNMT1 protein is abundant in retinal progenitors at E10.5, it becomes restricted to postmitotic cells by E15.5. Most cells in the postnatal retina show nuclear immunostaining of DNMT1; however, the photoreceptors exhibit distinctive patterns. In rods, weak expression of DNMT1 is detected in perinuclear region and in the nucleus, whereas a strong nuclear labeling is evident in cones. DNMT3a and DNMT3b show a discrete pattern in developing retina with high expression at E11.5, little or no immunostaining by E15.5, and then postnatal expression overlapping with DNMT1 in early born neurons (ganglion, amacrine and horizontal cells, and cones). Robust nuclear localization of DNMTs in cones compared to rods suggests a potential role of DNA methylation in differential remodeling of chromatin in these two specialized neurons. Our studies indicate that DNA methyltransferases contribute to the establishment and maturation of cell fates during retinal development. PMID:21452232

  2. The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins promotes nuclear localization of active caspase 8

    SciTech Connect

    Manzo-Merino, Joaquin; Lizano, Marcela

    2014-02-15

    The HPV-16 E6 and E6{sup ⁎} proteins have been shown previously to be capable of regulating caspase 8 activity. We now show that the capacity of E6 to interact with caspase 8 is common to diverse HPV types, being also seen with HPV-11 E6, HPV-18 E6 and HPV-18 E6{sup ⁎}. Unlike most E6-interacting partners, caspase 8 does not appear to be a major proteasomal target of E6, but instead E6 appears able to stimulate caspase 8 activation, without affecting the overall apoptotic activity. This would appear to be mediated in part by the ability of the HPV E6 oncoproteins to recruit active caspase 8 to the nucleus. - Highlights: • Multiple HPV E6 oncoproteins interact with the caspase 8 DED domain. • HPV E6 stimulates activation of caspase 8. • HPV E6 promotes nuclear accumulation of caspase 8.

  3. Nuclear pore components affect distinct stages of intron-containing gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Amandine; Bretes, Hugo; Palancade, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Several nuclear pore-associated factors, including the SUMO-protease Ulp1, have been proposed to prevent the export of intron-containing messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) in yeast. However, the molecular mechanisms of this nuclear pore-dependent mRNA quality control, including the sumoylated targets of Ulp1, have remained unidentified. Here, we demonstrate that the apparent ‘pre-mRNA leakage’ phenotype arising upon ULP1 inactivation is shared by sumoylation mutants of the THO complex, an early mRNP biogenesis factor. Importantly, we establish that alteration of THO complex activity differentially impairs the expression of intronless and intron-containing reporter genes, rather than triggering bona fide ‘pre-mRNA leakage’. Indeed, we show that the presence of introns within THO target genes attenuates the effect of THO inactivation on their transcription. Epistasis analyses further clarify that different nuclear pore components influence intron-containing gene expression at distinct stages. Ulp1, whose maintenance at nuclear pores depends on the Nup84 complex, impacts on THO-dependent gene expression, whereas the nuclear basket-associated Mlp1/Pml39 proteins prevent pre-mRNA export at a later stage, contributing to mRNA quality control. Our study thus highlights the multiplicity of mechanisms by which nuclear pores contribute to gene expression, and further provides the first evidence that intronic sequences can alleviate early mRNP biogenesis defects. PMID:25845599

  4. Engineering light-inducible nuclear localization signals for precise spatiotemporal control of protein dynamics in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Niopek, Dominik; Benzinger, Dirk; Roensch, Julia; Draebing, Thomas; Wehler, Pierre; Eils, Roland; Di Ventura, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The function of many eukaryotic proteins is regulated by highly dynamic changes in their nucleocytoplasmic distribution. The ability to precisely and reversibly control nuclear translocation would, therefore, allow dissecting and engineering cellular networks. Here we develop a genetically encoded, light-inducible nuclear localization signal (LINuS) based on the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1. LINuS is a small, versatile tag, customizable for different proteins and cell types. LINuS-mediated nuclear import is fast and reversible, and can be tuned at different levels, for instance, by introducing mutations that alter AsLOV2 domain photo-caging properties or by selecting nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of various strengths. We demonstrate the utility of LINuS in mammalian cells by controlling gene expression and entry into mitosis with blue light. PMID:25019686

  5. Identification of a nuclear localization signal in the retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP26 protein, ceramide kinase-like protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inagaki, Yuichi; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-05-12

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. A mutation in a new ceramide kinase (CERK) homologous gene, named CERK-like protein (CERKL), was found to cause autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP26). Here, we show a point mutation of one of two putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences inhibited the nuclear localization of the protein. Furthermore, the tetra-GFP-tagged NLS, which cannot passively enter the nucleus, was observed not only in the nucleus but also in the nucleolus. Our results provide First evidence of the active nuclear import of CERKL and suggest that the identified NLS might be responsible for nucleolar retention of the protein. As recent studies have shown other RP-related proteins are localized in the nucleus or the nucleolus, our identification of NLS in CERKL suggests that CERKL likely plays important roles for retinal functions in the nucleus and the nucleolus.

  6. Phosphatidic Acid Interacts with a MYB Transcription Factor and Regulates Its Nuclear Localization and Function in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongyan; Wang, Geliang; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xuemin

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidic acid (PA) has emerged as a class of cellular mediators involved in various cellular and physiological processes, but little is known about its mechanism of action. Here we show that PA interacts with WEREWOLF (WER), a R2R3 MYB transcription factor involved in root hair formation. The PA-interacting region is confined to the end of the R2 subdomain. The ablation of the PA binding motif has no effect on WER binding to DNA, but abolishes its nuclear localization and its function in regulating epidermal cell fate. Inhibition of PA production by phospholipase Dζ also suppresses WER’s nuclear localization, root hair formation, and elongation. These results suggest a role for PA in promoting protein nuclear localization. PMID:24368785

  7. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Leukocyte Protease Binding to Nucleic Acids Promotes Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of Nucleic Acid Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Marshall P.; Whangbo, Jennifer; McCrossan, Geoffrey; Deutsch, Aaron; Martinod, Kimberly; Walch, Michael; Lieberman, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Killer lymphocyte granzyme (Gzm) serine proteases induce apoptosis of pathogen-infected cells and tumor cells. Many known Gzm substrates are nucleic acid binding proteins, and the Gzms accumulate in the target cell nucleus by an unknown mechanism. Here we show that human Gzms bind to DNA and RNA with nanomolar affinity. Gzms cleave their substrates most efficiently when both are bound to nucleic acids. RNase treatment of cell lysates reduces Gzm cleavage of RNA binding protein (RBP) targets, while adding RNA to recombinant RBP substrates increases in vitro cleavage. Binding to nucleic acids also influences Gzm trafficking within target cells. Pre-incubation with competitor DNA and DNase treatment both reduce Gzm nuclear localization. The Gzms are closely related to neutrophil proteases, including neutrophil elastase (NE) and cathepsin G (CATG). During neutrophil activation, NE translocates to the nucleus to initiate DNA extrusion into neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which bind NE and CATG. These myeloid cell proteases, but not digestive serine proteases, also bind DNA strongly and localize to nuclei and NETs in a DNA-dependent manner. Thus, high affinity nucleic acid binding is a conserved and functionally important property specific to leukocyte serine proteases. Furthermore, nucleic acid binding provides an elegant and simple mechanism to confer specificity of these proteases for cleavage of nucleic acid binding protein substrates that play essential roles in cellular gene expression and cell proliferation. PMID:24771851

  9. Local, Regional and National Responses for Medical Management of a Radiological/Nuclear Incident

    PubMed Central

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Skudlarska, Beata; Albanese, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Radiological and nuclear devices may be used by terrorists or may be the source of accidental exposure. A tiered approach has been recommended for response to a terrorist event wherein local, regional, state and federal assets become involved sequentially, as the magnitude in severity of the incident increases. State-wide hospital plans have been developed and published for Connecticut, New York and California. These plans address delineation of responsibilities of various categories of health professionals, protection of healthcare providers, identification and classification of individuals who might have been exposed to and/or contaminated by radiation and, in the case of Connecticut response plan, early management of victims. Regional response programs such as the New England Regional Health Compact (consisting of 6 member states) have been developed to manage consequences of radiation injury. The Department of Homeland Security is ultimately responsible for managing both health consequences and the crisis. Multiple US national response assets may be called upon for use in radiological incidents. These include agencies and programs that have been developed by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Defense. Coordination of national, regional and state assets with local response efforts is necessary to provide a timely and efficient response. PMID:23447742

  10. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Ningling; Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li; Xu, Hong; Li, Rong; Huang, Hefeng

    2016-02-26

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. PMID:26850853

  11. Local, regional and national responses for medical management of a radiological/nuclear incident.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Skudlarska, Beata; Albanese, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Radiological and nuclear devices may be used by terrorists or may be the source of accidental exposure. A tiered approach has been recommended for response to a terrorist event wherein local, regional, state and federal assets become involved sequentially, as the magnitude in severity of the incident increases. State-wide hospital plans have been developed and published for Connecticut, New York and California. These plans address delineation of responsibilities of various categories of health professionals, protection of healthcare providers, identification and classification of individuals who might have been exposed to and/or contaminated by radiation and, in the case of Connecticut response plan, early management of victims. Regional response programs such as the New England Regional Health Compact (consisting of 6 member states) have been developed to manage consequences of radiation injury. The Department of Homeland Security is ultimately responsible for managing both health consequences and the crisis. Multiple US national response assets may be called upon for use in radiological incidents. These include agencies and programs that have been developed by the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Defense. Coordination of national, regional and state assets with local response efforts is necessary to provide a timely and efficient response. PMID:23447742

  12. Dynamic localization of tripartite motif-containing 22 in nuclear and nucleolar bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Sun, Yang; Tan, Si Kee; Lin, Valerie C.L.

    2009-05-01

    Tripartite motif-containing 22 (TRIM22) exhibits antiviral and growth inhibitory properties, but there has been no study on the localization and dynamics of the endogenous TRIM22 protein. We report here that TRIM22 is dramatically induced by progesterone in MDA-MB-231-derived ABC28 cells and T47D cells. This induction was associated with an increase in TRIM22 nuclear bodies (NB), and an even more prominent increase in nucleolar TRIM22 bodies. Distinct endogenous TRIM22 NB were also demonstrated in several other cell lines including MCF7 and HeLa cells. These TRIM22 NB resemble Cajal bodies, co-localized with these structures and co-immunoprecipitated with p80-coilin. However, IFN{gamma}-induced TRIM22 in HeLa and MCF7 cells did not form NB, implying the forms and distribution of TRIM22 are regulated by specific cellular signals. This notion is also supported by the observation that TRIM22 NB undergoes dynamic cell-cycle dependent changes in distribution such that TRIM22 NB started to form in early G0/G1 but became dispersed in the S-phase. In light of its potential antiviral and antitumor properties, the findings here provide an interesting gateway to study the relationship between the different forms and functions of TRIM22.

  13. Aurora B–mediated localized delays in nuclear envelope formation facilitate inclusion of late-segregating chromosome fragments

    PubMed Central

    Karg, Travis; Warecki, Brandt; Sullivan, William

    2015-01-01

    To determine how chromosome segregation is coordinated with nuclear envelope formation (NEF), we examined the dynamics of NEF in the presence of lagging acentric chromosomes in Drosophila neuroblasts. Acentric chromosomes often exhibit delayed but ultimately successful segregation and incorporation into daughter nuclei. However, it is unknown whether these late-segregating acentric fragments influence NEF to ensure their inclusion in daughter nuclei. Through live analysis, we show that acentric chromosomes induce highly localized delays in the reassembly of the nuclear envelope. These delays result in a gap in the nuclear envelope that facilitates the inclusion of lagging acentrics into telophase daughter nuclei. Localized delays of nuclear envelope reassembly require Aurora B kinase activity. In cells with reduced Aurora B activity, there is a decrease in the frequency of local nuclear envelope reassembly delays, resulting in an increase in the frequency of acentric-bearing, lamin-coated micronuclei. These studies reveal a novel role of Aurora B in maintaining genomic integrity by promoting the formation of a passageway in the nuclear envelope through which late-segregating acentric chromosomes enter the telophase daughter nucleus. PMID:25877868

  14. A novel nuclear localization signal in the auxiliary domain of apobec-1 complementation factor regulates nucleocytoplasmic import and shuttling.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Valerie; Kennedy, Susan; Davidson, Nicholas O

    2003-10-17

    C to U editing of the nuclear apolipoprotein B (apoB) transcript is mediated by a core enzyme containing a catalytic deaminase, apobec-1, and an RNA binding subunit, apobec-1 complementation factor (ACF). ACF expression is predominantly nuclear, including mutant proteins with deletions of a putative nuclear localization signal. We have now identified a novel 41-residue motif (ANS) in the auxiliary domain of ACF that functions as an authentic nuclear localization signal. ANS-green fluorescence protein and ANS-beta-galactosidase chimeras were both expressed exclusively in the nucleus, whereas wild-type chimeras or an ACF deletion mutant lacking the ANS were cytoplasmic. Nuclear accumulation of ACF is transcription-dependent, temperature-sensitive, and reversible, features reminiscent of a shuttling protein. ACF relocates to the cytoplasm after actinomycin D treatment, an effect blocked by the CRM1 inhibitor leptomycin B. Heterokaryon assays confirmed directly that ACF shuttles in vivo. ACF binds to the protein carrier, transportin 2 in vivo, and colocalizes to the nucleus as determined by confocal microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that transportin 2 binds directly to the ANS motif. These data suggest that directed nuclear localization and compartmentalization of the core complex of the apoB RNA editing enzyme is regulated through a dominant targeting sequence (ANS) contained within ACF. PMID:12896982

  15. A Role for the GSG Domain in Localizing Sam68 to Novel Nuclear Structures in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Boisvert, François-Michel; Bazett-Jones, David P.; Richard, Stéphane

    1999-01-01

    The GSG (GRP33, Sam68, GLD-1) domain is a protein module found in an expanding family of RNA-binding proteins. The numerous missense mutations identified genetically in the GSG domain support its physiological role. Although the exact function of the GSG domain is not known, it has been shown to be required for RNA binding and oligomerization. Here it is shown that the Sam68 GSG domain plays a role in protein localization. We show that Sam68 concentrates into novel nuclear structures that are predominantly found in transformed cells. These Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) are distinct from coiled bodies, gems, and promyelocytic nuclear bodies. Electron microscopic studies show that SNBs are distinct structures that are enriched in phosphorus and nitrogen, indicating the presence of nucleic acids. A GFP-Sam68 fusion protein had a similar localization as endogenous Sam68 in HeLa cells, diffusely nuclear with two to five SNBs. Two other GSG proteins, the Sam68-like mammalian proteins SLM-1 and SLM-2, colocalized with endogenous Sam68 in SNBs. Different GSG domain missense mutations were investigated for Sam68 protein localization. Six separate classes of cellular patterns were obtained, including exclusive SNB localization and association with microtubules. These findings demonstrate that the GSG domain is involved in protein localization and define a new compartment for Sam68, SLM-1, and SLM-2 in cancer cell lines. PMID:10473643

  16. Comparison and characterization of α-amylase inducers in Aspergillus nidulans based on nuclear localization of AmyR.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Yuriko; Makita, Tomohiro; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2012-06-01

    AmyR, a fungal transcriptional activator responsible for induction of amylolytic genes in Aspergillus nidulans, localizes to the nucleus in response to the physiological inducer isomaltose. Maltose, kojibiose, and D: -glucose were also found to trigger the nuclear localization of GFP-AmyR. Isomaltose- and kojibiose-triggered nuclear localization was not inhibited by the glucosidase inhibitor, castanospermine, while maltose-triggered localization was inhibited. Thus, maltose itself does not appear to be an direct inducer, but its degraded or transglycosylated product does. Non-metabolizable D: -glucose analogues were also able to trigger the nuclear localization, implying that these sugars, except maltose, directly function as the inducers of AmyR nuclear entry. The inducing activity of D: -glucose was 4 orders-of-magnitude weaker compared with isomaltose. Although D: -glucose has the ability to induce α-amylase production, this activity would generally be masked by CreA-dependent carbon catabolite repression. Significant induction of α-amylase by D: -glucose was observed in creA-defective A. nidulans. PMID:22252265

  17. Nuclear localization of the Hermes transposase depends on basic amino acid residues at the N-terminus of the protein.

    PubMed

    Michel, K; Atkinson, P W

    2003-07-01

    For the Hermes transposable element to be mobilized in its eukaryotic host, the transposase, encoded by the element, must make contact with its DNA. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, the transposase has to be actively imported into the nucleus because its size of 70.1 kDa prevents passive diffusion through the nuclear pore. Studies in vitro using transient expression of a Hermes-EGFP fusion protein in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 cells showed the transposase was located predominantly in the nucleus. In silico sequence analysis, however, did not reveal any nuclear localization signal (NLS). To identify the sequence(s) responsible for localization of Hermes transposase in the nucleus, truncated or mutated forms of the transposase were examined for their influence on sub-cellular localization of marker proteins fused to the transposase. Using the same expression system and a GFP-GUS fusion double marker, residues 1-110 were recognized as sufficient, and residues 1-32 as necessary, for nuclear localization. Amino acid K25 greatly facilitated nuclear localization, indicating that at least this basic amino acid plays a significant role in this process. This sequence overlaps the proposed DNA binding region of the Hermes transposase and is not necessarily conserved in all members of the hAT transposable element family. PMID:12858343

  18. Functional analysis of the C-terminal region of human adenovirus E1A reveals a misidentified nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Michael J.; King, Cason R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2014-11-15

    The immortalizing function of the human adenovirus 5 E1A oncoprotein requires efficient localization to the nucleus. In 1987, a consensus monopartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) was identified at the C-terminus of E1A. Since that time, various experiments have suggested that other regions of E1A influence nuclear import. In addition, a novel bipartite NLS was recently predicted at the C-terminal region of E1A in silico. In this study, we used immunofluorescence microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation analysis with importin-α to verify that full nuclear localization of E1A requires the well characterized NLS spanning residues 285–289, as well as a second basic patch situated between residues 258 and 263 ({sup 258}RVGGRRQAVECIEDLLNEPGQPLDLSCKRPRP{sup 289}). Thus, the originally described NLS located at the C-terminus of E1A is actually a bipartite signal, which had been misidentified in the existing literature as a monopartite signal, altering our understanding of one of the oldest documented NLSs. - Highlights: • Human adenovirus E1A is localized to the nucleus. • The C-terminus of E1A contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS). • This signal was previously misidentified to be a monopartite NLS. • Key basic amino acid residues within this sequence are highly conserved.

  19. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  20. Physiological and Pathological Aging Affects Chromatin Dynamics, Structure and Function at the Nuclear Edge.

    PubMed

    Robin, Jérôme D; Magdinier, Frédérique

    2016-01-01

    Lamins are intermediate filaments that form a complex meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. Mammalian cells express two types of Lamins, Lamins A/C and Lamins B, encoded by three different genes, LMNA, LMNB1, and LMNB2. Mutations in the LMNA gene are associated with a group of phenotypically diverse diseases referred to as laminopathies. Lamins interact with a large number of binding partners including proteins of the nuclear envelope but also chromatin-associated factors. Lamins not only constitute a scaffold for nuclear shape, rigidity and resistance to stress but also contribute to the organization of chromatin and chromosomal domains. We will discuss here the impact of A-type Lamins loss on alterations of chromatin organization and formation of chromatin domains and how disorganization of the lamina contributes to the patho-physiology of premature aging syndromes. PMID:27602048

  1. Structural determination of importin alpha in complex with beak and feather disease virus capsid nuclear localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Edward I.; Dombrovski, Andrew K.; Swarbrick, Crystall M.D.; Raidal, Shane R.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Circovirus capsid proteins contain large nuclear localization signals (NLS). •A method of nuclear import has not been elucidated. •Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) capsid NLS was crystallized with importin α. •The structure showed BFDV NLS binding to the major site of importin α. •Result shows implications for mechanism of nuclear transport for all circoviruses. -- Abstract: Circoviruses represent a rapidly increasing genus of viruses that infect a variety of vertebrates. Replication requires shuttling viral molecules into the host cell nucleus, a process facilitated by capsid-associated protein (Cap). Whilst a nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been shown to mediate nuclear translocation, the mode of nuclear transport remains to be elucidated. To better understand this process, beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) Cap NLS was crystallized with nuclear import receptor importin-α (Impα). Diffraction yielded structural data to 2.9 Å resolution, and the binding site on both Impα and BFDV Cap NLS were well resolved. The binding mechanism for the major site is likely conserved across circoviruses as supported by the similarity of NLSs in circovirus Caps. This finding illuminates a crucial step for infection of host cells by this viral family, and provides a platform for rational drug design against the binding interface.

  2. The neuroanatomical basis of affective mentalizing in schizophrenia: comparison of patients with schizophrenia and patients with localized prefrontal lesions.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Levkovitz, Yechiel

    2007-02-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show impaired emotional and social behavior, such as misinterpretation of social situations and lack of Theory of Mind (ToM). However, the neuroanatomical basis of impaired ToM and its nature in schizophrenia is still largely unknown. Based on previous findings, the present study suggests that impaired social cognition observed in schizophrenic patients may be similar to that observed in patients with prefrontal (PFC) damage due to impaired 'affective ToM' abilities, rather than to a general impairment in ToM. We examined the behavioral and neural mechanisms that underlie the social and communicative impairments observed in patients with schizophrenia and with PFC damage, by looking at differential patterns of ToM impairment in these individuals. The performance of 24 patients with schizophrenia was compared to the responses of patients with localized lesions in the ventromedial (VM) or dorsolateral PFC, patients with non-frontal lesions, and healthy control subjects. Patients with schizophrenia and those with VM lesions were impaired on 'affective ToM' tasks but not in cognitive ToM conditions. It was concluded that the pattern of mentalizing impairments in schizophrenia resembled those seen in patients with lesions of the frontal lobe, particularly with VM damage, providing support for the notion of a disturbance of the fronto-limbic circuits in schizophrenia. PMID:17182218

  3. The transcriptional activities and cellular localization of the human estrogen receptor alpha are affected by the synonymous Ala87 mutation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Astrada, Soledad; Alberti, Alvaro; Horjales, Sofía; Arnal, Jean Francois; Rovira, Carlos; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Flouriot, Gilles; Marin, Mónica

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, synonymous mutations (which do not change amino acids) have been much neglected. Some evidence suggests that this kind of mutations could affect mRNA secondary structure or stability, translation kinetics and protein structure. To explore deeper the role of synonymous mutations, we studied their consequence on the functional activity of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). The ERα is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that orchestrates pleiotropic cellular effects, at both genomic and non-genomic levels in response to estrogens. In this work we analyzed in transient transfection experiments, the activity of ERα carrying the synonymous mutation Ala87, a polymorphism involving about 5-10% of the population. In comparison to the wild type receptor, our results show that ERαA87 mutation reduces the transactivation efficiency of ERα on an ERE reporter gene while its expression level remains similar. This mutation enhances 4-OHT-induced transactivation of ERα on an AP1 reporter gene. Finally, the mutation affects the subcellular localization of ERα in a cell type specific manner. It enhances the cytoplasmic location of ERα without significant changes in non-genomic effects of E2. The functional alteration of the ERαA87 determined in this work highlights the relevance of synonymous mutations for biomedical and pharmacological points of view. PMID:24607813

  4. Interferon regulatory factor subcellular localization is determined by a bipartite nuclear localization signal in the DNA-binding domain and interaction with cytoplasmic retention factors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Joe F.; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M.

    2000-01-01

    The transduction of type I interferon signals to the nucleus relies on activation of a protein complex, ISGF3, involving two signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, STAT1 and STAT2, and the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) protein, p48/ISGF3γ. The STAT subunits are cytoplasmically localized in unstimulated cells and rapidly translocate to the nucleus of IFN-stimulated cells, but the p48/ISGF3γ protein is found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm, regardless of IFN stimulation. Here, we demonstrate that p48 is efficiently and constitutively targeted to the nucleus. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of green fluorescent protein-p48 fragments indicates that p48 contains a bipartite nuclear retention signal within its amino-terminal DNA-binding domain. This signal is preserved in two other IRF proteins involved in immune responses, ICSBP and IRF4. Mutations to clustered basic residues within amino acids 50–100 of p48 or IRF4 disrupt their nuclear accumulation, and DNA-binding ability is not required for nuclear targeting. This is the only example of a nuclear localization signal for any ISGF3 component and assigns a second function to the IRF DNA-binding domain. We also demonstrate that the nuclear distribution of p48 is dramatically altered by coexpression of the STAT2 protein, indicating that STAT2 forms a cytoplasmic complex with p48, overriding the intrinsic p48 nuclear targeting. Retention by STAT2 may serve to regulate the activity of free p48 and/or guarantee that cytoplasmic pools of preassociated STAT2:p48 are available for rapid activation of the IFN response. These findings suggest that analogous mechanisms may exist for regulating the distribution of other IRF proteins. PMID:10860992

  5. Post-translational regulation and nuclear entry of TIMELESS and PERIOD are affected in new timeless mutant

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Taichi; Koh, Kyunghee; Combs, David J.; Sehgal, Amita

    2011-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock consists of a feedback loop in which canonical clock proteins negatively regulate transcription of their own genes. Timed nuclear entry of these proteins is critical, but regulation of this event is poorly understood. In Drosophila melanogaster, the idea that nuclear entry of PERIOD (PER) is controlled by its partner protein, TIMELESS (TIM), has been challenged by several studies. We identify here a novel mutation in the tim gene that eliminates behavioral rhythms while allowing robust expression of TIM and PER. Mutant TIM can bind to and stabilize PER. However, neither protein is expressed cyclically, and phosphorylation of both is reduced. In addition, TIM and PER are localized in the cytoplasm at all times of day and mutant TIM attenuates transcriptional feedback by PER in cultured cells, suggesting that it holds PER in the cytoplasm. In fact, much of the reduced phosphorylation of PER in the new tim mutant appears to result from the cytoplasmic localization of PER. Interestingly, mutating a threonine near the original mutation produces similar phenotypes, raising the possibility that defective phosphorylation is the basis of TIM dysfunction in the novel tim mutant. We also show that a stable form of PER is cytoplasmic in tim-null flies. These studies establish an essential role of TIM in the timed nuclear entry of PER. PMID:21734289

  6. Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) increases cell death of human osteosarcoma cells and binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Hakan; Lindholm, Dan

    2008-02-08

    Nuclear localized protein-1 (Nulp1) is a recently identified gene expressed in mouse and human tissues particularly during embryonic development. Nulp1 belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that are important in development. The precise function of Nulp1 in cells is however not known. We observed that overexpression of Nulp1 induces a large increase in cell death of human osteosarcoma Saos2 cells with DNA fragmentation. In mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells Nulp1 affected cell proliferation and sensitized cells towards death induced by staurosporine. Staining using a novel antibody localized Nulp1 mainly to the cell nucleus and to some extent to the cytoplasm. Nulp1 binds the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and this interaction was increased during cell death. These results indicate that Nulp1 plays a role in cell death control and may influence tumor growth.

  7. Nuclear F-actin enhances the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by increasing its nuclear localization and binding to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shota; Yamamoto, Koji; de Lanerolle, Primal; Harata, Masahiko

    2016-04-01

    Actin plays multiple roles both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Cytoplasmic actin, in addition to its structural role in the cytoskeleton, also contributes to the subcellular localization of transcription factors by interacting with them or their partners. The transcriptional cofactor β-catenin, which acts as an intracellular transducer of canonical Wnt signaling, indirectly associates with the cytoplasmic filamentous actin (F-actin). Recently, it has been observed that F-actin is transiently formed within the nucleus in response to serum stimulation and integrin signaling, and also during gene reprogramming. Despite these earlier observations, information about the function of nuclear F-actin is poorly defined. Here, by facilitating the accumulation of nuclear actin artificially, we demonstrate that polymerizing nuclear actin enhanced the nuclear accumulation and transcriptional function of β-catenin. Our results also show that the nuclear F-actin colocalizes with β-catenin and enhances the binding of β-catenin to the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, including the genes for the cell cycle regulators c-myc and cyclin D, and the OCT4 gene. Nuclear F-actin itself also associated with these genes. Since Wnt/β-catenin signaling has important roles in cell differentiation and pluripotency, our observations suggest that nuclear F-actin formed during these biological processes is involved in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26900020

  8. Red-channel (6000-8000 Å) nuclear spectra of 376 local galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Consolandi, Guido; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo; Savorgnan, Giulia; Gualandi, Roberto; Bruni, Ivan

    2013-10-01

    We obtained long-slit optical spectra of the nuclear regions of 376 galaxies in the local Universe using the 1.5 m Cassini telescope of Bologna Observatory. Of these spectra, 164 were either never taken before by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), or given by the Nasa Extragalactic Database (NED). With these new spectra, we contribute investigating the occurrence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Nevertheless, we stress that the present sample is by no means complete, thus, it cannot be used to perform any demographic study. Following the method used in a previous work, we classify the nuclear spectra using a six bin scheme: SEY (Seyfert), sAGN (strong AGN), and wAGN (weak AGN) represent active galactic nuclei of different levels of activity; HII accounts for star-forming nuclei; RET (retired) and PAS (passive) refer to nuclei with poor or no star-formation activity. The spectral classification is performed using the ratio of λ 6584 [NII] to Hα lines and the equivalent width (EW) of Hα versus [NII] /Hα (WHAN diagnostic introduced by Cid Fernandes and collaborators) after correcting Hα for underlying absorption. The obtained spectra are made available in machine readable format via the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) and NED. Full Tables 3 and 4 and Fig. 4 (in FITS format) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/558/A68

  9. EGFR Signaling Regulates Maspin/SerpinB5 Phosphorylation and Nuclear Localization in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Jeffrey; Morais Freitas, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Maspin (SerpinB5) is a non-inhibitory serpin (serine protease inhibitor) with very diverse biological activities including regulation of cell adhesion, migration, death, control of gene expression and oxidative stress response. Initially described as a tumor and metastasis suppressor, clinical data brought controversies to the field, as some studies reported no correlation between SerpinB5 expression and prognosis value. These data underscore the importance of understanding SerpinB5 function in a normal physiological context and the molecular mechanism involved. Several SerpinB5 phosphoforms have been detected in different cell lines, but the signaling pathways involved and the biological significance of this post-translational modification in vivo remains to be explored. In this study we investigated SerpinB5 expression, subcellular localization and phosphorylation in different stages of the mouse mammary gland development and the signaling pathway involved. Here we show that SerpinB5 is first detected in late pregnancy, reaches its highest levels in lactation and remains at constant levels during post-lactational regression (involution). Using high resolution isoelectric focusing followed but immunoblot, we found at least 8 different phosphoforms of SerpinB5 during lactation, which decreases steadily at the onset of involution. In order to investigate the signaling pathway involved in SerpinB5 phosphorylation, we took advantage of the non-transformed MCF-10A model system, as we have previously observed SerpinB5 phosphorylation in these cells. We detected basal levels of SerpinB5 phosphorylation in serum- and growth factor-starved cells, which is due to amphiregulin autocrine activity on MCF-10A cells. EGF and TGF alpha, two other EGFR ligands, promote important SerpinB5 phosphorylation. Interestingly, EGF treatment is followed by SerpinB5 nuclear accumulation. Altogether, these data indicate that SerpinB5 expression and phosphorylation are developmentally

  10. Characterization of microstructure, local deformation and microchemistry in Alloy 690 heat-affected zone and stress corrosion cracking in high temperature water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhanpeng; Chen, Junjie; Shoji, Tetsuo; Takeda, Yoichi; Yamazaki, Seiya

    2015-10-01

    With increasing the distance from the weld fusion line in an Alloy 690 heat-affected zone, micro-hardness decreases, kernel average misorientation decreases and the fraction of Σ3 boundaries increases. Chromium depletion at grain boundaries in the Alloy 690 heat-affected zone is less significant than that in an Alloy 600 heat-affected zone. Alloy 690 heat-affected zone exhibits much higher IGSCC resistance than Alloy 600 heat-affected zone in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water. Heavily cold worked Alloy 690 exhibits localized intergranular stress corrosion cracking. The effects of metallurgical and mechanical properties on stress corrosion cracking in Alloy 690 are discussed.

  11. Functional Analysis of Nuclear Localization Signals in VP1-2 Homologues from All Herpesvirus Subfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, T.; Abaitua, F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The herpes simplex virus (HSV) tegument protein VP1-2 contains an N-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) that is critical for capsid routing to the nuclear pore. Here we analyzed positionally conserved determinants in VP1-2 homologues from each of the alpha, beta, and gamma classes of human herpesviruses. The overall architectures of the VP1-2s were similar, with a conserved N-terminal ubiquitin-specific protease domain separated from an internal region by a linker that was quite poorly conserved in length and sequence. Within this linker region all herpesviruses contained a conserved, highly basic motif which nevertheless exhibited distinct class-specific features. The motif in HSV functioned as a monopartite NLS, while in varicella-zoster virus (VZV) activity required an adjacent basic section defining the motif as a bipartite NLS. Neither the beta- nor gammaherpesvirus VP1-2 motifs were identified by prediction algorithms, but they nevertheless functioned as efficient NLS motifs both in heterologous transfer assays and in HSV VP1-2. Furthermore, though with different efficiencies and with the exception of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), these chimeric variants rescued the replication defect of an HSV mutant lacking its NLS motif. We demonstrate that the lysine at position 428 of HSV is critical for replication, with a single alanine substitution being sufficient to abrogate NLS function and virus growth. We conclude that the basic motifs of each of the VP1-2 proteins are likely to confer a similar function in capsid entry in the homologous setting and that while there is flexibility in the exact type of motif employed, specific individual residues are critical for function. IMPORTANCE To successfully infect cells, all herpesviruses, along with many other viruses, e.g., HIV, hepatitis B virus, and influenza virus, must navigate through the cytoplasmic environment and dock with nuclear pores for transport of their genomes into the nucleus. However, we

  12. Quantitative cw Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the Analysis of Local Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Pavlova, Anna; Scott, John A.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Liquid state Overhauser Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) has experienced a recent resurgence of interest. The ODNP technique described here relies on the double resonance of electron spin resonance (ESR) at the most common, i.e. X-band (~ 10 GHz), frequency and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at ~ 15 MHz. It requires only a standard continuous wave (cw) ESR spectrometer with an NMR probe inserted or built into an X-band cavity. Our focus lies on reviewing a new and powerful manifestation of ODNP as a high frequency NMR relaxometry tool that probes dipolar cross relaxation between the electron spins and the 1H nuclear spins at X-band frequencies. This technique selectively measures the translational mobility of water within a volume extending 0.5–1.5 nm outward from a nitroxide radical spin probe that is attached to a targeted site of a macromolecule. This method has been applied to study the dynamics of water that hydrates or permeates the surface or interior of proteins, polymers, and lipid membrane vesicles. We begin by reviewing the recent advances that have helped develop ODNP into a tool for mapping the dynamic landscape of hydration water with sub-nanometer locality. In order to bind this work coherently together, and to place it in the context of the extensive body of research in the field of NMR relaxometry, we then rephrase the analytical model and extend the description of the ODNP-derived NMR signal enhancements. This extended model highlights several aspects of ODNP data analysis, including the importance of considering all possible effects of microwave sample heating, the need to consider the error associated with various relaxation rates, and the unique ability of ODNP to probe the electron–1H cross-relaxation process, which is uniquely sensitive to fast (tens of ps) dynamical processes. By implementing the relevant corrections in a stepwise fashion, this paper draws a consensus result from previous ODNP procedures, and then shows

  13. Identification of cis- and trans-acting factors involved in the localization of MALAT-1 noncoding RNA to nuclear speckles

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Tano, Keiko; Mizuno, Rie; Nakamura, Yo; Ijiri, Kenichi; Rakwal, Randeep; Shibato, Junko; Masuo, Yoshinori; Mayeda, Akila; Hirose, Tetsuro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    MALAT-1 noncoding RNA is localized to nuclear speckles despite its mRNA-like characteristics. Here, we report the identification of several key factors that promote the localization of MALAT-1 to nuclear speckles and also provide evidence that MALAT-1 is involved in the regulation of gene expression. Heterokaryon assays revealed that MALAT-1 does not shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. RNAi-mediated repression of the nuclear speckle proteins, RNPS1, SRm160, or IBP160, which are well-known mRNA processing factors, resulted in the diffusion of MALAT-1 to the nucleoplasm. We demonstrated that MALAT-1 contains two distinct elements directing transcripts to nuclear speckles, which were also capable of binding to RNPS1 in vitro. Depletion of MALAT-1 represses the expression of several genes. Taken together, our results suggest that RNPS1, SRm160, and IBP160 contribute to the localization of MALAT-1 to nuclear speckles, where MALAT-1 could be involved in regulating gene expression. PMID:22355166

  14. Interaction with the histone chaperone Vps75 promotes nuclear localization and HAT activity of Rtt109 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Kristin M.; Pemberton, Lucy F.

    2011-01-01

    Modification of histones is critical for the regulation of all chromatin-templated processes. Yeast Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that acetylates H3 lysines 9, 27 and 56. Rtt109 associates with and is stabilized by Nap1 family histone chaperone Vps75. Our data suggest Vps75 and Nap1 have some overlapping functions despite their different cellular localization and histone binding specificity. We determined that Vps75 contains a classical nuclear localization signal and is imported by Kap60–Kap95. Rtt109 nuclear localization depends on Vps75, and nuclear localization of the Vps75-Rtt109 complex is not critical for Rtt109-dependent functions, suggesting Rtt109 may be able to acetylate nascent histones before nuclear import. To date, the effects of VPS75 deletion on Rtt109 function had not been separated from the resulting Rtt109 degradation; thus, we used an Rtt109 mutant lacking the Vps75-interaction domain that is stable without Vps75. Our data show that in addition to promoting Rtt109 stability, Vps75 binding is necessary for Rtt109 acetylation of the H3 tail. Direct interaction of Vps75 with H3 likely allows Rtt109 access to the histone tail. Furthermore, our genetic interaction data support the idea of Rtt109-independent functions of Vps75. In summary, our data suggest that Vps75 influences chromatin structure by regulating histone modification and through its histone chaperone functions. PMID:21463458

  15. A Study of Community Leaders in a Nuclear Host Community: Local Issues, Expectations and Support and Opposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfman, B. H.

    As part of a continuing effort to assess the social impacts on communities of energy facility planning, construction, operation, and decommissioning, a May 1977 survey of 37 community leaders in Hartsville, Tennessee (site of a nuclear power plant) establishes major local issues (past, present, and future) which leaders feel are important to…

  16. Rapid targeting of plasmid DNA to zebrafish embryo nuclei by the nuclear localization signal of SV40 T antigen.

    PubMed

    Collas, P; Aleström, P

    1997-03-01

    Binding SV40 T antigen nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to plasmid DNA promotes transgene expression following injection of DNA-NLS complexes into the cytoplasm of zebrafish eggs. We now demonstrate that NLS peptides mediate import of DNA from the cytoplasm into embryo nuclei, under conditions in which naked DNA is not imported. Plasmid DNA was localized by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in isolated nuclei, and relative amounts were quantified by densitometry. Binding DNA to NLSs, but not to nuclear-import-deficient peptides, promoted rapid targeting of DNA-NLS complexes to nuclei, and transport across the nuclear envelope. Import of DNA-NLS complexes was competed by co-injected albumin-NLS conjugates. NLS, but not reverse NLS, was detected on blots of nuclei probed with 32P-labeled DNA. The results suggest that NLS-mediated DNA transfer into nuclei may constitute a valuable tool for several gene transfer applications. PMID:9116870

  17. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  18. Quantitative assessment of in situ microbial communities affecting nuclear waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |

    1996-05-01

    Microbes in the environments surrounding nuclear waste depositories pose several questions regarding the protection of the surrounding communities. microbes can facilitate microbially influenced corrosion (MIC), mobilize and facilitate the transport of nuclides as well as produce gaseous emissions which can compromise containment. We have developed an analysis of the extant microbiota that is independent of quantitative recovery and subsequent growth, based on signature biomarkers analysis (SBA).

  19. Disrupting Mitochondrial–Nuclear Coevolution Affects OXPHOS Complex I Integrity and Impacts Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  20. Disrupting mitochondrial-nuclear coevolution affects OXPHOS complex I integrity and impacts human health.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Moran; Levin, Liron; Ovadia, Ofer; Toiw, Yasmin; Shani, Naama; Dadon, Sara; Barzilai, Nir; Bergman, Aviv; Atzmon, Gil; Wainstein, Julio; Tsur, Anat; Nijtmans, Leo; Glaser, Benjamin; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-10-01

    The mutation rate of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is higher by an order of magnitude as compared with the nuclear genome, enforces tight mitonuclear coevolution to maintain mitochondrial activities. Interruption of such coevolution plays a role in interpopulation hybrid breakdown, speciation events, and disease susceptibility. Previously, we found an elevated amino acid replacement rate and positive selection in the nuclear DNA-encoded oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex I subunit NDUFC2, a phenomenon important for the direct interaction of NDUFC2 with the mtDNA-encoded complex I subunit ND4. This finding underlines the importance of mitonuclear coevolution to physical interactions between mtDNA and nuclear DNA-encoded factors. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether this interaction is important for the stability and activity of complex I. Here, we show that siRNA silencing of NDUFC2 reduced growth of human D-407 retinal pigment epithelial cells, significantly diminished mitochondrial membrane potential, and interfered with complex I integrity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis of a positively selected amino acid in NDUFC2 significantly interfered with the interaction of NDUFC2 with its mtDNA-encoded partner ND4. Finally, we show that a genotype combination involving this amino acid (NDUFC2 residue 46) and the mtDNA haplogroup HV likely altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus in Ashkenazi Jews. Therefore, mitonuclear coevolution is important for maintaining mitonuclear factor interactions, OXPHOS, and for human health. PMID:25245408

  1. Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus DNA Polymerase C Terminus Is Required for Nuclear Localization and Viral DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The DNA polymerase (DNApol) of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is essential for viral DNA replication. The DNApol exonuclease and polymerase domains are highly conserved and are considered functional in DNA replication. However, the role of the DNApol C terminus has not yet been characterized. To identify whether only the exonuclease and polymerase domains are sufficient for viral DNA replication, several DNApol C-terminal truncations were cloned into a dnapol-null AcMNPV bacmid with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter. Surprisingly, most of the truncation constructs, despite containing both exonuclease and polymerase domains, could not rescue viral DNA replication and viral production in bacmid-transfected Sf21 cells. Moreover, GFP fusions of these same truncations failed to localize to the nucleus. Truncation of the C-terminal amino acids 950 to 984 showed nuclear localization but allowed for only limited and delayed viral spread. The C terminus contains a typical bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) motif at residues 804 to 827 and a monopartite NLS motif at residues 939 to 948. Each NLS, as a GFP fusion peptide, localized to the nucleus, but both NLSs were required for nuclear localization of DNApol. Alanine substitutions in a highly conserved baculovirus DNApol sequence at AcMNPV DNApol amino acids 972 to 981 demonstrated its importance for virus production and DNA replication. Collectively, the data indicated that the C terminus of AcMNPV DNApol contains two NLSs and a conserved motif, all of which are required for nuclear localization of DNApol, viral DNA synthesis, and virus production. IMPORTANCE The baculovirus DNA polymerase (DNApol) is a highly specific polymerase that allows viral DNA synthesis and hence virus replication in infected insect cells. We demonstrated that the exonuclease and polymerase domains of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) alone are

  2. Basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 are essential for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Shiheido, Hirokazu Shimizu, Jun

    2015-02-20

    BEN domain-containing protein 3 (BEND3) has recently been reported to function as a heterochromatin-associated protein in transcriptional repression in the nucleus. BEND3 should have nuclear localization signals (NLSs) to localize to the nucleus in light of its molecular weight, which is higher than that allowed to pass through nuclear pore complexes. We here analyzed the subcellular localization of deletion/site-directed mutants of human BEND3 by an immunofluorescence assay in an attempt to identify the amino acids essential for its nuclear localization. We found that three basic amino acid residues located in the N-terminal region of BEND3 (BEND3{sub 56–58}, KRK) are essential, suggesting that these residues play a role as a functional NLS. These results provide valuable information for progressing research on BEND3. - Highlights: • BEND3 localizes to the nucleus. • The N-terminal 60 amino acids region of BEND3 contains NLS. • Amino acids located between 56 and 58 of BEND3 (KRK) are part of NLS. • KRK motif is highly conserved among BEND3 homologs.

  3. Nuclear Containment Inspection Using AN Array of Guided Wave Sensors for Damage Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, A. C.; Fisher, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Nuclear power plant containments are typically both the last line of defense against the release of radioactivity to the environment and the first line of defense to protect against intrusion from external objects. As such, it is important to be able to locate any damage that would limit the integrity of the containment itself. Typically, a portion of the containment consists of a metallic pressure boundary that encloses the reactor primary circuit. It is made of thick steel plates welded together, lined with concrete and partially buried, limiting areas that can be visually inspected for corrosion damage. This study presents a strategy using low frequency (<50 kHz) guided waves to find corrosion-like damage several meters from the probe in a mock-up of the containment vessel. A magnetostrictive sensor (MsS) is scanned across the width of the vessel, acquiring waveforms at a fixed interval. A beam forming strategy is used to localize the defects. Experimental results are presented for a variety of damage configurations, demonstrating the efficacy of this technique for detecting damage smaller than the ultrasonic wavelength.

  4. Improved radiological/nuclear source localization in variable NORM background: An MLEM approach with segmentation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, Robert D.; Crowley, Tanya M.; Gardner, Barbara M.; Mandell, Myron J.; Guo, Yanlin; Haas, Eric B.; Knize, Duane J.; Kuharski, Robert A.; Ranta, Dale; Shyffer, Ryan; Labov, Simon; Nelson, Karl; Seilhan, Brandon; Valentine, John D.

    2015-06-01

    A novel approach and algorithm have been developed to rapidly detect and localize both moving and static radiological/nuclear (R/N) sources from an airborne platform. Current aerial systems with radiological sensors are limited in their ability to compensate for variable naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) background. The proposed approach suppresses the effects of NORM background by incorporating additional information to segment the survey area into regions over which the background is likely to be uniform. The method produces pixelated Source Activity Maps (SAMs) of both target and background radionuclide activity over the survey area. The task of producing the SAMs requires (1) the development of a forward model which describes the transformation of radionuclide activity to detector measurements and (2) the solution of the associated inverse problem. The inverse problem is ill-posed as there are typically fewer measurements than unknowns. In addition the measurements are subject to Poisson statistical noise. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation-Maximization (MLEM) algorithm is used to solve the inverse problem as it is well suited for under-determined problems corrupted by Poisson noise. A priori terrain information is incorporated to segment the reconstruction space into regions within which we constrain NORM background activity to be uniform. Descriptions of the algorithm and examples of performance with and without segmentation on simulated data are presented.

  5. An Apicoplast Localized Ubiquitylation System Is Required for the Import of Nuclear-encoded Plastid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ponts, Nadia; van Dooren, Giel G.; Prudhomme, Jacques; Brooks, Carrie F.; Rodrigues, Elisadra M.; Tan, John C.; Ferdig, Michael T.; Striepen, Boris; Le Roch, Karine G.

    2013-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for numerous important human diseases including toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and most importantly malaria. There is a constant need for new antimalarials, and one of most keenly pursued drug targets is an ancient algal endosymbiont, the apicoplast. The apicoplast is essential for parasite survival, and several aspects of its metabolism and maintenance have been validated as targets of anti-parasitic drug treatment. Most apicoplast proteins are nuclear encoded and have to be imported into the organelle. Recently, a protein translocon typically required for endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) has been proposed to act in apicoplast protein import. Here, we show ubiquitylation to be a conserved and essential component of this process. We identify apicoplast localized ubiquitin activating, conjugating and ligating enzymes in Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum and observe biochemical activity by in vitro reconstitution. Using conditional gene ablation and complementation analysis we link this activity to apicoplast protein import and parasite survival. Our studies suggest ubiquitylation to be a mechanistic requirement of apicoplast protein import independent to the proteasomal degradation pathway. PMID:23785288

  6. Thr308 determines Akt1 nuclear localization in insulin-stimulated keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, Itamar; Mueller, Elke; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2008-07-18

    Here, we determined the localization and activation of protein kinase B (Akt) in acute cutaneous wound tissue in mice. Akt1 represented the major Akt isoform that was expressed and activated in wound margin keratinocytes and also in the cultured human keratinocyte line HaCaT. Mutation of Akt1 protein, exchanging the activation-essential Ser473 and Thr308 residues for inactive Ala or phosphorylation-mimicking Asp and Glu residues, revealed that phosphorylation of Ser473 represented an essential prerequisite for auto-phosphorylation of Thr308 within the Akt1 protein in keratinocytes. Moreover, cell culture experiments and transfection studies using Thr308 mutated Akt1 proteins demonstrated that phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308 appeared to selectively exclude the active kinase from the nucleus and direct the kinase to the cytoplasmic compartment in keratinocytes upon insulin stimulation. In summary, our data show that phosphorylation of Thr308 during insulin-mediated Akt1 activation is an essential prerequisite to exclude Akt1 from the nuclear compartment.

  7. Local seismic network for monitoring of a potential nuclear power plant area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiira, Timo; Uski, Marja; Kortström, Jari; Kaisko, Outi; Korja, Annakaisa

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a plan for seismic monitoring of a region around a potential nuclear power plant. Seismic monitoring is needed to evaluate seismic risk. The International Atomic Energy Agency has set guidelines on seismic hazard evaluation and monitoring of such areas. According to these guidelines, we have made a plan for a local network of seismic stations to collect data for seismic source characterization and seismotectonic interpretations, as well as to monitor seismic activity and natural hazards. The detection and location capability of the network were simulated using different station configurations by computing spatial azimuthal coverages and detection threshold magnitudes. Background noise conditions around Pyhäjoki were analyzed by comparing data from different stations. The annual number of microearthquakes that should be detected with a dense local network centered around Pyhäjoki was estimated. The network should be dense enough to fulfill the requirements of azimuthal coverage better than 180° and automatic event location capability down to ML ˜ 0 within a distance of 25 km from the site. A network of 10 stations should be enough to reach these goals. With this setup, the detection threshold magnitudes are estimated to be ML = -0.1 and ML = 0.1 within a radius of 25 and 50 km from Pyhäjoki, respectively. The annual number of earthquakes detected by the network is estimated to be 2 (ML ≥ ˜ -0.1) within 25 km radius and 5 (ML ≥ ˜-0.1 to ˜0.1) within 50 km radius. The location accuracy within 25 km radius is estimated to be 1-2 and 4 km for horizontal coordinates and depth, respectively. Thus, the network is dense enough to map out capable faults with horizontal accuracy of 1-2 km within 25 km radius of the site. The estimation is based on the location accuracies of five existing networks in northern Europe. Local factors, such as seismic noise sources, geology and infrastructure might limit the station configuration and detection and

  8. Eukaryotic-Type Ser/Thr Protein Kinase Mediated Phosphorylation of Mycobacterial Phosphodiesterase Affects its Localization to the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase enzymes, involved in cAMP hydrolysis reaction, are present throughout phylogeny and their phosphorylation mediated regulation remains elusive in prokaryotes. In this context, we focused on this enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene encoded by Rv0805 was PCR amplified and expressed as a histidine-tagged protein (mPDE) utilizing Escherichia coli based expression system. In kinase assays, upon incubation with mycobacterial Clade I eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases (PknA, PknB, and PknL), Ni-NTA purified mPDE protein exhibited transphosphorylation ability albeit with varying degree. When mPDE was co-expressed one at a time with these kinases in E. coli, it was also recognized by an anti-phosphothreonine antibody, which further indicates its phosphorylating ability. Mass spectrometric analysis identified Thr-309 of mPDE as a phosphosite. In concordance with this observation, anti-phosphothreonine antibody marginally recognized mPDE-T309A mutant protein; however, such alteration did not affect the enzymatic activity. Interestingly, mPDE expressed in Mycobacterium smegmatis yielded a phosphorylated protein that preferentially localized to cell wall. In contrast, mPDE-T309A, the phosphoablative variant of mPDE, did not show such behavior. On the other hand, phosphomimics of mPDE (T309D or T309E), exhibited similar cell wall anchorage as was observed with the wild-type. Thus, our results provide credence to the fact that eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinase mediated phosphorylation of mPDE renders negative charge to the protein, promoting its localization on cell wall. Furthermore, multiple sequence alignment revealed that Thr-309 is conserved among mPDE orthologs of M. tuberculosis complex, which presumably emphasizes evolutionary significance of phosphorylation at this residue. PMID:26904001

  9. Inhibition of nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont affects the localization of glutamine synthetase in hair cells of Azolla.

    PubMed

    Uheda, Eiji; Maejima, Kazuhiro

    2009-10-15

    In the Azolla-Anabaena association, the host plant Azolla efficiently incorporates and assimilates ammonium ions that are released from the nitrogen-fixing cyanobiont, probably via glutamine synthetase (GS; EC 6.3.1.2) in hair cells, which are specialized cells protruding into the leaf cavity. In order to clarify the regulatory mechanism underlying ammonium assimilation in the Azolla-Anabaena association, Azolla plants were grown under an argon environment (Ar), in which the nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont was inhibited specifically and completely. The localization of GS in hair cells was determined by immunoelectron microscopy and quantitative analysis of immunogold labeling. Azolla plants grew healthily under Ar when nitrogen sources, such as NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+), were provided in the growth medium. Both the number of cyanobacterial cells per leaf and the heterocyst frequency of the plants under Ar were similar to those of plants in a nitrogen environment (N(2)). In hair cells of plants grown under Ar, regardless of the type of nitrogen source provided, only weak labeling of GS was observed in the cytoplasm and in chloroplasts. In contrast, in hair cells of plants grown under N(2), abundant labeling of GS was observed in both sites. These findings indicate that specific inhibition of the nitrogen-fixing activity of the cyanobiont affects the localization of GS isoenzymes. Ammonium fixed and released by the cyanobiont could stimulate GS synthesis in hair cells. Simultaneously, the abundant GS, probably GS1, in these cells, could assimilate ammonium rapidly. PMID:19464754

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Deletion in Protein Phosphatase 2A That Affects Its Stability and Localization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huawen; Miller, Michelle L.; Granas, David M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing is a powerful tool in the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and small insertions/deletions (indels) among mutant strains, which simplifies forward genetics approaches. However, identification of the causative mutation among a large number of non-causative SNPs in a mutant strain remains a big challenge. In the unicellular biflagellate green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we generated a SNP/indel library that contains over 2 million polymorphisms from four wild-type strains, one highly polymorphic strain that is frequently used in meiotic mapping, ten mutant strains that have flagellar assembly or motility defects, and one mutant strain, imp3, which has a mating defect. A comparison of polymorphisms in the imp3 strain and the other 15 strains allowed us to identify a deletion of the last three amino acids, Y313F314L315, in a protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2A3) in the imp3 strain. Introduction of a wild-type HA-tagged PP2A3 rescues the mutant phenotype, but mutant HA-PP2A3 at Y313 or L315 fail to rescue. Our immunoprecipitation results indicate that the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations do not affect the binding of PP2A3 to the scaffold subunit, PP2A-2r. In contrast, the Y313, L315, or YFLΔ mutations affect both the stability and the localization of PP2A3. The PP2A3 protein is less abundant in these mutants and fails to accumulate in the basal body area as observed in transformants with either wild-type HA-PP2A3 or a HA-PP2A3 with a V310T change. The accumulation of HA-PP2A3 in the basal body region disappears in mated dikaryons, which suggests that the localization of PP2A3 may be essential to the mating process. Overall, our results demonstrate that the terminal YFL tail of PP2A3 is important in the regulation on Chlamydomonas mating. PMID:24086163

  11. Away-from-reactor storage of spent nuclear fuel: factors affecting demand

    SciTech Connect

    Dinneen, P.M.; Solomon, K.A.; Triplett, M.B.

    1980-10-01

    This report analyzes factors that affect the magnitude and timing of demand for government AFRs, relative to the demand for other storage options, to assist policymakers in predicting this demand. Past predictions of AFT demand range widely and often appear to conflict. This report helps to explain the apparent conflicts among existing demand predictions by demonstrating their sensitivity to changes in key assumptions. Specifically, the report analyzes factors affecting the demand for government AFR storage facilities; illustrates why demand estimates may vary; and identifies actions that may be undertaken by groups, within and outside the government, to influence the level and timing of demands.

  12. The nuclear localization signal of mitotic kinesin-like protein Mklp-1: Effect on Mklp-1 function during cytokinesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaoqi; E-mail: liu8@purdue.edu; Erikson, Raymond L.

    2007-02-23

    The mitotic kinesin-like protein (Mklp-1) localizes in the nucleus during interphase due to the presence of nuclear localization signal(s) [NLS(s)] within its sequence. Here, we mapped two NLSs to be {sub 899}SRKRRSST{sub 906} and {sub 949}KRKKP{sub 953} in the tail domain of Mklp-1, and showed that ectopic expression of a mutant Mklp-1 without the NLSs leads to cell cycle arrest at cytokinesis, indicating that the NLSs are necessary for Mklp-1 to execute its normal function during cell division. Furthermore, mutation of two serine residues in First NLS to aspartic acid, which mimics phosphorylation, attenuated its nuclear localization function, suggesting that the function of this NLS might be regulated by phosphorylation.

  13. An unconventional nuclear localization motif is crucial for function of the Drosophila Wnt/wingless antagonist Naked cuticle.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Sharon; Chan, Chih-Chiang; Cagatay, Tolga; Zhang, Shu; Rousset, Raphaël; Mack, Judy; Zeng, Wenlin; Fish, Matt; Zhang, Mei; Amanai, Manami; Wharton, Keith A

    2006-09-01

    Wnt/beta-catenin signals orchestrate cell fate and behavior throughout the animal kingdom. Aberrant Wnt signaling impacts nearly the entire spectrum of human disease, including birth defects, cancer, and osteoporosis. If Wnt signaling is to be effectively manipulated for therapeutic advantage, we first must understand how Wnt signals are normally controlled. Naked cuticle (Nkd) is a novel and evolutionarily conserved inducible antagonist of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling that is crucial for segmentation in the model genetic organism, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Nkd can bind and inhibit the Wnt signal transducer Dishevelled (Dsh), but the mechanism by which Nkd limits Wnt signaling in the fly embryo is not understood. Here we show that nkd mutants exhibit elevated levels of the beta-catenin homolog Armadillo but no alteration in Dsh abundance or distribution. In the fly embryo, Nkd and Dsh are predominantly cytoplasmic, although a recent report suggests that vertebrate Dsh requires nuclear localization for activity in gain-of-function assays. While Dsh-binding regions of Nkd contribute to its activity, we identify a conserved 30-amino-acid motif, separable from Dsh-binding regions, that is essential for Nkd function and nuclear localization. Replacement of the 30-aa motif with a conventional nuclear localization sequence rescued a small fraction of nkd mutant animals to adulthood. Our studies suggest that Nkd targets Dsh-dependent signal transduction steps in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments of cells receiving the Wnt signal. PMID:16849595

  14. Nuclear Localization of the Autism Candidate Gene Neurobeachin and Functional Interaction with the NOTCH1 Intracellular Domain Indicate a Role in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tuand, Krizia; Stijnen, Pieter; Volders, Karolien; Declercq, Jeroen; Nuytens, Kim; Meulemans, Sandra; Creemers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Neurobeachin (NBEA) is an autism spectrum disorders (ASD) candidate gene. NBEA deficiency affects regulated secretion, receptor trafficking, synaptic architecture and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation. NBEA is a large multidomain scaffolding protein. From N- to C-terminus, NBEA has a concanavalin A-like lectin domain flanked by armadillo repeats (ACA), an A-kinase anchoring protein domain that can bind to PKA, a domain of unknown function (DUF1088) and a BEACH domain, preceded by a pleckstrin homology-like domain and followed by WD40 repeats (PBW). Although most of these domains mediate protein-protein interactions, no interaction screen has yet been performed. Methods Yeast two-hybrid screens with the ACA and PBW domain modules of NBEA gave a list of interaction partners, which were analyzed for Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment. Neuro-2a cells were used for confocal microscopy and nuclear extraction analysis. NOTCH-mediated transcription was studied with luciferase reporter assays and qRT-PCR, combined with NBEA knockdown or overexpression. Results Both domain modules showed a GO enrichment for the nucleus. PBW almost exclusively interacted with transcription regulators, while ACA interacted with a number of PKA substrates. NBEA was partially localized in the nucleus of Neuro-2a cells, albeit much less than in the cytoplasm. A nuclear localization signal was found in the DUF1088 domain, which was shown to contribute to the nuclear localization of an EGFP-DPBW fusion protein. Yeast two-hybrid identified the Notch1 intracellular domain as a physical interactor of the PBW domain and a role for NBEA as a negative regulator in Notch-mediated transcription was demonstrated. Conclusion Defining novel interaction partners of conserved NBEA domain modules identified a role for NBEA as transcriptional regulator in the nucleus. The physical interaction of NBEA with NOTCH1 is most relevant for ASD pathogenesis because NOTCH signaling is essential for

  15. Localization of Pom121 to the inner nuclear membrane is required for an early step of interphase nuclear pore complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Funakoshi, Tomoko; Clever, Michaela; Watanabe, Ai; Imamoto, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a large protein assembly that mediates molecular trafficking between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. NPCs assemble twice during the cell cycle in metazoans: postmitosis and during interphase. In this study, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in conjunction with a cell fusion–based NPC assembly assay, we demonstrated that pore membrane protein (Pom)121, a vertebrate-specific integral membrane nucleoporin, is indispensable for an early step in interphase NPC assembly. Functional domain analysis of Pom121 showed that its nuclear localization signals, which bind to importin β via importin α and likely function with RanGTP, play an essential role in targeting Pom121 to the interphase NPC. Furthermore, a region of Pom121 that interacts with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and lamin B receptor was found to be crucial for its NPC targeting. Based on these findings and on evidence that Pom121 localizes at the INM in the absence of a complete NPC structure, we propose that the nuclear migration of Pom121 and its subsequent interaction with INM proteins are required to initiate interphase NPC assembly. Our data also suggest, for the first time, the importance of the INM as a seeding site for “prepores” during interphase NPC assembly. PMID:21289085

  16. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  17. Role of a nuclear localization signal on the minor capsid Proteins VP2 and VP3 in BKPyV nuclear entry

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Shauna M.; Zhao, Linbo; Bosard, Catherine; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a ubiquitous nonenveloped human virus that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised populations. After internalization into renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, BKPyV traffics through the ER and enters the cytosol. However, it is unclear how the virus enters the nucleus. In this study, we elucidate a role for the nuclear localization signal located on the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 during infection. Site-directed mutagenesis of a single lysine in the basic region of the C-terminus of the minor capsid proteins abrogated their nuclear localization, and the analogous genomic mutation reduced infectivity. Additionally, through use of the inhibitor ivermectin and knockdown of importin β1, we found that the importin α/β pathway is involved during infection. Overall these data are the first to show the significance of the NLS of the BKPyV minor capsid proteins during infection in a natural host cell. - Highlights: • Polyomaviruses must deliver their genome to the nucleus to replicate. • The minor capsid proteins have a well-conserved nuclear localization signal. • Mutation of this NLS diminishes, but does not completely inhibit, infection.

  18. Nuclear localization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase small subunit requires a karyopherin and a WD40 repeat protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; An, Xiuxiang; Yang, Kui; Perlstein, Deborah L.; Hicks, Leslie; Kelleher, Neil; Stubbe, JoAnne; Huang, Mingxia

    2006-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the reduction of ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxyribonucleotides and is an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair. Cells have evolved intricate mechanisms to regulate RNR activity to ensure high fidelity of DNA replication during normal cell-cycle progression and of DNA repair upon genotoxic stress. The RNR holoenzyme is composed of a large subunit R1 (α, oligomeric state unknown) and a small subunit R2 (β2). R1 binds substrates and allosteric effectors; R2 contains a diferric-tyrosyl radical [(Fe)2-Y·] cofactor that is required for catalysis. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, R1 is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas R2, which is a heterodimer (ββ′), is predominantly in the nucleus. When cells encounter DNA damage or stress during replication, ββ′ is redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in a checkpoint-dependent manner, resulting in the colocalization of R1 and R2. We have identified two proteins that have an important role in ββ′ nuclear localization: the importin β homolog Kap122 and the WD40 repeat protein Wtm1. Deletion of either WTM1 or KAP122 leads to loss of ββ′ nuclear localization. Wtm1 and its paralog Wtm2 are both nuclear proteins that are in the same protein complex with ββ′. Wtm1 also interacts with Kap122 in vivo and requires Kap122 for its nuclear localization. Our results suggest that Wtm1 acts either as an adaptor to facilitate nuclear import of ββ′ by Kap122 or as an anchor to retain ββ′ in the nucleus. PMID:16432237

  19. The subcellular localization of PBX1 and EXD proteins depends on nuclear import and export signals and is modulated by association with PREP1 and HTH.

    PubMed

    Berthelsen, J; Kilstrup-Nielsen, C; Blasi, F; Mavilio, F; Zappavigna, V

    1999-04-15

    Nuclear localization of the Extradenticle (EXD) and PBX1 proteins is regionally restricted during Drosophila and mammalian development. We studied the subcellular localization of EXD, PBX, and their partners Homothorax (HTH) and PREP1, in different cell contexts. HTH and PREP1 are cytoplasmic and require association with EXD/PBX for nuclear localization. EXD and PBX1 are nuclear in murine fibroblasts but not in Drosophila Schneider cells, in which they are actively exported to the cytoplasm. Coexpression of EXD/PBX with HTH/PREP1 causes nuclear localization of their heterodimers in both cell contexts. We propose that heterodimerization with HTH/PREP induces nuclear translocation of EXD and PBX1 in specific cell contexts by blocking their nuclear export. PMID:10215622

  20. The subcellular localization of PBX1 and EXD proteins depends on nuclear import and export signals and is modulated by association with PREP1 and HTH

    PubMed Central

    Berthelsen, Jens; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Blasi, Francesco; Mavilio, Fulvio; Zappavigna, Vincenzo

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear localization of the Extradenticle (EXD) and PBX1 proteins is regionally restricted during Drosophila and mammalian development. We studied the subcellular localization of EXD, PBX, and their partners Homothorax (HTH) and PREP1, in different cell contexts. HTH and PREP1 are cytoplasmic and require association with EXD/PBX for nuclear localization. EXD and PBX1 are nuclear in murine fibroblasts but not in Drosophila Schneider cells, in which they are actively exported to the cytoplasm. Coexpression of EXD/PBX with HTH/PREP1 causes nuclear localization of their heterodimers in both cell contexts. We propose that heterodimerization with HTH/PREP induces nuclear translocation of EXD and PBX1 in specific cell contexts by blocking their nuclear export. PMID:10215622

  1. The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and ori binding activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin

    2009-02-20

    Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (ori). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.

  2. Large nuclear vacuoles in spermatozoa negatively affect pregnancy rate in IVF cycles

    PubMed Central

    Ghazali, Shahin; Talebi, Ali Reza; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Esfandiari, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) criteria as a new real time tool for evaluation of spermatozoa in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles has been considered. Objective: The aim was to investigate the predictive value of MSOME in in vitro fertilization (IVF) in comparison to ICSI cycles and evaluation of the association between MSOME parameters and traditional sperm parameters in both groups. Materials and Methods: This is a cross sectional prospective analysis of MSOME parameters in IVF (n=31) and ICSI cycles (n=35). MSOME parameters were also evaluated as the presence of vacuole (none, small, medium, large or mix); head size (normal, small or large); cytoplasmic droplet; head shape and acrosome normality. In sub-analysis, MSOME parameters were compared between two groups with successful or failed clinical pregnancy in each group. Results: In IVF group, the rate of large nuclear vacuole showed significant increase in failed as compared to successful pregnancies (13.81±9.7vs7.38±4.4, respectively, p=0.045) while MSOME parameters were the same between successful and failed pregnancies in ICSI group. Moreover, a negative correlation was noticed between LNV and sperm shape normalcy. In ICSI group, a negative correlation was established between cytoplasmic droplet and sperm shape normalcy. In addition, there was a positive correlation between sperm shape normalcy and non-vacuolated spermatozoa. Conclusion: The high rate of large nuclear vacuoles in sperm used in IVF cycles with failed pregnancies confirms that MSOME, is a helpful tool for fine sperm morphology assessment, and its application may enhance the assisted reproduction technology success rates. PMID:26494990

  3. Protein kinase A activation enhances β-catenin transcriptional activity through nuclear localization to PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Mahoney, Emilia; Zuo, Tao; Manchanda, Parmeet K; Davuluri, Ramana V; Kirschner, Lawrence S

    2014-01-01

    The Protein Kinase A (PKA) and Wnt signaling cascades are fundamental pathways involved in cellular development and maintenance. In the osteoblast lineage, these pathways have been demonstrated functionally to be essential for the production of mineralized bone. Evidence for PKA-Wnt crosstalk has been reported both during tumorigenesis and during organogenesis, and the nature of the interaction is thought to rely on tissue and cell context. In this manuscript, we analyzed bone tumors arising from mice with activated PKA caused by mutation of the PKA regulatory subunit Prkar1a. In primary cells from these tumors, we observed relocalization of β-catenin to intranuclear punctuate structures, which were identified as PML bodies. Cellular redistribution of β-catenin could be recapitulated by pharmacologic activation of PKA. Using 3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts as a model system, we found that PKA phosphorylation sites on β-catenin were required for nuclear re-localization. Further, β-catenin's transport to the nucleus was accompanied by an increase in canonical Wnt-dependent transcription, which also required the PKA sites. PKA-Wnt crosstalk in the cells was bi-directional, including enhanced interactions between β-catenin and the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and transcriptional crosstalk between the Wnt and PKA signaling pathways. Increases in canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling were associated with a decrease in the activity of the non-canonical Wnt/Ror2 pathway, which has been shown to antagonize canonical Wnt signaling. Taken together, this study provides a new understanding of the complex regulation of the subcellular distribution of β-catenin and its differential protein-protein interaction that can be modulated by PKA signaling. PMID:25299576

  4. Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Study of the Nitrogen Mustards and Local Anesthetics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buess, Michael Lee

    The density matrix description of pulsed nitrogen -14 nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spin-echoes is presented. The parallel between this problem, when formulated in terms of the fictitious spin- 1/2 operators, and that of spin - 1/2 NMR spin-echoes in liquids is discussed along with the complications which arise in multiple-pulse NQR experiments in powders due to the random orientation of the electric field gradient tensors. The equipment and procedures involved in searching for, detecting and identifying NQR resonances using pulsed techniques are described. The ('14)N NQR spectra of several nitrogen mustard compounds in the solid state are reported and analyzed in the framework of the Townes and Dailey theory. For the aniline derivatives, a correlation exists between l -(sigma), l being the nitrogen lone-pair electron density and (sigma) the average N-C sigma bond electron density, and the enhanced Hammett sigma constant (sigma)('-). An improved correlation is obtained between l-(sigma) and (sigma)(,R)('-), which emphasizes the importance of resonance effects in determining l-(sigma). The increase of hydrolysis and alkylation rates with increasing values of l-(sigma) is in agreement with the identification of the cyclic immonium ion as the intermediate in the hydrolysis and alkylation processes of the aromatic nitrogen mustards. A possible correlation is noted between the ('35)Cl NQR spectra for some of the mustards and measures of toxic and antitumor activity. ('14)N NQR spectra for several local anesthetics in the solid state are also reported and analyzed using the Townes and Dailey approach. The changes in the electron distributions at various nitrogen sites, produced by protonating the tertiary amino nitrogen, are discussed and shown to be in general agreement with expectations bases on the increased electrophilic character of the protonated amino group.

  5. hnRNP I, the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein: distinct nuclear localization and association with hnRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ghetti, A; Piñol-Roma, S; Michael, W M; Morandi, C; Dreyfuss, G

    1992-01-01

    Many hnRNP proteins and snRNPs interact with hnRNA in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and affect the fate of hnRNA and its processing into mRNA. There are at least 20 abundant proteins in vertebrate cell hnRNP complexes and their structure and arrangement on specific hnRNAs is likely to be important for the processing of pre-mRNAs. hnRNP I, a basic protein of ca. 58,000 daltons by SDS-PAGE, is one of the abundant hnRNA-binding proteins. Monoclonal antibodies to hnRNP I were produced and full length cDNA clones for hnRNP I were isolated and sequenced. The sequence of hnRNP I (59,632 daltons and pI 9.86) demonstrates that it is identical to the previously described polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB) and shows that it is highly related to hnRNP L. The sequences of these two proteins, I and L, define a new family of hnRNP proteins within the large superfamily of the RNP consensus RNA-binding proteins. Here we describe experiments which reveal new and unique properties on the association of hnRNP I/PTB with hnRNP complexes and on its cellular localization. Micrococcal nuclease digestions show that hnRNP I, along with hnRNP S and P, is released from hnRNP complexes by nuclease digestion more readily than most other hnRNP proteins. This nuclease hypersensitivity suggests that hnRNP I is bound to hnRNA regions that are particularly exposed in the complexes. Immunofluorescence microscopy shows that hnRNP I is found in the nucleoplasm but in addition high concentrations are detected in a discrete perinucleolar structure. Thus, the PTB is one of the major proteins that bind pre-mRNAs; it is bound to nuclease-hypersensitive regions of the hnRNA-protein complexes and shows a novel pattern of nuclear localization. Images PMID:1641332

  6. The nuclear localization of SOCS6 requires the N-terminal region and negatively regulates Stat3 protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Mi-Na; Min, Chan-Hee; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Ho; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Eun Sook; Yoon, Sungpil . E-mail: yoons@ncc.re.kr

    2007-08-24

    We determined that endogenous- and overexpressed- SOCS6 was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. The localization of SOCS6 depended on amino acids 1-210 in the N-terminal region of the protein, which contains an unidentified domain. GFP-tagged SOCS6 or the N-terminal region, was exclusively localized and widely distributed throughout the entire nucleus, whereas the C-terminal region displayed a nuclear omission pattern. We also demonstrated that the SOCS6 protein could decrease the levels of the Stat3 protein in the nucleus, and that its negative regulation of the Stat3 protein level was dependent on its C-terminal region. These observations suggest that SOCS6 is composed of at least two functional domains required for its biological role in localizing and degrading Stat3 in the nucleus.

  7. Nucleocytoplasmic Recycling of the Nuclear Localization Signal Receptor α Subunit In Vivo Is Dependent on a Nuclear Export Signal, Energy, and RCC1

    PubMed Central

    Boche, Irene; Fanning, Ellen

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear protein import requires a nuclear localization signal (NLS) receptor and at least three other cytoplasmic factors. The α subunit of the NLS receptor, Rag cohort 1 (Rch1), enters the nucleus, probably in a complex with the β subunit of the receptor, as well as other import factors and the import substrate. To learn more about which factors and/or events end the import reaction and how the import factors return to the cytoplasm, we have studied nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Rch1 in vivo. Recombinant Rch1 microinjected into Vero or tsBN2 cells was found primarily in the cytoplasm. Rch1 injected into the nucleus was rapidly exported in a temperature-dependent manner. In contrast, a mutant of Rch1 lacking the first 243 residues accumulated in the nuclei of Vero cells after cytoplasmic injection. After nuclear injection, the truncated Rch1 was retained in the nucleus, but either Rch1 residues 207–217 or a heterologous nuclear export signal, but not a mutant form of residues 207–217, restored nuclear export. Loss of the nuclear transport factor RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) at the nonpermissive temperature in the thermosensitive mutant cell line tsBN2 caused nuclear accumulation of wild-type Rch1 injected into the cytoplasm. However, free Rch1 injected into nuclei of tsBN2 cells at the nonpermissive temperature was exported. These results suggested that RCC1 acts at an earlier step in Rch1 recycling, possibly the disassembly of an import complex that contains Rch1 and the import substrate. Consistent with this possibility, incubation of purified RanGTP and RCC1 with NLS receptor and import substrate prevented assembly of receptor/substrate complexes or stimulated their disassembly. PMID:9334337

  8. Causal Factors Affecting Local Fiscal Stress in U.S. Northeast Counties. Cornell Rural Sociology Series. Bulletin No. 149.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberts, Paul; Khawaja, Marwan

    Conceptualizing high local fiscal stress as a variable which includes low fiscal capacity, high local tax effort and high local need requires building a typology reflecting this conceptualization. This study builds such a typology for 166 counties in the northeastern United States and examines the effects of variables taken from a series of…

  9. Nuclear β-catenin localization supports homology of feathers, avian scutate scales, and alligator scales in early development.

    PubMed

    Musser, Jacob M; Wagner, Günter P; Prum, Richard O

    2015-01-01

    Feathers are an evolutionary novelty found in all extant birds. Despite recent progress investigating feather development and a revolution in dinosaur paleontology, the relationship of feathers to other amniote skin appendages, particularly reptile scales, remains unclear. Disagreement arises primarily from the observation that feathers and avian scutate scales exhibit an anatomical placode-defined as an epidermal thickening-in early development, whereas alligator and other avian scales do not. To investigate the homology of feathers and archosaur scales we examined patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization during early development of feathers and different bird and alligator scales. In birds, nuclear β-catenin is first localized to the feather placode, and then exhibits a dynamic pattern of localization in both epidermis and dermis of the feather bud. We found that asymmetric avian scutate scales and alligator scales share similar patterns of nuclear β-catenin localization with feathers. This supports the hypothesis that feathers, scutate scales, and alligator scales are homologous during early developmental stages, and are derived from early developmental stages of an asymmetric scale present in the archosaur ancestor. Furthermore, given that the earliest stage of β-catenin localization in feathers and archosaur scales is also found in placodes of several mammalian skin appendages, including hair and mammary glands, we hypothesize that a common skin appendage placode originated in the common ancestor of all amniotes. We suggest a skin placode should not be defined by anatomical features, but as a local, organized molecular signaling center from which an epidermal appendage develops. PMID:25963196

  10. Novel localization of formin mDia2: importin β-mediated delivery to and retention at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xiaowei; Kawauchi, Keiko; Shivashankar, G. V.; Bershadsky, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formin family proteins are important regulators of actin polymerization that are involved in many cellular processes. However, little is known about their specific cellular localizations. Here, we show that Diaphanous-related formin-3 (mDia2) localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear envelope. This localization of mDia2 to the nuclear rim required the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence at the mDia2 N-terminal. Consistent with this result, super-resolution images demonstrated that at the nuclear rim, mDia2 co-localized with the nuclear pore complexes and a nuclear transport receptor, importin β. Furthermore, an interaction between mDia2 and importin β was detected by immunoprecipitation, and silencing of importin β was shown to attenuate accumulation of mDia2 to the nuclear rim. We have shown previously that Ca2+ entry leads to the assembly of perinuclear actin rim in an inverted formin 2 (INF2) dependent manner. mDia2, however, was not involved in this process since abolishing its localization at the nuclear rim by silencing of importin β had no effect on actin assembly at the nuclear rim triggered by Ca2+ stimulation. PMID:26519515

  11. ICP27-dependent resistance of herpes simplex virus type 1 to leptomycin B is associated with enhanced nuclear localization of ICP4 and ICP0

    SciTech Connect

    Lengyel, Joy; Strain, Anna K.; Perkins, Keith D.; Rice, Stephen A. . E-mail: ricex019@umn.edu

    2006-09-01

    It was previously shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is sensitive to leptomycin B (LMB), an inhibitor of nuclear export factor CRM1, and that a single methionine to threonine change at residue 50 (M50T) of viral immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 can confer LMB resistance. In this work, we show that deletion of residues 21-63 from ICP27 can also confer LMB resistance. We further show that neither the M50T mutation nor the presence of LMB affects the nuclear shuttling activity of ICP27, suggesting that another function of ICP27 determines LMB resistance. A possible clue to this function emerged when it was discovered that LMB treatment of HSV-1-infected cells dramatically enhances the cytoplasmic accumulation of two other IE proteins, ICP0 and ICP4. This effect is completely dependent on ICP27 and is reversed in cells infected with LMB-resistant mutants. Moreover, LMB-resistant mutations in ICP27 enhance the nuclear localization of ICP0 and ICP4 even in the absence of LMB, and this effect can be discerned in transfected cells. Thus, the same amino (N)-terminal region of ICP27 that determines sensitivity to LMB also enhances ICP27's previously documented ability to promote the cytoplasmic accumulation of ICP4 and ICP0. We speculate that ICP27's effects on ICP4 and ICP0 may contribute to HSV-1 LMB sensitivity.

  12. Identification of the nuclear export signals that regulate the intracellular localization of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Akiko; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken. E-mail: kitajima@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2007-03-30

    The CMP-sialic acid synthetase (CSS) catalyzes the activation of sialic acid (Sia) to CMP-Sia which is a donor substrate of sialyltransferases. The vertebrate CSSs are usually localized in nucleus due to the nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the molecule. In this study, we first point out that a small, but significant population of the mouse CMP-sialic acid synthetase (mCSS) is also present in cytoplasm, though mostly in nucleus. As a mechanism for the localization in cytoplasm, we first identified two nuclear export signals (NESs) in mCSS, based on the localization studies of the potential NES-deleted mCSS mutants as well as the potential NES-tagged eGFP proteins. These two NESs are conserved among mammalian and fish CSSs, but not present in the bacterial or insect CSS. These results suggest that the intracellular localization of vertebrate CSSs is regulated by not only the NLS, but also the NES sequences.

  13. Nuclear Import of Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E1 Protein Is Mediated by Multiple Alpha Importins and Is Negatively Regulated by Phosphorylation near a Nuclear Localization Signal▿

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xue-Lin; Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Wu, Yu-Chieh; Wilson, Van G.

    2007-01-01

    Papillomavirus DNA replication occurs in the nucleus of infected cells and requires the viral E1 protein, which enters the nuclei of host epithelial cells and carries out enzymatic functions required for the initiation of viral DNA replication. In this study, we investigated the pathway and regulation of the nuclear import of the E1 protein from bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1). Using an in vitro binding assay, we determined that the E1 protein interacted with importins α3, α4, and α5 via its nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence. In agreement with this result, purified E1 protein was effectively imported into the nucleus of digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells after incubation with importin α3, α4, or α5 and other necessary import factors. We also observed that in vitro binding of E1 protein to all three α importins was significantly decreased by the introduction of pseudophosphorylation mutations in the NLS region. Consistent with the binding defect, pseudophosphorylated E1 protein failed to enter the nucleus of digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells in vitro. Likewise, the pseudophosphorylation mutant showed aberrant intracellular localization in vivo and accumulated primarily on the nuclear envelope in transfected HeLa cells, while the corresponding alanine replacement mutant displayed the same cellular location pattern as wild-type E1 protein. Collectively, our data demonstrate that BPV1 E1 protein can be transported into the nucleus by more than one importin α and suggest that E1 phosphorylation by host cell kinases plays a regulatory role in modulating E1 nucleocytoplasmic localization. This phosphoregulation of nuclear E1 protein uptake may contribute to the coordination of viral replication with keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. PMID:17192311

  14. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of (137)Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of (137)Cs in forest surface (0-3 cm) soils. The K(2)SO(4) extraction process liberated 2.1%-12.8% of the total (137)Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher (137)Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the (137)Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout (137)Cs. The results indicate that uptake of (137)Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile (137)Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  15. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and adverse cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Medzikovic, Lejla; Schumacher, Cees A.; Verkerk, Arie O.; van Deel, Elza D.; Wolswinkel, Rianne; van der Made, Ingeborg; Bleeker, Natascha; Cakici, Daniella; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Meggouh, Farid; Creemers, Esther E.; Ann Remme, Carol; Baartscheer, Antonius; de Winter, Robbert J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Arkenbout, E. Karin; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Distinct stressors may induce heart failure. As compensation, β-adrenergic stimulation enhances myocardial contractility by elevating cardiomyocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). However, chronic β-adrenergic stimulation promotes adverse cardiac remodelling. Cardiac expression of nuclear receptor Nur77 is enhanced by β-adrenergic stimulation, but its role in cardiac remodelling is still unclear. We show high and rapid Nur77 upregulation in cardiomyocytes stimulated with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Nur77 knockdown in culture resulted in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Ventricular cardiomyocytes from Nur77-deficient (Nur77-KO) mice exhibited elevated diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i and prolonged action potentials compared to wild type (WT). In vivo, these differences resulted in larger cardiomyocytes, increased expression of hypertrophic genes, and more cardiac fibrosis in Nur77-KO mice upon chronic isoproterenol stimulation. In line with the observed elevated [Ca2+]i, Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin was more active in Nur77-KO mice compared to WT. In contrast, after cardiac pressure overload by aortic constriction, Nur77-KO mice exhibited attenuated remodelling compared to WT. Concluding, Nur77-deficiency results in significantly altered cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis and distinct remodelling outcome depending on the type of insult. Detailed knowledge on the role of Nur77 in maintaining cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and the dual role Nur77 plays in cardiac remodelling will aid in developing personalized therapies against heart failure. PMID:26486271

  16. Estimating Annual Individual Doses for Evacuees Returning Home to Areas Affected by the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Kazuaki; Kurihara, Osamu; Ohmachi, Yasushi; Takada, Masashi; Omori, Yasutaka; Akahane, Keiichi; Kim, Eunjoo; Torikoshi, Masami; Yonehara, Hidenori; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sakai, Kazuo; Akashi, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    To contribute to the reconstruction and revitalization of Fukushima Prefecture following the 2011 nuclear power disaster, annual individual doses were estimated for evacuees who will return home to Tamura City, Kawauchi Village, and Iitate Village in Fukushima. Ambient external dose rates and individual doses obtained with personal dosimeters were measured at many residential and occupational sites throughout the study areas to obtain fundamental data needed for the estimation. The measurement results indicated that the ratio of individual dose based on a personal dosimeter to the ambient external dose measurement was 0.7 with 10% uncertainty. Multiplying the ambient external dose by 0.7 may be an appropriate measure of the effective dose to an individual in the investigated area. Annual individual doses were estimated for representative lifestyles and occupations based on the ambient external dose rates at the measurement sites, taking into account the relationship between the ambient external dose and individual dose. The results were as follows: 0.6-2.3 mSv y in Tamura, 1.1-5.5 mSv y in Kawauchi, and 3.8-17 mSv y in Iitate. For all areas investigated, the estimated dose to outdoor workers was higher than that to indoor workers. Identifying ways to reduce the amount of time that an outdoor worker spends outdoors would provide an effective measure to reduce dose. PMID:26107433

  17. Retention of potentially mobile radiocesium in forest surface soils affected by the Fukushima nuclear accident

    PubMed Central

    Koarashi, Jun; Moriya, Koichi; Atarashi-Andoh, Mariko; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroki; Nagaoka, Mika

    2012-01-01

    The fate of 137Cs derived from the Fukushima nuclear accident fallout and associated radiological hazards are largely dependent on its mobility in the surface soils of forest ecosystems. Thus, we quantified microbial and adsorptive retentions of 137Cs in forest surface (0–3 cm) soils. The K2SO4 extraction process liberated 2.1%–12.8% of the total 137Cs from the soils. Two soils with a higher content of clay- and silt-sized particles, organic carbon content, and cation exchange capacity showed higher 137Cs extractability. Microbial biomass was observed in all of the soils. However, the 137Cs extractability did not increase after destruction of the microbial biomass by chloroform fumigation, providing no evidence for microbial retention of the Fukushima-fallout 137Cs. The results indicate that uptake of 137Cs by soil microorganisms is less important for retention of potentially mobile 137Cs in the forest surface soils compared to ion-exchange adsorption on non-specific sites provided by abiotic components. PMID:23256039

  18. Nuclear DNA content affects the productivity of conifer forests by altering hydraulic architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alday, Josu; Resco de Dios, Víctor

    2014-05-01

    Predictions of future global climate rely on feedbacks between terrestrial vegetation and the global carbon cycle, but the exact mechanisms underlying this relationship are still being discussed. One of the key knowledge gaps lies on the scaling of cellular processes to the ecosystem level. Here we examine whether an under-explored plant trait, inter-specific variation in the bulk amount of DNA in unreplicated somatic cells (2C DNA content), can explain inter-specific variation in the maximum productivity of conifer forests. We expected 2C DNA content to be negatively related to conifer productivity because: 1) it is positively correlated with cell volume (which, in turn, potentially affects structural features such as leaf mass area, a strong predictor of photosynthetic capacity); 2) it is positively correlated with stomatal size (with larger stomata leading to lower overall stomatal conductance and, by extension, lower CO2 uptake); and 3) larger genome sizes may reduce P availability in RNA (which has been hypothesized to slow growth). We present the results of regression and independent contrasts in different monospecific forests encompassing a 52º latitudinal gradient, each being dominated by 1 of 35 different conifer species. Contrary to expectations, we observed a positive correlation between genome size and maximum Gross Primary Productivity (R2 = 0.47) and also between genome size maximum tree height (R2 = 0.27). This correlation was apparently driven by the effects of genome size on stem hydraulics, since 2C DNA was positively correlated with wood density (R2 = 0.40) and also with resistance to cavitation (P50, R2 = 0.28). That is, increased genome sizes have a positive effect on the productivity of conifer forests by affecting the vascular tissues to increase their capacity for water transport. Our results shed a new light on the evolution of the vascular system of conifer forests and how they affect ecosystem productivity, and indicate the potential to

  19. Strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information of visual stimuli: an approach using large-size Navon letters

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Tomoike, Kouta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies argue that strongly-motivated positive emotions (e.g. desire) narrow a scope of attention. This argument is mainly based on an observation that, while humans normally respond faster to global than local information of a visual stimulus (global advantage), positive affects eliminated the global advantage by selectively speeding responses to local (but not global) information. In other words, narrowing of attentional scope was indirectly evidenced by the elimination of global advantage (the same speed of processing between global and local information). No study has directly shown that strongly-motivated positive affects induce faster responses to local than global information while excluding a bias for global information (global advantage) in a baseline (emotionally-neutral) condition. In the present study, we addressed this issue by eliminating the global advantage in a baseline (neutral) state. Induction of positive affects under this state resulted in faster responses to local than global information. Our results provided direct evidence that positive affects in high motivational intensity narrow a scope of attention. PMID:26754087

  20. Binding of Y-P30 to Syndecan 2/3 Regulates the Nuclear Localization of CASK

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Peter; Mikhaylova, Marina; Macharadze, Tamar; Borutzki, Corinna; Zenclussen, Ana-Claudia; Wahle, Petra; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The survival promoting peptide Y-P30 has documented neuroprotective effects as well as cell survival and neurite outgrowth promoting activity in vitro and in vivo. Previous work has shown that multimerization of the peptide with pleiotrophin (PTN) and subsequent binding to syndecan (SDC) -2 and -3 is involved in its neuritogenic effects. In this study we show that Y-P30 application regulates the nuclear localization of the SDC binding partner Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine kinase (CASK) in neuronal primary cultures during development. In early development at day in vitro (DIV) 8 when mainly SDC-3 is expressed supplementation of the culture medium with Y-P30 reduces nuclear CASK levels whereas it has the opposite effect at DIV 18 when SDC-2 is the dominant isoform. In the nucleus CASK regulates gene expression via its association with the T-box transcription factor T-brain-1 (Tbr-1) and we indeed found that gene expression of downstream targets of this complex, like the GluN2B NMDA-receptor, exhibits a corresponding down- or up-regulation at the mRNA level. The differential effect of Y-P30 on the nuclear localization of CASK correlates with its ability to induce shedding of the ectodomain of SDC-2 but not -3. shRNA knockdown of SDC-2 at DIV 18 and SDC-3 at DIV 8 completely abolished the effect of Y-P30 supplementation on nuclear CASK levels. During early development a protein knockdown of SDC-3 also attenuated the effect of Y-P30 on axon outgrowth. Taken together these data suggest that Y-P30 can control the nuclear localization of CASK in a SDC-dependent manner. PMID:24498267

  1. The Tobamovirus Turnip Vein Clearing Virus 30-Kilodalton Movement Protein Localizes to Novel Nuclear Filaments To Enhance Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Amit; Zheng, Judy Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses overcome the barrier of the plant cell wall by encoding cell-to-cell movement proteins (MPs), which direct newly replicated viral genomes to, and across, the wall. The paradigm for how a single MP regulates and coordinates these activities is the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) 30-kDa protein (MPTMV). Detailed studies demonstrate that TMV multiplies exclusively in the cytoplasm and have documented associations of MPTMV with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, microtubules, and plasmodesmata throughout the course of infection. As TMV poorly infects Arabidopsis thaliana, Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV) is the tobamovirus of choice for studies in this model plant. A key problem, which has contributed to confusion in the field, is the unproven assumption that the TVCV and TMV life cycles are identical. We engineered an infectious TVCV replicon that expressed a functional fluorescence-tagged MPTVCV and report here the unexpected discovery that MPTVCV, beyond localizing to ER membrane and plasmodesmata, targeted to the nucleus in a nuclear localization signal (NLS)-dependent manner, where it localized to novel F-actin-containing filaments that associated with chromatin. The MPTVCV NLS appeared to be conserved in the subgroup 3 tobamoviruses, and our mutational analyses showed that nuclear localization of MPTVCV was necessary for efficient TVCV cell-to-cell movement and systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana. Our studies identify a novel nuclear stage in TVCV infection and suggest that nuclear MP encoded by TVCV and other subgroup 3 tobamoviruses interacts with F-actin and chromatin to modulate host defenses or cellular physiology to favor virus movement and infection. PMID:23536678

  2. Mutations within the nuclear localization signal of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nucleocapsid protein attenuate virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhee; Hodgins, Douglas; Calvert, Jay G.; Welch, Siao-Kun W.; Jolie, Rika; Yoo, Dongwan . E-mail: dyoo@uoguelph.ca

    2006-03-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an RNA virus replicating in the cytoplasm, but the nucleocapsid (N) protein is specifically localized to the nucleus and nucleolus in virus-infected cells. A 'pat7' motif of 41-PGKK(N/S)KK has previously been identified in the N protein as the functional nuclear localization signal (NLS); however, the biological consequences of N protein nuclear localization are unknown. In the present study, the role of N protein nuclear localization during infection was investigated in pigs using an NLS-null mutant virus. When two lysines at 43 and 44 at the NLS locus were substituted to glycines, the modified NLS with 41-PGGGNKK restricted the N protein to the cytoplasm. This NLS-null mutation was introduced into a full-length infectious cDNA clone of PRRSV. Upon transfection of cells, the NLS-null full-length clone induced cytopathic effects and produced infectious progeny. The NLS-null virus grew to a titer 100-fold lower than that of wild-type virus. To examine the response to NLS-null PRRSV in the natural host, three groups of pigs, consisting of seven animals per group, were intranasally inoculated with wild-type, placebo, or NLS-null virus, and the animals were maintained for 4 weeks. The NLS-null-infected pigs had a significantly shorter mean duration of viremia than wild-type-infected pigs but developed significantly higher titers of neutralizing antibodies. Mutations occurred at the NLS locus in one pig during viremia, and four types of mutations were identified: 41-PGRGNKK, 41-PGGRNKK, and 41-PGRRNKK, and 41-PGKKSKK. Both wild-type and NLS-null viruses persisted in the tonsils for at least 4 weeks, and the NLS-null virus persisting in the tonsils was found to be mutated to either 41-PGRGNKK or 41-PGGRNKK in all pigs. No other mutation was found in the N gene. All types of reversions which occurred during viremia and persistence were able to translocate the mutated N proteins to the nucleus, indicating a

  3. Nuclear α Spectrin Differentially Affects Monoubiquitinated Versus Non-Ubiquitinated FANCD2 Function After DNA Interstrand Cross-Link Damage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan; Sridharan, Deepa; Lambert, Muriel W

    2016-03-01

    Nonerythroid α spectrin (αIISp) and the Fanconi anemia (FA) protein, FANCD2, play critical roles in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair during S phase. Both are needed for recruitment of repair proteins, such as XPF, to sites of damage and repair of ICLs. However, the relationship between them in ICL repair and whether αIISp is involved in FANCD2's function in repair is unclear. The present studies show that, after ICL formation, FANCD2 disassociates from αIISp and localizes, before αIISp, at sites of damage in nuclear foci. αIISp and FANCD2 foci do not co-localize, in contrast to our previous finding that αIISp and the ICL repair protein, XPF, co-localize and follow a similar time course for formation. Knock-down of αIISp has no effect on monoubiquitination of FANCD2 (FANCD2-Ub) or its localization to chromatin or foci, though it leads to decreased ICL repair. Studies using cells from FA patients, defective in ICL repair and αIISp, have elucidated an important role for αIISp in the function of non-Ub FANCD2. In FA complementation group A (FA-A) cells, in which FANCD2 is not monoubiquitinated and does not form damage-induced foci, we demonstrate that restoration of αIISp levels to normal, by knocking down the protease μ-calpain, leads to formation of non-Ub FANCD2 foci after ICL damage. Since restoration of αIISp levels in FA-A cells restores DNA repair and cell survival, we propose that αIISp is critical for recruitment of non-Ub FANCD2 to sites of damage, which has an important role in the repair response and ICL repair. PMID:26297932

  4. 137Cesium Exposure and Spirometry Measures in Ukrainian Children Affected by the Chernobyl Nuclear Incident

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Erik R.; Kolpakov, Igor E.; Stepanova, Yevgenia I.; Vdovenko, Vitaliy Y.; Naboka, Maryna V.; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Mohr, Lawrence C.; Hoel, David G.; Karmaus, Wilfried J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, children of the contaminated Narodichesky region of Ukraine were obliged to participate in a yearly medical screening. They have been exposed to 137cesium (137Cs; half-life = 30 years) in contaminated soils, air, and food. Objective Using a “natural experiment” approach and a longitudinal prospective cohort study design, we investigated the association of soil 137Cs and spirometry measures for 415 children using 1,888 repeated measurements from 1993 to 1998. Methods Mean baseline village soil 137Cs measurements, which varied from 29.0 to 879 kBq/m2, were used as exposure indicators. A standardized spirometry protocol and prediction equations specific to Ukrainian children were used by the same pulmonologist in all screenings. Results Children living in villages with the highest quintile of soil 137Cs were 2.60 times more likely to have forced vital capacity (FVC) < 80% of predicted [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07–6.34] and 5.08 times more likely to have a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) to FVC% < 80% (95% CI, 1.02–25.19). We found statistically significant evidence of both airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC%, peak expiratory flow, and maximum expiratory flow at 25%, 50%, and 75% of FVC) and restriction (FVC) with increasing soil 137Cs. Conclusions These findings are unique and suggest significant airway obstruction and restriction consequences for children chronically exposed to low-dose radioactive contaminants such as those found downwind of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. PMID:20100677

  5. Identification and characterization of a nuclear localization signal of TRIM28 that overlaps with the HP1 box

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, Tetsuji; Sangel, Percival; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Obuse, Chikashi; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-03

    Tripartite motif-containing 28 (TRIM28) is a transcription regulator, which forms a repressor complex containing heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1). Here, we report identification of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) within the 462-494 amino acid region of TRIM28 that overlaps with its HP1 binding site, HP1 box. GST-pulldown experiments revealed the interaction of the arginine-rich TRIM28 NLS with various importin α subtypes (α1, α2 and α4). In vitro transport assay demonstrated that nuclear localization of GFP-TRIM28 NLS is mediated by importin αs, in conjunction with importin β1 and Ran. Further, we demonstrated that HP1 and importin αs compete for binding to TRIM28. Together, our findings suggest that importin α has an essential role in the nuclear delivery and preferential HP1 interaction of TRIM28. - Highlights: • TRIM28 contains an NLS within the 462-494 amino acid region. • The nuclear import of TRIM28 is mediated by importin α/importin β1. • TRIM28 NLS overlaps with HP1 Box. • HP1 and importin α compete for binding to TRIM28.

  6. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-08-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence {sup 916}NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG{sup 934} comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin {alpha}/{beta} mechanism employing importins {alpha}1 and {alpha}3 but not {alpha}5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTP{gamma}S. The sequence {sup 1414}SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL{sup 1433}, a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin {alpha}1/{beta} or {alpha}3/{beta} complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS.

  7. Developmental Nuclear Localization and Quantification of GFP-Tagged EB1c in Arabidopsis Root Using Light-Sheet Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Novák, Dominik; Kuchařová, Anna; Ovečka, Miroslav; Komis, George; Šamaj, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    The development of the root apex is determined by progress of cells from the meristematic region to the successive post-mitotic developmental zones for transition, cell elongation and final cell differentiation. We addressed root development, tissue architecture and root developmental zonation by means of light-sheet microscopic imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings expressing END BINDING protein 1c (EB1c) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) under control of native EB1c promoter. Unlike the other two members of the EB1 family, plant-specific EB1c shows prominent nuclear localization in non-dividing cells in all developmental zones of the root apex. The nuclear localization of EB1c was previously mentioned solely in meristematic cells, but not further addressed. With the help of advanced light-sheet microscopy, we report quantitative evaluations of developmentally-regulated nuclear levels of the EB1c protein tagged with GFP relatively to the nuclear size in diverse root tissues (epidermis, cortex, and endodermis) and root developmental zones (meristem, transition, and elongation zones). Our results demonstrate a high potential of light-sheet microscopy for 4D live imaging of fluorescently-labeled nuclei in complex samples such as developing roots, showing capacity to quantify parameters at deeper cell layers (e.g., endodermis) with minimal aberrations. The data presented herein further signify the unique role of developmental cell reprogramming in the transition from cell proliferation to cell differentiation in developing root apex. PMID:26779221

  8. Importance of nuclear localization for the apoptosis-induced activity of a fungal galectin AAL (Agrocybe aegerita lectin)

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yi; Feng, Lei; Tong, Xin; Wang, Kun; Li, De Feng; Lin, Jia Cheng; Tang, Zi Jian; Liu, Hong Hong; Jiang, Shuai; Guo, Lin; Wang, Da Cheng; Sun, Hui

    2009-08-28

    Agrocybe aegerita lectin (AAL) was identified previously in our group as a novel galectin from medicinal fungi Agrocybe aegerita, and has been shown to effectively induce cancer cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in vivo. Here, AAL was observed to translocate into the HeLa cell nucleus and induce cell apoptosis when it was predominantly in the nucleus. The N-terminus and C-terminus of AAL were required for nuclear localization. Site mutated proteins were generated based on AAL structure. Dimer interface mutant I25G, carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) mutant R63H, and loop region mutant L33A could not enter the nucleus and lost the ability to induce apoptosis. CRD mutant H59Q and loop region mutant I144G maintained nuclear localization activity, and H59Q retained residual bioability but I144G had no activity, indicating that nuclear localization is important but not sufficient for AAL to become apoptotically active. Our findings provide a novel antitumor mechanism of fungal galectin.

  9. Nuclear localization of glutamate-cysteine ligase is associated with proliferation in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DEQUANTER, DIDIER; VAN DE VELDE, MAUREEN; BAR, ISABELLE; NUYENS, VINCENT; ROUSSEAU, ALEXANDRE; NAGY, NATHALIE; VANHAMME, LUC; VANHAEVERBEEK, MICHEL; BROHÉE, DANY; DELRÉE, PAUL; BOUDJELTIA, KARIM; LOTHAIRE, PHILIPPE; UZUREAU, PIERRICK

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the keystone of the cellular response toward oxidative stress. Elevated GSH content correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy of head and neck (HN) tumors. The purpose of the present cross-sectional study was to evaluate whether the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) accounts for the increased GSH availability observed in HN squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). For that purpose, the messenger (m)RNA levels of the modifier (M) and catalytic (C) subunits of GCL and its putative regulators (namely, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase-1 and nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha) were monitored in 35 surgical resections of untreated HNSCC. The localization of GCLM was evaluated using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. GCLM expression was significantly increased in tumor samples, compared with normal mucosa, both at the mRNA and protein level (P=0.029), but the pathway of GCLM activation remains to be elucidated. Protein expression of GCLM was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus. GCLM and the proliferation marker Ki-67 displayed a similar distribution, being both mainly expressed at the periphery of tumor lobules. The present study reported increased expression of GCL and the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis, within HNSCC. The nuclear localization of GCLM and the concomitant expression of Ki-67 suggested that the localization of GSH synthesis contributes to the protection against oxidative stress within hotspots of cell proliferation. PMID:27284370

  10. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. PMID:27230377

  11. 7SK small nuclear RNA directly affects HMGA1 function in transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Wegert, Thomas; Urlaub, Henning; Benecke, Bernd-Joachim; Benecke, Arndt

    2011-01-01

    Non-coding (nc) RNAs are increasingly recognized to play important regulatory roles in eukaryotic gene expression. The highly abundant and essential 7SK ncRNA has been shown to negatively regulate RNA Polymerase II transcription by inactivating the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) in cellular and Tat-dependent HIV transcription. Here, we identify a more general, P-TEFb-independent role of 7SK RNA in directly affecting the function of the architectural transcription factor and chromatin regulator HMGA1. An important regulatory role of 7SK RNA in HMGA1-dependent cell differentiation and proliferation regulation is uncovered with the identification of over 1500 7SK-responsive HMGA1 target genes. Elevated HMGA1 expression is observed in nearly every type of cancer making the use of a 7SK substructure in the inhibition of HMGA1 activity, as pioneered here, potentially useful in therapy. The 7SK-HMGA1 interaction not only adds an essential facet to the comprehension of transcriptional plasticity at the coupling of initiation and elongation, but also might provide a molecular link between HIV reprogramming of cellular gene expression-associated oncogenesis. PMID:21087998

  12. Absence of internal radiation contamination by radioactive cesium among children affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster.

    PubMed

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Nomura, Shuhei; Morita, Tomohiro; Sugimoto, Amina; Gilmour, Stuart; Kami, Masahiro; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi; Kanazawa, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Chronic internal radiation contamination accounts for a substantial fraction of long-term cumulative radiation exposure among residents in radiation-contaminated areas. However, little information is available on ongoing chronic internal radiation contamination among residents near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Using a whole body counter, internal radiation contamination levels among elementary and middle school students who commute to 22 schools located within Minamisoma city were assessed between May and July 2013 (26 to 28 mo after the disaster). Of 3,299 elementary and middle school students in the city, 3,255 individuals (98%) were screened through school health check-ups. Not a single student was detected with internal radiation contamination due to radioactive cesium. The study found no risk of chronic internal radiation exposure among residents near the crippled nuclear power plant. Current food inspection by local governments, volunteers, and farmers has been functioning well within Fukushima prefecture. However, food management by screening suspected contamination along with whole body counter screening are key public health interventions and should be continued to avoid further internal radiation exposure in radiation-contaminated areas. PMID:25437518

  13. The Affect of Realistic Geologic Heterogeneity on Local and Regional P/S Amplitude Ratios Based on Numerical Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Wagoner, J L; Preston, L; Smith, K; Larsen, S C

    2005-07-11

    Regional seismic discriminants based on high-frequency P/S ratios reliably distinguish between earthquakes and explosions. However, P/S discriminants in the 0.5 to 3 Hz band (where SNR can be highest) rarely perform well, with similar ratios for earthquake and explosion populations. Variability in discriminant performance has spawned numerous investigations into the generation of S-waves from explosions. Several viable mechanisms for the generation of S-waves from explosions have been forwarded, but most of these mechanisms do not explain observations of frequency-dependant S-wave generation. Recent studies have focused on the affect of near-source scattering to explain the frequency-dependence of both S-wave generation and P/S discriminant performance. In this study we investigate near-source scatter through numerical simulation with a realistic geological model We have constructed a realistic, 3-dimensional earth model of the southern Basin and Range. This regional model includes detailed constraints at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) based on extensive geologic and geophysical studies. Gross structure of the crust and upper mantle is taken from regional surface-wave studies. Variations in crustal thickness are based on receiver function analysis and a compilation of reflection/refraction studies. Upper-crustal constraints are derived from geologic maps and detailed studies of sedimentary basin geometry throughout the study area. The free surface is based on a 10-meter digital elevation model (DEM) at NTS, and a 60-meter DEM elsewhere. The model extends to a depth of 150km, making it suitable for simulations at local and regional distances. Our simulation source is based on the 1993 Non-Proliferation Experiment explosion at the NTS. This shot was well recorded, offering ample validation data. Our validation tests include measures of long-period waveform fit and relative amplitude measurements for P and S phases. Our primary conclusion is that near-source topography

  14. Elevated expression of fatty acid synthase and nuclear localization of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C are common among human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wakamiya, Tomihiro; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Hamasaki, Hideomi; Honda, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Yoshimoto, Koji; Iwaki, Toru

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C), a brain-specific isoform of the CPT1 family, are upregulated in certain types of cancers, including gliomas. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) catalyzes the carboxylation of acetyl-CoA to malonyl-CoA, the rate-limiting step in fatty acid synthesis, and its phosphorylated form inhibits lipid synthesis. We examined the expression and subcellular localization of these fatty acid metabolism-related molecules in human gliomas. We performed immunostaining of two glioma cell lines (U373MG and U87MG) and 41 surgical specimens of diffuse gliomas with various histological grades (21 with the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1(IDH1) R132H mutation and 20 without the mutation). In the cultured glioma cells, CPT1C and phosphorylated ACC (p-ACC) were mainly localized to the nuclei, whereas FASN localized to the cytoplasm. In the surgical specimens, most glioma tissues showed nuclear staining for CPT1C and p-ACC, and cytoplasmic staining for FASN, regardless of the genetic status of IDH1 and the histological grade. Therefore, elevated cytoplasmic expression of FASN and nuclear localization of CPT1C are common among human diffuse gliomas, which may be regulated by the differential phosphorylation status of ACC in the cellular compartment. PMID:24984811

  15. Commentary on "Finance, Management, and Costs of Public and Private Schools in Indonesia" and "Do Local Contributions Affect the Efficiency of Public Primary Schools?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Mark C.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on Indonesia and the Philippines in this special issue examine how local financial control affects costs of providing primary schooling. In both countries, schools with greater financial decentralization operated more efficiently. These results have important implications for U.S. schools, where decentralization reforms in Kentucky and…

  16. Expression of Nuclear Transcription Factor Kappa B in Locally Advanced Human Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Chemoradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Amit K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Klopp, Ann H.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajai B.; Broadus, Russell R.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), a transcriptional factor that has been shown to be constitutively active in cervical cancer, is part of an important pathway leading to treatment resistance in many tumor types. The purpose of our study was to determine whether expression of NF-{kappa}B in pretreatment specimens and specimens taken shortly after treatment initiation correlated with outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled in a study in which cervical biopsy specimens were obtained before radiation therapy and 48 h after treatment initiation. Matched biopsy specimens from 16 of these patients were available and evaluated for the nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B protein by immunohistochemical staining. Results: After a median follow-up of 43 months, there were 9 total treatment failures. Nuclear staining for NF-{kappa}B was positive in 3 of 16 pretreatment biopsy specimens (19%) and 5 of 16 postradiation biopsy specimens (31%). Pretreatment expression of NF-{kappa}B nuclear staining correlated with increased rates of local-regional failure (100% vs. 23%, p = 0.01), distant failure (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055), disease-specific mortality (100% vs. 31%, p = 0.03), and overall mortality (100% vs. 38%, p = 0.055). Conclusions: Our data suggest that pretreatment nuclear expression of NF-{kappa}B may be associated with a poor outcome for cervical cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. Although these data require validation in a larger group of patients, the results support the continued study of the relationship between NF-{kappa}B and outcome in patients treated for carcinoma of the cervix.

  17. SIRT6 deacetylates PKM2 to suppress its nuclear localization and oncogenic functions

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Das, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 (sirtuin 6) is a member of sirtuin family of deacetylases involved in diverse processes including genome stability, metabolic homeostasis, and tumorigenesis. However, the role of SIRT6 deacetylase activity in its tumor-suppressor functions is not well understood. Here we report that SIRT6 binds to and deacetylates nuclear PKM2 (pyruvate kinase M2) at the lysine 433 residue. PKM2 is a glycolytic enzyme with nonmetabolic nuclear oncogenic functions. SIRT6-mediated deacetylation results in PKM2 nuclear export. We further have identified exportin 4 as the specific transporter mediating PKM2 nuclear export. As a result of SIRT6-mediated deacetylation, PKM2 nuclear protein kinase and transcriptional coactivator functions are abolished. Thus, SIRT6 suppresses PKM2 oncogenic functions, resulting in reduced cell proliferation, migration potential, and invasiveness. Furthermore, studies in mouse tumor models demonstrate that PKM2 deacetylation is integral to SIRT6-mediated tumor suppression and inhibition of metastasis. Additionally, reduced SIRT6 levels correlate with elevated nuclear acetylated PKM2 levels in increasing grades of hepatocellular carcinoma. These findings provide key insights into the pivotal role of deacetylase activity in SIRT6 tumor-suppressor functions. PMID:26787900

  18. A nuclear localization of the infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus NV protein is necessary for optimal viral growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, M.K.; Moon, C.H.; Ko, M.S.; Lee, U.-H.; Cho, W.J.; Cha, S.J.; Do, J.W.; Heo, G.J.; Jeong, S.G.; Hahm, Y.S.; Harmache, A.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.; Park, J.-W.

    2011-01-01

    The nonvirion (NV) protein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) has been previously reported to be essential for efficient growth and pathogenicity of IHNV. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the NV supports the viral growth. In this study, cellular localization of NV and its role in IHNV growth in host cells was investigated. Through transient transfection in RTG-2 cells of NV fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), a nuclear localization of NV was demonstrated. Deletion analyses showed that the 32EGDL35 residues were essential for nuclear localization of NV protein, and fusion of these 4 amino acids to GFP directed its transport to the nucleus. We generated a recombinant IHNV, rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL in which the 32EGDL35 was deleted from the NV. rIHNVs with wild-type NV (rIHNV-NV) or with the NV gene replaced with GFP (rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP) were used as controls. RTG-2 cells infected with rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL yielded 12- and 5-fold less infectious virion, respectively, than wild type rIHNV-infected cells at 48 h post-infection (p.i.). While treatment with poly I:C at 24 h p.i. did not inhibit replication of wild-type rIHNVs, replication rates of rIHNV-ΔNV-GFP and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL were inhibited by poly I:C. In addition, both rIHNV-ΔNV and rIHNV-NV-ΔEGDL induced higher levels of expressions of both IFN1 and Mx1 than wild-type rIHNV. These data suggest that the IHNV NV may support the growth of IHNV through inhibition of the INF system and the amino acid residues of 32EGDL35 responsible for nuclear localization are important for the inhibitory activity of NV.

  19. The Homothorax homeoprotein activates the nuclear localization of another homeoprotein, Extradenticle, and suppresses eye development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Chi-Yun; Kuo, Tung-Sheng; Jaw, Thomas J.; Kurant, Estee; Chen, Cheng-Tse; Bessarab, Dmitri A.; Salzberg, Adi; Sun, Y. Henry

    1998-01-01

    The Extradenticle (Exd) protein in Drosophila acts as a cofactor to homeotic proteins. Its nuclear localization is regulated. We report the cloning of the Drosophila homothorax (hth) gene, a homolog of the mouse Meis1 proto-oncogene that has a homeobox related to that of exd. Comparison with Meis1 finds two regions of high homology: a novel MH domain and the homeodomain. In imaginal discs, hth expression coincides with nuclear Exd. hth and exd also have virtually identical, mutant clonal phenotypes in adults. These results suggest that hth and exd function in the same pathway. We show that hth acts upstream of exd and is required and sufficient for Exd protein nuclear localization. We also show that hth and exd are both negative regulators of eye development; their mutant clones caused ectopic eye formation. Targeted expression of hth, but not of exd, in the eye disc abolished eye development completely. We suggest that hth acts with exd to delimit the eye field and prevent inappropriate eye development. PMID:9450936

  20. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates the deubiquitylase OTUB1 at Ser16 to trigger its nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Lina; Perez-Oliva, Ana B.; Cozza, Giorgio; Gourlay, Robert; Weidlich, Simone; Campbell, David G.; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2015-01-01

    The deubiquitylating enzyme OTUB1 is present in all tissues and targets a multitude of substrates, both in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that the phosphorylation of OTUB1 at Ser16 and its subsequent nuclear accumulation is mediated by casein kinase 2 (CK2). Whereas unphosphorylated OTUB1 was detected mainly in the cytosol, Ser16-phosphorylated OTUB1 was detected only in the nucleus. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of CK2 blocked the phosphorylation of OTUB1 at Ser16 and its nuclear localization in various cells. The phosphorylation of OTUB1 at Ser16 did not alter its catalytic activity in vitro, its ability to bind K63-linked ubiquitin chains in vitro and its ability to interact with the E2 enzyme UBE2N in vitro. The phosphorylation at Ser16 and subsequent nuclear localization of OTUB1 was essential for cells to repair ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage in osteosarcoma U2OS cells. PMID:25872870

  1. A novel role for the nuclear localization signal in regulating hnRNP K protein stability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Erica J; Belrose, Jamie L; Szaro, Ben G

    2016-09-16

    hnRNP K is a highly conserved nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein, which associates with RNAs through synergistic binding via its three KH domains. hnRNP K is required for proper nuclear export and translational control of its mRNA targets, and these processes are controlled by hnRNP K's movement between subcellular compartments. Whereas the nuclear export and localization of hnRNP K that is associated with mRNP complexes has been well studied, the trafficking of hnRNP K that is unbound to mRNA has yet to be elucidated. To that end, we expressed an EGFP-tagged RNA binding-defective form of hnRNP K in intact Xenopus embryos, and found it was rapidly degraded in vivo. Deleting hnRNP K's nuclear localization signal (NLS), which contains two prospective ubiquitination sites, rescued the protein from degradation. These data demonstrate a novel activity for the NLS of hnRNP K in regulating the protein's stability in vivo when it is unbound to nucleic acids. PMID:27501755

  2. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiuyang; Wang, Bing; Liu, Erlong; Chen, Ni; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Heng

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26923071

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance studies of hydration and local water dynamics in micelle and vesicle assemblies.

    PubMed

    McCarney, Evan R; Armstrong, Brandon D; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi

    2008-09-16

    We present a unique analysis tool for the selective detection of local water inside soft molecular assemblies (hydrophobic cores, vesicular bilayers, and micellar structures) suspended in bulk water. Through the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), the (1)H NMR signal of water is amplified, as it interacts with stable radicals that possess approximately 658 times higher spin polarization. We utilized stable nitroxide radicals covalently attached along the hydrophobic tail of stearic acid molecules that incorporate themselves into surfactant-based micelle or vesicle structures. Here, we present a study of local water content and fluid viscosity inside oleate micelles and vesicles and Triton X-100 micelles to serve as model systems for soft molecular assemblies. This approach is unique because the amplification of the NMR signal is performed in bulk solution and under ambient conditions with site-specific spin labels that only detect the water that is directly interacting with the localized spin labels. Continuous wave (cw) electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis provides rotational dynamics of the spin-labeled molecular chain segments and local polarity parameters that can be related to hydration properties, whereas we show that DNP-enhanced (1)H NMR analysis of fluid samples directly provides translational water dynamics and permeability of the local environment probed by the spin label. Our technique therefore has the potential to become a powerful analysis tool, complementary to cw ESR, to study hydration characteristics of surfactant assemblies, lipid bilayers, or protein aggregates, where water dynamics is a key parameter of their structure and function. In this study, we find that there is significant penetration of water inside the oleate micelles with a higher average local water viscosity (approximately 1.8 cP) than in bulk water, and Triton X-100 micelles and oleate vesicle bilayers mostly exclude water while allowing for considerable surfactant chain

  4. A novel nuclear localization signal in the human single-minded proteins SIM1 and SIM2.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Akiko; Kudoh, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Yoshiko

    2004-01-16

    Human Single-minded 1 (SIM1) and SIM2 genes were found as homologs of Drosophila sim gene which plays a key role in the midline cell lineage of the central nervous system. SIM proteins belong to a family of transcription factors, called bHLH/PAS. Here we examined the intracellular localization of SIM proteins using the expression constructs of whole SIM2 or SIM1 protein fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The transient expression analysis revealed the nuclear localization of SIM proteins in the cultured cells. To identify the nuclear localization signal, we made expression constructs of EGFP-fusion protein consisting of various portions of SIM proteins. Transfection assay showed the presence of NLS activity in the small region of 23 and 21 amino acid residues at the central part of SIM2 and SIM1 proteins, respectively. Further analysis with amino acid substitution of this small region of SIM2 protein revealed the critical role of five amino acid residues (Arg367, Lys373, Pro385, Tyr386, and Gln389) in NLS activity. The consensus sequence of RKxxKx[K/R]xxxxKxKxRxxPY was estimated as a presumptive NLS in SIM proteins from various species. Thus, the NLS consisting of a cluster of basic amino acids with Pro and Tyr at the C-terminal end is novel and well conserved in the SIM proteins during evolution. PMID:14697214

  5. On-site storage of high level nuclear waste: attitudes and perceptions of local residents.

    PubMed

    Bassett, G W; Jenkins-Smith, H C; Silva, C

    1996-06-01

    No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and-more generally-the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to emanate mainly from stigmatization of the region due to increased perceptions of risk. Analogous impacts from leaving waste at power plants have been either ignored or assumed to be negligible. This paper presents survey results on attitudes of residents in three counties where nuclear waste is currently stored. Topics include perceived risk, knowledge of nuclear waste and radiation, and impacts on jobs, tourism, and housing values from leaving waste on site. Results are similar to what has been reported for Nevada; the public is concerned about possible adverse effects from on-site storage of waste. PMID:8693158

  6. Casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylates the deubiquitylase OTUB1 at Ser16 to trigger its nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Lina; Perez-Oliva, Ana B; Cozza, Giorgio; Gourlay, Robert; Weidlich, Simone; Campbell, David G; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Sapkota, Gopal P

    2015-01-01

    The deubiquitylating enzyme OTUB1 is present in all tissues and targets many substrates, in both the cytosol and nucleus. We found that casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylated OTUB1 at Ser(16) to promote its nuclear accumulation in cells. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of CK2 blocked the phosphorylation of OTUB1 at Ser(16), causing its nuclear exclusion in various cell types. Whereas we detected unphosphorylated OTUB1 mainly in the cytosol, we detected Ser(16)-phosphorylated OTUB1 only in the nucleus. In vitro, Ser(16)-phosphorylated OTUB1 and nonphosphorylated OTUB1 exhibited similar catalytic activity, bound K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and interacted with the E2 enzyme UBE2N. CK2-mediated phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear localization of OTUB1 promoted the formation of 53BP1 (p53-binding protein 1) DNA repair foci in the nucleus of osteosarcoma cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Our findings indicate that the activity of CK2 is necessary for the nuclear translocation and subsequent function of OTUB1 in DNA damage repair. PMID:25872870

  7. Prolonged, brain-wide expression of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 for functional circuit mapping

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christina K.; Miri, Andrew; Leung, Louis C.; Berndt, Andre; Mourrain, Philippe; Tank, David W.; Burdine, Rebecca D.

    2014-01-01

    Larval zebrafish offer the potential for large-scale optical imaging of neural activity throughout the central nervous system; however, several barriers challenge their utility. First, ~panneuronal probe expression has to date only been demonstrated at early larval stages up to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf), precluding imaging at later time points when circuits are more mature. Second, nuclear exclusion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) limits the resolution of functional fluorescence signals collected during imaging. Here, we report the creation of transgenic zebrafish strains exhibiting robust, nuclearly targeted expression of GCaMP3 across the brain up to at least 14 dpf utilizing a previously described optimized Gal4-UAS system. We confirmed both nuclear targeting and functionality of the modified probe in vitro and measured its kinetics in response to action potentials (APs). We then demonstrated in vivo functionality of nuclear-localized GCaMP3 in transgenic zebrafish strains by identifying eye position-sensitive fluorescence fluctuations in caudal hindbrain neurons during spontaneous eye movements. Our methodological approach will facilitate studies of larval zebrafish circuitry by both improving resolution of functional Ca2+ signals and by allowing brain-wide expression of improved GECIs, or potentially any probe, further into development. PMID:25505384

  8. Relativistic corrections to the diamagnetic term of the nuclear magnetic shielding: Analysis of contributions from localized orbitalsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Sergio S.; Melo, Juan I.; Romero, Rodolfo H.; Aucar, Gustavo A.; de Azúa, Martín Ruiz

    2005-02-01

    We have calculated the relativistic corrections to the diamagnetic term of the nuclear magnetic shielding constants for a series of molecules containing heavy atoms. An analysis of the contributions from localized orbitals is performed. We establish quantitatively the relative importance of inner core and valence shell molecular orbitals in each correcting term. Contributions from the latter are much less important than those from the former. The calculated values of the correction σL-PSO, first derived within the linear response elimination of small component formalism, show a power-law dependence on the nuclear charge ˜Z3.5, in contrast with the ˜Z3.1 behavior of the mass-velocity external-field correction to the paramagnetic term previously reported.

  9. Residues R{sup 199}H{sup 200} of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-20

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R{sup 199}H{sup 200} and R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}, but not R{sup 199}H{sup 200}, relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}. Collectively, our findings suggest that R{sup 199}H{sup 200} directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223} residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R{sup 199}H{sup 200} residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R{sup 199}H{sup 200} in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R{sup 221}R{sup 222}R{sup 223}.

  10. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-04-15

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G{sub 1} phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance multiwindow analysis of proton local fields and magnetization distribution in natural and deuterated mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H; Pintar, M M

    1979-01-01

    The proton free-induction decays, spin-spin relaxation times, local fields in the rotating frame, and spin-lattice relaxation times in the laboratory and rotating frames, in natural and fully deuterated mouse muscle, are reported. Measurements were taken above and below freezing temperature and at two time windows on the free-induction decay. A comparative analysis show that the magnetization fractions deduced from the different experiments are in good agreement. The main conclusion is that the resolution of the (heterogeneous) muscle nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) response is improved by the multiwindow analysis. PMID:262554

  12. How local authority services may be affected during the 2012 Olympics and how they can be maintained.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    On 6th July, 2005, the International Olympic Committee awarded London the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. This is the first time an event of this magnitude has been hosted in a western country since the September 11th attacks. The UK Government continues to assess the risk, and five years on, planning is well under way. With a limited amount of time remaining, those UK local authorities hosting Olympic events will be considering what they need to have in place to support command and control arrangements during the Games. This paper provides an overview of what local authorities need to be doing over the next two years to prepare. PMID:21482515

  13. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the rabies virus P protein requires a nuclear localization signal and a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal

    SciTech Connect

    Pasdeloup, David; Poisson, Nicolas; Raux, Helene; Gaudin, Yves; Ruigrok, Rob W.H. . E-mail: danielle.blondel@vms.cnrs-gif.fr

    2005-04-10

    Rabies virus P protein is a co-factor of the viral RNA polymerase. It has been shown previously that P mRNA directs the synthesis of four N-terminally truncated P products P2, P3, P4, and P5 due to translational initiation by a leaky scanning mechanism at internal Met codons. Whereas P and P2 are located in the cytoplasm, P3, P4, and P5 are found in the nucleus. Here, we have analyzed the molecular basis of the subcellular localization of these proteins. Using deletion mutants fused to GFP protein, we show the presence of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) in the C-terminal part of P (172-297). This domain contains a short lysine-rich stretch ({sup 211}KKYK{sup 214}) located in close proximity with arginine 260 as revealed by the crystal structure of P. We demonstrate the critical role of lysine 214 and arginine 260 in NLS activity. In the presence of Leptomycin B, P is retained in the nucleus indicating that it contains a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). The subcellular distribution of P deletion mutants indicates that the domain responsible for export is the amino-terminal part of the protein. The use of fusion proteins that have amino terminal fragments of P fused to {beta}-galactosidase containing the NLS of SV40 T antigen allows us to identify a NES between residues 49 and 58. The localization of NLS and NES determines the cellular distribution of the P gene products.

  14. The SV40 T antigen nuclear localization sequence enhances nuclear import of vector DNA in embryos of a crustacean (Litopenaeus schmitti).

    PubMed

    Arenal, Amilcar; Pimentel, Rafael; García, Carmen; Pimentel, Eulogio; Aleström, Peter

    2004-08-01

    A genetic transformation system for penaeid shrimp could provide a powerful technique for the improvement of different production traits of importance for a sustainable aquaculture. The development of a successful transformation system depends on the ability to efficiently introduce exogenous DNA into the target species. The ability of the nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide of the SV40 T antigen to facilitate nuclear import and transient gene expression is known from vertebrate systems and for the first time, is shown here to be efficient in a crustacean species, i.e. the shrimp Litopenaeus schmitti. Electroporation was used to introduce the pCMV-lacZ plasmid that contains the human cytomegalovirus promoter/enhancer (CMV) fused to the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) coding region, into L. schmitti zygotes. Supercoiled DNA was used at 50 or 500 ng/microl naked or bound to NLS peptide. The hatching rate of electroporated zygotes was around 60% for all groups, except from the pCMV-lacZ:NLS group at 500 ng/microl (43%). Based on Southern blot analyses of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products the gene transfer frequency was 2-fold higher using DNA:NLS complexes than with naked DNA (23.8% vs. 11.5%, with 50 ng/microl of plasmid DNA, 44.3% vs. 28.8% with 500 ng/microl). The beta-galactosidase activity assay indicated that nuclear uptake is faster for the DNA:NLS complexes than for naked DNA. The beta-galactosidase activity was always higher in the DNA:NLS groups than in the naked DNA groups. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of an NLS peptide to improve gene transfer and nuclear uptake in crustaceans. PMID:15276203

  15. Variation at Local Government Level in the Support for Families of Severely Disabled Children and the Factors that Affect It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Rob; McNally, Richard; James, Peter; Crossland, Kevin; Woolley, Mark; Colver, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to examine geographical variability in the support for families caring for children with severe disabilities as well as the relationships between this variability and local government social and educational performance indicators. Method: Data were collected from a cross-sectional, self-completed postal survey of the…

  16. Characterization of amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 that play a role in Ubc9 nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhri, Palak; Tao, Tao; Kaplan, Feige; Zhang, Xiang-Dong

    2015-02-27

    As the sole E2 enzyme for SUMOylation, Ubc9 is predominantly nuclear. However, the underlying mechanisms of Ubc9 nuclear localization are still not well understood. Here we show that RNAi-depletion of Imp13, an importin known to mediate Ubc9 nuclear import, reduces both Ubc9 nuclear accumulation and global SUMOylation. Furthermore, Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation previously shown to interrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOs reduces the nuclear enrichment of Ubc9, suggesting that the interaction of Ubc9 with the nuclear SUMOs may enhance Ubc9 nuclear retention. Moreover, Ubc9-R17E mutation, which is known to disrupt the interaction of Ubc9 with both SUMOs and Imp13, causes a greater decrease in Ubc9 nuclear accumulation than Ubc9-R13A or Ubc9-H20D mutation. Lastly, Ubc9-K74A/S89D mutations that perturb the interaction of Ubc9 with nucleus-enriched SUMOylation-consensus motifs has no effect on Ubc9 nuclear localization. Altogether, our results have elucidated that the amino acid residues within the N-terminal region of Ubc9 play a pivotal role in regulation of Ubc9 nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Imp13-mediated nuclear import of Ubc9 is critical for global SUMOylation. • Ubc9 mutations disrupting Ubc9-SUMO interaction decrease Ubc9 nuclear accumulation. • N-terminal amino acid residues of Ubc9 are critical for Ubc9 nuclear enrichment.

  17. Adipogenesis stimulates the nuclear localization of EWS with an increase in its O-GlcNAc glycosylation in 3T3-L1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Kamemura, Kazuo

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The majority of EWS localizes stably in the cytosol in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. • Adipogenic stimuli induce the nuclear localization of EWS. • Adipogenesis promotes O-GlcNAcylation of EWS. • O-GlcNAcylation stimulates the recruitment of EWS to the nuclear periphery. - Abstract: Although the Ewing sarcoma (EWS) proto-oncoprotein is found in the nucleus and cytosol and is associated with the cell membrane, the regulatory mechanisms of its subcellular localization are still unclear. Here we found that adipogenic stimuli induce the nuclear localization of EWS in 3T3-L1 cells. Tyrosine phosphorylation in the C-terminal PY-nuclear localization signal of EWS was negative throughout adipogenesis. Instead, an adipogenesis-dependent increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) glycosylation of EWS was observed. Pharmacological inactivation of O-GlcNAcase in preadipocytes promoted perinuclear localization of EWS. Our findings suggest that the nuclear localization of EWS is partly regulated by the glycosylation.

  18. In vitro decondensation of the sperm chromatin in Holothuria tubulosa (sea cucumber) not affecting proteolysis of basic nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    del Valle, Luis J

    2005-06-01

    Sea urchin and sea star oocyte extracts contain proteolytic activities that are active against sperm basic nuclear proteins (SNBP). This SNBP degradation has been related to the decondensation of sperm chromatin as a possible model to male pronuclei formation. We have studied the presence of this proteolytic activity in Holothuria tubulosa (sea cucumber) and its possible relationship with sperm nuclei decondensation. The mature oocyte extracts from H. tubulosa contain a proteolytic activity to SNBP located in the macromolecular fraction of the egg-jelly layer. SNBP degradation occurred both on sperm nuclei and on purified SNBP, histones being more easily degraded than protein Ø(o) (sperm-specific protein). SNBP degradation was found to be dependent on concentration, incubation time, presence of Ca(2+), pH, and this activity could be a serine-proteinase. Thermal denaturalization of the oocyte extracts (80 degrees C, 10-15 min) inactivates its proteolytic activity on SNBP but does not affect sperm nuclei decondensation. These results would suggest that sperm nuclei decondensation occurs by a mechanism different from SNBP degradation. Thus, the sperm nuclei decondensation occurs by a thermostable factor(s) and the removal of linker SNBP (H1 and protein Ø(o)) will be a first condition in the process of sperm chromatin remodeling. PMID:16026541

  19. Factors Affecting Student Success in Distance Learning Courses at a Local California Community College: Joint Governance Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of staff and faculty regarding factors affecting student success in distance learning at a California community college (CCC). Participants were members of the leadership group known as the distance learning committee. Data were collected through in-depth interviews using open-ended…

  20. Local nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with giant magnetic resistance-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guitard, P. A.; Ayde, R.; Jasmin-Lebras, G.; Caruso, L.; Pannetier-Lecoeur, M.; Fermon, C.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy on small volumes, either on microfluidic channels or in vivo configuration, is a present challenge. We report here a high resolution NMR spectroscopy on micron scale performed with Giant Magnetic Resistance-based sensors placed in a static magnetic B 0 field of 0.3 T. The sensing volume of the order of several tens of pL opens the way to high resolution spectroscopy on volumes unreached so far.

  1. On-site storage of high level nuclear waste: Attitudes and perceptions of local residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, G.W. Jr.; Jenkins-Smith, H.C.; Silva, C.

    1996-06-01

    No public policy issue has been as difficult as high-level nuclear waste. Debates continue regarding Yucca Mountain as a disposal site, and - more generally - the appropriateness of geologic disposal and the need to act quickly. Previous research has focused on possible social, political, and economic consequences of a facility in Nevada. Impacts have been predicted to be potentially large and to emanate mainly from stigmatization of the region due to increased perceptions of risk. Analogous impacts from leaving waste at power plants have been either ignored or assumed to be negligible. This paper presents survey results on attitudes of residents in three countries where nuclear waste is currently stored. Topics include perceived risk, knowledge of nuclear waste and radiation, and impacts on jobs, tourism, and housing values from leaving waste on site. Results are similar to what has been reported for Nevada; the public is concerned about possible adverse effects from on-site storage of waste. 24 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4(K271R) mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4(K210R) mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3'-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4(K271R) was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4(K210R) was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4(K271R), but not M10-XRCC4(K210R), showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4(K271R) than in M10-XRCC4(WT), whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4(K210R) as compared to M10-XRCC4(WT). The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. PMID:25934149

  3. Quantum efficiency affected by localized carrier distribution near the V-defect in GaN based quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yong-Hee Shim, Mun-Bo; Hwang, Sangheum; Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jun-Youn; Kim, Jaekyun; Park, Young-Soo; Park, Seoung-Hwan

    2013-12-23

    It is known that due to the formation of in-plane local energy barrier, V-defects can screen the carriers which non-radiatively recombine in threading dislocations (TDs) and hence, enhance the internal quantum efficiency in GaN based light-emitting diodes. By a theoretical modeling capable of describing the inhomogeneous carrier distribution near the V-defect in GaN based quantum wells, we show that the efficient suppression of non-radiative (NR) recombination via TD requires the local energy barrier height of V-defect larger than ∼80 meV. The NR process in TD combined with V-defect influences the quantum efficiency mainly in the low injection current density regime suitably described by the linear dependence of carrier density. We provide a simple phenomenological expression for the NR recombination rate based on the model result.

  4. An investigation of potential regional and local source regions affecting fine particulate matter concentrations in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saikat; Biswas, Jhumoor; Guttikunda, Sarath; Roychowdhury, Soma; Nayak, Mugdha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, potential regional and local sources influencing PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter >2.5 μm) concentrations in Delhi, India, are identified and their possible impact evaluated through diverse approaches based on study of variability of synoptic and local airflow patterns that transport aerosol concentrations from these emission sources to an urban receptor site in Delhi, India. Trajectory clustering of 72-hr and 48-hr back trajectories simulated at arrival heights of 500 m and 100 m, respectively, every hour for representative years 2008-2010 are used to assess the relative influence of long-distance, regional, and subregional sources on this site. Nonparametric statistical procedures are employed on trajectory clusters to better delineate various distinct regional pollutant source regions. Trajectory clustering and concentration-weighted trajectory (CWT) analyses indicate that regional and subregional PM2.5 emission sources in neighboring country of Pakistan and adjacent states of Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh contribute significantly to the total surplus of aerosol concentrations in the Delhi region. Conditional probability function and Bayesian approach used to identify local source regions have established substantial influence from highly urbanized satellite towns located southwest (above 25%) and southeast (above 45%) of receptor location. There is significant seasonal variability in synoptic and local air circulation patterns, which is discerned in variability in seasonal concentrations. Mean of daily averaged PM2.5 concentrations at the Income Tax Office (ITO) receptor site over Delhi at 95% confidence level is highest in winter, ranging between 209 and 185 μg m⁻³ for the entire study period. The annual variability in air transport pathways is more in winter than in other seasons. Year-to-year variability is present in aerosol concentrations, especially during winter, with standard deviations varying from a

  5. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs ofmore » the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.« less

  6. Nuclear localization of the DNA repair scaffold XRCC1: Uncovering the functional role of a bipartite NLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Thomas W.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Smith, Cassandra E.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Gabel, Scott A.; Sobhany, Mack; Wilson, Samuel H.; London, Robert E.

    2015-08-25

    We have characterized the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of XRCC1 structurally using X-ray crystallography and functionally using fluorescence imaging. Crystallography and binding studies confirm the bipartite nature of the XRCC1 NLS interaction with Importin α (Impα) in which the major and minor binding motifs are separated by >20 residues, and resolve previous inconsistent determinations. Binding studies of peptides corresponding to the bipartite NLS, as well as its major and minor binding motifs, to both wild-type and mutated forms of Impα reveal pronounced cooperative binding behavior that is generated by the proximity effect of the tethered major and minor motifs of the NLS. The cooperativity stems from the increased local concentration of the second motif near its cognate binding site that is a consequence of the stepwise binding behavior of the bipartite NLS. We predict that the stepwise dissociation of the NLS from Impα facilitates unloading by providing a partially complexed intermediate that is available for competitive binding by Nup50 or the Importin β binding domain. This behavior gives a basis for meeting the intrinsically conflicting high affinity and high flux requirements of an efficient nuclear transport system.

  7. Interaction of Sp1 zinc finger with transport factor in the nuclear localization of transcription factor Sp1

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuo; Kitamura, Haruka; Uwatoko, Chisana; Azumano, Makiko; Itoh, Kohji; Kuwahara, Jun

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} Sp1 zinc fingers themselves interact with importin {alpha}. {yields} Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a nuclear localization signal. {yields} Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Transcription factor Sp1 is localized in the nucleus and regulates the expression of many cellular genes, but the nuclear transport mechanism of Sp1 is not well understood. In this study, we revealed that GST-fused Sp1 protein bound to endogenous importin {alpha} in HeLa cells via the Sp1 zinc finger domains, which comprise the DNA binding domain of Sp1. It was found that the Sp1 zinc finger domains directly interacted with a wide range of importin {alpha} including the armadillo (arm) repeat domain and the C-terminal acidic domain. Furthermore, it turned out that all three zinc fingers of Sp1 are essential for binding to importin {alpha}. Taken together, these results suggest that the Sp1 zinc finger domains play an essential role as a NLS and Sp1 can be transported into the nucleus in an importin-dependent manner even though it possesses no classical NLSs.

  8. Nuclear export and mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum localization of IGF-binding protein 3 regulate its apoptotic properties

    PubMed Central

    Paharkova-Vatchkova, Vladislava; Lee, Kuk-Wha

    2011-01-01

    Tumor suppression by IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) may occur in an IGF-independent manner, in addition to its role as a regulator of IGF bioavailability. After secretion, IGFBP3 is internalized, rapidly localized to the nucleus, and is later detected in the cytoplasm. We identified a putative nuclear export sequence (NES) in IGFBP3 between amino acids 217 and 228, analogous to the leucine-rich NES sequence of p53 and HIV Rev. Mutation of the NES prevents nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of IGFBP3 and blocks its ability to induce apoptosis. Targeting of IGFBP3 to the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was confirmed by co-localization with organelle markers using fluorescence confocal microscopy and subcellular fractionation. Mitochondrial targeting was also demonstrated in vivo in IGFBP3-treated prostate cancer xenografts. These results show that IGFBP3 shuttles from the nucleus to the mitochondria and ER, and that nuclear export is essential for its effects on prostate cancer apoptosis. PMID:20228135

  9. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  10. hnRNP M interacts with PSF and p54{sup nrb} and co-localizes within defined nuclear structures

    SciTech Connect

    Marko, Marija; Leichter, Michael; Patrinou-Georgoula, Meropi; Guialis, Apostolia

    2010-02-01

    The abundant heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M) is able to associate with early spliceosomes and to influence splicing patterns of specific pre-mRNAs. Here, by a combination of immunoprecipitation and pull-down assays, we have identified PSF (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein-associated splicing factor) and p54{sup nrb}, two highly related proteins involved in transcription and RNA processing, as new binding partners of hnRNP M. HnRNP M was found to co-localize with PSF within a subset of nuclear paraspeckles and to largely co-fractionate with PSF and p54{sup nrb} in biochemical nuclear matrix preparations. In cells transfected with an alternatively spliced preprotachykinin (PPT) minigene expression of hnRNP M promoted exon skipping while expression of PSF favours exon inclusion. The latter effect was reverted specifically by co-expressing the full length hnRNP M or a deletion mutant capable of interaction with PSF and p54{sup nrb}. Together our data provide new insights and some functional implications on the hnRNP M network of interactions.

  11. MUC1-C nuclear localization drives invasiveness of renal cancer cells through a sheddase/gamma secretase dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Bouillez, Audrey; Gnemmi, Viviane; Gaudelot, Kelly; Hémon, Brigitte; Ringot, Bélinda; Pottier, Nicolas; Glowacki, François; Butruille, Caroline; Cauffiez, Christelle; Hamdane, Malika; Sergeant, Nicolas; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Perrais, Michaël

    2014-02-15

    MUC1 is a membrane-anchored mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (CT) can interact with many signaling pathways and act as a co-transcription factor to activate genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. MUC1 is overexpressed in renal cell carcinoma with correlation to prognosis and has been implicated in the hypoxic pathway, the main renal carcinogenetic pathway. In this context, we assessed the effects of MUC1 overexpression on renal cancer cells properties. Using shRNA strategy and/or different MUC1 constructs, we found that MUC1-extracellular domain and MUC1-CT are involved in increase of migration, cell viability, resistance to anoikis and in decrease of cell aggregation in cancer cells. Invasiveness depends only on MUC1-CT. Then, by using siRNA strategy and/or pharmacological inhibitors or peptides, we showed that sheddases ADAM10, ADAM17 and gamma-secretase are necessary for MUC1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) nuclear location and in increase of invasion property. Finally, MUC1 overexpression increases ADAM10/17 protein expression suggesting a positive regulatory loop. In conclusion, we report that MUC1 acts in renal cancer progression and MUC1-C nuclear localization drives invasiveness of cancer cells through a sheddase/gamma secretase dependent pathway. MUC1 appears as a therapeutic target by blocking MUC1 cleavage or nuclear translocation by using pharmacological approach and peptide strategies. PMID:24504508

  12. Nucleoplasmic localization of prelamin A: implications for prenylation-dependent lamin A assembly into the nuclear lamina.

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, R J; Trujillo, M A; Denham, K S; Wenger, L; Sinensky, M

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of the nuclear lamina protein lamin A requires the prenylation-dependent processing of its precursor protein, prelamin A. Unlike p21ras, which undergoes similar initial posttranslational modifications, maturation of lamin A results in the proteolytic removal of the prenylated portion of the molecule. We have used an in vitro prenylation system to demonstrate the nature of the prenyl substituent on prelamin A to be a farnesyl group. Further, the in vitro farnesylation of prelamin A requires an intact cysteine-aliphatic-aliphatic-other (CAAX) amino acid sequence motif at its carboxyl terminus. The effect of blocking the prenylation of prelamin A on its localization and assembly into the nuclear lamina was investigated by indirect immunofluorescence. Expression of wild-type prelamin A in lovastatin-treated cells showed that nonprenylated prelamin A accumulated as nucleoplasmic particles. Upon addition of mevalonate to lovastatin-treated cells, the wild-type lamin A was incorporated into the lamina within 3 hr. Expression of a mutant lamin A in which the carboxyl-terminal 21 amino acids were deleted resulted in a lamin molecule that was directly assembled into the lamina. These results indicate that the carboxyl-terminal peptide of prelamin A blocks its proper assembly into the nuclear lamina and that the prenylation-initiated removal of this peptide can occur in the nucleus. Images PMID:1557405

  13. MUC1-C nuclear localization drives invasiveness of renal cancer cells through a sheddase/gamma secretase dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gaudelot, Kelly; Hémon, Brigitte; Ringot, Bélinda; Pottier, Nicolas; Glowacki, François; Butruille, Caroline; Cauffiez, Christelle; Hamdane, Malika; Sergeant, Nicolas; Seuningen, Isabelle Van; Leroy, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane-anchored mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (CT) can interact with many signaling pathways and act as a co-transcription factor to activate genes involved in tumor progression and metastasis. MUC1 is overexpressed in renal cell carcinoma with correlation to prognosis and has been implicated in the hypoxic pathway, the main renal carcinogenetic pathway. In this context, we assessed the effects of MUC1 overexpression on renal cancer cells properties. Using shRNA strategy and/or different MUC1 constructs, we found that MUC1-extracellular domain and MUC1-CT are involved in increase of migration, cell viability, resistance to anoikis and in decrease of cell aggregation in cancer cells. Invasiveness depends only on MUC1-CT. Then, by using siRNA strategy and/or pharmacological inhibitors or peptides, we showed that sheddases ADAM10, ADAM17 and gamma-secretase are necessary for MUC1 C-terminal subunit (MUC1-C) nuclear location and in increase of invasion property. Finally, MUC1 overexpression increases ADAM10/17 protein expression suggesting a positive regulatory loop. In conclusion, we report that MUC1 acts in renal cancer progression and MUC1-C nuclear localization drives invasiveness of cancer cells through a sheddase/gamma secretase dependent pathway. MUC1 appears as a therapeutic target by blocking MUC1 cleavage or nuclear translocation by using pharmacological approach and peptide strategies. PMID:24504508

  14. The localization of FGFR3 mutations causing thanatophoric dysplasia type I differentially affects phosphorylation, processing and ubiquitylation of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Jacky; Gibbs, Linda; Horne, William C; Baron, Roland

    2007-06-01

    Recurrent missense fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations have been ascribed to skeletal dysplasias of variable severity including the lethal neonatal thanatophoric dysplasia types I (TDI) and II (TDII). To elucidate the role of activating mutations causing TDI on receptor trafficking and endocytosis, a series of four mutants located in different domains of the receptor were generated and transiently expressed. The putatively elongated X807R receptor was identified as three isoforms. The fully glycosylated mature isoform was constitutively but mildly phosphorylated. Similarly, mutations affecting the extracellular domain (R248C and Y373C) induced moderate constitutive receptor phosphorylation. By contrast, the K650M mutation affecting the tyrosine kinase 2 (TK2) domain produced heavy phosphorylation of the nonglycosylated and mannose-rich isoforms that impaired receptor trafficking through the Golgi network. This resulted in defective expression of the mature isoform at the cell surface. Normal processing was rescued by tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Internalization of the R248C and Y373C mutant receptors, which form stable disulfide-bonded dimers at the cell surface was less efficient than the wild-type, whereas ubiquitylation was markedly increased but apparently independent of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl). Constitutive phosphorylation of c-Cbl by the K650M mutant appeared to be related to the intracellular retention of the receptor. Therefore, although mutation K650M affecting the TK2 domain induces defective targeting of the overphosphorylated receptor, a different mechanism characterized by receptor retention at the plasma membrane, excessive ubiquitylation and reduced degradation results from mutations that affect the extracellular domain and the stop codon. PMID:17509076

  15. Prime-Boost Strategies in Mucosal Immunization Affect Local IgA Production and the Type of Th Response

    PubMed Central

    Fiorino, Fabio; Pettini, Elena; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata; Ciabattini, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    Combinations of different delivery routes for priming and boosting represent vaccination strategies that can modulate magnitude, quality, and localization of the immune response. A murine model was used to study T cell clonal expansion following intranasal (IN) or subcutaneous (SC) priming, and secondary immune responses after boosting by either homologous or heterologous routes. T cell primary activation was studied by using the adoptive transfer model of ovalbumin-specific transgenic CD4+ T cells. Both IN and SC immunization efficiently elicited, in the respective draining lymph nodes, primary clonal expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that disseminated toward distal lymph nodes (mesenteric and iliac) and the spleen. After boosting, a significant serum IgG response was induced in all groups independent of the combination of immunization routes used, while significant levels of local IgA were detected only in mice boosted by the IN route. Mucosal priming drove a stronger Th1 polarization than the systemic route, as shown by serum IgG subclass analysis. IFN-gamma production was observed in splenocytes of all groups, while prime-boost vaccine combinations that included the mucosal route, yielded higher levels of IL-17. Memory lymphocytes were identified in both spleen and draining lymph nodes in all immunized mice, with the highest number of IL-2 producing cells detected in mice primed and boosted by the nasal route. This work shows the critical role of immunization routes in modulating quality and localization of immune responses in prime-boost vaccine strategies. PMID:23755051

  16. Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor and Proteinase Precursor Contain Two Nuclear Localization Signals That Mediate Their Own Nuclear Translocation and That of the Major Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Gibson, Wade

    1998-01-01

    The cytomegalovirus (CMV) assembly protein precursor (pAP) interacts with the major capsid protein (MCP), and this interaction is required for nuclear translocation of the MCP, which otherwise remains in the cytoplasm of transfected cells (L. J. Wood et al., J. Virol. 71:179–190, 1997). We have interpreted this finding to indicate that the CMV MCP lacks its own nuclear localization signal (NLS) and utilizes the pAP as an NLS-bearing escort into the nucleus. The CMV pAP amino acid sequence has two clusters of basic residues (e.g., KRRRER [NLS1] and KARKRLK [NLS2], for simian CMV) that resemble the simian virus 40 large-T-antigen NLS (D. Kalderon et al., Cell 39:499–509, 1984) and one of these (NLS1) has a counterpart in the pAP homologs of other herpesviruses. The work described here establishes that NLS1 and NLS2 are mutually independent NLS that can act (i) in cis to translocate pAP and the related proteinase precursor (pNP1) into the nucleus and (ii) in trans to transport MCP into the nucleus. By using combinations of NLS mutants and carboxy-terminal deletion constructs, we demonstrated a self-interaction of pAP and cytoplasmic interactions of pAP with pNP1 and of pNP1 with itself. The relevance of these findings to early steps in capsid assembly, the mechanism of MCP nuclear transport, and the possible cytoplasmic formation of protocapsomeric substructures is discussed. PMID:9733808

  17. Functional characterization of nuclear localization and export signals in hepatitis C virus proteins and their role in the membranous web.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A; Wozniak, Richard W; Tyrrell, D Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  18. Intracellular Expression of Camelid Single-Domain Antibodies Specific for Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Uncovers Distinct Features of Its Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Joseph; Schmidt, Florian I.; Hanke, Leo; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Cavallari, Marco; Altenburg, Arwen; Brewer, Rebeccah; Ingram, Jessica; Shoemaker, Charles

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Perturbation of protein-protein interactions relies mostly on genetic approaches or on chemical inhibition. Small RNA viruses, such as influenza A virus, do not easily lend themselves to the former approach, while chemical inhibition requires that the target protein be druggable. A lack of tools thus constrains the functional analysis of influenza virus-encoded proteins. We generated a panel of camelid-derived single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs) against influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP), a viral protein essential for nuclear trafficking and packaging of the influenza virus genome. We show that these VHHs can target NP in living cells and perturb NP's function during infection. Cytosolic expression of NP-specific VHHs (αNP-VHHs) disrupts virus replication at an early stage of the life cycle. Based on their specificity, these VHHs fall into two distinct groups. Both prevent nuclear import of the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex without disrupting nuclear import of NP alone. Different stages of the virus life cycle thus rely on distinct nuclear localization motifs of NP. Their molecular characterization may afford new means of intervention in the virus life cycle. IMPORTANCE Many proteins encoded by RNA viruses are refractory to manipulation due to their essential role in replication. Thus, studying their function and determining how to disrupt said function through pharmaceutical intervention are difficult. We present a novel method based on single-domain-antibody technology that permits specific targeting and disruption of an essential influenza virus protein in the absence of genetic manipulation of influenza virus itself. Characterization of such interactions may help identify new targets for pharmaceutical intervention. This approach can be extended to study proteins encoded by other viral pathogens. PMID:25540369

  19. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Localization and Export Signals in Hepatitis C Virus Proteins and Their Role in the Membranous Web

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  20. Potential negative impacts of nuclear activities on local economies: Rethinking the issue

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, W.C. )

    1994-10-01

    Surveys of public opinion about perceptions of risk associated with the nuclear fuel cycle have shown that the public professes a widespread feeling of dread, a fear of associated stigmas, and a concern about possible catastrophic nuclear accidents. Various interest groups and state governments that oppose congressionally mandated siting of centralized high-level radioactive waste (HLW) storage and disposal facilities are using this negative imagery to create a powerful, emotional obstacle to the siting process. From statistical analyses of images and location preferences, researchers have claimed that possible significant economic losses could potentially accompany the siting of HLW facilities. However, several paradoxes, or self-contradictory statements, apparently exist between the responses expressed in surveys and the actual economic and demographic behavior evidenced in the marketplace. Federal policymakers need to evaluate whether the request for a change in siting policy is based on subjective fear of a potential negative economic effect or on proven negative effects. Empirically observed behavior does not support predicted negative economic effects based on survey responses. 41 refs.

  1. Lysine 271 but not lysine 210 of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuchi, Mikoto; Wanotayan, Rujira; Liu, Sicheng; Imamichi, Shoji; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2015-06-12

    XRCC4 and DNA Ligase IV (LIG4) cooperate to join two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). However, it is not fully understood how these proteins are localized to the nucleus. Here we created XRCC4{sup K271R} mutant, as Lys271 lies within the putative nuclear localization signal (NLS), and XRCC4{sup K210R} mutant, as Lys210 was reported to undergo SUMOylation, implicated in the nuclear localization of XRCC4. Wild-type and mutated XRCC4 with EGFP tag were introduced into HeLa cell, in which endogenous XRCC4 had been knocked down using siRNA directed to 3′-untranslated region, and tested for the nuclear localization function by fluorescence microscopy. XRCC4{sup K271R} was defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4, whereas XRCC4{sup K210R} was competent for the nuclear localization with LIG4. To examine DSB repair function, wild-type and mutated XRCC4 were introduced into XRCC4-deficient M10. M10-XRCC4{sup K271R}, but not M10-XRCC4{sup K210R}, showed significantly reduced surviving fraction after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The number of γ-H2AX foci remaining 2 h after 2 Gy γ-ray irradiation was significantly greater in M10-XRCC4{sup K271R} than in M10-XRCC4{sup WT}, whereas it was only marginally increased in M10-XRCC4{sup K210R} as compared to M10-XRCC4{sup WT}. The present results collectively indicated that Lys271, but not Lys210, of XRCC4 is required for the nuclear localization of XRCC4 and LIG4 and that the nuclear localizing ability is essential for DSB repair function of XRCC4. - Highlights: • XRCC4{sup K271R} is defective in the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is competent for the nuclear localization of itself and LIG4. • XRCC4{sup K271R} is deficient in DSB repair function. • XRCC4{sup K210R} is mostly normal in DSB repair function.

  2. p27 Nuclear localization and growth arrest caused by perlecan knockdown in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Katsuya; Oka, Kiyomasa; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu

    2010-02-12

    Perlecan, a secreted heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a major component of the vascular basement membrane and participates in angiogenesis. Here, we used small interference RNA-mediated knockdown of perlecan expression to investigate the regulatory function of perlecan in the growth of human vascular endothelial cells. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced ERK phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression were unchanged by perlecan deficiency in endothelial cells; however, perlecan deficiency inhibited the Rb protein phosphorylation and DNA synthesis induced by bFGF. By contrast to cytoplasmic localization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 in control endothelial cells, p27 was localized in the nucleus and its expression increased in perlecan-deficient cells, which suggests that p27 mediates inhibition of Rb phosphorylation. In addition to the well-characterized function of perlecan as a co-receptor for heparin-binding growth factors such as bFGF, our results suggest that perlecan plays an indispensible role in endothelial cell proliferation and acts through a mechanism that involves subcellular localization of p27.

  3. Genotype-by-Environment Interactions and Adaptation to Local Temperature Affect Immunity and Fecundity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lazzaro, Brian P.; Flores, Heather A.; Lorigan, James G.; Yourth, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Natural populations of most organisms harbor substantial genetic variation for resistance to infection. The continued existence of such variation is unexpected under simple evolutionary models that either posit direct and continuous natural selection on the immune system or an evolved life history “balance” between immunity and other fitness traits in a constant environment. However, both local adaptation to heterogeneous environments and genotype-by-environment interactions can maintain genetic variation in a species. In this study, we test Drosophila melanogaster genotypes sampled from tropical Africa, temperate northeastern North America, and semi-tropical southeastern North America for resistance to bacterial infection and fecundity at three different environmental temperatures. Environmental temperature had absolute effects on all traits, but there were also marked genotype-by-environment interactions that may limit the global efficiency of natural selection on both traits. African flies performed more poorly than North American flies in both immunity and fecundity at the lowest temperature, but not at the higher temperatures, suggesting that the African population is maladapted to low temperature. In contrast, there was no evidence for clinal variation driven by thermal adaptation within North America for either trait. Resistance to infection and reproductive success were generally uncorrelated across genotypes, so this study finds no evidence for a fitness tradeoff between immunity and fecundity under the conditions tested. Both local adaptation to geographically heterogeneous environments and genotype-by-environment interactions may explain the persistence of genetic variation for resistance to infection in natural populations. PMID:18369474

  4. Local adaptations to frost in marginal and central populations of the dominant forest tree Fagus sylvatica L. as affected by temperature and extreme drought in common garden experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kreyling, Juergen; Buhk, Constanze; Backhaus, Sabrina; Hallinger, Martin; Huber, Gerhard; Huber, Lukas; Jentsch, Anke; Konnert, Monika; Thiel, Daniel; Wilmking, Martin; Beierkuhnlein, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Local adaptations to environmental conditions are of high ecological importance as they determine distribution ranges and likely affect species responses to climate change. Increased environmental stress (warming, extreme drought) due to climate change in combination with decreased genetic mixing due to isolation may lead to stronger local adaptations of geographically marginal than central populations. We experimentally observed local adaptations of three marginal and four central populations of Fagus sylvaticaL., the dominant native forest tree, to frost over winter and in spring (late frost). We determined frost hardiness of buds and roots by the relative electrolyte leakage in two common garden experiments. The experiment at the cold site included a continuous warming treatment; the experiment at the warm site included a preceding summer drought manipulation. In both experiments, we found evidence for local adaptation to frost, with stronger signs of local adaptation in marginal populations. Winter frost killed many of the potted individuals at the cold site, with higher survival in the warming treatment and in those populations originating from colder environments. However, we found no difference in winter frost tolerance of buds among populations, implying that bud survival was not the main cue for mortality. Bud late frost tolerance in April differed between populations at the warm site, mainly because of phenological differences in bud break. Increased spring frost tolerance of plants which had experienced drought stress in the preceding summer could also be explained by shifts in phenology. Stronger local adaptations to climate in geographically marginal than central populations imply the potential for adaptation to climate at range edges. In times of climate change, however, it needs to be tested whether locally adapted populations at range margins can successfully adapt further to changing conditions. PMID:25035801

  5. Nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor gene product is determined by cell density.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S; Chen, D Y; Humphrey, J S; Gnarra, J R; Linehan, W M; Klausner, R D

    1996-01-01

    The product of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene, the gene inactivated in VHL disease and in sporadic clear-cell renal carcinomas, has recently been shown to have as a functional target the transcription elongation complex, elongin (also called SIII). Here it is shown that there is a tightly regulated, cell-density-dependent transport of VHL into and/or out of the nucleus. In densely grown cells, the VHL protein is predominantly in the cytoplasm, whereas in sparse cultures, most of the protein can be detected in the nucleus. We have identified a putative nuclear localization signal in the first 60 and first 28 amino acids of the human and rat VHL protein, respectively. Sequences in the C-terminal region of the VHL protein may also be required for localization to the cytosol. These findings provide the initial indication of a novel cell density-dependent pathway that is responsible for the regulation of VHL cellular localization. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8700833

  6. Does the local food environment around schools affect diet? Longitudinal associations in adolescents attending secondary schools in East London

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The local retail food environment around schools may act as a potential risk factor for adolescent diet. However, international research utilising cross-sectional designs to investigate associations between retail food outlet proximity to schools and diet provides equivocal support for an effect. In this study we employ longitudinal perspectives in order to answer the following two questions. First, how has the local retail food environment around secondary schools changed over time and second, is this change associated with change in diet of students at these schools? Methods The locations of retail food outlets and schools in 2001 and 2005 were geo-coded in three London boroughs. Network analysis in a Geographic Information System (GIS) ascertained the number, minimum and median distances to food outlets within 400 m and 800 m of the school location. Outcome measures were ‘healthy’ and ‘unhealthy’ diet scores derived from adolescent self-reported data in the Research with East London Adolescents: Community Health Survey (RELACHS). Adjusted associations between distance from school to food retail outlets, counts of outlets near schools and diet scores were assessed using longitudinal (2001–2005 n=757) approaches. Results Between 2001 and 2005 the number of takeaways and grocers/convenience stores within 400 m of schools increased, with many more grocers reported within 800 m of schools in 2005 (p< 0.001). Longitudinal analyses showed a decrease of the mean healthy (−1.12, se 0.12) and unhealthy (−0.48, se 0.16) diet scores. There were significant positive relationships between the distances travelled to grocers and healthy diet scores though effects were very small (0.003, 95%CI 0.001 – 0.006). Significant negative relationships between proximity to takeaways and unhealthy diet scores also resulted in small parameter estimates. Conclusions The results provide some evidence that the local food environment around secondary schools

  7. How water molecules affect the catalytic activity of hydrolases - A XANES study of the local structures of peptide deformylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Peixin; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Guo, Xiaoyun; Yang, Feifei; Yu, Meijuan; Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Yuhui; Xie, Yaning; Gong, Weimin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-12-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a prokaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the deformylation of nascent peptides generated during protein synthesis and water molecules play a key role in these hydrolases. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and ab initio calculations we accurately probe the local atomic environment of the metal ion binding in the active site of PDF at different pH values and with different metal ions. This new approach is an effective way to monitor existing correlations among functions and structural changes. We show for the first time that the enzymatic activity depends on pH values and metal ions via the bond length of the nearest coordinating water (Wat1) to the metal ion. Combining experimental and theoretical data we may claim that PDF exhibits an enhanced enzymatic activity only when the distance of the Wat1 molecule with the metal ion falls in the limited range from 2.15 to 2.55 Å.

  8. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Jasmin S.; Nagel, Anja C.; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H)MAPK-ko and a phospho-mimetic Su(H)MAPK-ac isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vgBE-lacZ). In general, Su(H)MAPK-ko induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H)MAPK-ac was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vgBE-lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DERact) or the MAPK (rlSEM) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones. PMID:26702412

  9. Adaptation to local thermal regimes by crustose coralline algae does not affect rates of recruitment in coral larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Evenhuis, Christian; Logan, Murray; Motti, Cherie A.

    2015-12-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are well known for their ability to induce settlement in coral larvae. While their wide distribution spans reefs that differ substantially in temperature regimes, the extent of local adaptation to these regimes and the impact they have on CCA inductive ability are unknown. CCA Porolithon onkodes from Heron (southern) and Lizard (northern) islands on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (separated by 1181 km) were experimentally exposed to acute or prolonged thermal stress events and their thermal tolerance and recruitment capacity determined. A sudden onset bleaching model was developed to determine the health status of CCA based on the rate of change in the CCA live surface area (LSA). The interaction between location and temperature was significant ( F (2,119) = 6.74, p = 0.0017), indicating that thermally driven local adaptation had occurred. The southern population remained healthy after prolonged exposure to 28 °C and exhibited growth compared to the northern population ( p = 0.022), with its optimum temperature determined to be slightly below 28 °C. As expected, at the higher temperatures (30 and 32 °C) the Lizard Island population performed better that those from Heron Island, with an optimum temperature of 30 °C. Lizard Island CCA displayed the lowest bleaching rates at 30 °C, while levels consistently increased with temperature in their southern counterparts. The ability of those CCA deemed thermally tolerant (based on LSA) to induce Acropora millepora larval settlement was then assessed. While spatial differences influenced the health and bleaching levels of P. onkodes during prolonged and acute thermal exposure, thermally tolerant fragments, regardless of location, induced similar rates of coral larval settlement. This confirmed that recent thermal history does not influence the ability of CCA to induce settlement of A. millepora larvae.

  10. Local overexpression of Su(H)-MAPK variants affects Notch target gene expression and adult phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Auer, Jasmin S; Nagel, Anja C; Schulz, Adriana; Wahl, Vanessa; Preiss, Anette

    2015-12-01

    In Drosophila, Notch and EGFR signalling pathways are closely intertwined. Their relationship is mostly antagonistic, and may in part be based on the phosphorylation of the Notch signal transducer Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] by MAPK. Su(H) is a transcription factor that together with several cofactors regulates the expression of Notch target genes. Here we address the consequences of a local induction of three Su(H) variants on Notch target gene expression. To this end, wild-type Su(H), a phospho-deficient Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) and a phospho-mimetic Su(H) (MAPK-ac) isoform were overexpressed in the central domain of the wing anlagen. The expression of the Notch target genes cut, wingless, E(spl)m8-HLH and vestigial, was monitored. For the latter two, reporter genes were used (E(spl)m8-lacZ, vg (BE) -lacZ). In general, Su(H) (MAPK-) (ko) induced a stronger response than wild-type Su(H), whereas the response to Su(H) (MAPK-ac) was very weak. Notch target genes cut, wingless and vg (BE) -lacZ were ectopically activated, whereas E(spl)m8-lacZ was repressed by overexpression of Su(H) proteins. In addition, in epistasis experiments an activated form of the EGF-receptor (DER (act) ) or the MAPK (rl (SEM) ) and individual Su(H) variants were co-overexpressed locally, to compare the resultant phenotypes in adult flies (thorax, wings and eyes) as well as to assay the response of the Notch target gene cut in cell clones. PMID:26702412

  11. Cell cycle-dependent nuclear accumulation of the p94fer tyrosine kinase is regulated by its NH2 terminus and is affected by kinase domain integrity and ATP binding.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dor, I; Bern, O; Tennenbaum, T; Nir, U

    1999-02-01

    p94fer and p51ferT are two tyrosine kinases that are encoded by differentially spliced transcripts of the FER locus in the mouse. The two tyrosine kinases share identical SH2 and kinase domains but differ in their NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. Unlike p94fer, the presence of which has been demonstrated in most mammalian cell lines analyzed, the expression of p51ferT is restricted to meiotic cells. Here, we show that the two related tyrosine kinases also differ in their subcellular localization profiles. Although p51ferT accumulates constitutively in the cell nucleus, p94fer is cytoplasmic in quiescent cells and enters the nucleus concomitantly with the onset of S phase. The nuclear translocation of the FER proteins is driven by a nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is located within the kinase domain of these enzymes. The functioning of that NLS depends on the integrity of the kinase domain but was not affected by inactivation of the kinase activity. The NH2 terminus of p94fer dictated the cell cycle-dependent functioning of the NLS of FER kinase. This process was governed by coiled-coil forming sequences that are present in the NH2 terminus of the kinase. The regulatory effect of the p94fer NH2-terminal sequences was not affected by kinase activity but was perturbed by mutations in the kinase domain ATP binding site. Ectopic expression of the constitutively nuclear p51ferT in CHO cells interfered with S-phase progression in these cells. This was not seen in p94fer-overexpressing cells. The FER tyrosine kinases seem, thus, to be regulated by novel mechanisms that direct their different subcellular distribution profiles and may, consequently, control their cellular functioning. PMID:10074905

  12. Roosters affected by epididymal lithiasis present local alteration in vitamin D3, testosterone and estradiol levels as well as estrogen receptor 2 (beta) expression.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, André G; Dornas, Rubem A P; Praes, Lílian C; Hess, Rex A; Mahecha, Germán A B; Oliveira, Cleida A

    2011-09-01

    Epididymal lithiasis is a reproductive dysfunction of roosters that is associated with loss of fertility and is characterized by the formation of calcium stones in the lumen of the efferent ductules of the epididymal region. The efferent ductules of birds are responsible for the reabsorption of the fluid coming from the testis as well as luminal calcium. It has been hypothesized that the epididymal stone formation may be related to the impairment of local fluid or calcium homeostasis, which depends on hormones such as estradiol (E(2)). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate possible alterations in the expression of ERα (ESR1) and ERβ (ESR2) in the epididymal region of roosters affected by epididymal lithiasis. The study was performed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assays. In addition, the concentrations of E(2), vitamin D3, and testosterone, which are also key hormones in maintenance of calcium homeostasis, were determined in the plasma and epididymal region, by ELISA. It was observed that ESR2 expression is increased in all segments of the epididymal region of affected roosters, whereas ESR1 levels are not altered. Moreover, the hormone concentration profiles were changed, as in the epididymal region of roosters with lithiasis the E(2) levels were increased and vitamin D3 as well as testosterone concentrations were significantly decreased. These results suggest that a hormonal imbalance may be involved with the origin and progression of the epididymal lithiasis, possibly by affecting the local fluid or calcium homeostasis. PMID:21670126

  13. Localization of the bacterial agent of juvenile oyster disease (Roseovarius crassostreae) within affected eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica).

    PubMed

    Boardman, Cynthia L; Maloy, Aaron P; Boettcher, Katherine J

    2008-02-01

    The bacterium Roseovarius crassostreae causes seasonal mortalities among commercially produced eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) grown in the Northeastern United States. Phylogenetically, the species belongs to a major lineage of marine bacteria (the Roseobacter clade), within which Roseovarius crassostreae is the only known pathogen to be isolated in laboratory culture. The objective of the current study was to determine the location and nature of R. crassostreae interactions with oysters affected by juvenile oyster disease (JOD). Scanning electron microscopy of diseased individuals revealed abundant colonization of the inner shell surfaces by bacteria which were morphologically similar to R. crassostreae. The same types of cells were also observed on and within layers of host-derived conchiolin on the inner valves. Most bacterial cells were alive as determined by the use of a fluorescent viability stain. Further, most were clearly attached at the cell poles, which is consistent with the ability of R. crassostreae to express polar fimbriae. When material from the pallial fluid, soft tissue and inner valve surfaces was cultured, the highest numbers of R. crassostreae were recovered from the inner valves. These samples also contained the greatest abundance of R. crassostreae as a percentage of total colonies. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes provided culture-independent evidence of the numerical dominance of R. crassostreae among the bacterial consortia associated with the inner shell surfaces of JOD-affected animals. The ability of R. crassostreae to colonize shell and conchiolin is consistent with the described JOD-pathology and may aid the bacteria in avoiding hemocyte-mediated killing. PMID:17931651

  14. Definition of regions in human c-myc that are involved in transformation and nuclear localization.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, J; de Lange, T; Ramsay, G; Jakobovits, E; Bishop, J M; Varmus, H; Lee, W

    1987-01-01

    To study the relationship between the primary structure of the c-myc protein and some of its functional properties, we made in-frame insertion and deletion mutants of the normal human c-myc coding domain that was expressed from a retroviral promoter-enhancer. We assessed the effects of these mutations on the ability of c-myc protein to cotransform normal rat embryo cells with a mutant ras gene, induce foci in a Rat-1-derived cell line (Rat-1a), and localize in nuclei. Using the cotransformation assay, we found two regions of the protein (amino acids 105 to 143 and 321 to 439) where integrity was critical: one region (amino acids 1 to 104) that tolerated insertion and small deletion mutations, but not large deletions, and another region (amino acids 144) to 320) that was largely dispensable. Comparison with regions that were important for transformation of Rat-1a cells revealed that some are essential for both activities, but others are important for only one or the other, suggesting that the two assays require different properties of the c-myc protein. Deletion of each of three regions of the c-myc protein (amino acids 106 to 143, 320 to 368, and 370 to 412) resulted in partial cytoplasmic localization, as determined by immunofluorescence or immunoprecipitation following subcellular fractionation. Some abnormally located proteins retained transforming activity; most proteins lacking transforming activity appeared to be normally located. Images PMID:3299053

  15. DAYSLEEPER: a nuclear and vesicular-localized protein that is expressed in proliferating tissues

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DAYSLEEPER is a domesticated transposase that is essential for development in Arabidopsis thaliana [Nature, 436:282–284, 2005]. It is derived from a hAT-superfamily transposon and contains many of the features found in the coding sequence of these elements [Nature, 436:282–284, 2005, Genetics, 158:949–957, 2001]. This work sheds light on the expression of this gene and localization of its product in protoplasts and in planta. Using deletion constructs, important domains in the protein were identified. Results DAYSLEEPER is predominantly expressed in meristems, developing flowers and siliques. The protein is mainly localized in the nucleus, but can also be seen in discrete foci in the cytoplasm. Using several vesicular markers, we found that these foci belong to vesicular structures of the trans-golgi network, multivesicular bodies (MVB’s) and late endosomes. The central region as well as both the N- and the C-terminus are essential to DAYSLEEPER function, since versions of DAYSLEEPER deleted for these regions are not able to complement the daysleeper phenotype. Like hAT-transposases, we show that DAYSLEEPER has a functionally conserved dimerization domain [J Biol Chem, 282:7563–7575, 2007]. Conclusions DAYSLEEPER has retained the global structure of hAT transposases and it seems that most of these conserved features are essential to DAYSLEEPER’s cellular function. Although structurally similar, DAYSLEEPER seems to have broadened its range of action beyond the nucleus in comparison to transposases. PMID:24330683

  16. Structural protein 4.1R is integrally involved in nuclear envelope protein localization, centrosome–nucleus association and transcriptional signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Adam J.; Almendrala, Donna K.; Go, Minjoung M.; Krauss, Sharon Wald

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional structural protein 4.1R is required for assembly and maintenance of functional nuclei but its nuclear roles are unidentified. 4.1R localizes within nuclei, at the nuclear envelope, and in cytoplasm. Here we show that 4.1R, the nuclear envelope protein emerin and the intermediate filament protein lamin A/C co-immunoprecipitate, and that 4.1R-specific depletion in human cells by RNA interference produces nuclear dysmorphology and selective mislocalization of proteins from several nuclear subcompartments. Such 4.1R-deficiency causes emerin to partially redistribute into the cytoplasm, whereas lamin A/C is disorganized at nuclear rims and displaced from nucleoplasmic foci. The nuclear envelope protein MAN1, nuclear pore proteins Tpr and Nup62, and nucleoplasmic proteins NuMA and LAP2α also have aberrant distributions, but lamin B and LAP2β have normal localizations. 4.1R-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts show a similar phenotype. We determined the functional effects of 4.1R-deficiency that reflect disruption of the association of 4.1R with emerin and A-type lamin: increased nucleus–centrosome distances, increased β-catenin signaling, and relocalization of β-catenin from the plasma membrane to the nucleus. Furthermore, emerin- and lamin-A/C-null cells have decreased nuclear 4.1R. Our data provide evidence that 4.1R has important functional interactions with emerin and A-type lamin that impact upon nuclear architecture, centrosome–nuclear envelope association and the regulation of β-catenin transcriptional co-activator activity that is dependent on β-catenin nuclear export. PMID:21486941

  17. North Atlantic Oscillation affecting aerosols ground levels over Europe through local processes: asymmetries in time and space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerez, Sonia; Jimenez-Guerrero, Pedro; Montávez, Juan Pedro; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2013-04-01

    Air pollution is a major environmental and health problem. Hence, understanding when and why episodes of air pollution arise becomes essential. Besides emissions, air pollution levels depend on the atmospheric conditions handling and transforming them through processes related to chemistry, transport and removal. In this sense, this contribution assesses the variation in ground-level aerosols concentrations over Europe associated to changes in the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) motivated by the well-known strong impact of the NAO on the European climate variability. For that we used a high-resolution (25 km) air quality simulation spanning the period 1970-1999 and covering western Europe and most of the Mediterranean basin. Additionally, we used observed aerosol data from the EMEP database whose observational periods range between 1993 and 2010. The simulation was performed by using climatological boundary conditions for the aerosols concentrations, hence allowing to isolate the influence of the local atmospheric processes, as they are governed by the NAO, on the levels of the various aerosol species analyzed (namely sea salt, wind-blown and resuspended dust, secondary inorganic aerosols, organic matter and elemental carbon) from the influence of large-scale mechanisms. The results highlight that positive NAO phases favor increased aerosols levels in southern (northern) regions in winter (summer), while negative NAO phases enhance them in northern (southern) regions in winter (summer), being generally in good agreement with the analysis based on the observational database. Variations are up to and over 100% for most aerosols, being clearly related to the NAO-impact on local precipitation and wind, as they act to clean the atmosphere through removal and dispersion processes, but equally resulting from the NAO-impact on the radiation balance (i.e. cloudiness) as it rebounds on the biogenic emitting activity and on the oxidative capacity of the

  18. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  19. How water molecules affect the catalytic activity of hydrolases--a XANES study of the local structures of peptide deformylase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peixin; Wang, Yu; Chu, Wangsheng; Guo, Xiaoyun; Yang, Feifei; Yu, Meijuan; Zhao, Haifeng; Dong, Yuhui; Xie, Yaning; Gong, Weimin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a prokaryotic enzyme that catalyzes the deformylation of nascent peptides generated during protein synthesis and water molecules play a key role in these hydrolases. Using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and ab initio calculations we accurately probe the local atomic environment of the metal ion binding in the active site of PDF at different pH values and with different metal ions. This new approach is an effective way to monitor existing correlations among functions and structural changes. We show for the first time that the enzymatic activity depends on pH values and metal ions via the bond length of the nearest coordinating water (Wat1) to the metal ion. Combining experimental and theoretical data we may claim that PDF exhibits an enhanced enzymatic activity only when the distance of the Wat1 molecule with the metal ion falls in the limited range from 2.15 to 2.55 Å. PMID:25503313

  20. Diversity and Composition of the Leaf Mycobiome of Beech (Fagus sylvatica) Are Affected by Local Habitat Conditions and Leaf Biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Unterseher, Martin; Siddique, Abu Bakar; Brachmann, Andreas; Peršoh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Comparative investigations of plant-associated fungal communities (mycobiomes) in distinct habitats and under distinct climate regimes have been rarely conducted in the past. Nowadays, high-throughput sequencing allows routine examination of mycobiome responses to environmental changes and results at an unprecedented level of detail. In the present study, we analysed Illumina-generated fungal ITS1 sequences from European beech (Fagus sylvatica) originating from natural habitats at two different altitudes in the German Alps and from a managed tree nursery in northern Germany. In general, leaf-inhabiting mycobiome diversity and composition correlated significantly with the origin of the trees. Under natural condition the mycobiome was more diverse at lower than at higher elevation, whereas fungal diversity was lowest in the artificial habitat of the tree nursery. We further identified significant correlation of leaf chlorophylls and flavonoids with both habitat parameters and mycobiome biodiversity. The present results clearly point towards a pronounced importance of local stand conditions for the structure of beech leaf mycobiomes and for a close interrelation of phyllosphere fungi and leaf physiology. PMID:27078859

  1. Do local adaptation and the reproductive tactic of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affect offspring metabolic capacities?

    PubMed

    Rossignol, O; Dodson, J J; Marquilly, C; Guderley, H

    2010-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) is an iteroparous, anadromous species that exhibits some of the greatest within-population variability in size and age at maturity of all vertebrates. In the conditional reproductive strategy of salmonids, the male reproductive tactic expressed is believed to depend on an individual male's status relative to others in the population and therefore depends on his capacity to attain a physiological threshold, the exact nature of which is unknown. Although the threshold is influenced by local biotic and abiotic conditions, it is likely to be under genetic control. Our study examined whether the early growth, muscle metabolic capacities, routine metabolic rate, and spontaneous swimming of salmon alevins reared in laboratory conditions varied with the population of origin, maternal investment, and the paternal reproductive tactic. Our experimental design allowed us to establish that neither the population of origin nor the paternal reproductive tactic influenced the physiological capacities of alevins. The strong influence of the mother on alevin metabolic capacities suggests that the bioenergetic differences in metabolic capacities, realized metabolic rates, and activity levels that could eventually dictate the reproductive tactic of male offspring may originate in maternal effects. PMID:20350165

  2. Simulation study for lifetime distribution of middle-of-line time-dependent dielectric breakdown affected by global and local spacing variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokogawa, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    The impact of process fluctuations for the lifetime distribution of middle-of-line time-dependent dielectric breakdown was investigated by Monte-Carlo simulation. Global and local variations were simulated using a doubly truncated normal distribution. A goodness of fit to the generated data was determined statistically in terms of the Weibull distribution and clustering model. A change in the standard deviation of the global variation shows a large contribution to lifetime variation. However, it does not affect the average lifetime. A change in the standard deviation of the local variation contributes to both the average lifetime and the distribution variation. The upper limit of the process variation induces the convex upward shape of the lifetime distribution on the Weibull plot. The clustering model well explains the distribution shape.

  3. GRP-3 and KAPP, encoding interactors of WAK1, negatively affect defense responses induced by oligogalacturonides and local response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Savatin, Daniel V; Sicilia, Francesca; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-04-01

    Conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) act as danger signals to activate the plant immune response. These molecules are recognized by surface receptors that are referred to as pattern recognition receptors. Oligogalacturonides (OGs), DAMPs released from the plant cell wall homogalacturonan, have also been proposed to act as local signals in the response to wounding. The Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase 1 (WAK1), a receptor of OGs, has been described to form a complex with a cytoplasmic plasma membrane-localized kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) and a glycine-rich protein (GRP-3) that we find localized mainly in the cell wall and, in a small part, on the plasma membrane. By using Arabidopsis plants overexpressing WAK1, and both grp-3 and kapp null insertional mutant and overexpressing plants, we demonstrate a positive function of WAK1 and a negative function of GRP-3 and KAPP in the OG-triggered expression of defence genes and the production of an oxidative burst. The three proteins also affect the local response to wounding and the basal resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. GRP-3 and KAPP are likely to function in the phasing out of the plant immune response. PMID:26748394

  4. GRP-3 and KAPP, encoding interactors of WAK1, negatively affect defense responses induced by oligogalacturonides and local response to wounding

    PubMed Central

    Gramegna, Giovanna; Modesti, Vanessa; Savatin, Daniel V.; Sicilia, Francesca; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Conserved microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) act as danger signals to activate the plant immune response. These molecules are recognized by surface receptors that are referred to as pattern recognition receptors. Oligogalacturonides (OGs), DAMPs released from the plant cell wall homogalacturonan, have also been proposed to act as local signals in the response to wounding. The Arabidopsis Wall-Associated Kinase 1 (WAK1), a receptor of OGs, has been described to form a complex with a cytoplasmic plasma membrane-localized kinase-associated protein phosphatase (KAPP) and a glycine-rich protein (GRP-3) that we find localized mainly in the cell wall and, in a small part, on the plasma membrane. By using Arabidopsis plants overexpressing WAK1, and both grp-3 and kapp null insertional mutant and overexpressing plants, we demonstrate a positive function of WAK1 and a negative function of GRP-3 and KAPP in the OG-triggered expression of defence genes and the production of an oxidative burst. The three proteins also affect the local response to wounding and the basal resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. GRP-3 and KAPP are likely to function in the phasing out of the plant immune response. PMID:26748394

  5. Identification of Nuclear Genes Encoding Chloroplast-Localized Proteins Required for Embryo Development in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Nicole; Lloyd, Johnny; Sweeney, Colleen; Myouga, Fumiyoshi; Meinke, David

    2011-01-01

    We describe here the diversity of chloroplast proteins required for embryo development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Interfering with certain chloroplast functions has long been known to result in embryo lethality. What has not been reported before is a comprehensive screen for embryo-defective (emb) mutants altered in chloroplast proteins. From a collection of transposon and T-DNA insertion lines at the RIKEN chloroplast function database (http://rarge.psc.riken.jp/chloroplast/) that initially appeared to lack homozygotes and segregate for defective seeds, we identified 23 additional examples of EMB genes that likely encode chloroplast-localized proteins. Fourteen gene identities were confirmed with allelism tests involving duplicate mutant alleles. We then queried journal publications and the SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) to establish a comprehensive dataset of 381 nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins of Arabidopsis associated with embryo-defective (119 genes), plant pigment (121 genes), gametophyte (three genes), and alternate (138 genes) phenotypes. Loci were ranked based on the level of certainty that the gene responsible for the phenotype had been identified and the protein product localized to chloroplasts. Embryo development is frequently arrested when amino acid, vitamin, or nucleotide biosynthesis is disrupted but proceeds when photosynthesis is compromised and when levels of chlorophyll, carotenoids, or terpenoids are reduced. Chloroplast translation is also required for embryo development, with genes encoding chloroplast ribosomal and pentatricopeptide repeat proteins well represented among EMB datasets. The chloroplast accD locus, which is necessary for fatty acid biosynthesis, is essential in Arabidopsis but not in Brassica napus or maize (Zea mays), where duplicated nuclear genes compensate for its absence or loss of function. PMID:21139083

  6. Structure of Importin-α from a Filamentous Fungus in Complex with a Classical Nuclear Localization Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dreyer, Thiago R.; Freitas, Fernanda Z.; Bertolini, Maria Célia; Fontes, Marcos R. M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurospora crassa is a filamentous fungus that has been extensively studied as a model organism for eukaryotic biology, providing fundamental insights into cellular processes such as cell signaling, growth and differentiation. To advance in the study of this multicellular organism, an understanding of the specific mechanisms for protein transport into the cell nucleus is essential. Importin-α (Imp-α) is the receptor for cargo proteins that contain specific nuclear localization signals (NLSs) that play a key role in the classical nuclear import pathway. Structures of Imp-α from different organisms (yeast, rice, mouse, and human) have been determined, revealing that this receptor possesses a conserved structural scaffold. However, recent studies have demonstrated that the Impα mechanism of action may vary significantly for different organisms or for different isoforms from the same organism. Therefore, structural, functional, and biophysical characterization of different Impα proteins is necessary to understand the selectivity of nuclear transport. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of an Impα from a filamentous fungus which is also the highest resolution Impα structure already solved to date (1.75 Å). In addition, we performed calorimetric analysis to determine the affinity and thermodynamic parameters of the interaction between Imp-α and the classical SV40 NLS peptide. The comparison of these data with previous studies on Impα proteins led us to demonstrate that N. crassa Imp-α possess specific features that are distinct from mammalian Imp-α but exhibit important similarities to rice Imp-α, particularly at the minor NLS binding site. PMID:26091498

  7. Conifer Encroachment into Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park: How Anthropogenic Impacts to Local Hydrology Affect Meadow Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, J. W.; Lundquist, J. L.; Cooper, D. J.; King, J. C.; Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.

    2006-12-01

    Tuolumne Meadows, at 2600 m in Yosemite National Park, is one of the most popular sub-alpine destinations in the Sierra Nevada of California and, as such, one of the most impacted by current and historic use. Conifer (lodgepole pine) encroachment into the meadow has been managed for over 70 years to maintain vistas and to protect potentially impacted meadow vegetation. This study seeks to characterize hydrologic, soil, and vegetation assemblages throughout the affected area, document departures from expected relationships, and identify causative disruptive mechanisms. The snowmelt-dominated Tuolumne River, an integral part of the meadow system, drains 200 km{2} of the Sierra Nevada crest above the meadows. Much of the meadow area consists of recently glaciated granitic bedrock overlain by 1-2 meters of alluvial sand and gravel topped with 30-40 cm of organic-rich meadow soil. Almost all areas examined to date reveal plant assemblages and hydrologic regimes that are inconsistent with the formation of these meadow soils. In upland sites, this is characterized by groundwater conditions that are incapable of supporting meadow forming vegetation and soils. In lower areas, where groundwater levels remain close to the surface throughout the summer, the vegetation present lacks plant species with high below ground biomass production, and could not have formed the existing meadow soils. Potential mechanisms for these disruptions include ditching associated with road construction and drainage, changes in river morphology due to loss of willow riparian vegetation, and lingering impacts of intensive grazing more than a century ago. Patterns of conifer invasion as well as tree-ring and fire scar chronologies were also documented and appear to reflect similar responses to the impacts mentioned above. Results of this study are intended to inform future management and possible restoration of the area.

  8. Long isoform of ErbB3 binding protein, p48, mediates protein kinase B/Akt-dependent HDM2 stabilization and nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chung Kwon; Lee, Sang Bae; Nguyen, Truong L.X.; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Jihoe; Ahn, Jee-Yin

    2012-01-15

    p48 is a long isoform of the ErbB3 binding protein that has oncogenic functions including promotion of carcinogenesis and induction of malignant transformation through negative regulation of tumor suppressor p53. Here, we show that high level of p48 protein expression leads to enhance HDM2 phosphorylation by Akt and inhibits the self-ubiquitination of HDM2 by up-regulation of Akt activity, thereby promoting its protein stability. Moreover, p48 expression leads to accumulated nuclear localization of HDM2, whereas p48 depletion disturbs its nuclear localization. Hence, higher expression of p48 in cancer cells reduces p53 levels through modulation of HDM2 nuclear localization and protein stability via regulation of its Akt-mediated phosphorylation.

  9. Robotic camera for automatic localization of steam generator tubes in nuclear power stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cers, Philippe; Garnero, Marie-Agnes

    1994-11-01

    Maintenance of steam generators occupies a substantial proportion of scheduled shutdowns at nuclear power stations. Maintenance operations are broken down into a number of distinct phases; these are performed separately to ensure accountability for the work carried out at each stage, thereby guaranteeing the quality of the maintenance process as a whole. One of these phases, known as `marking,' consists in locating certain tubes in the steam generator tube plate and marking them using a suitable system. The list of tubes for marking may be determined on the basis of prior tests. Marked tubes will undergo subsequent operations as required, such as plugging for example. Clearly, the quality of the marking process will have a significant impact on all subsequent maintenance operations on tubes in the secondary bundle. Present-day marking tools make little use of automation, and over-reliance on human judgement means that the marking phase is liable to error. Moreover, depending on the number of tubes to mark, this phase can be long and fastidious. With these considerations in mind, the EDF Research Division has developed a display system for locating steam generator tubes, with the main purpose of facilitating marking operations. Following an initialization phase, this system (named LUCANER) provides the operator with a simple, reliable and fully automatic method for locating tubes in the tube plate. Besides reducing the risk of error, the system also reduces the time required for the marking phase. The system can also be used for complementary phases involving checks on markings, checks on plugging, etc. In a wider context, it provides visual inspection capabilities over a large part of the bowl.

  10. Glypican and Biglycan in the Nuclei of Neurons and Glioma Cells: Presence of Functional Nuclear Localization Signals and Dynamic Changes in Glypican During the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu; Häring, Monika; Roughley, Peter J.; Margolis, Renée K.; Margolis, Richard U.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the expression patterns and subcellular localization in nervous tissue of glypican, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is predominantly synthesized by neurons, and of biglycan, a small, leucine-rich chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. By laser scanning confocal microscopy of rat central nervous tissue and C6 glioma cells, we found that a significant portion of the glypican and biglycan immunoreactivity colocalized with nuclear staining by propidium iodide and was also seen in isolated nuclei. In certain regions, staining was selective, insofar as glypican and biglycan immunoreactivity in the nucleus was seen predominantly in a subpopulation of large spinal cord neurons. The amino acid sequences of both proteoglycans contain potential nuclear localization signals, and these were demonstrated to be functional based on their ability to target β-galactosidase fusion proteins to the nuclei of transfected 293 cells. Nuclear localization of glypican β-galactosidase or Fc fusion proteins in transfected 293 cells and C6 glioma cells was greatly reduced or abolished after mutation of the basic amino acids or deletion of the sequence containing the nuclear localization signal, and no nuclear staining was seen in the case of heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that do not possess a nuclear localization signal, such as syndecan-3 or decorin (which is closely related in structure to biglycan). Transfection of COS-1 cells with an epitope-tagged glypican cDNA demonstrated transport of the full-length proteoglycan to the nucleus, and there are also dynamic changes in the pattern of glypican immunoreactivity in the nucleus of C6 cells both during cell division and correlated with different phases of the cell cycle. Our data therefore suggest that in certain cells and central nervous system regions, glypican and biglycan may be involved in the regulation of cell division and survival by directly

  11. Nuclear Localization of Haa1, Which Is Linked to Its Phosphorylation Status, Mediates Lactic Acid Tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Minetaka; Akase, Shin-Pei; Nakanishi, Ryota; Horie, Hitoshi; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    Improvement of the lactic acid resistance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important for the application of the yeast in industrial production of lactic acid from renewable resources. However, we still do not know the precise mechanisms of the lactic acid adaptation response in yeast and, consequently, lack effective approaches for improving its lactic acid tolerance. To enhance our understanding of the adaptation response, we screened for S. cerevisiae genes that confer enhanced lactic acid resistance when present in multiple copies and identified the transcriptional factor Haa1 as conferring resistance to toxic levels of lactic acid when overexpressed. The enhanced tolerance probably results from increased expression of its target genes. When cells that expressed Haa1 only from the endogenous promoter were exposed to lactic acid stress, the main subcellular localization of Haa1 changed from the cytoplasm to the nucleus within 5 min. This nuclear accumulation induced upregulation of the Haa1 target genes YGP1, GPG1, and SPI1, while the degree of Haa1 phosphorylation observed under lactic acid-free conditions decreased. Disruption of the exportin gene MSN5 led to accumulation of Haa1 in the nucleus even when no lactic acid was present. Since Msn5 was reported to interact with Haa1 and preferentially exports phosphorylated cargo proteins, our results suggest that regulation of the subcellular localization of Haa1, together with alteration of its phosphorylation status, mediates the adaptation to lactic acid stress in yeast. PMID:24682296

  12. An alternative domain containing a leucine-rich sequence regulates nuclear cytoplasmic localization of protein 4.1R.

    PubMed

    Luque, Carlos M; Pérez-Ferreiro, Carmen M; Pérez-Gonzalez, Alicia; Englmeier, Ludwig; Koffa, Maria D; Correas, Isabel

    2003-01-24

    In red blood cells, protein 4.1 (4.1R) is an 80-kDa protein that stabilizes the spectrin-actin network and anchors it to the plasma membrane. The picture is more complex in nucleated cells, in which many 4.1R isoforms, varying in size and intracellular location, have been identified. To contribute to the characterization of signals involved in differential intracellular localization of 4.1R, we have analyzed the role the exon 5-encoded sequence plays in 4.1R distribution. We show that exon 5 encodes a leucine-rich sequence that shares key features with nuclear export signals (NESs). This sequence adopts the topology employed for NESs of other proteins and conserves two hydrophobic residues that are shown to be critical for NES function. A 4.1R isoform expressing the leucine-rich sequence binds to the export receptor CRM1 in a RanGTP-dependent fashion, whereas this does not occur in a mutant whose two conserved hydrophobic residues are substituted. These two residues are also essential for 4.1R intracellular distribution, because the 4.1R protein containing the leucine-rich sequence localizes in the cytoplasm, whereas the mutant protein predominantly accumulates in the nucleus. We hypothesize that the leucine-rich sequence in 4.1R controls distribution and concomitantly function of a specific set of 4.1R isoforms. PMID:12427749

  13. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  14. Nuclear localization of the caspase-3-cleaved form of p73 in anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alsafadi, Samar; Tourpin, Sophie; Bessoltane, Nadia; Salomé-Desnoulez, Sophie; Vassal, Gilles; André, Fabrice; Ahomadegbe, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor p73 is a homologue of p53 that can be expressed as pro- or anti-apoptotic isoforms. Unlike p53, p73 is rarely mutated or lost in cancers and it is found to replace defective p53 inducing apoptosis. Here, we investigated the p73 involvement in anoikis, a type of apoptosis caused by inadequate cell-matrix interactions. Breast cancer cell lines with different p53 status were treated with doxorubicin (DOX) or docetaxel (DOC) and cells detached from the extracellular matrix were analyzed. We demonstrate for the first time that DOX-induced cell detachment is associated with p73 cleavage and caspase activation, independently of the p53 status. However, we did not detect p73 cleavage or caspase activation in detached cells under DOC treatment. Overexpressing the apoptotic isoform of p73 led to cell detachment associated with p73 cleavage and caspase activation. Interestingly, p73 cleaved forms localize to the nucleus during the late phase of cell death indicating an increase in the transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that the cleavage of p73 on specific sites may release its pro-apoptotic function and contribute to cell death. PMID:26575022

  15. Uncoupling of EGFR-RAS signaling and nuclear localization of YBX1 in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Roßner, F; Gieseler, C; Morkel, M; Royer, H-D; Rivera, M; Bläker, H; Dietel, M; Schäfer, R; Sers, C

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor YBX1 can act as a mediator of signals transmitted via the EGFR-RAS-MAPK axis. YBX1 expression has been associated with tumor progression and prognosis in multiple types of cancer. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed dependency between YBX1 expression and individual EGFR family members. We analyzed YBX1 and EGFR family proteins in a colorectal cancer (CRC) cohort and provide functional analyses of YBX1 in the context of EGFR-RAS-MAPK signaling. Immunohistochemistry for YBX1 and EGFR family receptors with two antibodies for YBX1 and EGFR were performed and related to clinicopathological data. We employed Caco2 cells expressing an inducible KRASV12 gene to determine effects on localization and levels of YBX1. Mouse xenografts of Caco2-KRASV12 cells were used to determine YBX1 dynamics in a tissue context. The two different antibodies against YBX1 showed discordant immunohistochemical stainings in cell culture and clinical specimens. Expression of YBX1 and EGFR family members were not correlated in CRC. Analysis of Caco2 xenografts displayed again heterogeneity of YBX1 staining with both antibodies. Our results suggest that YBX1 is controlled via complex regulatory mechanisms involving tumor stroma interaction and signal transduction processes. Our study highlights that YBX1 antibodies have different specificities, advocating their use in a combined manner. PMID:26779809

  16. Src tyrosine kinase signaling antagonizes nuclear localization of FOXO and inhibits its transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Margret H; Bülow, Torsten R; Hoch, Michael; Pankratz, Michael J; Jünger, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Biochemical experiments in mammalian cells have linked Src family kinase activity to the insulin signaling pathway. To explore the physiological link between Src and a central insulin pathway effector, we investigated the effect of different Src signaling levels on the Drosophila transcription factor dFOXO in vivo. Ectopic activation of Src42A in the starved larval fatbody was sufficient to drive dFOXO out of the nucleus. When Src signaling levels were lowered by means of loss-of-function mutations or pharmacological inhibition, dFOXO localization was shifted to the nucleus in growing animals, and transcription of the dFOXO target genes d4E-BP and dInR was induced. dFOXO loss-of-function mutations rescued the induction of dFOXO target gene expression and the body size reduction of Src42A mutant larvae, establishing dFOXO as a critical downstream effector of Src signaling. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the regulation of FOXO transcription factors by Src is evolutionarily conserved in mammalian cells. PMID:24513978

  17. SUMOylation regulates nuclear localization and stability of TRAIP/RNF206.

    PubMed

    Park, I Seul; Han, Ye gi; Chung, Hee Jin; Jung, Yong Woo; Kim, Yonghwan; Kim, Hongtae

    2016-02-19

    TRAIP/RNF206 plays diverse roles in cell cycle progression, DNA damage response, and DNA repair pathways. Physiological importance of TRAIP is highlighted by the identification of pathogenic mutations of TRAIP gene in patients diagnosed with primordial dwarfism. Although the diverse functions of TRAIP in the nucleus have been well characterized, molecular mechanism of TRAIP retention in the nucleus has not been determined. Here, we discovered that TRAIP is post-translationally modified by the small ubiquitin-like protein (SUMO). In addition, we identified five SUMOylation sites in TRAIP, and successfully generated SUMOylation deficient mutant of TRAIP. In an attempt to define the functional roles of TRAIP SUMOylation, we discovered that SUMOylation deficient TRAIP is not retained in the nucleus. In addition, protein stability of SUMOylation deficient TRAIP is lower than wild type TRAIP, demonstrating that SUMOylation is critical for both proper subcellular localization and protein stability of TRAIP. Taken together, these findings improve the understanding clinical implication of TRAIP in various diseases including primordial dwarfism and cancers. PMID:26820530

  18. Uncoupling of EGFR–RAS signaling and nuclear localization of YBX1 in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roßner, F; Gieseler, C; Morkel, M; Royer, H-D; Rivera, M; Bläker, H; Dietel, M; Schäfer, R; Sers, C

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor YBX1 can act as a mediator of signals transmitted via the EGFR–RAS–MAPK axis. YBX1 expression has been associated with tumor progression and prognosis in multiple types of cancer. Immunohistochemical studies have revealed dependency between YBX1 expression and individual EGFR family members. We analyzed YBX1 and EGFR family proteins in a colorectal cancer (CRC) cohort and provide functional analyses of YBX1 in the context of EGFR–RAS–MAPK signaling. Immunohistochemistry for YBX1 and EGFR family receptors with two antibodies for YBX1 and EGFR were performed and related to clinicopathological data. We employed Caco2 cells expressing an inducible KRASV12 gene to determine effects on localization and levels of YBX1. Mouse xenografts of Caco2-KRASV12 cells were used to determine YBX1 dynamics in a tissue context. The two different antibodies against YBX1 showed discordant immunohistochemical stainings in cell culture and clinical specimens. Expression of YBX1 and EGFR family members were not correlated in CRC. Analysis of Caco2 xenografts displayed again heterogeneity of YBX1 staining with both antibodies. Our results suggest that YBX1 is controlled via complex regulatory mechanisms involving tumor stroma interaction and signal transduction processes. Our study highlights that YBX1 antibodies have different specificities, advocating their use in a combined manner. PMID:26779809

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance secondary shifts of a light-harvesting 2 complex reveal local backbone perturbations induced by its higher-order interactions.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Anjali; Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; van Gammeren, Adriaan J; Buda, Francesco; Ganapathy, Swapna; de Groot, Huub J M

    2010-01-26

    Protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) secondary chemical shifts are widely used to predict the secondary structure, and in solid-state NMR, they are often the only unambiguous structural parameters available. However, the employed prediction methods are empirical in nature, relying on the assumption that secondary shifts are only affected by shielding effects of neighboring atoms. We analyzed the secondary shifts of a photosynthetic membrane protein with a high density of chromophores and very tight packing, the light-harvesting 2 (LH2) complex of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. A relation was found between secondary shift anomalies and protein-protein or pigment-protein tertiary and quaternary contacts. For several residues, including the bacteriochlorophyll-coordinating histidines (alphaH31 and betaH30) and the phenylalanine alphaF41 that has strongly twisted C(b)-C(a)-C and C(a)-C-N conformations in the LH2 crystal structure, the perturbing effects on the backbone chemical shifts were tested by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We propose that higher-order interactions in the tightly packed complex can induce localized perturbations of the backbone conformation and electronic structure, related to functional pigment-protein or protein-protein interactions. PMID:19954238

  20. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  1. Interaction between yeast mitochondrial and nuclear genomes: null alleles of RTG genes affect resistance to the alkaloid lycorine in rho0 petites of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Luigi; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Pontieri, Paola; Wolf, Klaus

    2005-07-18

    Some nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) respond to signals from the mitochondria in a process called by Butow (Cell Death Differ. 9 (2002) 1043-1045) retrograde regulation. Expression of these genes is activated in cells lacking mitochondrial function by involvement of RTG1, RTG2 and RTG3 genes whose protein products bind to "R-boxes" in the promoter region; RTG2p is a cytoplasmic protein. Since S. cerevisiae rho0 strains, lacking the entire mitochondrial genome, are resistant to lycorine, an alkaloid extracted from Amaryllis plants, it could be hypothesized that in rho0 cells the dysfunctional mitochondrial status stimulates overexpression of nuclear genes very likely involved in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication. In this report we show that the resistance of rho0 cells to lycorine is affected by the deletion of RTG genes. PMID:15893890

  2. Unique behavior of Trypanosoma dionisii interacting with mammalian cells: invasion, intracellular growth, and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Cortez, Mauro; Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller; Yoshida, Nobuko; Mortara, Renato Arruda

    2009-04-01

    The phylogenetic proximity between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii suggests that these parasites might explore similar strategies to complete their life cycles. T. cruzi is the etiological agent of the life-threatening Chagas' disease, whereas T. dionisii is a bat trypanosome and probably not capable of infecting humans. Here we sought to compare mammalian cell invasion and intracellular traffic of both trypanosomes and determine the differences and similarities in this process. The results presented demonstrate that T. dionisii is highly infective in vitro, particularly when the infection process occurs without serum and that the invasion is similarly affected by agents known to interfere with T. cruzi invasion process. Our results indicate that the formation of lysosomal-enriched compartments is part of a cell-invasion mechanism retained by related trypanosomatids, and that residence and further escape from a lysosomal compartment may be a common requisite for successful infection. During intracellular growth, parasites share a few epitopes with T. cruzi amastigotes and trypomastigotes. Unexpectedly, in heavily infected cells, amastigotes and trypomastigotes were found inside the host cell nucleus. These findings suggest that T. dionisii, although sharing some features in host cell invasion with T. cruzi, has unique behaviors that deserve to be further explored. PMID:19283898

  3. Nuclear localization of Vpr is crucial for the efficient replication of HIV-1 in primary CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Iijima, Sayuki; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Kimata, Kiyonori; Wen Zhongzhuang; Kamata, Masakazu; Isogai, Maya; Miwa, Masanao; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Aida, Yoko . E-mail: aida@riken.jp

    2004-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory protein Vpr appears to make a substantial contribution to the replication of HIV-1 in established T cell lines when HIV-1 is present at very low multiplicities of infection. However, the role of Vpr in viral replication in primary CD4{sup +} T cells remains to be clarified. In this study, we generated a panel of viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that lacked either the ability to accumulate in the nucleus and induce G{sub 2} arrest or the ability to induce apoptosis, which has been shown to occur independently of G{sub 2} arrest of the cell cycle. We demonstrate here that the nuclear localization of Vpr and consequent G{sub 2} arrest but not the induction of apoptosis by Vpr are important for viral replication in primary CD4{sup +} T cells at both high and low multiplicities of infection. Viruses that encoded mutant forms of Vpr that failed to be imported into the nucleus in the presence of cytoplasmic extracts from primary CD4{sup +} T cells in an in vitro nuclear import assay replicated at drastically reduced rates. Thus, Vpr might be a key regulator of the viral nuclear import process during infection in primary CD4{sup +} T cells. By contrast, a mutant form of Vpr that exhibited diffuse cytosolic staining exclusively in an immunofluorescence assay of HeLa cells and was not imported into nucleus by the cytosol from HeLa cells was effectively imported into the nucleus by cytosol from primary CD4{sup +} T cells. This Vpr mutant virus replicated well in primary CD4{sup +} T cells, indicating that cellular factors in primary CD4{sup +} T cells are indispensable for the accumulation of Vpr in the nucleus and, thus, for viral replication. Our results suggest that the nuclear import of Vpr might be a good target in efforts to block the early stages of replication of HIV-1.

  4. Arabidopsis NMD3 Is Required for Nuclear Export of 60S Ribosomal Subunits and Affects Secondary Cell Wall Thickening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Qin; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Bao-Cai; Nan, Jie; Li, Xia; Liu, Na; Qu, Hong; Lu, Cong-Ming; Sudmorgen; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Bai, Shu-Nong

    2012-01-01

    NMD3 is required for nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit in yeast and vertebrate cells, but no corresponding function of NMD3 has been reported in plants. Here we report that Arabidopsis thaliana NMD3 (AtNMD3) showed a similar function in the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit. Interference with AtNMD3 function by overexpressing a truncated dominant negative form of the protein lacking the nuclear export signal sequence caused retainment of the 60S ribosomal subunits in the nuclei. More interestingly, the transgenic Arabidopsis with dominant negative interference of AtNMD3 function showed a striking failure of secondary cell wall thickening, consistent with the altered expression of related genes and composition of cell wall components. Observation of a significant decrease of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) in the differentiating interfascicular fiber cells of the transgenic plant stems suggested a link between the defective nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the abnormal formation of the secondary cell wall. These findings not only clarified the evolutionary conservation of NMD3 functions in the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits in yeast, animals and plants, but also revealed a new facet of the regulatory mechanism underlying secondary cell wall thickening in Arabidopsis. This new facet is that the nuclear export of 60S ribosomal subunits and the formation of RER may play regulatory roles in coordinating protein synthesis in cytoplasm and transcription in nuclei. PMID:22558264

  5. The R35 residue of the influenza A virus NS1 protein has minimal effects on nuclear localization but alters virus replication through disrupting protein dimerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lalime, Erin N.; Pekosz, Andrew

    2014-06-15

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein has a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the amino terminal region. This NLS overlaps sequences that are important for RNA binding as well as protein dimerization. To assess the significance of the NS1 NLS on influenza virus replication, the NLS amino acids were individually mutated to alanines and recombinant viruses encoding these mutations were rescued. Viruses containing NS1 proteins with mutations at R37, R38 and K41 displayed minimal changes in replication or NS1 protein nuclear localization. Recombinant viruses encoding NS1 R35A were not recovered but viruses containing second site mutations at position D39 in addition to the R35A mutation were isolated. The mutations at position 39 were shown to partially restore NS1 protein dimerization but had minimal effects on nuclear localization. These data indicate that the amino acids in the NS1 NLS region play a more important role in protein dimerization compared to nuclear localization. - Highlights: • Mutations were introduced into influenza NS1 NLS1. • NS1 R37A, R38A, K41A viruses had minimal changes in replication and NS1 localization. • Viruses from NS1 R35A rescue all contained additional mutations at D39. • NS1 R35A D39X mutations recover dimerization lost in NS1 R35A mutations. • These results reaffirm the importance of dimerization for NS1 protein function.

  6. A constitutive region is responsible for nuclear targeting of 4.1R: modulation by alternative sequences results in differential intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    Luque, C M; Correas, I

    2000-07-01

    Red blood cell protein 4.1, 4.1R, is an extreme variation on the theme of isoform multiplicity. The diverse 4.1R isoforms, mainly generated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing, are localized at different intracellular sites, including the nucleus. To characterize nonerythroid 4.1 proteins lacking the most upstream translation initiation site, analyze their intracellular localization and define specific domains involved in differential intracellular targeting of 4.1R, we cloned 4.1 cDNAs lacking that translation initiation site. Seven different 4.1R cDNAs were isolated. Four of these encoded 4.1R proteins localized predominantly to the nucleus and the other three localized to the cytoplasm. Three of the nuclear 4.1R isoforms did not contain the nuclear localization signal previously identified in the alternative exon 16. A comparative analysis of the exon composition of the naturally occurring 4.1R cDNAs cloned and of appropriate composite cDNA constructs, with the subcellular distribution of their respective products, demonstrated that a region encoded by constitutive exons, which is therefore common to all 4.1R isoforms and has been termed 'core region', had the capacity of localizing to the nucleus. This region was able to confer nuclear targeting to a cytosolic reporter. In protein 4.1R isoforms, the nuclear targeting of the core region is modulated by the expression of alternative exons. Thus, exon 5-encoded sequences eclipsed nuclear entry of the core region, resulting in 4.1R isoforms that predominantly distributed to the cytoplasm. Exon 5 was also able to confer cytoplasmic localization to a nuclear reporter. In protein 4.1R isoforms, when exons 5 and 16 were both expressed the nuclear targeting effect of exon 16 was dominant to the inhibitory effect observed by the expression of exon 5, yielding proteins that predominantly localized to the nucleus. Taken together, these results indicate that all 4.1R molecules contain a conserved region that is sufficient to

  7. Local Ordering at Mobile Sites in Proteins from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation: The Role of Site Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tchaicheeyan, Oren; Freed, Jack H; Meirovitch, Eva

    2016-03-24

    Restricted motions in proteins (e.g., N-H bond dynamics) are studied effectively with NMR. By analogy with restricted motions in liquid crystals (LC), the local ordering has in the past been primarily represented by potentials comprising the L = 2, |K| = 0, 2 spherical harmonics. However, probes dissolved in LCs experience nonpolar ordering, often referred to as alignment, while protein-anchored probes experience polar ordering, often referred to as orientation. In this study we investigate the role of local (site) symmetry in the context of the polarity of the local ordering. We find that potentials comprising the L = 1, |K| = 0, 1 spherical harmonics represent adequately polar ordering. It is useful to characterize potential symmetry in terms of the irreducible representations of D2h point group, which is already implicit in the definition of the rotational diffusion tensor. Thus, the relevant rhombic L = 1 potentials have B1u and B3u symmetry whereas the relevant rhombic L = 2 potentials have Ag symmetry. A comprehensive scheme where local potentials and corresponding probability density functions (PDFs) are represented in Cartesian and spherical coordinates clarifies how they are affected by polar and nonpolar ordering. The Cartesian coordinates are chosen so that the principal axis of polar axial PDF is pointing along the z-axis, whereas the principal axis of the nonpolar axial PDF is pointing along ±z. Two-term axial potentials with 1 ≤ L ≤ 3 exhibit substantial diversity; they are expected to be useful in NMR-relaxation-data-fitting. It is shown how potential coefficients are reflected in the experimental order parameters. The comprehensive scheme representing local potentials and PDFs is exemplified for the L = 2 case using experimental data from (15)N-labeled plexin-B1 and thioredoxin, (2)H-, and (13)C-labeled benzenehexa-n-alkanoates, and nitroxide-labeled T4 lysozyme. Future prospects for improved ordering analysis based on combined atomistic and

  8. Whole body counter assessment of internal radiocontamination in patients with end-stage renal disease living in areas affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant disaster: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Shimmura, Hiroaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Kato, Shigeaki; Akiyama, Junichi; Nomura, Shuhei; Mori, Jinichi; Tanimoto, Tetsuya; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Tokiwa, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess internal radiocontamination of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who were regularly taking haemodialysis (HD) and living in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant after the Great East Japan earthquake on 11 March 2011. Methods Internal radiocontamination in 111 patients with ESRD regularly taking HD at Jyoban Hospital in Iwaki city, Fukushima from July 2012 to November 2012 was assessed with a whole body counter (WBC). The maximum annual effective dose was calculated from the detected Cs-137 levels. Interviews concerning patient dietary preferences and outdoor activities were also conducted. Results Among the 111 patients tested, internal radiocontamination with Cs-137 was detected in two participants, but the levels were marginal and just exceeded the detection limit (250 Bq/body). The tentatively calculated maximum annual effective dose ranged from 0.008 to 0.009 mSv/year, which is far below the 1 mSv/year limit set by the government of Japan. Relative to 238 non-ESRD participants, patients with ERSD had significantly more opportunities to consume locally grown produce that was not distributed to the market (p<0.01). However, the percentage of patients with ESRD with detectable Cs (1.8%) was lower than that for non-ESRD participants (3.8%), although this difference was not significant (p=0.51). Conclusions These findings suggest that internal radiocontamination levels and the calculated annual additional effective doses were negligible for patients with ESRD taking HD in areas affected by the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Although HD is suggested to promote Cs-137 excretion, continuous inspection of locally grown produce together with WBC screening for radiocontamination should be continued for patients with ESRD regularly taking HD. PMID:26644125

  9. Nuclear envelope-localized EGF family protein amphiregulin activates breast cancer cell migration in an EGF-like domain independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Hisae; Nishioka, Yu; Yokoyama, Yuhki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Matsuura, Nariaki; Matsuura, Shuji; Hieda, Miki

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear envelope-localized proAREG activates cancer cell migration via its cytoplasmic domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induction of cell migration does not require the EGF-like domain or EGR function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear envelope-localized proAREG suppresses breast cancer cell growth without EGFR function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study revealed a novel function mediated by the intracellular domain of proAREG. -- Abstract: Amphiregulin (AREG), an EGF family protein, is synthesized as a type I transmembrane precursor (proAREG) and expressed on the cell surface with an extracellular EGF-like domain and an intracellular short cytoplasmic tail. The ectodomain shedding yields a soluble EGF receptor ligand (soluble AREG) which binds to EGF receptor (EGFR) and concomitantly induces migration of unshed proAREG from the plasma membrane to the nuclear envelope (NE). AREG is known to play a potential role in breast cancer and has been intensively investigated as an EGF receptor ligand, while the function of the NE-localized proAREG remains unknown. In this study we used a truncated mutant that mimics NE-localized proAREG without shedding stimuli to discriminate between the functions of NE-localized and plasma membrane-localized proAREG and demonstrate that NE-localized proAREG activates breast cancer cell migration, but suppresses cell growth. Moreover, the present study shows that induction of cell migration by NE-localized proAREG does not require the extracellular growth factor domain or EGF receptor function. Collectively these data demonstrate a novel function mediated by the intracellular domain of proAREG and suggest a significant role for NE-localized proAREG in driving human breast cancer progression.

  10. Subcellular localization of CrmA: identification of a novel leucine-rich nuclear export signal conserved in anti-apoptotic serpins.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Span, Simone W; Kruyt, Frank A E; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The cowpox virus-encoded anti-apoptotic protein cytokine response modifier A (CrmA) is a member of the serpin family that specifically inhibits the cellular proteins caspase 1, caspase 8 and granzyme B. In this study, we have used Flag- and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged versions of CrmA to investigate the mechanisms that regulate its subcellular localization. We show that CrmA can actively enter and exit the nucleus and we demonstrate the role of the nuclear export receptor CRM1 in this shuttling process. CrmA contains a novel leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) that is functionally conserved in the anti-apoptotic cellular serpin PI-9. Besides this leucine-rich export signal, additional sequences mapping to a 103-amino-acid region flanking the NES contribute to the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of CrmA. Although YFP-tagged CrmA is primarily located in the cytoplasm, shifting its localization to be predominantly nuclear by fusion of a heterologous nuclear localization signal did not impair its ability to prevent Fas-induced apoptosis. We propose that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling would allow CrmA to efficiently target cellular pro-apoptotic proteins not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus, and thus to carry out its anti-apoptotic function in both compartments. PMID:12667137

  11. Feedback Regulation of DYT1 by Interactions with Downstream bHLH Factors Promotes DYT1 Nuclear Localization and Anther Development.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; You, Chenjiang; Zhu, Engao; Huang, Qiang; Ma, Hong; Chang, Fang

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional regulation is one of the most important mechanisms controlling development and cellular functions in plants and animals. The Arabidopsis thaliana bHLH transcription factor (TF) DYSFUNCTIONL TAPETUM1 (DYT1) is required for normal male fertility and anther development and activates the expression of the bHLH010/bHLH089/bHLH091 genes. Here, we showed that DYT1 is localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus at anther stage 5 but specifically to the nucleus at anther stage 6 and onward. The bHLH010/bHLH089/bHLH091 proteins have strong nuclear localization signals, interact with DYT1, and facilitate the nuclear localization of DYT1. We further found that the conserved C-terminal BIF domain of DYT1 is required for its dimerization, nuclear localization, transcriptional activation activity, and function in anther development. Interestingly, when the BIF domain of DYT1 was replaced with that of bHLH010, the DYT1(N)-bHLH010(BIF) chimeric protein shows nuclear-preferential localization at anther stage 5 but could not fully rescue the dyt1-3 phenotype, suggesting that the normal spatio-temporal subcellular localization of DYT1 is important for DYT1 function and/or that the BIF domains from different bHLH members might be functionally distinct. Our results support an important positive feedback regulatory mechanism whereby downstream TFs increase the function of an upstream TF by enhancing its nucleus localization through the BIF domain. PMID:27113773

  12. Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of two hypothetical 1-MT nuclear bursts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.

    1984-12-01

    This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from two hypothetical 1-Mt nuclear bursts. Calculations are made of the debris from two types of bombs: one containing /sup 235/U as a fissionable material (designated oralloy), the other containing /sup 238/U (designated tuballoy). 4 references.

  13. Some Ways in Which Neighborhoods, Nuclear Families, Friendship Groups, and Schools Jointly Affect Changes in Early Adolescent Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas D.; Herman, Melissa R.; Phillips, Meredith; Settersten, Richard A., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed how schools, neighborhoods, nuclear families, and friendship groups jointly contribute to positive change during early adolescence. Analyses showed that the four context indices modestly intercorrelated at the individual student level, but clustered more tightly at the school and neighborhood levels. Joint influence of all four…

  14. Nuclear localization of the C2H2 zinc finger protein Msn2p is regulated by stress and protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed

    Görner, W; Durchschlag, E; Martinez-Pastor, M T; Estruch, F; Ammerer, G; Hamilton, B; Ruis, H; Schüller, C

    1998-02-15

    Msn2p and the partially redundant factor Msn4p are key regulators of stress-responsive gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. They are required for the transcription of a number of genes coding for proteins with stress-protective functions. Both Msn2p and Msn4p are Cys2His2 zinc finger proteins and bind to the stress response element (STRE). In vivo footprinting studies show that the occupation of STREs is enhanced in stressed cells and dependent on the presence of Msn2p and Msn4p. Both factors accumulate in the nucleus under stress conditions, such as heat shock, osmotic stress, carbon-source starvation, and in the presence of ethanol or sorbate. Stress-induced nuclear localization was found to be rapid, reversible, and independent of protein synthesis. Nuclear localization of Msn2p and Msn4p was shown to be correlated inversely to cAMP levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activity. A region with significant homologies shared between Msn2p and Msn4p is sufficient to confer stress-regulated localization to a SV40-NLS-GFP fusion protein. Serine to alanine or aspartate substitutions in a conserved PKA consensus site abolished cAMP-driven nuclear export and cytoplasmic localization in unstressed cells. We propose stress and cAMP-regulated intracellular localization of Msn2p to be a key step in STRE-dependent transcription and in the general stress response. PMID:9472026

  15. Troponin T3 regulates nuclear localization of the calcium channel Cavβ1a subunit in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tan; Taylor, Jackson; Jiang, Yang; Pereyra, Andrea S; Messi, Maria Laura; Wang, Zhong-Min; Hereñú, Claudia; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-08-15

    The voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) β1a subunit (Cavβ1a) plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), a process in the myoplasm that leads to muscle-force generation. Recently, we discovered that the Cavβ1a subunit travels to the nucleus of skeletal muscle cells where it helps to regulate gene transcription. To determine how it travels to the nucleus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening of the mouse fast skeletal muscle cDNA library and identified an interaction with troponin T3 (TnT3), which we subsequently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization assays in mouse skeletal muscle in vivo and in cultured C2C12 muscle cells. Interacting domains were mapped to the leucine zipper domain in TnT3 COOH-terminus (160-244 aa) and Cavβ1a NH2-terminus (1-99 aa), respectively. The double fluorescence assay in C2C12 cells co-expressing TnT3/DsRed and Cavβ1a/YFP shows that TnT3 facilitates Cavβ1a nuclear recruitment, suggesting that the two proteins play a heretofore unknown role during early muscle differentiation in addition to their classical role in ECC regulation. PMID:25981458

  16. Nuclear Localization of COX-2 in relation to the Expression of Stemness Markers in Urinary Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thanan, Raynoo; Murata, Mariko; Ma, Ning; Hammam, Olfat; Wishahi, Mohamed; El Leithy, Tarek; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation may activate stem cells via prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production mediated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of stemness markers (Oct3/4 and CD44v6) and COX-2 in urinary bladder tissues obtained from cystitis and cancer patients with and without Schistosoma haematobium infections. Immunoreactivity to Oct3/4 was significantly higher in S. haematobium-associated cystitis and cancer tissues than in normal tissues. CD44v6 expression was significantly higher in bladder cancer without S. haematobium than in normal tissues. COX-2 was located in the cytoplasmic membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus of the cancer cells. Interestingly, the nuclear localization of COX-2, which was reported to function as a transcription factor, was significantly associated with the upregulation of Oct3/4 and CD44v6 in bladder cancer tissues with and without S. haematobium infection, respectively. COX-2 activation may be involved in inflammation-mediated stem cell proliferation/differentiation in urinary bladder carcinogenesis. PMID:22577245

  17. The C-terminus of Nej1 is critical for nuclear localization and non-homologous end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Mahaney, Brandi L.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.; Cobb, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Nej1 is an essential factor in the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway and interacts with the DNA ligase complex, Lif1-Dnl4, through interactions with Lif1. We have mapped K331-V338 in the C-terminal region of Nej1 to be critical for its functionality during repair. Truncation and alanine scanning mutagenesis have been used to identify a motif in Nej1, KKRK (331–334), which is important for both nuclear targeting and NHEJ repair after localization. We have identified F335-V338 to be important for proper interaction with Lif1, however this region is not required for Nej1 recruitment to HO endonuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks in vivo. Phenylalanine at position 335 is particularly important for the role of Nej1 in repair and the loss of association between Nej1 and Lif1 correlates with a decrease in cell survival upon either transient or continuous HO expression in nej1 mutants. PMID:24369855

  18. The methylation of the C-terminal region of hnRNPQ (NSAP1) is important for its nuclear localization

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, Dario O.; Quaresma, Alexandre J.C.; Kobarg, Joerg . E-mail: jkobarg@lnls.br

    2006-07-28

    Protein arginine methylation is an irreversible post-translational protein modification catalyzed by a family of at least nine different enzymes entitled PRMTs (protein arginine methyl transferases). Although PRMT1 is responsible for 85% of the protein methylation in human cells, its substrate spectrum has not yet been fully characterized nor are the functional consequences of methylation for the protein substrates well understood. Therefore, we set out to employ the yeast two-hybrid system in order to identify new substrate proteins for human PRMT1. We were able to identify nine different PRMT1 interacting proteins involved in different aspects of RNA metabolism, five of which had been previously described either as substrates for PRMT1 or as functionally associated with PRMT1. Among the four new identified possible protein substrates was hnRNPQ3 (NSAP1), a protein whose function has been implicated in diverse steps of mRNA maturation, including splicing, editing, and degradation. By in vitro methylation assays we were able to show that hnRNPQ3 is a substrate for PRMT1 and that its C-terminal RGG box domain is the sole target for methylation. By further studies with the inhibitor of methylation Adox we provide evidence that hnRNPQ1-3 are methylated in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence analysis of HeLa cells that the methylation of hnRNPQ is important for its nuclear localization, since Adox treatment causes its re-distribution from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

  19. Endogenous lectins from cultured cells: nuclear localization of carbohydrate-binding protein 35 in proliferating 3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Moutsatsos, I K; Wade, M; Schindler, M; Wang, J L

    1987-01-01

    Proliferating 3T3 mouse fibroblasts contain higher levels of the lectin carbohydrate-binding protein 35 (CBP35) than do quiescent cultures of the same cells. An immunofluorescence study was carried out with a rabbit antiserum directed against CBP35 to map the cellular fluorescence distribution in a large population of cells under different growth conditions. This cytometric analysis showed that the lectin is predominantly localized in the nucleus of the proliferating cells. In quiescent 3T3 cultures, the majority of the cells lost their nuclear staining and underwent a general decrease in the overall fluorescence intensity. Stimulation of serum-starved quiescent 3T3 cells by the addition of serum resulted in an increase in the level of CBP35. The percentage of cells showing distinct punctate intranuclear staining reached a maximum at about the same time as the onset of the first S-phase of the cell cycle. All of these results suggest that CBP35 may be a protein whose presence in the nucleus, in discrete punctate distribution, is coordinated with the proliferation state of the cell. Images PMID:3306680

  20. Nuclear localization of dengue virus nonstructural protein 5 does not strictly correlate with efficient viral RNA replication and inhibition of type I interferon signaling.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Bühler, Sandra; Selisko, Barbara; Davidson, Andrew; Mulder, Klaas; Canard, Bruno; Miller, Sven; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2013-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an important human pathogen, especially in the tropical and subtropical parts of the world, causing considerable morbidity and mortality. DENV replication occurs in the cytoplasm; however, a high proportion of nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), containing methyltransferase (MTase) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activities, accumulates in the nuclei of infected cells. The present study investigates the impact of nuclear localization of NS5 on its known functions, including viral RNA replication and subversion of the type I interferon response. By using a mutation analysis approach, we identified the most critical residues within the αβ nuclear localization signal (αβNLS), which are essential for the nuclear accumulation of this protein. Although we observed an overall correlation between reduced nuclear accumulation of NS5 and impaired RNA replication, we identified one mutant with drastically reduced amounts of nuclear NS5 and virtually unaffected RNA replication, arguing that nuclear localization of NS5 does not correlate strictly with DENV replication, at least in cell culture. Because NS5 plays an important role in blocking interferon signaling via STAT-2 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 2) degradation, the abilities of the NLS mutants to block this pathway were investigated. All mutants were able to degrade STAT-2, with accordingly similar type I interferon resistance phenotypes. Since the NLS is contained within the RdRp domain, the MTase and RdRp activities of the mutants were determined by using recombinant full-length NS5. We found that the C-terminal region of the αβNLS is a critical functional element of the RdRp domain required for polymerase activity. These results indicate that efficient DENV RNA replication requires only minimal, if any, nuclear NS5, and they identify the αβNLS as a structural element required for proper RdRp activity. PMID:23408610

  1. The scaffolding protein IQGAP1 co-localizes with actin at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope: implications for cytoskeletal regulation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    IQGAP1 is an important cytoskeletal regulator, known to act at the plasma membrane to bundle and cap actin filaments, and to tether the cortical actin meshwork to microtubules via plus-end binding proteins. Here we describe the novel subcellular localization of IQGAP1 at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear envelope, where it co-located with F-actin. The IQGAP1 and F-actin staining overlapped that of microtubules at the nuclear envelope, revealing a pattern strikingly similar to that observed at the plasma membrane. In detergent-extracted cells IQGAP1 was retained at cytoskeletal structures at the nuclear envelope. This finding has new implications for involvement of IQGAP1 in cell polarization and migration events and potentially in cell cycle-associated nuclear envelope assembly/disassembly. PMID:22964981

  2. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase localizes to the Golgi complex and its expression levels affect the sensitivity to anti-cancer drug 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Nasu, Takashi; Koike, Shuji; Kakehata, Seiji; Ito, Tsukasa; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) is engaged in de novo pyrimidine synthesis. It catalyzes oronitine to uridine monophosp