Science.gov

Sample records for affect nutrient concentrations

  1. Elevated tropospheric ozone affects the concentration and allocation of mineral nutrients of two bamboo species.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Minghao; Lam, Shu Kee; Li, Yingchun; Chen, Shuanglin

    2017-01-15

    The increase in tropospheric ozone (O3) affects plant physiology and ecosystem processes, and consequently the cycle of nutrients. While mineral nutrients are critical for plant growth, the effect of elevated tropospheric O3 concentration on the uptake and allocation of mineral nutrients by plants is not well understood. Using open top chambers (OTCs), we investigated the effect of elevated O3 on calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe) in mature bamboo species Phyllostachys edulis and Oligostachyum lubricum. Our results showed that elevated O3 decreased the leaf biomass of P. edulis and O. lubricum by 35.1% and 26.7%, respectively, but had no significant effect on the biomass of branches, stem or root. For P. edulis, elevated O3 increased the nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) concentration and allocation in leaf but reduced the concentration in other organs. In contrast, elevated O3 increased the nutrient concentration and allocation in the branch of O. lubricum but decreased that of other organs. We also found that that P. edulis and O. lubricum responded differently to elevated O3 in terms of nutrient (Ca, Mg and Fe) uptake and allocation. This information is critical for nutrient management and adaptation strategies for sustainable growth of P. edulis and O. lubricum under global climate change.

  2. Nutrient concentrations of runoff as affected by the diameter of unconsolidated material from feedlot surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beef cattle feedlots contain unconsolidated material that accumulates on the feedlot surface during a feeding cycle. This study was conducted to measure the effects of varying diameters of unconsolidated surface material and varying flow rates on nutrient concentrations in runoff. Unconsolidated sur...

  3. Testing an agent-based model of bacterial cell motility: How nutrient concentration affects speed distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V.; Birbaumer, M.; Schweitzer, F.

    2011-08-01

    We revisit a recently proposed agent-based model of active biological motion and compare its predictions with own experimental findings for the speed distribution of bacterial cells, Salmonella typhimurium. Agents move according to a stochastic dynamics and use energy stored in an internal depot for metabolism and active motion. We discuss different assumptions of how the conversion from internal to kinetic energy d( v) may depend on the actual speed, to conclude that d 2 v ξ with either ξ = 2 or 1 < ξ < 2 are promising hypotheses. To test these, we compare the model's prediction with the speed distribution of bacteria which were obtained in media of different nutrient concentration and at different times. We find that both hypotheses are in line with the experimental observations, with ξ between 1.67 and 2.0. Regarding the influence of a higher nutrient concentration, we conclude that the take-up of energy by bacterial cells is indeed increased. But this energy is not used to increase the speed, with 40 μm/s as the most probable value of the speed distribution, but is rather spend on metabolism and growth.

  4. Biochar and manure affect calcareous soil and corn silage nutrient concentrations and uptake.

    PubMed

    Lentz, R D; Ippolito, J A

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-rich biochar derived from the pyrolysis of biomass can sequester atmospheric CO, mitigate climate change, and potentially increase crop productivity. However, research is needed to confirm the suitability and sustainability of biochar application to different soils. To an irrigated calcareous soil, we applied stockpiled dairy manure (42 Mg ha dry wt) and hardwood-derived biochar (22.4 Mg ha), singly and in combination with manure, along with a control, yielding four treatments. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied when needed (based on preseason soil test N and crop requirements) in all plots and years, with N mineralized from added manure included in this determination. Available soil nutrients (NH-N; NO-N; Olsen P; and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-extractable K, Mg, Na, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Fe), total C (TC), total N (TN), total organic C (TOC), and pH were evaluated annually, and silage corn nutrient concentration, yield, and uptake were measured over two growing seasons. Biochar treatment resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in available soil Mn and a 1.4-fold increase in TC and TOC, whereas manure produced a 1.2- to 1.7-fold increase in available nutrients (except Fe), compared with controls. In 2009 biochar increased corn silage B concentration but produced no yield increase; in 2010 biochar decreased corn silage TN (33%), S (7%) concentrations, and yield (36%) relative to controls. Manure produced a 1.3-fold increase in corn silage Cu, Mn, S, Mg, K, and TN concentrations and yield compared with the control in 2010. The combined biochar-manure effects were not synergistic except in the case of available soil Mn. In these calcareous soils, biochar did not alter pH or availability of P and cations, as is typically observed for acidic soils. If the second year results are representative, they suggest that biochar applications to calcareous soils may lead to reduced N availability, requiring additional soil N inputs to maintain yield targets.

  5. Ultraviolet-B radiation and nitrogen affect nutrient concentrations and the amount of nutrients acquired by above-ground organs of maize.

    PubMed

    Correia, Carlos M; Coutinho, João F; Bacelar, Eunice A; Gonçalves, Berta M; Björn, Lars Olof; Moutinho Pereira, José

    2012-01-01

    UV-B radiation effects on nutrient concentrations in above-ground organs of maize were investigated at silking and maturity at different levels of applied nitrogen under field conditions. The experiment simulated a 20% stratospheric ozone depletion over Portugal. At silking, UV-B increased N, K, Ca, and Zn concentrations, whereas at maturity Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cu increased and N, P and Mn decreased in some plant organs. Generally, at maturity, N, Ca, Cu, and Mn were lower, while P, K, and Zn concentrations in stems and nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) were higher in N-starved plants. UV-B and N effects on shoot dry biomass were more pronounced than on nutrient concentrations. Nutrient uptake decreased under high UV-B and increased with increasing N application, mainly at maturity harvest. Significant interactions UV-B x N were observed for NUE and for concentration and mass of some elements. For instance, under enhanced UV-B, N, Cu, Zn, and Mn concentrations decreased in leaves, except on N-stressed plants, whereas they were less affected by N nutrition. In order to minimize nutritional, economical, and environmental negative consequences, fertiliser recommendations based on element concentration or yield goals may need to be adjusted.

  6. Biomass production and nutrient removal by Chlorella sp. as affected by sludge liquor concentration.

    PubMed

    Åkerström, Anette M; Mortensen, Leiv M; Rusten, Bjørn; Gislerød, Hans Ragnar

    2014-11-01

    The use of microalgae for biomass production and nutrient removal from the reject water produced in the dewatering process of anaerobically digested sludge, sludge liquor, was investigated. The sludge liquor was characterized by a high content of total suspended solids (1590 mg L(-1)), a high nitrogen concentration (1210 mg L(-1)), and a low phosphorus concentration (28 mg L(-1)). Chlorella sp. was grown in sludge liquor diluted with wastewater treatment plant effluent water to different concentrations (12, 25, 40, 50, 70, and 100%) using batch mode. The environmental conditions were 25 °C, a continuous lightning of 115 μmol m(-2) s(-1), and a CO2 concentration of 3.0%. The highest biomass production (0.42-0.45 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1)) was achieved at 40-50% sludge liquor, which was comparable to the production of the control culture grown with an artificial fertilizer. The biomass production was 0.12 and 0.26 g dry weight L(-1) Day(-1) at 12% and 100% sludge liquor, respectively. The percentage of nitrogen in the algal biomass increased from 3.6% in 12% sludge liquor and reached a saturation of ∼10% in concentrations with 50% sludge liquor and higher. The phosphorus content in the biomass increased linearly from 0.2 to 1.5% with increasing sludge liquor concentrations. The highest nitrogen removal rates by algal biosynthesis were 33.6-42.6 mg TN L(-1) Day(-1) at 40-70% sludge liquor, while the highest phosphorus removal rates were 3.1-4.1 mg TP L(-1) Day(-1) at 50-100% sludge liquor.

  7. Varying type of forage, concentration of metabolizable protein, and source of carbohydrate affects nutrient digestibility and production by dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Weiss, W P; St-Pierre, N R; Willett, L B

    2009-11-01

    The effects of forage source, concentration of metabolizable protein (MP), type of carbohydrate, and their interactions on nutrient digestibility and production were evaluated using a central composite treatment design. All diets (dry basis) contained 50% forage that ranged from 25:75 to 75:25 alfalfa silage:corn silage. Rumen-degradable protein comprised 10.7% of the dry matter (DM) in all diets, but undegradable protein ranged from 4.1 to 7.1%, resulting in dietary MP concentrations of 8.8 to 12.0% of the DM. Dietary starch ranged from 22 to 30% of the DM with a concomitant decrease in neutral detergent fiber concentrations. A total of 15 diets were fed to 36 Holstein cows grouped in 6 blocks. Each block consisted of three 21-d periods, and each cow was assigned a unique sequence of 3 diets, resulting in 108 observations. Milk production and composition, feed intake, and digestibility of major nutrients (via total collection of feces and urine) were measured. Few significant interactions between main effects were observed. Starch concentration had only minor effects on digestibility and production. Replacing corn silage with alfalfa decreased digestibility of N but increased digestibility of neutral detergent fiber. Increasing the concentration of MP increased N digestibility. The concentration (Mcal/kg) of dietary digestible energy (DE) increased linearly as starch concentration increased (very small effect) and was affected by a forage by MP interaction. At low MP, high alfalfa reduced DE concentration, but at high MP, increasing alfalfa increased DE concentration. Increasing alfalfa increased DM and DE intakes, which increased yields of energy-corrected milk, protein, and fat. Increasing MP increased yields of energy-corrected milk and protein. The response in milk protein to changes in MP was much less than predicted using the National Research Council (2001) model.

  8. Nutrient demand affects ruminal digestion responses to a change in dietary forage concentration.

    PubMed

    Linton, J A Voelker; Allen, M S

    2007-10-01

    Previous research in our laboratory has indicated that the physical filling effects of high-forage diets become increasingly dominant in determining feed intake and milk production as nutrient demand increases. This effect was tested further by using 14 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design experiment with a 14-d preliminary period and two 15-d experimental periods. During the preliminary period, 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield was 15 to 60 kg/d (mean = 40 kg/d), and preliminary voluntary dry matter intake (pVDMI) was 20.6 to 30.5 kg/d (mean = 25.0 kg/ d). Treatments were a low-forage diet (LF), containing 20% (dry matter basis) forage neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and a high-forage diet (HF), containing 27% forage NDF. The ability of linear and quadratic factors of pVDMI to predict the difference in responses of individual cows to treatments (Y(LF) - Y(HF)) was tested by ANOVA, with treatment sequence as a covariate. In contrast to results of previous research, differences in dry matter intake and fat-corrected milk yield responses to LF and HF did not depend on pVDMI. This might be because of the combined physical fill and metabolic satiety effects of LF, especially in cows with the greatest pVDMI. Digestion or passage of NDF might have been inhibited on LF among high-pVDMI cows. As pVDMI increased, NDF turnover time increased more on LF than on HF. Among high-pVDMI cows, the NDF turnover time was unexpectedly greater on LF than on HF. With increasing pVDMI, the digestion rate of potentially digestible NDF decreased at a similar rate on both diets. Passage rates of potentially digestible NDF and indigestible NDF were not related to pVDMI, regardless of treatment. Greater starch fermentation (resulting from greater starch intake) for LF as pVDMI increased likely inhibited NDF digestion through pH-dependent and pH-independent effects. Inhibition of NDF digestion might cause LF and HF to have similar effects on dry matter intake

  9. Shade, irrigation, and nutrients affect flavanoid concentration and yield in American Skullcap.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    American skullcap (Scutellaria lateriflora L.) is valued for its sedative properties that are associated with flavonoids. Information on how growing conditions affect flavonoid content is lacking. A 2x2x3 factorial experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design (r = 4) with a split ...

  10. Nutrient demand interacts with grass maturity to affect milk fat concentration and digestion responses in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-09-01

    Effects of grass maturity on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, digestion and passage kinetics, and chewing activity and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 23.5 to 28.2 kg/d (mean=26.1 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk (FCM) yield ranged from 30.8 to 57.2 kg/d (mean=43.7 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing orchardgrass silage harvested either (1) early-cut, less mature (EC) or (2) late-cut, more mature (LC) as the sole forage. Early- and late-cut orchardgrass contained 44.9 and 54.4% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and 20.1 and 15.3% crude protein, respectively. Forage:concentrate ratio was 58:42 and 46:54 for EC and LC, respectively; both diets contained approximately 25% forage NDF and 30% total NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of grass maturity and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. The EC diet decreased milk yield and increased milk fat concentration compared with the LC diet. Grass maturity and its interaction with pDMI did not affect FCM yield, DMI, rumen pH, or microbial efficiency. The EC diet increased rates of ruminal digestion of potentially digestible NDF and passage of indigestible NDF (iNDF) compared with the LC diet. The lower concentration and faster passage rate of iNDF for EC resulted in lower rumen pools of iNDF, total NDF, organic matter, and dry matter for EC than LC. Ruminal passage rates of potentially digestible NDF and starch were related to level of intake (quadratic and linear interactions, respectively) and subsequently affected ruminal digestibility of these nutrients

  11. Factors Affecting Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nutrient and Pesticide Concentrations in the Surficial Aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debrewer, Linda M.; Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    Water quality in the unconfined, unconsolidated surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is influenced by the availability of soluble ions from natural and human sources, and by geochemical factors that affect the mobility and fate of these ions within the aquifer. Ground-water samples were collected from 60 wells completed in the surficial aquifer of the peninsula in 2001 and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, and selected pesticides and degradation products. Analytical results were compared to similar data from a subset of sampled wells in 1988, as well as to land use, soils, geology, depth, and other potential explanatory variables to demonstrate the effects of natural and human factors on water quality in the unconfined surficial aquifer. This study was conducted as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program of the U.S. Geological Survey, which is designed (in part) to describe the status and trends in ground-water quality and to provide an understanding of natural and human factors that affect ground-water chemistry in different parts of the United States. Results of this study may be useful for water-resources managers tasked with addressing water-quality issues of local and regional importance because the surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is a major source of water for domestic and public supply and provides the majority of flow in local streams. Human impacts are apparent in ground-water quality throughout the surficial aquifer. The surficial aquifer on the Delmarva Peninsula is generally sandy and very permeable with well-oxygenated ground water. Dissolved constituents found throughout various depths of the unconfined aquifer are likely derived from the predominantly agricultural practices on the peninsula, although effects of road salt, mineral dissolution, and other natural and human influences are also apparent in some areas. Nitrate occurred at concentrations exceeding natural levels in many areas, and commonly exceeded 10

  12. Meal frequency changes the basal and time-course profiles of plasma nutrient concentrations and affects feed efficiency in young growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Le Naou, T; Le Floc'h, N; Louveau, I; van Milgen, J; Gondret, F

    2014-05-01

    Ingested dietary nutrients and feed energy are partitioned among tissues to sustain body growth. Based on the respective costs of the various metabolic pathways allowing use and storage of feed energy into cells, it may be theorized that daily meal frequency could affect growth, body composition or feed efficiency. This study aimed to determine the effects of daily meal frequency on nutrient partitioning, tissue metabolism and composition, and performance. Young growing pigs (30 kg BW) were offered a same amount of feed either in 2 (M2, n = 15) or 12 (M12, n = 16) meals per day during a 3-wk interventional period. Animals fed twice a day had an accelerated weight gain (+6.4%, P < 0.05) and exhibited a greater G:F (+4%, P = 0.03) than animals fed 12 meals per day during this period. Basal plasma concentrations of glucose, lactate, triglyceride, urea, and leptin were lower (P < 0.001) in M2 pigs than in M12 pigs. Meal frequency also changed (P < 0.001) the time-course profiles of plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, and lactate in response to meal ingestion. A greater rise and a sharper fall in plasma glucose and insulin levels were observed in M2 pigs compared with M12 pigs. In both groups, similarities were observed in the postprandial time courses of plasma concentrations of insulin and of α-amino nitrogen (used as a measure of total AA). Despite these metabolic responses, tissue lipids, glycogen content, and enzyme activities participating in energy metabolism in muscle and liver were similar (P > 0.10) in both groups at the end of the trial. Percentage of perirenal fat in the body and depth of dorsal subcutaneous fat tissue were not affected by meal frequency, but kidney weight was lower (-18%, P < 0.001) in M2 pigs than in M12 pigs. Altogether, the less frequent daily meal intake improves the conversion of feed into weight gain, without marked modifications of tissue composition in young pigs.

  13. Long-term experimental warming, shading and nutrient addition affect the concentration of phenolic compounds in arctic-alpine deciduous and evergreen dwarf shrubs.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anja H; Jonasson, Sven; Michelsen, Anders; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2006-02-01

    Environmental changes are likely to alter the chemical composition of plant tissues, including content and concentrations of secondary compounds, and thereby affect the food sources of herbivores. After 10 years of experimental increase of temperature, nutrient levels and light attenuation in a sub-arctic, alpine ecosystem, we investigated the effects on carbon based secondary compounds (CBSC) and nitrogen in one dominant deciduous dwarf shrub, Salix herbacea x polaris and two dominant evergreen dwarf shrubs, Cassiope tetragona and Vaccinium vitis-idaea throughout one growing season. The main aims were to compare the seasonal course and treatment effects on CBSC among the species, life forms and leaf cohorts and to examine whether the responses in different CBSC were consistent across compounds. The changes in leaf chemistry both during the season and in response to the treatments were higher in S. herbacea x polaris than in the corresponding current year's leaf cohort of the evergreen C. tetragona. The changes were also much higher than in the 1-year-old leaves of the two evergreens probably due to differences in dilution and turnover of CBSC in growing and mature leaves paired with different rates of allocation. Most low molecular weight phenolics in the current year's leaves decreased in all treatments. Condensed tannins and the tannin-to-N ratio, however, either increased or decreased, and the strength and even direction of the responses varied among the species and leaf cohorts, supporting views of influential factors additional to resource-based or developmental controls, as e.g. species specific or genetic controls of CBSC. The results indicate that there is no common response to environmental changes across species and substances. However, the pronounced treatment responses imply that the quality of the herbivore forage is likely to be strongly affected in a changing arctic environment, although both the direction and strength of the responses will be

  14. Nutrients affecting brain composition and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wurtman, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    This review examines the changes in brain composition and in various brain functions, including behavior, that can follow the ingestion of particular foods or nutrients. It details those that are best understood: the increases in serotonin, catecholamine, or acetylcholine synthesis that can occur subsequent to food-induced increases in brain levels of tryptophan, tyrosine, or choline; it also discusses the various processes that must intervene between the mouth and the synapse, so to speak, in order for a nutrient to affect neurotransmission, and it speculates as to additional brain chemicals that may ultimately be found to be affected by changes in the availability of their nutrient precursors. Because the brain chemicals best known to be nutrient dependent overlap with those thought to underlie the actions of most of the drugs used to treat psychiatric diseases, knowledge of this dependence may help the psychiatrist to understand some of the pathologic processes occurring in his/her patients, particularly those with appetitive symptoms. At the very least, such knowledge should provide the psychiatrist with objective criteria for judging when to take seriously assertions that particular foods or nutrients do indeed affect behavior (e.g., in hyperactive children). If the food can be shown to alter neurotransmitter release, it may be behaviorally-active; however, if it lacks a discernible neurochemical effect, the likelihood that it really alters behavior is small.

  15. Sodium diformate and extrusion temperature affect nutrient digestibility and physical quality of diets with fish meal and barley protein concentrate for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of the experiment were to evaluate the effects of ingredient, extrusion temperature, and the acid salt sodium diformate (NaDF) in diets for rainbow trout on apparent nutrient digestibility and physical quality of the diets. The experiment was arranged in a 23 factorial design with two...

  16. The emerging farmed fish species meagre (Argyrosomus regius): how culinary treatment affects nutrients and contaminants concentration and associated benefit-risk balance.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara; Afonso, Cláudia; Bandarra, Narcisa Maria; Gueifão, Sandra; Castanheira, Isabel; Carvalho, Maria Luísa; Cardoso, Carlos; Nunes, Maria Leonor

    2013-10-01

    The effect of cooking methods (boiling, grilling, and roasting) on the proximate and mineral composition, contaminants concentration and fatty acids profile was evaluated aiming to understand the benefits and risks associated to the consumption of the emerging farmed fish meagre (Argyrosomus regius). All the treatments led to lower moisture content. After grilling and roasting, the SFA, MUFA and PUFA contents increased. There was no degradation of EPA and DHA during the culinary processes. Significant retention of minerals in grilled and roasted meagre samples was registered. For Pb and Cd there were no concentration differences between culinary treatments and regarding raw fish. Whereas As level was higher in grilled meagre, total Hg and Me-Hg values were augmented in grilled and roasted meagre. The consumption of meagre is advisable due to the low and healthy fat, high selenium and protein content. Grilling would be the best culinary treatment due to the retention of protein, EPA, DHA and minerals. But as the risk of ingestion of Me-Hg content also increases, based on the risk assessment, intake should not exceed two weekly meals, provided that no other important Me-Hg food source is present in the diet. Otherwise, even this maximum threshold should be lower.

  17. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Covino, T. P.; Bergstrom, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with a distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role

  18. Hydrologic and biologic influences on stream network nutrient concentrations: Interactions of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Covino, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Stream networks lie in a crucial landscape position between terrestrial ecosystems and downstream water bodies. As such, whether inferring terrestrial watershed processes from watershed outlet nutrient signals or predicting the effect of observed terrestrial processes on stream nutrient signals, it is requisite to understand how stream networks can modulate terrestrial nutrient inputs. To date integrated understanding and modeling of physical and biological influences on nutrient concentrations at the stream network scale have been limited. However, watershed scale groundwater - surface water exchange (hydrologic turnover), concentration-variable biological uptake, and the interaction between the two can strongly modify stream water nutrient concentrations. Stream water and associated nutrients are lost to and replaced from groundwater with distinct nutrient concentrations while in-stream nutrients can also be retained by biological processes at rates that vary with concentration. We developed an empirically based network scale model to simulate the interaction between hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent nutrient uptake across stream networks. Exchange and uptake parameters were measured using conservative and nutrient tracer addition experiments in the Bull Trout Watershed, central Idaho. We found that the interaction of hydrologic turnover and concentration-dependent uptake combined to modify and subsequently stabilize in-stream concentrations, with specific concentrations dependent on the magnitude of hydrologic turnover, groundwater concentrations, and the shape of nutrient uptake kinetic curves. We additionally found that by varying these physical and biological parameters within measured ranges we were able to generate a spectrum of stream network concentration distributions representing a continuum of shifting magnitudes of physical and biological influences on in-stream concentrations. These findings elucidate the important and variable role of

  19. Boosted Regression Tree Models to Explain Watershed Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boosted regression tree (BRT) models were developed to quantify the nonlinear relationships between landscape variables and nutrient concentrations in a mesoscale mixed land cover watershed during base-flow conditions. Factors that affect instream biological components, based on ...

  20. Biofortification of crops with nutrients: factors affecting utilization and storage.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Gómez, Joana; Twyman, Richard M; Zhu, Changfu; Farré, Gemma; Serrano, José Ce; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Muñoz, Pilar; Sandmann, Gerhard; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2017-01-06

    Biofortification is an effective and economical method to improve the micronutrient content of crops, particularly staples that sustain human populations in developing countries. Whereas conventional fortification requires artificial additives, biofortification involves the synthesis or accumulation of nutrients by plants at source. Little is known about the relative merits of biofortification and artificial fortification in terms of nutrient bioaccessibility and bioavailability, and much depends on the biochemical nature of the nutrient, which can promote or delay uptake, and determine how efficiently different nutrients are transported through the blood, stored, and utilized. Data from the first plants biofortified with minerals and vitamins provide evidence that the way in which nutrients are presented can affect how they are processed and utilized in the human body. The latest studies on the effects of the food matrix, processing and storage on nutrient transfer from biofortified crops are reviewed, as well as current knowledge about nutrient absorption and utilization.

  1. Ozone alters the concentrations of nutrients in bean tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, D.T.; Rodecap, K.D.; Lee, E.H.; Moser, T.J.; Hogsett, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the impact of ozone on the nutrient concentrations in tissue from various organs of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv Bush Bluelake 290). The plants were exposed to episodic concentrations of ozone in open-top field exposure chambers from soon after emergence until pod maturity. At harvest the leaf, stem, root and pod tissue were separated and dried (at 70C) to a constant weight. Nutrient concentrations in the tissue were determined using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer. Ozone exposure decreased the foliar concentrations of only four of the twelve nutrients analyzed (Ca, Mg, Fe and Mn) and increased the concentrations of three nutrients (K,P and Mo) in the pods. There were no significant changes in the macro- or micronutrient levels in the stem or root tissue. The decreased concentrations in the foliage appear to be the result of reduced transport into the leaves rather than reduced uptake or leaching.

  2. Swift recovery of Sphagnum nutrient concentrations after excess supply.

    PubMed

    Limpens, Juul; Heijmans, Monique M P D

    2008-08-01

    Although numerous studies have addressed the effects of increased N deposition on nutrient-poor environments such as raised bogs, few studies have dealt with to what extent, and on what time-scale, reductions in atmospheric N supply would lead to recovery of the ecosystems in question. Since a considerable part of the negative effects of elevated N deposition on raised bogs can be related to an imbalance in tissue nutrient concentrations of the dominant peat-former Sphagnum, changes in Sphagnum nutrient concentration after excess N supply may be used as an early indicator of ecosystem response. This study focuses on the N and P concentrations of Sphagnum magellanicum and Sphagnum fallax before, during and after a factorial fertilization experiment with N and P in two small peatlands subject to a background bulk deposition of 2 g N m(-2) year(-1). Three years of adding N (4.0 g N m(-2) year(-1)) increased the N concentration, and adding P (0.3 g P m(-2) year(-1)) increased the P concentration in Sphagnum relative to the control treatment at both sites. Fifteen months after the nutrient additions had ceased, N concentrations were similar to the control whereas P concentrations, although strongly reduced, were still slightly elevated. The changes in the N and P concentrations were accompanied by changes in the distribution of nutrients over the capitulum and the stem and were congruent with changes in translocation. Adding N reduced the stem P concentration, whereas adding P reduced the stem N concentration in favor of the capitulum. Sphagnum nutrient concentrations quickly respond to reductions in excess nutrient supply, indicating that a management policy aimed at reducing atmospheric nutrient input to bogs can yield results within a few years.

  3. Modeling the Response of Nutrient Concentrations and Primary Productivity in Lake Michigan to Nutrient Loading Scenarios

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water quality model, LM3 Eutro, will be used to estimate the response of nutrient concentrations and primary productivity in Lake Michigan to nutrient loading scenarios. This work is part of a larger effort, the Future Midwestern landscapes study, that will estimate the produc...

  4. Exploited and excreting: parasite type affects host nutrient recycling.

    PubMed

    Narr, Charlotte F; Frost, Paul C

    2016-08-01

    Parasite-induced changes in the nutrient balance of hosts could alter the availability of nutrients in ecosystems by changing consumer-driven nutrient recycling. While these effects on host nutrient use are mediated by host physiology, they likely depend on characteristics of the parasite and host diet quality. We examined this possibility by measuring nutrient release rates of uninfected Daphnia and conspecifics infected by two microparasites (the bacterium Pasteuria ramosa and the microsporidium Hamiltosporidium tvaerminnensis) from daphnid hosts fed food that varied in phosphorus content. We found that infection type and diet affected host nutrient release rates, but the strength of these effects varied among parasite treatments. To improve our understanding of these effects, we examined whether two separate aspects of host exploitation (parasite-induced reductions in host fecundity and parasite load) could account for variation in Daphnia nutrient release, ingestion, and elemental ratios caused by our infection and diet treatments. Regardless of whether we compared individuals across infection type or diet treatment, Daphnia fecundity described variation in multiple aspects of host nutrient use better than infection, diet, or spore load. Our results suggest that parasite-induced changes in host nutrient use are both parasite and diet specific, and that host fecundity could be a useful parameter for predicting the magnitude and direction of these changes.

  5. Lake nutrient stoichiometry is less predictable than nutrient concentrations at regional and sub-continental scales.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah M; Oliver, Samantha K; Lapierre, Jean Francois; Stanley, Emily H; Jones, John R; Wagner, Tyler; Soranno, Patricia A

    2017-03-31

    Production in many ecosystems is co-limited by multiple elements. While a known suite of drivers associated with nutrient sources, nutrient transport, and internal processing controls concentrations of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in lakes, much less is known about whether the drivers of single nutrient concentrations can also explain spatial or temporal variation in lake N:P stoichiometry. Predicting stoichiometry might be more complex than predicting concentrations of individual elements because some drivers have similar relationships with N and P, leading to a weak relationship with their ratio. Further, the dominant controls on elemental concentrations likely vary across regions, resulting in context dependent relationships between drivers, lake nutrients and their ratios. Here, we examine whether known drivers of N and P concentrations can explain variation in N:P stoichiometry, and whether explaining variation in stoichiometry differs across regions. We examined drivers of N:P in ~2,700 lakes at a sub-continental scale and two large regions nested within the sub-continental study area that have contrasting ecological context, including differences in the dominant type of land cover (agriculture vs. forest). At the sub-continental scale, lake nutrient concentrations were correlated with nutrient loading and lake internal processing, but stoichiometry was only weakly correlated to drivers of lake nutrients. At the regional scale, drivers that explained variation in nutrients and stoichiometry differed between regions. In the Midwestern US region, dominated by agricultural land use, lake depth and the percentage of row crop agriculture were strong predictors of stoichiometry because only phosphorus was related to lake depth and only nitrogen was related to the percentage of row crop agriculture. In contrast, all drivers were related to N and P in similar ways in the Northeastern US region, leading to weak relationships between drivers and stoichiometry. Our

  6. Root and foliar nutrient concentrations in loblolly pine: Effects of season, site, and fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.B. ); Campbell, R.G. ); Allen, H.L.; Davey, C.B. )

    1987-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in the roots and foliage of plantation-grown loblolly pine were examined over a period of 18 months. Samples were collected from 4 sites on the lower coastal plain of North Carolina, each representing a distinct combination of soil moisture and soil fertility. The patterns in foliar and root nutrient concentrations followed similar trends over the course of this study. However, seasonal trends were irregular, suggesting that annual climatic variation may affect seasonal nutrient levels. Nutrient concentrations varied among sites, as did effects of fertilization (225 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}, 225 kg N ha{sup {minus}1} + 75 kg P ha{sup {minus}1}) on nutrient concentrations. Significant fertilizer effects on nutrient concentrations did not always result in increased volume growth. On some sites, root N and P concentrations appeared to be more sensitive to fertilizer-induced changes than did foliar nutrient levels and may have integrated site factors more effectively than foliar concentrations. Foliage seemed more sensitive of N deficiencies, while the roots detected P deficiencies more often.

  7. Prediction of nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations in fresh grass using nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Stergiadis, S; Allen, M; Chen, X J; Wills, D; Yan, T

    2015-05-01

    Improved nutrient utilization efficiency is strongly related to enhanced economic performance and reduced environmental footprint of dairy farms. Pasture-based systems are widely used for dairy production in certain areas of the world, but prediction equations of fresh grass nutritive value (nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations) are limited. Equations to predict digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) used for grazing cattle have been either developed with cattle fed conserved forage and concentrate diets or sheep fed previously frozen grass, and the majority of them require measurements less commonly available to producers, such as nutrient digestibility. The aim of the present study was therefore to develop prediction equations more suitable to grazing cattle for nutrient digestibility and energy concentrations, which are routinely available at farm level by using grass nutrient contents as predictors. A study with 33 nonpregnant, nonlactating cows fed solely fresh-cut grass at maintenance energy level for 50 wk was carried out over 3 consecutive grazing seasons. Freshly harvested grass of 3 cuts (primary growth and first and second regrowth), 9 fertilizer input levels, and contrasting stage of maturity (3 to 9 wk after harvest) was used, thus ensuring a wide representation of nutritional quality. As a result, a large variation existed in digestibility of dry matter (0.642-0.900) and digestible organic matter in dry matter (0.636-0.851) and in concentrations of DE (11.8-16.7 MJ/kg of dry matter) and ME (9.0-14.1 MJ/kg of dry matter). Nutrient digestibilities and DE and ME concentrations were negatively related to grass neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents but positively related to nitrogen (N), gross energy, and ether extract (EE) contents. For each predicted variable (nutrient digestibilities or energy concentrations), different combinations of predictors (grass chemical composition) were found to be

  8. Evolution of root plasticity responses to variation in soil nutrient distribution and concentration.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Judah D; Rice, Kevin J

    2012-12-01

    Root plasticity, a trait that can respond to selective pressure, may help plants forage for nutrients in heterogeneous soils. Agricultural breeding programs have artificially selected for increased yield under comparatively homogeneous soil conditions, potentially decreasing the capacity for plasticity in crop plants like barley (Hordeum vulgare). However, the effects of domestication on the evolution of root plasticity are essentially unknown. Using a split container approach, we examined the differences in root plasticity among three domestication levels of barley germplasm (wild, landrace, and cultivar) grown under different concentrations and distribution patterns of soil nutrients. Domestication level, nutrient concentration, and nutrient distribution interactively affected average root diameter; differential root allocation (within-plant plasticity) was greatest in wild barley (Hordeum spontaneum), especially under low nutrient levels. Correlations of within-plant root plasticity and plant size were most pronounced in modern cultivars under low-nutrient conditions. Barley plants invested more resources to root systems when grown in low-nutrient soils and allocated more roots to higher-nutrient locations. Root plasticity in barley is scale dependent and varies with domestication level. Although wild barley harbors a greater capacity for within-plant root plasticity than domesticated barley, cultivars exhibited the greatest capacity to translate within-plant plasticity into increased plant size.

  9. Nutrient Infiltrate Concentrations from Three Permeable Pavement Types

    EPA Science Inventory

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha...

  10. Plant invasion is associated with higher plant-soil nutrient concentrations in nutrient-poor environments.

    PubMed

    Sardans, Jordi; Bartrons, Mireia; Margalef, Olga; Gargallo-Garriga, Albert; Janssens, Ivan A; Ciais, Phillipe; Obersteiner, Michael; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Chen, Han Y H; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-03-01

    Plant invasion is an emerging driver of global change worldwide. We aimed to disentangle its impacts on plant-soil nutrient concentrations. We conducted a meta-analysis of 215 peer-reviewed articles and 1233 observations. Invasive plant species had globally higher N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues but not in foliar litter, in comparison with their native competitors. Invasive plants were also associated with higher soil C and N stocks and N, P, and K availabilities. The differences in N and P concentrations in photosynthetic tissues and in soil total C and N, soil N, P, and K availabilities between invasive and native species decreased when the environment was richer in nutrient resources. The results thus suggested higher nutrient resorption efficiencies in invasive than in native species in nutrient-poor environments. There were differences in soil total N concentrations but not in total P concentrations, indicating that the differences associated to invasive plants were related with biological processes, not with geochemical processes. The results suggest that invasiveness is not only a driver of changes in ecosystem species composition but that it is also associated with significant changes in plant-soil elemental composition and stoichiometry.

  11. Nutrient and Mercury Concentrations and Loads in Tahoe Basin Snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, C.; Obrist, D.; Schumer, R.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately seventy percent of Lake Tahoe Basin precipitation falls as snow during the winter and spring. During snowpack storage, chemicals that accumulate throughout the season through wet and dry deposition are subject to transformations and emissions that affect the end-of-season chemical load in runoff and infiltrating groundwater. This study describes dynamics of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and mercury (Hg) concentrations and loads in Tahoe Basin snowpack to fill a gap in the watershed's nutrient and pollutant mass balance. Bi-weekly snowpack cores and storm-based surface samples were collected at seven sites along two elevation gradients in the Tahoe Basin during the 2012 and 2013 snow years. Snowpack N content is controlled largely by deposition of nitrate (NO3-) and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN: NH3 + NH4+). NO3- deposition is linked with snow accumulation and snowpack concentrations are consistent throughout the sampling seasons. NO3- snowpack concentrations have no discernible spatial pattern and are likely driven by NOx emissions from out-of-basin sources. Unlike NO3-, TAN deposition is associated with dry deposition and concentrations increase towards the end of winter. This late season influx of TAN is likely connected with increased vertical mixing of the boundary layer and the onset of agricultural activity in the San Joaquin Valley. P deposition is strongly correlated with both longitude and elevation. These spatial patterns of P loading are consistent with particulate-bound dry deposition, originating mainly from in-basin urban sources. Lastly, Hg deposition shows little spatial or temporal variability throughout the Basin. This pattern is consistent with out-of-basin sourcing, likely from global background atmospheric concentrations. Hg speciation shows a post-depositional shift from dissolved to particulate phase as the dominant form. This shift is consistent photochemical induced gaseous emission of dissolved Hg and preferential retention of

  12. Hypolimnetic concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace elements in Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woods, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    A reconnaissance study of Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho done from May through November 1987 assessed water quality throughout the lake. Particular emphasis was on hypolimnetic concentrations of dissolved oxygen, nutrients, and trace elements. Study results enabled refinement of the sampling protocol in a U.S. Geological Survey research proposal for a large-scale investigation of nutrient enrichment and trace element contamination problems affecting the 129.5 sq kilometer lake in northern Idaho. Hypolimnetic dissolved-oxygen concentrations as low as 4.1 mg/L in November and the frequent occurrence of supersaturated dissolved-oxygen concentrations during June through August indicated nutrient enrichment. Secchi-disc depths in the lake 's central and southern areas were typical of mesotrophic conditions, whereas oligotrophic conditions prevailed in the northern area. Throughout the study, hypolimnetic concentrations of total recoverable zinc exceeded chronic and acute toxicity criteria for freshwater aquatic life. (USGS)

  13. Climate Change Will Affect Nutrient Dispersal In UK Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamaschi, B. A.; Robins, P. E.; Cooper, D.

    2015-12-01

    It is still largely unclear how nutrients that travel through the catchment-river system are distributed within estuaries. How long will nutrients remain in the estuary, and what proportion will disperse offshore into the oceans? In the UK, where many catchments are relatively small and steep, estuaries react rapidly to rainfall events, which crucially control the mixing process, even though tidal stirring is generally large. Seasonal and short-term variability in estuarine functioning is therefore greater than variabilities over semi-diurnal timescales linked to tidal cycling. We present both published and on-going research that is emerging from an interdisciplinary pan-UK NERC Macronutrient Cycles Programme (macronutrient-cycles.ouce.ox.ac.uk). We pull together intensive field campaigns (Howlett et al. 2015) and model simulations (Robins et al. 2015), and present for the first time coupled simulations of catchment-river-estuary nutrient transport, using a variety of hydrological and hydrodynamic models. We investigate the response of the hydrodynamics and nutrients to extreme flows and storm surge events, and the response to climate change by simulating the IPCC 5th Assessment projections for 2100. On-going research will extend this integrated approach into the macronutrient controls on atmospheric-land exchange. Emerging research from our UK case study suggests that simulating the hourly river hydrograph, rather than daily-averaged, is important for estuarine response and recovery; daily-averaged flowrates, which are commonly used, under-predict the offshore transport of nutrients. Moreover, biogeochemical processing, whilst detected over estuarine residence times, did not measurably alter the estuarine concentrations, due to the much stronger advective fluxes. By simulating past mean and extreme events, using time-series analysis of river flow and tidal level data collected over the past 50 years, we are able to characterise the future estuarine nutrient

  14. Factors affecting nutrient trends in major rivers of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Langland, M.J.; Yochum, S.E.; Edwards, R.E.; Blomquist, J.D.; Phillips, S.W.; Shenk, G.W.; Preston, S.D.

    2000-01-01

    Trends in nutrient loads and flow-adjusted concentrations in the major rivers entering Chesapeake Bay were computed on the basis of water-quality data collected between 1985 and 1998 at 29 monitoring stations in the Susquehanna, Potomac, James, Rappahannock, York, Patuxent, and Choptank River Basins. Two computer models?the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model (WSM) and the U.S. Geological Survey?s 'Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes' (SPARROW) Model?were used to help explain the major factors affecting the trends. Results from WSM simulations provided information on temporal changes in contributions from major nutrient sources, and results from SPARROW model simulations provided spatial detail on the distribution of nutrient yields in these basins. Additional data on nutrient sources, basin characteristics, implementation of management practices, and ground-water inputs to surface water were analyzed to help explain the trends. The major factors affecting the trends were changes in nutrient sources and natural variations in streamflow. The dominant source of nitrogen and phosphorus from 1985 to 1998 in six of the seven tributary basins to Chesapeake Bay was determined to be agriculture. Because of the predominance of agricultural inputs, changes in agricultural nutrient sources such as manure and fertilizer, combined with decreases in agricultural acreage and implementation of best management practices (BMPs), had the greatest impact on the trends in flow-adjusted nutrient concentrations. Urban acreage and population, however, were noted to be increasing throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, and as a result, delivered loads of nutrients from urban areas increased during the study period. Overall, agricultural nutrient management, in combination with load decreases from point sources due to facility upgrades and the phosphate detergent ban, led to downward trends in flow-adjusted nutrient concentrations atmany of the monitoring stations in the

  15. Factors Affecting Tocopherol Concentrations in Soybean Seeds.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Constanza S; Seguin, Philippe

    2016-12-21

    Soybean seeds contain several health-beneficial compounds, including tocopherols, which are used by the nutraceutical and functional food industries. Soybean tocopherol concentrations are, however, highly variable. Large differences observed in tocopherol concentrations among soybean genotypes together with the relatively simple biosynthetic pathway involving few genes support the feasibility of selecting for high-tocopherol soybean. Tocopherol concentrations are also highly influenced by environmental factors and field management. Temperature during seed filling and soil moisture appear to be the main factors affecting tocopherol concentrations; other factors such as soil fertility and solar radiation also affect concentrations and composition. Field management decisions including seeding date, row spacing, irrigation, and fertilization also affect tocopherols. Knowledge of factors affecting soybean tocopherols is essential to develop management strategies that will lead to the production of seeds with consistent target concentrations that will meet the needs of the nutraceutical and functional food industries.

  16. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  17. Detecting terrestrial nutrient limitation: a global meta-analysis of foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Rebecca; DiManno, Nicole

    2016-03-01

    Examining foliar nutrient concentrations after fertilization provides an alternative method for detecting nutrient limitation of ecosystems, which is logistically simpler to measure than biomass change. We present a meta-analysis of response ratios of foliar nitrogen and phosphorus (RRN, RRP) after addition of fertilizer of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), or the two elements in combination, in relation to climate, ecosystem type, life form, family, and methodological factors. Results support other meta-analyses using biomass, and demonstrate there is strong evidence for nutrient limitation in natural communities. However, because N fertilization experiments greatly outnumber P fertilization trials, it is difficult to discern the absolute importance of N vs. P vs. co-limitation across ecosystems. Despite these caveats, it is striking that results did not follow "conventional wisdom" that temperate ecosystems are N-limited and tropical ones are P-limited. In addition, the use of ratios of N-to-P rather than response ratios also are a useful index of nutrient limitation, but due to large overlap in values, there are unlikely to be universal cutoff values for delimiting N vs. P limitation. Differences in RRN and RRP were most significant across ecosystem types, plant families, life forms, and between competitive environments, but not across climatic variables.

  18. Effects of Reservoirs on Nutrient Concentrations and Ratios along the Longitudinal Gradient of Danube River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo Borda, J. S.; Gettel, G. M.; Irvine, K.

    2015-12-01

    Reservoirs reduce water flow and increase the retention time which can provide conditions to increase primary production, sedimentation and nutrient retention. As a consequence, nutrient ratios and fluxes of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and silica (Si) may be altered which in turn affects the identity of limiting nutrients and the dynamics of primary production in downstream ecosystems. Residence time as well as the position of reservoirs along the longitudinal gradient (headwaters vs. mouth) may affect these processes. The Danube River Basin is one example where reservoirs have likely altered nutrient stoichiometry along the longitudinal gradient. It has a dam every 17 Km in the upper 1000 km of the river along with a very large dam complex (Iron Gates Dam) 117- Km from the mouth. There has been there has been an observed decline in Si flux, which may have led to changes in phytoplankton community structure in the Black Sea, but for which the causes for this decline are not yet clear. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of reservoirs from headwaters to the mouth on nutrient stoichiometry in the Danube Basin. Data on dissolved Si, N, and P concentrations from 1996 to 2012 were analyzed from 40 monitoring stations from the TransNational Monitoring Network (TNMN), which are located in the main stem of the Danube. Time series analysis is used to compare nutrient concentrations and ratios both through seasons and through the 15 year time-period. The monitoring stations are located above and below reservoirs in order to analyze the effect of reservoirs on nutrient ratios and fluxes. Preliminary results show that relationship of dissolved inorganic N (DIN): soluble reactive P (SRP) range from 207 to 76, while DIN:Si ratio ranges from 1.89 to 0.2 from the headwaters to the mouth.

  19. Turion morphological responses to water nutrient concentrations and plant density in the submerged macrophyte Potamogeton crispus

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Chang; You, Wenhua; Xie, Dong; Yu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Asexual propagules are the dominant means of propagation in most submerged macrophytes. To improve the understanding of how water nutrient concentrations and population density influence the turion production of Potamogeton crispus L., the turions were planted in mesocosms with three water nutrient conditions (ambient lake water, high P and high N) and two plant density levels (4 and 15 turions m−2). After a 9-month experiment, the +P in the water column significantly increased the total turion number per plant under both of the plant density treatments. However, the +N in the water column did not affect the turion number per plant under low plant density. The +P in the water and high plant density significantly reduced the turion individual biomass. An examination of 3210 turion individuals from all treatments revealed that the increased water nutrient concentrations and plant density impacted the turion size by producing different stem diameters of individual turions. Most of the scale leaf morphological traits of the turions were significantly increased under higher water nutrients, but these traits were similar between the different plant density treatments. These results demonstrate that the water P concentration interacts with plant density, affecting both the production and traits of turions. PMID:25399866

  20. MEETING IN PHILADELPHIA: NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this poster is by comparing nutrient and DOM concentrations in small and large streams, we hope to better understand: (1) watershed controls on stream nutrient and DOM concentrations; and (2) the variability of nutrient and DOM concentrations within a river netwo...

  1. N limited herbivore consumer growth and low nutrient regeneration N:P ratios in nutrient poor Swedish lakes along a gradient in DOC concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, A. K.; Karlsson, D.; Karlsson, J.; Vrede, T.

    2014-12-01

    Nutrient limitation of primary producers and their consumers can have a large influence on ecosystem productivity. The nature and strength of nutrient limitation is driven both by external factors (nutrient loading) and internal processes (consumer-driven nutrient regeneration). Here we present results from a field study in 16 unproductive headwater lakes in northern subarctic and boreal Sweden where N deposition is low. We assessed the C:N:P stoichiometry of lake water, seston and zooplankton and estimated the consumer driven nutrient regeneration N:P ratio. The elemental imbalances between seston and zooplankton indicated that zooplankton were mainly N limited and regenerated nutrients with low N:P ratios (median 9.7, atomic ratio). The N:P regeneration ratios declined with increasing DOC concentrations, suggesting that catchment release of DOC accentuates the N limitation by providing more P to the lakes. The N:P regeneration ratios were related to responses in phytoplankton bioassays in mid-summer with low N:P regeneration with N limited phytoplankton, and high N:P regeneration with P limited phytoplankton. During other seasons, increased nutrient loading from the surrounding catchments during periods of greater water throughput had stronger effects on phytoplankton nutrient limitation. Our results suggest that herbivore zooplankton are N limited and recycle nutrients with low N:P ratio in low productive lakes with low N deposition. This will, at least during seasons when in-lake processes play an important role in nutrient turn over, contribute to continued N limitation of phytoplankton in these systems. We anticipate that increased N deposition and changes in climate and hydrology may affect this feedback and result in qualitative changes in these ecosystems, changing both autotroph producers and herbivore consumers from N- to P-limitation, eventually affecting important ecosystem characteristics such as productivity and turnover of energy and nutrients.

  2. Influence of light presence and biomass concentration on nutrient kinetic removal from urban wastewater by Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J; Arbib, Z; Alvarez-Díaz, P D; Garrido-Pérez, C; Barragán, J; Perales, J A

    2014-05-20

    This work was aimed at studying the effect of light-darkness and high-low biomass concentrations in the feasibility of removing nitrogen and phosphorus from urban treated wastewater by the microalga Scenedesmus obliquus. Laboratory experiments were conducted in batch, where microalgae were cultured under different initial biomass concentrations (150 and 1500mgSSl(-1)) and light conditions (dark or illuminated). Nutrient uptake was more dependent on internal nutrient content of the biomass than on light presence or biomass concentration. When a maximum nitrogen or phosphorus content in the biomass was reached (around 8% and 2%, respectively), the removal of that nutrient was almost stopped. Biomass concentration affected more than light presence on the nutrient removal rate, increasing significantly with its increase. Light was only required to remove nutrients when the maximum nutrient storage capacity of the cells was reached and further growth was therefore needed. Residence times to maintain a stable biomass concentration, avoiding the washout of the reactor, were much higher than those needed to remove the nutrients from the wastewater. This ability to remove nutrients in the absence of light could lead to new configurations of reactors aimed to wastewater treatment.

  3. Nutrient prices and concentrations in midwestern agricultural watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Policies to reduce nutrient emissions from agriculture rest on the assumption that it is very difficult to link inputs on farms to nutrient outputs. As a result, conservation programs fund the installation of best management practices that attempt to avoid, trap, or otherwise control nutrient emissi...

  4. Nutrient concentrations and loads in the northeastern United States - Status and trends, 1975-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trench, Elaine C. Todd; Moore, Richard B.; Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Mullaney, John R.; Hickman, R. Edward; Schwarz, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) began regional studies in 2003 to synthesize information on nutrient concentrations, trends, stream loads, and sources. In the northeastern United States, a study area that extends from Maine to central Virginia, nutrient data were evaluated for 130 USGS water-quality monitoring stations. Nutrient data were analyzed for trends in flow-adjusted concentrations, modeled instream (non-flow-adjusted) concentrations, and stream loads for 32 stations with 22 to 29 years of water-quality and daily mean streamflow record during 1975-2003 (termed the long-term period), and for 46 stations during 1993-2003 (termed the recent period), by using a coupled statistical model of streamflow and water quality developed by the USGS. Recent trends in flow-adjusted concentrations of one or more nutrients also were analyzed for 90 stations by using Tobit regression. Annual stream nutrient loads were estimated, and annual nutrient yields were calculated, for 47 stations for the long-term and recent periods, and for 37 additional stations that did not have a complete streamflow and water-quality record for 1993-2003. Nutrient yield information was incorporated for 9 drainage basins evaluated in a national NAWQA study, for a total of 93 stations evaluated for nutrient yields. Long-term downward trends in flow-adjusted concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus (18 and 19 of 32 stations, respectively) indicate regional improvements in nutrient-related water-quality conditions. Most of the recent trends detected for total phosphorus were upward (17 of 83 stations), indicating possible reversals to the long-term improvements. Concentrations of nutrients in many streams persist at levels that are likely to affect aquatic habitat adversely and promote freshwater or coastal eutrophication. Recent trends for modeled instream concentrations, and modeled reference concentrations, were evaluated relative to

  5. Nutrient infiltrate concentrations from three permeable pavement types.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert A; Borst, Michael

    2015-12-01

    While permeable pavement is increasingly being used to control stormwater runoff, field-based, side-by-side investigations on the effects different pavement types have on nutrient concentrations present in stormwater runoff are limited. In 2009, the U.S. EPA constructed a 0.4-ha parking lot in Edison, New Jersey, that incorporated permeable interlocking concrete pavement (PICP), pervious concrete (PC), and porous asphalt (PA). Each permeable pavement type has four, 54.9-m(2), lined sections that direct all infiltrate into 5.7-m(3) tanks enabling complete volume collection and sampling. This paper highlights the results from a 12-month period when samples were collected from 13 rainfall/runoff events and analyzed for nitrogen species, orthophosphate, and organic carbon. Differences in infiltrate concentrations among the three permeable pavement types were assessed and compared with concentrations in rainwater samples and impervious asphalt runoff samples, which were collected as controls. Contrary to expectations based on the literature, the PA infiltrate had significantly larger total nitrogen (TN) concentrations than runoff and infiltrate from the other two permeable pavement types, indicating that nitrogen leached from materials in the PA strata. There was no significant difference in TN concentration between runoff and infiltrate from either PICP or PC, but TN in runoff was significantly larger than in the rainwater, suggesting meaningful inter-event dry deposition. Similar to other permeable pavement studies, nitrate was the dominant nitrogen species in the infiltrate. The PA infiltrate had significantly larger nitrite and ammonia concentrations than PICP and PC, and this was presumably linked to unexpectedly high pH in the PA infiltrate that greatly exceeded the optimal pH range for nitrifying bacteria. Contrary to the nitrogen results, the PA infiltrate had significantly smaller orthophosphate concentrations than in rainwater, runoff, and infiltrate from PICP

  6. Maternal nutrient restriction affects properties of skeletal muscle in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei J; Ford, Stephen P; Means, Warrie J; Hess, Bret W; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Du, Min

    2006-01-01

    Maternal nutrient restriction (NR) affects fetal development with long-term consequences on postnatal health of offspring, including predisposition to obesity and diabetes. Most studies have been conducted in fetuses in late gestation, and little information is available on the persistent impact of NR from early to mid-gestation on properties of offspring skeletal muscle, which was the aim of this study. Pregnant ewes were subjected to 50% NR from day 28–78 of gestation and allowed to deliver. The longissimus dorsi muscle was sampled from 8-month-old offspring. Maternal NR during early to mid-gestation decreased the number of myofibres in the offspring and increased the ratio of myosin IIb to other isoforms by 17.6 ± 4.9% (P < 0.05) compared with offspring of ad libitum fed ewes. Activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, a key enzyme controlling fatty acid oxidation, was reduced by 24.7 ± 4.5% (P < 0.05) in skeletal muscle of offspring of NR ewes and would contribute to increased fat accumulation observed in offspring of NR ewes. Intramuscular triglyceride content (IMTG) was increased in skeletal muscle of NR lambs, a finding which may be linked to predisposition to diabetes in offspring of NR mothers, since enhanced IMTG predisposes to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis demonstrated downregulation of several catabolic enzymes in 8-month-old offspring of NR ewes. These data demonstrate that the early to mid-gestation period is important for skeletal muscle development. Impaired muscle development during this stage of gestation affects the number and composition of fibres in offspring which may lead to long-term physiological consequences, including predisposition to obesity and diabetes. PMID:16763001

  7. Nutrient Exchange through Hyphae in Intercropping Systems Affects Yields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thun, Tim Von

    2013-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF) play a large role in the current understanding of the soil ecosystem. They increase nutrient and water uptake, improve soil structure, and form complex hyphal networks that transfer nutrients between plants within an ecosystem. Factors such as species present, the physiological balance between the plants in the…

  8. Nutrient stoichiometry in winter wheat: Element concentration pattern reflects developmental stage and weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weih, M.; Pourazari, F.; Vico, G.

    2016-10-01

    At least 16 nutrient elements are required by plants for growth and survival, but the factors affecting element concentration and their temporal evolution are poorly understood. The objective was to investigate i) element concentration pattern in winter wheat as affected by crop developmental stage and weather, and ii) whether, in the short term, element stoichiometry reflects the type of preceding crop. We assessed the temporal trajectories of element concentration pattern (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Mn, Fe, Cu, Na, Zn) across the life cycle (from seed to seed) of winter wheat field-grown in cool-temperate Sweden during two years with contrasting weather and when cultivated in monoculture or after different non-wheat preceding crops. We found strong influence of developmental stage on concentration pattern, with the greatest deviation from grain concentrations found in plants at the start of stem elongation in spring. Inter-annual differences in weather affected stoichiometry, but no evidence was found for a short-term preceding–crop effect on element stoichiometry. Winter wheat element stoichiometry is similar in actively growing plant tissues and seeds. Nitrogen exerts a strong influence on the concentration pattern for all elements. Three groups of elements with concentrations changing in concert were identified.

  9. Nutrient stoichiometry in winter wheat: Element concentration pattern reflects developmental stage and weather

    PubMed Central

    Weih, M.; Pourazari, F.; Vico, G.

    2016-01-01

    At least 16 nutrient elements are required by plants for growth and survival, but the factors affecting element concentration and their temporal evolution are poorly understood. The objective was to investigate i) element concentration pattern in winter wheat as affected by crop developmental stage and weather, and ii) whether, in the short term, element stoichiometry reflects the type of preceding crop. We assessed the temporal trajectories of element concentration pattern (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Mn, Fe, Cu, Na, Zn) across the life cycle (from seed to seed) of winter wheat field-grown in cool-temperate Sweden during two years with contrasting weather and when cultivated in monoculture or after different non-wheat preceding crops. We found strong influence of developmental stage on concentration pattern, with the greatest deviation from grain concentrations found in plants at the start of stem elongation in spring. Inter-annual differences in weather affected stoichiometry, but no evidence was found for a short-term preceding–crop effect on element stoichiometry. Winter wheat element stoichiometry is similar in actively growing plant tissues and seeds. Nitrogen exerts a strong influence on the concentration pattern for all elements. Three groups of elements with concentrations changing in concert were identified. PMID:27775050

  10. Nutrient stoichiometry in winter wheat: Element concentration pattern reflects developmental stage and weather.

    PubMed

    Weih, M; Pourazari, F; Vico, G

    2016-10-24

    At least 16 nutrient elements are required by plants for growth and survival, but the factors affecting element concentration and their temporal evolution are poorly understood. The objective was to investigate i) element concentration pattern in winter wheat as affected by crop developmental stage and weather, and ii) whether, in the short term, element stoichiometry reflects the type of preceding crop. We assessed the temporal trajectories of element concentration pattern (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Mn, Fe, Cu, Na, Zn) across the life cycle (from seed to seed) of winter wheat field-grown in cool-temperate Sweden during two years with contrasting weather and when cultivated in monoculture or after different non-wheat preceding crops. We found strong influence of developmental stage on concentration pattern, with the greatest deviation from grain concentrations found in plants at the start of stem elongation in spring. Inter-annual differences in weather affected stoichiometry, but no evidence was found for a short-term preceding-crop effect on element stoichiometry. Winter wheat element stoichiometry is similar in actively growing plant tissues and seeds. Nitrogen exerts a strong influence on the concentration pattern for all elements. Three groups of elements with concentrations changing in concert were identified.

  11. Reduction of transpiration and altered nutrient allocation contribute to nutrient decline of crops grown in elevated CO(2) concentrations.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Justin M; Lobell, David B

    2013-03-01

    Plants grown in elevated [CO(2) ] have lower protein and mineral concentrations compared with plants grown in ambient [CO(2) ]. Dilution by enhanced production of carbohydrates is a likely cause, but it cannot explain all of the reductions. Two proposed, but untested, hypotheses are that (1) reduced canopy transpiration reduces mass flow of nutrients to the roots thus reducing nutrient uptake and (2) changes in metabolite or enzyme concentrations caused by physiological changes alter requirements for minerals as protein cofactors or in other organic complexes, shifting allocation between tissues and possibly altering uptake. Here, we use the meta-analysis of previous studies in crops to test these hypotheses. Nutrients acquired mostly by mass flow were decreased significantly more by elevated [CO(2) ] than nutrients acquired by diffusion to the roots through the soil, supporting the first hypothesis. Similarly, Mg showed large concentration declines in leaves and wheat stems, but smaller decreases in other tissues. Because chlorophyll requires a large fraction of total plant Mg, and chlorophyll concentration is reduced by growth in elevated [CO(2) ], this supports the second hypothesis. Understanding these mechanisms may guide efforts to improve nutrient content, and allow modeling of nutrient changes and health impacts under future climate change scenarios.

  12. Nutrient enrichment affects the mechanical resistance of aquatic plants

    PubMed Central

    Puijalon, Sara

    2012-01-01

    For many plant species, nutrient availability induces important anatomical responses, particularly the production of low-density tissues to the detriment of supporting tissues. Due to the contrasting biomechanical properties of plant tissues, these anatomical responses may induce important modifications in the biomechanical properties of plant organs. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of nutrient enrichment on the anatomical traits of two freshwater plant species and its consequences on plant biomechanical performance. Two plant species were grown under controlled conditions in low versus high nutrient levels. The anatomical and biomechanical traits of the plant stems were measured. Both species produced tissues with lower densities under nutrient-rich conditions, accompanied by modifications in the structure of the aerenchyma for one species. As expected, nutrient enrichment also led to important modifications in the biomechanical properties of the stem for both species. In particular, mechanical resistance (breaking force and strength) and stiffness of stems were significantly reduced under nutrient rich conditions. The production of weaker stem tissues as a result of nutrient enrichment may increase the risk of plants to mechanical failure, thus challenging plant maintenance in mechanically stressful or disturbed habitats. PMID:23028018

  13. Nutrient omission in Bt cotton affects soil organic carbon and nutrients status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aladakatti, Y. R.; Biradar, D. P.; Satyanarayana, T.; Majumdar, K.; Shivamurthy, D.

    2012-04-01

    Studies carried out at the University of Agricultural Sciences, Dharwad, India, in medium black soils assessed the effect of nutrient omission in Bt cotton and its effect on the soil organic carbon (SOC) and available nutrients at the end of second consecutive year of nutrient omission. The study also assessed the extent of contribution of the macro and micronutrients towards seed cotton yield. The experiment consisting 11 treatments omitting a nutrient in each treatment including an absolute control without any nutrients was conducted in a Randomised Block Design with three replications. Cotton crop sufficiently fertilized with macro and micro nutrients (165 : 75 : 120 NPK kg ha-1 and 20 kg each of CaSO4, and MgSO4, 10 kg of S, 20 kg each of ZnSO4, FeSO4 and 0.1 per cent Boron twice as foliar spray) was taken as a standard check to assess the contribution of each nutrient in various nutrient omission treatments. Soils of each treatment were analysed initially and after each crop of cotton for SOC and available nutrient status. Results indicated that the SOC decreased after each crop of cotton in absolute control where no nutrients were applied (0.50 % to 0.38 %) and also in the N omission treatment (0.50 % to 0.35 %). But there was no significant impact of omission of P, K and other nutrients on soil organic carbon. Soil available N, P and K in the soil were reduced as compared to the initial soil status after first and second crop of cotton in the respective treatment where these nutrients were omitted. The soil available N, P and K were reduced to the extent of 61 kg ha-1, 7.1 kg ha-1 and 161.9 kg ha-1 in the respective nutrient omission treatment at end of second crop of cotton as compared to the initial status of these nutrients in the soil. This might be due to the mining of these nutrients from the soil nutrient pool with out addition of these nutrients extraneously. The nutrient status of N, P and K remained almost similar in omission of other nutrients

  14. Food microstructure affects the bioavailability of several nutrients.

    PubMed

    Parada, J; Aguilera, J M

    2007-03-01

    There is an increased interest in the role that some nutrients may play in preventing or ameliorating the effect of major diseases (for example, some types of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, eye disorders, among others). In this respect, the bioavailability or the proportion of an ingested nutrient that is made available (that is, delivered to the bloodstream) for its intended mode of action is more relevant than the total amount present in the original food. Disruption of the natural matrix or the microstructure created during processing may influence the release, transformation, and subsequent absorption of some nutrients in the digestive tract. Alternatively, extracts of bioactive molecules (for example, nutraceuticals) and beneficial microorganisms may be protected during their transit in the digestive system to the absorption sites by encapsulation in designed matrices. This review summarizes relevant in vivo and in vitro methods used to assess the bioavailability of some nutrients (mostly phytochemicals), types of microstructural changes imparted by processing and during food ingestion that are relevant in matrix-nutrient interactions, and their effect on the bioavailability of selected nutrients.

  15. Effects of dietary protein concentration on performance and nutrient digestibility in Pekin ducks during aflatoxicosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Murdoch, R; Zhang, Q; Shafer, D J; Applegate, T J

    2016-04-01

    A 14-d study was conducted to determine the impact of dietary crude protein concentration on performance, serum biochemistry, and nutrient digestive functions in Pekin ducklings during aflatoxicosis. A total of 144 male Pekin ducklings were randomly allotted to 4 dietary treatments arranged in a 2×2 factorial with 2 crude protein (CP) (20 and 24% on an analyzed basis) with or without 0.2 mg/kg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (0.21 mg/kg analyzed). The AFB1 reduced BW gain, feed intake, and breast muscle weight by 33 to 43% (P<0.0001). Serum concentration of protein, glucose, and Ca were also decreased by AFB1 (P≤0.0015), while pancreatic activities of amylase and lipase were increased by AFB1 (P<0.005). Apparent N digestibility was not affected by dietary treatment, whereas apparent ileal digestible energy was reduced 7.6% by AFB1 (P=0.0003). Higher dietary CP improved BW gain, gain:feed ratio, and breast muscle weight (P≤0.021), and tended to improve feed intake (P=0.094), but did not improve serum measures, digestive enzyme activity, or nutrient digestibility. No statistical interaction of AFB1 by CP was observed for any measures. Results from the current study suggest that AFB1 at low concentration can significantly impair performance of Pekin ducklings primarily through inhibited feed intake, as well as influence nutrient digestion processes (jejunum morphology, digestive enzyme activity, and apparent energy digestibility). Higher dietary CP can improve growth performance of ducklings regardless of AF exposure, but did not interact with dietary AFB1 on performance, serum biochemistry, or nutrient digestion in Pekin ducklings from hatch to 14 d.

  16. Interacting effects of CO/sub 2/ and nutrient concentration. [Glycine max; Cassia obtusifolia; Crotalaria spectabilis

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.T.; Flint, E.P.

    1982-07-01

    Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. Tracy) and two associated weeds, sicklepod (Cassia obtusifolia L.) and showy crotalaria (Crotalaria spectabilis Roth), were grown in controlled-environment chambers with day/night temperatures of 29/23 C, photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 600 ..mu..E m/sup -2/ s/sup -1/, CO/sub 2/ concentrations of 350 or 675 ppm, and one-eighth or one-half strength Hoagland's nutrient solution applied three times daily. Leaf areas and dry weights of plant parts were determined at 1, 3, and 5 weeks. Stomatal resistances, transpiration rates, leaf water potentials, and leaf chlorophyll contents were measured, and net assimilation rates (NAR) and leaf area durations (LAD) were calculated. In all species, growth in 675 ppm CO/sub 2/ enhanced dry-matter production through increases in both NAR and LAD. The increased dry-matter production with one-half strength compared to one-eighth strength Hoagland's solution was, however, caused by increased LAD. Stomatal conductances and transpiration rates decreased in 675 ppm CO/sub 2/, but were not affected by nutrient level. High CO/sub 2/ concentration or low nutrient level generally decreased leaf chlorophyll content per unit area. Growth enhancement by high CO/sub 2/ was greater in one-half strength than in one-eighth strength Hoagland's solution. 18 references, 5 figures.

  17. A nutrient combination that can affect synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Wurtman, Richard J

    2014-04-23

    Brain neurons form synapses throughout the life span. This process is initiated by neuronal depolarization, however the numbers of synapses thus formed depend on brain levels of three key nutrients-uridine, the omega-3 fatty acid DHA, and choline. Given together, these nutrients accelerate formation of synaptic membrane, the major component of synapses. In infants, when synaptogenesis is maximal, relatively large amounts of all three nutrients are provided in bioavailable forms (e.g., uridine in the UMP of mothers' milk and infant formulas). However, in adults the uridine in foods, mostly present at RNA, is not bioavailable, and no food has ever been compelling demonstrated to elevate plasma uridine levels. Moreover, the quantities of DHA and choline in regular foods can be insufficient for raising their blood levels enough to promote optimal synaptogenesis. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) the need for extra quantities of the three nutrients is enhanced, both because their basal plasma levels may be subnormal (reflecting impaired hepatic synthesis), and because especially high brain levels are needed for correcting the disease-related deficiencies in synaptic membrane and synapses.

  18. Modeling of nutrient concentrations in the river Loktinka, Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheludkov, Artyom; Kiesel, Jens; Veshkurtseva, Tatyana

    2014-05-01

    Nutrient pollution is the process where too many nutrients, mainly nitrogen and phosphorus, are added to bodies of water and act as fertilizer, causing excessive growth of algae and threatening the natural species assemblages. The investigated catchment area is the river Loktinka which is located in the southern part of the West Siberian Plain, in the forest-steppe vegetation region. One of the most serious contaminant of the surface waters in the region are nutrients. The main input of nutrients comes from untreated runoff from agricultural fields and pastures. To mitigate agricultural non-point source pollution, simulation tools can aid in the development of temporal and spatial management plans. This study presents a software application of a Geohydrological Analysis Model, developed by Prof. Kalinin, Tyumen State University, Russian Federation (1998) for the region. The model is based on "Runoff Forming Surfaces", which are a distinguished part of the catchment characterized by a set of natural components such as land use, soil and elevation. These areas are relatively homogeneous and lead to the same parameters for representing the hydrological cycle. The model is used to simulate the water quality situation which was sampled during spring runoff in 2013. Results of the Siberian Geohydrological Analysis Model are compared to simulations carried out with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT).

  19. Groundwater nutrient concentrations near an incised midwestern stream: Effects of floodplain lithology and land management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Jacobson, P.

    2008-01-01

    It has been recognized that subsurface lithology plays an important role in controlling nutrient cycling and transport in riparian zones. In Iowa and adjacent states, the majority of alluvium preserved in small and moderate sized valleys consists of Holocene-age organic-rich, and fine-grained loam. In this paper, we describe and evaluate spatial and temporal patterns of lithology and groundwater nutrient concentrations at a riparian well transect across Walnut Creek at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Jasper County, Iowa. Land treatment on one side of the stream reduced the grass cover to bare ground and allowed assessment of the effects of land management on nutrient concentrations. Results indicated that groundwater in Holocene alluvium is very nutrient rich with background concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and dissolved organic carbon that exceed many environmentally sensitive criteria. Average concentrations of ammonium exceeded 1 mg/l in several wells under grass cover whereas nitrate concentrations exceeded 20 mg/l in wells under bare ground. Phosphate concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mg/l and DOC concentrations exceeded 5 mg/l in many wells. Denitrification, channel incision, land management and geologic age of alluvium were found to contribute to variable nutrient loading patterns at the site. Study results indicated that riparian zones of incised streams downcutting through nutrient-rich Holocene alluvium can potentially be a significant source of nutrient loadings to streams. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  20. Factors affecting plant growth in membrane nutrient delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.; Sager, J. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of the tubular membrane plant growth unit for the delivery of water and nutrients to roots in microgravity has recently focused on measuring the effects of changes in physical variables controlling solution availability to the plants. Significant effects of membrane pore size and the negative pressure used to contain the solution were demonstrated. Generally, wheat grew better in units with a larger pore size but equal negative pressure and in units with the same pore size but less negative pressure. Lettuce also exhibited better plant growth at less negative pressure.

  1. Nutrient transport in runoff as affected by diet, tillage and manure application rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Including distillers grains in feedlot finishing diets may increase feedlot profitability. However the nutrient content of by-products are concentrated about three during the distillation process. Manure can be applied to meet single or multiple year crop nutrient requirements. The water quality eff...

  2. Factors affecting atmospheric radon concentration, human health.

    PubMed

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, D E; Kłos, M

    2017-04-15

    We studied the influence of terrain, geology and weather condition on radon concentration in the atmosphere and occurrence of radon density currents. The survey was carried out in Kowary (SW Poland) and in the spoil tip formed during uranium mining. The measurements of radon concentration were performed using SSNTD LR-115. The measurements of uranium thorium and potassium content in soil were carried out using gamma ray spectrometer Exploranium RS-230. We noticed that terrain and stability of weather condition had significant impact on atmospheric radon concentration. The seasonal variations of radon concentrations in Kowary differ from those usually registered in temperate climate. Based on our analyses, the increase of radon concentration in winter and spring was caused by inversion occurring in that area during these seasons. The observed seasonal variations of radon concentrations in the spoil tip were consistent with those characteristic for temperate climate (the highest radon concentration registered in spring and summer and the lowest in winter and autumn). The spoil tip is located above 900m a.s.l. and is not cover by grass or trees. These circumstances promoted radon exhalation. The air movement above the spoil tip area is intensive, even in winter time. The average atmospheric radon concentration in the spoil tip was 318Bqm(-3). The performed research did not reveal occurrence of radon density currents and flow of radon from the spoil tip to lower lying areas in Kowary. We noticed interdependence of atmospheric radon concentration measured at the height of 1.5 above the ground and uranium content in soil and no correlation between thorium content and radon concentration. The lung cancer in residents of Kowary which is more common than in Poland can be associated with increased concentrations of radon. The average radon concentration in the atmosphere in Kowary was 79Bq m(-3).

  3. Artificial neural network estimation of soil erosion and nutrient concentrations in runoff from land application areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport of sediment and nutrients from land application areas is an environmental concern. New methods are needed for estimating soil and nutrient concentrations of runoff from cropland areas on which manure is applied. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) trained with a Backpropagation (BP) algor...

  4. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites in pastures, which severely disturbs soil and vegetation leading to erosion and nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the extent and spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas in pastures. We georeferenced...

  5. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Livestock frequently congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites on pastures, which severely disturbs soil and vegetation leading to erosion and nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the extent and spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas on pastures and qu...

  6. Nutrient concentrations in wastewater treatment plant effluents, South Platte River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pocernich, M.; Litke, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate data about nutrient concentrations in wastewater treatment plant effluents are needed for river basin water-quality studies. As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program in the South Platte River Basin, nutrient data were requested from 31 wastewater-treatment plants located in the basin. This article describes the types of nutrient data available from the plants, examines the variability of effluent nutrient concentrations, and discusses methods for estimation of nutrient concentrations where data are lacking. Ammonia was monitored at 88 percent of the plants, nitrite plus nitrate was monitored at 40 percent of the plants, and organic nitrogen and phosphorus were monitored at less than 25 percent of the plants. Median total nitrogen concentrations and median total phosphorus concentrations were small compared to typical literature estimates for wastewater-treatment plants with secondary treatment. Nutrient concentrations in effluent from wastewater-treatment plants varied widely between and within plants. For example, ammonia concentrations varied as much as 5 mg/L during a day, as much as 10 mg/L from day to day, and as much as 30 mg/L from summer to winter within a plant. In the South Platte River Basin, estimates of median annual ammonia and nitrite plus nitrate concentrations can be improved based on plant processes; and nitrite plus nitrate and organic nitrogen concentrations can be estimated based on ammonia concentrations. However, to avoid large estimation errors, mere complete nutrient data from wastewater-treatment plants are needed for integration into river basin water quality studies. The paucity of data hinders attempts to evaluate the relative importance of point source and nonpoint source nutrient loadings to rivers.

  7. Nutrient Concentrations and Their Relations to the Biotic Integrity of Nonwadeable Rivers in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Weigel, Brian M.; Graczyk, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Excessive nutrient [phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N)] input from point and nonpoint sources is frequently associated with degraded water quality in streams and rivers. Point-source discharges of nutrients are fairly constant and are controlled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System. To reduce inputs from nonpoint sources, agricultural performance standards and regulations for croplands and livestock operations are being proposed by various States. In addition, the USEPA is establishing regionally based nutrient criteria that can be refined by each State to determine whether actions are needed to improve water quality. More confidence in the environmental benefits of the proposed performance standards and nutrient criteria would be possible with improved understanding of the biotic responses to a range of nutrient concentrations in different environmental settings. To achieve this general goal, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources collected data from 282 streams and rivers throughout Wisconsin during 2001 through 2003 to: (1) describe how nutrient concentrations and biotic-community structure differ throughout the State, (2) determine which environmental characteristics are most strongly related to the distribution of nutrient concentrations and biotic-community structure, (3) determine reference conditions for water quality and biotic indices for streams and rivers in the State, (4) determine how the biotic communities in streams and rivers in different areas of the State respond to differences in nutrient concentrations, (5) determine the best regionalization scheme to describe the patterns in reference conditions and the corresponding responses in water quality and the biotic communities (primarily for smaller streams), and (6) develop algorithms to estimate nutrient concentrations in streams and rivers from a combination of biotic indices. The ultimate goal of

  8. Nutrient concentrations and their relations to the biotic integrity of wadeable streams in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Graczyk, David J.; Garrison, Paul J.; Wang, Lizhu; LaLiberte, Gina; Bannerman, Roger

    2006-01-01

    Excessive nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) loss from watersheds is frequently associated with degraded water quality in streams. To reduce this loss, agricultural performance standards and regulations for croplands and livestock operations are being proposed by various States. In addition, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is establishing regionally based nutrient criteria that can be refined by each State to determine whether actions are needed to improve a stream's water quality. More confidence in the environmental benefits of the proposed performance standards and nutrient criteria will be possible with a better understanding of the biotic responses to a range of nutrient concentrations in different environmental settings. The U.S. Geological Survey and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources collected data from 240 wadeable streams throughout Wisconsin to: 1) describe how nutrient concentrations and biotic-community structure vary throughout the State; 2) determine which environmental characteristics are most strongly related to the distribution of nutrient concentrations; 3) determine reference water-quality and biotic conditions for different areas of the State; 4) determine how the biotic community of streams in different areas of the State respond to changes in nutrient concentrations; 5) determine the best regionalization scheme to describe the patterns in reference conditions and the responses in water quality and the biotic community; and 6) develop new indices to estimate nutrient concentrations in streams from a combination of biotic indices. The ultimate goal of this study is to provide the information needed to guide the development of regionally based nutrient criteria for Wisconsin streams. For total nitrogen (N) and suspended chlorophyll (SCHL) concentrations and water clarity, regional variability in reference conditions and in the responses in water quality to changes in land use are best described by subdividing wadeable streams

  9. Quantifying Nutrient and Mercury Concentrations and Loads in Lake Tahoe Snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, C.; Obrist, D.; Schumer, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent climate models predict a large decrease in Sierra Nevada snowpack over the next fifty years as a result of climate change. This decrease will not only affect the hydrologic balance but also change inputs of nutrients and pollutants through atmospheric deposition. In the Lake Tahoe basin, winter precipitation dominates and snowfall provides approximately 70 percent of the annual water input. From the first snowfall until the end of melting, snowpack acts as a temporary storage for atmospheric deposition that accumulates throughout winter and spring. Through melt and runoff processes, these nutrients and pollutants can enter the aquatic ecosystem where they can have detrimental effects on lake clarity and health. Most previous studies in this basin have focused on direct atmospheric deposition loads to the lake surface, and little temporal and spatial information is available on the dynamics of atmospheric deposition in the basin's snowpack. We here present nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and mercury (Hg) concentrations and pool sizes in snowpack along two elevational transects in the Tahoe Basin from January to April of 2012. Total N and P concentrations in the snowpack ranged from 0.07 mg/L to 0.38 mg/L and 0.003 mg/L to 0.109 mg/L, respectively. P concentrations showed strong increases from the west-side to the east-side of the basin which we attribute to local (e.g., urban or road-dust), in-basin sources that are distributed along the dominant west-wind patterns. N species, on the other hand, generally showed little spatial trends, indicating that its sources were more diffuse and possibly from out-of- basin. Hg concentrations ranged from 0.81 ppt to 6.25 ppt and showed similar spatial patterns as N. Hg, however, also showed significant snowpack concentration decreases during storm-free periods which we attribute to gaseous losses of Hg back to the atmosphere from photochemical reduction. These emissions are further supported by lower Hg concentrations in

  10. Hydrology, nutrient concentrations, and nutrient yields in nearshore areas of four lakes in northern Wisconsin, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, David J.; Hunt, Randall J.; Greb, Steven R.; Buchwald, Cheryl A.; Krohelski, James T.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of shoreline development on water quality and nutrient yields in nearshore areas of four lakes in northern Wisconsin were investigated from October 1999 through September 2001. The study measured surface runoff and ground-water flows from paired developed (sites containing lawn, rooftops, sidewalks, and driveways) and undeveloped (mature and immature woods) catchments adjacent to four lakes in northern Wisconsin. Water samples from surface runoff and ground water were collected and analyzed for nutrients. Coupled with water volumes, loads and subsequent yields of selected constituents were computed for developed and undeveloped catchments. The median runoff from lawn surfaces ranged from 0.0019 to 0.059 inch over the catchment area. Median surface runoff estimates from the wooded catchments were an order of magnitude less than those from the lawn catchments. The increased water volumes from the lawn catchments resulted in greater nutrient loads and subsequent annual nutrient yields from the developed sites. Soil temperature and soil moisture were measured at two sites with mixed lawn and wooded areas. At both of these sites, the area covered with a lawn commonly was warmer than the wooded area. No consistent differences in soil moisture were found. A ground-water model was constructed to simulate the local flow systems at two of the paired catchments. Model simulations showed that much of the ground water delivered to the lake originated from distant areas that did not contribute runoff directly to the lake. Surface runoff and ground-water nutrient concentrations from the lawn and wooded catchments did not have apparent patterns. Some of the median concentrations from lawns were significantly different (at the 0.05 significance level) from those at wooded catchments. Water wells and piezometers were sampled for chemical analyses three times during the study period. Variability in the shallow ground-water chemistry over time in the lawn samples was

  11. Effects of whole-stream nutrient enrichment on the concentration and abundance of aquatic hyphomycete conidia in transport.

    PubMed

    Gulis, Vladislav; Suberkropp, Keller

    2004-01-01

    The concentrations and relative abundances of aquatic hyphomycete conidia in water were followed during a three-year study in two headwater streams at Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, North Carolina, using the membrane-filtration technique. After a one-year pretreatment period, one of the streams was enriched continuously with inorganic nutrients (N+P) for two years while the other stream served as the reference. This ecosystem-level nutrient manipulation resulted in concentrations of aquatic hyphomycete conidia in the water of the treated stream that were 4.5-6.9 times higher than the concentrations observed during the pretreatment period and in the reference stream. Nutrient enrichment led to an increase in the number of fungal species detected on each sampling date. Changes in dominance patterns and relative abundances of individual species also were detected after treatment. Nutrient addition stimulates the reproductive activity of aquatic hyphomycetes, their colonization success and fungal-mediated leaf-litter decomposition. Such changes in the activity of the fungal community might affect higher trophic levels in lotic ecosystems.

  12. Groundwater nutrient concentrations during prairie reconstruction on an Iowa landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomer, M.D.; Schilling, K.E.; Cambardella, C.A.; Jacobson, P.; Drobney, P.

    2010-01-01

    One anticipated benefit of ecosystem restoration is water quality improvement. This study evaluated NO3-N and phosphorus in subsurface waters during prairie establishment following decades of row-crop agriculture. A prairie seeding in late 2003 became established in 2006. Wells and suction cup samplers were monitored for NO3-N and phosphorus. Nitrate-N varied with time and landscape position. Non-detectable NO3-N concentrations became modal along ephemeral drainageways in 2006, when average concentrations in uplands first became <10mg NO3-NL-1. This decline continued and upland groundwater averaged near 2mg NO3-NL-1 after 2007. The longer time lag in NO3-N response in uplands was attributed to greater quantities of leachable N in upland subsoils. Spatial differences in vadose-zone travel times were less important, considering water table dynamics. Phosphorus showed a contrasting landscape pattern, without any obvious temporal trend. Phosphorus was greatest along and near ephemeral drainageways. Sediment accumulation from upland agricultural erosion provided a source of P along drainageways, where shallow, reductive groundwater increased P solubility. Phosphorus exceeded eutrophication risk thresholds in these lower areas, where saturation-excess runoff could readily transport P to surface waters. Legacy impacts of past agricultural erosion and sedimentation may include soluble phosphorus in shallow groundwater, at sites prone to saturation-excess runoff. ?? 2010.

  13. Nonrecirculating Hydroponic System Suitable for Uptake Studies at Very Low Nutrient Concentrations 1

    PubMed Central

    Gutschick, Vincent P.; Kay, Lou Ellen

    1991-01-01

    We describe the mechanical, electronic, hydraulic, and structural design of a nonrecirculating hydroponic system. The system is particularly suited to studies at very low nutrient concentrations, for which on-line concentration monitoring methods either do not exist or are costly and limited to monitoring relatively few individual plants. Solutions are mixed automatically to chosen concentrations, which can be set differently for every pump fed from a master supply of deionized water and nutrient concentrates. Pumping rates can be varied over a 50-fold range, up to 400 liters per day, which suffices to maintain a number of large, post-seedling plants in rapid growth at (sub)micromolar levels of N and P. The outflow of each pump is divided among as many as 12 separate root chambers. In each chamber one may monitor uptake by individual plant roots or segments thereof, by measuring nutrient depletion in batch samples of solution. The system is constructed from nontoxic materials that do not adsorb nutrient ions; no transient shifts of nitrate and phosphate concentrations are observable at the submicromolar level. Nonrecirculation of solutions limits problems of pH shifts, microbial contamination, and cumulative imbalances in unmonitored nutrients. We note several disadvantages, principally related to high consumption of deionized water and solutes. The reciprocating pumps can be constructed inexpensively, particularly by the researcher. We also report previously unattainable control of passive temperature rise of chambers exposed to full sunlight, by use of white epoxy paint. PMID:16668100

  14. Upland disturbance affects headwater stream nutrients and suspended sediments during baseflow and stormflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Mulholland, P.J.; Maloney, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    Because catchment characteristics determine sediment and nutrient inputs to streams, upland disturbance can affect stream chemistry. Catchments at the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) experience a range of upland disturbance intensities due to spatial variability in the intensity of military training. We used this disturbance gradient to investigate the effects of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on stream chemistry. During baseflow, mean total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and mean inorganic suspended sediment (ISS) concentration increased with catchment disturbance intensity (TSS: R2 = 0.7, p = 0.005, range = 4.0-10.1 mg L-1; ISS: R2 = 0.71, p = 0.004, range = 2.04-7.3 mg L-1); dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.79, p = 0.001, range = 1.5-4.1 mg L-1) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration (R2 = 0.75, p = 0.008, range = 1.9-6.2 ??g L-1) decreased with increasing disturbance intensity; and ammonia (NH 4+), nitrate (NO3-), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were unrelated to disturbance intensity. The increase in TSS and ISS during storms was positively correlated with disturbance (R2 = 0.78 and 0.78, p = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively); mean maximum change in SRP during storms increased with disturbance (r = 0.7, p = 0.04); and mean maximum change in NO3- during storms was marginally correlated with disturbance (r = 0.58, p = 0.06). Soil characteristics were significant predictors of baseflow DOC, SRP, and Ca 2+, but were not correlated with suspended sediment fractions, any nitrogen species, or pH. Despite the largely intact riparian zones of these headwater streams, upland soil and vegetation disturbances had clear effects on stream chemistry during baseflow and stormflow conditions. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  15. Upland disturbance affects headwater stream nutrients and suspended sediments during baseflow and stormflow

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, Jeffrey N

    2006-01-01

    Because catchment characteristics determine sediment and nutrient inputs to streams, upland disturbance can affect stream chemistry. Catchments at the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) experience a range of upland disturbance intensities due to spatial variability in the intensity of military training. We used this disturbance gradient to investigate the effects of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on stream chemistry. During baseflow, mean total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and mean inorganic suspended sediment (ISS) concentration increased with catchment disturbance intensity (TSS: R 2 = 0.7, p = 0.005, range = 4.0-10.1 mg L-1; ISS: R 2 = 0.71, p = 0.004, range = 2.04-7.3 mg L-1); dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R 2 = 0.79, p = 0.001, range = 1.5-4.1 mg L-1) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration (R 2 = 0.75, p = 0.008, range = 1.9-6.2 {micro}g L-1) decreased with increasing disturbance intensity; and ammonia (NH4 +), nitrate (NO3 -), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were unrelated to disturbance intensity. The increase in TSS and ISS during storms was positively correlated with disturbance (R 2 = 0.78 and 0.78, p = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively); mean maximum change in SRP during storms increased with disturbance (r = 0.7, p = 0.04); and mean maximum change in NO3 - during storms was marginally correlated with disturbance (r = 0.58, p = 0.06). Soil characteristics were significant predictors of baseflow DOC, SRP, and Ca2+, but were not correlated with suspended sediment fractions, any nitrogen species, or pH. Despite the largely intact riparian zones of these headwater streams, upland soil and vegetation disturbances had clear effects on stream chemistry during baseflow and stormflow conditions.

  16. Fruit and vegetable intakes in relation to plasma nutrient concentrations in women in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Frankenfeld, Cara L.; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shannon, Jackilen; Gao, Dao L.; Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Chen, Chu; King, Irena B.; Thomas, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the validity of fruit and vegetable intake, using three classification schemes, as it relates to plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations among Chinese women. Design Intakes were calculated from an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire. Fruits and vegetables, botanical groups, and high-nutrient groups were evaluated. These three classification schemes were compared with plasma carotenoid and vitamin C concentrations from blood drawn within one week of questionnaire completion. Setting Shanghai, China Subjects Participants (n=2031) were drawn from women who participated in a case-control study of diet and breast diseases nested within a randomized trial of breast self-examination among textile workers (n=266,064) Results Fruit intake was significantly (p<0.05) and positively associated with plasma concentrations of α-tocopherol, β-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, α-carotene, β-carotene, retinyl palmitate, and vitamin C. Fruit intake was inversely associated with γ-tocopherol and lutein+zeaxanthin concentrations. Vegetable consumption was significantly and positively associated with γ-tocopherol, and β-cryptoxanthin concentrations. Each botanical and high-nutrient group was also significantly associated with particular plasma nutrient concentrations. Fruit and vegetable intake and most plasma nutrient concentrations were significantly associated with season of interview. Conclusions These results suggest that the manner in which fruits and vegetables are grouped provides different plasma nutrient exposure information, which may be an important consideration when testing and generating hypotheses regarding disease risk in relation to diet. Interview season should be considered when evaluating associations of reported intake and plasma nutrients with disease outcomes. PMID:21729475

  17. Decadal and seasonal trends of nutrient concentration and export from highly managed coastal catchments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yongshan; Wan, Lei; Li, Yuncong; Doering, Peter

    2017-03-02

    Understanding anthropogenic and hydro-climatic influences on nutrient concentrations and export from highly managed catchments often necessitates trend detection using long-term monitoring data. This study analyzed the temporal trend (1979-2014) of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations and export from four adjacent coastal basins in south Florida where land and water resources are highly managed through an intricate canal network. The method of integrated seasonal-trend decomposition using LOESS (LOcally weighted regrESSion) was employed for trend detection. The results indicated that long-term trends in TN and TP concentrations (increasing/decreasing) varied with basins and nutrient species, reflecting the influence of basin specific land and water management practices. These long-term trends were intervened by short-term highs driven by high rainfall and discharges and lows associated with regional droughts. Seasonal variations in TP were more apparent than for TN. Nutrient export exhibited a chemostatic behavior for TN from all the basins, largely due to the biogenic nature of organic N associated with the ubiquity of organic materials in the managed canal network. Varying degrees of chemodynamic export was present for TP, reflecting complex biogeochemical responses to the legacy of long-term fertilization, low soil P holding capacity, and intensive stormwater management. The anthropogenic and hydro-climatic influences on nutrient concentration and export behavior had great implications in nutrient loading abatement strategies for aquatic ecosystem restoration of the downstream receiving waterbody.

  18. Nutrient concentrations in coarse and fine woody debris of Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary forest harvesting practices, specifically harvesting woody biomass as a source of bioenergy feedstock, may remove more woody debris from a site than conventional harvesting. Woody debris, particularly smaller diameter woody debris, plays a key role in maintaining ecosystem nutrient stores following disturbance. Understanding nutrient concentrations within woody debris is necessary for assessing the long-term nutrient balance consequences of altered woody debris retention, particularly in forests slated for use as bioenergy feedstocks. Nutrient concentrations in downed woody debris of various sizes, decay classes, and species were characterized within one such forest type, Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Nutrient concentrations differed significantly between size and decay classes and generally increased as decay progressed. Fine woody debris (≤ 7.5 cm diameter) had higher nutrient concentrations than coarse woody debris (> 7.5 cm diameter) for all nutrients examined except Na and Mn, and nutrient concentrations varied among species. Concentrations of N, Mn, Al, Fe, and Zn in coarse woody debris increased between one and three orders of magnitude, while K decreased by an order of magnitude with progressing decay. The variations in nutrient concentrations observed here underscore the complexity of woody debris nutrient stores in forested ecosystems and suggest that retaining fine woody debris at harvest may provide a potentially important source of nutrients following intensive removals of bioenergy feedstocks.

  19. Long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunaka, S.; Ono, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Whitney, F. A.; Wada, C.; Murata, A.; Nakaoka, S.; Hosoda, S.

    2016-04-01

    We present the spatial distributions and temporal changes of the long-term variability of surface nutrient concentrations in the North Pacific by using nutrient samples collected by volunteer ships and research vessels from 1961 to 2012. Nutrient samples are optimally interpolated onto 1° × 1° monthly grid boxes. When the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the western North Pacific are significantly higher than the climatological means, and those in the eastern North Pacific are significantly lower. When the North Pacific Gyre Oscillation is in its positive phase, nutrient concentrations in the subarctic are significantly higher than the climatological means. The trends of phosphate and silicate averaged over the North Pacific are -0.012 ± 0.005 µmol l-1 decade-1 and -0.38 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1, whereas the nitrate trend is not significant (0.01 ± 0.13 µmol l-1 decade-1).

  20. Notable increases in nutrient concentrations in a shallow lake during seasonal ice growth.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yang; Changyou, Li; Leppäranta, Matti; Xiaonghong, Shi; Shengnan, Zhao; Chengfu, Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Nutrients may be eliminated from ice when liquid water is freezing, resulting in enhanced concentrations in the unfrozen water. The nutrients diluted from the ice may contribute to accumulated concentrations in sediment during winter and an increased risk of algae blooms during the following spring and summer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of ice cover on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in the water and sediment of a shallow lake, through an examination of Ulansuhai Lake, northern China, from the period of open water to ice season in 2011-2013. The N and P concentrations were between two and five times higher, and between two and eight times higher, than in unfrozen lakes, respectively. As the ice thickness grew, contents of total N and total P showed C-shaped profiles in the ice, and were lower in the middle layer and higher in the bottom and surface layers. Most of the nutrients were released from the ice to liquid water. The results confirm that ice can cause the nutrient concentrations in water and sediment during winter to increase dramatically, thereby significantly impacting on processes in the water environment of shallow lakes.

  1. Solubility and Plant Availability of Nutrients as Affected by Soil Drainage Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn growth is affected due to oxygen deficiency and root death in a perched water table (PWT). The study objective was to evaluate a surface application of FGD gypsum (FGDG) and glyphosate (GLY) on nutrient uptake in corn with different drainage conditions. The experiment was conducted in greenhous...

  2. Pan-European modelling of riverine nutrient concentrations - spatial patterns, source detection, trend analyses, scenario modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosova, Alena; Arheimer, Berit; Capell, Rene; Donnelly, Chantal; Strömqvist, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient transport models are important tools for large scale assessments of macro-nutrient fluxes (nitrogen, phosphorus) and thus can serve as support tool for environmental assessment and management. Results from model applications over large areas, i.e. from major river basin to continental scales can fill a gap where monitoring data is not available. Here, we present results from the pan-European rainfall-runoff and nutrient transfer model E-HYPE, which is based on open data sources. We investigate the ability of the E-HYPE model to replicate the spatial and temporal variations found in observed time-series of riverine N and P concentrations, and illustrate the model usefulness for nutrient source detection, trend analyses, and scenario modelling. The results show spatial patterns in N concentration in rivers across Europe which can be used to further our understanding of nutrient issues across the European continent. E-HYPE results show hot spots with highest concentrations of total nitrogen in Western Europe along the North Sea coast. Source apportionment was performed to rank sources of nutrient inflow from land to sea along the European coast. An integrated dynamic model as E-HYPE also allows us to investigate impacts of climate change and measure programs, which was illustrated in a couple of scenarios for the Baltic Sea. Comparing model results with observations shows large uncertainty in many of the data sets and the assumptions used in the model set-up, e.g. point source release estimates. However, evaluation of model performance at a number of measurement sites in Europe shows that mean N concentration levels are generally well simulated. P levels are less well predicted which is expected as the variability of P concentrations in both time and space is higher. Comparing model performance with model set-ups using local data for the Weaver River (UK) did not result in systematically better model performance which highlights the complexity of model

  3. Yield, Quality, and Nutrient Concentrations of Strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch. cv. 'Sonata') Grown with Different Organic Fertilizer Strategies.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Bhaniswor; Laursen, Kristian Holst; Petersen, Karen Koefoed

    2015-06-17

    Four combinations of two solid organic fertilizers (Monterra Malt and chicken manure) applied before planting and two liquid organic fertilizers (broad bean and Pioner Hi-Fruit/K-Max) given through drip irrigation (fertigation) were compared with inorganic fertilization regarding growth, yield, nutrient concentration, and fruit quality of strawberries. Broad bean fertigation combined with Monterra Malt resulted in a similar fruit yield as inorganic fertilizer and a higher yield than Monterra Malt combined with Pioner; however, total soluble solids, firmness, and titratable acid were improved with Pioner fertigation, although these parameters were more affected by harvest time than the applied fertilizers. The concentrations of most nutrients in fruits and leaves were higher in inorganically fertigated plants. The reductions in fruit yield in three of four treatments and fruit weight in all organic treatments may be due to a combination of the following conditions in the root zone: (1) high pH and high NH4(+)/NO3(-) ratio; (2) high EC and/or high NaCl concentration; (3) cation imbalance; and (4) nutrient deficiency.

  4. Influence of calcium foliar fertilization on plant growth, nutrient concentrations, and fruit quality of papaya.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium (Ca) is a major plant nutrient that affects cell wall and plasma membrane formation and plays a key role in plant growth and biomass production. It can be used to decrease fruit decay and increase firmness and shelf life. So far, little attention has been paid to investigate the effects of f...

  5. High nutrient pulses, tidal mixing and biological response in a small California estuary: Variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caffrey, J.M.; Chapin, T.P.; Jannasch, H.W.; Haskins, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Elkhorn Slough is a small estuary in Central California, where nutrient inputs are dominated by runoff from agricultural row crops, a golf course, and residential development. We examined the variability in nutrient concentrations from decadal to hourly time scales in Elkhorn Slough to compare forcing by physical and biological factors. Hourly data were collected using in situ nitrate analyzers and water quality data sondes, and two decades of monthly monitoring data were analyzed. Nutrient concentrations increased from the mid 1970s to 1990s as pastures and woodlands were converted to row crops and population increased in the watershed. Climatic variability was also a significant factor controlling interannual nutrient variability, with higher nutrient concentrations during wet than drought years. Elkhorn Slough has a Mediterranean climate with dry and rainy seasons. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were relatively low (10-70 ??mol L-1) during the dry season and high (20-160 ??mol L-1) during the rainy season. Dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) concentrations showed the inverse pattern, with higher concentrations during the dry season. Pulsed runoff events were a consistent feature controlling nitrate concentrations during the rainy season. Peak nitrate concentrations lagged runoff events by 1 to 6 days. Tidal exchange with Monterey Bay was also an important process controlling nutrient concentrations, particularly near the mouth of the Slough. Biological processes had the greatest effect on nitrate concentrations during the dry season and were less important during the rainy season. While primary production was enhanced by nutrient pulses, chlorophyll a concentrations were not. We believe that the generally weak biological response compared to the strong physical forcing in Elkhorn Slough occurred because the short residence time and tidal mixing rapidly diluted nutrient pulses. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationships Among Watershed Condition, Nutrients, and Algae in New England Streams Affected by Urbanization

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined algal metrics as indicators of altered watershed land cover and nutrients to inform their potential use in monitoring programs. Multiple regression models, in which impervious cover explained the most variation, indicated concentrations <0.202 mg/l NO3 and <0.015 mg/l...

  7. NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS IN FLOWING WATERS OF THE SOUTH FORK BROAD RIVER, GEORGIA WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    We monitored concentrations of nutrients, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other parameters in 17 headwater streams, at three sites on the main stem, and in three major tributaries near their confluence with the South Fork Broad River on a monthly basis for over a year. Concent...

  8. RELATIONS BETWEEN LAND USE AND STREAM NUTRIENT CONCENTRATIONS FOR SMALL WATERSHEDS IN THE GEORGIA PIEDMONT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have been sampling nutrient concentrations in 17 headwater streams within the South Fork Broad River (SFBR) watershed on a monthly basis since November 2001. The streams were classified as either developed (n=4), agriculture/pasture (n=4), mixed land use (n=6) or forested (n=3...

  9. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes and nutrient concentrations in zooplankton: Indicators of anthropogenic influences on the Gulf of Aqaba?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J. Y.; Paytan, A.; Al-Najjar, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba is a narrow gulf surrounded by arid deserts and connected to the northern Red Sea via a shallow straight through which water is exchanged. It is an oligotrophic sea with high evaporation and low precipitation rates, and the low nutrient Red Sea surface waters are the primary source of water input into the gulf. The Gulf of Aqaba is characterized by strong seasonal fluctuations in primary production and phytoplankton biomass (Genin et al 1995, Lindell and Post 1995). Primary production in the gulf is unusually high compared with other warm oligotrophic seas under similar nutrient conditions. This may be sustained by external sources of nutrients and bio-limiting trace metals from sources such as aerosol deposition and groundwater input. In addition to aerosol and groundwater inputs, the northern Gulf coast is affected by anthropogenic influences, such as a phosphate loading perth, hotels, aquaculture and sewage leakage. Surface zooplankton samples were collected every month from January 2004 to December 2004 from one offshore station and eight coastal sites along the northern tip of the Gulf of Aqaba. Samples were size- fractionated, dried, homogenized, and analyzed for δ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), δ15N, and C/N as well as total phosphorus content and trace metal concentration. Preliminary data reveal differential influences from anthropogenic sources along the coast of the Gulf of Aqaba on surface water nutrient availability.

  10. Dietary L-carnitine affects periparturient nutrient metabolism and lactation in multiparous cows.

    PubMed

    Carlson, D B; McFadden, J W; D'Angelo, A; Woodworth, J C; Drackley, J K

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary L-carnitine supplementation on liver lipid accumulation, hepatic nutrient metabolism, and lactation in multiparous cows during the periparturient period. Cows were assigned to treatments at d -25 relative to expected calving date and remained on the experiment until 56 d in milk. Treatments were 4 amounts of supplemental dietary carnitine: control (0 g/d of L-carnitine; n = 14); low carnitine (LC, 6 g/d; n = 11); medium carnitine (MC, 50 g/d; n = 12); and high carnitine (HC, 100 g/d; n = 12). Carnitine was supplied by mixing a feed-grade carnitine supplement with 113.5 g of ground corn and 113.5 g of dried molasses, which was then fed twice daily as a topdress to achieve desired daily carnitine intakes. Carnitine supplementation began on d -14 relative to expected calving and continued until 21 d in milk. Liver and muscle carnitine concentrations were markedly increased by MC and HC treatments. Milk carnitine concentrations were elevated by all amounts of carnitine supplementation, but were greater for MC and HC than for LC during wk 2 of lactation. Dry matter intake and milk yield were decreased by the HC treatment. The MC and HC treatments increased milk fat concentration, although milk fat yield was unaffected. All carnitine treatments decreased liver total lipid and triacylglycerol accumulation on d 10 after calving. In addition, carnitine-supplemented cows had higher liver glycogen during early lactation. In general, carnitine supplementation increased in vitro palmitate beta-oxidation by liver slices, with MC and HC treatments affecting in vitro palmitate metabolism more potently than did LC. In vitro conversion of Ala to glucose by liver slices was increased by carnitine supplementation independent of dose. The concentration of nonesterified fatty acids in serum was not affected by carnitine. As a result of greater hepatic fatty acid beta-oxidation, plasma beta-hydroxybutyric acid was

  11. Intra-annual variation of the association between agricultural best management practices and stream nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Nolan J T; Yates, Adam G

    2017-05-15

    Temporal variation may influence the ability of best management practices (BMPs) to mitigate the loss of agricultural pollutants to streams. Our goal was to assess variation in mitigation effects of BMPs by examining the associations between instream nutrient concentrations and the abundance and location of four structural BMPs over a hydrologic year. Water samples were collected monthly (Nov. 2013-Oct. 2014) in 15 headwater streams representing a gradient of BMP use in Southern Ontario, Canada. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models were used to associate two groups of collinear nutrient forms with the abundance and location of BMPs, antecedent precipitation and time of year. BMP metrics in PLS models were associated with instream concentrations of major phosphorus forms and ammonium throughout the year. In contrast, total nitrogen and nitrate-nitrite were only associated with BMPs during snowmelt. BMP metrics associated with reductions of phosphorus and ammonium included greater abundances of riparian buffers and manure storage structures, but not livestock restriction fences. Likewise, the abundance and location riparian vegetation in areas capturing more surface runoff were associated with decreased stream nitrogen concentrations during snowmelt. However, the amount of tile drainage was associated with increased nitrogen concentrations following snowmelt, as well as with greater phosphorus and ammonium concentrations throughout the year. Overall, our findings indicate that increasing the abundance of riparian buffers and manure storage structures may decrease instream nutrient concentrations in agricultural areas. Additionally, the implementation of these structural BMPs appear to be an effective year-round strategy to assist management objectives in reducing phosphorus concentrations in small agricultural streams and thus loadings to downstream tributaries. Further mitigation measures, such as managerial BMPs and controlled tile drainage, may be

  12. Contribution of luminal concentration of nutrients and osmolality to postprandial intestinal hyperemia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kvietys, P R; Pittman, R P; Chou, C C

    1976-09-01

    Intestinal blood flow is increased during digestion. This study assesses if the concentration of nutrients and/or osmolality of chyme in the intestinal lumen are factors determining the hyperemia. Six digested food mixtures containing different concentrations of nutrients and/or having different osmolalities were placed into the jejunal lumen, and their effects on local venous outflow compared. The 100% (999 mOsm/kg), 33% (291 mOsm/kg), and 20% (183 mOsm/kg) food mixtures all increased flow, but the 10% food mixture (94 mOsm/kg) did not. The hyperemic effect of 33 and 20% food was similar, but 100% food produced a greater increase in flow than did 33 or 20% food. Luminal placement of a 30% solution of a nonabsorbable substance polyethylene glycol (1000 mOsm/kg) did not alter flow. Also, the vascular effects of 20 or 10% food mixtures were not altered when these mixtures were made isotonic by the addition of NaCl. These studies indicate that lumen osmolality, within a range of 180 to 1000 mOsm/kg, is not a significant factor contributing to the local hyperemia occurring when nutrients are in the gut lumen. However, the concentration of nutrients in the lumen is a factor determining the local hyperemia.

  13. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-02

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations.

  14. Seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents: the effects of tannin and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Yang, Xiaolan

    2015-04-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and seed plants have a long co-evolutionary history. Plants are believed to have evolved traits that influence the foraging behavior of rodents, thus increasing the probability of seed removal and caching, which benefits the establishment of seedlings. Tannin and nutrient content in seeds are considered among the most essential factors in this plant-animal interaction. However, most previous studies used different species of plant seeds, rendering it difficult to tease apart the relative effect of each single nutrient on rodent foraging behavior due to confounding combinations of nutrient contents across seed species. Hence, to further explore how tannin and different nutritional traits of seed affect scatter-hoarding rodent foraging preferences, we manipulated tannin, fat, protein and starch content levels, and also seed size levels by using an artificial seed system. Our results showed that both tannin and various nutrients significantly affected rodent foraging preferences, but were also strongly affected by seed size. In general, rodents preferred to remove seeds with less tannin. Fat addition could counteract the negative effect of tannin on seed removal by rodents, while the effect of protein addition was weaker. Starch by itself had no effect, but it interacted with tannin in a complex way. Our findings shed light on the effects of tannin and nutrient content on seed removal by scatter-hoarding rodents. We therefore, believe that these and perhaps other seed traits should interactively influence this important plant-rodent interaction. However, how selection operates on seed traits to counterbalance these competing interests/factors merits further study.

  15. Copper, lead and zinc concentrations of human breast milk as affected by maternal dietary practices

    SciTech Connect

    Umoren, J.; Kies, C.

    1986-03-01

    Maternal dietary practices have been found to affect the concentrations of some nutrients in human breast milk. Lead toxicity is a concern in young children. Lead, copper and zinc are thought to compete for intestinal absorption sites. The objective of the current project was to compare copper, lead and zinc contents of breast milk from practicing lacto-vegetarian and omnivore, lactating women at approximately four months post-partum. Analyses were done by atomic absorption spectrophotometry using a carbon rod attachment. Copper concentrations were higher in milk samples from lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Milk samples from the omnivores had the highest lead and zinc concentrations. Lead and copper concentrations in milk were negatively correlated. The higher zinc concentrations in the milk of the omnivore women may have been related to better utilization of zinc from meat than from plant food sources.

  16. Positional variation in grain mineral nutrients within a rice panicle and its relation to phytic acid concentration.

    PubMed

    Su, Da; Sultan, Faisal; Zhao, Ning-chun; Lei, Bing-ting; Wang, Fu-biao; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fang-min

    2014-11-01

    Six japonica rice genotypes, differing in panicle type, grain density, and phytic acid (PA) content, were applied to investigate the effect of grain position on the concentrations of major mineral nutrients and its relation to PA content and grain weight within a panicle. Grain position significantly affected the concentrations of the studied minerals in both the vertical and horizontal axes of a rice panicle. Heavy-weight grains, located on primary rachis and top rachis, generally had higher mineral concentrations, but were lower in PA concentration and molar ratios of PA/Zn, compared with the small-weight grains located on secondary rachis and bottom rachis, regardless of rice genotypes. However, on the basis of six rice genotypes, no significant correlations were found among mineral elements, PA, and grain weight. These results suggested that some desired minerals, like Zn and Fe, and their bioavailability, can be enhanced simultaneously by the modification of panicle patterns, and it will be helpful in the selection of rice genotypes with low PA and high mineral nutrients for further breeding strategy without sacrificing their high yields.

  17. Controls of suspended sediment concentration, nutrient content, and transport in a subtropical wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noe, G.B.; Harvey, J.W.; Schaffranek, R.W.; Larsen, L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Redistribution of largely organic sediment from low elevation sloughs to higher elevation ridges is a leading hypothesis for the formation and maintenance of the native ridge and slough landscape pattern found in peat wetlands of the Florida Everglades. We tested this redistribution hypothesis by measuring the concentration and characteristics of suspended sediment and its associated nutrients in the flowpaths of adjacent ridge and slough plant communities. Over two wet seasons we found no sustained differences in suspended sediment mass concentrations, particle-associated P and N concentrations, or sizes of suspended particles between ridge and slough sites. Discharge of suspended sediment, particulate nutrients, and solutes were nearly double in the slough flowpath compared to the ridge flowpath due solely to deeper and faster water flow in sloughs. Spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment were not related to water velocity, consistent with a hypothesis that the critical sheer stress causing entrainment is not commonly exceeded in the present-day managed Everglades. The uniformity in the concentrations and characteristics of suspended sediment at our research site suggests that sediment and particulate nutrient redistribution between ridges and sloughs does not occur, or rarely occurs, in the modern Everglades.

  18. Beaver Ponds Increase Methylmercury and Nutrients Concentrations in Canadian Shield Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, V.; Amyot, M.; Carignan, R.

    2007-12-01

    Beaver populations and the number of beaver dams are currently increasing in many Canadian regions. Since natural and anthropogenic impoundments have historically been identified as sources of the potent neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg), beaver dams could also increase MeHg levels in streams. During summer 2006, we collected water samples upstream and downstream from twenty beaver dams of the Laurentians, located on the Canadian Shield. Samples were analysed for total Hg, MeHg and other chemical variables including DOC, TP, TDP, TN, and major ions. Significant increases of nutrients (DOC, TP, TDP, TN) and ammonium concentrations and depletions of oxygen, nitrate and sulphate concentrations between inlet and outlet show that beaver ponds provide environmental conditions that can favour methylation of inorganic mercury. Heterogeneity of the ratio MeHg/THg at the outlet among our sites was well explained by the estimated age of the impoundment, with methylation capacity of beaver ponds decreasing with age. Further, the geographic location of beaver ponds influenced water chemistry at the outlet, as we observed a dichotomy between northern and southern sites; these differences were based mainly on forest composition. On average, beaver impoundments increased MeHg concentrations by 5.7 fold, total Hg concentrations by 1.6 fold and nutrients concentrations by 2-3 fold. Overall, our results suggest that beaver dams may considerably increase MeHg and nutrients levels in downstream ecosystems. The impact of beavers on the cycling of contaminants and nutrients in boreal watersheds should therefore be considered in the management of their populations.

  19. Misreporting of dietary intake affects estimated nutrient intakes in low-income Spanish-speaking women.

    PubMed

    Banna, Jinan C; Fialkowski, Marie K; Townsend, Marilyn S

    2015-07-01

    Misreporting of dietary intake affects the validity of data collected and conclusions drawn in studies exploring diet and health outcomes. One consequence of misreporting is biological implausibility. Little is known regarding how accounting for biological implausibility of reported intake affects nutrient intake estimates in Hispanics, a rapidly growing demographic in the United States. Our study explores the effect of accounting for plausibility on nutrient intake estimates in a sample of Mexican-American women in northern California in 2008. Nutrient intakes are compared with Dietary Reference Intake recommendations, and intakes of Mexican-American women in a national survey are presented as a reference. Eighty-two women provided three 24-hour recalls. Reported energy intakes were classified as biologically plausible or implausible using the reported energy intakes to total energy expenditure cutoff of <0.76 or >1.24, with low-active physical activity levels used to estimate total energy expenditure. Differences in the means of nutrient intakes between implausible (n=36) and plausible (n=46) reporters of energy intake were examined by bivariate linear regression. Estimated energy, protein, cholesterol, dietary fiber, and vitamin E intakes were significantly higher in plausible reporters than implausible. There was a significant difference between the proportions of plausible vs implausible reporters meeting recommendations for several nutrients, with a larger proportion of plausible reporters meeting recommendations. Further research related to misreporting in Hispanic populations is warranted to explore the causes and effects of misreporting in studies measuring dietary intake, as well as actions to be taken to prevent or account for this issue.

  20. Detritus Quality Controls Macrophyte Decomposition under Different Nutrient Concentrations in a Eutrophic Shallow Lake, North China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Cui, Baoshan; Yang, Qichun; Tian, Hanqin; Lan, Yan; Wang, Tingting; Han, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Macrophyte decomposition is important for carbon and nutrient cycling in lake ecosystems. Currently, little is known about how this process responds to detritus quality and water nutrient conditions in eutrophic shallow lakes in which incomplete decomposition of detritus accelerates the lake terrestrialization process. In this study, we investigated the effects of detritus quality and water nutrient concentrations on macrophyte decomposition in Lake Baiyangdian, China, by analyzing the decomposition of three major aquatic plants at three sites with different pollution intensities (low, medium, and high pollution sites). Detritus quality refers to detritus nutrient contents as well as C∶N, C∶P, and N∶P mass ratios in this study. Effects of detritus mixtures were tested by combining pairs of representative macrophytes at ratios of 75∶25, 50∶50 and 25∶75 (mass basis). The results indicate that the influence of species types on decomposition was stronger than that of site conditions. Correlation analysis showed that mass losses at the end of the experimental period were significantly controlled by initial detritus chemistry, especially by the initial phosphorus (P) content, carbon to nitrogen (C∶N), and carbon to phosphorus (C∶P) mass ratios in the detritus. The decomposition processes were also influenced by water chemistry. The NO3-N and NH4-N concentrations in the lake water retarded detritus mass loss at the low and high pollution sites, respectively. Net P mineralization in detritus was observed at all sites and detritus P release at the high pollution site was slower than at the other two sites. Nonadditive effects of mixtures tended to be species specific due to the different nutrient contents in each species. Results suggest that the nonadditive effects varied significantly among different sites, indicating that interactions between the detritus quality in species mixtures and site water chemistry may be another driver controlling decomposition

  1. Soybean tocopherol concentrations are affected by crop management.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Philippe; Tremblay, Gilles; Pageau, Denis; Liu, Wucheng

    2010-05-12

    Soybeans are an important source of tocopherols, which have health-beneficial properties. Previous studies have demonstrated that environmental factors may affect soybean tocopherol concentrations; the impact of specific crop management strategies, however, remains poorly understood. Experiments were conducted for 2 years at three sites in Quebec to determine the impact on soybean tocopherol concentrations of seeding rate, row spacing, seeding date, cultivar, and P and K fertilization. Total and alpha-, gamma-, and delta-tocopherol concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Overall, alpha-tocopherol was the most responsive to the factors evaluated; the response of other tocopherols was often lower or inconsistent across environments. The seeding rate affected alpha-tocopherol concentrations in three out of five environments; seeding at a rate of 40 seeds m(-2) resulted in 4% higher concentrations than seeding at a higher rate. Wide row spacing (more than 36 cm) resulted in two out of five environments in 6% higher alpha-tocopherol concentrations as compared to narrower row spacing. The seeding date had a greater impact; mid- to late-May seeding across four environments resulted in 45% greater alpha-tocopherol concentrations than seeding at later dates. Phosphorus and K fertilization had a negligible impact on tocopherol concentrations. Across experiments, large differences were observed between environments; plants grown in northern environments consistently had lower concentrations of alpha- and gamma-tocopherols but higher concentrations of delta-tocopherol. Differences between cultivars were also consistent, ranging between 10 and 30%, depending on the tocopherol. Results demonstrate that soybean tocopherol concentrations are affected by crop management and thus suggest that specific recommended agronomic practices may need to be established for the production of soybeans for the functional food market.

  2. Riparian and in-stream controls on nutrient concentrations and fluxes in a headwater forested stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, S.; Lupon, A.; Ribot, M.; Sabater, F.; Martí, E.

    2015-03-01

    Headwater streams are recipients of water sources draining through terrestrial ecosystems. At the same time, stream biota can transform and retain nutrients dissolved in stream water. Yet studies considering simultaneously these two sources of variation in stream nutrient chemistry are rare. To fill this gap of knowledge, we analyzed stream water and riparian groundwater concentrations and fluxes as well as in-stream net uptake rates for nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) along a 3.7 km reach on an annual basis. Chloride concentrations (used as conservative tracer) indicated a strong hydrological connection at the riparian-stream interface. However, stream and riparian groundwater nutrient concentrations showed a moderate to null correlation, suggesting high in-stream biogeochemical processing. In-stream net nutrient uptake (Fsw) was highly variable across contiguous segments and over time, but its temporal variation was not related to the vegetative period of the riparian forest. For NH4+, the occurrence of Fsw > 0 μg N m-1 s-1 (gross uptake > release) was high along the reach, while for NO3-, the occurrence of Fsw < 0 μg N m-1 s-1 (gross uptake < release) increased along the reach. Within segments and dates, Fsw, whether negative or positive, accounted for a median of 6, 18, and 20% of the inputs of NO3-, NH4+, and SRP, respectively. Whole-reach mass balance calculations indicated that in-stream net uptake reduced stream NH4+ flux up to 90%, while the stream acted mostly as a source of NO3- and SRP. During the dormant period, concentrations decreased along the reach for NO3-, but increased for NH4+ and SRP. During the vegetative period, NH4+ decreased, SRP increased, and NO3- showed a U-shaped pattern along the reach. These longitudinal trends resulted from the combination of hydrological mixing with terrestrial inputs and in-stream nutrient processing. Therefore, the assessment of these two sources of variation in stream

  3. Nutrient demand interacts with forage family to affect digestion responses in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-06-01

    Effects of forage family on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal pool sizes, digestion and passage kinetics, and chewing activity and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI), an index of nutrient demand, were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 19.6 to 29.5 kg/d (mean=25.9 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 24.3 to 60.3 kg/d (mean=42.1 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing either a) alfalfa silage (AL) or b) orchardgrass silage (OG) as the sole forage. Alfalfa and orchardgrass contained 42.3 and 58.2% neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and 22.5 and 11.4% crude protein, respectively. Forage:concentrate ratios were 60:40 and 43:57 for AL and OG, respectively; both diets contained approximately 25% forage NDF and 30% total NDF. Preliminary DMI was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of forage family and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Forage family and its interaction with pDMI did not affect feed intake, milk yield, or milk composition. The AL diet increased indigestible NDF (iNDF) intake and decreased potentially digestible NDF (pdNDF) intake compared with OG. The AL diet increased ruminal pH, digestion rates of pdNDF and starch, and passage rates of pdNDF and iNDF compared with OG, which affected ruminal digestibility. Passage rate of iNDF was related to pDMI; AL increased iNDF passage rate and OG decreased it as pDMI increased. The AL diet decreased ruminal pool sizes of pdNDF, starch, organic matter, dry matter, and rumen digesta wet weight and volume compared with OG. The AL diet decreased ruminating time per unit of forage NDF consumed compared with OG, indicating that alfalfa provided less physically effective

  4. Treating surface water with low nutrients concentration by mixed substrates constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun J; Wan, Ming H; Dong, Yang; Men, Zhen Y; Lin, Yan; Wu, De Y; Kong, Hai N

    2011-01-01

    Constructed wetland (CW) has been widely applied in nutrients reduction for eutrophication control, especially in the advanced treatment of effluent of municipal sewage plants or the in-lake river treatment with high hydraulic loads and low nutrient concentrations. But in real application, it shows lower nutrient removal efficiency. The main reason is that traditional substrates, such as soil and gravel have low capacity for nitrogen and phosphorus removal. This study aims to enhance nutrients removal in constructed wetland systems by using series of substrates including calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), vermiculite and ceramsite which are all investigated individually in static experiment or mixed in batch and continuous flow experiments. The result showed that the efficiency of phosphorus removal by CSH could reach 97%, much higher than the other substrates. However, when it was applied in CW, the removal efficiency decreased. Although vermiculite showed the highest ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency of 65.91%, the ammonia nitrogen removal efficiency may have depended on the action of microorganism. High total nitrogen removal efficiency was obtained in continuous-flow mixed substrate CW. Under a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 18h and hydraulic loading rate (HLR) of 0.496 m(3)/m(3).d, average total nitrogen removal efficiency of above 91% was achieved, but the average phosphorus removal efficiency was around 65% and this needs to be improved further.

  5. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and corresponding loads during the historic June 2008 flooding in eastern Iowa.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, L; Kolpin, D W; Kalkhoff, S J; Robertson, D M

    2011-01-01

    A combination of above-normal precipitation during the winter and spring of 2007-2008 and extensive rainfall during June 2008 led to severe flooding in many parts of the midwestern United States. This resulted in transport of substantial amounts of nutrients and sediment from Iowa basins into the Mississippi River. Water samples were collected from 31 sites on six large Iowa tributaries to the Mississippi River to characterize water quality and to quantify nutrient and sediment loads during this extreme discharge event. Each sample was analyzed for total nitrogen, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, dissolved ammonia as nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment. Concentrations measured near peak flow in June 2008 were compared with the corresponding mean concentrations from June 1979 to 2007 using a paired t test. While there was no consistent pattern in concentrations between historical samples and those from the 2008 flood, increased flow during the flood resulted in near-peak June 2008 flood daily loads that were statistically greater (p < 0.05) than the median June 1979 to 2007 daily loads for all constituents. Estimates of loads for the 16-d period during the flood were calculated for four major tributaries and totaled 4.95 x 10(7) kg of nitrogen (N) and 2.9 x 10(6) kg of phosphorus (P) leaving Iowa, which accounted for about 22 and 46% of the total average annual nutrient yield, respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of large flood events to the total annual nutrient load in both small streams and large rivers.

  6. Nutrient and sediment concentrations and corresponding loads during the historic June 2008 flooding in eastern Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, L.; Kolpin, D.W.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Robertson, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of above-normal precipitation during the winter and spring of 2007-2008 and extensive rainfall during June 2008 led to severe flooding in many parts of the midwestern United States. This resulted in transport of substantial amounts of nutrients and sediment from Iowa basins into the Mississippi River. Water samples were collected from 31 sites on six large Iowa tributaries to the Mississippi River to characterize water quality and to quantify nutrient and sediment loads during this extreme discharge event. Each sample was analyzed for total nitrogen, dissolved nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, dissolved ammonia as nitrogen, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and suspended sediment. Concentrations measured near peak flow in June 2008 were compared with the corresponding mean concentrations from June 1979 to 2007 using a paired t test. While there was no consistent pattern in concentrations between historical samples and those from the 2008 flood, increased flow during the flood resulted in near-peak June 2008 flood daily loads that were statistically greater (p < 0.05) than the median June 1979 to 2007 daily loads for all constituents. Estimates of loads for the 16-d period during the flood were calculated for four major tributaries and totaled 4.95 x 10(7) kg of nitrogen (N) and 2.9 x 10(6) kg of phosphorus (P) leaving Iowa, which accounted for about 22 and 46% of the total average annual nutrient yield, respectively. This study demonstrates the importance of large flood events to the total annual nutrient load in both small streams and large rivers.

  7. Characterizing the Effects of Stormwater Mitigation on Nutrient Export and Stream Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin D; McMillan, Sara K; Clinton, Sandra M; Jefferson, Anne J

    2017-04-01

    Urbanization increases nutrient loading and lowers residence times for processing of reactive solutes, including nitrate, total dissolved nitrogen, orthophosphate, and dissolved organic carbon), which leads to increased stream concentrations and mass export. Stormwater control measures mitigate the impacts of urbanization, and have the potential to improve stream water quality, however the net effect instream is not well understood. We monitored two urban and two suburban watersheds in Charlotte, NC to determine if mitigation controlled the fraction of total mass export during storm, if development classification as either urban or suburban (defined by the age, density and distribution of urban development) controlled storm nutrient and carbon dynamics, and if stormwater control measures were able to change stream water chemistry. While average concentrations during stormflow were generally greater than baseflow, indicating that storms are important times of solute export, the fraction of storm-derived export was unrelated to mitigation by stormwater control measures. Development classification was generally not an important control on export of N and dissolved organic carbon. However, event mean concentrations of orthophosphate were higher at the suburban sites, possibly from greater fertilizer application. Stormwater control measures influenced instream water chemistry at only one site, which also had the greatest mitigated area, but differences between stormwater control measure outflow and stream water suggest the potential for water quality improvements. Together, results suggest stormwater control measures have the potential to decrease solute concentrations from urban runoff, but the type, location, and extent of urban development in the watershed may influence the magnitude of this effect.

  8. Direct measurement of nutrient concentrations in freshwaters with a miniaturized analytical probe: evaluation and validation.

    PubMed

    Copetti, D; Valsecchi, L; Capodaglio, A G; Tartari, G

    2017-04-01

    This work deals with the evaluation of the aqueous concentrations of dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP), total phosphorus (TP), and ammonium nitrogen (N-NH4) in surface water by means of direct online instrumentation. A portable, submersible, and automated analyzer designed to measure dissolved and total nutrient concentrations characterized by miniaturization of the entire analytical process was tested against laboratory methods. A total number of 36 water samples of different origin (i.e., rain, river, lake, and sewage waters) were analyzed and used in the comparison of DRP, TP, and N-NH4 data. Raw data were distributed in a broad range of concentrations: 5-299 μg P/L for DRP, 7-97 μg P/L for TP, and 11-332 μg N/L for N-NH4. Regression analysis underlined a high significant correlation between the measures of the probe and those of the laboratory (0.6 < R (2) < 0.9; p < 0.001) and pointed out the effectiveness of the new instrument in representing a broad range of nutrient concentrations.

  9. Characterizing the Effects of Stormwater Mitigation on Nutrient Export and Stream Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Colin D.; McMillan, Sara K.; Clinton, Sandra M.; Jefferson, Anne J.

    2017-04-01

    Urbanization increases nutrient loading and lowers residence times for processing of reactive solutes, including nitrate, total dissolved nitrogen, orthophosphate, and dissolved organic carbon), which leads to increased stream concentrations and mass export. Stormwater control measures mitigate the impacts of urbanization, and have the potential to improve stream water quality, however the net effect instream is not well understood. We monitored two urban and two suburban watersheds in Charlotte, NC to determine if mitigation controlled the fraction of total mass export during storm, if development classification as either urban or suburban (defined by the age, density and distribution of urban development) controlled storm nutrient and carbon dynamics, and if stormwater control measures were able to change stream water chemistry. While average concentrations during stormflow were generally greater than baseflow, indicating that storms are important times of solute export, the fraction of storm-derived export was unrelated to mitigation by stormwater control measures. Development classification was generally not an important control on export of N and dissolved organic carbon. However, event mean concentrations of orthophosphate were higher at the suburban sites, possibly from greater fertilizer application. Stormwater control measures influenced instream water chemistry at only one site, which also had the greatest mitigated area, but differences between stormwater control measure outflow and stream water suggest the potential for water quality improvements. Together, results suggest stormwater control measures have the potential to decrease solute concentrations from urban runoff, but the type, location, and extent of urban development in the watershed may influence the magnitude of this effect.

  10. Variability in the contents of pork meat nutrients and how it may affect food composition databases.

    PubMed

    Reig, Milagro; Aristoy, M-Concepción; Toldrá, Fidel

    2013-10-01

    Pork meat is generally recognised as a food with relevant nutritional properties because of its content in high biological value proteins, group B vitamins, minerals especially heme iron, trace elements and other bioactive compounds. But pork meat also contributes to the intake of fat, saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and other substances that, in inappropriate amounts, may result in negative physiologically effects. However, there are relevant factors affecting the content of many of these substances and somehow such variability should be taken into consideration. So, genetics, age and even type of muscle have a relevant influence on the amount of fat and the contents in heme iron. Also the composition in fatty acids of triacylglycerols is very sensitive to the contents of cereals in the feed; for instance, polyunsaturated fatty acids may range from 10% to 22% in pork meat. The content of other nutrients, like vitamins E and A, are also depending on the type of feed. Some bioactive substances like coenzyme Q10, taurine, glutamine, creatine, creatinine, carnosine and anserine show a large dependence on the type of muscle. This manuscript describes the main factors affecting the composition of pork meat nutrients and how these changes may affect the general food composition databases.

  11. Select nutrients, progesterone, and interferon tau affect conceptus metabolism and development.

    PubMed

    Bazer, Fuller W; Kim, Jingyoung; Song, Gwonhwa; Ka, Hakhyun; Tekwe, Carmen D; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-10-01

    Interferon tau (IFNT), a novel multifunctional type I interferon secreted by trophectoderm, is the pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants that also has antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory bioactivities. IFNT, with progesterone, affects availability of the metabolic substrate in the uterine lumen by inducing expression of genes for transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen that activate mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cell signaling responsible for proliferation, migration, and protein synthesis by conceptus trophectoderm. As an immunomodulatory protein, IFNT induces an anti-inflammatory state affecting metabolic events that decrease adiposity and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase 1 activity, while increasing insulin sensitivity, nitric oxide production by endothelial cells, and brown adipose tissue in rats. This short review focuses on effects of IFNT and progesterone affecting transport of select nutrients into the uterine lumen to stimulate mTOR cell signaling required for conceptus development, as well as effects of IFNT on the immune system and adiposity in rats with respect to its potential therapeutic value in reducing obesity.

  12. Relation of nutrient concentrations, nutrient loading, and algal production to changes in water levels in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota, 2008-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Maki, Ryan P.; Kiesling, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrient enrichment has led to excessive algal growth in Kabetogama Lake, Voyageurs National Park, northern Minnesota. Water- and sediment-quality data were collected during 2008-09 to assess internal and external nutrient loading. Data collection was focused in Kabetogama Lake and its inflows, the area of greatest concern for eutrophication among the lakes of Voyageurs National Park. Nutrient and algal data were used to determine trophic status and were evaluated in relation to changes in Kabetogama Lake water levels following changes to dam operation starting in 2000. Analyses were used to estimate external nutrient loading at inflows and assess the potential contribution of internal phosphorus loading. Kabetogama Lake often was mixed vertically, except for a few occasionally stratified areas, including Lost Bay in the northeastern part of Kabetogama Lake. Stratification, combined with larger bottom-water nutrient concentrations, larger sediment phosphorus concentrations, and estimated phosphorus release rates from sediment cores indicate that Lost Bay may be one of several areas that may be contributing substantially to internal loading. Internal loading is a concern because nutrients may cause excessive algal growth including potentially toxic cyanobacteria. The cyanobacterial hepatotoxin, microcystin, was detected in 7 of 14 cyanobacterial bloom samples, with total concentrations exceeding 1.0 microgram per liter, the World Health Organization's guideline for finished drinking water for the congener, microcystin-LR. Comparisons of the results of this study to previous studies indicate that chlorophyll-a concentrations and trophic state indices have improved since 2000, when the rules governing dam operation changed. However, total-phosphorus concentrations have not changed significantly since 2000.

  13. Effect of nutrient supplementation of crude or detoxified concentrated distilled grape marc hemicellulosic hydrolysates on the xylitol production by Debaryomyces hansenii.

    PubMed

    Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Biosynthesis of xylitol using the yeast Debaryomyces hansenii NRRL Y-7426 was carried out using distilled grape marc (DGM) hemicellulosic hydrolysates directly concentrated by vacuum evaporation or after detoxification with activated charcoal. The effect of nutrient supplementation with vinasses, corn steep liquor (CSL) or commercial nutrients was explored. Using crude concentrated hemicellulosic hydrolysates, the maximum xylitol concentration, 11.3 g/L, was achieved after 172 hr (Q ( xylitol ) = 0.066 g/L-hr; Y ( xylitol ) (/SC) = 0.21 g/g); meanwhile, using detoxified concentrated hydrolysates, the concentration increased up to 19.7 g/L after 72 hr (Q ( xylitol ) = 0.274 g/L-hr; Y ( xylitol ) (/SC) = 0.38 g/g). On the other hand, using crude or detoxified hydrolysates, the xylose-to-xylitol bioconversion was strongly affected by the addition of nutrients, suggesting that these hydrolysates present essential nutrients favouring the growth of D. hansenii.

  14. Hydroperiod affects nutrient accumulation in tree islands of the Florida Everglades: a stable isotope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Sternberg, L. O.; Engel, V.; Ross, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    Tree islands are important and unique components of wetland ecosystems. In many cases they are the end product of self organizing vegetation systems, which are often characterized by uneven soil nutrient distributions. Tree islands in the Everglades are phosphorus rich in contrast to the phosphorus-poor surrounding vegetation matrix. Everglades tree islands occur in the ridge-slough habitat of Shark River Slough, which is characterized by deep organic soils, multi-year hydroperiods, and maximum water depths of ~ 1 m. Tree islands are also found in the drier marl prairie habitat of the Everglades, characterized by marl soils, shallow water (< 0.5 m) and short (< 180 day) hydroperiods. In this study we used stable isotopes to investigate dry season water limitation and soil and foliar nutrient status in upland hammock communities of 18 different tree islands located in the Shark River Slough and adjacent prairie landscapes. We observed that prairie tree islands suffer greater drought stress during the dry season than slough tree islands by examining shifts in foliar δ13C values. We also found that slough tree islands have higher soil total phosphorus concentration and lower foliar N/P ratio than prairie tree islands. Foliar δ15N values, which often increase with greater P availability, was also found to be higher in slough tree islands than in prairie tree islands. Both the elemental N and P and foliar δ15N results indicate that the upland hammock plant communities in slough tree islands have higher amount of P available than those in prairie tree islands. Our findings are consistent with the transpiration driven nutrient harvesting chemohydrodynamic model. Tree islands without drought stress hypothetically transpire more and harvest more P than tree islands that have drought stress during the dry season. These findings suggest that hydroperiod is important to nutrient accumulation of tree island habitats and to the self-organization of the Everglades landscape.

  15. Concentration is not enough to evaluate accumulation of heavy metals and nutrients in plants.

    PubMed

    Vymazal, Jan

    2016-02-15

    Wetland plants produce high aboveground biomass and possess the ability to accumulate heavy metals and nutrients. This ability is used for phytoremediation purposes including removal of nutrients and heavy metals from polluted waters. The concentrations of heavy metals are usually much higher in the belowground then in aboveground biomass, especially in roots which are primary sites of uptake. This may lead to the conclusion that accumulation of heavy metals is higher in the belowground biomass. However, in case the aboveground is much higher than belowground biomass the accumulation could be higher in the aboveground biomass. Concentration of nitrogen and phosphorus is always higher in leaves than in stems. However, the stem biomass is often much higher in robust emergent species such as Phragmites australis and therefore, more nutrients can be stored in stems. The examples shown in this communication clearly reveal that to evaluate properly the accumulation of heavy metals and nutrients in particular plant compartment biomass amount must be taken into consideration. In the first study, concentrations of Cd, Cr and Hg in Phalaris arundinacea belowground/aboveground biomass were 150/80 μg/kg, 5420/228 μg/kg and 38/18 μg/kg. The high aboveground biomass (1196 g/m(2)) and low belowground biomass (244 g/(2)) resulted in much higher accumulation of Cd and Hg in aboveground biomass (96 μg/m(2) and 21.2 μg/m(2), respectively) than in belowground biomass (36 μg/m(2) and 9.3 μg/m(2), respectively). Only for chromium, belowground accumulation (1312 μg/m(2)) was higher than aboveground accumulation (272 μg/m(2)). In the second study, both nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were higher (26.7 mg/g and 749 mg/kg, respectively) in leaves than in stems (8.2mg/g and 534 mg/kg, respectively) of P. australis. The higher biomass of stems (1835 g/m(2)) than leaves (967 g/m(2)) resulted in higher accumulation of nitrogen but lower accumulation of phosphorus in leaves as

  16. Effects of nitrogen fertilization on soil nutrient concentration and phosphatase activity and forage nutrient uptake from a grazed pasture system.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Sandra Leanne; Wood, Charles Wesley; Wood, Brenda Hall; Feng, Yucheng; Owsley, Walter Frank; Muntifering, Russell Brian

    2015-05-01

    Over a 3-year period, the effect of differing N-application regimes on soil extractable-P concentration, soil phosphatase activity, and forage P uptake in a P-enriched grazed-pasture system was investigated. In the fall of each year, six 0.28-ha plots were overseeded with triticale ( × Triticosecale rimpaui Wittm.) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum) into a tall fescue (Lolium arundinacea)/bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) sod and assigned to 1 of 3 N-fertilizer treatments (n = 2): 100% of N recommendation in a split application (100N), 50% in a single application (50N), and 0% of N recommendation (0N) for triticale. Cattle commenced grazing the following spring and grazed until May. In the summer, plots were overseeded with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), fertilized at the same rates by reference to N recommendations for bermudagrass, and grazed by cattle until September. There were no effects of N fertilization on soil phosphatase activity, electrical conductivity, or concentrations of water-soluble P. Concentrations of extractable P decreased in plots receiving 50N, but increasing N fertilization to 100N resulted in no further reduction in extractable P. Forage biomass, foliar P concentrations, and forage P mass were not affected by N fertilization rates at the plant-community level, but responses were observed within individual forage species. Results are interpreted to mean that N fertilization at 50% of the agronomic recommendation for the grass component can increase forage P mass of specific forages and decrease soil extractable P, thus providing opportunity for decreasing P losses from grazed pasture.

  17. Micro and Macroscale Drivers of Nutrient Concentrations in Urban Streams in South, Central and North America.

    PubMed

    Loiselle, Steven A; Gasparini Fernandes Cunha, Davi; Shupe, Scott; Valiente, Elsa; Rocha, Luciana; Heasley, Eleanore; Belmont, Patricia Pérez; Baruch, Avinoam

    Global metrics of land cover and land use provide a fundamental basis to examine the spatial variability of human-induced impacts on freshwater ecosystems. However, microscale processes and site specific conditions related to bank vegetation, pollution sources, adjacent land use and water uses can have important influences on ecosystem conditions, in particular in smaller tributary rivers. Compared to larger order rivers, these low-order streams and rivers are more numerous, yet often under-monitored. The present study explored the relationship of nutrient concentrations in 150 streams in 57 hydrological basins in South, Central and North America (Buenos Aires, Curitiba, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City and Vancouver) with macroscale information available from global datasets and microscale data acquired by trained citizen scientists. Average sub-basin phosphate (P-PO4) concentrations were found to be well correlated with sub-basin attributes on both macro and microscales, while the relationships between sub-basin attributes and nitrate (N-NO3) concentrations were limited. A phosphate threshold for eutrophic conditions (>0.1 mg L-1 P-PO4) was exceeded in basins where microscale point source discharge points (eg. residential, industrial, urban/road) were identified in more than 86% of stream reaches monitored by citizen scientists. The presence of bankside vegetation covaried (rho = -0.53) with lower phosphate concentrations in the ecosystems studied. Macroscale information on nutrient loading allowed for a strong separation between basins with and without eutrophic conditions. Most importantly, the combination of macroscale and microscale information acquired increased our ability to explain sub-basin variability of P-PO4 concentrations. The identification of microscale point sources and bank vegetation conditions by citizen scientists provided important information that local authorities could use to improve their management of lower order river ecosystems.

  18. Micro and Macroscale Drivers of Nutrient Concentrations in Urban Streams in South, Central and North America

    PubMed Central

    Loiselle, Steven A.; Gasparini Fernandes Cunha, Davi; Shupe, Scott; Valiente, Elsa; Rocha, Luciana; Heasley, Eleanore; Belmont, Patricia Pérez; Baruch, Avinoam

    2016-01-01

    Global metrics of land cover and land use provide a fundamental basis to examine the spatial variability of human-induced impacts on freshwater ecosystems. However, microscale processes and site specific conditions related to bank vegetation, pollution sources, adjacent land use and water uses can have important influences on ecosystem conditions, in particular in smaller tributary rivers. Compared to larger order rivers, these low-order streams and rivers are more numerous, yet often under-monitored. The present study explored the relationship of nutrient concentrations in 150 streams in 57 hydrological basins in South, Central and North America (Buenos Aires, Curitiba, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City and Vancouver) with macroscale information available from global datasets and microscale data acquired by trained citizen scientists. Average sub-basin phosphate (P-PO4) concentrations were found to be well correlated with sub-basin attributes on both macro and microscales, while the relationships between sub-basin attributes and nitrate (N-NO3) concentrations were limited. A phosphate threshold for eutrophic conditions (>0.1 mg L-1 P-PO4) was exceeded in basins where microscale point source discharge points (eg. residential, industrial, urban/road) were identified in more than 86% of stream reaches monitored by citizen scientists. The presence of bankside vegetation covaried (rho = –0.53) with lower phosphate concentrations in the ecosystems studied. Macroscale information on nutrient loading allowed for a strong separation between basins with and without eutrophic conditions. Most importantly, the combination of macroscale and microscale information acquired increased our ability to explain sub-basin variability of P-PO4 concentrations. The identification of microscale point sources and bank vegetation conditions by citizen scientists provided important information that local authorities could use to improve their management of lower order river

  19. Distributions of median nutrient and chlorophyll concentrations across the Red River Basin, USA.

    PubMed

    Longing, D; Haggard, B E

    2010-01-01

    Acquisition and compilation of water-quality data for an 11-yr time period (1996-2006) from 589 stream and river stations were conducted to support nutrient criteria development for the multistate Red River Basin shared by Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas. Ten water-quality parameters were collected from six data sources (USGS, Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality, Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, Oklahoma Conservation Commission, Oklahoma Water Resources Board, and Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), and an additional 13 parameters were acquired from at least one source. Median concentrations of water-quality parameters were calculated at each individual station and frequency distributions (minimum, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th percentiles, and maximum) of the median concentrations were calculated. Across the Red River Basin, median values for total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and sestonic chlorophyll-a (chl-a) ranged from < 0.02 to 20.2 mg L(-1), < 0.01 to 6.66 mg L(-1), and 0.10 to 262 microg L(-1), respectively. Overall, the 25th percentiles of TN data specific to the Red River Basin were generally similar to the USEPA-recommended ecoregion nutrient criteria of 0.31 to 0.88 mg L(-1), whereas median TP and chl-a data specific to the Red River Basin showed 25th percentiles higher than the USEPA-recommended criteria (0.010-0.067 mg TP L(-1); 0.93-3.00 microg chl-a L(-1)). The unique location of the Red River Basin in the south-central United States places it near the boundaries of several aggregate ecoregions; therefore, the development of ecoregion nutrient criteria likely requires using data specific to the Red River Basin, as shown in these analyses. This study provided basin-specific frequency distribution of median concentrations of water-quality parameters as the first step to support states in developing nutrient criteria to protect designated uses in the multijurisdictional Red River Basin.

  20. Glyphosate-based herbicides reduce the activity and reproduction of earthworms and lead to increased soil nutrient concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Hofer, Martin; Rewald, Boris; Zaller, Johann G.

    2015-01-01

    Herbicide use is increasing worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. However, our knowledge of potential side-effects on non-target soil organisms, even on such eminent ones as earthworms, is still very scarce. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the impact of the most widely used glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup on two earthworm species with different feeding strategies. We demonstrate, that the surface casting activity of vertically burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) almost ceased three weeks after herbicide application, while the activity of soil dwelling earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) was not affected. Reproduction of the soil dwellers was reduced by 56% within three months after herbicide application. Herbicide application led to increased soil concentrations of nitrate by 1592% and phosphate by 127%, pointing to potential risks for nutrient leaching into streams, lakes, or groundwater aquifers. These sizeable herbicide-induced impacts on agroecosystems are particularly worrisome because these herbicides have been globally used for decades. PMID:26243044

  1. Glyphosate-based herbicides reduce the activity and reproduction of earthworms and lead to increased soil nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gaupp-Berghausen, Mailin; Hofer, Martin; Rewald, Boris; Zaller, Johann G

    2015-08-05

    Herbicide use is increasing worldwide both in agriculture and private gardens. However, our knowledge of potential side-effects on non-target soil organisms, even on such eminent ones as earthworms, is still very scarce. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the impact of the most widely used glyphosate-based herbicide Roundup on two earthworm species with different feeding strategies. We demonstrate, that the surface casting activity of vertically burrowing earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) almost ceased three weeks after herbicide application, while the activity of soil dwelling earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) was not affected. Reproduction of the soil dwellers was reduced by 56% within three months after herbicide application. Herbicide application led to increased soil concentrations of nitrate by 1592% and phosphate by 127%, pointing to potential risks for nutrient leaching into streams, lakes, or groundwater aquifers. These sizeable herbicide-induced impacts on agroecosystems are particularly worrisome because these herbicides have been globally used for decades.

  2. Monitoring Stream Nutrient Concentration Trends in a Mixed-Land-Use Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiger, S. J.; Hubbart, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Mixed-land use watersheds are often a complex patchwork of forested, agricultural, and urban land-uses where differential land-use mediated non-point source pollution can significantly impact water quality. Stream nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations serve as important variables for quantifying land use effects on non-point source pollution in receiving waters and relative impacts on aquatic biota. The Hinkson Creek Watershed (HCW) is a representative mixed land use urbanizing catchment (231 km2) located in central Missouri, USA. A nested-scale experimental watershed study including five permanent hydroclimate stations was established in 2009 to provide quantitative understanding of multiple land use impacts on nutrient loading. Spectrophotometric analysis was used to quantify total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) and total phosphorus (TP as PO4) regimes. Results (2010 - 2013) indicate average nitrate (NO3-) concentration (mg/l) range of 0.28 to 0.46 mg/l, nitrite (NO2-) range of 0.02 to 0.03 mg/l, ammonia (NH3) ranged from 0.04 to 0.08 mg/l, and TP range of 0.26 to 0.39 mg/l. With n=858, NO3-, NO2-, NH3, and TP concentrations were significantly (CI=95%, p=0.00) higher in the subbasin with the greatest percent cumulative agricultural land use (57%). NH3 and TP concentrations were significantly (CI=95%, p=0.00) higher (with the exception of the agricultural subbasin) in the subbasin with the greatest percent cumulative urban land use (26%). Results from multiple regression analyses showed percent cumulative agricultural and urban land uses accounted for 85% and 96% of the explained variance in TIN loading (CI=95%, p=0.08) and TP loading (CI=95%, p=0.02), respectively, between gauging sites. These results improve understanding of agricultural and urban land use impacts on nutrient concentrations in mixed use watersheds of the Midwest and have implications for nutrient reduction programs in the Mississippi River Basin and hypoxia reductions in the Gulf of Mexico, USA.

  3. [Effect of microbial nutrient concentration on improvement of municipal sewage sludge dewaterability through bioleaching].

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-wei; Liu, Fen-wu; Zhou, Li-xiang

    2012-08-01

    In this study, shaking flask batch experiments and practical engineering application tests were performed to investigate the effect of microbial nutrient concentration on the dewaterability of municipal sewage sludge with 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% solid contents via bioleaching. Meanwhile, the changes of pH value and the utilization efficiency of microbial nutrients during bioleaching were analyzed in this study. The results showed that the pH value decreased gradually at the beginning and then maintained a stable state in the treatments with different solid contents, and the nutrients were completely used up by the microorganisms after 2 days of bioleaching. It was found that the SRF of 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% sludges decreased quickly and then rose gradually with the extension of bioleaching time. In addition, the higher solid content the greater the increase. It was determined that the optimum microbial nutrient dosage for sludge with solid content of 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% were 3.0 g x L(-1), 4.5 g x L(-1), 8.3 g x L(-1) and 12.8 g x L(-1) respectively. At this point, the lowest SRF of sludge with each solid content were 0.61 x 10(12) m x kg(-1), 1.22 x 10(12) m x kg(-1), 3.09 x 10(12) m x kg(-1) and 4.83 x 10(12) m x kg(-1), respectively. Through the engineering application, it was showed that diluting the solid content of sewage sludge from 5% to 3% before bioleaching was feasible. It could not only improve the dewaterability of bioleached sewage sludge (the SRF declined from 3.29 x 10(12) m x kg(-1) to 1.10 x 10(12) m x kg(-1)), but also shorten the sludge nutrient time (shortened from 4 days to 2.35 days) and reduce the operation costs. Therefore, the results of this study have important significance for the engineering application of bioleaching of municipal sewage sludge with high solid content.

  4. Amelioration of boron toxicity in sweet pepper as affected by calcium management under an elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Piñero, María Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Margarita; López-Marín, Josefa; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2017-03-10

    We investigated B tolerance in sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuun L.) under an elevated CO2 concentration, combined with the application of calcium as a nutrient management amelioration technique. The data show that high B affected the roots more than the aerial parts, since there was an increase in the shoot/root ratio, when plants were grown with high B levels; however, the impact was lessened when the plants were grown at elevated CO2, since the root FW reduction caused by excess B was less marked at the high CO2 concentration (30.9% less). Additionally, the high B concentration affected the membrane permeability of roots, which increased from 39 to 54% at ambient CO2 concentration, and from 38 to 51% at elevated CO2 concentration, producing a cation imbalance in plants, which was differentially affected by the CO2 supply. The Ca surplus in the nutrient solution reduced the nutritional imbalance in sweet pepper plants produced by the high B concentration, at both CO2 concentrations. The medium B concentration treatment (toxic according to the literature) did not result in any toxic effect. Hence, there is a need to review the literature on critical and toxic B levels taking into account increases in atmospheric CO2.

  5. Nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation are differentially affected by the consumption of resistant starch varieties and conventional fibres in pigs.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Todd C; Liu, Qiang; Wood, Peter; Fan, Ming Z

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the influence of different resistant starch (RS) varieties and conventional fibres on the efficiency of nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation in pigs. Thirty-six pigs (30 kg) were fed poultry meal-based diets supplemented with 10 % granular resistant corn starch (GCS), granular resistant potato starch (GPS), retrograded resistant corn starch (RCS), guar gum (GG) or cellulose for 36 d according to a completely randomised block design. Distal ileal and total tract recoveries were similar (P>0.05) among the RS varieties. Distal ileal starch recovery was higher (P < 0.05) in pigs consuming the RS diets (27-42 %) as compared with the control group (0.64 %). Consumption of GCS reduced (P < 0.05) apparent total tract digestibility and whole-body retention of crude protein in comparison with the control group. Consumption of GPS reduced (P < 0.05) total tract Ca digestibility and whole-body retention of Ca and P compared with the control group. However, consumption of RCS increased (P < 0.05) total tract Ca digestibility compared with the control group. Caecal butyrate concentration was increased (P < 0.05) following consumption of RCS and GG in comparison with the control group. Consumption of all the RS varieties reduced (P < 0.05) caecal indole concentrations compared with the control. Caecal butyrate concentrations were positively correlated (P < 0.05; r 0.63-0.83) with thermal properties among the RS varieties. We conclude that nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation are differentially affected by the consumption of different RS varieties and types of fibres. Thermal properties associated with different RS varieties may be useful markers for developing RS varieties with specific functionality.

  6. Altitudinal patterns and controls of plant and soil nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry in subtropical China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xianjin; Hou, Enqing; Liu, Yang; Wen, Dazhi

    2016-04-01

    Altitude is a determining factor of ecosystem properties and processes in mountains. This study investigated the changes in the concentrations of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) and their ratios in four key ecosystem components (forest floor litter, fine roots, soil, and soil microorganisms) along an altitudinal gradient (from 50 m to 950 m a.s.l.) in subtropical China. The results showed that soil organic C and microbial biomass C concentrations increased linearly with increasing altitude. Similar trends were observed for concentrations of total soil N and microbial biomass N. In contrast, the N concentration of litter and fine roots decreased linearly with altitude. With increasing altitude, litter, fine roots, and soil C:N ratios increased linearly, while the C:N ratio of soil microbial biomass did not change significantly. Phosphorus concentration and C:P and N:P ratios of all ecosystem components generally had nonlinear relationships with altitude. Our results indicate that the altitudinal pattern of plant and soil nutrient status differs among ecosystem components and that the relative importance of P vs. N limitation for ecosystem functions and processes shifts along altitudinal gradients.

  7. Competition of Escherichia coli O157 with a drinking water bacterial community at low nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Vital, Marius; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    In contrast to studies on (long-term) survival of enteric pathogens in the environment, investigations on the principles of their growth and competition with autochthonous aquatic bacteria are rare and unexplored. Hence, improved basic knowledge is crucial for an adequate risk assessment and for understanding (and avoiding) the spreading of waterborne diseases. Therefore, the pathogen Escherichia coli O157 was grown in competition with a drinking water bacterial community on natural assimilable organic carbon (AOC) originating from diluted wastewater, in both batch and continuous culture. Growth was monitored by flow cytometry enabling enumeration of total cell concentration as well as specific E. coli O157 detection using fluorescently-labelled antibodies. An enhanced competitive fitness of E. coli O157 with higher AOC concentrations, higher temperatures and increased dilution rates (continuous culture) was observed. A classical "opportunist" versus "gleaner" relationship, where E. coli O157 is the "opportunist", specialised for growth at high nutrient concentrations (μ(max): 0.87 h(-1) and K(s): 489 μg consumed DOC L(-1)), and the bacterial community is the "gleaner" adapted to nutrient-poor environments (μ(max): 0.33 h(-1) and K(s): 7.4 μg consumed DOC L(-1)) was found. The obtained competition results can be explained by the growth properties of the two competitors determined in pure cultures and it was possible to model many of the observed dynamics based on Monod kinetics. The study provides new insights into the principles governing competition of an enteric pathogen with autochthonous aquatic bacteria.

  8. Substitution of common concentrates with by-products modulated ruminal fermentation, nutrient degradation, and microbial community composition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ertl, P; Knaus, W; Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Klevenhusen, F; Khiaosa-Ard, R; Zebeli, Q

    2015-07-01

    A rumen simulation technique was used to evaluate the effects of the complete substitution of a common concentrate mixture (CON) with a mixture consisting solely of by-products from the food industry (BP) at 2 different forage-to-concentrate ratios on ruminal fermentation profile, nutrient degradation, and abundance of rumen microbiota. The experiment was a 2×2 factorial arrangement with 2 concentrate types (CON and BP) and 2 concentrate levels (25 and 50% of diet dry matter). The experiment consisted of 2 experimental runs with 12 fermentation vessels each (n=6 per treatment). Each run lasted for 10d, with data collection on the last 5d. The BP diets had lower starch, but higher neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and fat contents compared with CON. Degradation of crude protein was decreased, but NDF and nonfiber carbohydrate degradation were higher for the BP diets. At the 50% concentrate level, organic matter degradation tended to be lower for BP and CH4 formation per unit of NDF degraded was also lower for BP. The BP mixture led to a higher concentration of propionate and a lower acetate-to-propionate ratio, whereas concentrations of butyrate and caproate decreased. Concentrate type did not affect microbial community composition, except that the abundance of bacteria of the genus Prevotella was higher for BP. Increasing the concentrate level resulted in higher degradation of organic matter and crude protein. At the higher concentrate level, total short-chain fatty acid formation increased and concentrations of isobutyrate and valerate decreased. In addition, at the 50% concentrate level, numbers of protozoa increased, whereas numbers of methanogens, anaerobic fungi, and fibrolytic bacteria decreased. No interaction was noted between the 2 dietary factors on most variables, except that at the higher concentrate level the effects of BP on CH4 and CO2 formation per unit of NDF degraded, crude protein degradation, and the abundance of Prevotella were more prominent. In

  9. Yeast mutant affected for viability upon nutrient starvation: characterization and cloning of the RVS161 gene.

    PubMed

    Crouzet, M; Urdaci, M; Dulau, L; Aigle, M

    1991-10-01

    In yeast, nutrient starvation leads to entry into stationary phase. Mutants that do not respond properly to starvation conditions have been isolated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Among them the rvs161 mutant (RVS for Reduced Viability upon Starvation) is sensitive to carbon, nitrogen and sulphur starvation. When these nutrients are depleted in the medium, mutant cells show cellular viability loss with morphological changes. The mutation rvs161-1 is very pleiotropic, and besides the defects in stationary phase entry, the mutant strain presents other alterations: sensitivity to high salt concentrations, hypersensitivity to amino acid analogs, no growth on lactate or acetate medium. The addition of salts or amino acid analogs leads to the same morphological defects observed in starved cells, suggesting that the gene could be implicated mainly in the control of cellular viability. The gene RVS161 was cloned; it codes for a 30,252 daltons protein. No homology was detected with the proteins contained in the databases. Moreover, Southern analysis revealed the presence of other sequences homologous to the RVS161 gene in the yeast genome.

  10. Hypothalamic melanin concentrating hormone neurons communicate the nutrient value of sugar

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Ana I; Sordillo, Aylesse; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Tellez, Luis A; Vaynshteyn, Jake; Ferreira, Jozelia G; Ekstrand, Mats I; Horvath, Tamas L; de Araujo, Ivan E; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    Sugars that contain glucose, such as sucrose, are generally preferred to artificial sweeteners owing to their post-ingestive rewarding effect, which elevates striatal dopamine (DA) release. While the post-ingestive rewarding effect, which artificial sweeteners do not have, signals the nutrient value of sugar and influences food preference, the neural circuitry that mediates the rewarding effect of glucose is unknown. In this study, we show that optogenetic activation of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons during intake of the artificial sweetener sucralose increases striatal dopamine levels and inverts the normal preference for sucrose vs sucralose. Conversely, animals with ablation of MCH neurons no longer prefer sucrose to sucralose and show reduced striatal DA release upon sucrose ingestion. We further show that MCH neurons project to reward areas and are required for the post-ingestive rewarding effect of sucrose in sweet-blind Trpm5−/− mice. These studies identify an essential component of the neural pathways linking nutrient sensing and food reward. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01462.001 PMID:24381247

  11. Ethanol concentration in food and body condition affect foraging behavior in Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Francisco; Korine, Carmi; Kotler, Burt P.; Pinshow, Berry

    2008-06-01

    Ethanol occurs in fleshy fruit as a result of sugar fermentation by both microorganisms and the plant itself; its concentration [EtOH] increases as fruit ripens. At low concentrations, ethanol is a nutrient, whereas at high concentrations, it is toxic. We hypothesized that the effects of ethanol on the foraging behavior of frugivorous vertebrates depend on its concentration in food and the body condition of the forager. We predicted that ethanol stimulates food consumption when its concentration is similar to that found in ripe fruit, whereas [EtOH] below or above that of ripe fruit has either no effect, or else deters foragers, respectively. Moreover, we expected that the amount of food ingested on a particular day of feeding influences the toxic effects of ethanol on a forager, and consequently shapes its feeding decisions on the following day. We therefore predicted that for a food-restricted forager, ethanol-rich food is of lower value than ethanol-free food. We used Egyptian fruit bats ( Rousettus aegyptiacus) as a model to test our hypotheses, and found that ethanol did not increase the value of food for the bats. High [EtOH] reduced the value of food for well-fed bats. However, for food-restricted bats, there was no difference between the value of ethanol-rich and ethanol-free food. Thus, microorganisms, via their production of ethanol, may affect the patterns of feeding of seed-dispersing frugivores. However, these patterns could be modified by the body condition of the animals because they might trade-off the costs of intoxication against the value of nutrients acquired.

  12. Controls on foliar nutrient and aluminium concentrations in a tropical tree flora: phylogeny, soil chemistry and interactions among elements.

    PubMed

    Metali, Faizah; Abu Salim, Kamariah; Tennakoon, Kushan; Burslem, David F R P

    2015-01-01

    Foliar elemental concentrations are predictors of life-history variation and contribute to spatial patterns in biogeochemical cycling. We examined the contributions of habitat association, local soil environment, and elemental interactions to variation in foliar elemental concentrations in tropical trees using methods that account for phylogeny. We sampled top-soils and leaves of 58 tropical trees in heath forest (HF) on nutrient-poor sand and mixed dipterocarp forest (MDF) on nutrient-rich clay soils. A phylogenetic generalized least squares method was used to determine how foliar nutrient and aluminium (Al) concentrations varied in response to habitat distribution, soil chemistry and other elemental concentrations. Foliar nitrogen (N) and Al concentrations were greater for specialists of MDF than for specialists of HF, while foliar calcium (Ca) concentrations showed the opposite trend. Foliar magnesium (Mg) concentrations were lower for generalists than for MDF specialists. Foliar element concentrations were correlated with fine-scale variation in soil chemistry in phylogenetically controlled analyses across species, but there was limited within-species plasticity in foliar elemental concentrations. Among Al accumulators, foliar Al concentration was positively associated with foliar Ca and Mg concentrations, and negatively associated with foliar phosphorus (P) concentrations. The Al-accumulation trait and relationships between foliar elemental and Al concentrations may contribute to species habitat partitioning and ecosystem-level differences in biogeochemical cycles.

  13. A field study to evaluate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaochen; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Chenrui; Zhang, Xinbo; Wang, Jianghai

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate the impact of different factors on the nutrient pollutant concentrations in green roof runoff and to provide reference data for the engineering design of dual substrate layer green roofs. The data were collected from eight different trays under three kinds of artificial rains. The results showed that except for total phosphorus, dual substrate layer green roofs behaved as a sink for most of the nutrient pollutants (significant at p < 0.05), and the first-flush effect did not occur during the 27 simulated rain events. The results also revealed that the concentration of these nutrient pollutants in the runoff strongly depended on the features of the nutrient substrates used in the green roof and the depth of the adsorption substrates. Compared with the influence of the substrates, the influence of the plant density and drainage systems was small.

  14. Factors affecting stream nutrient loads: A synthesis of regional SPARROW model results for the continental United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Preston, Stephen D.; Alexander, Richard B.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2011-01-01

    We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models - 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus - all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Does cutting of mugwort stands affect airborne pollen concentrations?

    PubMed

    Rantio-Lehtimäki, A; Helander, M L; Karhu, K

    1992-08-01

    Pollen of mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris L.) is the most important allergenic pollen in urban areas of south and central Finland in late summer. The purpose of this study was to investigate, experimentally, whether the cutting of mugwort stands affects its airborne pollen concentrations. Experimental plots were either cut (4 plots) or uncut (4 plots) in 2 previous seasons: 4 of them were small (less than 0.5 hectare) and 4 large (greater than 5 hectares). Finally, the plots were divided randomly into 2 groups according to a third variable, cutting in the study season, 1989. Samples were taken on 2 rainless mornings at the peak mugwort flowering time. Two rotorod type samplers were used at heights of 1 and 2 m from ground level, simulating the inhalation heights of children and adults, respectively. The results indicate that cutting mugwort stands significantly reduces airborne pollen concentrations, but the treated areas have to be large, since in the town area there are plenty of mugwort pollen sources. The pollen concentrations at the 2 heights tested did not differ significantly.

  16. [Effects of long-term tillage and rice straw returning on soil nutrient pools and Cd concentration].

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen-guang; Xiao, Xiao-ping; Tang, Hai-ming; Zhang, Hai-lin; Chen, Fu; Chen, Zhong-du; Xue, Jian-fu; Yang, Guang-li

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of tillage and straw returning on soil nutrient and its pools, and soil Cd concentration, and to identify the strategies for rational tillage and remediation of Cd contaminated paddy fields. The experiment was established with no-tillage with straw retention (NTS) , rotary tillage with straw incorporation (RTS) , conventional plow tillage with straw incorporation (CTS), conventional plow tillage with straw removed ( CT) from 2005 to 2013. The results indicated that tillage and rice straw retention had a great impact on soil properties at 0-10 cm soil depth. The soil aeration, and concentrations of soil nutrient and soil Cd increased under CTS, CT, and RTS. Due to the shallow plow layers, soil nutrient pools and the Cd concentration in rice shoot decreased in long-term tilled soil. Under long-term no-tillage, the soil bulk, soil nutrient pools and Cd concentration in rice shoot increased, but concentrations of soil nutrients decreased. In addition, rice straw returning significantly increased the soil nutrient concentrations, cation exchange capacity, depth of plow layer, and soil nutrient pools. However, the Cd in the rice straw was also returned to the soil by rice straw returning, which would not benefit the remediation of soil Cd. Therefore, it is necessary to improve tillage and straw retention practices due to the disadvantages of long-term continuous single tillage method and rice straw returning practices. Some recommended managements (e.g., rotational tillage or subsoiling, reducing straw returning amount, and rotational straw returning) could be good options in enhancing soil fertility and remedying soil pollution.

  17. Uptake of Pharmaceuticals Influences Plant Development and Affects Nutrient and Hormone Homeostases.

    PubMed

    Carter, Laura J; Williams, Mike; Böttcher, Christine; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-10-20

    The detection of a range of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) in the soil environment has led to a number of publications demonstrating uptake by crops, however very few studies have explored the potential for impacts on plant development as a result of API uptake. This study investigated the effect of carbamazepine and verapamil (0.005-10 mg/kg) on a range of plant responses in zucchini (Cucurbita pepo). Uptake increased in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum leaf concentrations of 821.9 and 2.2 mg/kg for carbamazepine and verapamil, respectively. Increased carbamazepine uptake by zucchini resulted in a decrease in above (<60%) and below (<30%) ground biomass compared to the controls (p < 0.05). At soil concentrations >4 mg/kg the mature leaves suffered from burnt edges and white spots as well as a reduction in photosynthetic pigments but no such effects were seen for verapamil. For both APIs, further investigations revealed significant differences in the concentrations of selected plant hormones (auxins, cytokinins, abscisic acid and jasmonates), and in the nutrient composition of the leaves in comparison to the controls (p < 0.05). This is some of the first research to demonstrate that the exposure of plants to APIs is likely to cause impacts on plant development with unknown implications.

  18. Effect of trees on the reduction of nutrient concentrations in the soils of cultivated areas.

    PubMed

    Gikas, Georgios D; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A; Sykas, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    The function of trees in reducing nutrient migration to groundwaters in cultivated areas, under Mediterranean climate conditions, is tested. Three cultivated fields were monitored for two cultivation periods. The common characteristic of the three fields was that on one side, they bordered with a poplar tree field. Four different crops were cultivated, and two cultivation periods were monitored. Based on the number of fields (i.e., three) and the cultivation periods (i.e., two), six different conditions (systems) were studied with four crops (i.e., sunflower, cotton, rapeseed, and corn). Soil samples were collected in all systems at the beginning, the middle, and the end of the cultivation period at various sampling sites (i.e., various distances from the tree row) and at various depths, and were analyzed in the laboratory for the determination of ΝΟ3-Ν and P-Olsen. In all systems, the greatest concentration of P-Olsen was measured in the surface layers (0-5, 10-15, and 30-35 cm) and was gradually decreased in the deeper layers (55-60 and 75-80 cm) indicating that P mobility is low. The ΝΟ3-Ν concentration in the deeper layers (55-60 and 75-80 cm) at all sampling sites was equal to or greater than that of the surface layers, indicating that ΝΟ3-Ν has high mobility in soils. At the sampling sites in the soil zone near the tree row, the ΝΟ3-Ν concentration in the deeper layers was lower than that of the surface, indicating that the tree root system takes up nutrients which otherwise would move toward the water table. There was also a reduction observed of the depth-averaged P-Olsen and ΝΟ3-Ν concentrations at the soil zone at a distance of 2.0-3.5 m from the tree row compared to locations more distant from the trees; this reduction ranged between 15 and 50 % and 36 and 54 %, respectively. The results indicate that planting of trees in cultivated fields can contribute to the reduction of nitrate pollution of groundwaters.

  19. Sudden increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration reveals strong coupling between shoot carbon uptake and root nutrient uptake in young walnut trees.

    PubMed

    Delaire, Mickaël; Frak, Ela; Sigogne, Monique; Adam, Boris; Beaujard, François; Le Roux, Xavier

    2005-02-01

    We studied the short-term (i.e., a few days) effect of a sudden increase in CO2 uptake by shoots on nutrient (NO3-, P ion, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+) uptake by roots during vegetative growth of young walnut (Juglans nigra x J. major L.) trees. The increase in CO2 uptake was induced by a sudden increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]). Twelve 2-year-old trees were transplanted and grown in perlite-filled pots in a greenhouse. Rates of CO2 uptake and water loss by individual trees were determined by a branch bag method from 3 days before until 6 days after [CO2] was increased. Nutrient uptake rates were measured concurrently by a hydroponic recirculating nutrient solution system that provided non-limiting supplies of water and nutrients. Six control trees were kept in ambient [CO2] (360 ppm), and [CO2] was increased to 550 ppm for one set of three trees and to 800 ppm for another set of three trees. Before imposing the elevated [CO2] treatments, all trees exhibited similar daily water loss, CO2 uptake and nutrient uptake rates when expressed per unit leaf area to account for the tree size effect. Daily water loss rates were only slightly affected by elevated [CO2]. Carbon dioxide uptake rates greatly increased with increasing atmospheric [CO2], and nutrient uptake rates were proportional to CO2 uptake rates during the study period, except for P ion. Our results show that, despite the important carbon and nitrogen storage capacities previously observed in young walnut trees, nutrient uptake by roots is strongly coupled to carbon uptake by shoots over periods of a few days.

  20. Estimating Summer Nutrient Concentrations in Northeastern Lakes from SPARROW Load Predictions and Modeled Lake Depth and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Milstead, W. Bryan; Hollister, Jeffrey W.; Moore, Richard B.; Walker, Henry A.

    2013-01-01

    Global nutrient cycles have been altered by the use of fossil fuels and fertilizers resulting in increases in nutrient loads to aquatic systems. In the United States, excess nutrients have been repeatedly reported as the primary cause of lake water quality impairments. Setting nutrient criteria that are protective of a lakes ecological condition is one common solution; however, the data required to do this are not always easily available. A useful solution for this is to combine available field data (i.e., The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Lake Assessment (NLA)) with average annual nutrient load models (i.e., USGS SPARROW model) to estimate summer concentrations across a large number of lakes. In this paper we use this combined approach and compare the observed total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TN) concentrations in Northeastern lakes from the 2007 National Lake Assessment to those predicted by the Northeast SPARROW model. We successfully adjusted the SPARROW predictions to the NLA observations with the use of Vollenweider equations, simple input-output models that predict nutrient concentrations in lakes based on nutrient loads and hydraulic residence time. This allows us to better predict summer concentrations of TN and TP in Northeastern lakes and ponds. On average we improved our predicted concentrations of TN and TP with Vollenweider models by 18.7% for nitrogen and 19.0% for phosphorus. These improved predictions are being used in other studies to model ecosystem services (e.g., aesthetics) and dis-services (e.g. cyanobacterial blooms) for ~18,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States. PMID:24260579

  1. Estimating summer nutrient concentrations in Northeastern lakes from SPARROW load predictions and modeled lake depth and volume.

    PubMed

    Milstead, W Bryan; Hollister, Jeffrey W; Moore, Richard B; Walker, Henry A

    2013-01-01

    Global nutrient cycles have been altered by the use of fossil fuels and fertilizers resulting in increases in nutrient loads to aquatic systems. In the United States, excess nutrients have been repeatedly reported as the primary cause of lake water quality impairments. Setting nutrient criteria that are protective of a lakes ecological condition is one common solution; however, the data required to do this are not always easily available. A useful solution for this is to combine available field data (i.e., The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Lake Assessment (NLA)) with average annual nutrient load models (i.e., USGS SPARROW model) to estimate summer concentrations across a large number of lakes. In this paper we use this combined approach and compare the observed total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TN) concentrations in Northeastern lakes from the 2007 National Lake Assessment to those predicted by the Northeast SPARROW model. We successfully adjusted the SPARROW predictions to the NLA observations with the use of Vollenweider equations, simple input-output models that predict nutrient concentrations in lakes based on nutrient loads and hydraulic residence time. This allows us to better predict summer concentrations of TN and TP in Northeastern lakes and ponds. On average we improved our predicted concentrations of TN and TP with Vollenweider models by 18.7% for nitrogen and 19.0% for phosphorus. These improved predictions are being used in other studies to model ecosystem services (e.g., aesthetics) and dis-services (e.g. cyanobacterial blooms) for ~18,000 lakes in the Northeastern United States.

  2. Nutrient Deprivation Affects Salmonella Invasion and Its Interaction with the Gastrointestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yurist-Doutsch, Sophie; Arrieta, Marie-Claire; Tupin, Audrey; Valdez, Yanet; Antunes, L. Caetano M.; Yen, Ryan; Finlay, B. Brett

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a foodborne enteric pathogen and a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans. It is known that molecules derived from the human fecal microbiota downregulate S. Typhimurium virulence gene expression and induce a starvation-like response. In this study, S. Typhimurium was cultured in minimal media to mimic starvation conditions such as that experienced by S. Typhimurium in the human intestinal tract, and the pathogen’s virulence in vitro and in vivo was measured. S. Typhimurium cultured in minimal media displayed a reduced ability to invade human epithelial cells in a manner that was at least partially independent of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1) type III secretion system. Nutrient deprivation did not, however, alter the ability of S. Typhimurium to replicate and survive inside epithelial cells. In a murine model of S. Typhimurium-induced gastroenteritis, prior cultivation in minimal media did not alter the pathogen’s ability to colonize mice, nor did it affect levels of gastrointestinal inflammation. Upon examining the post-infection fecal gastrointestinal microbiota, we found that specifically in the 129Sv/ImJ murine strain S. Typhimurium cultured in minimal media induced differential microbiota compositional shifts compared to that of S. Typhimurium cultured in rich media. Together these findings demonstrate that S. Typhimurium remains a potent pathogen even in the face of nutritional deprivation, but nevertheless that nutrient deprivation encountered in this environment elicits significant changes in the bacterium genetic programme, as well as its capacity to alter host microbiota composition. PMID:27437699

  3. The filter feeder Dreissena polymorpha affects nutrient, silicon, and metal(loid) mobilization from freshwater sediments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Planer-Friedrich, Britta

    2017-05-01

    Organic sediments in aquatic ecosystems are well known sinks for nutrients, silicon, and metal(loid)s. Organic matter-consuming organisms like invertebrate shredders, grazers, and bioturbators significantly affect element fixation or remobilization by changing redox conditions or binding properties of organic sediments. Little is known about the effect of filter feeders, like the zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha, an invasive organism in North American and European freshwater ecosystems. A laboratory batch experiment exposing D. polymorpha (∼1200 organisms per m(2)) to organic sediment from a site contaminated with arsenic, copper, lead, and uranium revealed a significant uptake and accumulation of arsenic, copper, iron, and especially uranium both into the soft body tissues and the seashell. This is in line with previous observations of metal(loid) accumulation from biomonitoring studies. Regarding its environmental impact, D. polymorpha significantly contributed to mobilization of silicon, iron, phosphorus, arsenic, and copper and to immobilization of uranium (p < 0.001), probably driven by redox conditions, microbial activity within the gut system, or active control of element homeostasis. No net mobilization or immobilization was observed for zinc and lead, because of their low mobility at the prevailing pH of 7.5-8.5. The present results suggest that D. polymorpha can both ameliorate (nutrient mobilization, immobilization of toxicants mobile under oxic conditions) or aggravate negative effects (mobilization of toxicants mobile under reducing conditions) in ecosystems. Relating the results of the present study to observed population densities in natural freshwater ecosystems suggests a significant influence of D. polymorpha on element cycling and needs to be considered in future studies.

  4. Growth, allocation and tissue chemistry of Picea abies seedlings affected by nutrient supply during the second growing season.

    PubMed

    Kaakinen, Seija; Jolkkonen, Annika; Iivonen, Sari; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2004-06-01

    One-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber to investigate the effects of low and high nutrient availability (LN; 0.25 mM N and HN; 2.50 mM N) on growth, biomass allocation and chemical composition of needles, stem and roots during the second growing season. Climatic conditions in the growth chamber simulated the mean growing season from May to early October in Flakaliden, northern Sweden. In the latter half of the growing season, biomass allocation changed in response to nutrient availability: increased root growth and decreased shoot growth led to higher root/shoot ratios in LN seedlings than in HN seedlings. At high nutrient availability, total biomass, especially stem biomass, increased, as did total nonstructural carbohydrate and nitrogen contents per seedling. Responses of stem chemistry to nutrient addition differed from those of adult trees of the same provenance. In HN seedlings, concentrations of alpha-cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin decreased in the secondary xylem. Our results illustrate the significance of retranslocation of stored nutrients to support new growth early in the season when root growth and nutrient uptake are still low. We conclude that nutrient availability alters allocation patterns, thereby influencing the success of 2-year-old Norway spruce seedlings at forest planting sites.

  5. Predictable communities of soil bacteria in relation to nutrient concentration and successional stage in a laboratory culture experiment.

    PubMed

    Song, Woojin; Kim, Mincheol; Tripathi, Binu M; Kim, Hyoki; Adams, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    It is difficult to understand the processes that structure immensely complex bacterial communities in the soil environment, necessitating a simplifying experimental approach. Here, we set up a microcosm culturing experiment with soil bacteria, at a range of nutrient concentrations, and compared these over time to understand the relationship between soil bacterial community structure and time/nutrient concentration. DNA from each replicate was analysed using HiSeq2000 Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. We found that each nutrient treatment, and each time point during the experiment, produces characteristic bacterial communities that occur predictably between replicates. It is clear that within the context of this experiment, many soil bacteria have distinct niches from one another, in terms of both nutrient concentration, and successional time point since a resource first became available. This fine niche differentiation may in part help to explain the coexistence of a diversity of bacteria in soils. In this experiment, we show that the unimodal relationship between nutrient concentration/time and species diversity often reported in communities of larger organisms is also evident in microbial communities.

  6. Interactive effects of dietary protein concentration and aflatoxin B1 on performance, nutrient digestibility, and gut health in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Naehrer, K; Applegate, T J

    2016-06-01

    A 20-day trial was conducted to determine the impact of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and dietary protein concentration on performance, nutrient digestibility, and gut health in broiler chicks. The 6 dietary treatments were arranged in a 2 × 3 factorial with 3 crude protein (CP) concentrations (16, 22, and 26%) with or without 1.5 mg/kg AFB1 Each diet was fed to 6 replicate cages (6 chicks per cage) from zero to 20 d of age. Endogenous N and amino acid loss were estimated from birds fed a N-free diet with or without 1.5 mg/kg AFB1 A significant interaction between AFB1 and CP concentration was observed for growth performance, where reduction of BW gain, feed intake, gain:feed ratio, and breast muscle weight by AFB1 were most profound in birds fed the 16%-CP diet, and were completely eliminated when birds were fed the 26%-CP diet (AFB1 by CP interaction; P ≤ 0.023). Similarly, AFB1 reduced serum albumin, total protein, and globulin concentrations in birds fed 16 and 22% CP diets, but not in those fed the 26%-CP (AFB1 by CP interaction; P ≤ 0.071). Gut permeability was increased in birds fed AFB1-contamiated diets as measured by serum lactulose/rhamnose ratio (main effect; P = 0.04). Additionally, AFB1 tended to increase endogenous N loss (P = 0.09), and significantly reduced apparent ileal digestible energy and standardized ileal N and amino acid digestibility in birds fed the 16%-CP diet, while birds fed higher dietary CP were not affected (AFB1 by CP interaction; P ≤ 0.01). Further, AFB1 increased the translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP1), claudin1, and multiple jejunal amino acid transporters expression (main effect; P ≤ 0.04). Results from this study indicate that a 1.5 mg AFB1/kg diet significantly impairs growth, major serum biochemistry measures, gut barrier, endogenous loss, and energy and amino acid digestibility. Aflatoxicosis can be augmented by low dietary CP, while higher dietary CP completely eliminated the impairment of

  7. Minimizing nitrous oxide in biological nutrient removal from municipal wastewater by controlling copper ion concentrations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Hong; Li, Xiang; Peng, Yongzhen; Wang, Shuying

    2013-02-01

    In this study, nitrous oxide (N(2)O) production during biological nutrient removal (BNR) from municipal wastewater was reported to be remarkably reduced by controlling copper ion (Cu(2+)) concentration. Firstly, it was observed that the addition of Cu(2+) (10-100 μg/L) reduced N(2)O generation by 54.5-73.2 % and improved total nitrogen removal when synthetic wastewater was treated in an anaerobic-aerobic (with low dissolved oxygen) BNR process. Then, the roles of Cu(2+) were investigated. The activities of nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases were increased by Cu(2+) addition, which accelerated the bio-reductions of both nitrite to nitric oxide (NO (2) (-)  → NO) and nitrous oxide to nitrogen gas (N(2)O → N(2)). The quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay indicated that Cu(2+) addition increased the number of N(2)O reducing denitrifiers. Further investigation showed that more polyhydoxyalkanoates were utilized in the Cu(2+)-added system for denitrification. Finally, the feasibility of reducing N(2)O generation by controlling Cu(2+) was examined in two other BNR processes treating real municipal wastewater. As the Cu(2+) in municipal wastewater is usually below 10 μg/L, according to this study, the supplement of influent Cu(2+) to a concentration of 10-100 μg/L is beneficial to reduce N(2)O emission and improve nitrogen removal when sludge concentration in the BNR system is around 3,200 mg/L.

  8. Nutrient Provinces in the Sea: Concentration Ratios, Reaction Rate Ratios, and Ideal Covariation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanning, Kent A.

    1992-04-01

    Global distributions of the ratios of the concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (= [N]) and phosphate (= [P]) are evaluated from Geochemical Ocean Sections Study (GEOSECS) and Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) data sets. If large oceanic regions (or provinces) can be identified on the basis of constant [N]: [P] ratios, then the distribution equation for a reactive variable shows that the ratio of the net reaction rates involving N and P in each one is equal to its concentration ratio. Organisms within the interiors of the provinces would then be in balance with the ratios in which the nutrients are present, producing a non-fractionated or "ideal" nutrient covariation. Such provinces can be observed throughout the ocean. Notable features are as follows: (1) Between the euphotic zone and 500 m in the west central North Atlantic is a large region in which N-P regeneration produces very high [N]:[P] ratios: ˜50 mol mol-1. Potential causes are 18° Water formation, coccolithophorid growth, nitrogen fixation, or atmospheric fixed-nitrogen deposition. (2) Most oligotrophic surface waters seem to have [N]:[P] between 0 and 3 mol mol-1, implying that the net removal ratio of N and P in those waters is 0-3 mol mol-1. (3) Below 600 m, the ocean contains large provinces with N-P regeneration ratios of 12-18 mol mol-1. The dominant ratio is slightly sub-Redfield at 14.5-15 mol mol-1, with the entire Indian Ocean below 3000 m being ideally covariant at 14.7 mol mol-1. The northeastern Pacific has provinces with very low regeneration ratios (<14 mol mol-1). Vertical boundaries between deep provinces in the western Pacific and eastern Atlantic suggest that particles from immediately above control regeneration ratios, whereas the more horizontal boundaries between western Atlantic provinces appear to reflect a greater importance of horizontally transported particles in water masses like Antarctic Intermediate Water. N-P reaction rate ratios along deep isopycnal surfaces are quite

  9. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis.

  10. Responses of soil nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry to different human land uses in a subtropical tidal wetland

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W.; Sardans, J.; Zeng, C.; Zhong, C.; Li, Y.; Peñuelas, J.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the impacts of anthropogenic changes in land use on the stoichiometric imbalance of soil carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) in Phragmites australis wetlands in the Minjiang River estuary. We compared five areas with different land uses: P. australis wetland (control), grassland, a mudskipper breeding flat, pond aquaculture and rice cropland. Human activity has affected the elemental and stoichiometric compositions of soils through changes in land use. In general, soil C and N concentrations were lower and total soil K concentrations were higher at the sites under human land uses relative to the control site, and total soil P concentrations were generally not significantly different. The close relationship between total soil C and N concentrations in all cases, including fertilization with N, suggested that N was the most limiting nutrient in these wetlands. Lower soil N concentrations and similar soil P concentrations and higher soil K concentrations under human land-use activities suggest that human activity has increased the role of N limitation in these wetlands. Only grassland use increases soil N contents (only in the 0-10 cm of soil). Despite N fertilization, lower soil N concentrations were also observed in the rice cropland, indicating the difficulty of avoiding N limitation in these wetlands. The observed lower soil N:P ratio, together with higher soil P and K availabilities in rice croplands, is consistent with the tendency of human activity to change the competitive relationships of plants, in this case favoring species adapted to high rates of growth (low N:P ratio) and/or favoring plants with high demands for P and K. Both, soil C storage and respiration were higher in grasslands, likely due to the introduction of grasses, which led to a high density of plants, increased grazing activity and soil compaction. Soil C storage and respiration were lower under human land uses, except in the rice cropland, with respect to

  11. Acute interval exercise intensity does not affect appetite and nutrient preferences in overweight and obese males.

    PubMed

    Alkahtani, Shaea A; Byrne, Nuala M; Hills, Andrew P; King, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of two different intensities of acute interval exercise on food preferences and appetite sensations in overweight and obese men. Twelve overweight/obese males (age=29.0±4.1 years; BMI =29.1±2.4 kg/m2) completed three exercise sessions: an initial graded exercise test, and two interval cycling sessions: moderate-(MIIT) and high-intensity (HIIT) interval exercise sessions on separate days in a counterbalanced order. The MIIT session involved cycling for 5-minute repetitions of alternate workloads 20% below and 20% above maximal fat oxidation. The HIIT session consisted of cycling for alternate bouts of 15 seconds at 85% VO2max and 15 seconds unloaded recovery. Appetite sensations and food preferences were measured immediately before and after the exercise sessions using the Visual Analogue Scale and the Liking & Wanting experimental procedure. Results indicated that liking significantly increased and wanting significantly decreased in all food categories after both MIIT and HIIT. There were no differences between MIIT and HIIT on the effect on appetite sensations and Liking & Wanting. In conclusion, manipulating the intensity of acute interval exercise did not affect appetite and nutrient preferences.

  12. Nutrient loads and sediment losses in sprinkler irrigation runoff affected by compost and manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High water application rates beneath the outer spans of center pivot sprinkler systems can cause runoff, erosion, and nutrient losses, particularly from sloping fields. This study determined runoff, sediment losses, and loads of nutrients (dissolved organic C, Nitrate-N, ammonium-N, total phosphoru...

  13. Weed management, training, and irrigation practices for organic production of trailing blackberry: II. Soil and plant nutrient concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic production of blackberries is increasing, but there is relatively little known about how production practices affect plant and soil nutrient status. The impact of cultivar (‘Black Diamond’ and ‘Marion’), weed management (weed mat, hand weeding, and no weeding), primocane training time (Augus...

  14. The effects of nutrient concentration, addition of thickeners, and agitation speed on liquid fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid media for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, media viscosity, and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. For all the experiments, the base medium contained yeast ...

  15. Effects of raw and diluted municipal sewage effluent with micronutrient foliar sprays on the growth and nutrient concentration of foxtail millet in southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Asgharipour, Mohammad Reza; Reza Azizmoghaddam, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the effect of irrigation with raw or diluted municipal sewage effluent accompanied by foliar micronutrient fertilizer sprays was examined on the growth, dry matter accumulation, grain yield, and mineral nutrients in foxtail millet plants. The experimental design was a split plot with three irrigation sources: raw sewage, 50% diluted sewage, and well water comprising the main treatments, and four combinations of Mn and Zn foliar sprays as sub-treatments that were applied with four replications. The experiment was conducted in 2009 at the Zabol University research farm in Zabol, south Iran. The applied municipal sewage effluent contained higher levels of micronutrients and macronutrients and exhibited greater degrees of electrical conductivity compared to well water. Because of the small scale of industrial activities in Zabol, the amount of heavy metals in the sewage was negligible (below the limits set for irrigation water in agricultural lands); these contaminants would not be severely detrimental to crop growth. The experimental results indicated that irrigation of plants with raw or diluted sewage stimulates the measured growth and productivity parameters of foxtail millet plants. The concentrations of micronutrients and macronutrients were also positively affected. These stimulations were attributed to the presence of high levels of such essential nutrients as N, P, and organic matter in wastewater. Supplied in sewage water alone, Mn and Zn were not able to raise the productivity of millet to the level obtained using fertilizers at the recommended values; this by itself indicated that additional nutrients from fertilizers are required to obtain higher levels of millet productivity with sewage farming. Despite the differences in nutrient concentrations among the different irrigation water sources, the micronutrient foliar sprays did not affect the concentrations of micronutrients and macronutrients in foxtail millet plants. These results suggested

  16. Ruminant nutrition from an environmental perspective: factors affecting whole-farm nutrient balance.

    PubMed

    Van Horn, H H; Newton, G L; Kunkle, W E

    1996-12-01

    Nutrient budgeting strategies focus primarily on recycling manure to land as fertilizer for crop production. Critical elements for determining environmental balance and accountability require knowledge of nutrients excreted, potential nutrient removal by plants, acceptable losses of nutrients within the manure management and crop production systems, and alternatives that permit export of nutrients off-farm, if necessary. Nutrient excretions are closely related to nutrient intake and can be predicted by subtracting predicted nutrients in food animal products exported from the farm from total nutrients consumed. Intensifying crop production with double- or triple-cropping often is necessary for high-density food animal production units to use manure without being forced to export manure or fertilizer coproducts to other farms. Most manures are P-rich relative to N largely because of 1) relatively large losses of volatilized NH3, most of it converted from urea in urine, 2) denitrification losses in soil under wet, anaerobic conditions, and 3) ability of many crops to luxury-consume much more N than P. Most soils bind P effectively and P usually is permitted to accumulate, allowing for budgets to be based on N. However, P budgeting may be required in regions where surface runoff of P contributes to algae growth and eutrophication of surface waters or where soil P increases to levels of concern. Research is needed to determine whether dietary P allowances can be lowered without detriment to animal production or health in order to lower P intake and improve N:P ratios in manure relative to fertilization needs.

  17. Thermal acclimation and nutritional history affect the oxidation of different classes of exogenous nutrients in Siberian hamsters, Phodopus sungorus.

    PubMed

    McCue, Marshall D; Voigt, Christian C; Jefimow, Małgorzata; Wojciechowski, Michał S

    2014-11-01

    During acclimatization to winter, changes in morphology and physiology combined with changes in diet may affect how animals use the nutrients they ingest. To study (a) how thermal acclimation and (b) nutritional history affect the rates at which Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) oxidize different classes of dietary nutrients, we conducted two trials in which we fed hamsters one of three (13) C-labeled compounds, that is, glucose, leucine, or palmitic acid. We predicted that under acute cold stress (3 hr at 2°C) hamsters previously acclimated to cold temperatures (10°C) for 3 weeks would have higher resting metabolic rate (RMR) and would oxidize a greater proportion of dietary fatty acids than animals acclimated to 21°C. We also investigated how chronic nutritional stress affects how hamsters use dietary nutrients. To examine this, hamsters were fed four different diets (control, low protein, low lipid, and low-glycemic index) for 2 weeks. During cold challenges, hamsters previously acclimated to cold exhibited higher thermal conductance and RMR, and also oxidized more exogenous palmitic acid during the postprandial phase than animals acclimated to 21°C. In the nutritional stress trial, hamsters fed the low protein diet oxidized more exogenous glucose, but not more exogenous palmitic acid than the control group. The use of (13) C-labeled metabolic tracers combined with breath testing demonstrated that both thermal and nutritional history results in significant changes in the extent to which animals oxidize dietary nutrients during the postprandial period.

  18. Nitrogen and Potassium Concentrations in the Nutrients Solution for Melon Plants Growing in Coconut Fiber without Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Gratieri, Luiz Augusto; Cecílio Filho, Arthur Bernardes; Barbosa, José Carlos

    2013-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the effects of N and K concentrations for melon plants, an experiment was carried out from July 1, 2011 to January 3, 2012 in Muzambinho city, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The “Bonus no. 2” was cultivated at the spacing of 1.1 × 0.4. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replications in a 4 × 4 factorial scheme with four N concentrations (8, 12, 16, and 20 mmol L−1) and four K concentrations (4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol L−1). The experimental plot constituted of eight plants. It was observed that the leaf levels of N and K, of N-NO3 and of K, and the electrical conductivity (CE) of the substrate increased with the increment of N and K in the nutrients' solution. Substratum pH, in general, was reduced with increments in N concentration and increased with increasing K concentrations in the nutrients' solution. Leaf area increased with increments in N concentration in the nutrients solution. Fertigation with solutions stronger in N (20 mmol L−1) and K (10 mmol L−1) resulted in higher masses for the first (968 g) and the second (951 g) fruits and crop yield (4,425 gm−2). PMID:23864827

  19. Effects of lead on anatomy, ultrastructure and concentration of nutrients in plants Oxycaryum cubense (Poep. & Kunth) Palla: a species with phytoremediator potential in contaminated watersheds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Laize Queiroz; de Jesus, Raildo Mota; de Almeida, Alex-Alan Furtado; Souza, Vânia Lima; Mangabeira, Pedro Antônio Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Lead (Pb) has been highlighted as a major pollutant of both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, causing negative impacts to these environments. The concentration of Pb in plants has increased in recent decades, mainly due to anthropogenic activities. This study has as a hypothesis that the species Oxycaryum cubense (Poep. & Kunth) Palla, abundant in aquatic environments, has the potential to be used a phytoremediator. The plants were grown in a hydroponic system with Pb in increasing concentrations (0, 4, 8, 16 and 32 mg l(-1)) for 15 days. Inductively coupled mass spectrometer (ICP OES) was used to determine the concentration of mineral nutrients and lead. Optical and transmission electron microscopy were used for the analysis of cellular damage induced by lead in roots and leaves. Ultrastructural alterations were observed as disorganization of thylakoids in the chloroplast and disruption of mitochondrial membranes in cells of leaf tissues of plants subjected to increasing Pb concentrations. There was accumulation of Pb, especially in the root system, affecting the absorption and translocation of some mineral nutrients analysed. In roots, there was reduction in the thickness of the epidermis in plants treated with Pb. This species was shown to be tolerant to the Pb concentrations evaluated, compartmentalizing and accumulating Pb mainly in roots. Due to these results, it may be considered a species with phytoremediation capacity for Pb, with potential rizofiltration of this metallic element in contaminated watersheds.

  20. Nutrient addition differentially affects ecological processes of Avicennia germinans in nitrogen versus phosphorus limited mangrove ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feller, Ilka C.; Lovelock, C.E.; McKee, K.L.

    2007-01-01

    Nutrient over-enrichment is a major threat to marine environments, but system-specific attributes of coastal ecosystems may result in differences in their sensitivity and susceptibility to eutrophication. We used fertilization experiments in nitrogen (N)- and phosphorus (P)-limited mangrove forests to test the hypothesis that alleviating different kinds of nutrient limitation may have different effects on ecosystem structure and function in natural systems. We compared a broad range of ecological processes to determine if these systems have different thresholds where shifts might occur in nutrient limitation. Growth responses indicated N limitation in Avicennia germinans (black mangrove) forests in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and P limitation at Twin Cays, Belize. When nutrient deficiency was relieved, A. germinans grew out of its stunted form by increasing wood relative to leaf biomass and shoot length relative to lateral growth. At the P-limited site, P enrichment (+P) increased specific leaf area, N resorption, and P uptake, but had no effect on P resorption. At the N-limited site, +N increased both N and P resorption, but did not alter biomass allocation. Herbivory was greater at the P-limited site and was unaffected by +P, whereas +N led to increased herbivory at the N-limited site. The responses to nutrient enrichment depended on the ecological process and limiting nutrient and suggested that N- versus P-limited mangroves do have different thresholds. +P had a greater effect on more ecological processes at Twin Cays than did +N at the IRL, which indicated that the P-limited site was more sensitive to nutrient loading. Because of this sensitivity, eutrophication is more likely to cause a shift in nutrient limitation at P-limited Twin Cays than N-limited IRL. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  1. A method to estimate the impact of clear-cutting on nutrient concentrations in boreal headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Palviainen, Marjo; Finér, Leena; Laurén, Ari; Mattsson, Tuija; Högbom, Lars

    2015-10-01

    Large-scale forestry operations, like clear-cutting, may impair surface water quality if not done with environmental considerations in mind. Catchment and country level estimates of nutrient loads from forestry are generally based on specific export values, i.e., changes in annual exports due to the implemented forestry operations expressed in kg ha(-1). We introduce here a specific concentration approach as a method to estimate the impact of clear-cutting on nutrient concentrations and export in headwater streams. This new method is potentially a more dynamic and flexible tool to estimate nutrient loads caused by forestry, because variation in annual runoff can be taken into account in load assessments. We combined water quality data from eight boreal headwater catchment pairs located in Finland and Sweden, where the effect of clear-cutting on stream water quality has been studied experimentally. Statistically significant specific concentration values could be produced for total nitrogen, nitrate, ammonium, and phosphate. The significant increases in the concentrations of these nutrients occurred between 2 and 6 years after clear-cutting. Significant specific concentration values could not be produced for total phosphorus and total organic carbon with the whole dataset, although in some single studies significant increases in their concentrations after clear-cutting were observed. The presented method enables taking into account variation in runoff, temporal dynamics of effects, and the proportional size of the treated area in load calculations. The number of existing studies considering large site-specific variation in responses to clear-cutting is small, and therefore further empirical studies are needed to improve predictive capabilities of the specific concentration values.

  2. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  3. Effect of Temperature and Nutrient Concentration on Survival of Foodborne Pathogens in Deciduous Fruit Processing Environments for Effective Hygiene Management.

    PubMed

    Duvenage, Stacey; Korsten, Lise

    2016-11-01

    Temperature and good sanitation practices are important factors for controlling growth of microorganisms. Fresh produce is stored at various temperatures to ensure quality and to prolong shelf life. When foodborne pathogens survive and grow on fresh produce at storage temperatures, then additional control strategies are needed to inactivate these pathogens. The aim of this study was to determine how temperatures associated with deciduous fruit processing and storage facilities (0.5, 4, and 21°C) affect the growth and/or survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes , Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus under different nutrient conditions (nutrient rich and nutrient poor) and on simulated contact surfaces (vinyl coupons). Information on the growth and survival of foodborne pathogens at specific deciduous fruit processing and storage temperatures (0.5°C) is not available. All pathogens except E. coli O157:H7 were able to survive on vinyl coupons at all temperatures. L. monocytogenes proliferated under both nutrient conditions independent of temperature. S. aureus was the pathogen least affected by nutrient conditions. The survival of foodborne pathogens on the vinyl coupons, a model system for studying surfaces in fruit preparation and storage environments, indicates the potential for cross-contamination of deciduous fruit products under poor sanitation conditions. Foodborne pathogens that can proliferate and survive at various temperatures under different nutrient conditions could lead to fruit cross-contamination. Temperature mismanagement, which could allow pathogen proliferation in contaminated fruit packing houses and storage environments, is a concern. Therefore, proper hygiene and sanitation practices, removal of possible contaminants, and proper food safety management systems are needed to ensure food safety.

  4. Spatial and temporal variability in nutrient concentrations in surface waters of the Chattahoochee River basin near Atlanta, Georgia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Buell, G.R.; Frick, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Nutrient concentrations from the early 1970s through 1995 were evaluated at several sites along the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries near Atlanta, to determine general patterns and processes controlling nutrient concentrations in the river. A spatial analysis was conducted on data collected in 1994 and 1995 from an intensive nutrient study of the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division. The 1994-1995 data show step increases in ammonium (NH4-N), nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3-N), and total-phosphorus (Tot-P) concentrations in the river. The step increases occur downstream of two wastewater treatment facilities (WWTFs) and Peachtree Creek, a small tributary inflow with degraded water quality draining a predominantly urban and industrial area. Median NO2 + NO3-N and Tot-P concentrations in the mainstem increase downstream of these inputs from 0.5 to 1 mg 1-1 and from 0.04 to 0.13 mg 1-1, respectively. NH4-N concentrations were typically low with 95% of the 2575 observations less than 0.2 mg 1-1 throughout the river system, except some high values (>1 mg 1-1) in some tributaries, particularly near the central part of Atlanta. High NH4-N concentrations are attributed to sewage discharge as they also are associated with high biological oxygen demand and faecal coliform bacteria concentrations. Nutrient concentrations vary temporally. An assessment of four sites, two mainstem and two tributaries, from 1970 to 1995 indicates a progressive increase and variability in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations during the period. The progressive increase in NO2 + NO3-N concentrations and their variability is similar to that reported for surface waters throughout the world and for which increased fertilizer usage has been attributed. Tot-P concentrations increase at mainstem sites through the middle to late 1980s and decrease markedly thereafter, due to improvements to WWTFs and a 1990 phosphate

  5. Phytotoxic effects of nickel on yield and concentration of macro- and micro-nutrients in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) achenes.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Aqeel; Ashraf, Muhammad; Hussain, Mumtaz

    2011-01-30

    The phytotoxic effects of varying levels of nickel (0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg L(-1)) on growth, yield and accumulation of macro- and micro-nutrients in leaves and achenes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were appraised in this study. A marked reduction in root and shoot fresh biomass was recorded at higher Ni levels. Nickel stress also caused a substantial decrease in all macro- and micro-nutrients in leaves and achenes. The lower level of Ni (10 mg L(-1)) had a non-significant effect on various yield attributes, but higher Ni levels considerably decreased these parameters. Higher Ni levels decreased the concentrations of Ca, Mn and Fe in achenes. In contrast, achene N, K, Zn, Mn and Cu decreased consistently with increasing level of Ni, even at lower level (10 mg L(-1)). Sunflower hybrid Hysun-33 had better yield and higher most of the nutrients in achenes as compared with SF-187. The maximum reduction in all parameters was observed at the maximum level of nickel (40 mg L(-1)) where almost all parameters were reduced more than 50% of those of control plants. In conclusion, the pattern of uptake and accumulation of different nutrients in sunflower plants were nutrient- and cultivar-specific under Ni-stress.

  6. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, S.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Voshell, J.R.

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO 4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17??-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations >1ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (>1000??g/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R 2=0.56-0.81) and E2Eq (R 2=0.39-0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO 4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R 2=0.27-0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO 4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO 4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effects of watershed densities of animal feeding operations on nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity in agricultural streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ciparis, Serena; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Voshell, J. Reese

    2012-01-01

    Application of manures from animal feeding operations (AFOs) as fertilizer on agricultural land can introduce nutrients and hormones (e.g. estrogens) to streams. A landscape-scale study was conducted in the Shenandoah River watershed (Virginia, USA) in order to assess the relationship between densities of AFOs in watersheds of agricultural streams and in-stream nutrient concentrations and estrogenic activity. The effect of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) on nutrients and estrogenic activity was also evaluated. During periods of high and low flow, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and orthophosphate (PO4-P) concentrations were analyzed and estrogens/estrogenic compounds were extracted and quantified as17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) using a bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen. Estrogenic activity was measurable in the majority of collected samples, and 20% had E2Eq concentrations > 1 ng/L. Relatively high concentrations of DIN (> 1000 μg/L) were also frequently detected. During all sampling periods, there were strong relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and in-stream concentrations of DIN (R2 = 0.56–0.81) and E2Eq (R2 = 0.39–0.75). Relationships between watershed densities of AFOs and PO4-P were weaker, but were also significant (R2 = 0.27–0.57). When combined with the effect of watershed AFO density, streams receiving WWTP effluent had higher concentrations of PO4-P than streams without WWTP discharges, and PO4-P was the only analyte with a consistent relationship to WWTPs. The results of this study suggest that as the watershed density of AFOs increases, there is a proportional increase in the potential for nonpoint source pollution of agricultural streams and their receiving waters by nutrients, particularly DIN, and compounds that can cause endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms.

  8. Dissolved oxygen concentration affects hybrid striped bass growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. Three studies were conducted to quantify performance traits and metabolic responses of hybrid striped b...

  9. Timing of Levothyroxine Administration Affects Serum Thyrotropin Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Bach-Huynh, Thien-Giang; Nayak, Bindu; Loh, Jennifer; Soldin, Steven; Jonklaas, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Context: Patients treated with levothyroxine typically ingest it in a fasting state to prevent food impairing its absorption. The serum thyrotropin concentration is the therapeutic index of levothyroxine action. Objective: The study objective was to determine the effect of the timing of levothyroxine administration in relationship to food on serum thyrotropin levels. Design: Participants were randomized to one of six sequences, each consisting of three 8-wk regimens in a three-period crossover design. These regimens were in a fasting state, at bedtime, and with breakfast. The concentrations of TSH, free T4, and total T3 during each of the three timing regimens were documented. The primary outcome was the difference between serum TSH concentrations under fasting conditions compared with concentrations during the other 8-wk regimens. Setting: The study was conducted in an academic medical center. Participants: Study participants were receiving levothyroxine for treatment of hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer. Results: Sixty-five patients completed the study. The mean thyrotropin concentration was 1.06 ± 1.23 mIU/liter when levothyroxine was administered in the fasting state. When levothyroxine was taken with breakfast, the serum thyrotropin concentration was significantly higher (2.93 ± 3.29 mIU/liter). When levothyroxine was taken at bedtime, the serum TSH concentration was also significantly higher (2.19 ± 2.66 mIU/liter). Conclusion: Nonfasting regimens of levothyroxine administration are associated with higher and more variable serum TSH concentrations. If a specific serum TSH goal is desired, thereby avoiding iatrogenic subclinical thyroid disease, then fasting ingestion of levothyroxine ensures that TSH concentrations remain within the narrowest target range. PMID:19584184

  10. Influence of salinity and organic nutrient concentration on survival and growth of Vibrio cholerae in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed Central

    Singleton, F L; Attwell, R W; Jangi, M S; Colwell, R R

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory microcosms were employed to evaluate the influence of selected environmental parameters, organic nutrient concentration, and salinity on the growth and survival of a toxigenic strain of Vibrio cholerae LA4808. Over the range conditions tested, this strain of V. cholerae showed maximum response as determined by increased plate counts and direct microscopic counts in microcosms prepared with a chemically defined sea salts solution at a salinity of 25%, but with lower or higher salinity levels, the maximum population size declined. When added organic concentrations of less than 1,000 micrograms/liter were present, a marked salinity effect on the growth of V. cholerae was detected. However, at or above an organic nutrient concentration of 1,000 micrograms/liter, the need for an optimum salinity level was spared. From the results of this study, it is concluded that V. cholerae can grow under conditions of organic nutrient concentration and salinity typical of estuaries. Results obtained support the hypothesis that V. cholerae is an autochthonous member of the estuarine microbial community. PMID:6896621

  11. Water uptake and nutrient concentrations under a floodplain oak savanna during a non-flood period, lower Cedar River, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, K.E.; Jacobson, P.

    2009-01-01

    Floodplains during non-flood periods are less well documented than when flooding occurs, but non-flood periods offer opportunities to investigate vegetation controls on water and nutrient cycling. In this study, we characterized water uptake and nutrient concentration patterns from 2005 to 2007 under an oak savanna located on the floodplain of the Cedar River in Muscatine County, Iowa. The water table ranged from 0.5 to 2.5 m below ground surface and fluctuated in response to stream stage, plant water demand and rainfall inputs. Applying the White method to diurnal water table fluctuations, daily ET from groundwater averaged more than 3.5 mm/day in June and July and approximately 2 mm/day in May and August. Total annual ET averaged 404 mm for a growing season from mid-May to mid-October. Savanna groundwater concentrations of nitrate-N, ammonium-N, and phosphate-P were very low (mean <0.18, <0.14, <0.08 mg/l, respectively), whereas DOC concentrations were high (7.1 mg/l). Low concentrations of N and P were in contrast to high nutrient concentrations in the nearby Cedar River, where N and P averaged 7.5 mg/ l and 0.13, respectively. In regions dominated by intensive agriculture, study results document valuable ecosystem services for native floodplain ecosystems in reducing watershed-scale nutrient losses and providing an oasis for biological complexity. Improved understanding of the environmental conditions of regionally significant habitats, including major controls on water table elevations and water quality, offers promise for better management aimed at preserving the ecology of these important habitats. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Development and Application of Regression Models for Estimating Nutrient Concentrations in Streams of the Conterminous United States, 1992-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, Norman E.; Mueller, David K.; Wolock, David M.; Hitt, Kerie J.; Gronberg, JoAnn M.

    2010-01-01

    Data collected for the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment program from 1992-2001 were used to investigate the relations between nutrient concentrations and nutrient sources, hydrology, and basin characteristics. Regression models were developed to estimate annual flow-weighted concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus using explanatory variables derived from currently available national ancillary data. Different total-nitrogen regression models were used for agricultural (25 percent or more of basin area classified as agricultural land use) and nonagricultural basins. Atmospheric, fertilizer, and manure inputs of nitrogen, percent sand in soil, subsurface drainage, overland flow, mean annual precipitation, and percent undeveloped area were significant variables in the agricultural basin total nitrogen model. Significant explanatory variables in the nonagricultural total nitrogen model were total nonpoint-source nitrogen input (sum of nitrogen from manure, fertilizer, and atmospheric deposition), population density, mean annual runoff, and percent base flow. The concentrations of nutrients derived from regression (CONDOR) models were applied to drainage basins associated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) River Reach File (RF1) to predict flow-weighted mean annual total nitrogen concentrations for the conterminous United States. The majority of stream miles in the Nation have predicted concentrations less than 5 milligrams per liter. Concentrations greater than 5 milligrams per liter were predicted for a broad area extending from Ohio to eastern Nebraska, areas spatially associated with greater application of fertilizer and manure. Probabilities that mean annual total-nitrogen concentrations exceed the USEPA regional nutrient criteria were determined by incorporating model prediction uncertainty. In all nutrient regions where criteria have been established, there is at least a 50 percent probability of exceeding

  13. NUTRIENT DYNAMICS IN RELATION TO GEOMORPHOLOGY OF RIVERINE WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variation in water depth and soil properties associated with geomorphic structures can affect riverine wetland nutrient dynamics by altering biogeochemical processes. We examined the seasonal influence of soils and geomorphology on nutrient forms and concentrations in riverine we...

  14. Growth, morphology, ammonium uptake and nutrient allocation of Myriophyllum brasiliense Cambess. under high NH₄⁺ concentrations.

    PubMed

    Saunkaew, Piyanart; Wangpakapattanawong, Prasit; Jampeetong, Arunothai

    2011-11-01

    The effects of high NH(4)(+) concentration on growth, morphology, NH(4) (+) uptake and nutrient allocation of Myriophyllum brasiliense were investigated in hydroponic culture. The plants were grown under greenhouse conditions for 4 weeks using four levels of NH(4)(+) concentration: 1, 5, 10 and 15 mM. M. brasiliense grew well with a relative growth rate of c.0.03 day(-1) at NH(4)(+) concentration up to 5 mM. At the higher NH(4)(+) concentrations the growth of the plants was stunted and the plants had short roots and few new buds, especially when grown in 15 mM NH(4)(+) where the submerged leaves were lost and there were rotten roots and submerged stems. To avoid NH(4)(+) toxicity, the plants may have a mechanism to prevent cytoplasmic NH(4)(+) accumulation in plant cells. The net uptake of NH(4)(+) significantly decreased and the total N significantly increased in the plants treated with 10 and 15 mM NH(4)(+), respectively. The plant may employ NH(4)(+) assimilation and extrusion as a mechanism to compensate for the high NH(4)(+) concentrations. However, the plants may show nutrient deficiency symptoms, especially K deficiency symptoms, after they were exposed to NH(4)(+) concentration higher than 10 mM. The present study provides a basic ecophysiology of M. brasiliense that it can grow in NH(4)(+) enriched water up to concentrations as high as 5 mM.

  15. Effect of volcano ash additions on nutrient concentrations, bloom dynamics and community metabolism in a short-term experiment in the NW Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinbauer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Volcano ash deposition is now considered as an important source of inorganic bioavailable iron which can relieve Fe-limitation in the ocean. As volcano ash also releases PO4, a experiment was performed in the NW Mediterranean Sea to test whether volcano ash deposition can affect nutrient dynamics and bloom development in a P-limited system. In a 54h experiment, it was shown that the development of a phytoplankton bloom was not enhanced or even repressed by ash additions of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas higher ash concentrations (200 mg l-1) induced a phytoplankton bloom as indicated by elevated Chlorophyll-a levels. Concurrently, net community production (NCP) and gross primary production (GPP) were enhanced at T24h at the highest ash additions. The metabolic balance was roughly neutral at low or no ash additions, but shifted towards phototrophy at the highest ash additions. The data on inorganic nutrient development and release estimates from ash material assays suggest relieving of P-limitation concomitant with NO3 and silicate use from ash. The concentration of TEP increased with increasing ash levels. The abundances of the heterotrophic compartment (bacteria, viruses and ciliates) also indicated dose-dependent responses. Our data suggest that heterotrophs won the competition for inorganic nutrients at ash levels of 2 and 20 mg l-1, whereas phytoplankton won at levels of 200 mg l-1. Overall, our experiments point to a strong potential of volcano ash deposition as forcing factor for nutrient dynamics and the activity of microbial plankton in a P-limited system.

  16. Water quality in Indiana: trends in concentrations of selected nutrients, metals, and ions in streams, 2000-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risch, Martin R.; Bunch, Aubrey R.; Vecchia, Skip V.; Martin, Jeffrey D.; Baker, Nancy T.

    2014-01-01

    Statistically significant trends were identified that included 167 downward trends and 83 upward trends. The Kankakee River Basin had the most significant upward trends while the most significant downward trends were in the Whitewater River Basin, the Lake Michigan Basin, and the Patoka River Basin. For most constituents, a majority of sites had significant downward trends. Two streams in the Lake Michigan Basin have shown substantial decreases in most constituents. The West Fork White River near Indianapolis, Indiana, showed increases in nitrate and phosphorus and the Kankakee River Basin showed increases in copper, zinc, chloride, sulfate, and hardness. Upward trends in nutrients were identified at a few sites, but most nutrient trends were downward. Upward trends in metals corresponded with relatively small concentration increases while downward trends involved considerably larger concentration changes. Downward trends in chloride, sulfate, and suspended solids were observed statewide, but upward trends in hardness were observed in the northern half of Indiana.

  17. Factors affecting indoor radon concentrations in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gunby, J A; Darby, S C; Miles, J C; Green, B M; Cox, D R

    1993-01-01

    Data collected in a nationwide study on natural radiation exposure in UK dwellings (Wrixon et al. 1988) were re-analyzed to investigate the effects of rock type and various building and lifestyle characteristics, taken into account simultaneously, on indoor radon concentrations. A multiplicative model which takes into consideration the outdoor radon concentration is used. Indoor radon concentrations were found to be influenced by type of rock underlying the dwelling, double glazing, house type, floor level of rooms in which measurements were taken, window opening habits in the main bedroom, building materials used in the construction of the walls, floor type, and draught proofing. However, these eight factors together account for only 22% of the variation between dwellings. Estimates of the size of the effect associated with each factor are given.

  18. Factors affecting pollutant concentrations in the near-road environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Nichole; Gilani, Owais; Raja, Suresh; Batterman, Stuart; Ganguly, Rajiv; Hopke, Philip; Berrocal, Veronica; Robins, Thomas; Hoogterp, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    An improved understanding of traffic-related air pollutants is needed to estimate exposures and adverse health impacts in traffic corridors and near-road environments. In this study, concentrations of black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2, NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and particulate matter (PM2.5, PM10, ultrafine particles, and accumulation mode particles, AMP) were measured using a mobile air pollutant laboratory along nine transects across major roads in Detroit, MI in winter 2012. Repeated measurements were taken during rush-hour periods at sites in residential neighborhoods located 50-500 m from both sides of the road. Concentration gradients attributable to on-road emissions were estimated by accounting for traffic volume and mix, wind speed, wind direction, and background concentrations. BC, NO, NOx, and UFP had the strongest gradients, and elevated concentrations of NOx, NO2, PM2.5 and PM10, as well as decreased particle size, were found at the 50 m sites compared to background levels. Exponential models incorporating effects of road size, wind speed, and up- and downwind distance explained from 31 to 53% of the variability in concentration gradients for BC, NO, NOx, UFP and particle size. The expected concentration increments 50 m from the study roads were 17.0 ppb for NO, 17.7 ppb for NOx, 2245 particles/cm3 for UFP, and 0.24 μg/m3 for BC, and the expected distance to decrease increments by half was 89-129 m in the downwind direction, and 14-20 m in the upwind direction. While accounting for portion of the temporal and spatial variability across transects and measurement periods, these results highlight the influence of road-to-road differences and other locally-varying factors important in urban and industrial settings. The study demonstrates a methodology to quantify near-road concentrations and influences on these concentrations while accounting for temporal and spatial variability, and it provides information useful for estimating exposures of

  19. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria affect the growth and nutrient uptake of Fraxinus americana container seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fangchun; Xing, Shangjun; Ma, Hailin; Du, Zhenyu; Ma, Bingyao

    2013-05-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are important catalysts that regulate the functional properties of agricultural systems. However, there is little information on the effect of PGPR inoculation on the growth and nutrient accumulation of forest container seedlings. This study determined the effects of a growth medium inoculated with PGPR on the nutrient uptake, nutrient accumulation, and growth of Fraxinus americana container seedlings. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the dry matter accumulation of the F. americana aerial parts with delayed seedling emergence time. Under fertilized conditions, the accumulation time of phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) in the F. americana aerial parts was 13 days longer due to PGPR inoculation. PGPR increased the maximum daily P and K accumulations in fertilized seedlings by 9.31 and 10.44 %, respectively, but had little impact on unfertilized ones. Regardless of fertilizer application, the root exudates, namely sugars, amino acids, and organic acids significantly increased because of PGPR inoculation. PGPR inoculation with fertilizer increased the root, shoot, and leaf yields by 19.65, 22.94, and 19.44 %, respectively, as well as the P and K contents by 8.33 and 10.60 %, respectively. Consequently, the N, P, and K uptakes increased by 19.85, 31.97, and 33.95 %, respectively. Hence, PGPR inoculation with fertilizer can be used as a bioenhancer for plant growth and nutrient uptake in forest container seedling nurseries.

  20. Runoff nutrient transport as affected by land application method, swine growth stage, and runoff rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to measure the effects of slurry application method, swine growth stage, and flow rate on runoff nutrient transport. Swine slurry was obtained from production units containing grower pigs, finisher pigs, or sows and gilts. The swine slurry was applied using broadcast, disk, ...

  1. Runoff nutrient loads as affected by residue cover, manure application rate, and flow rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure is applied to cropland areas with varying surface cover to meet single- or multiple-year crop nutrient requirements. The objectives of this field study were to (1) examine runoff water quality characteristics following land application of manure to sites with and without wheat residue, (2) co...

  2. Carrot, Corn, Lettuce and Soybean Nutrient Contents are Affected by Biochar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biochar, the carbon-rich material remaining after pyrolysis of cellulosic and manure feedstocks, has the potential as a soil amendment to sequester carbon and to improve soil water-holding and nutrient properties- thereby enhancing plant growth. However, biochar produced from so...

  3. Seasonal variation in the concentrations of nutrients in two green macroalgae and nutrient levels in sediments in the Rı´as Baixas (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villares, R.; Carballeira, A.

    2003-12-01

    Seasonal monitoring of the levels of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in two green macroalgae ( Ulva and Enteromorpha) was carried out at 22 sampling sites in four embayments (rı´as) on the northwest coast of Spain. Sediments were also analysed to determine the concentrations of these elements as well as organic matter, organic carbon, iron and texture. In addition, accumulations of Ulva were monitored. Nitrogen levels in algae were similar to those found in comparable studies, whereas carbon concentrations were generally higher and those of phosphorus were lower. As a result the macroalgae were relatively enriched by carbon and nitrogen compared with phosphorus. Seasonal variations in algal tissue nitrogen and phosphorus followed the usual pattern for temperate zones, with minimum levels in summer and maximum levels in winter. Variations in carbon concentrations were much less accentuated. The low levels of P in the algae appear to indicate limitation by this element, however, comparison of the monthly changes in nitrogen and phosphorus in Ulva with the critical concentrations of these elements suggests dual nutrient limitation in this alga in summer. By contrast, the sediments were more enriched by phosphorus; high retention of this element by the sediment may explain the low levels in algae. The highest accumulations of Ulva occurred in spring and summer; hydrodynamic factors appeared to be important in determining the extent of these accumulations.

  4. U.S. Geological Survey nutrient preservation experiment; nutrient concentration data for surface-, ground-, and municipal-supply water samples and quality-assurance samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, Charles J.; Truitt, Earl P.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of analytical results from a study conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) in 1992 to assess the effectiveness of three field treatment protocols to stabilize nutrient concentra- tions in water samples stored for about 1 month at 4C. Field treatments tested were chilling, adjusting sample pH to less than 2 with sulfuric acid and chilling, and adding 52 milligrams of mercury (II) chloride per liter of sample and chilling. Field treatments of samples collected for determination of ammonium, nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen, orthophosphate, and dissolved phosphorus included 0.45-micrometer membrane filtration. Only total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorus were determined in unfiltered samples. Data reported here pertain to water samples collected in April and May 1992 from 15 sites within the continental United States. Also included in this report are analytical results for nutrient concentrations in synthetic reference samples that were analyzed concurrently with real samples.

  5. Investigating Factors that Affect Dissolved Oxygen Concentration in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes activities that demonstrate the effects of factors such as wind velocity, water temperature, convection currents, intensity of light, rate of photosynthesis, atmospheric pressure, humidity, numbers of decomposers, presence of oxidizable ions, and respiration by plants and animals on the dissolved oxygen concentration in water. (MA)

  6. Maternal investment and nutrient use affect phenotype of American alligator and domestic chicken hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Thomas C; Groth, Kevin D; Sotherland, Paul R

    2010-09-01

    Maternal investment by oviparous amniotes, in the form of yolk and albumen, and the mechanisms by which embryos use available energy and nutrients have a profound effect on embryo and, consequently, hatchling phenotype. Nutrient provisioning and uptake vary within and among oviparous taxa, avian and non-avian reptiles, due to differences and similarities in environment, behavior, and phylogeny. Eggs of crocodilians, the closest extant relatives to modern birds, are ideal models for examining modes of embryonic development, especially with regard to nutrient uptake, in non-avian reptiles and comparing them with those of birds. In this study, we investigated egg composition, embryo growth, and nutrient use in the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus) and American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). We explored egg composition by separating and weighing components of fresh eggs. We measured embryo growth and nutrient usage by dissecting embryos and by obtaining samples of liquid from the amnion, digestive tract, and yolk sac throughout the last half of incubation. Variation in albumen mass contributed most to egg mass variation in chicken eggs, whereas alligator eggs were composed almost equally of yolk and albumen, although larger eggs contained proportionally more albumen and less yolk than smaller eggs. Both chicken and alligator albumen were mostly water (87% and 96%, respectively) although chicken albumen contained over three times more solid mass per gram than alligator albumen. In both species, yolk contained a high proportion of solids. Larger eggs produced larger hatchlings in both chickens and alligators, but albumen solids contributed to embryo mass only in chicken embryos. However, intact albumen proteins appeared in the stomach in embryos of both species. While the final disposition of albumen in alligators is unclear, variation in maternal investment of yolk at oviposition was responsible for nearly all of the variation in alligator hatchling phenotype

  7. Maize (Zea mays L) cultivars nutrients concentration in leaves and stalks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is pressure for crop residue removal for use as biofuel, animal feed, animal bedding and many other functions which may increase nutrient export. However, there is little information about nutritional composition of maize stover considering the wide variability of cultivars used. The aim of th...

  8. Corn response and soil nutrient concentration from subsurface application of poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilizer management is vital to corn (Zea mays L.) production from financial and environmental perspectives. Poultry litter as a nutrient source in this cropping system is generally surface broadcast, potentially causing volatilization of NH3. Recently a new application method was devel...

  9. No-till corn response and soil nutrient concentrations from subsurface banding of poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilizer management is vital to no-till corn (Zea mays) production from financial and environmental perspectives. Poultry litter as a nutrient source in this cropping system is generally land applied by surface broadcast, potentially causing volatilization of ammonia (NH3)-N. Recently a...

  10. Nutrient and toxic element soil concentrations during repeated mineral and compost fertilization treatments in a Mediterranean agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Baldantoni, Daniela; Morra, Luigi; Saviello, Giovanni; Alfani, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Agricultural soils of semi-arid Mediterranean areas are often subjected to depletion of their chemical, physical, and biological properties. In this context, organic fertilization, in addition to providing nutrients for a longer time in respect to mineral fertilization, improves many other characteristics related to soil fertility. Moreover, the combined use of organic and mineral fertilizers may promote a more sustainable crop production. However, a concern on the long-term use of organic fertilizers arises in relation to the possible accumulation of toxic elements in soil and their transfer to human beings. For this reason, a long-term study on nutrient and toxic element total concentrations and availabilities during fertilization treatments was carried out. In particular, mineral NPK fertilized soils, soils amended with biowaste compost, soils amended with biowaste compost plus mineral nitrogen, and unfertilized soils were analyzed for 11 chemical elements. The results highlighted that temporal variations in total and bioavailable concentrations of both nutrients and toxic elements, occurring also in unfertilized soils, are wider than those related to fertilization treatments. Anyway, soil amendments with biowaste compost, alone or in combination with mineral fertilizers, reduce Cu bioavailability but improve K, Fe, Mn, and Zn availabilities, excluding at the same time a long-term accumulation in soil. Total and bioavailable toxic element concentrations (apart from available Cd) do not vary in relation to fertilization treatments.

  11. Nutritional plane and selenium supply during gestation affect yield and nutrient composition of colostrum and milk in primiparous ewes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A M; Reed, J J; Neville, T L; Thorson, J F; Maddock-Carlin, K R; Taylor, J B; Reynolds, L P; Redmer, D A; Luther, J S; Hammer, C J; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S

    2011-05-01

    cell count and total somatic cells were greater (P ≤ 0.05) in milk from CON than RES. A cubic effect of day (P ≥ 0.01) was observed for milk yield (g and mL). Butterfat, solids-not-fat, lactose, milk urea N, and Se concentration responded quadratically (P ≤ 0.01) to day. Protein (%), total butterfat, and total Se, and somatic cells (cells/mL and cells/d) decreased linearly (P < 0.01) with day. Results indicate that gestational nutrition affects colostrum and milk yield and nutrient content, even when lactational nutrient requirements are met.

  12. Temporal variability in nutrient concentrations and loads in the River Tamar and its catchment (SW England) between 1974 and 2004.

    PubMed

    Tappin, Alan D; Mankasingh, Utra; McKelvie, Ian D; Worsfold, Paul J

    2013-06-01

    This study reports the results from the analyses of a 30-year (1974-2004) river water quality monitoring dataset for NO x -N (NO₃-N + NO2-N), NH₄-N, PO₄-P and SiO₂-Si at the tidal limit of the River Tamar (SW England), an agriculturally dominated and sparsely populated catchment. Annual mean concentrations of NH4-N, PO₄-P and SiO₂-Si were similar to other rural UK rivers, while annual mean concentrations of NO x -N were clearly lower. Estimated values for the 1940s were much lower than for those of post-1974, at least for NO₃-N and PO₄-P. Flow-weighted mean concentrations of PO₄-P decreased by approximately 60 % between 1974 and 2004, although this change cannot be unequivocally ascribed to either PO₄-P stripping from sewage treatment work effluents or reductions in phosphate fertiliser applications. Lower-resolution sampling (to once per month) in the late 1990s may also have led to the apparent decline; a similar trend was also seen for NH4-N. There were no temporal trends in the mean concentrations of NO x -N, emphasising the continuing difficulty in controlling diffuse pollution from agriculture. Concentrations of SiO₂-Si and NO x -N were significantly and positively correlated with river flows ≤15 m(3) s(-1), showing that diffuse inputs from the catchment were important, particularly during the wet winter periods. In contrast, concentrations of PO₄-P and NH4-N did not correlate across any flow window, despite the apparent importance of diffuse inputs for these constituents. This observation, coupled with the absence of a seasonal (monthly) cycle for these nutrients, indicates that, for PO₄-P and NH4-N, there were no dominant sources and/or both undergo extensive within-catchment processing. Analyses of nutrient fluxes reveal net losses for NO₃-N and SiO₂-Si during the non-winter months; for NO3-N, this may be due to denitrification. Areal fluxes of NO x -N from the catchment were towards the higher end of the range for the UK

  13. Influence of tallow and calcium concentrations on the performance and energy and nutrient utilization in broiler starters.

    PubMed

    Tancharoenrat, P; Ravindran, V

    2014-06-01

    The influence of tallow and Ca concentrations on the performance, apparent ileal digestibility, and total tract retention of N, Ca, P, and AME in broiler starter diets fed corn-soy-based diets was examined. The experimental design was a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments evaluating 3 inclusion levels of tallow (0, 40, and 80 g/kg) and 3 dietary concentrations of Ca (7, 10, and 13 g/kg). Nine treatment diets were formulated to meet the requirements for major nutrients for broiler starters, except for AME and Ca concentrations. The results showed that increasing tallow inclusion increased (P < 0.001) the weight gain and lowered (P < 0.001) the feed to gain. Increasing dietary Ca concentrations decreased (P < 0.001) the weight gain. Birds fed diets containing 7 g/kg of Ca had similar (P > 0.05) feed to gain to 10 g/kg of Ca but lower (P < 0.05) than that of 13 g/kg of Ca. In diets with no tallow, increasing Ca concentrations decreased (P < 0.05) feed intake, whereas diets with 40 and 80 g/kg of tallow containing 13 g/kg of Ca showed lower (P < 0.05) feed intake than those of 7 and 10 g/kg of Ca. Diets supplemented with 40 and 80 g/kg of tallow containing 7 g/kg of Ca showed the lowest (P < 0.05) excreta soap content. Total tract retention of fat was higher (P < 0.001) in diets with 40 g/kg of tallow compared with those with 0 and 80 g/kg of tallow. Birds fed diets containing 7 g/kg of Ca had similar (P > 0.05) fat retention to that of 10 g/kg of Ca, but higher (P < 0.05) than that of 13 g/kg of Ca. Calcium retention decreased (P < 0.001) with increasing Ca concentrations. Diets containing 13 g/kg of Ca had the lowest (P < 0.01) P retention. Diets with no inclusion of tallow containing 7 g/kg of Ca had higher (P < 0.05) N retention than that of 13 g/kg of Ca, but similar to 10 g/kg of Ca, whereas in 40 g/kg of tallow diets, 7 g/kg of Ca had the highest (P < 0.05) N retention. Increasing fat inclusion increased (P < 0.001) the soap content in ileal digesta

  14. Geographic variation in the relationships of temperature, salinity or sigma sub t versus plant nutrient concentrations in the world ocean. [silicic acid, nitrate, and phosphate concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamykowski, D.; Zentara, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    A NODC data set representing all regions of the world ocean was analyzed for temperature and sigma-t relationships with nitrate, phosphate or silicic acid. Six cubic regressions were for each ten degree square of latitude and longitude containing adequate data. World maps display the locations that allow the prediction of plant nutrient concentrations from temperature or sigma-t. Geographic coverage improves along the sequence: nitrate, phosphate, and silicic acid and is better for sigma-t than for temperature. Contour maps of the approximate temperature of sigma-t at which these nitrients are no longer measurable in a parcel of water are generated, based on a percentile analysis of the temperature or sigma-t at which less than a selected amount of plant nutrient occurs. Results are stored on magnetic tape in tabular form. The global potential to predict plant nutrient concentrations from remotely sensed temperature of sigma-t and to emphasize the latitudinally and longitudinally changing phytoplankton growth environment in present and past oceans is demonstrated.

  15. Dietary sulfur concentration affects rumen hydrogen sulfide concentrations in feedlot steers during transition and finishing.

    PubMed

    Drewnoski, M E; Richter, E L; Hansen, S L

    2012-12-01

    Angus steers (n = 96; 321 ± 29 kg BW) were used to determine how previous exposure to increased dietary S would affect ruminal hydrogen sulfide concentrations ([H(2)S]) in the feedlot, to investigate the effects of dietary S on ruminal [H(2)S] during transition and finishing, and to determine if dietary S affects the glutathione status of finishing cattle. Steers were strip-grazed on smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis L.) over a 35 d period and received a dry distillers grains plus solubles (DDGS) supplement at 1% of BW (DM basis) that contained either 0.50% S (LS; n = 4 plots) or the DDGS supplement with an additional 0.30% S from sodium sulfate (0.80% S in supplement; HS; n = 4 plots). On d 36 steers were moved from the pastures to feedlot pens with one-half of the steers on each treatment in the pasture period remaining on the same treatment during the feedlot period and half being switched to the other treatment (n = 6 pens). For the first 10 d in the feedlot, steers were fed hay ad libitum and 1% BW of the DDGS supplement representing their new treatment, followed by transition to finishing diets. Dietary S of transition and finishing diets were 0.2% to 0.3% S for LS and 0.5% to 0.6% S for HS. No interaction between pasture and feedlot treatment was observed (P ≥ 0.50), so data for the feedlot period were pooled by feedlot treatment (n = 12 pens). Rumen [H(2)S] were measured on d 35 of the pasture period and on d 46 while receiving ad libitum hay and supplement at 6 h after the feeding of the supplement and after 7 d on each of the 3 transition diets (d 53, 60, and 67) and on d 93, 126, and 155 of the study after receiving the finishing diet for 26, 59, and 88 d at 6 h after feeding. Ruminal [H(2)S] did not differ between treatment while steers were fed the supplement on forage-based diets. However, ruminal [H(2)S] of HS-fed steers was greater (P < 0.05) than LS-fed steers when transition diets and the finishing diets were fed. Relative to S intake, ruminal

  16. Growth, biomass allocation and nutrient use efficiency in Cladium jamaicense and Typha domingensis as affected by phosphorus and oxygen availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenzen, B.; Brix, H.; Mendelssohn, I.A.; McKee, K.L.; Miao, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of phosphorus (P) and oxygen availability on growth, biomass allocation and nutrient use efficiency in Cladium jamaicense Crantz and Typha domingensis Pers. were studied in a growth facility equipped with steady-state hydroponic rhizotrons. The treatments included four P concentrations (10, 40, 80 and 500 ??g I-1) and two oxygen concentration (8.0 and <0.5 mg O2 I-1) in the culture solutions. In Cladium, no clear relationship was found between P availability and growth rate (19-37 mg g-1 d-1), the above to below ground biomass ratio (A/B) (mean = 4.6), or nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) (mean = 72 g dry weight g-1 N). However, the ratio between root supported tissue (leaves, rhizomes and ramets) and root biomass (S/R) (5.6-8) increased with P availability. In contrast, the growth rate (48-89 mg g-1 d-1) and the biomass ratios A/B (2.4-6.1) and S/R (5.4-10.3) of Typha increased with P availability, while NUE (71-30 g dry weight g-1 N) decreased. The proportion of root laterals was similar in the two species, but Typha had thinner root laterals (diameter = 186 ??m) than Cladium (diameter = 438 ??m) indicating a larger root surface area in Typha. The two species had a similar P use efficiency (PUE) at 10 ??g PI-1 (mean = 1134 g dry weight g-1 P) and at 40 and 80 ??g PI-1 (mean = 482 dry weight g-1 P) but the N/P ratio indicated imbalances in nutrient uptake at a higher P concentration (40 ??g PI-1) in Typha than in Cladium (10 ??g PI-1). The two species had similar root specific P accumulation rate at the two lowest P levels, whereas Typha had 3-13-fold higher P uptake rates at the two highest P levels, indicating a higher nutrient uptake capacity in Typha. The experimental oxygen concentration in the rhizosphere had only limited effect on the growth of the two species and had little effect on biomass partitioning and nutrient use efficiency. The aerenchyma in these species was probably sufficient to maintain adequate root oxygenation under partially oxygen

  17. Do dietary intakes affect search for nutrient information on food labels?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan; Lee, Jonq-Ying; Yen, Steven T

    2004-11-01

    Nutrition labels on food packages are designed to promote and protect public health by providing nutrition information so that consumers can make informed dietary choices. High levels of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol in diets are linked to increased blood cholesterol levels and a greater risk of heart disease. Therefore, an understanding of consumer use of total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol information on food labels has important implications for public health and nutrition education. This study explores the association between dietary intakes of these three nutrients and psychological or demographic factors and the search for total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol information on food labels. Psychology literature suggests a negative association between intakes of these nutrients and probability of search for their information on food labels. Health behavior theories also suggest perceived benefits and costs of using labels and perceived capability of using labels are associated with the search behavior. We estimate the relationship between label information search and its predictors using logistic regressions. Our samples came from the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals and Diet and Health Knowledge Survey conducted by the United States Department of Agriculture. Results suggest that search for total fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol information on food labels is less likely among individuals who consume more of the three nutrients, respectively. The search is also related to perceived benefits and costs of using the label, perceived capability of using the label, knowledge of nutrition and fats, perceived efficacy of diets in reducing the risk of illnesses, perceived importance of nutrition in food shopping, perceived importance of a healthy diet, and awareness of linkage between excessive consumption of the nutrients and health problems. These findings suggest encouraging search of food label information among

  18. Microbial and Nutrient Concentration and Load Data During Stormwater Runoff at a Swine Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes water-quality and hydrologic data collected during 2006-2007 to characterize bacteria and nutrient loads associated with overland runoff and subsurface tile drainage in spray fields at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation. Four monitoring locations were established at the Lizzie Research Site in the North Carolina Coastal Plain Physiographic Province for collecting discharge and water-quality data during stormwater-runoff events. Water stage was measured continuously at each monitoring location. A stage-discharge relation was developed for each site and was used to compute instantaneous discharge values for collected samples. Water-quality samples were collected for five storm events during 2006-2007 for analysis of nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria. Instantaneous loads of nitrite plus nitrate, total coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci were computed for selected times during the five storm events.

  19. Nutrient concentrations and primary productivity at the Peros Banhos and Salomon atolls in the Chagos Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, R. F.; Drew, E. A.

    1984-02-01

    Coral atolls are areas of high biological productivity even though they are usually located in regions of the tropical ocean characterized by low primary production and extremely low levels of vital dissolved nutrient materials. Recent studies have indicated the possible importance of in situ dinitrogen fixation on shallow reef flats in supplementing low oceanic nitrate levels and thus contributing to the maintenance of high reef productivity. Variations in the structure of atolls may have a direct bearing on the accumulation of fixed nitrogen and other nutrient materials, and consequently on lagoonal and reefal primary productivity. This paper investigates the effect of differing atoll configurations by comparing neighbouring, but structurally dissimilar, mid-ocean atolls. The findings are discussed in terms of ecosystem function and possible influences on the structural evolution of atolls.

  20. Do Foliar, Litter, and Root Nitrogen and Phosphorus Concentrations Reflect Nutrient Limitation in a Lowland Tropical Wet Forest?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation —as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization— based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9 % higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community. PMID:25901750

  1. Do foliar, litter, and root nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations reflect nutrient limitation in a lowland tropical wet forest?

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Clare, Silvia; Mack, Michelle C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding nutrient limitation of net primary productivity (NPP) is critical to predict how plant communities will respond to environmental change. Foliar nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations ([N] and [P]) and their ratio, have been used widely as indicators of plant nutritional status and have been linked directly to nutrient limitation of NPP. In tropical systems, however, a high number of confounding factors can limit the ability to predict nutrient limitation--as defined mechanistically by NPP responses to fertilization--based on the stoichiometric signal of the plant community. We used a long-term full factorial N and P fertilization experiment in a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica to explore how tissue (foliar, litter and root) [N] and [P] changed with fertilization, how different tree size classes and taxa influenced the community response, and how tissue nutrients related to NPP. Consistent with NPP responses to fertilization, there were no changes in community-wide foliar [N] and [P], two years after fertilization. Nevertheless, litterfall [N] increased with N additions and root [P] increased with P additions. The most common tree species (Pentaclethra macroloba) had 9% higher mean foliar [N] with NP additions and the most common palm species (Socratea exohrriza) had 15% and 19% higher mean foliar [P] with P and NP additions, respectively. Moreover, N:P ratios were not indicative of NPP responses to fertilization, either at the community or at the taxa level. Our study suggests that in these diverse tropical forests, tissue [N] and [P] are driven by the interaction of multiple factors and are not always indicative of the nutritional status of the plant community.

  2. Evaluation of Nutrient Concentrations, Sources, and Pathways in Three Urban Streams in Durham County, North Carolina using Stable Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSwain, K. B.; Giorgino, M.; Woolfolk, M.; Young, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    In 2010, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted nutrient-management strategies for the Falls Lake and Jordan Lake reservoirs that call for comprehensive controls to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus loads from sources in the watershed, including urban stormwater, wastewater, and agriculture. The City of Durham Public Works Department Stormwater Services Division is implementing best management practices (BMPs) for new and existing development to reduce nutrient inputs from stormwater. The many small watersheds that drain into Falls and Jordan Lakes typically have diverse sources of nutrients and other pollutants, a range of agricultural to urban land use and embedded urban infrastructure, and limited available space, making effective BMPs complex and expensive to implement. The U.S. Geological Survey and the City of Durham are collaborating to evaluate current and historic nutrient concentration data at three small urban stream sites, two located within the upper Neuse River basin upstream from Falls Lake, and one located upstream from Jordan Lake in the Cape Fear River basin. Use of stable isotopes to characterize sources and transport of nitrogen in these streams is being evaluated as a tool to optimize design and cost effectiveness of BMPs to improving water quality. Analyses of transport pathways and nitrogen sources is focusing on the feasibility of nutrient source tracking using stable isotopes in small drainage area urban watersheds. Six months of preliminary data suggest that the surface water in the small urban basins is mostly derived from precipitation and that atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an overlooked component. Results of this study will provide a basis for further study of other low-order urban streams of the North Carolina Piedmont Physiographic Province.

  3. Composting of waste paint sludge containing melamine resin as affected by nutrients and gypsum addition and microbial inoculation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongqiang; Chen, Liming; Gao, Lihong; Michel, Frederick C; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo; Dick, Warren A

    2012-03-01

    Melamine formaldehyde resins have hard and durable properties and are found in many products, including automobile paints. These resins contain high concentrations of nitrogen and, if properly composted, can yield valuable products. We evaluated the effects of starter compost, nutrients, gypsum and microbial inoculation on composting of paint sludge containing melamine resin. A bench-scale composting experiment was conducted at 55 °C for 91 days and then at 30 °C for an additional 56 days. After 91 days, the composts were inoculated with a mixed population of melamine-degrading microorganisms. Melamine resin degradation after the entire 147 days of composting varied between 73 and 95% for the treatments with inoculation of microorganisms compared to 55-74% for the treatments without inoculation. Degradation was also enhanced by nutrients and gypsum additions. Our results infer that large scale composting of melamine resins in paint sludge is possible.

  4. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Lehoczky, E.; Szabados, I.; Marth, P.

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers.

    PubMed

    House, R A

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.

  6. Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    House, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.35 references.

  7. Headwater Nutrient Concentration Patterns in Response to Storm Events Across Land Use Types using In Situ Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Wollheim, W. M.; Mulukutla, G. K.; Carey, R. O.; McDowell, W. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the aquatic biogeochemical impacts of land use change and climate variability will require improved understanding of nutrient variability over temporal scales ranging from storms to seasons. New in situ sensor technology offers the prospect of efficient nutrient measurements over multiple time scales. We quantified nutrient flux patterns in response to storm events across seasons using in situ nutrient sensors deployed in headwater streams draining three land use types (forest, suburban, and agriculture) within the Lamprey River watershed, New Hampshire, between April-December 2012. We utilized two sensor suites, each consisting of a Satlantic Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzer (NO3-N), Turner Designs C6 Multi-Sensor Platform (CDOM, Turbidity, Chl), Hydrolab MS5 (Dissolved Oxygen, pH), WET Labs Cycle P (PO4-P), and Hobo Water Level & Conductivity meters. Preliminary spring/summer comparisons at the suburban site suggest increased baseflow nitrate concentrations and decreased diurnal nitrate variability (~0.05 vs. 0.035 mg/L daily fluctuation) following leaf emergence in spring. Nitrate concentrations were diluted during storms. Hysteresis was evident, suggesting groundwater nitrate sources attributable to septic systems were diluted by surface runoff during spring storms. The agricultural stream showed similar but more extreme patterns of increasing baseflow nitrate during the summer (~2.4 to 4.1 mg/L) and dilution during storms. The compilation of a high-frequency dataset for headwater streams across seasons and land-use types will provide valuable insight into complex land use/water quality relationships in urbanizing watersheds.

  8. Factors affecting yearly variations of indoor radon concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, D.J.; Baynes, S.A.

    1996-06-01

    Since indoor radon exposures take place over many years while radon measurement periods are shorter, we are studying the yearly variation of indoor radon concentrations in approximately 100 houses located throughout Minnesota. Most houses were initially measured for one or more years in the late 1980`s and for 5 consecutive years starting in 1990. Two houses have been monitored for 12 y. Each year, two alpha track detectors were placed on the two lowest livable levels. The year-to-year variations averaged about 35% (corrected for instrumental uncertainties) in both basements and first floors. The minimum observed variation was 5% and the maximum was 130%. Some homes have shown substantial variation associated with Structural modifications. While most homes show no obvious systematic trends, a few houses have shown temporal trends that may be associated with aging or climate. We are studying possible correlation between year-to-year radon variation, climatic variables (yearly-average and seasonal such as heating/cooling degree days, precipitation, soil moisture), and structural changes.

  9. Real-time water quality monitoring and regression analysis to estimate nutrient and bacteria concentrations in Kansas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, V.G.; Rasmussen, P.P.; Ziegler, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    An innovative approach currently is underway in Kansas to estimate and monitoring constituent concentrations in streams. Continuous in-stream water-quality monitors are installed at selected U.S. Geological Survey stream-gaging stations to provide real-time measurement of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and total chlorophyll. In addition, periodic water samples are collected manually and analyzed for nutrients, bacteria, and other constituents of concern. Regression equations then are developed from measurements made by the water-quality monitors and analytical results of manually collected samples. These regression equations are used to estimate nutrient, bacteria, and other constituent concentrations. Concentrations then are available to calculate loads and yields to further assess water quality in watersheds. The continuous and real-time nature of the data may be important when considering recreational use of a water body; developing and monitoring total maximum daily loads; adjusting water-treatment strategies; and determining high constituent concentrations in time to prevent adverse effects on fish or other aquatic life.

  10. Assessment of Water and Nitrate-N deep percolation fluxes in soil as affected by irrigation and nutrient management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsehaye, Habte; Ceglie, Francesco; Mimiola, Giancarlo; dragonetti, giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Many farming practices can result in contamination of groundwater, due to the downward migration of fertilizers and pesticides through the soil profile. The detrimental effects of this contamination are not limited to deterioration of chemical and physical properties of soils and waters, but also constitute a real risk to human and ecosystem health. Groundwater contamination may come from a very large array of chemicals. Nevertheless, on a global scale the main cause of pollution is a high nitrate concentration in the aquifer water. Nitrate concentrations of groundwater have constantly increased during the last decades, and the widespread use of commercial N fertilizers has been implicated as the main causative factor. It is often claimed that nutrient management in organic farming is more environmentally sustainable than its conventional counterpart. It is commonly presumed that organic agriculture causes only minimal environmental pollution. There is scientific evidence that organic management may enhance some soil physical and biological properties. In particular, soil fertility management strategies can affect soil properties and the related hydrological processes. It is thus crucial to quantify and predict management effects on soil properties in order to evaluate the effects of soil type, natural processes such as decomposition of organic matter, irrigation applications and preferential flow on the deep percolation fluxes of water and nitrates to the groundwater. In this study, we measured the water fluxes and the quality of water percolating below the root zone, underlying organic agriculture systems in greenhouse. Specifically, the aim was to examine the effects of application time and type of organic matter in the soil on the nitrate-N deep percolation fluxes under the following three organic soil fertility strategies in greenhouse tomato experiment: i. Organic input Substitution (which will be hereafter denoted SUBST) is represented as typical

  11. Changing climate and nutrient transfers: Evidence from high temporal resolution concentration-flow dynamics in headwater catchments.

    PubMed

    Ockenden, M C; Deasy, C E; Benskin, C McW H; Beven, K J; Burke, S; Collins, A L; Evans, R; Falloon, P D; Forber, K J; Hiscock, K M; Hollaway, M J; Kahana, R; Macleod, C J A; Reaney, S M; Snell, M A; Villamizar, M L; Wearing, C; Withers, P J A; Zhou, J G; Haygarth, P M

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesise that climate change, together with intensive agricultural systems, will increase the transfer of pollutants from land to water and impact on stream health. This study builds, for the first time, an integrated assessment of nutrient transfers, bringing together a) high-frequency data from the outlets of two surface water-dominated, headwater (~10km(2)) agricultural catchments, b) event-by-event analysis of nutrient transfers, c) concentration duration curves for comparison with EU Water Framework Directive water quality targets, d) event analysis of location-specific, sub-daily rainfall projections (UKCP, 2009), and e) a linear model relating storm rainfall to phosphorus load. These components, in combination, bring innovation and new insight into the estimation of future phosphorus transfers, which was not available from individual components. The data demonstrated two features of particular concern for climate change impacts. Firstly, the bulk of the suspended sediment and total phosphorus (TP) load (greater than 90% and 80% respectively) was transferred during the highest discharge events. The linear model of rainfall-driven TP transfers estimated that, with the projected increase in winter rainfall (+8% to +17% in the catchments by 2050s), annual event loads might increase by around 9% on average, if agricultural practices remain unchanged. Secondly, events following dry periods of several weeks, particularly in summer, were responsible for high concentrations of phosphorus, but relatively low loads. The high concentrations, associated with low flow, could become more frequent or last longer in the future, with a corresponding increase in the length of time that threshold concentrations (e.g. for water quality status) are exceeded. The results suggest that in order to build resilience in stream health and help mitigate potential increases in diffuse agricultural water pollution due to climate change, land management practices should target

  12. Influences of spatial scale and soil permeability on relationships between land cover and baseflow stream nutrient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Daniel, F Bernard; Griffith, Michael B; Troyer, Michael E

    2010-02-01

    The Little Miami River (LMR) basin, dominated by agriculture, contains two geologically-distinct regions; a glaciated northern till plain with soils three times more permeable than a southern, pre-Wisconsinan drift plain. The influences of two landscape measures, percent row crop cover (%RCC, computed at three spatial scales), and soil permeability (PERM), on baseflow nutrient concentrations were modeled using linear regressions. Quarterly water samples collected for four years were analyzed for nitrate-N (NN), Kjeldahl-N (KN), total-N (TN), and total-P (TP). In till plain streams (n = 17), NN concentrations were 8.5-times greater than drift plain streams (n = 18), but KN and TP were 20-40% lower at comparable %RCC. These differences resulted in TN/TP molar ratios >80 in till plain streams, but <6 in drift plain streams. For till plain steams regression models based on %RCC accounted for 79% of the variance in NN concentrations but only 27% in drift plain streams. However, regressions on %RCC accounted for 68-75% of the KN and TP concentration variance in the drift plain streams but essentially none in the till plain. Catchment PERM influenced the regional NN/KN ratios which were 10-fold higher in the drift plain streams. For both till and drift streams the catchment scale %RCC gave the best predictions of NN, a water soluble anion, but the smaller spatial scales produced better models for insoluble nutrient species (e.g., KN and TP). Published literature on Ohio streams indicates that these inter-regional differences in nutrient ratios have potential implications for aquatic biota in the receiving streams.

  13. Land use and nutrient inputs affect priming in Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mganga, Kevin; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Organic C and nutrients additions in soil can accelerate mineralisation of soil organic matter i.e. priming effects. However, only very few studies have been conducted to investigate the priming effects phenomenon in tropical Andosols. Nutrients (N, P, N+P) and 14C labelled glucose were added to Andosols from six natural and intensively used ecosystems at Mt. Kilimanjaro i.e. (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) Chagga homegardens. Carbon-dioxide emissions were monitored over a 60 days incubation period. Mineralisation of glucose to 14CO2 was highest in coffee plantation and lowest in Chagga homegarden soils. Maximal and minimal mineralisation rates immediately after glucose additions were observed in lower montane forest with N+P fertilisation (9.1% ± 0.83 d -1) and in savannah with N fertilisation (0.9% ± 0.17 d -1), respectively. Glucose and nutrient additions accelerated native soil organic matter mineralisation i.e. positive priming. Chagga homegarden soils had the lowest 14CO2 emissions and incorporated the highest percent of glucose into microbial biomass. 50-60% of the 14C input was retained in soil. We attribute this mainly to the high surface area of non-crystalline constituents i.e. allophanes, present in Andosols and having very high sorption capacity for organic C. The allophanic nature of Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro especially under traditional Chagga homegarden agroforestry system shows great potential for providing essential environmental services, notably C sequestration. Key words: Priming Effects, Andosols, Land Use Changes, Mt. Kilimanjaro, Allophanes, Tropical Agroforestry

  14. Rising CO2 concentrations affect settlement behaviour of larval damselfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, B. M.; Munday, P. L.; Jones, G. P.

    2012-03-01

    Reef fish larvae actively select preferred benthic habitat, relying on olfactory, visual and acoustic cues to discriminate between microhabitats at settlement. Recent studies show exposure to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) impairs olfactory cue recognition in larval reef fishes. However, whether this alters the behaviour of settling fish or disrupts habitat selection is unknown. Here, the effect of elevated CO2 on larval behaviour and habitat selection at settlement was tested in three species of damselfishes (family Pomacentridae) that differ in their pattern of habitat use: Pomacentrus amboinensis (a habitat generalist), Pomacentrus chrysurus (a rubble specialist) and Pomacentrus moluccensis (a live coral specialist). Settlement-stage larvae were exposed to current-day CO2 levels or CO2 concentrations that could occur by 2100 (700 and 850 ppm) based on IPCC emission scenarios. First, pair-wise choice tests were performed using a two-channel flume chamber to test olfactory discrimination between hard coral, soft coral and coral rubble habitats. The habitat selected by settling fish was then compared among treatments using a multi-choice settlement experiment conducted overnight. Finally, settlement timing between treatments was compared across two lunar cycles for one of the species, P. chrysurus. Exposure to elevated CO2 disrupted the ability of larvae to discriminate between habitat odours in olfactory trials. However, this had no effect on the habitats selected at settlement when all sensory cues were available. The timing of settlement was dramatically altered by CO2 exposure, with control fish exhibiting peak settlement around the new moon, whereas fish exposed to 850 ppm CO2 displaying highest settlement rates around the full moon. These results suggest larvae can rely on other sensory information, such as visual cues, to compensate for impaired olfactory ability when selecting settlement habitat at small spatial scales. However, rising CO2 could cause larvae

  15. Polycube oxidation and factors affecting the concentrations of gaseous products

    SciTech Connect

    J Abrefah; PJ MacFarlan; RL Sell

    2000-05-04

    The polycubes stored at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) have been identified in a Vulnerability Assessment as material that requires a stabilization process in support of the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. The baseline plan involves a pyrolysis process to separate out the plutonium and uranium oxides before the remaining material is packaged for interim storage, in accordance with the Record of Decision (ROD), issued June 25, 1996, for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0244-F. The polycubes were manufactured at Hanford in the 1960s for use in criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation. A mixture of plutonium and/or uranium oxides and a polystyrene (vinyl benzene) matrix, cast into the shape of cubes, the polycubes simulated solutions containing high concentrations of fissile materials. The polycubes varied in size, typically 1/2 x 2 x 2 in. up to 2 x 2 x 2 in., and were sealed with a coating of aluminum paint and/or tape (PVC or Shurtape). The estimated 1,600 polycubes (calculated 179,165 grams net weight) stored at PFP were packed in vented food cans with five to eight cubes per can to accommodate gas generation by radiolysis. Some polycube containers are suspected to contain loose material as well, left over from the forming process. With a fairly high {sup 240}Pu content, polycubes present a challenge for handling, as a result of the 7 to 8 R contact dose rate. Significant hazards linked to unstabilized polycubes are associated with the polystyrene matrix, which generates hydrogen gas due to radiolysis. In addition, some cans of polycubes may contain fines. Because of insufficient data, hazards associated with the fines have not been assessed.

  16. A review of sediment and nutrient concentration data from Australia for use in catchment water quality models.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Rebecca; Speirs, William J; Ellis, Tim W; Waters, David K

    2012-01-01

    Land use (and land management) change is seen as the primary factor responsible for changes in sediment and nutrient delivery to water bodies. Understanding how sediment and nutrient (or constituent) concentrations vary with land use is critical to understanding the current and future impact of land use change on aquatic ecosystems. Access to appropriate land-use based water quality data is also important for calculating reliable load estimates using water quality models. This study collated published and unpublished runoff, constituent concentration and load data for Australian catchments. Water quality data for total suspended sediments (TSS), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were collated from runoff events with a focus on catchment areas that have a single or majority of the contributing area under one land use. Where possible, information on the dissolved forms of nutrients were also collated. For each data point, information was included on the site location, land use type and condition, contributing catchment area, runoff, laboratory analyses, the number of samples collected over the hydrograph and the mean constituent concentration calculation method. A total of ∼750 entries were recorded from 514 different geographical sites covering 13 different land uses. We found that the nutrient concentrations collected using "grab" sampling (without a well defined hydrograph) were lower than for sites with gauged auto-samplers although this data set was small and no statistical analysis could be undertaken. There was no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between data collected at plot and catchment scales for the same land use. This is most likely due to differences in land condition over-shadowing the effects of spatial scale. There was, however, a significant difference in the concentration value for constituent samples collected from sites where >90% of the catchment was represented by a single land use, compared to sites with <90% of the

  17. Response of dissolved carbon and nitrogen concentrations to moderate nutrient additions in a tropical montane forest of south Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velescu, Andre; Valarezo, Carlos; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    In the past two decades, the tropical montane rain forests in south Ecuador experienced increasing deposition of reactive nitrogen mainly originating from Amazonian forest fires, while Saharan dust inputs episodically increased deposition of base metals. Increasing air temperature and unevenly distributed rainfall have allowed for longer dry spells in a perhumid ecosystem. This might have favored mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by microorganisms and increased nutrient release from the organic layer. Environmental change is expected to impact the functioning of this ecosystem belonging to the biodiversity hotspots of the Earth. In 2007, we established a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) to understand the response of the ecosystem to moderately increased nutrient inputs. Since 2008, we have continuously applied 50 kg ha-1 a-1 of nitrogen (N), 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of phosphorus (P), 50 kg + 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of N and P and 10 kg ha-1 a-1 of calcium (Ca) in a randomized block design at 2000 m a.s.l. in a natural forest on the Amazonia-exposed slopes of the south Ecuadorian Andes. Nitrogen concentrations in throughfall increased following N+P additions, while separate N amendments only increased nitrate concentrations. Total organic carbon (TOC) and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations showed high seasonal variations in litter leachate and decreased significantly in the P and N+P treatments, but not in the N treatment. Thus, P availability plays a key role in the mineralization of DOM. TOC/DON ratios were narrower in throughfall than in litter leachate but their temporal course did not respond to nutrient amendments. Our results revealed an initially fast, positive response of the C and N cycling to nutrient additions which declined with time. TOC and DON cycling only change if N and P supply are improved concurrently, while NO3-N leaching increases only if N is separately added. This indicates co-limitation of the microorganisms by N and P

  18. Richness and species composition of arboreal arthropods affected by nutrients and predators: a press experiment.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Daniel S; Taylor, Andrew D

    2006-04-01

    A longstanding goal for ecologists is to understand the processes that maintain biological diversity in communities, yet few studies have investigated the combined effects of predators and resources on biodiversity in natural ecosystems. We fertilized nutrient limited plots and excluded insectivorous birds in a randomized block design, and examined the impacts on arthropods associated with the dominant tree in the Hawaiian Islands, Metrosideros polymorpha (Myrtaceae). After 33 months, the species load (per foliage mass) of herbivores and carnivores increased with fertilization, but rarified richness (standardized to abundance) did not change. Fertilization depressed species richness of arboreal detritivores, and carnivore richness dropped in caged, unfertilized plots, both because of the increased dominance of common, introduced species with treatments. Herbivore species abundance distributions were more equitable than other trophic levels following treatments, and fertilization added specialized native species without changing relativized species richness. Overall, bird removal and nutrient addition treatments on arthropod richness acted largely independently, but with countervailing influences that obscured distinct top-down and bottom-up effects on different trophic levels. This study demonstrates that species composition, biological invasions, and the individuality of species traits may complicate efforts to predict the interactive effects of resources and predation on species diversity in food webs.

  19. Changing nutrient stoichiometry affects phytoplankton production, DOP accumulation and dinitrogen fixation - a mesocosm experiment in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; Löscher, C. R.; Neulinger, S. C.; Reichel, A. F.; Loginova, A.; Borchard, C.; Schmitz, R. A.; Hauss, H.; Kiko, R.; Riebesell, U.

    2016-02-01

    Ocean deoxygenation due to climate change may alter redox-sensitive nutrient cycles in the marine environment. The productive eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) upwelling region may be particularly affected when the relatively moderate oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) deoxygenates further and microbially driven nitrogen (N) loss processes are promoted. Consequently, water masses with a low nitrogen to phosphorus (N : P) ratio could reach the euphotic layer, possibly influencing primary production in those waters. Previous mesocosm studies in the oligotrophic Atlantic Ocean identified nitrate availability as a control of primary production, while a possible co-limitation of nitrate and phosphate could not be ruled out. To better understand the impact of changing N : P ratios on primary production and N2 fixation in the ETNA surface ocean, we conducted land-based mesocosm experiments with natural plankton communities and applied a broad range of N : P ratios (2.67-48). Silicic acid was supplied at 15 µmol L-1 in all mesocosms. We monitored nutrient drawdown, biomass accumulation and nitrogen fixation in response to variable nutrient stoichiometry. Our results confirmed nitrate to be the key factor determining primary production. We found that excess phosphate was channeled through particulate organic matter (POP) into the dissolved organic matter (DOP) pool. In mesocosms with low inorganic phosphate availability, DOP was utilized while N2 fixation increased, suggesting a link between those two processes. Interestingly this observation was most pronounced in mesocosms where nitrate was still available, indicating that bioavailable N does not necessarily suppress N2 fixation. We observed a shift from a mixed cyanobacteria-proteobacteria dominated active diazotrophic community towards a diatom-diazotrophic association of the Richelia-Rhizosolenia symbiosis. We hypothesize that a potential change in nutrient stoichiometry in the ETNA might lead to a general shift within

  20. Major-ion, nutrient, and trace-element concentrations in the Steamboat Creek basin, Oregon, 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinella, Frank A.

    1998-01-01

    Bottom-sediment concentrations of antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, and organic carbon were largest in City Creek. In City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek, concentrations for 11 constituents--antimony, arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese (Horse Heaven Creek only), mercury, selenium, silver, zinc, and organic carbon (City Creek only)--exceeded concentrations considered to be enriched in streams of the nearby Willamette River Basin, whereas in Steamboat Creek only two trace elements--antimony and nickel--exceeded Willamette River enriched concentrations. Bottom-sediment concentrations for six of these constituents in City Creek and Horse Heaven Creek--arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc--also exceeded interim Canadian threshold effect level (TEL) concentrations established for the protection of aquatic life, whereas only four constituents between Singe Creek and Steamboat Creek--arsenic, chromium, copper (Singe Creek only), and nickel--exceeded the TEL concentrations.

  1. Response of diatom-associated bacteria to host growth state, nutrient concentrations, and viral host infection in a model system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lydia J; Alegado, Rosanna A; Kemp, Paul F

    2016-08-25

    Diatoms are photosynthetic unicellular eukaryotes found ubiquitously in aquatic systems. Frequent physical associations with other microorganisms such as bacteria may influence diatom fitness. The predictability of bacterial-diatom interactions is hypothesized to depend on availability of nutrients as well as the physiological state of the host. Biotic and abiotic factors such as nutrient levels, host growth stage and host viral infection were manipulated to determine their effect on the ecological succession of bacterial communities associated with a single cell line of Chaetoceros sp. KBDT20; this was assessed using the relative abundance of bacterial phylotypes based on 16S rDNA sequences. A single bacterial family, Alteromonadaceae, dominated the attached-bacterial community (84.0%), with the most prevalent phylotypes belonging to the Alteromonas and Marinobacter genera. The taxa comprising the other 16% of the attached bacterial assemblage include Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli, Deltaproteobacteria, other Gammaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. Nutrient concentration and host growth stage had a statistically significant effect on the phylogenetic composition of the attached bacteria. It was inferred that interactions between attached bacteria, as well as the inherent stochasticity mediating contact may also contribute to diatom-bacterial associations.

  2. Effect of mine wastewater on nutrient removal and lipid production by a green microalga Micratinium reisseri from concentrated municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ji, Min-Kyu; Kabra, Akhil N; Salama, El-Sayed; Roh, Hyun-Seog; Kim, Jung Rae; Lee, Dae Sung; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2014-04-01

    Effect of mine wastewater on the nutrient removal efficiency of a green microalga Micratinium reisseri from concentrated municipal wastewater (CMW) with simultaneous lipid production was investigated. Different dilution ratios (1-10%) of CMW either with mine wastewater (MWF) or mine wastewater without Fe (MWOF) were used. M. reisseri showed the highest growth (0.8gL(-1)) and nutrient uptake (35.9mgTNL(-1) and 5.4mgTPL(-1)) at 3% MWF ([Fe]tot=6.7mgL(-1)), and the highest lipid productivity (10.4mgL(-1)day(-1)) at 5% MWF ([Fe]tot=11.2mgL(-1)) after 15days. CMW supported the algal autoflocculation due to formation of phosphate, calcium and magnesium precipitates at a high suspension pH. Fatty acid methyl ester analysis revealed that the microalgal lipids possessed 79-82% of C16/C18 fatty acids. Application of mine wastewater improved the nutrient removal efficiency, growth and lipid productivity of M. reisseri cultivated in CMW.

  3. A summary of the scientific literature on the effects of fire on the concentration of nutrients in surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ranalli, Anthony J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed review of the chemical changes that occur in soil during a fire, the pathways by which nutrients are transferred from soil to surface-water bodies following a fire, and the temporal and spatial effects of fires on the concentration of nutrients in surface-water bodies during and following a fire that have been reported in the scientific literature. Thirty-nine papers from the scientific literature that represent studies that (1) were done in a variety of environments (savannas, grasslands, temperate forests, alpine forests, and so forth); (2) had a range of sampling frequency and duration, such as during and immediately following a fire (from the start of fire to 1 year later), short-term sampling (from end of fire to 3 years later), and long term-sampling (sampling for greater than 3 years following a fire); and (3) incorporated watersheds with various burn intensities, severities, and histories were reviewed and summarized. The review of the scientific literature has revealed that measurable effects of fires on streamwater quality are most likely to occur if the fire was severe enough to burn large amounts of organic matter, if windy conditions were present during the fire, if heavy rain occurred following the fire, and if the fire occurred in a watershed with steep slopes and soils with little cation-exchange capacity. Measurable effects of fires on lake- and reservoir-water quality are most likely to occur if, in addition to the factors listed for streams, the lake or reservoir is oligotrophic or mesotrophic and the residence time of water in the lake or reservoir is short relative to the length of time elevated concentrations of nutrients occur in runoff. Knowledge of whether a lake or reservoir is nitrogen or phosphorus limited is important because eutrophication of nitrogen-limited lakes may occur following a fire due to increasing nitrogen:phosphorus ratios caused by prolonged increases of nitrogen concentrations, especially

  4. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) analyses of nutrient composition and condensed tannin concentrations in carolina willow (Salix caroliniana).

    PubMed

    Lavin, Shana R; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Wooley, Stuart C; Stone, Koni; Russell, Scott; Valdes, Eduardo V

    2015-11-01

    Iron overload disorder has been described in a number of zoo-managed species, and it has been recommended to increase the tannin composition of the diet as a safe way to minimize iron absorption in these iron-sensitive species. The goal of this study was to examine the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a rapid and simple screening tool to assess willow (Salix caroliniana) nutrient composition (crude protein: CP; acid detergent fiber: ADF; neutral detergent fiber: NDF; lignin, gross energy: GE) and condensed tannin (CT) concentrations. Calibration equations were developed by regression of the lab values from 2 years using partial least squares on n = 144 NIRS spectra to predict n = 20 independent validation samples. Using the full 2-year dataset, good prediction statistics were obtained for CP, ADF, NDF, and GE in plant leaves and stems (r(2 ) > 0.75). NIRS did not predict lignin concentrations reliably (leaves r(2)  = 0.52, stems r(2)  = 0.33); however, CTs were predicted moderately well (leaves r(2)  = 0.72, stems r(2)  = 0.67). These data indicate that NIRS can be used to quantify several key nutrients in willow leaves and stems including concentrations of plant secondary compounds which, depending on the bioactivity of the compound, may be targeted to feed iron-sensitive browsing animals.

  5. Nutrient and oxygen concentrations within the sediments of an Alaskan beach polluted with the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

    PubMed

    Boufadel, Michel C; Sharifi, Youness; Van Aken, Benoit; Wrenn, Brian A; Lee, Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    Measurements of the background concentrations of nutrients, dissolved oxygen (DO), and salinity were obtained from a beach that has oil from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989. Two transects were set across the beach, one passed through an oil patch while the other transect was clean. Three pits were dug in each transect, and they ranged in depth from 0.9 to 1.5 m. The DO was around 1.0 mg L(-1) at oiled pits and larger than 5 mg L(-1) at clean pits. The average nutrient concentrations in the beach were 0.39 mg-N L(-1) and 0.020 mg-P L(-1). Both concentrations are lower than optimal values for oil biodegradation (2 to 10 mg-N L(-1) and 0.40 to 2.0 mg-P L(-1)), which suggests that they are both limiting factors for biodegradation. The lowest nitrate and DO values were found in the oiled pits, leading to the conclusion that microbial oil consumption was probably occurring under anoxic conditions and was associated to denitrification. We present evidence that the oxygen level may be a major factor limiting oil biodegradation in the beaches.

  6. Effects of arsenic on concentration and distribution of nutrients in the fronds of the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    PubMed

    Tu, Cong; Ma, Lena Q

    2005-05-01

    Pteris vittata was the first terrestrial plant known to hyperaccumulate arsenic (As). However, it is unclear how As hyperaccumulation influences nutrient uptake by this plant. P. vittata fern was grown in soil spiked with 0-500 mg As kg(-1) in the greenhouse for 24 weeks. The concentrations of essential macro- (P, K, Ca, and Mg) and micro- (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, B and Mo) elements in the fronds of different age were examined. Both macro- and micronutrients in the fronds were found to be within the normal concentration ranges for non-hyperaccumulators. However, As hyperaccumulation did influence the elemental distribution among fronds of different age of P. vittata. Arsenic-induced P and K enhancements in the fronds contributed to the As-induced growth stimulation at low As levels. The frond P/As molar ratios of 1.0 can be used as the threshold value for normal growth of P. vittata. Potassium may function as a counter-cation for As in the fronds as shown by the As-induced K increases in the fronds. The present findings not only demonstrate that P. vittata has the ability to maintain adequate concentrations of essential nutrients while hyperaccumulating As from the soil, but also have implications for soil management (fertilization in particular) of P. vittata in As phytoextraction practice.

  7. Effects of the percentage of concentrate on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, plasma metabolites, and milk composition in mid-lactation goats.

    PubMed

    Serment, A; Schmidely, P; Giger-Reverdin, S; Chapoutot, P; Sauvant, D

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of the dietary percentage of concentrate on patterns of intake, the evolution of rumen fermentation characteristics and plasma metabolites after a meal, nutrient digestibility, and milk production and composition in a medium-term trial in dairy goats. These effects have been well studied in dairy cattle but seldom in goats. Thirteen ruminally and duodenally cannulated dairy goats (95±4 d in milk) fed ad libitum were used in this study. Goats were assigned to 1 of 2 dietary treatments: high-concentrate (70% concentrate on dry matter basis) or a low-concentrate (35%) total mixed rations. The experiment was conducted over a period of 10 wk, including 3 wk of adaption to the diets. Patterns of intake, rumen fermentation characteristics, and plasma metabolites after a meal and fatty acids profile of milk fat were compared at the onset and at the end of the experiment. The increase in dietary percentage of concentrate decreased rumen pH, acetate to propionate ratio, ammonia-N concentration, and plasma urea concentration. The percentage of concentrate did not affect total volatile fatty acid concentrations. The high-concentrate diet increased the rate of intake during the morning meal at the onset of the experiment, whereas it decreased total dry matter intake and the rate of intake during the morning meal at the end of the experiment. The high-concentrate diet resulted in greater organic matter digestibility. Raw milk yield and protein yield were greater in goats fed the high-concentrate diet, whereas fat yield was not affected by dietary treatments. The milk fat content was lower in goats fed the high-concentrate diet. Proportions of the trans-C18:1 isomer relative to total fatty acids in milk were higher with the high-concentrate diet, but no modification of the proportion of total trans-C18:1 was detected, in particular no shift from trans-11 C18:1 to trans-10 C18:1 was observed. Further, the isomer trans-10,cis-12 C18

  8. The Effects of Nutrient Concentration, Addition of Thickeners, and Agitation Speed on Liquid Fermentation of Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Luis G.; Shapiro-Ilan, David I.; Hazir, Selcuk; Jackson, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematode production in liquid fermentation still requires improvements to maximize efficiency, yield, and nematode quality. Therefore, this study was aimed at developing a more suitable liquid medium for mass production of Steinernema feltiae, by assessing the effects of nutrient concentration, thickeners (primarily agar), and agitation speed on infective juvenile (IJ) yield. Base medium (BM) contained yeast extract (2.3%), egg yolk (1.25%), NaCl (0.5%), and corn oil (4%). All media were inoculated with Xenorhabdus bovienii, and 2 d later, with 2-d-old S. feltiae juveniles. For the nutrient concentration experiment, we evaluated the base medium versus a modified base medium containing all the components, but with 3× concentrations of yeast extract (6.9%), egg yolk (3.75%), and corn oil (12%). The nematodes and bacteria were cultured in 150-ml Erlenmeyer flasks containing 50 ml of liquid medium at (25°C) and 180 rpm on a rotary shaker incubator. To assess the effect of thickeners, IJs were inoculated in BM with agar (0.2%), carrageen (0.2%), and carboxymethyl cellulose (0.2% and 0.5%). The addition of 3× more nutrients relative to the BM resulted in a significantly lower yield of nematodes. For agar and agitation speed experiments, five levels of agar in the BM (0%, 0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%, and 0.8% agar) and two agitation speeds (180 and 280 rpm) were evaluated for production. Increasing agitation speed from 180 to 280 rpm and higher levels of agar in the medium (> 0.2%) significantly increased the yield of bacteria. At the lower agitation speed, media amended with 0.4% and 0.6% agar produced higher nematode yields compared to media without agar. Media with 0.2% and 0.8% agar resulted in intermediate levels of nematode production. At the higher agitation speed, media supplemented with 0.8% agar resulted in the lowest yield of nematodes when compared to the other media tested. Results indicated that increasing nutrient concentration levels was

  9. Tempo-spatial variation of nutrient and chlorophyll- α concentrations from summer to winter in the Zhangzi Island Area (Northern Yellow Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiehui; Zhao, Zengxia; Zhang, Guangtao; Wang, Shiwei; Wan, Aiyong

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient and Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) concentrations were investigated monthly along three transects extending from a mariculture area to open waters around the Zhangzi Island area from July to December 2009. The objective of this study is to illustrate food availability to the bottom-sowed scallop Patinopecten yessoensis under the influences of the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM), freshwater input and feedbacks of cultivated scallops. Significant thermal stratification was present in open waters from July to October, and salinity decreased in July and August in surface layers in the mariculture area. Nutrient concentrations increased with depth in both areas in summer, but were similar through water column in November and December. On average, nutrient increased from summer to autumn in all components except ammonia. Nutrient concentrations lower than the minimum thresholds for phytoplankton growth were present only in upper layers in summer, but stoichiometric nitrogen limitation existed in the entire investigation period. Column-averaged Chl- a concentration was lower in open waters than in mariculture area in all months. It increased significantly in mariculture area in August and October, and was less variable in open waters. Our results show that nutrients limitation to phytoplankton growth is present mainly in upper layer in association with stratification caused by YSCWM in summer. Freshwater input and upwelling of nutrients accumulated in YSCWM can stimulate phytoplankton production in mariculture area. Farming activities may change stoichiometric nutrient ratios but have less influence on Chl- a concentration.

  10. Fate of Compost Nutrients as Affected by Co-Composting of Chicken and Swine Manures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunwande, Gbolabo A.; Ogunjimi, Lawrence A. O.; Osunade, James A.

    2014-04-01

    Passive aeration co-composting using four mixtures of chicken manure and swine manure at 1:0, 1:1, 3:7 and 0:1 with sawdust and rice husk was carried out to study the effects of co-composting on the physicochemical properties of the organic materials. The experiment, which lasted 66 days, was carried out in bins equipped with inverted T aeration pipes. The results showed that nutrient losses decreased as the proportion of chicken manure in the mixtures decreased for saw dust and rice husk treatments. This indicates better nutrientst conservation during composting in swine than chicken manure. Manure mixtures with rice husk had higher pile temperatures (> 55°C), total carbon and total nitrogen losses, while manure mixtures with saw dust had higher total phosphorus loss and carbon to nitrogen ratio. Composts with rice husk demonstrated the ability to reach maturity faster by the rate of drop of the carbon to nitrogen ratio.

  11. Refining in silico simulation to study digestion parameters affecting the bioaccessibility of lipophilic nutrients and micronutrients.

    PubMed

    Marze, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable number of in vivo and in vitro studies on the digestive fate of lipophilic nutrients, micronutrients, and bioactives, the effects of the structure and composition of foods on the physicochemical mechanisms of luminal digestion are still poorly understood. Studying them is indeed complex because the number of parameters is high and many of them are interdependent. To solve this problem, an in silico simulation based on a multi-agent system was recently proposed to study the intestinal bioaccessibility of lipophilic nutrients and micronutrients from a single oil droplet. The roles of lipolysis and solubilization in bile salt were included. The effects of several food and digestion parameters were in line with those reported in the experimental literature. The goal of the research reported in this new article was to include more digestion parameters in the simulation in order to make it more realistic against complex cases. This was done in one specific digestion condition reflecting in vitro experiments, using droplets of tricaprylin or triolein containing vitamin A. The structure and principles of the original model were kept, with independent local modifications in order to study each factor separately. First, a gastric step was added where lipolysis took place, and only a marginal effect on the following intestinal step was found. Then, the chemical form of vitamin A, either non-hydrolyzed retinyl ester or retinyl ester instantly hydrolyzed into retinol, was investigated by considering different localizations in the droplet, resulting in a higher bioaccessibility for the retinol. The case of a mixture of tricaprylin and triolein indicated an influence of the oil phase viscosity. The consideration of mixed micelles compared to simple bile salt micelles was also investigated, and resulted in a higher vitamin A bioaccessibility, especially with triolein. Finally, a full model including the most influential parameters was tested to simulate

  12. Nutrient availability affects pigment production but not growth in lichens of biological soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowker, M.A.; Koch, G.W.; Belnap, J.; Johnson, N.C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent research suggests that micronutrients such as Mn may limit growth of slow-growing biological soil crusts (BSCs) in some of the drylands of the world. These soil surface communities contribute strongly to arid ecosystem function and are easily degraded, creating a need for new restoration tools. The possibility that Mn fertilization could be used as a restoration tool for BSCs has not been tested previously. We used microcosms in a controlled greenhouse setting to investigate the hypothesis that Mn may limit photosynthesis and consequently growth in Collema tenax, a dominant N-fixing lichen found in BSCs worldwide. We found no evidence to support our hypothesis; furthermore, addition of other nutrients (primarily P, K, and Zn) had a suppressive effect on gross photosynthesis (P = 0.05). We also monitored the growth and physiological status of our microcosms and found that other nutrients increased the production of scytonemin, an important sunscreen pigment, but only when not added with Mn (P = 0.01). A structural equation model indicated that this effect was independent of any photosynthesis-related variable. We propose two alternative hypotheses to account for this pattern: (1) Mn suppresses processes needed to produce scytonemin; and (2) Mn is required to suppress scytonemin production at low light, when it is an unnecessary photosynthate sink. Although Mn fertilization does not appear likely to increase photosynthesis or growth of Collema, it could have a role in survivorship during environmentally stressful periods due to modification of scytonemin production. Thus, Mn enrichment should be studied further for its potential to facilitate BSC rehabilitation. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Using Algal Metrics and Biomass to Evaluate Multiple Ways of Defining Concentration-Based Nutrient Criteria in Streams and their Ecological Relevance

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the utility of nutrient criteria derived solely from total phosphorus (TP) concentrations in streams (regression models and percentile distributions) and evaluated their ecological relevance to diatom and algal biomass responses. We used a variety of statistics to cha...

  14. Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality using a cross-sectional design. The setting was The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. The sub...

  15. High levels of inorganic nutrients affect fertilization kinetics, early development and settlement of the scleractinian coral Platygyra acuta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, E. K. Y.; Chui, A. P. Y.; Kwok, C. K.; Ip, A. H. P.; Chan, S. W.; Leung, H. N.; Yeung, L. C.; Ang, P. O.

    2015-09-01

    Dose-response experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ammonia nitrogen (NH3/NH4 +) and orthophosphate (PO4 3-) on four stages of larval development in Platygyra acuta, including fertilization, embryonic development and the survival, motility, and settlement of planula larvae. Fertilization success was reduced significantly under 200 μM NH3/NH4 + or PO4 3-. These high doses of NH3/NH4 + and PO4 - affected egg viability (or sperm viability and polyspermic block simultaneously) and polyspermic block, respectively. These results provide the first evidence to indicate the mechanisms of how inorganic nutrients might affect coral fertilization processes. For embryonic development, NH3/NH4 + at 25-200 μM caused delay in cell division after 2-h exposure and NH3/NH4 + at 100-200 μM resulted in larval death after 72 h. However, no significant differences were observed in the mobility and survivorship of either planula or competent larvae under different levels of NH3/NH4 + or PO4 3-. There was a significant (~30 %) drop in the settlement of competent larvae under the combined effect of 100 μM NH3/NH4 + and PO4 3-. The effects of elevated nutrients appeared to become more significant only on gametes or larvae undergoing active cellular activities at fertilization, early development, and settlement.

  16. Nutrients intake, digestibility, nitrogen balance and growth performance of sheep fed different silages with or without concentrate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sohail H; Shahzad, Muhammad Aasif; Nisa, Mahr; Sarwar, Muhammad

    2011-04-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and millet (Pennisetum americannum) silages with or without concentrate on nutrients intake, digestibility, nitrogen balance and weight gain in Sipli sheep. Six experimental diets were formulated having 100% maize silage (MS), maize silage and concentrate as 50:50 (MSC), 100% sorghum silage (SS), sorghum silage and concentrate as 50:50 (SSC), 100% millet silage (MiS) and millet silage and concentrate as 50:50 (MiSC), respectively. For this purpose, 24 Sipli lambs were randomly allotted to six experimental diets in a completely randomized design for 90 days, four lambs per diet. The results indicated that among various silage diets, lambs fed MS diet consumed higher dry matter (DM) than those fed SS and MiS diets. Likewise, lambs offered MSC had higher dry matter intake than those fed SSC and MiSC diets. Crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) consumed by the lambs also followed the similar trend. Higher DM, CP and NDF digestibilities were also observed in lambs fed MS and MSC diets than those fed SS, SSC, MiS and MiSC diets. Overall digestibilities of DM, CP and NDF were higher in experimental diets containing silage with concentrate. Lambs fed MS diet had 2.79 g/day and 4.45 g/day higher N retention than those fed SS and MiS, respectively. Similarly, lambs fed MSC diet had 2.24 g/day and 5.12 g/day higher N retention than those fed SSC and MiSC diets, respectively. The results showed that lambs fed MSC gained more daily weight gain had better feed conversion ratio than those fed MS, SS, SSC, MiS and MiSC diets. The findings of the present study indicated that lambs fed MSC diet had higher nutrients intake, digestibility, nitrogen balance and weight gain.

  17. Effect of substrate load and nutrients concentration on the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production using mixed consortia through wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Venkateswar Reddy, M; Venkata Mohan, S

    2012-06-01

    Production of biodegradable plastics in the form of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) especially from renewable substrates is gaining interest. The present work mainly aims to investigate the influence of substrate load and nutrient concentration (nitrogen and phosphorous) on PHA production using wastewater as substrate and mixed culture as biocatalyst. PHA accumulation was high at higher substrate load [OLR3, 40.3% of dry cell weight (DCW)], low nitrogen (N(1), 45.1% DCW) and low phosphorous (P(1), 54.2% DCW) conditions. With optimized nutrient conditions production efficiency increased by 14%. Fractional composition of PHA showed co-polymer [poly(β-OH) butyrate-co-poly(β-OH) valerate, P3(HB-co-HV)] contains PHB (88%) in more concentration compared to PHV (8%). Dehydrogenase and phosphatase enzymatic activities were monitored during process operation. Good substrate degradation (as COD) of 75% was registered during PHA production. The phylogenetic profile of 16S rRNA sequencing showed the dominance of Firmicutes (71.4%) and Proteobacteria (28.6%), which are known to involve in PHA accumulation and waste treatment.

  18. Nutrients, oxygen dynamics, stable isotopes and fatty acid concentrations of a freshwater tidal system, Washington, D.C.

    PubMed

    MacAvoy, Stephen E; Ewers, Evan C; Bushaw-Newton, Karen L

    2009-09-01

    The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., USA is an urban waterway contaminated with PAHs, PCBs, metals and sewage. Although several studies have examined the heavy metal geochemistry within the river, no studies have examined basic biogeochemical processes within the Anacostia river system. This study examines nutrients, bacterial biomarkers, organic material, and carbon, nitrogen and sulfur sources in the system. High biological oxygen demand and low nitrogen (0.33-0.56 mg L(-1)) and phosphorus (0.014-0.021 mg L(-1)) concentrations were observed in three areas of the river. Downstream sites had higher nutrient concentrations and dissolved organic matter (up to 13.7 mg L(-1)). Odd-chain length and branched fatty acids (FAs) in the sediments indicated bacterial sources, but long chain FAs indicative of terrestrial primary production were also abundant in some sediments. Sediment carbon stable isotope analyses showed a mix of autochthonous and allochthonous derived materials, but most carbon was derived from terrestrial sources (-23.3 to -31.7 per thousand). Sediment nitrogen stable isotopes ranged from -5.4 to 5.6 per thousand, showing nitrate uptake by plants and also recycling of nitrogen within the river. Sulfur sources were generally between 3 and -5 per thousand, reflecting local sulfate sources and anaerobic sulfate reduction.

  19. [Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and temperature on nutrient accumulation and allocation in Betula albo-sinensis seedlings].

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Wang, Kai-yun; Zhang, Chao

    2008-01-01

    With enclosed chamber system, this paper studied the effects of elevated CO2 concentration (ambient + 350 micromol x mol(-1), E(C)), temperature (ambient + 2 degrees C, E(T)), and their combination (E(CT)) on the nutrient accumulation and allocation in subalpine Betula albo-sinensis seedlings in western Sichuan Province. The results showed that after a growth season, the accumulation amount of N, P and K per plant increased by 44%, 45% and 11% under E(C) (P < 0.05), by 37%, 76% and 9% under E(T) (P < 0.05), and by 24%, 88% and 20% under E(CT) (P < 0.05), respectively. The N allocation to leaves reduced by 11.68% (P < 0.05) under E(C) but increased by 11.09% (P <0.05) under E(T) while that to branches, stems and roots increased by 2.95%, 3.39% and 5.34% under E(C) (P > 0.05), but decreased by 0.69%, 10.35% and 0.05% under E(T) (P > 0.05), respectively. The N allocation pattern under E(CT) was similar to that under E(C). The allocation of P and K had greater differences under E(C), E(T) and E(CT). All of these suggested that elevated CO2 concentration and temperature could promote nutrient accumulation, and change its allocation pattern in plant organs.

  20. Factors affecting population of filamentous bacteria in wastewater treatment plants with nutrients removal.

    PubMed

    Miłobędzka, Aleksandra; Witeska, Anna; Muszyński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous population in activated sludge and key operational parameters of full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with bulking problems representative for Poland were investigated with quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Statistical analyses revealed few relationships between operational parameters and biovolume of filamentous bacteria. Sludge age was not only positively correlated with abundance of Chloroflexi (parametric correlation and principal component analysis (PCA)), but also differentiated Microthrix population (analysis of variance (ANOVA)). Phylum Chloroflexi and pH presented a negative relation during the study (PCA). ANOVA showed that pH of influent and sludge volume index (SVI) differentiated abundance of types 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi and candidate division TM7. SVI increased along with higher abundance of Microthrix (positive parametric and non-parametric correlations and positive relation in PCA). Biovolumes of morphotypes 0803 and 1851 of Chloroflexi were differentiated by organic matter in influent, also by nutrients in the case of Chloroflexi type 1851. Chemical and biological oxygen demands (COD and BOD5, respectively) were negatively correlated with Microthrix. COD also differentiated the abundance of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis. Results of the study can be used to prevent WWTPs from excessive proliferation of filamentous bacteria and operational problems caused by them--bulking and foaming of activated sludge.

  1. Residental factors affecting nutrient intake and nutritional status of female pharmacy students in Bydgoszcz.

    PubMed

    Jaworowska, Agnieszka; Bazylak, Grzegorz

    2007-01-01

    The aim of present study was to estimate nutrient intake as well as nutritional status of female pharmacy students from Bydgoszcz, and to investigate relationship of these factors with type of usual residence place during academic year The 24-hour recall method was used to evaluate dietary intake of 47 subjects. Measured values of height, body mass and four skinfolds thickness were used for calculation of BM, FFM, %FM indices. An analysis of nutritional status of studied population showed lower body mass and BMI in the sub-group of female students residing outside of their family home. In comparison to the female students living without parents percentage of energy provided by total fat (29.9%) was significantly less and percentage of energy from carbohydrate was significantly higher (55.4%) than students who reside with their parents. Elevated intake of phosphorus and retinol accompanied by inadequate intake of riboflavin, calcium, iron and copper was exhibited in both residence-type related sub-groups of investigated female pharmacy students.

  2. Vector competence of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes for filarial nematodes is affected by age and nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Ariani, Cristina V; Juneja, Punita; Smith, Sophia; Tinsley, Matthew C; Jiggins, Francis M

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are one of the most important vectors of human disease. The ability of mosquitoes to transmit disease is dependent on the age structure of the population, as mosquitoes must survive long enough for the parasites to complete their development and infect another human. Age could have additional effects due to mortality rates and vector competence changing as mosquitoes senesce, but these are comparatively poorly understood. We have investigated these factors using the mosquito Aedes aegypti and the filarial nematode Brugia malayi. Rather than observing any effects of immune senescence, we found that older mosquitoes were more resistant, but this only occurred if they had previously been maintained on a nutrient-poor diet of fructose. Constant blood feeding reversed this decline in vector competence, meaning that the number of parasites remained relatively unchanged as mosquitoes aged. Old females that had been maintained on fructose also experienced a sharp spike in mortality after an infected blood meal ("refeeding syndrome") and few survived long enough for the parasite to develop. Again, this effect was prevented by frequent blood meals. Our results indicate that old mosquitoes may be inefficient vectors due to low vector competence and high mortality, but that frequent blood meals can prevent these effects of age.

  3. Linking river nutrient concentrations to land use and rainfall in a paddy agriculture-urban area gradient watershed in southeast China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongqiu; Ti, Chaopu; She, Dongli; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-10-01

    The effects of land use and land-use changes on river nutrient concentrations are not well understood, especially in the watersheds of developing countries that have a mixed land use of rice paddy fields and developing urban surfaces. Here, we present a three-year study of a paddy agricultural-urban area gradient watershed in southeast China. The annual anthropogenic nitrogen (N) input from the agricultural region to the urban region was high, yet the results showed that the monthly nutrient concentrations in the river were low in the rainy seasons. The nutrient concentrations decreased continuously as the river water passed through the traditional agriculture region (TAR; paddy rice and wheat rotation) and increased substantially in the city region (CR). The traditional agricultural reference region exported most of the nutrient loads at high flows (>1mmd(-1)), the intensified agricultural region (IAR, aquaculture and poultry farming) exported most of the nutrient loads at moderate flows (between 0.5 and 1mmd(-1)), and the CR reference area exported most of the nutrient loads under low to moderate flows. We developed a statistical model to link variations in the nutrient concentrations to the proportion of land-use types and rainfall. The statistical results showed that impervious surfaces, which we interpret as a proxy for urban activities including sewage disposal, were the most important drivers of nutrient concentrations, whereas water surfaces accounted for a substantial proportion of the nutrient sinks. Therefore, to efficiently reduce water pollution, sewage from urban areas must be addressed as a priority, although wetland restoration could also achieve substantial pollutant removal.

  4. Trophic dynamics of shrinking Subarctic lakes: naturally eutrophic waters impart resilience to rising nutrient and major ion concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tyler L; Heglund, Patricia J; Lindberg, Mark S; Schmutz, Joel A; Schmidt, Joshua H; Dubour, Adam J; Rover, Jennifer; Bertram, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Shrinking lakes were recently observed for several Arctic and Subarctic regions due to increased evaporation and permafrost degradation. Along with lake drawdown, these processes often boost aquatic chemical concentrations, potentially impacting trophic dynamics. In particular, elevated chemical levels may impact primary productivity, which may in turn influence populations of primary and secondary consumers. We examined trophic dynamics of 18 shrinking lakes of the Yukon Flats, Alaska, that had experienced pronounced increases in nutrient (>200 % total nitrogen, >100 % total phosphorus) and ion concentrations (>100 % for four major ions combined) from 1985-1989 to 2010-2012, versus 37 stable lakes with relatively little chemical change over the same period. We found that phytoplankton stocks, as indexed by chlorophyll concentrations, remained unchanged in both shrinking and stable lakes from the 1980s to 2010s. Moving up the trophic ladder, we found significant changes in invertebrate abundance across decades, including decreased abundance of five of six groups examined. However, these decadal losses in invertebrate abundance were not limited to shrinking lakes, occurring in lakes with stable surface areas as well. At the top of the food web, we observed that probabilities of lake occupancy for ten waterbird species, including adults and chicks, remained unchanged from the period 1985-1989 to 2010-2012. Overall, our study lakes displayed a high degree of resilience to multi-trophic cascades caused by rising chemical concentrations. This resilience was likely due to their naturally high fertility, such that further nutrient inputs had little impact on waters already near peak production.

  5. Trophic dynamics of shrinking Subarctic lakes: naturally eutrophic waters impart resilience to rising nutrient and major ion concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, Tyler; Lindberg, Mark S.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Schmidt, Joshua H.; Dubour, Adam J.; Rover, Jennifer R.; Bertram, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Shrinking lakes were recently observed for several Arctic and Subarctic regions due to increased evaporation and permafrost degradation. Along with lake drawdown, these processes often boost aquatic chemical concentrations, potentially impacting trophic dynamics. In particular, elevated chemical levels may impact primary productivity, which may in turn influence populations of primary and secondary consumers. We examined trophic dynamics of 18 shrinking lakes of the Yukon Flats, Alaska, that had experienced pronounced increases in nutrient (>200 % total nitrogen, >100 % total phosphorus) and ion concentrations (>100 % for four major ions combined) from 1985-1989 to 2010-2012, versus 37 stable lakes with relatively little chemical change over the same period. We found that phytoplankton stocks, as indexed by chlorophyll concentrations, remained unchanged in both shrinking and stable lakes from the 1980s to 2010s. Moving up the trophic ladder, we found significant changes in invertebrate abundance across decades, including decreased abundance of five of six groups examined. However, these decadal losses in invertebrate abundance were not limited to shrinking lakes, occurring in lakes with stable surface areas as well. At the top of the food web, we observed that probabilities of lake occupancy for ten waterbird species, including adults and chicks, remained unchanged from the period 1985-1989 to 2010-2012. Overall, our study lakes displayed a high degree of resilience to multi-trophic cascades caused by rising chemical concentrations. This resilience was likely due to their naturally high fertility, such that further nutrient inputs had little impact on waters already near peak production.

  6. Biomass and nutrient concentrations of sporocarps produced by mycorrhizal and decomposer fungi in Abies amabilis stands.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Kristiina A; Edmonds, Robert L; Grier, Charles C

    1981-08-01

    Sporocarps and sclerotia were collected for a one-year period in 23- and 180-year-old Abies amabilis stands in western Washington. All sporocarps were classified and chemically analyzed for N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na and Fe. Lactarius sp. and Cortinarius sp. contributed the largest proportion of the total annual epigeous sporocarp production in both stands. Annual epigeous production was 34 kg/ha in the young stand and 27 kg/ha in the mature stand. Hypogeous sporocarp production increased from 1 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) to 380 kg ha(-1) yr(-1) with increasing stand age. High sclerotia biomass occurred in the young (2,300 kg/ha) and mature (3,000 kg/ha) stands. Peak sclerotia and epigeous sporocarp biomass in the young stand and epigeous and hypogeous sporocarp biomass in the mature stand coincided with the fall peak of mycorrhizal root biomass.In the young stand, sporocarps produced by decomposer fungi concentrated higher levels of Ca and Mn than those produced by mycorrhizal fungi. In the mature stand, sporocarps of decomposer fungi concentrated higher levels of N, P, Mn, Ca and Fe than sporocarps of mycorrhizal fungi. Epigeous and hypogeous sporocarps concentrated higher levels of N, P, and K than sclerotia or mycelium. The highest concentration of N (4.36%), P (0.76%), K (3.22%) and Na (1,678 ppm) occurred in epigeous sporocarps. Highest Mn (740 ppm) and Ca (20,600 ppm) concentrations occurred in mycelium, while highest Mg (1,929 ppm) concentrations were in hypogeous sporocarps and highest Fe (4,153 ppm) concentrations were in sclerotia.

  7. Nutrient demand interacts with legume particle length to affect digestion responses and rumen pool sizes in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Ying, Y; Allen, M S

    2012-05-01

    Effects of legume particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, and digestion and passage kinetics, and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 13 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 19-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.8 to 32.4 kg/d (mean=26.5 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 22.9 to 62.4 kg/d (mean=35.1 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing alfalfa silage chopped to (1) 19 mm (long cut, LC) or (2) 10 mm (short cut, SC) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Alfalfa silages contained approximately 43% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained approximately 47% forage and 20% forage NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period, when cows were fed a common diet, and used as a covariate. Main effects of legume particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Alfalfa particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield or rumen pH. The LC diet decreased milk fat concentration more per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet and increased yields of milk fat and fat-corrected milk less per kilogram of pDMI increase than the SC diet, resulting in a greater benefit for LC at low pDMI and for SC at high pDMI. The LC diet tended to decrease DMI compared with the SC diet. Ruminal digestion and passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between LC and SC and were not related to level of intake. The LC diet tended to decrease the rate of ruminal turnover for NDF but increased NDF rumen pools at a slower rate than the SC diet as pDMI increased. This indicated that the faster NDF turnover rate did not counterbalance the higher DMI for SC, resulting in larger NDF rumen pools for SC than LC. As p

  8. Concentrations and loads of nutrients in the tributaries of the Lake Okeechobee watershed, south-central Florida, water years 2004-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Wood, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Lake Okeechobee in south-central Florida is the second largest freshwater lake in the contiguous United States. Excessive phosphorus loading, harmful high and low water levels, and rapid expansion of non-native vegetation have threatened the health of the lake in recent decades. A study was conducted to monitor discharge and nutrient concentrations from selected tributaries into Lake Okeechobee and to evaluate nutrient loads. The data analysis was performed at 16 monitoring stations from December 2003 to September 2008. Annual and seasonal discharge measured at monitoring stations is affected by rainfall. Hurricanes affected three wet years (2004, 2005, and the latter part of 2008) and resulted in substantially greater discharge than the drought years of 2006, 2007, and the early part of 2008. Rainfall supplies about 50 percent of the water to Lake Okeechobee, discharge from the Kissimmee River supplies about 25 percent, and discharge from tributaries and groundwater seepage along the lake perimeter collectively provide the remaining 25 percent. Annually, tributary discharge from basins located on the west side of the Kissimmee River is about 5 to 6 times greater than that from basins located on the east side. For the purposes of this study, the basins on the east side of the Kissimmee River are called "priority basins" because of elevated phosphorus concentrations, while those on the west side are called "nonpriority" basins. Total annual discharge in the non-priority basins ranged from 245,000 acre-feet (acre-ft) in 2007 to 1,322,000 acre-ft in 2005, while annual discharge from the priority basins ranged from 41,000 acre-ft in 2007 to 219,000 acre-ft in 2005. Mean total phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.10 to 0.54 milligrams per liter (mg/L) at the 16 tributaries during 2004–2008. Mean concentrations were significantly higher at priority basin sites than at non-priority basin sites, particularly at Arbuckle Creek and C 41A Canal. Concentrations of organic

  9. Estimates of wintertime mixed layer nutrient concentrations in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, David M.; Brewer, Peter G.

    1988-09-01

    Nonlinear, time-dependent model sensitivity to initial conditions poses a challenging problem when attempting to initialize such a model. In order to intialize a chemical-physical model of the upper several hundred meters of the North Atlantic, we have calculated the initial concentrations of several chemical species from three estimation methods by a combination of the Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean ( LEVITUS, 1982) and the TTO north, and tropical, Atlantic study data bases. A 1° × 1° grid of the average initial concentrations over the mixed layer depth was generated for the method of preference and added to the inialization data base of the model. Contour maps of this calculated initial concentration set are presented and comparisons with the other methods and actual data are made.

  10. Yellow perch nutrient utilization and performance fed grower diet formulations with fermented soybean concentrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Feeds formulated with fermented soybean concentrate (FSBC) were processed using a pilot-scale Wenger twin screw extruder, using a 1.9 cm diameter circular die, and then fed to juvenile yellow perch (Perca flavescens) (~26g) as a protein replacer for fish meal protein. Four fish-meal replacement lev...

  11. Assessment of marine pollution in Izmir Bay: nutrient, heavy metal and total hydrocarbon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kucuksezgin, F; Kontas, A; Altay, O; Uluturhan, E; Darilmaz, E

    2006-01-01

    Izmir Bay (western Turkey) is one of the great natural bays of the Mediterranean. Izmir is an important industrial and commercial centre and a cultural focal point. The main industries in the region include food processing, oil, soap and paint production, chemical industries, paper and pulp factories, textile industries and metal processing. The mean concentrations showed ranges of 0.01-0.19 and 0.01-10 microM for phosphate, 0.10-1.8 and 0.12-27 microM for nitrate+nitrite, and 0.30-5.8 and 0.43-39 microM for silicate in the outer and middle-inner bays, respectively. The TNO(x)/PO(4) ratio is significantly lower than the Redfield's ratio and nitrogen is the limiting element in the middle-inner bays. Diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed all year around in the bay and are normally nitrogen limited. Metal concentrations ranged between Hg: 0.05-1.3, Cd: 0.005-0.82, Pb: 14-113 and Cr: 29-316 microg g(-1) in the sediments. The results showed significant enrichments during sampling periods from Inner Bay. Outer and middle bays show low levels of heavy metal enrichments except estuary of Gediz River. The concentrations of Hg, Cd and Pb in the outer bay were generally similar to the background levels from the Mediterranean. The levels gradually decreased over the sampling period. Total hydrocarbons concentrations range from 427 to 7800 ng g(-1) of sediments. The highest total hydrocarbon levels were found in the inner bay due to the anthropogenic activities, mainly combustion processes of traffic and industrial activities. The concentrations of heavy metals found in fish varied for Hg: 4.5-520, Cd: 0.10-10 and Pb: 0.10-491 microg kg(-1) in Izmir Bay. There was no significant seasonal variation in metal concentrations. An increase in Hg concentration with increasing length was noted for Mullus barbatus. A person can consume more than 2, 133 and 20 meals per week of fish in human diet would represent the tolerable weekly intake of mercury, cadmium and lead, respectively

  12. Dynamic response of land use and river nutrient concentration to long-term climatic changes.

    PubMed

    Bussi, Gianbattista; Janes, Victoria; Whitehead, Paul G; Dadson, Simon J; Holman, Ian P

    2017-07-15

    The combined indirect and direct impacts of land use change and climate change on river water quality were assessed. A land use allocation model was used to evaluate the response of the catchment land use to long-term climatic changes. Its results were used to drive a water quality model and assess the impact of climatic alterations on freshwater nitrate and phosphorus concentrations. Climatic projections were employed to estimate the likelihood of such response. The River Thames catchment (UK) was used as a case-study. If land use is considered as static parameter, according to the model results, climate change alone should reduce the average nitrate concentration, although just by a small amount, by the 2050s in the Lower Thames, due to reduced runoff (and lower export of nitrate from agricultural soils) and increased instream denitrification, and should increase the average phosphorus concentration by 12% by the 2050s in the Lower Thames, due to a reduction of the effluent dilution capacity of the river flow. However, the results of this study also show that these long-term climatic alterations are likely to lead to a reduction in the arable land in the Thames, replaced by improved grassland, due to a decrease in agriculture profitability in the UK. Taking into account the dynamic co-evolution of land use with climate, the average nitrate concentration is expected to be decreased by around 6% by the 2050s in both the upper and the lower Thames, following the model results, and the average phosphorus concentration increased by 13% in the upper Thames and 5% in the lower Thames. On the long term (2080s), nitrate is expected to decrease by 9% and 8% (upper and lower Thames respectively) and phosphorus not to change in the upper thames and increase by 5% in the lower Thames.

  13. Factors affecting the sorption of cesium in a nutrient-poor boreal bog.

    PubMed

    Lusa, M; Bomberg, M; Virtanen, S; Lempinen, J; Aromaa, H; Knuutinen, J; Lehto, J

    2015-09-01

    (135)Cs is among the most important radionuclides in the long-term safety assessments of spent nuclear fuel, due to its long half-life of 2.3 My and large inventory in spent nuclear fuel. Batch sorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the sorption behavior of radiocesium ((134)Cs) in the surface moss, peat, gyttja, and clay layers of 7-m-deep profiles taken from a nutrient-poor boreal bog. The batch distribution coefficient (Kd) values of radiocesium increased as a function of sampling depth. The highest Kd values, with a geometric mean of 3200 L/kg dry weight (DW), were observed in the bottom clay layer and the lowest in the 0.5-1.0 m peat layer (50 L/kg DW). The maximum sorption in all studied layers was observed at a pH between 7 and 9.5. The in situ Kd values of (133)Cs in surface Sphagnum moss, peat and gyttja samples were one order of magnitude higher than the Kd values obtained using the batch method. The highest in situ Kd values (9040 L/kg DW) were recorded for the surface moss layer. The sterilization of fresh surface moss, peat, gyttja and clay samples decreased the sorption of radiocesium by 38%, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, bacteria belonging to the genera Pseudomonas, Paenibacillus, Rhodococcus and Burkholderia isolated from the bog were found to remove radiocesium from the solution under laboratory conditions. The highest biosorption was observed for Paenibacillus sp. V0-1-LW and Pseudomonas sp. PS-0-L isolates. When isolated bacteria were added to sterilized bog samples, the removal of radiocesium from the solution increased by an average of 50% compared to the removal recorded for pure sterilized peat. Our results demonstrate that the sorption of radiocesium in the bog environment is dependent on pH and the type of the bog layer and that common environmental bacteria prevailing in the bog can remove cesium from the solution phase.

  14. Nutrient-based ecological consideration of a temporary river catchment affected by a reservoir operation to facilitate efficient management.

    PubMed

    Tzoraki, Ourania A; Dörflinger, Gerald; Kathijotes, Nicholas; Kontou, Artemis

    2014-01-01

    The water quality status of the Kouris river in Cyprus was examined in order to fulfil the requirements for ecological quality as defined by the Water Framework Directive-2000/60/EC. Nitrate concentration (mean value) was increased in the Limnatis (2.8 mg L(-1)) tributary in comparison with the Kryos (2.1 mg L(-1)) and Kouris (1.0 mg L(-1)) tributaries depicting the influence of anthropogenic activities. The total maximum daily nutrients loads (TMDLs) based on the flow duration curves approach, showed that nutrients loads exceeded threshold values (33.3-75.6% in all hydrologic condition classes in the Kouris tributary, and 65-78% in the Limnatis tributary) especially under low flow conditions. The TMDL graph is intended to guide the temporal schedule for chemical sampling in all hydrologic classes. Kouris reservoir is an oligotrophic system, strongly influenced by the river's flash-flood character but also by the implemented management practices. Kouris river outflow, which was reduced to one-tenth in the post dam period altered the wetland hydrologic network and contributed to the decrease of aquifer thickness. Continuous evaluation and update of the River Basin Management Plans will be the basis for the sustainable development of the Kouris basin.

  15. The effect of nutrient enrichment on the growth, nucleic acid concentrations, and elemental stoichiometry of coral reef macroalgae

    PubMed Central

    Reef, Ruth; Pandolfi, John M; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2012-01-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) links growth rates with organism elemental stoichiometry. Support for the GRH was found for many animal species, but less so for plants. This is the first study to test the GRH in macroalgae. Tropical coral reef macroalgae from three lineages, Caulerpa serrulata (Chlorophyta), Laurencia intricata (Rhodophyta), and Sargassum polyphyllum (Phaeophyceae) were grown enriched with nitrogen or phosphorous and under control conditions at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Growth rate, photosynthesis, nucleic acid composition, and elemental stoichiometry were measured. Nutrient enrichment had positive effects on photosynthetic rates and on investment in RNA. However, growth rate was not correlated with either photosynthetic rates or RNA content; thus, we did not find support for the GRH in tropical macroalgae. Macroalgae, especially L. intricata, accumulated P to very high levels (>0.6% of dry weight). The growth rate response to tissue P concentrations was unimodal. Above 0.21%, P accumulation had negative effects on growth. Nitrogen was not stored, but evidence of futile cycling was observed. The capacity to store large amounts of P is probably an adaptation to the low and patchy nutrient environment of the tropical oceans. PMID:22957199

  16. The effect of nutrient enrichment on the growth, nucleic acid concentrations, and elemental stoichiometry of coral reef macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Reef, Ruth; Pandolfi, John M; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2012-08-01

    The growth rate hypothesis (GRH) links growth rates with organism elemental stoichiometry. Support for the GRH was found for many animal species, but less so for plants. This is the first study to test the GRH in macroalgae. Tropical coral reef macroalgae from three lineages, Caulerpa serrulata (Chlorophyta), Laurencia intricata (Rhodophyta), and Sargassum polyphyllum (Phaeophyceae) were grown enriched with nitrogen or phosphorous and under control conditions at Heron Island on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Growth rate, photosynthesis, nucleic acid composition, and elemental stoichiometry were measured. Nutrient enrichment had positive effects on photosynthetic rates and on investment in RNA. However, growth rate was not correlated with either photosynthetic rates or RNA content; thus, we did not find support for the GRH in tropical macroalgae. Macroalgae, especially L. intricata, accumulated P to very high levels (>0.6% of dry weight). The growth rate response to tissue P concentrations was unimodal. Above 0.21%, P accumulation had negative effects on growth. Nitrogen was not stored, but evidence of futile cycling was observed. The capacity to store large amounts of P is probably an adaptation to the low and patchy nutrient environment of the tropical oceans.

  17. Litter type affects the activity of aerobic decomposers in a boreal peatland more than site nutrient and water table regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straková, P.; Niemi, R. M.; Freeman, C.; Peltoniemi, K.; Toberman, H.; Heiskanen, I.; Fritze, H.; Laiho, R.

    2011-09-01

    Peatlands are carbon (C) storage ecosystems sustained by a high water table (WT). High WT creates anoxic conditions that suppress the activity of aerobic decomposers and provide conditions for peat accumulation. Peatland function can be dramatically affected by WT drawdown caused by climate and/or land-use change. Aerobic decomposers are directly affected by WT drawdown through environmental factors such as increased oxygenation and nutrient availability. Additionally, they are indirectly affected via changes in plant community composition and litter quality. We studied the relative importance of direct and indirect effects of WT drawdown on aerobic decomposer activity in plant litter at two stages of decomposition (incubated in the field for 1 or 2 years). We did this by profiling 11 extracellular enzymes involved in the mineralization of organic C, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulphur. Our study sites represented a three-stage chronosequence from pristine to short-term (years) and long-term (decades) WT drawdown conditions under two nutrient regimes (bog and fen). The litter types included reflected the prevalent vegetation: Sphagnum mosses, graminoids, shrubs and trees. Litter type was the main factor shaping microbial activity patterns and explained about 30 % of the variation in enzyme activities and activity allocation. Overall, enzyme activities were higher in vascular plant litters compared to Sphagnum litters, and the allocation of enzyme activities towards C or nutrient acquisition was related to the initial litter quality (chemical composition). Direct effects of WT regime, site nutrient regime and litter decomposition stage (length of incubation period) summed to only about 40 % of the litter type effect. WT regime alone explained about 5 % of the variation in enzyme activities and activity allocation. Generally, enzyme activity increased following the long-term WT drawdown and the activity allocation turned from P and N acquisition towards C

  18. Identification of some factors affecting pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs) removal in real wastewater. Case study of fungal treatment of reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Badia-Fabregat, Marina; Lucas, Daniel; Gros, Meritxell; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Barceló, Damià; Caminal, Glòria; Vicent, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Many technologies are being developed for the efficient removal of micropollutants from wastewater and, among them, fungal degradation is one of the possible alternative biological treatments. In this article, some factors that might affect pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) removal in a fungal treatment of real wastewater were identified in batch bioreactor treating reverse osmosis concentrate (ROC) from urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We found that degradation of PhACs by Trametes versicolor was enhanced by addition of external nutrients (global removal of 44%). Moreover, our results point out that high aeration might be involved in the increase in the concentration of some PhACs. In fact, conjugation and deconjugation processes (among others) affect the removal assessment of emerging contaminants when working with real concentrations in comparison to experiments with spiked samples. Moreover, factors that could affect the quantification of micropollutants at lab-scale experiments were studied.

  19. Strategic assessment of near coastal waters: Northeast case study. Chapter 3. Susceptibility and concentration status of northeast estuaries to nutrient discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Warsh, C.; Tolson, J.P.; Klein, C.J.; Orlando, S.P.; Alexander, C.

    1988-07-01

    The study is an assessment of the susceptibility and status of 17 Northeast estuaries to nutrient-related pollution problems. It is the final version of one of seven chapters in the Case Study and one of two chapters that will be completed. It first presents background information on the problems of nutrient overenrichment in estuaries followed by a screening analysis of the susceptibility and status of estuaries to nutrient discharges and sections on nutrient sources and discharge estimation methods. The final section is an overview of the region based on simple comparisons of discharge estimates across estuaries in the region. Appendix A contains one-page summaries for each estuary that include information on significant physical and hydrologic features, susceptibility and pollutant status, nutrient discharge estimates, and a narrative to assist the reader interpret the data. Summary estimates of particular interest are the changes in nitrogen and phosphorus inputs that would significantly alter the pollutant status of each estuary. Four additional appendices contain more detailed breakdowns of nutrient discharges by season and by source, an evaluation of the quality of the discharge estimates, and the method for determining an estuary's nutrient concentration status and susceptibility to nutrient-related pollution problems.

  20. Prebiotics affect nutrient digestibility but not faecal ammonia in dogs fed increased dietary protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hesta, M; Roosen, W; Janssens, G P J; Millet, S; De Wilde, R

    2003-12-01

    An increased protein content and less digestible protein sources in the diet can induce bad faecal odour. The present study investigated the effect of adding prebiotics to dog diets enriched with animal-derived protein sources on apparent digestibilities and faecal ammonia concentration. In three subsequent periods eight healthy beagle dogs were fed a commercial dog diet that was gradually supplemented by up to 50 % with meat and bone meal (MBM), greaves meal (GM) or poultry meal (PM) respectively. Afterwards, 3 % fructo-oligosaccharides or 3 % isomalto-oligosaccharides were substituted for 3 % of the total diet. Supplementation with animal-derived protein sources did not decrease the apparent N digestibility significantly but oligosaccharides did. On the other hand the bacterial N content (% DM) in the faeces was highest in the oligosaccharide groups followed by the protein-supplemented groups and lowest in the control groups. When the apparent N digestibility was corrected for bacterial N no significant differences were noted anymore except for the GM group where the corrected N digestibility was still lower after oligosaccharide supplementation. The amount of faecal ammonia was significantly increased by supplementing with protein or oligosaccharides in the MBM and GM groups but not in the PM group. When apparent N digestibility is interpreted, a correction for bacterial N should be taken into account, especially when prebiotics are added to the diet. Oligosaccharides did not reduce the faecal ammonia concentrations as expected.

  1. Prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements increase cord leptin concentration in pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Huybregts, Lieven; Roberfroid, Dominique; Lanou, Hermann; Meda, Nicolas; Taes, Youri; Valea, Innocent; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Kolsteren, Patrick; Van Camp, John

    2013-05-01

    In developing countries, prenatal lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) were shown to increase birth size; however, the mechanism of this effect remains unknown. Cord blood hormone concentrations are strongly associated with birth size. Therefore, we hypothesize that LNSs increase birth size through a change in the endocrine regulation of fetal development. We compared the effect of daily prenatal LNSs with multiple micronutrient tablets on cord blood hormone concentrations using a randomized, controlled design including 197 pregnant women from rural Burkina Faso. Insulin-like growth factors (IGF) I and II, their binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3, leptin, cortisol, and insulin were quantified in cord sera using immunoassays. LNS was associated with higher cord blood leptin mainly in primigravidae (+57%; P = 0.02) and women from the highest tertile of BMI at study inclusion (+41%; P = 0.02). We did not find any significant LNS effects on other measured cord hormones. The observed increase in cord leptin was associated with a significantly higher birth weight. Cord sera from small-for-gestational age newborns had lower median IGF-I (-9 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGF-II (-79 μg/L; P = 0.003), IGFBP-3 (-0.7 μg/L; P = 0.007), and leptin (-1.0 μg/L; P = 0.016) concentrations but higher median cortisol (+18 μg/L; P = 0.037) concentrations compared with normally grown newborns. Prenatal LNS resulted in increased cord leptin concentrations in primigravidae and mothers with higher BMI at study inclusion. The elevated leptin concentrations could point toward a higher neonatal fat mass.

  2. Food, nutrients and nutraceuticals affecting the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uranga, José Antonio; López-Miranda, Visitación; Lombó, Felipe; Abalo, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease) are debilitating relapsing inflammatory disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract, with deleterious effect on quality of life, and increasing incidence and prevalence. Mucosal inflammation, due to altered microbiota, increased intestinal permeability and immune system dysfunction underlies the symptoms and may be caused in susceptible individuals by different factors (or a combination of them), including dietary habits and components. In this review we describe the influence of the Western diet, obesity, and different nutraceuticals/functional foods (bioactive peptides, phytochemicals, omega 3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, probiotics and prebiotics) on the course of IBD, and provide some hints that could be useful for nutritional guidance. Hopefully, research will soon offer enough reliable data to slow down the spread of the disease and to make diet a cornerstone in IBD therapy.

  3. Regulation of hormonal responses of sweet pepper as affected by salinity and elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Piñero, María Carmen; Houdusse, Fabrice; Garcia-Mina, Jose M; Garnica, María; Del Amor, Francisco M

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the extent to which the predicted CO2 -protective effects on the inhibition of growth, impairment of photosynthesis and nutrient imbalance caused by saline stress are mediated by an effective adaptation of the endogenous plant hormonal balance. Therefore, sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum, cv. Ciclón) were grown at ambient or elevated [CO2] (400 or 800 µmol mol(-1)) with a nutrient solution containing 0 or 80 mM NaCl. The results show that, under saline conditions, elevated [CO2] increased plant dry weight, leaf area, leaf relative water content and net photosynthesis compared with ambient [CO2], whilst the maximum potential quantum efficiency of photosystem II was not modified. In salt-stressed plants, elevated [CO2 ] increased leaf NO3(-) concentration and reduced Cl(-) concentration. Salinity stress induced ABA accumulation in the leaves but it was reduced in the roots at high [CO2], being correlated with the stomatal response. Under non-stressed conditions, IAA was dramatically reduced in the roots when high [CO2] was applied, which resulted in greater root DW and root respiration. Additionally, the observed high CK concentration in the roots (especially tZR) could prevent downregulation of photosynthesis at high [CO2], as the N level in the leaves was increased compared with the ambient [CO2], under salt-stress conditions. These results demonstrate that the hormonal balance was altered by the [CO2], which resulted in significant changes at the growth, gas exchange and nutritional levels.

  4. Estimating Summer Nutrient Concentrations in Northeastern Lakes from SPARROW Load Predictions and Modeled Lake Depth and Volume

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global nutrient cycles have been altered by use of fossil fuels and fertilizers resulting in increases in nutrient loads to aquatic systems. In the United States, excess nutrients have been repeatedly reported as the primary cause of lake water quality impairments. Setting nutr...

  5. Responses of feeding prebiotics on nutrient digestibility, faecal microbiota composition and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in dogs: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Patra, A K

    2011-09-01

    The effects of prebiotics on digestibility, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations and bacterial populations in the faeces and immunity in dogs were evaluated by meta-analyses. Overall, data from 15 published studies containing 65 different treatment means of 418 observations from different breeds of dogs were included in the data set. Feeding of prebiotics to dogs did not affect the nutrient intake (P > 0.10), nor did prebiotics change (P > 0.10) the digestibility of dry matter (DM) and fat. However, crude protein (CP) digestibility tended to decrease quadratically (P = 0.06) with increasing dosages of prebiotics, although the degree of prediction was low (R(2) = 0.33). The concentration of total SCFA (P = 0.08; R(2) = 0.90) tended to increase linearly, whereas concentration of acetate (R(2) = 0.25), propionate (R(2) = 0.88) and butyrate (R(2) = 0.85) increased quadratically with increasing dosage of prebiotics in the faeces of dogs. The numbers of beneficial bifidobacteria (P < 0.01; R(2) = 0.62) increased quadratically, but lactobacilli (P < 0.01; R(2) = 0.66) increased linearly with increasing supplementation of prebiotics. The changes in healthy bacterial numbers were affected by the interaction of initial bacterial numbers and dose of prebiotics; bacterial numbers increased relatively more when initial bacterial numbers were low. Dietary composition did not influence the response of prebiotics on lactobacilli and bifidobacterial numbers in this study. The numbers of pathogenic Clostridium perfringens and Escherichia coli were not affected by prebiotics. Prebiotics did not affect the serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations such as IgG, IgA and IgM in dogs. Although prebiotics may tend to have an adverse effect on CP digestibility, prebiotics at doses up to 1.40% food intake (DM basis) might increase the beneficial bacterial populations and SCFA concentrations in the faeces of dogs. Thus, the feeding of prebiotics has a great prospective to improve the

  6. Fermentation in nutrient salt mixtures affects green Spanish-style Manzanilla table olive characteristics.

    PubMed

    López-López, Antonio; Bautista-Gallego, Joaquín; Moreno-Baquero, José María; Garrido-Fernández, Antonio

    2016-11-15

    This work studies the effects of the substitution of NaCl with KCl and CaCl2 on the physicochemical, mineral and sensory profile of fermented green Spanish-style Manzanilla olives, using an enlarged centroid mixture design. An increasing presence of CaCl2 in the initial brines improved the colour index, L(∗), b(∗) values, and firmness. The Na in the olives decreased (linearly) while the levels of K and Ca increased (quadratic) as a function of the KCl and CaCl2 concentrations in the initial brines. CaCl2 also improved the retention of Zn and P in the flesh. PLS showed a strong relationship between Ca and bitterness, hardness, fibrousness, crunchiness and saltiness (negative) and allowed for the prediction of sensory attributes (except acid) from the mineral contents in the flesh. Most of the treatments could lead to new green Spanish-style Manzanilla olive presentations with reduced Na and healthier characteristics.

  7. Nutrient and sediment concentrations, yields, and loads in impaired streams and rivers in the Taunton River Basin, Massachusetts, 1997-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barbaro, Jeffrey R.; Sorenson, Jason R.

    2013-01-01

    phosphorus concentrations in the impaired-reach areas ranged from 0.0046 to 0.91 milligrams per liter (mg/L) in individual samples (number of samples (n)=331), with a median of 0.090 mg/L; total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 0.34 to 14 mg/L in individual samples (n=139), with a median of 1.35 mg/L; and total suspended solids concentrations ranged from 2/d) for total phosphorus and 100 lb/mi2/d for total nitrogen in these reaches. In most of the impaired reaches not affected by the Brockton Advanced Water Reclamation Facility outfall, yields were lower than in reaches downstream from the outfall, and the difference between measured and threshold yields was fairly uniform over a wide range of flows, suggesting that multiple processes contribute to nonpoint loading in these reaches. The Northeast and Mid-Atlantic SPAtially-Referenced Regression On Watershed (SPARROW) models for total phosphorus and total nitrogen also were used to estimate annual nutrient loads in the impaired tributary stream reaches and main stem of the Taunton River and predict the distribution of these loads among point and diffuse sources in reach drainage areas. SPARROW is a regional, statistical model that relates nutrient loads in streams to upstream sources and land-use characteristics and can be used to make predictions for streams that do not have nutrient-load data. The model predicts mean annual loads based on longterm streamflow and water-quality data and nutrient source conditions for the year 2002. Predicted mean annual nutrient loads from the SPARROW models were consistent with the measured yield and load data from sampling sites in the basin. For conditions in 2002, the Brockton Advanced Water Reclamation Facility outfall accounted for over 75 percent of the total nitrogen load and over 93 percent of the total phosphorus load in the Salisbury Plain and Matfield Rivers downstream from the outfall. Municipal point sources also accounted for most of the load in the main stem of the Taunton

  8. Concentrations, and estimated loads and yields of nutrients and suspended sediment in the Little River basin, Kentucky, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.

    2006-01-01

    Nutrients, primarily nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, naturally occur but also are applied to land in the form of commercial fertilizers and livestock waste to enhance plant growth. Concentrations, estimated loads and yields, and sources of nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, and orthophosphate were evaluated in streams of the Little River Basin to assist the Commonwealth of Kentucky in developing 'total maximum daily loads' (TMDLs) for streams in the basin. The Little River Basin encompasses about 600 square miles in Christian and Trigg Counties, and a portion of Caldwell County in western Kentucky. Water samples were collected in streams in the Little River Basin during 2003-04 as part of a study conducted in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. A total of 92 water samples were collected at four fixed-network sites from March through November 2003 and from February through November 2004. An additional 20 samples were collected at five synoptic-network sites during the same period. Median concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended sediment varied spatially and seasonally. Concentrations of nitrogen were higher in the spring (March-May) after fertilizer application and runoff. The highest concentration of nitrite plus nitrate-5.7 milligrams per liter (mg/L)-was detected at the South Fork Little River site. The Sinking Fork near Cadiz site had the highest median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate (4.6 mg/L). The North Fork Little River site and the Little River near Cadiz site had higher concentrations of orthophosphate in the fall and lower concentrations in the spring. Concentrations of orthophosphate remained high during the summer (June-August) at the North Fork Little River site possibly because of the contribution of wastewater effluent to streamflow. Fifty-eight percent of the concentrations of total phosphorus at the nine sites exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended maximum concentration limit of

  9. Nanosilver and Nano Zero-Valent Iron Exposure Affects Nutrient Exchange Across the Sediment-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Buchkowski, Robert W; Williams, Clayton J; Kelly, Joel; Veinot, Jonathan G C; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A

    2016-01-01

    To examine how nanoparticles influence biogeochemical cycles in streams, we studied the acute impact of nanosilver (nAg) and nanoparticulate zero-valent iron (nZVI) exposure on nutrient and oxygen exchange across the sediment-water interface of two streams (agricultural canal and wetland) that differed in their water quality and sediment characteristics. At the agricultural site, nAg increased oxygen consumption and decreased N2 flux rates from that observed in control incubations. nZVI caused sediment-water systems from both streams to go hypoxic within 1.5 h of exposure. N2 flux rates were at least an order of magnitude higher in nZVI treatments as compared to control. Water column nitrate and nitrite concentrations were not impacted by nZVI exposure but total dissolved phosphorus concentrations were higher in cores treated with nZVI. nAg and nZVI exposure to surface water ecosystems can disrupt ecological function across the sediment-water interface.

  10. Dietary supplementation with cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid affects concentrations of amino acids in tissues of young pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Kim, Sung Woo; Li, Xilong; Datta, Sujay; Pond, Wilson G.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are important nutrients for neural development of infants. However, little is known about the effect of cholesterol or DHA on concentrations of amino acids (AA) in neonatal tissues. This study was conducted with the piglet (an established model for studying human infant nutrition) to test the hypothesis that dietary supplementation with the lipids may modulate AA availability in tissues. Sixteen newborn pigs were nursed by sows for 24 h and then assigned to one of four treatment groups, representing supplementation with 0.0% (control), 0.2% cholesterol, 0.2% DHA, or cholesterol plus DHA to the basal milk-formula. All piglets were euthanized at 49 days of age. In brain, cholesterol supplementation reduced (P < 0.05) concentrations of glutamate, serine, glutamine, threonine, β-alanine, alanine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine, and γ-aminobutyrate but increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of glycine and lysine, whereas DHA supplementation similarly affected (P < 0.05) concentrations of the same AA (except for isoleucine and lysine) and taurine. In addition, concentrations of most AA in liver, muscle and plasma were substantially altered by dietary supplementation of cholesterol and DHA in a tissue-dependent manner. Further, DHA reduced concentrations of carnosine in skeletal muscle, as well as ammonia in both plasma and brain. The results reveal that cholesterol and DHA can regulate AA metabolism and availability in various tissues of piglets. These novel findings have important implications for designing the next generation of infant formula to optimize neonatal growth and development. PMID:18972185

  11. Concentrations and estimated loads of nutrients, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls in selected tributaries to Lake Michigan, 2005-6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Project (LMMBP) measured and modeled the concentrations of environmentally persistent contaminants in air, river and lake water, sediment, and fish and bird tissues in and around Lake Michigan for an 18-month period spanning 1994-95. Tributary loads were calculated as part of the LMMBP. The work described in this report was designed to provide updated concentration data and load estimates for 5 nutrients, total mercury, and total polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) at 5 of the original 11 LMMBP sampling sites. Samples were collected at five Lake Michigan tributary monitoring sites during 2005 and 2006. Annual loads calculated for the 2005-6 sampling period are as much as 50 percent lower relative to the 1994-95 time period. Differences between the loads calculated for the two time periods are likely related to a combination of (1) biases introduced by a reduced level of sampling effort, (2) differences in hydrological characteristics, and (3) actual environmental change. Estimated annual total mercury loads during 2005-6 ranged from 51 kilograms per year (kg/yr) in the Fox River to 2.2 kg/yr in the Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal. Estimated annual total PCB loads during 2005-6 ranged from 132 kg/yr in the Fox River to 6.2 kg/yr in the Grand River.

  12. Wet distillers grains plus solubles concentration in steam-flaked-corn-based diets: Effects on feedlot cattle performance, carcass characteristics, nutrient digestibility, and ruminal fermentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Luebbe, M K; Patterson, J M; Jenkins, K H; Buttrey, E K; Davis, T C; Clark, B E; McCollum, F T; Cole, N A; MacDonald, J C

    2012-05-01

    processing method influences nutrient digestibility and ruminal fermentation. The addition of WDG in SFC-based diets appears to negatively affect animal performance by diluting the energy density of the diet.

  13. Linking nutrient enrichment, sediment erodibility and biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, B.; Mahon, R.; Sojka, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment movement in coastal lagoons affects nutrient flux and primary producer growth. Previous research has shown that sediment erodibility is affected by biofilm concentration and that growth of benthic organisms, which produce biofilm, is affected by nutrient enrichment. However, researchers have not examined possible links between nutrient addition and sediment erodibility. We manipulated nutrient levels in the water column of 16 microcosms filled with homogenized sediment from a shallow coastal lagoon and artificial seawater to determine the effects on biofilm growth, measured through chlorophyll a and colloidal carbohydrate concentrations. Erosion tests using a Gust microcosm were conducted to determine the relationship between sediment erodibility and biofilm concentration. Results show that carbohydrate levels decreased with increasing nutrient enrichment and were unrelated to chlorophyll concentrations and erodibility. The nutrient levels did not predictably affect the chlorophyll levels, with lower chlorophyll concentrations in the control and medium enrichment treatments than the low and high enrichment treatments. Controls on biofilm growth are still unclear and the assumed relationship between carbohydrates and erodibility may be invalid. Understanding how biofilms respond to nutrient enrichment and subsequent effects on sediment erodibility is essential for protecting and restoring shallow coastal systems.

  14. Nutrient concentrations, loads, and yields in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 2002-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esralew, Rachel A.; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    The city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, uses Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin in northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma for public water supply. The city has spent millions of dollars over the last decade to eliminate taste and odor problems in the drinking water from the Eucha-Spavinaw system, which may be attributable to blue-green algae. Increases in the algal biomass in the lakes may be attributable to increases in nutrient concentrations in the lakes and in the waters feeding the lakes. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, investigated and summarized total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations in water samples and provided estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus loads, yields, and flow-weighted concentrations during base flow and runoff for two streams discharging to Lake Eucha for the period January 2002 through December 2009. This report updates a previous report that used data from water-quality samples collected from January 2002 through December 2006. Based on the results from the Mann-Whitney statistical test, unfiltered total nitrogen concentrations were significantly greater in runoff water samples than in base-flow water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Maysville and near Cherokee City, Arkansas; Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Nitrogen concentrations in runoff water samples collected from all stations generally increased with increasing streamflow. Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow and runoff water samples collected in Spavinaw Creek significantly increased from the station furthest upstream (near Maysville) to the Sycamore station and then significantly decreased from the Sycamore station to the station furthest downstream (near Colcord). Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow and runoff water samples collected from Beaty Creek were significantly less than base-flow and runoff water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek. Based on the results

  15. Changes in Hydraulic Gradient, Hyporheic Exchange, and Patterns of Nutrient Concentration between Dry and Wet Season Flows for a Tropical Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, M.; Endreny, T.; Lautz, L.; Siegel, D.

    2009-05-01

    Mountain streams are a common source in Central America for community water supplies (CWS). These streams become dewatered by the CWS during dry season low flows, with potential impacts on hydraulic gradients, hyporheic exchange flow, terrestrial-aquatic linkages, and nutrient dynamics, which may ultimately affect aquatic and riparian micro-ecosystems. We are presenting preliminary results of a study conducted in Buena Vista, a village in Yoro, Honduras where the mountain stream was instrumented and manipulated to measure impacts of a CWS. Piezometric head and stream water levels were taken at 7 cross-sections along 30 m of step-pool stream, and water quality samples were retrieved from 48 pairs of riparian and stream piezometers and monitoring wells. We computed vertical hydraulic gradients, zones of hyporheic upwelling and downwelling, and nutrient patterns, and their change with streamflow. Streamflow ranged from 30 L/s in the wet-season high flow to about 2 L/s in the dry-season low flow, and were dewatered to about 1 L/s. A HEC- RAS water-surface profile model was calibrated to observed stages to establish gradients along the entire reach, and river head was then input as a boundary condition into a MODFLOW groundwater model to examine patterns of hyporheic exchange. Changes in hydraulic gradients and fluxes are compared with baseline conditions during the dry season low flow without dewatering. Noticeable changes in hydraulic gradient occurred between high and low flows, but changes in low flow to dewatered flow were negligible. Lengths and location of hyporheic upwelling and downwelling zones shifted slightly with changes in flow, but again the dewatering had a minor impact. Concentrations of nitrate, sulfate, chloride, fluoride and dissolved oxygen were detected in the hyporheic zone, the stream water, and adjacent ground water. We are exploring mixing models to assess the extent to which hyporheic exchange migrated to and from the creek to adjacent

  16. Mutation increasing β-carotene concentrations does not adversely affect concentrations of essential mineral elements in pepper fruit

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jacqueline A.; Penchev, Emil A.; Nielen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are prevalent in human populations throughout the world. Vitamin A deficiency affects hundreds of millions of pre-school age children in low income countries. Fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) can be a major dietary source of precursors to Vitamin A biosynthesis, such as β-carotene. Recently, pepper breeding programs have introduced the orange-fruited (of) trait of the mutant variety Oranzheva kapiya, which is associated with high fruit β-carotene concentrations, to the mutant variety Albena. In this manuscript, concentrations of β-carotene and mineral elements (magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, zinc, calcium, manganese, iron and copper) were compared in fruit from P31, a red-fruited genotype derived from the variety Albena, and M38, a genotype developed by transferring the orange-fruited mutation (of) into Albena. It was observed that fruit from M38 plants had greater β-carotene concentration at both commercial and botanical maturity (4.9 and 52.7 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively) than fruit from P31 plants (2.3 and 30.1 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively). The mutation producing high β-carotene concentrations in pepper fruits had no detrimental effect on the concentrations of mineral elements required for human nutrition. PMID:28207797

  17. Mutation increasing β-carotene concentrations does not adversely affect concentrations of essential mineral elements in pepper fruit.

    PubMed

    Tomlekova, Nasya B; White, Philip J; Thompson, Jacqueline A; Penchev, Emil A; Nielen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin and mineral deficiencies are prevalent in human populations throughout the world. Vitamin A deficiency affects hundreds of millions of pre-school age children in low income countries. Fruits of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) can be a major dietary source of precursors to Vitamin A biosynthesis, such as β-carotene. Recently, pepper breeding programs have introduced the orange-fruited (of) trait of the mutant variety Oranzheva kapiya, which is associated with high fruit β-carotene concentrations, to the mutant variety Albena. In this manuscript, concentrations of β-carotene and mineral elements (magnesium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, zinc, calcium, manganese, iron and copper) were compared in fruit from P31, a red-fruited genotype derived from the variety Albena, and M38, a genotype developed by transferring the orange-fruited mutation (of) into Albena. It was observed that fruit from M38 plants had greater β-carotene concentration at both commercial and botanical maturity (4.9 and 52.7 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively) than fruit from P31 plants (2.3 and 30.1 mg / kg fresh weight, respectively). The mutation producing high β-carotene concentrations in pepper fruits had no detrimental effect on the concentrations of mineral elements required for human nutrition.

  18. Effects of live yeast on the performance, nutrient digestibility, gastrointestinal microbiota and concentration of volatile fatty acids in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieyun; Li, Defa; Gong, Limin; Ma, Yongxi; He, Yonghui; Zhai, Hengxiao

    2006-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of live yeast supplementation on performance, nutrient digestibility, enteric microbial populations and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration of weanling pigs, receiving diets supplemented with aureomycin and elevated doses of CuSO4. In experiment 1, 90 crossbred pigs (7.20 +/- 0.44 kg, 28 d of age) were randomly allotted to one of five dietary treatments containing either 0, 4.0 x 10(6), 9.0 x 10(6), 2.6 x 10(7), or 5.1 x 10(7) cfu Saccharomyces cerevisiae per gram with six replicate pens per treatment and three pigs per pen. BWG and feed intake increased quadratically during days 1-14 and days 1-28 as live yeast levels increased (p < 0.01). Pigs fed the diet containing 2.6 x 10(7) cfu yeast per gram had the highest BWG and feed intake among the treatments. In experiment 2, 48 crossbred pigs (7.64 +/- 0.72 kg, 28 d of age) were fed diets containing live yeast at 0 or 3.2 x 10(7) cfu of S. cerevisiae per g with six replicate pens per treatment and four pigs per pen. The yeast supplementation improved BWG and feed intake during days 1-14 (p < 0.01) and days 1-28 (p < 0.05). Treatment differences were not observed in any of the bacterial populations, yeast numbers or VFA concentrations, at any of the sites of the gastrointestinal tract tested. Total tract nutrient digestibility was also not different between treatments. Overall, dietary supplementation of live yeast had a positive effect on BWG and feed intake of weanling pigs, receiving diets supplemented with aureomycin and elevated doses of CuSO4. The improvement in BWG appears to be partly related to an increase in feed intake. The mechanism of yeast improving feed intake of piglets needs to be explored.

  19. Nutrient Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    The City of Tulsa, Oklahoma, uses Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin in northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma for public water supply. Taste and odor problems in the water attributable to blue-green algae have increased in frequency. Changes in the algae community in the lakes may be attributable to increases in nutrient levels in the lakes, and in the waters feeding the lakes. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, investigated and summarized nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and provided estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus loads, yields, and flow-weighted concentrations in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin for three 3-year periods - 2002-2004, 2003-2005, and 2004-2006, to update a previous report that used data from water-quality samples for a 3-year period from January 2002 through December 2004. This report provides information needed to advance knowledge of the regional hydrologic system and understanding of hydrologic processes, and provides hydrologic data and results useful to multiple agencies for interstate agreements. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly greater in runoff samples than in base-flow samples for all three periods at Spavinaw Creek near Maysville, Arkansas; Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Runoff concentrations were not significantly greater than base-flow concentrations at Spavinaw Creek near Cherokee, Arkansas; and Spavinaw Creek near Sycamore, Oklahoma except for phosphorus during 2003-2005. Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow samples significantly increased downstream in Spavinaw Creek from the Maysville to Sycamore stations then significantly decreased from the Sycamore to the Colcord stations for all three periods. Nitrogen in base-flow samples from Beaty Creek was significantly less than in samples from Spavinaw Creek. Phosphorus concentrations in base-flow samples significantly increased from the Maysville to

  20. Sediment Metal Concentration Survey Along the Mine-Affected Molonglo River, NSW, Australia.

    PubMed

    Wadige, Chamani P M Marasinghe; Taylor, Anne M; Krikowa, Frank; Maher, William A

    2016-04-01

    Metal concentrations were measured in sediments of the mine-affected Molonglo River to determine current metal concentrations and distribution along the river. Compared with an uncontaminated site at 6.5 km upstream of the Captains Flat mine, sediments collected from the river at ≤12.5 km distance below the mine had a significantly higher percentage of finely divided silt and clay with higher concentrations of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The measured metal concentrations in the mine affected sites of the river were in the following order: Zn = 697-6818 > Pb = 23-1796 > Cu = 10-628 > Cd = 0.13-8.7 µg/g dry mass. The highest recorded metal concentrations were Cd at 48, Cu at 45, Pb at 240, and Zn at 81 times higher than the background concentrations of these metals in the river sediments. A clear sediment metal-contamination gradient from the mine site to 63 km downstream was established for Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the river sediments. Compared with sediment metal concentrations before a major flood in 2010, only Zn concentrations increased. For all of the mine-affected sites studied, Cd and Zn concentrations exceeded the (ANZECC/ARMCANZ, Australian and New Zealand guidelines for fresh and marine water quality. Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council/Agriculture and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand, 2000) interim sediment-quality guidelines low values for Cd (1.5 µg/g dry mass) and the high value for Zn (410 µg/g dry mass). Existing metal loads in the riverbed sediments may still be adversely affecting the river infauna.

  1. Nutrient Concentrations, Loads, and Yields in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Arkansas and Oklahoma, 2002-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tortorelli, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The City of Tulsa, Oklahoma, uses Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin in northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma for public water supply. Taste and odor problems in the water attributable to blue-green algae have increased in frequency over time. Changes in the algae community in the lakes may be attributable to increases in nutrient levels in the lakes, and in the waters feeding the lakes. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, conducted an investigation to summarize nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations and provide estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus loads, yields, and flow-weighted concentrations in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin for a 3-year period from January 2002 through December 2004. This report provides information needed to advance knowledge of the regional hydrologic system and understanding of hydrologic processes, and provides hydrologic data and results useful to multiple parties for interstate compacts. Nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations were significantly greater in runoff samples than in base-flow samples at Spavinaw Creek near Maysville, Arkansas; Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Runoff concentrations were not significantly greater than in base-flow samples at Spavinaw Creek near Cherokee, Arkansas; and Spavinaw Creek near Sycamore, Oklahoma. Nitrogen concentrations in base-flow samples significantly increased in the downstream direction in Spavinaw Creek from the Maysville to Sycamore stations then significantly decreased from the Sycamore to the Colcord stations. Nitrogen in base-flow samples from Beaty Creek was significantly less than in those from Spavinaw Creek. Phosphorus concentrations in base-flow samples significantly increased from the Maysville to Cherokee stations in Spavinaw Creek, probably due to a point source between those stations, then significantly decreased downstream from the Cherokee to Colcord stations. Phosphorus in base

  2. Tomato growth as affected by root-zone temperature and the addition of gibberellic acid and kinetin to nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; White, J. W.; Salisbury, F. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    The effect of root-zone temperature on young tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Heinz 1350) was evaluated in controlled environments using a recirculating solution culture system. Growth rates were measured at root-zone temperatures of 15 degrees, 20 degrees, 25 degrees, and 30 degrees C in a near optimum foliar environment. Optimum growth occurred at 25 degrees to 30 degrees during the first 4 weeks of growth and 20 degrees to 25 degrees during the 5th and 6th weeks. Growth was severely restricted at 15 degrees. Four concentrations of gibberellic acid (GA3) and kinetin were added to the nutrient solution in a separate trial; root-zone temperature was maintained at 15 degrees and 25 degrees. Addition of 15 micromoles GA3 to solutions increased specific leaf area, total leaf area, and dry weight production of plants in both temperature treatments. GA3-induced growth stimulation was greater at 15 degrees than at 25 degrees. GA3 may promote growth by increasing leaf area, enhancing photosynthesis per unit leaf area, or both. Kinetic was not useful in promoting growth at either temperature.

  3. Dietary potassium diformate did not affect growth and survival but did reduce nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effect of a dietary supplement potassium diformate (PDF) on growth performance, survival and nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions. We found that weight gain was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the different levels of ...

  4. Effects of partial replacement of concentrate with feed blocks on nutrient utilization, microbial N flow, and milk yield and composition in goats.

    PubMed

    Molina-Alcaide, E; Morales-García, E Y; Martín-García, A I; Ben Salem, H; Nefzaoui, A; Sanz-Sampelayo, M R

    2010-05-01

    affected by diet. Milk yield was higher in goats fed the AC diet than in those receiving the FB diets. Conjugated linoleic acid content was higher in milk from FB than in milk from AC goats. Our study suggests that FB type II based on local ingredients could be used advantageously to reduce half of the amount of concentrate without detrimental effects on nutrient utilization, N value of the diet, and milk composition. The decrease of milk yield with ACBII compared with that obtained with the AC diet could be compensated by better quality of milk, decreased cost of feeding, and environmental advantage derived of including by-products in FB.

  5. [Variation of nutrient concentrations at the inshore coastal area of northern Jiangsu province and the occurrence of green tide caused by Enteromorpha prolifera].

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Shi, Xiao-Yong; Wang, Ting

    2012-07-01

    Based on the investigation of the inshore coastal area of northern Jiangsu province with occurrence of green tide caused by Enteromorpha prolifera, which was performed in five voyages during March to June 2010, the variation of nutrient concentrations and its distribution characteristics were studied in this paper. The results showed that the concentrations of nutrients were relatively high in this region due to the terrestrial runoff and northern Jiangsu coastal current, which contributed to the outbreak of green tide. The highest concentrations of dissolved inorganic N (DIN), PO4(3-)-P and SiO3(2-)-Si were 23.04, 0. 55 and 15.85 micromol x L(-1), respectively. In spring, due to the strong life activities of plankton and the intake of nutrients by green tide, the concentrations of NO(3-)-N, PO4(3-)-P, SiO3(2-)-Si and DIN all showed a tendency of decreasing from the first to the fifth voyage. Besides, the closer the N/P ratios in water and in the body of plankton, the faster the plankton grows. The N/P ratios measured in the fourth and fifth voyages were relatively favorable for the growth of Enteromorpha prolifera. The distribution characteristics of nutrients had a tendency of decreasing from inshore to offshore in all voyages.

  6. Effects of Dietary Zinc Pectin Oligosaccharides Chelate Supplementation on Growth Performance, Nutrient Digestibility and Tissue Zinc Concentrations of Broilers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongcheng; Yu, Huimin; Wu, Xuezhuang; Zhang, Tietao; Cui, Hu; Wan, Chunmeng; Gao, Xiuhua

    2016-10-01

    The experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of zinc pectin oligosaccharides (Zn-POS) chelate on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, and tissue zinc concentrations of Arbor Acre broilers aged from 1 to 42 days. A total of 576 1-day-old broilers were randomly assigned into 4 groups with 9 replicates per group and 16 chicks per replicate. Chicks were fed either a basal diet (control) or basal diet supplemented with Zn-POS at 300 (Zn-POS-300), 600 (Zn-POS-600), or 900 mg/kg (Zn-POS-900), respectively, for 42 days. A 3-day metabolism trial was conducted during the last week of the experiment feeding. The average daily gain and the average daily feed intake of Zn-POS-600 were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of either the control, Zn-POS-300, or Zn-POS-900. Zn-POS-600 had the highest apparent digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, and metabolic energy among all groups. The control group had the lowest apparent digestibility of dry matter (P < 0.05), whereas the apparent digestibility of dry matter in Zn-POS-600 was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Zn-POS-300. The apparent digestibility of crude protein in Zn-POS-600 or Zn-POS-900 was higher (P < 0.05) compared to Zn-POS-300 or the control. The apparent digestibility of metabolic energy in Zn-POS-600 or Zn-POS-900 was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Zn-POS-300. Zn-POS-600 had the highest liver zinc concentrations (P < 0.05), while Zn-POS-900 had the highest pancreatic zinc concentrations (P < 0.05). Our data suggest that the supplementation of 600 mg/kg Zn-POS is optimal in improving the average daily gain and the average daily feed intake, utilization of dietary dry matter and crude protein, and increasing tissue zinc concentrations in liver and pancreas of broilers.

  7. Low soil temperature inhibits the effect of high nutrient supply on photosynthetic response to elevated carbon dioxide concentration in white birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ambebe, Titus F; Dang, Qing-Lai; Li, Junlin

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the interactive effects of soil temperature (T(soil)) and nutrient availability on the response of photosynthesis to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]), white birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) seedlings were exposed to ambient (360 micromol mol(-1)) or elevated (720 micromol mol(-1)) [CO(2)], three T(soil) (5, 15 and 25 degrees C initially, increased to 7, 17 and 27 degrees C, respectively, 1 month later) and three nutrient regimes (4/1.8/3.3, 80/35/66 and 160/70/132 mg l(-1) N/P/K) for 3 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. Elevated [CO(2)] increased net photosynthetic rate (A(n)), instantaneous water-use efficiency (IWUE), internal to ambient carbon dioxide concentration ratio (C(i)/C(a)), triose phosphate utilization (TPU) and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation (J(c)), and it decreased actual photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (DeltaF/F(m)'), the fraction of total linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation (J(o)/J(T)) and leaf N concentration. The low T(soil) suppressed A(n), transpiration rate (E), TPU, DeltaF/F(m)' and J(c), but it increased J(o)/J(T). The low nutrient treatment reduced A(n), IWUE, maximum carboxylation rate of Rubisco, light-saturated electron transport rate, TPU, DeltaF/F(m)', J(c) and leaf N concentration, but increased C(i)/C(a). There were two-factor interactions for C(i)/C(a), TPU and leaf N concentration, and a significant effect of CO(2) x T(soil) x nutrient regime on A(n), IWUE and J(c). The stimulations of A(n) and IWUE by elevated [CO(2)] were limited to seedlings grown under the intermediate and high nutrient regimes at the intermediate and high T(soil). For J(c), the [CO(2)] effect was significant only at intermediate T(soil) + high nutrient availability. No significant [CO(2)] effects were observed under the low T(soil) at any nutrient level. Our results support this study's hypothesis that low T(soil) would reduce the positive effect of high

  8. Nutrient variability in phloem: examining changes in K, Mg, Zn and Fe concentration during grain loading in common wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lachlan J; Palmer, Lyndon T; Rutzke, Michael A; Graham, Robin D; Stangoulis, James C R

    2014-12-01

    In wheat, nutrients are transported to seeds via the phloem yet access to this vascular tissue for exudate collection and quantitative analysis of elemental composition is difficult. The purest phloem is collected through the use of aphid stylectomy with volumes of exudate collected normally in the range of 20-500 nl. In this work a new method using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was developed to measure the concentration of K, Mg, Zn and Fe in volumes of wheat (Triticum aestivum, genotype Samnyt 16) phloem as small as 15.5 nl. This improved method was used to observe changes in phloem nutrient concentration during the grain loading period. There were statistically significant increases in phloem Mg and Zn concentration and a significant decrease in K over the period from 1-2 days after anthesis (DAA) to 9-12 DAA. During this period, there was no statistically significant change in phloem Fe concentration.

  9. Nutrient demand interacts with grass particle length to affect digestion responses and chewing activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kammes, K L; Allen, M S

    2012-02-01

    Effects of grass particle length on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, ruminal fermentation and pool sizes, digestion and passage kinetics, and chewing activity and the relationship of these effects with preliminary DMI (pDMI) were evaluated using 15 ruminally and duodenally cannulated Holstein cows in a crossover design with a 14-d preliminary period and two 18-d treatment periods. During the preliminary period, pDMI of individual cows ranged from 22.6 to 29.8 kg/d (mean=25.8 kg/d) and 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield ranged from 29.2 to 56.9 kg/d (mean=41.9 kg/d). Experimental treatments were diets containing orchardgrass silage chopped to either (a) 19-mm (long) or (b) 10-mm (short) theoretical length of cut as the sole forage. Grass silages contained approximately 46% neutral detergent fiber (NDF); diets contained 50% forage, 23% forage NDF, and 28% total NDF. Preliminary DMI, an index of nutrient demand, was determined during the last 4 d of the preliminary period when cows were fed a common diet and used as a covariate. Main effects of grass particle length and their interaction with pDMI were tested by ANOVA. Grass particle length and its interaction with pDMI did not affect milk yield, milk composition, or rumen pH. Long particle length tended to decrease DMI compared with short particle length, which might have been limited by rumen fill or chewing time, or both. Passage rates of feed fractions did not differ between long and short particle lengths and were not related to level of intake. As pDMI increased, long particles decreased ruminal digestion rate of potentially digestible NDF at a faster rate than short particles. As a result, long particles decreased or tended to decrease rates of ruminal turnover for NDF, organic matter, and dry matter and increased their rumen pools compared with short particles for cows with high pDMI. Long particles increased eating time, which affected cows with high intake to the greatest extent, and total chewing time

  10. [Spatiotemporal distribution of negative air ion concentration in urban area and related affecting factors: a review].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Jian; Zeng, Hong-Da; Chen, Guang-Shui; Zhong, Xian-Fang

    2013-06-01

    Negative air ion (NAI) concentration is an important indicator comprehensively reflecting air quality, and has significance to human beings living environment. This paper summarized the spatiotemporal distribution features of urban NAI concentration, and discussed the causes of these features based on the characteristics of the environmental factors in urban area and their effects on the physical and chemical processes of NAI. The temporal distribution of NAI concentration is mainly controlled by the periodic variation of solar radiation, while the spatial distribution of NAI concentration along the urban-rural gradient is mainly affected by the urban aerosol distribution, underlying surface characters, and urban heat island effect. The high NAI concentration in urban green area is related to the vegetation life activities and soil radiation, while the higher NAI concentration near the water environment is attributed to the water molecules that participate in the generation of NAI through a variety of ways. The other environmental factors can also affect the generation, life span, component, translocation, and distribution of NAI to some extent. To increase the urban green space and atmospheric humidity and to maintain the soil natural attributes of underlying surface could be the effective ways to increase the urban NAI concentration and improve the urban air quality.

  11. Factors affecting platinum concentrations in human surgical tumour specimens after cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D. J.; Molepo, J. M.; Green, R. M.; Montpetit, V. A.; Hugenholtz, H.; Lamothe, A.; Mikhael, N. Z.; Redmond, M. D.; Gadia, M.; Goel, R.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed factors which affect cisplatin concentrations in human surgical tumour specimens. Cisplatin 10 mg m-2 was given i.v. to 45 consenting patients undergoing surgical resection of neoplasms, and platinum was assayed in resected tumour and in deproteinated plasma by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. By multiple stepwise regression analysis of normalised data, patient characteristics that emerged as being most closely associated (P < 0.05) with tumour platinum concentrations (after correcting for associations with other variables) were tumour 'source' [primary brain lymphomas, medulloblastomas and meningiomas ('type LMM') > 'others' > lung cancer > head/neck cancer > gliomas) or tumour 'type' (LMM > brain metastases > extracerebral tumours > gliomas), serum calcium and chloride (positive correlations) and bilirubin (negative). Tumour location (intracranial vs extracranial) did not correlate with platinum concentrations. If values for a single outlier were omitted, high-grade gliomas had significantly higher platinum concentrations (P < 0.003) than low-grade gliomas. For intracranial tumours, the computerised tomographic scan feature that correlated most closely with platinum concentrations in multivariate analysis was the darkness of peritumoral oedema. Tumour source or type is a much more important correlate of human tumour cisplatin concentrations than is intracranial vs extracranial location. Serum calcium, chloride and bilirubin levels may affect tumour cisplatin uptake or retention. CT scan characteristics may help predict cisplatin concentrations in intracranial tumours. PMID:7880744

  12. Stimulation of nitrogen turnover due to nutrients release from aggregates affected by freeze-thaw in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Zou, Yuanchun; Wang, Guoping; Yu, Xiaofei

    2017-02-01

    The freeze-thaw phenomenon will occur more frequently in mid-high latitude ecosystems under climate change which has a remarkable effect on biogeochemical processes in wetland soils. Here, we used a wet sieving procedure and a barometric process separation (BaPS) technique to examine the responses of wetland soil aggregates and related carbon and nitrogen turnover affected by the freeze-thaw treatment. Wetland soil samples were divided into a treatment group and a control group. The treatment group was incubated at temperatures fluctuating from 10 °C to -10 °C, whereas the control group was incubated at the constant temperature of 10 °C. A 24 h process was set as the total freeze-thaw cycle, and the experiment had 20 continuous freeze-thaw cycles. In our results, the freeze-thaw process caused great destruction to the >2 mm water-stable aggregates (WSA) fraction and increased the <0.053 mm WSA fraction. The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content was stimulated during the initial freeze-thaw cycles followed by a rapid decline, and then still increased during subsequent freeze-thaw cycles, which was mainly determined by the soil organic carbon (SOC). The NH4+ and NO3- content, respiration rate and gross nitrification rate were all significantly improved by the freeze-thaw effect. Because the amount of NH4+ and NO3- expressed prominent negative responses to the content of >2 mm WSA fraction and the gross nitrification rate can be stimulated at the initial freeze-thaw cycles, nutrients and substrates may play a leading role in the freeze-thaw treatment regardless of the minimal influences on microbial biomass pools.

  13. Recent (2008-10) water quality in the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and its contributing zone, central Texas, with emphasis on factors affecting nutrients and bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, Barbara J.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Sample, Thomas L.; Wong, Corinne I.

    2011-01-01

    The Barton Springs zone, which comprises the Barton Springs segment of the Edwards aquifer and the watersheds to the west that contribute to its recharge, is in south-central Texas, an area with rapid growth in population and increasing amounts of land area affected by development. During November 2008-March 2010, an investigation of factors affecting the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. The primary objectives of the study were to characterize occurrence of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone under a range of flow conditions; to improve understanding of the interaction between surface-water quality and groundwater quality; and to evaluate how factors such as streamflow variability and dilution affect the fate and transport of nutrients and bacteria in the Barton Springs zone. The USGS collected and analyzed water samples from five streams (Barton, Williamson, Slaughter, Bear, and Onion Creeks), two groundwater wells (Marbridge and Buda), and the main orifice of Barton Springs in Austin, Texas. During the period of the study, during which the hydrologic conditions transitioned from exceptional drought to wetter than normal, water samples were collected routinely (every 3 to 4 weeks) from the streams, wells, and spring and, in response to storms, from the streams and spring. All samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, the bacterium Escherichia coli, and suspended sediment. During the dry period, the geochemistry of groundwater at the two wells and at Barton Springs was dominated by flow from the aquifer matrix and was relatively similar and unchanging at the three sites. At the onset of the wet period, when the streams began to flow, the geochemistry of groundwater samples from the Marbridge well and Barton Springs changed rapidly, and concentrations of most major ions and nutrients and

  14. Seed protein, oil, fatty acids, and minerals concentration as affected by foliar K-glyphosate application in soybean cultivars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed that glyphosate (Gly) may chelate cation nutrients, including potassium (K), which might affect the nutritional status of soybean seed. The objective of this study was to evaluate seed composition (protein, oil, fatty acids, and minerals) as influenced by foliar applications ...

  15. Identity of the Growth-Limiting Nutrient Strongly Affects Storage Carbohydrate Accumulation in Anaerobic Chemostat Cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Hazelwood, Lucie A.; Walsh, Michael C.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of glycogen and trehalose in nutrient-limited cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is negatively correlated with the specific growth rate. Additionally, glucose-excess conditions (i.e., growth limitation by nutrients other than glucose) are often implicated in high-level accumulation of these storage carbohydrates. The present study investigates how the identity of the growth-limiting nutrient affects accumulation of storage carbohydrates in cultures grown at a fixed specific growth rate. In anaerobic chemostat cultures (dilution rate, 0.10 h−1) of S. cerevisiae, the identity of the growth-limiting nutrient (glucose, ammonia, sulfate, phosphate, or zinc) strongly affected storage carbohydrate accumulation. The glycogen contents of the biomass from glucose- and ammonia-limited cultures were 10- to 14-fold higher than those of the biomass from cultures grown under the other three glucose-excess regimens. Trehalose levels were specifically higher under nitrogen-limited conditions. These results demonstrate that storage carbohydrate accumulation in nutrient-limited cultures of S. cerevisiae is not a generic response to excess glucose but instead is strongly dependent on the identity of the growth-limiting nutrient. While transcriptome analysis of wild-type and msn2Δ msn4Δ strains confirmed that transcriptional upregulation of glycogen and trehalose biosynthesis genes is mediated by Msn2p/Msn4p, transcriptional regulation could not quantitatively account for the drastic changes in storage carbohydrate accumulation. The results of assays of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities supported involvement of posttranscriptional regulation. Consistent with the high glycogen levels in ammonia-limited cultures, the ratio of glycogen synthase to glycogen phosphorylase in these cultures was up to eightfold higher than the ratio in the other glucose-excess cultures. PMID:19734328

  16. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  17. Growth of mature boreal Norway spruce was not affected by elevated [CO(2)] and/or air temperature unless nutrient availability was improved.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Bjarni D; Medhurst, Jane L; Wallin, Göran; Eggertsson, Olafur; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    The growth responses of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (CE; 670-700 ppm) and long-term optimized nutrient availability or elevated air temperature (TE; ±3.9 °C) were studied in situ in northern Sweden in two 3 year field experiments using 12 whole-tree chambers in ca. 40-year-old forest. The first experiment (Exp. I) studied the interactions between CE and nutrient availability and the second (Exp. II) between CE and TE. It should be noted that only air temperature was elevated in Exp. II, while soil temperature was maintained close to ambient. In Exp. I, CE significantly increased the mean annual height increment, stem volume and biomass increment during the treatment period (25, 28, and 22%, respectively) when nutrients were supplied. There was, however, no significant positive CE effect found at the low natural nutrient availability. In Exp. II, which was conducted at the natural site fertility, neither CE nor TE significantly affected height or stem increment. It is concluded that the low nutrient availability (mainly nitrogen) in the boreal forests is likely to restrict their response to the continuous rise in [CO(2)] and/or TE.

  18. Effects of probiotic supplementation in different energy and nutrient density diets on performance, egg quality, excreta microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, and serum cholesterol concentrations in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Kim, I H

    2013-10-01

    This 6-wk study was conducted to determine the effects of probiotic (Enterococcus faecium DSM 7134) supplementation of different energy and nutrient density diets on performance, egg quality, excreta microflora, excreta noxious gas emission, and serum cholesterol concentrations in laying hens. A total of 432 Hy-Line brown layers (40 wk old) were allotted into 4 dietary treatments with 2 levels of probiotic supplementation (0 or 0.01%) and 2 levels of energy (2,700 or 2,800 kcal ME/kg) and nutrient density. Weekly feed intake, egg quality, and daily egg production were determined. Eighteen layers per treatment (2 layers/replication) were bled to determine serum cholesterol concentrations at wk 3 and 6. Excreta microbial shedding of Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella and noxious gas emission were determined at the end of the experiment. Hens fed the high-energy and high-nutrient-density diets had less (P < 0.01) ADFI than those fed the low-energy and low-nutrient-density diets throughout the experimental period. During wk 4 to 6 and overall, hens fed the diets supplemented with the probiotic had greater (P < 0.01) egg production, egg weight, and eggshell thickness than hens fed the diets without the probiotic. Dietary supplementation of the probiotic increased (P = 0.01) excreta Lactobacillus counts and decreased (P = 0.02) Escherichia coli counts compared with hens fed the diets without the probiotic. The excreta ammonia emission was decreased (P = 0.02) in hens fed the probiotic diets compared with hens fed the diets without the probiotic. Serum total cholesterol concentration was decreased (P < 0.01) by feeding hens with the probiotic at wk 3 and 6. Layers fed the probiotic-incorporated diets had greater (P < 0.01) high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and lower (P = 0.03) low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations than hens fed the nonsupplemented diets at wk 6. Interactive effects (P < 0.05) of energy and nutrient density and the

  19. Factors affecting the stability of the performance of ambient fine-particle concentrators.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Sioutas, C; Chang, M C; Gong, H

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a systematic evaluation of factors affecting the stability of the performance of Harvard ambient fine-particle concentrators, an essential requirement for controlled animal and human exposure studies that utilize these technologies. Phenomenological problems during the operation of the concentrator, including pressure drop increase and decrease in concentration enrichment, were statistically correlated with ambient air parameters such as temperature, relative humidity, PM2.5 mass concentration, and mass median diameter. The normalized hourly pressure drop across the concentrator was strongly associated (R2 = .81) with the product of ambient PM2.5 mass concentration and the difference between the vapor pressure downstream of the impactor nozzle and the saturation vapor pressure at the adiabatic expansion temperature (i.e., the temperature of the aerosol immediately downstream of the virtual impactors). From multiple regression analysis, the average enrichment factor was predicted reasonably well (R2 = .67) by aerosol mass median diameter and the normalized hourly pressure drop. Based on these results, we can anticipate in any given day whether an exposure study can be conducted without a considerable increase in the concentrator pressure drop, which might lead to an abrupt or premature termination of the exposure. As particle mass concentration and ambient dewpoint are the two main parameters responsible for raising the pressure drop across the concentrator, efforts should be made to either desiccate the ambient aerosol at days of high dewpoints, or to dilute the ambient PM at days of high concentrations, prior to drawing the aerosol through the virtual impactors. The latter approach is recommended on days of severe ambient pollution conditions because it is simpler and also makes it possible to maintain the appropriate concentration level delivered to the exposure chamber.

  20. Phosphorus concentration and solubility in dairy feces: variability and affecting factors.

    PubMed

    Chapuis-Lardy, L; Fiorini, J; Toth, J; Dou, Z

    2004-12-01

    Recent data from phosphorus (P) feeding trials have demonstrated that P concentration in dairy feces is directly affected by P levels in diets and that farm P surpluses as well as potential environmental losses can be reduced through dietary manipulation. The current study was conducted to examine the variability of fecal P under farm conditions and to elucidate factors affecting the concentration and solubility of fecal P. Feed and fecal samples from >30 commercial dairies in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions were analyzed. Dietary P concentrations ranged from 3.45 to 5.78 g/kg of feed DM (DM), and P determined in acid digests (TP) of feces from 5.84 to 12.84 g/kg of fecal DM. On average, 50% of fecal TP was water soluble; of the latter, 83% was inorganic (Pi). Across-farm variability (n=33) had CV averaging 18.9% for fecal TP and >20% for Pi and total P (Pt) in water extracts. Within-farm variability based on multiple samples per herd had the same magnitude as across-farm and was independent of sample numbers from individual farms (n=7 to 30). Of all fecal parameters determined, pH and DM had the lowest variability (CV <10%), water-soluble Pi, Pt, and Ca the highest (CV of 20 to 30%), and total P, Ca, and Mg determined by acid digests were intermediate (CV 10 to 20%). Water-soluble Pi concentrations determined in dried-ground fecal samples were lower than in wet samples. The drying-grinding process changes Pi solubility and the change is not linear. This study confirms that dietary P concentration is the dominating factor affecting fecal P excretion; however, Ca concentration, DIM, and fecal pH also made small, but statistically significant contributions, although some of the mechanisms remain to be thoroughly investigated.

  1. The effects of weed-crop competition on nutrient uptake as affected by crop rotation and fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Mohammaddoust-E-Chamanabad, Hamid Reza; Asghari, Ali; Tulikov, Aleksander Mikhailovic

    2007-11-15

    A field study at the Agricultural University of Timiriazev, Moscow, was conducted to determine the effect of crop rotation and Long-term fertilizer application on differences in the competitive ability of spring barley and weeds to nutrient uptake in 2004 and 2005. Spring barley was cultivated in continuous and in crop rotation with winter rye, potato, clover, flax and fallow, with and without NPK application since 1912. Spring barley, especially in no fertilizer plots grown in crop rotation has greater dry mass than spring barley grown in continuous. While dry weed mass markedly decreased in crop rotation. Decrease dry weeds mass was greater when NPK had applied. The statistical analyses show that when spring barley grew in competition with weeds in the no fertilizer plots, crop rotation significantly increased nutrient content in spring barley, but when fertilizer applied the content of N, P2O5 and K2O in barley did not change. Lowest weeds nutrient content observed where soil fertility was increased by crop rotation and NPK application. Crop rotation significantly increased total nutrient uptake of soils by spring barley, but decreased total nutrient uptake by weeds.

  2. Comparison of two methods for estimating discharge and nutrient loads from Tidally affected reaches of the Myakka and Peace Rivers, West-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levesque, V.A.; Hammett, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The Myakka and Peace River Basins constitute more than 60 percent of the total inflow area and contribute more than half the total tributary inflow to the Charlotte Harbor estuarine system. Water discharge and nutrient enrichment have been identified as significant concerns in the estuary, and consequently, it is important to accurately estimate the magnitude of discharges and nutrient loads transported by inflows from both rivers. Two methods for estimating discharge and nutrient loads from tidally affected reaches of the Myakka and Peace Rivers were compared. The first method was a tidal-estimation method, in which discharge and nutrient loads were estimated based on stage, water-velocity, discharge, and water-quality data collected near the mouths of the rivers. The second method was a traditional basin-ratio method in which discharge and nutrient loads at the mouths were estimated from discharge and loads measured at upstream stations. Stage and water-velocity data were collected near the river mouths by submersible instruments, deployed in situ, and discharge measurements were made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler. The data collected near the mouths of the Myakka River and Peace River were filtered, using a low-pass filter, to remove daily mixed-tide effects with periods less than about 2 days. The filtered data from near the river mouths were used to calculate daily mean discharge and nutrient loads. These tidal-estimation-method values were then compared to the basin-ratio-method values. Four separate 30-day periods of differing streamflow conditions were chosen for monitoring and comparison. Discharge and nutrient load estimates computed from the tidal-estimation and basin-ratio methods were most similar during high-flow periods. However, during high flow, the values computed from the tidal-estimation method for the Myakka and Peace Rivers were consistently lower than the values computed from the basin-ratio method. There were substantial

  3. Environmental conditions affecting concentrations of He, CO2, O2 and N2 in soil gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinkle, Margaret E.

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of concentrations of volatile species in soil gases has potential for use in geochemical exploration for concealed ore deposits and for monitoring of subsurface contaminants. However, the interpretation of anomalies in surficial gases can be difficult because soil-gas concentrations are dependent on both meteorological and environmental conditions.For this study, concentrations of He, CO2, O2 and N2 and meteorological conditions were monitored for 10–14 months at eight nonmineralized sites in both humid and dry environments. Gases were collected at 0.6–0.7-m depth at seven sites. At one site, gases were collected from 0.3-, 0.6-, 1.2-, and 2.0-m depths; diurnal monitoring studies were conducted at this site also. Rain and snowfall, soil and air temperatures, barometric pressure, and relative humidity were monitored at all the sites. The sand, silt and clay content, and the organic carbon content of surficial soil were measured at each site.Meteorological conditions generally affected He and CO2 concentrations in the same way at all the sites; however, these effects were modified by local environmental conditions. Both seasonal and diurnal concentration changes occurred. The most important seasonal concentration changes were related to rain and snowfall and soil and air temperatures. Seasonal changes tended to be larger then the diurnal changes, but both could be related to the same processes. Local conditions of soil type and organic content affected the amount of pore space and moisture present in the soil and therefore the soil-gas concentrations.

  4. Effects of dietary forage-to-concentrate ratio on nutrient digestibility and enteric methane production in growing goats (Capra hircus hircus) and Sika deer (Cervus nippon hortulorum).

    PubMed

    Na, Youngjun; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Sang Rak

    2017-03-21

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of forage-to-concentrate (F:C) ratio on the nutrient digestibility and enteric methane (CH4) emission in growing goats and Sika deer. Three male growing goats (BW = 19.0 ± 0.7 kg) and three male growing deer (BW = 19.3 ± 1.2 kg) were respectively allotted to a 3 × 3 Latin square design with an adaptation period of 7 d and a data collection period of 3 d. Respiration-metabolism chambers were used for measuring the enteric CH4 emission. Treatments of low (25:75), moderate (50:50), and high (73:27) F:C ratios were given to both goats and Sika deer. Dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility decreased linearly with increasing F:C ratio in both goats and Sika deer. In both goats and Sika deer, the CH4 emissions expressed as g/d, g/kg BW0.75, % of gross energy intake, g/kg DM intake (DMI), and g/kg OM intake (OMI) decreased linearly as the F:C ratio increased, however, the CH4 emissions expressed as g/kg digested DMI and OMI were not affected by the F:C ratio. Eight equations were derived for predicting the enteric CH4 emission from goats and Sika deer. For goat, equation 1 was found to be of the highest accuracy: CH4 (g/day) = 3.36 + 4.71 × DMI (kg/day) - 0.0036 × NDFC (g/kg) + 0.01563 × DMD (g/kg) - 0.0108 × NDFD (g/kg). For Sika deer, equation 5 was found to be of the highest accuracy: CH4 (g/day) = 66.3 + 27.7 × DMI (kg/day) - 5.91 × NDFC (g/kg) - 7.11 × DMD (g/kg) + 0.0809 × NDFD (g/kg). Digested nutrient intake could be considered when determining the CH4 generation factor in goats and Sika deer. Finally, the enteric CH4 prediction model for goats and Sika deer were estimated.

  5. Multicenter study of posaconazole therapeutic drug monitoring: exposure-response relationship and factors affecting concentration.

    PubMed

    Dolton, Michael J; Ray, John E; Chen, Sharon C-A; Ng, Kingsley; Pont, Lisa; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Posaconazole has an important role in the prophylaxis and salvage treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs), although poor and variable bioavailability remains an important clinical concern. Therapeutic drug monitoring of posaconazole concentrations has remained contentious, with the use of relatively small patient cohorts in previous studies hindering the assessment of exposure-response relationships. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to investigate relationships between posaconazole concentration and clinical outcomes and adverse events and to assess clinical factors and drug interactions that may affect posaconazole concentrations. Medical records were reviewed for patients who received posaconazole and had ≥1 concentration measured at six hospitals in Australia. Data from 86 patients with 541 posaconazole concentrations were included in the study. Among 72 patients taking posaconazole for prophylaxis against IFIs, 12 patients (17%) developed a breakthrough fungal infection; median posaconazole concentrations were significantly lower than in those who did not develop fungal infection (median [range], 289 [50 to 471] ng/ml versus 485 [0 to 2,035] ng/ml; P < 0.01). The median posaconazole concentration was a significant predictor of breakthrough fungal infection via binary logistic regression (P < 0.05). A multiple linear regression analysis identified a number of significant drug interactions associated with reduced posaconazole exposure, including coadministration with proton pump inhibitors, metoclopramide, phenytoin or rifampin, and the H(2) antagonist ranitidine (P < 0.01). Clinical factors such as mucositis, diarrhea, and the early posttransplant period in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients were also associated with reduced posaconazole exposure (P < 0.01). Low posaconazole concentrations are common and are associated with breakthrough fungal infection, supporting the utility of monitoring posaconazole concentrations to ensure

  6. Changes in nutrient and pesticide concentrations in urban and agricultural areas of the South Platte River Basin, Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska, 1994-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sprague, Lori A.; Greve, Adrienne I.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) monitored two sites on the main-stem South Platte River? an urban site in Denver and a mixed urban/agricultural site near Kersey?to determine changes in nutrient and pesticide concentrations from 1994 through 2000. Concentrations of nitrate, nitrite, ammonia, and orthophosphorus decreased at the Denver site during the study period, likely due to an increase in instream dilution of wastewater-treatment plant (WWTP) discharge and upgrades at the WWTPs. In contrast, only concentrations of orthophosphorus decreased at the Kersey site; agricultural inputs between Denver and Kersey may have offset the observed decreases in other nutrients upstream. During the extreme low-flow conditions in 1994, when there was relatively little snowmelt to dilute instream pesticide concentrations, total median pesticide concentrations at both sites were the highest of the study period. During the less extreme conditions in 1997 through 2000, greater amounts of snowmelt likely led to lower total median pesticide concentrations at both sites. Because pesticide-use data are not available, the contribution of changes in the amount and type of pesticides applied on the land to changes in the concentration of pesticides in the river is not known but likely was substantial. In general, insecticides predominated at the Denver site, whereas herbicides predominated at the Kersey site.

  7. Short communication: Timing of first milking affects serotonin (5-HT) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Laporta, J; Gross, J J; Crenshaw, T D; Bruckmaier, R M; Hernandez, L L

    2014-05-01

    Hormonal signals differentially regulate the timing of parturition, as well lactogenesis and, potentially, colostrum formation in the mammary gland. Non-neuronal serotonin (5-HT) is a homeostatic regulator of the mammary gland. In the current study, we manipulated the timing of first milking to investigate its effects on serum 5-HT and calcium concentrations in the maternal and calf circulation, as well as in colostrum. Twenty-three cows were randomly assigned to a control (CON; n=10) group, milked for the first time at 4h postcalving, or a treatment (TRT; n=13) group, milked for the first time approximately 1 d before calving in addition to 4h postcalving. Maternal blood samples were collected for 4 d precalving, 3 times daily, and 1 blood sample was taken 4h postcalving. Calf blood samples were collected 4 (before first colostrum feeding) and 12h after birth, and at 3 wk of age. Calves from both treatments were fed colostrum from their respective mothers. Serum 5-HT concentrations were greater in CON cows and decreased significantly in TRT cows after milking was initiated precalving (951 vs. 524 ± 111 ng/mL, respectively). Cow serum calcium concentrations were affected by time, beginning to decrease 1 d precalving until 4h postcalving, but this drop in serum calcium was more pronounced in TRT cows. Serum 5-HT and calcium concentrations were negatively correlated (r=-0.57) for the CON cows and positively correlated (r=0.6) for the TRT cows. Maternal calcium and 5-HT decreased similarly due to precalving milking. Calcium and 5-HT concentrations were greater in colostrum collected from TRT cows milked precalving. Overall, calves had higher circulating 5-HT concentrations than cows, and calves born to TRT cows had increased 5-HT concentrations compared with the CON. Precalving milking could affect 5-HT synthesis within the mammary gland and therefore affect maternal 5-HT and calcium concentrations. Further research is needed in ruminants to assess the extent of 5-HT

  8. Effects of a specific blend of essential oils on apparent nutrient digestion, rumen fermentation and rumen microbial populations in sheep fed a 50:50 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet

    PubMed Central

    Khateri, N.; Azizi, O.; Jahani-Azizabadi, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of a specific mixture of essential oils (MEO), containing thyme, clove and cinnamon EO, on rumen microbial fermentation, nutrient apparent digestibility and blood metabolites in fistulated sheep. Methods Six sheep fitted with ruminal fistulas were used in a repeated measurement design with two 24-d periods to investigate the effect of adding MEO at 0 (control), 0.8, and 1.6 mL/d on apparent nutrient digestibility, rumen fermentation characteristics, rumen microbial population and blood chemical metabolites. Animals were fed with a 50:50 alfalfa hay:concentrate diet. Results Ruminal pH, total volatile fatty acids (VFA) concentration, molar proportion of individual VFA, acetate: propionate ratio and methane production were not affected with MEO. Relative to the control, Small peptides plus amino acid nitrogen and large peptides nitrogen concentration in rumen fluid were not affected with MEO supplementation; while, rumen fluid ammonia nitrogen concentration at 0 and 6 h after morning feeding in sheep fed with 1.6 mL/d of MEO was lower (p<0.05) compared to the control and 0.8 mL/d of MEO. At 0 h after morning feeding, ammonia nitrogen concentration was higher (p<0.05) in sheep fed 0.8 mL/d of MEO relative to 1.6 mL/d and control diet. Ruminal protozoa and hyper ammonia producing (HAP) bacteria counts were not affected by addition of MEO in the diet. Relative to the control, no changes were observed in the red and white blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyric acid, cholesterol, total protein, albumin, blood urea nitrogen and aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase concentration. Apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter, crude proten, organic matter, and neutral detergent fiber were not influenced by MEO supplementation. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that supplementation of MEO may have limited effects on apparent nutrient

  9. Typhoon-induced precipitation impact on nutrient and suspended matter dynamics of a tropical estuary affected by human activities in Hainan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbeck, Lucia S.; Unger, Daniela; Krumme, Uwe; Liu, Su Mei; Jennerjahn, Tim C.

    2011-07-01

    Typhoons regularly hit the coasts along the northern South China Sea during summer monsoon. However, little is known on the effects of typhoon-related heavy precipitation on estuarine dynamics and coastal ecosystems. We analyzed physico-chemical characteristics, and concentrations and composition of dissolved and suspended matter in the Wenchang/Wenjiao Estuary (WWE) on the tropical island of Hainan, China, prior to and after typhoon Kammuri in August 2008. Before the typhoon, the estuary displayed vertical and horizontal gradients. High nutrient inputs from agriculture and widespread aquaculture were to a large extent converted into biomass inside the estuarine lagoon resulting in low export of nutrients to coastal waters and a mainly autochthonous origin of total suspended matter (TSM). Heavy typhoon-associated precipitation increased river runoff, which moved the location of the estuarine salinity gradient seaward. It resulted in an export of dissolved and particulate matter to coastal waters one day after the typhoon. Dissolved nutrients increased by up to an order of magnitude and TSM increased approximately twofold compared to pre-typhoon values. Lower δ 13C org and δ 15N and elevated C/N ratios of TSM together with lower chlorophyll a (chl a) concentrations indicated an increased contribution of terrestrial material originating from typhoon-induced soil erosion. Local uptake of excess nutrients inside the lagoon was inhibited because of reduced water transparency and the lack of phytoplankton, which had been washed out by the initial freshwater pulse. Two weeks after the typhoon, TSM concentration and composition had almost returned to pre-typhoon conditions. However, physico-chemical properties and nutrients were still different from pre-typhoon conditions indicating that the estuarine system had not fully recovered. Unusually high chl a concentrations in the coastal zone indicated a phytoplankton bloom resulting from the typhoon-induced nutrient export

  10. Biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient contents in upland rice plants affected by application forms of microorganism growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Nascente, Adriano Stephan; de Filippi, Marta Cristina Corsi; Lanna, Anna Cristina; de Souza, Alan Carlos Alves; da Silva Lobo, Valácia Lemes; da Silva, Gisele Barata

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms are considered a genetic resource with great potential for achieving sustainable development of agricultural areas. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of microorganism application forms on the production of biomass, gas exchange, and nutrient content in upland rice. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions in a completely randomized design in a factorial 7 × 3 + 1, with four replications. The treatments consisted of combining seven microorganisms with three application forms (microbiolized seed; microbiolized seed + soil drenched with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 days after sowing (DAS); and microbiolized seed + plant sprayed with a microorganism suspension at 7 and 15 DAS) and a control (water). Treatments with Serratia sp. (BRM32114), Bacillus sp. (BRM32110 and BRM32109), and Trichoderma asperellum pool provided, on average, the highest photosynthetic rate values and dry matter biomass of rice shoots. Plants treated with Burkolderia sp. (BRM32113), Serratia sp. (BRM32114), and Pseudomonas sp. (BRM32111 and BRM32112) led to the greatest nutrient uptake by rice shoots. Serratia sp. (BRM 32114) was the most effective for promoting an increase in the photosynthetic rate, and for the greatest accumulation of nutrients and dry matter at 84 DAS, in rice shoots, which differed from the control treatment. The use of microorganisms can bring numerous benefits of rice, such as improving physiological characteristics, nutrient uptake, biomass production, and grain yield.

  11. Composting of biochars improves their sorption properties, retains nutrients during composting and affects greenhouse gas emissions after soil application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar application to soils has been suggested to elevate nutrient sorption, improve soil fertility and reduce net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We examined the impact of composting biochar together with a biologically active substrate (i.e., livestock manure-straw mixture). We hypothesized that ...

  12. Riparian and Associated Habitat Characteristics Related to Nutrient Concentrations and Biological Responses of Small Streams in Selected Agricultural Areas, United States, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zelt, Ronald B.; Munn, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Physical factors, including both in-stream and riparian habitat characteristics that limit biomass or otherwise regulate aquatic biological condition, have been identified by previous studies. However, linking the ecological significance of nutrient enrichment to habitat or landscape factors that could allow for improved management of streams has proved to be a challenge in many regions, including agricultural landscapes, where many ecological stressors are strong and the variability among watersheds typically is large. Riparian and associated habitat characteristics were sampled once during 2003-04 for an intensive ecological and nutrients study of small perennial streams in five contrasting agricultural landscapes across the United States to determine how biological communities and ecosystem processes respond to varying levels of nutrient enrichment. Nutrient concentrations were determined in stream water at two different sampling times per site and biological samples were collected once per site near the time of habitat characterization. Data for 141 sampling sites were compiled, representing five study areas, located in parts of the Delmarva Peninsula (Delaware and Maryland), Georgia, Indiana, Ohio, Nebraska, and Washington. This report examines the available data for riparian and associated habitat characteristics to address questions related to study-unit contrasts, spatial scale-related differences, multivariate correlation structure, and bivariate relations between selected habitat characteristics and either stream nutrient conditions or biological responses. Riparian and associated habitat characteristics were summarized and categorized into 22 groups of habitat variables, with 11 groups representing land-use and land-cover characteristics and 11 groups representing other riparian or in-stream habitat characteristics. Principal components analysis was used to identify a reduced set of habitat variables that describe most of the variability among the

  13. Combined effects of phosphorus nutrition and elevated carbon dioxide concentration on chlorophyll fluorescence, photosynthesis, and nutrient efficiency of cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the combined effects of phosphorus nutrition and CO2 on photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) processes, and nutrient utilization and uptake, two controlled environment experiments were conducted using 0.20, 0.05 and 0.01 mM external phosphate (Pi) nutrition each at ambient and...

  14. Nutrient and growth responses of Leersia oryzoides, rice cutgrass, to varying degrees of soil saturation and water nitrogen concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leersia oryzoides (rice cutgrass) is an obligate wetland plant common to agricultural ditches. The objective of this greenhouse study was to quantify the allocation of nutrients and biomass to different plant components exposed to various soil moisture and aqueous N input regimes. Plants in the con...

  15. Effect of microbial-based inoculants on nutrient concentrations and early root morphology of corn (Zea mays)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial-based inoculants have been reported to stimulate plant growth and nutrient uptake. However, their effect may vary depending on the growth stage when evaluated and on the chemical fertilizer applied. Thus, the objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that microbial-based inoculant...

  16. Phosphorus Concentrations in Sequentially Fractionated Soil Samples as Affected by Digestion Methods

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Carlos A. C.; Pagliari, Paulo H.; Schmitt, Djalma; He, Zhongqi; Waldrip, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Sequential fractionation has helped improving our understanding of the lability and bioavailability of P in soil. Nevertheless, there have been no reports on how manipulation of the different fractions prior to analyses affects the total P (TP) concentrations measured. This study investigated the effects of sample digestion, filtration, and acidification on the TP concentrations determined by ICP-OES in 20 soil samples. Total P in extracts were either determined without digestion by ICP-OES, or ICP-OES following block digestion, or autoclave digestion. The effects of sample filtration, and acidification on undigested alkaline extracts prior to ICP-OES were also evaluated. Results showed that, TP concentrations were greatest in the block-digested extracts, though the variability introduced by the block-digestion was the highest. Acidification of NaHCO3 extracts resulted in lower TP concentrations, while acidification of NaOH randomly increased or decreased TP concentrations. The precision observed with ICP-OES of undigested extracts suggests this should be the preferred method for TP determination in sequentially extracted samples. Thus, observations reported in this work would be helpful in appropriate sample handling for P determination, thereby improving the precision of P determination. The results are also useful for literature data comparison and discussion when there are differences in sample treatments. PMID:26647644

  17. Phosphorus Concentrations in Sequentially Fractionated Soil Samples as Affected by Digestion Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Nascimento, Carlos A. C.; Pagliari, Paulo H.; Schmitt, Djalma; He, Zhongqi; Waldrip, Heidi

    2015-12-01

    Sequential fractionation has helped improving our understanding of the lability and bioavailability of P in soil. Nevertheless, there have been no reports on how manipulation of the different fractions prior to analyses affects the total P (TP) concentrations measured. This study investigated the effects of sample digestion, filtration, and acidification on the TP concentrations determined by ICP-OES in 20 soil samples. Total P in extracts were either determined without digestion by ICP-OES, or ICP-OES following block digestion, or autoclave digestion. The effects of sample filtration, and acidification on undigested alkaline extracts prior to ICP-OES were also evaluated. Results showed that, TP concentrations were greatest in the block-digested extracts, though the variability introduced by the block-digestion was the highest. Acidification of NaHCO3 extracts resulted in lower TP concentrations, while acidification of NaOH randomly increased or decreased TP concentrations. The precision observed with ICP-OES of undigested extracts suggests this should be the preferred method for TP determination in sequentially extracted samples. Thus, observations reported in this work would be helpful in appropriate sample handling for P determination, thereby improving the precision of P determination. The results are also useful for literature data comparison and discussion when there are differences in sample treatments.

  18. Effect of roughage to concentrate ratio of sweet sorghum (Sorghum biclor L. Moench) bagasse-based complete diet on nutrient utilization and microbial N supply in lambs.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Nagireddy Nalini; Reddy, Yerradoddi Ramana; Blummel, Michel; Nagalakshmi, Devanaboyina; Sudhakar, Khaja; Reddy, Vangur Ravinder; Monika, Thamatam; Pavani, Mitta; Reddy, Marrivada Sudhakara; Reddy, Belum Venkata Subba; Reddy, Chintalapani Ravinder

    2012-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of roughage to the concentrate ratio of complete diets containing sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB), an agro-industrial by product, as sole roughage source on nutrient utilization in ram lambs. Twenty-four Nellore × Deccani cross ram lambs aged about 3 months (average body wt. 10.62 ± 0.03 kg) were randomly allotted into four groups fed with CR-I (60R:40C), CR-II (50R:50C), CR-III (40R:60C), and CR-IV (30R:70C) complete diets. The roughage to concentrate ratio did not affect the dry matter intake (in grams/day or grams/kilogram weight(0.75)). The crude protein (P < 0.01) and ether extract (P < 0.05) digestibility of ration CR-IV was higher than CR-I and CR-II rations, whereas, the digestibility of nitrogen-free extract and fiber fractions was similar among all the rations. Experimental diets were different (P < 0.01) in digestible crude protein (DCP) content, in which the CR-I ration contained lower DCP value whereas CR-IV ration contained higher DCP value. The total digestible nutrients (TDN) and metabolizable energy (ME) values were comparable among all the experimental rations. The daily DCP intake (in grams/day) was lower (P < 0.05) in lambs fed with CR-I ration compared to CR-III and CR-IV rations and it was comparable with CR-II ration. The TDN intake (in grams/day), digestible energy, and ME intakes (in megajoules/day) were similar among the lambs fed experimental rations with different SSB to concentrate ratios. The average daily DCP intake of lambs fed with CR-II, CR-III, and CR-IV rations met the requirements whereas, the daily TDN and ME intake was met by all the lambs. The lambs on all the diets were in positive nitrogen retention. The nitrogen balance expressed as grams/day was higher (P < 0.05) in lambs fed with CR-III and CR-IV ration than those fed with CR-I ration. The daily calcium and phosphorus intake and balance were comparable on all the experimental rations. The total purine derivatives (in

  19. Water quality and processes affecting dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Blackwater River, Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldron, M.C.; Wiley, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The water quality and environmental processes affecting dissolved oxygen were determined for the Blackwater River in Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Canaan Valley is oval-shaped (14 miles by 5 miles) and is located in the Allegheny Mountains at an average elevation of 3,200 feet above sea level. Tourism, population, and real estate development have increased in the past two decades. Most streams in Canaan Valley are a dilute calcium magnesium bicarbonate-type water. Streamwater typicaly was soft and low in alkalinity and dissolved solids. Maximum values for specific conductance, hardness, alkalinity, and dissolved solids occurred during low-flow periods when streamflow was at or near baseflow. Dissolved oxygen concentrations are most sensitive to processes affecting the rate of reaeration. The reaeration is affected by solubility (atmospheric pressure, water temperature, humidity, and cloud cover) and processes that determine stream turbulence (stream depth, width, velocity, and roughness). In the headwaters, photosynthetic dissolved oxygen production by benthic algae can result in supersaturated dissolved oxygen concentrations. In beaver pools, dissolved oxygen consumption from sediment oxygen demand and carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand can result in dissolved oxygen deficits.

  20. Observational uncertainty of Arctic sea-ice concentration significantly affects seasonal climate forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunzel, Felix; Notz, Dirk; Baehr, Johanna; Müller, Wolfgang; Fröhlich, Kristina

    2016-04-01

    We examine how the choice of a particular satellite-retrieved sea-ice concentration dataset used for initialising seasonal climate forecasts impacts the prediction skill of Arctic sea-ice area and Northern hemispheric 2-meter air temperatures. To do so, we performed two assimilation runs with the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model (MPI-ESM) from 1979 to 2012, where atmospheric and oceanic parameters as well as sea-ice concentration were assimilated using Newtonian relaxation. The two assimilation runs differ only in the sea-ice concentration dataset used for assimilating sea ice. In the first run, we use sea-ice concentrations as derived by the NASA-Team algorithm, while in the second run we use sea-ice concentrations as derived from the Bootstrap algorithm. A major difference between these two sea-ice concentration data products involves the treatment of melt ponds. While for both products melt ponds appear as open water in the raw satellite data, the Bootstrap algorithm more strongly attempts to offset this systematic bias by synthetically increasing the retrieved ice concentration during summer months. For each year of the two assimilation runs we performed a 10-member ensemble of hindcast experiments starting on 1 May and 1 November with a hindcast length of 6 months. For hindcasts started in November, initial differences in Arctic sea-ice area and surface temperature decrease rapidly throughout the freezing period. For hindcasts started in May, initial sea-ice area differences increase over time. By the end of the melting period, this causes significant differences in 2-meter air temperature of regionally more than 3°C. Hindcast skill for surface temperatures over Europe and North America is higher with Bootstrap initialization during summer and with NASA Team initialisation during winter. This implies that the choice of the sea-ice data product and, thus, the observational uncertainty also affects forecasts of teleconnections that depend on Northern

  1. One-time tillage of no-till: Effects on nutrients, mycorrhizae, and phosphorus uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stratification of nutrient availability, especially of P, that develops with continuous no-till (NT) can affect runoff nutrient concentration and possibly nutrient uptake. The effects of composted manure application and one-time tillage of NT on the distribution of soil chemical properties, root co...

  2. Increasing Plant Based Foods or Dairy Foods Differentially Affects Nutrient Intakes: Dietary Scenarios Using NHANES 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Cifelli, Christopher J.; Houchins, Jenny A.; Demmer, Elieke; Fulgoni, Victor L.

    2016-01-01

    Diets rich in plant foods and lower in animal-based products have garnered increased attention among researchers, dietitians and health professionals in recent years for their potential to, not only improve health, but also to lessen the environmental impact. However, the potential effects of increasing plant-based foods at the expense of animal-based foods on macro- and micronutrient nutrient adequacy in the U.S. diet is unknown. In addition, dairy foods are consistently under consumed, thus the impact of increased dairy on nutrient adequacy is important to measure. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to use national survey data to model three different dietary scenarios to assess the effects of increasing plant-based foods or dairy foods on macronutrient intake and nutrient adequacy. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007–2010 for persons two years and older (n = 17,387) were used in all the analyses. Comparisons were made of usual intake of macronutrients and shortfall nutrients of three dietary scenarios that increased intakes by 100%: (i) plant-based foods; (ii) protein-rich plant-based foods (i.e., legumes, nuts, seeds, soy); and (iii) milk, cheese and yogurt. Scenarios (i) and (ii) had commensurate reductions in animal product intake. In both children (2–18 years) and adults (≥19 years), the percent not meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) decreased for vitamin C, magnesium, vitamin E, folate and iron when plant-based foods were increased. However the percent not meeting the EAR increased for calcium, protein, vitamin A, and vitamin D in this scenario. Doubling protein-rich plant-based foods had no effect on nutrient intake because they were consumed in very low quantities in the baseline diet. The dairy model reduced the percent not meeting the EAR for calcium, vitamin A, vitamin D, magnesium, and protein, while sodium and saturated fat levels increased. Our modeling shows that increasing plant

  3. Increasing Plant Based Foods or Dairy Foods Differentially Affects Nutrient Intakes: Dietary Scenarios Using NHANES 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Cifelli, Christopher J; Houchins, Jenny A; Demmer, Elieke; Fulgoni, Victor L

    2016-07-11

    Diets rich in plant foods and lower in animal-based products have garnered increased attention among researchers, dietitians and health professionals in recent years for their potential to, not only improve health, but also to lessen the environmental impact. However, the potential effects of increasing plant-based foods at the expense of animal-based foods on macro- and micronutrient nutrient adequacy in the U.S. diet is unknown. In addition, dairy foods are consistently under consumed, thus the impact of increased dairy on nutrient adequacy is important to measure. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to use national survey data to model three different dietary scenarios to assess the effects of increasing plant-based foods or dairy foods on macronutrient intake and nutrient adequacy. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 for persons two years and older (n = 17,387) were used in all the analyses. Comparisons were made of usual intake of macronutrients and shortfall nutrients of three dietary scenarios that increased intakes by 100%: (i) plant-based foods; (ii) protein-rich plant-based foods (i.e., legumes, nuts, seeds, soy); and (iii) milk, cheese and yogurt. Scenarios (i) and (ii) had commensurate reductions in animal product intake. In both children (2-18 years) and adults (≥19 years), the percent not meeting the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) decreased for vitamin C, magnesium, vitamin E, folate and iron when plant-based foods were increased. However the percent not meeting the EAR increased for calcium, protein, vitamin A, and vitamin D in this scenario. Doubling protein-rich plant-based foods had no effect on nutrient intake because they were consumed in very low quantities in the baseline diet. The dairy model reduced the percent not meeting the EAR for calcium, vitamin A, vitamin D, magnesium, and protein, while sodium and saturated fat levels increased. Our modeling shows that increasing plant

  4. Siletz River nutrients: Effects of biosolids application

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stream water nutrients were measured in the Siletz River, Oregon, with the goal of comparing dissolved nutrient concentrations, primarily the nitrogenous nutrients nitrate and ammonium, with previously collected data for the Yaquina and Alsea Rivers for the nutrient criteria prog...

  5. Protein and lipid sources affect cholesterol concentrations of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z J; Hardy, R W

    2004-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of protein and lipid sources on cholesterol, AA, and fatty acid content, and on biological performance of juvenile Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei (Boone). In Exp. 1, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish meal; soybean meal; casein; fish meal + soybean meal; fish meal + casein; soybean meal + casein; and fish meal + soybean meal + casein. In Exp. 2, seven isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets were prepared using fish oil; soy oil; poultry fat; fish oil + soy oil; fish oil + poultry fat; soy oil + poultry fat; and fish oil + soy oil + poultry fat. Nine shrimp (average BW 570 mg) were stocked per 60-L tank, with three tanks per diet in each experiment. Shrimp were fed to apparent satiation twice daily for 28 d. Protein sources affected shrimp cholesterol, feed consumption, feed efficiency, protein consumption, protein efficiency ratio, and crude body fat (P < or = 0.05), but not weight gain, survival, hepatosomatic index, body protein, ash, and AA composition. Body (without hepatopancreas) cholesterol concentrations were the highest in shrimp fed the diet containing fish meal (0.81%), lowest for those fed the casein diet (0.64%), and intermediate in the other dietary treatment groups (range 0.71 to 0.74%). Lipid source also affected shrimp body cholesterol, body fatty acid profiles, and fatty acid profiles in the hepatopancreas (P < or = 0.05), but not growth performance, body protein, fat, ash, and cholesterol concentrations in the hepatopancreas. Shrimp fed the fish oil diet had the highest body cholesterol (0.75%), whereas those fed the soy oil or poultry fat diets were lowest (0.66 and 0.65%, respectively). Results indicate that by replacing fish meal and fish oil with soybean meal and soy oil, shrimp growth performance is not affected, but body cholesterol concentration is reduced.

  6. [Soil nutrient accumulation and its affecting factors during vegetation succession in karst peak-cluster depressions of South China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Ke-Lin; Liu, Su-Juan; Ye, Ying-Ying; Pan, Fu-Jing; He, Xu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Taking the typical karst peak-cluster depressions in Huanjiang County of northwest Guangxi as the objects, and by using the method of replacing time with space, an analysis was made on the dynamic changes of top soil (0-15 cm) nutrients and their dominant controlling factors during the process of vegetation succession. With the positive succession of vegetation (herb-shrub-secondary forest-primary forest), the soil organic carbon (SOC), total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) contents increased significantly, with the soil SOC, TN, and TP increased from 29.1 g x kg(-1), 2.48 g x kg(-1), and 0.72 g x kg(-1) in herb community to 73.9 g x kg(-1), 8.10 g x kg(-1), and 1.6 g x kg(-1) in primary forest, respectively, which indicated that the positive succession of vegetation was helpful to the soil nutrient accumulation. The soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) had close relationships with the soil SOC and TN, being the primary controlling factor for the accumulation of the soil C and N. The litter P content, C/P ratio, and N/P ratio were the major factors controlling the P accumulation in the topsoil. The litters higher P content and N/P ratio and smaller C/P ratio were helpful for the P accumulation. Topographic indices (slope, aspect, and rock exposure ratio) had little effects on the soil nutrients.

  7. Simulation of nutrient and sediment concentrations and loads in the Delaware inland bays watershed: Extension of the hydrologic and water-quality model to ungaged segments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrez-Magness, Angelica L.

    2006-01-01

    Rapid population increases, agriculture, and industrial practices have been identified as important sources of excessive nutrients and sediments in the Delaware Inland Bays watershed. The amount and effect of excessive nutrients and sediments in the Inland Bays watershed have been well documented by the Delaware Geological Survey, the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Estuary Program, the Delaware Center for Inland Bays, the University of Delaware, and other agencies. This documentation and data previously were used to develop a hydrologic and water-quality model of the Delaware Inland Bays watershed to simulate nutrients and sediment concentrations and loads, and to calibrate the model by comparing concentrations and streamflow data at six stations in the watershed over a limited period of time (October 1998 through April 2000). Although the model predictions of nutrient and sediment concentrations for the calibrated segments were fairly accurate, the predictions for the 28 ungaged segments located near tidal areas, where stream data were not available, were above the range of values measured in the area. The cooperative study established in 2000 by the Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, the Delaware Geological Survey, and the U.S. Geological Survey was extended to evaluate the model predictions in ungaged segments and to ensure that the model, developed as a planning and management tool, could accurately predict nutrient and sediment concentrations within the measured range of values in the area. The evaluation of the predictions was limited to the period of calibration (1999) of the 2003 model. To develop estimates on ungaged watersheds, parameter values from calibrated segments are transferred to the ungaged segments; however, accurate predictions are unlikely where parameter transference is subject to error. The unexpected nutrient and

  8. Factors affecting the indoor concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols of outdoor origin

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Hering, Susanne V.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2007-06-25

    A field study was conducted in an unoccupied single story residence in Clovis, California to provide data to address issues important to assess the indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin. Measurements of black and organic carbonaceous aerosols were performed using a variety of methods, resulting in both near real-time measurements as well as integrated filter based measurements. Comparisons of the different measurement methods show that it is crucial to account for gas phase adsorption artifacts when measuring organic carbon (OC). Measured concentrations affected by the emissions of organic compounds sorbed to indoor surfaces imply a higher degree of infiltration of outdoor organic carbon aerosols into the indoor environment for our unoccupied house. Analysis of the indoor and outdoor data for black carbon (BC) aerosols show that, on average, the indoor concentration of black carbon aerosols behaves in a similar manner to sulfate aerosols. In contrast, organic carbon aerosols are subject to chemical transformations indoors that, for our unoccupied home, resulted in lower indoor OC concentrations than would be expected by physical loss mechanisms alone. These results show that gas to particle partitioning of organic compounds, as well as gas to surface interactions within the residence, are an important process governing the indoor concentration to OC aerosols of outdoor origin.

  9. Perinatal thiamine restriction affects central GABA and glutamate concentrations and motor behavior of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita Hélen; de Freitas-Silva, Danielle Marra; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Pereira, Sílvia Rejane Castanheira; Ribeiro, Ângela Maria

    2016-03-23

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate the effects of perinatal thiamine deficiency, from the 11th day of gestation until the 5th day of lactation, on motor behavior and neurochemical parameters in adult rat offspring, using 3-month-old, adult, male Wistar rats. All rats were submitted to motor tests, using the rotarod and paw print tasks. After behavioral tests, their thalamus, cerebellum and spinal cord were dissected for glutamate and GABA quantifications by high performance liquid chromatography. The thiamine-restricted mothers (RM) group showed a significant reduction of time spent on the rotarod at 25 rpm and an increase in hind-base width. A significant decrease of glutamate concentration in the cerebellum and an increase of GABA concentrations in the thalamus were also observed. For the offspring from control mothers (CM) group there were significant correlations between thalamic GABA concentrations and both rotarod performance and average hind-base width. In addition, for rats from the RM group a significant correlation between stride length and cerebellar GABA concentration was found. These results show that the deficiency of thiamine during an early developmental period affects certain motor behavior parameters and GABA and glutamate levels in specific brain areas. Hence, a thiamine deficiency episode during an early developmental period can induce motor impairments and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter changes that are persistent and detectable in later periods of life.

  10. Ecohydrological factors affecting nitrate concentrations in a phreatic desert aquifer in northwestern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, J.B.; Böhlke, J.K.; Edmunds, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    Aerobic conditions in desert aquifers commonly allow high nitrate (NO 3-) concentrations in recharge to persist for long periods of time, an important consideration for N-cycling and water quality. In this study, stable isotopes of NO3- (??15N NO3 and ??18ONO3) were used to trace NO3- cycling processes which affect concentrations in groundwater and unsaturated zone moisture in the arid Badain Jaran Oesert in northwestern China. Most groundwater NO3- appears to be depleted relative to Cl- in rainfall concentrated by evapotranspiration, indicating net N losses. Unsaturated zone NO 3- is generally higher than groundwater NO 3- in terms of both concentration (up to 15 476 ??M, corresponding to 3.6 mg NO3--N per kg sediment) and ratios with Cl-. Isotopic data indicate that the NO3- derives primarily from nitrification, with a minor direct contribution of atmospheric NO3- inferred for some samples, particularly in the unsaturated zone. Localized denitrification in the saturated zone is suggested by isotopic and geochemical indicators in some areas. Anthropogenic inputs appear to be minimal, and variability is attributed to environmental factors. In comparison to other arid regions, the sparseness of vegetation in the study area appears to play an important role in moderating unsaturated zone NO3- accumulation by allowing solute flushing and deterring extensive N2 fixation. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  11. The Effect of Molecular Size, Concentration in Nutrient Solution, and Exposure Time on the Amount and Distribution of Polyethylene Glycol in Pepper Plants 12

    PubMed Central

    Janes, Byron E.

    1974-01-01

    Pepper plants Capsicum annuum L. var. California Wonder were grown in nutrient solutions of either −3.0 or −5.0 bars osmotic potential, using polyethylene glycol with molecular weights of 400, 600, 1000, 1540, or 4000 as osmotica. Polyethylene glycol with molecular weights of 1000 or 1540 proved most satisfactory as osmotica to decrease the water potential of nutrient solutions. There was no relationship between the small amount of polyethylene glycol accumulated in the plants and the amount of water transpired. The concentration of polyethylene glycol in the expressed sap of the leaves and the total accumulated was inversely related to molecular weight of polyethylene glycol, was greater at lower osmotic potential of nutrient solution, and increased with time in solution. Except for plants grown in polyethylene glycol 4000, there was more polyethylene glycol in leaves than roots. The indications were that, when the concentration of polyethylene glycol reached a value of 1 to 2 mg per ml, any additional quantity absorbed was transferred to the leaves. The major proportion of polyethylene glycol 4000 absorbed was retained in the roots. The results of Sephadex gel chromatographs showed that the passage of polyethylene glycol through the plants did not alter the average molecular weight. This indicated that there was no selective absorption of small molecules that might be present as contaminates in the commercial product. PMID:16658865

  12. Factors affecting Escherichia coli concentrations at Lake Erie public bathing beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, Donna S.; Darner, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The environmental and water-quality factors that affect concentrations of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in water and sediment were investigated at three public bathing beachesEdgewater Park, Villa Angela, and Sims Parkin the Cleveland, Ohio metropolitan area. This study was done to aid in the determination of safe recreational use and to help water- resource managers assess more quickly and accurately the degradation of recreational water quality. Water and lake-bottom sediments were collected and ancillary environmental data were compiled for 41 days from May through September 1997. Water samples were analyzed for E. coli concentrations, suspended sediment concentrations, and turbidity. Lake- bottom sediment samples from the beach area were analyzed for E. coli concentrations and percent dry weight. Concentrations of E. coli were higher and more variable at Sims Park than at Villa Angela or Edgewater Park; concentrations were lowest at Edgewater Park. Time-series plots showed that short-term storage (less than one week) of E. coli in lake-bottom sediments may have occurred, although no evidence for long-term storage was found during the sampling period. E. coli concentrations in water were found to increase with increasing wave height, but the resuspension of E. coli from lake-bottom sediments by wave action could not be adequately assessed; higherwave heights were often associated with the discharge of sewage containing E. coli during or after a rainfall and wastewater-treatment plant overflow. Multiple linear regression (MLR) was used to develop models to predict recreational water quality at the in water. The related variables included turbidity, antecedent rainfall, antecedent weighted rainfall, volumes of wastewater-treatment plant overflows and metered outfalls (composed of storm-water runoff and combined-sewer overflows), a resuspension index, and wave heights. For the beaches in this study, wind speed, wind direction, water temperature, and the prswimmers

  13. Nutrient uptake and mineralization during leaf decay in streams - a model simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, Jackson; Newbold, J. Denis; Thomas, Steve; Valett, H. Maurice; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2009-01-01

    We developed a stoichiometrically explicit computer model to examine how heterotrophic uptake of nutrients and microbial mineralization occurring during the decay of leaves in streams may be important in modifying nutrient concentrations. The simulations showed that microbial uptake can substantially decrease stream nutrient concentrations during the initial phases of decomposition, while mineralization may produce increases in concentrations during later stages of decomposition. The simulations also showed that initial nutrient content of the leaves can affect the stream nutrient concentration dynamics and determine whether nitrogen or phosphorus is the limiting nutrient. Finally, the simulations suggest a net retention (uptake > mineralization) of nutrients in headwater streams, which is balanced by export of particulate organic nutrients to downstream reaches. Published studies support the conclusion that uptake can substantially change stream nutrient concentrations. On the other hand, there is little published evidence that mineralization also affects nutrient concentrations. Also, there is little information on direct microbial utilization of nutrients contained in the decaying leaves themselves. Our results suggest several directions for research that will improve our understanding of the complex relationship between leaf decay and nutrient dynamics in streams.

  14. Correlation between nitrate concentration in groundwater and parameters affecting aquifer intrinsic vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debernardi, Laura; de Luca, Domenico Antonio; Lasagna, Manuela

    2008-08-01

    the complex phenomena affecting nitrate concentrations in soil, subsoil and groundwater. In particular, the traditional methods for vulnerability analysis do not analyze physical processes in aquifers, such as denitrification and nitrate dilution. According to a recent study in the shallow unconfined aquifer of the Piemonte plain, dilution can be considered as the main cause for nitrate attenuation in groundwater.

  15. Evaluation of soil characteristics potentially affecting arsenic concentration in paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Katja; Schenk, Manfred K

    2009-10-01

    Paddy rice may contribute considerably to the human intake of As. The knowledge of soil characteristics affecting the As content of the rice plant enables the development of agricultural measures for controlling As uptake. During field surveys in 2004 and 2006, plant samples from 68 fields (Italy, Po-area) revealed markedly differing As concentration in polished rice. The soil factors total As(aqua regia), pH, grain size fractions, total C, plant available P(CAL), poorly crystalline Fe(oxal.) and plant available Si(Na-acetate) content that potentially affect As content of rice were determined. A multiple linear regression analysis showed a significant positive influence of the total As(aqua regia) and plant available P(CAL) content and a negative influence of the poorly crystalline Fe(oxal.) content of the soil on the As content in polished rice and rice straw. Si concentration in rice straw varied widely and was negatively related to As content in straw and polished rice.

  16. Factors Affecting 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration in Response to Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Mazahery, Hajar; von Hurst, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    Sun exposure is the main source of vitamin D. Due to many lifestyle risk factors vitamin D deficiency/insufficiency is becoming a worldwide health problem. Low 25(OH)D concentration is associated with adverse musculoskeletal and non-musculoskeletal health outcomes. Vitamin D supplementation is currently the best approach to treat deficiency and to maintain adequacy. In response to a given dose of vitamin D, the effect on 25(OH)D concentration differs between individuals, and it is imperative that factors affecting this response be identified. For this review, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify those factors and to explore their significance in relation to circulating 25(OH)D response to vitamin D supplementation. The effect of several demographic/biological factors such as baseline 25(OH)D, aging, body mass index(BMI)/body fat percentage, ethnicity, calcium intake, genetics, oestrogen use, dietary fat content and composition, and some diseases and medications has been addressed. Furthermore, strategies employed by researchers or health care providers (type, dose and duration of vitamin D supplementation) and environment (season) are other contributing factors. With the exception of baseline 25(OH)D, BMI/body fat percentage, dose and type of vitamin D, the relative importance of other factors and the mechanisms by which these factors may affect the response remains to be determined. PMID:26121531

  17. Interactions between repeated fire, nutrients, and insect herbivores affect the recovery of diversity in the southern Amazon.

    PubMed

    Massad, Tara Joy; Balch, Jennifer K; Davidson, Eric A; Brando, Paulo M; Mews, Cândida Lahís; Porto, Pábio; Quintino, Raimundo Mota; Vieira, Simone A; Junior, Ben Hur Marimon; Trumbore, Susan E

    2013-05-01

    Surface fires burn extensive areas of tropical forests each year, altering resource availability, biotic interactions, and, ultimately, plant diversity. In transitional forest between the Brazilian cerrado (savanna) and high stature Amazon forest, we took advantage of a long-term fire experiment to establish a factorial study of the interactions between fire, nutrient availability, and herbivory on early plant regeneration. Overall, five annual burns reduced the number and diversity of regenerating stems. Community composition changed substantially after repeated fires, and species common in the cerrado became more abundant. The number of recruits and their diversity were reduced in the burned area, but burned plots closed to herbivores with nitrogen additions had a 14 % increase in recruitment. Diversity of recruits also increased up to 50 % in burned plots when nitrogen was added. Phosphorus additions were related to an increase in species evenness in burned plots open to herbivores. Herbivory reduced seedling survival overall and increased diversity in burned plots when nutrients were added. This last result supports our hypothesis that positive relationships between herbivore presence and diversity would be strongest in treatments that favor herbivory--in this case herbivory was higher in burned plots which were initially lower in diversity. Regenerating seedlings in less diverse plots were likely more apparent to herbivores, enabling increased herbivory and a stronger signal of negative density dependence. In contrast, herbivores generally decreased diversity in more species rich unburned plots. Although this study documents complex interactions between repeated burns, nutrients, and herbivory, it is clear that fire initiates a shift in the factors that are most important in determining the diversity and number of recruits. This change may have long-lasting effects as the forest progresses through succession.

  18. Partial calcium depletion during membrane filtration affects gelation of reconstituted milk protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Eshpari, H; Jimenez-Flores, R; Tong, P S; Corredig, M

    2015-12-01

    Milk protein concentrate powders (MPC) with improved rehydration properties are often manufactured using processing steps, such as acidification and high-pressure processing, and with addition of other ingredients, such as sodium chloride, during their production. These steps are known to increase the amount of serum caseins or modify the mineral equilibrium, hence improving solubility of the retentates. The processing functionality of the micelles may be affected. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of partial acidification by adding glucono-δ-lactone (GDL) to skim milk during membrane filtration on the structural changes of the casein micelles by observing their chymosin-induced coagulation behavior, as such coagulation is affected by both the supramolecular structure of the caseins and calcium equilibrium. Milk protein concentrates were prepared by preacidification with GDL to pH 6 using ultrafiltration (UF) and diafiltration (DF) followed by spray-drying. Reconstituted UF and DF samples (3.2% protein) treated with GDL showed significantly increased amounts of soluble calcium and nonsedimentable caseins compared with their respective controls, as measured by ion chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE electrophoresis, respectively. The primary phase of chymosin-induced gelation was not significantly different between treatments as measured by the amount of caseino-macropeptide released. The rheological properties of the reconstituted MPC powders were determined immediately after addition of chymosin, both before and after dialysis against skim milk, to ensure similar serum composition for all samples. Reconstituted samples before dialysis showed no gelation (defined as tan δ=1), and after re-equilibration only control UF and DF samples showed gelation. The gelation properties of reconstituted MPC powders were negatively affected by the presence of soluble casein, and positively affected by the amount of both soluble and insoluble

  19. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol affect rat intestinal epithelial cells: a concentration related study.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Bianca; Severino, Lorella; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Marzocco, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5-80 µM) significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i) Bax induction; (ii) Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii) caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G(0)/G(1) interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G(2). Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1-2.5 µM), both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution), representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins.

  20. Trends in Streamflow and Nutrient and Suspended-Sediment Concentrations and Loads in the Upper Mississippi, Ohio, Red, and Great Lakes River Basins, 1975-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorenz, David L.; Robertson, Dale M.; Hall, David W.; Saad, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Many actions have been taken to reduce nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations and the amount of nutrients and sediment transported in streams as a result of the Clean Water Act and subsequent regulations. This report assesses how nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in selected streams have changed during recent years to determine if these actions have been successful. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in concentrations and trends in loads from 1993 to 2004 were computed for total nitrogen, dissolved ammonia, total organic nitrogen plus ammonia, dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, dissolved phosphorus, total suspended material (total suspended solids or suspended sediment), and total suspended sediment for 49 sites in the Upper Mississippi, Ohio, Red, and Great Lakes Basins. Changes in total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and total suspended-material loads were examined from 1975 to 2003 at six sites to provide a longer term context for the data examined from 1993 to 2004. Flow-adjusted trends in total nitrogen concentrations at 19 of 24 sites showed tendency toward increasing concentrations, and overall trends in total nitrogen concentrations at 16 of the 24 sites showed a general tendency toward increasing concentrations. The trends in these flow-adjusted total nitrogen concentrations are related to the changes in fertilizer nitrogen applications. Flow-adjusted trends in dissolved ammonia concentrations from 1993 to 2004 showed a widespread tendency toward decreasing concentrations. The widespread, downward trends in dissolved ammonia concentrations indicate that some of the ammonia reduction goals of the Clean Water Act are being met. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in total organic plus ammonia nitrogen concentrations from 1993 to 2004 did not show a distinct spatial pattern. Flow-adjusted and overall trends in dissolved nitrite plus nitrate concentrations from 1993 to 2004 also did not show a distinct spatial pattern

  1. Trace contaminant concentration affects mineral transformation and pollutant fate in hydroxide-weathered Hanford sediments.

    PubMed

    Perdrial, Nicolas; Rivera, Nelson; Thompson, Aaron; O'Day, Peggy A; Chorover, Jon

    2011-12-15

    Prior work has shown that when silicaceous sediments are infused with caustic radioactive waste, contaminant fate is tightly coupled to ensuing mineral weathering reactions. However, the effects of local aqueous geochemical conditions on these reactions are poorly studied. Thus, we varied contaminant concentration and pCO(2) during the weathering of previously uncontaminated Hanford sediments over 6 months and 1 year in a solution of caustic waste (pH 13, high ionic strength). Co-contaminants Sr, Cs and I were added at "low" (Cs/Sr: 10(-5)m; I: 10(-7)m) and "high" (Cs/Sr: 10(-3)m; I: 10(-5)m) concentrations, and headspace was held at atmospheric or undetectable (<10ppmv) CO(2) partial pressure. Solid phase characterization revealed the formation of the zeolite chabazite in "high" samples, whereas feldspathoids, sodalite and cancrinite, were formed preferentially in "low" samples. Sr, Cs and I were sequestered in all reacted sediments. Native calcite dissolution in the CO(2)-free treatment drove the formation of strätlingite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)·8H(2)O) and diminished availability of Si and Al for feldspathoid formation. Results indicate that pCO(2) and contaminant concentrations strongly affect contaminant speciation in waste-weathered sediments, and are therefore likely to impact reaction product stability under any remediation scenario.

  2. Emotional distress affects attention and concentration: the difference between mountains and valleys.

    PubMed

    Meyers, John E; Grills, Chad E; Zellinger, Margaret M; Miller, Ronald Mellado

    2014-01-01

    The current study tests the hypothesis that the "mountains and valleys pattern" (MVP) observed within the Attention and Concentration domain of the Meyers Neuropsychological Battery reflects the interference of emotional distress/anxiety on the patient's cognitive test performance. First, the MVP was objectively quantified using a formula that took into account both increased and decreased scores, rather than canceling them out through averaging. Using a total sample of 787 subjects, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Second Edition Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) profile scores of cases with and without this pattern were then compared using an extensive database followed by a smaller, matched-groups design. The presence of the MVP was related to MMPI-2-RF test performance. In particular, this pattern was related to emotional distress/anxiety scales but was not related to scales reflecting neurological or cognitive complaints. The degree of emotional distress experienced may affect attention and concentration test performance in a way that sometimes heightens focus and at other times disrupts focus. The MVP may be used to assess the effects of emotional distress on the consistency of an individual patient's attention and concentration test performance.

  3. Effect of foliar application of zinc, selenium, and iron fertilizers on nutrients concentration and yield of rice grain in China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yong; Wang, Lin; Xin, Zhihong; Zhao, Liyan; An, Xinxin; Hu, Qiuhui

    2008-03-26

    Zn, Se, and Fe levels in 65 Chinese rice samples were investigated, and the results indicated that these micronutrients contents of rice products from different location varied considerably. The mean contents of Zn, Se and Fe in these rice samples were 21.5+/-1.8, 0.020+/-0.012, and 12.4+/-4.3 mg kg(-1), respectively, which were too low to meet the micronutrient demands for the population feeding on the rice as staple. A field orthogonal experiment L9 (3(4)) was conducted on rice cultivar Wuyunjing 7, to evaluate the effect of Zn, Se, and Fe foliar fertilization on the concentration of these micronutrients, yield, and protein and ash content of rice grain. The results indicated that Zn and Se were the main variables influencing the Zn, Se, and Fe content of rice, and the optimal combination of fertilization for enhancing these micronutrients was 0.90 kg ha(-1) Zn, 0.015 kg ha(-1) Se, and 0.90 kg ha(-1) Fe. Under the optimal application condition, Zn, Se, and Fe content of rice could be significantly increased by 36.7%, 194.1%, and 37.1%, respectively, compared with the control, without affecting grain yield and protein and ash content of rice products. Moreover, in the confirmation experiment on rice cultivar Ninggeng 1, the optimal fertilization could increase the Zn, Se, and Fe content of rice up to 17.4, 0.123, and 14.2 mg kg(-1), respectively.

  4. [Effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration and nitrogen application level on absorption and transportation of nutrient elements in oilseed rape].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-ming; Zhang, Zhen-hua; Song, Hai-xing; Liu, Qiang; Rong, Xiang-min; Guan, Chun-yun; Zeng, Jing; Yuan, Dan

    2015-07-01

    Effect of elevated atmospheric-CO2 (780 µmol . mol-1) on the absorption and transportation of secondary nutrient elements (calcium, magnesium, sulphur) and micronutrient elements (iron, manganese, zinc, molybdenum and boron) in oilseed rape at the stem elongation stage were studied by greenhouse simulated method. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the content of Zn in stem was increased and the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with no nitrogen (N) application; the contents of Ca, S, B and Zn were increased, and the contents of Mg, Mn, Mo and Fe were decreased under the elevated atmospheric CO2 with N application (0.2 g N . kg-1 soil); except the content of Mo in leaf was increased, the contents of other nutrient elements were decreased under the elevated atmospheric-CO2 with two levels of N application. Compared with the ambient CO2 condition, the amounts of Ca and S relative to the total amount of secondary nutrient elements in stem and the amounts of B and Zn relative to the total amount of micronutrient elements in stem were increased under the elevated-CO2 treatment with both levels of N application, and the corresponding values of Mg, Fe, Mn and Mo were decreased; no-N application treatment increased the proportion of Ca distributed into the leaves, and the proportion of Mg distributed into leaves was increased by the normal-N application level; the proportions of Mn, Zn and Mo distributed into the leaves were increased at both N application levels. Without N application, the elevation of atmospheric CO2 increased the transport coefficients of SFe, Mo and SS,B, but decreased the transport coefficients of SMg,Fe, SMg, Mn and SS,Fe, indicating the proportions of Mo, S transported into the upper part of plant tissues was higher than that of Fe, and the corresponding value of B was higher than that observed for S, the corresponding value of Mg was higher than that of Fe and Mn. Under normal-N application

  5. Nutrient limitation leads to penetrative growth into agar and affects aroma formation in Pichia fabianii, P. kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rijswijck, Irma M H; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith C M; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2015-01-01

    Among fermentative yeast species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is most frequently used as a model organism, although other yeast species may have special features that make them interesting candidates to apply in food-fermentation processes. In this study, we used three yeast species isolated from fermented masau (Ziziphus mauritiana) fruit, S. cerevisiae 131, Pichia fabianii 65 and Pichia kudriavzevii 129, and determined the impact of nitrogen and/or glucose limitation on surface growth mode and the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). All three species displayed significant changes in growth mode in all nutrient-limited conditions, signified by the formation of metafilaments or pseudohyphae. The timing of the transition was found to be species-specific. Transition in growth mode is suggested to be linked to the production of certain fusel alcohols, such as phenylethyl alcohol, which serve as quorum-sensing molecules. Interestingly, we did not observe concomitant increased production of phenylethyl alcohol and filamentous growth. Notably, a broader range of esters was found only for the Pichia spp. grown on nitrogen-limited agar for 21 days compared to nutrient-rich agar, and when grown on glucose- and glucose- plus nitrogen-limited agar. Our data suggest that for the Pichia spp., the formation of esters may play an important role in the switch in growth mode upon nitrogen limitation. Further biological or ecological implications of ester formation are discussed.

  6. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Perilla Oil Affect the Expression of Secreted Virulence Factor Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mingjing; Li, Hongen; Dong, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Wang, Xiaoliang; Feng, Haihua; Ren, Wenzhi; Deng, Xuming

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenicity of staphylococcus aureus is dependent largely upon its ability to secrete a number of virulence factors, therefore, anti-virulence strategy to combat S. aureus-mediated infections is now gaining great interest. It is widely recognized that some plant essential oils could affect the production of staphylococcal exotoxins when used at subinhibitory concentrations. Perilla [Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton], a natural medicine found in eastern Asia, is primarily used as both a medicinal and culinary herb. Its essential oil (perilla oil) has been previously demonstrated to be active against S. aureus. However, there are no data on the influence of perilla oil on the production of S. aureus exotoxins. Methodology/Principal Findings A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of perilla oil against S. aureus strains. Hemolysis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil on exotoxins production in S. aureus. The data presented here show that perilla oil dose-dependently decreased the production of α-toxin, enterotoxins A and B (the major staphylococcal enterotoxins), and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) in both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions/Significance The production of α-toxin, SEA, SEB, and TSST-1 in S. aureus was decreased by perilla oil. These data suggest that perilla oil may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics, which can increase exotoxins production by S. aureus at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, perilla oil could be rationally applied in food systems as a novel food preservative both to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and to repress the production of exotoxins, particularly staphylococcal enterotoxins. PMID:21283822

  7. Estimated Nutrient Concentrations and Continuous Water-Quality Monitoring in the Eucha-Spavinaw Basin, Northwestern Arkansas and Northeastern Oklahoma, 2004-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Victoria G.; Esralew, Rachel A.; Allen, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    The Eucha-Spavinaw basin is the source of water for Lake Eucha and Spavinaw Lake, which are part of the water supply for the City of Tulsa. The City of Tulsa has received complaints of taste and odor in the finished drinking water because of deteriorating water quality. The deterioration is largely because of algal growth from the input of nutrients from the Eucha-Spavinaw basin. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Tulsa, implemented a continuous, real-time water-quality monitoring program in the Eucha-Spavinaw basin to better understand the source of the nutrient loading. This program included the manual collection of samples analyzed for nutrients and the collection of continuous, in-stream data from water-quality monitors. Continuous water-quality monitors were installed at two existing continuous streamflow-gaging stations - Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma, from October 2004 through September 2007. Total nitrogen concentrations for manually collected water samples ranged from 2.08 to 9.66 milligrams per liter for the water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Colcord, Oklahoma, and from 0.67 to 5.12 milligrams per liter for manually collected water samples from Beaty Creek near Jay, Oklahoma. Total phosphorus concentrations ranged from 0.04 to 1.5 milligrams per liter for the water samples collected from Spavinaw Creek near Colcord and from 0.028 to 1.0 milligram per liter for the water samples collected from Beaty Creek near Jay. Data from water samples and in-stream monitors at Spavinaw and Beaty Creeks (specific conductance and turbidity) were used to develop linear regression equations relating in-stream water properties to total nitrogen and total phosphorus concentrations. The equations developed for the Spavinaw and Beaty sites are site specific and only valid for the concentration ranges of the explanatory variables used in the analysis. The range in estimated and measured

  8. Ballistics ordnance gelatine - How different concentrations, temperatures and curing times affect calibration results.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Fisk, Wesley; Wachsberger, Christian; Byard, Roger W

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether different concentrations of ordnance gelatine, water types, temperatures and curing times would have an effect on projectile penetration of a gelatine tissue surrogate. Both Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) specified gelatines were compared against the FBI calibration standard. 10% w/w and 20% w/w concentrations of gelatine with Bloom numbers of 250 and 285 were prepared and cured at variable temperatures (3-20°C) for 21 hours-3 weeks. Each block was shot on four occasions on the same range using steel calibre 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) air rifle at the required standard velocity of 180 ± 4.5 m/s, to ascertain the mean penetration depth. The results showed no significant difference in mean penetration depth using the three different water types (p > 0.05). Temperature changes and curing times did affect penetration depth. At 10°C, mean penetration depth with 20% gelatine 285 Bloom for the two water types tested was 49.7 ± 1.5 mm after 21 h curing time, whereas the same formulation at 20°C using two different water types was 79.1 ± 2.1 mm after 100 h curing time (p < 0.001). Neither of the NATO 20% concentrations of gelatine at 10°C or a 20% concentration of 285 Bloom gelatine at 10°C met the same calibration standard as the FBI recommended 10% formulation at 4°C. A 20% concentration of 285 Bloom at 20°C met the same calibration/penetration criteria as a 10% concentration of 250 Bloom at 4 °C after 100 h of curing, therefore matching the FBI calibration standard for a soft tissue simulant for wound ballistics research. These results demonstrate significant variability in simulant properties. Failure to standardise ballistic simulants may invalidate experimental results.

  9. Land use and nutrient concentrations and yields in selected streams in the Albemarle-Pamlico drainage basin, North Carolina and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodside, M.D.; Simerl, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    Because nutrients can cause water-quaiity degradation, a major focus of NAWQA is to investigate effects of nutrients on surface- and ground-water quality. This report summarizes surface-water quality study design and land uses in the NAWQA Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin study unit, one of 60 study units nationwide, and shows how nutrient concentrations are related to land uses at selected basins in the study unit. The study area encompasses about 28,000 square miles (mi2) in central and eastern North Carolina and southern Virginia. The major river basins in the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin are the Chowan, Roanoke, Tar, and Neuse. The barrier islands, estuaries, and the AlbemarIe, Pamlico, and associated sounds are not included in the study-unit area. The Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin covers four physiographic provinces:Valley and Ridge, Blue Ridge, Piedmont, and Coastal Plain. About 50 percent of the land in the study areais forested, 30 percent is cropland, 15 percent is wetland, and 5 percent is developed. The population--of the study unit is about 3 million people.

  10. High-resolution monitoring of nutrients in groundwater and surface waters: process understanding, quantification of loads and concentrations, and management applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Geer, Frans C.; Kronvang, Brian; Broers, Hans Peter

    2016-09-01

    Four sessions on "Monitoring Strategies: temporal trends in groundwater and surface water quality and quantity" at the EGU conferences in 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 and a special issue of HESS form the background for this overview of the current state of high-resolution monitoring of nutrients. The overview includes a summary of technologies applied in high-frequency monitoring of nutrients in the special issue. Moreover, we present a new assessment of the objectives behind high-frequency monitoring as classified into three main groups: (i) improved understanding of the underlying hydrological, chemical, and biological processes (PU); (ii) quantification of true nutrient concentrations and loads (Q); and (iii) operational management, including evaluation of the effects of mitigation measures (M). The contributions in the special issue focus on the implementation of high-frequency monitoring within the broader context of policy making and management of water in Europe for support of EU directives such as the Water Framework Directive, the Groundwater Directive, and the Nitrates Directive. The overview presented enabled us to highlight the typical objectives encountered in the application of high-frequency monitoring and to reflect on future developments and research needs in this growing field of expertise.

  11. Chronic Exposure to Excess Nutrients Left-shifts the Concentration Dependence of Glucose-stimulated Insulin Secretion in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Erion, Karel A; Berdan, Charles A; Burritt, Nathan E; Corkey, Barbara E; Deeney, Jude T

    2015-06-26

    Hyperinsulinemia (HI) is elevated plasma insulin at basal glucose. Impaired glucose tolerance is associated with HI, although the exact cause and effect relationship remains poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that HI can result from an intrinsic response of the β-cell to chronic exposure to excess nutrients, involving a shift in the concentration dependence of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. INS-1 (832/13) cells were cultured in either a physiological (4 mm) or high (11 mm) glucose concentration with or without concomitant exposure to oleate. Isolated rat islets were also cultured with or without oleate. A clear hypersensitivity to submaximal glucose concentrations was evident in INS-1 cells cultured in excess nutrients such that the 25% of maximal (S0.25) glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was significantly reduced in cells cultured in 11 mm glucose (S0.25 = 3.5 mm) and 4 mm glucose with oleate (S0.25 = 4.5 mm) compared with 4 mm glucose alone (S0.25 = 5.7 mm). The magnitude of the left shift was linearly correlated with intracellular lipid stores in INS-1 cells (r(2) = 0.97). We observed no significant differences in the dose responses for glucose stimulation of respiration, NAD(P)H autofluorescence, or Ca(2+) responses between left- and right-shifted β-cells. However, a left shift in the sensitivity of exocytosis to Ca(2+) was documented in permeabilized INS-1 cells cultured in 11 versus 4 mm glucose (S0.25 = 1.1 and 1.7 μm, respectively). Our results suggest that the sensitivity of exocytosis to triggering is modulated by a lipid component, the levels of which are influenced by the culture nutrient environment.

  12. Barley chloroplast glutamine synthetase activity is not affected by CO sub 2 -concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, C.; Forde, B.; Wallsgrove, R. )

    1990-05-01

    It has been reported that when photorespiration is suppressed by raising the concentration of CO{sub 2}, the expression of the chloroplast glutamine synthetase (GS2) gene in pea leaves is reduced (Plant Cell, 1, 241). We have examined this effect in barley (Hordeum vulgare), and confirm that plants grown continuously in 0.8% CO{sub 2}, or transferred to such conditions after growth in air, appear to have a reduced GS2 mRNA abundance. However, we were unable to detect any significant difference in the extractable GS2 activity, or any change in amount of GS2 protein (judged by Western blots). Whatever controls are operating on gS2 mRNA expression in response to changes is external CO{sub 2}, they do not affect the activity or amount of the enzyme in barley.

  13. Galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide supplementation affects nutrient digestibility, fermentation end-product production, and large bowel microbiota of the dog.

    PubMed

    Faber, T A; Hopkins, A C; Middelbos, I S; Price, N P; Fahey, G C

    2011-01-01

    A galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide (GGMO) obtained from fiberboard production was evaluated as a dietary supplement for dogs. The GGMO substrate contained increased concentrations of oligosaccharides containing mannose, xylose, and glucose, with the mannose component accounting for 35% of DM. Adult dogs assigned to a 6 × 6 Latin square design were fed 6 diets, each containing a different concentration of supplemental GGMO (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8%) that replaced dietary cellulose. Total tract DM and OM apparent digestibilities increased (P < 0.001) linearly, whereas total tract CP apparent digestibility decreased (P < 0.001) linearly as dietary GGMO substrate concentration increased. Fecal concentrations of acetate, propionate, and total short-chain fatty acids increased (P ≤ 0.001) linearly, whereas butyrate concentration decreased (P ≤ 0.001) linearly with increasing dietary concentrations of GGMO. Fecal pH decreased (P ≤ 0.001) linearly as dietary GGMO substrate concentration increased, whereas fecal score increased quadratically (P ≤ 0.001). Fecal phenol (P ≤ 0.05) and indole (P ≤ 0.01) concentrations decreased linearly with GGMO supplementation. Fecal biogenic amine concentrations were not different among treatments except for phenylethylamine, which decreased (P < 0.001) linearly as dietary GGMO substrate concentration increased. Fecal microbial concentrations of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus spp., and Clostridium perfringens were not different among treatments. A quadratic increase (P ≤ 0.01) was noted for Bifidobacterium spp. as dietary GGMO substrate concentration increased. The data suggest positive nutritional properties of supplemental GGMO when incorporated in a good-quality dog food.

  14. Digestate color and light intensity affect nutrient removal and competition phenomena in a microalgal-bacterial ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Marcilhac, Cyril; Sialve, Bruno; Pourcher, Anne-Marie; Ziebal, Christine; Bernet, Nicolas; Béline, Fabrice

    2014-11-01

    During anaerobic digestion, nutrients are mineralized and may require post-treatment for optimum valorization. The cultivation of autotrophic microalgae using the digestate supernatant is a promising solution; however the dark color of the influent poses a serious problem. First, the color of the digestates was studied and the results obtained using three different digestates demonstrated a strong heterogeneity although their color remained rather constant over time. The digestates absorbed light over the whole visible spectrum and remained colored even after a ten-fold dilution. Secondly, the impact of light and of substrate color on the growth of Scenedesmus sp. and on nitrogen removal were assessed. These experiments led to the construction of a model for predicting the impact of influent color and light intensity on N removal. Maximum N removal (8.5 mgN- [Formula: see text]  L(-1) d(-1)) was observed with an initial optical density of 0.221 and 244 μmolE m(-)² s(-1) light and the model allows to determine N removal between 15.9 and 22.7 mgN- [Formula: see text]  L(-1) d(-1) in real conditions according to the dilution level of the influent and related color. Changes in the microalgae community were monitored and revealed the advantage of Chlorella over Scenedesmus under light-limitation. Additionally microalgae outcompeted nitrifying bacteria and experiments showed how microalgae become better competitors for nutrients when phosphorus is limiting. Furthermore, nitrification was limited by microalgae growth, even when P was not limiting.

  15. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Barber, Larry B.; Meghan R. McGee,; Megan A. Buerkley,; Matthew L. Julius,; Vajda, Alan M.; Heiko L. Schoenfuss,; Schultz, Melissa M.; Norris, David O.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by- frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration.

  16. Antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations affect predator avoidance behavior of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Painter, M.M.; Buerkley, M.A.; Julius, M.L.; Vajda, A.M.; Norris, D.O.; Barber, L.B.; Furlong, E.T.; Schultz, M.M.; Schoenfuss, H.L.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of embryonic and larval exposure to environmentally relevant (ng/L) concentrations of common antidepressants, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, and bupropion (singularly and in mixture) on C-start escape behavior were evaluated in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Embryos (postfertilization until hatching) were exposed for 5 d and, after hatching, were allowed to grow in control well water until 12 d old. Similarly, posthatch fathead minnows were exposed for 12 d to these compounds. High-speed (1,000 frames/s) video recordings of escape behavior were collected and transferred to National Institutes of Health Image for frame-by-frame analysis of latency periods, escape velocities, and total escape response (combination of latency period and escape velocity). When tested 12 d posthatch, fluoxetine and venlafaxine adversely affected C-start performance of larvae exposed as embryos. Conversely, larvae exposed for 12 d posthatch did not exhibit altered escape responses when exposed to fluoxetine but were affected by venlafaxine and bupropion exposure. Mixtures of these four antidepressant pharmaceuticals slowed predator avoidance behaviors in larval fathead minnows regardless of the exposure window. The direct impact of reduced C-start performance on survival and, ultimately, reproductive fitness provides an avenue to assess the ecological relevance of exposure in an assay of relatively short duration. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  17. Increasing concentrations of phenol progressively affect anaerobic digestion of cellulose and associated microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Chapleur, Olivier; Madigou, Céline; Civade, Raphaël; Rodolphe, Yohan; Mazéas, Laurent; Bouchez, Théodore

    2016-02-01

    Performance stability is a key issue when managing anaerobic digesters. However it can be affected by external disturbances caused by micropollutants. In this study the influence of phenol on the methanization of cellulose was evaluated through batch toxicity assays. Special attention was given to the dynamics of microbial communities by means of automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. We observed that, as phenol concentrations increased, the different steps of anaerobic cellulose digestion were unevenly and progressively affected, methanogenesis being the most sensitive: specific methanogenic activity was half-inhibited at 1.40 g/L of phenol, whereas hydrolysis of cellulose and its fermentation to VFA were observed at up to 2.00 g/L. Depending on the level of phenol, microbial communities resisted either through physiological or structural adaptation. Thus, performances at 0.50 g/L were maintained in spite of the microbial community's shift. However, the communities' ability to adapt was limited and performances decreased drastically beyond 2.00 g/L of phenol.

  18. Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Particles Does Not Affect Vascular Function in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Robinson, Simon D.; Fokkens, Paul H. B.; Leseman, Daan L. A. C.; Miller, Mark R.; Anderson, David; Freney, Evelyn J.; Heal, Mathew R.; Donovan, Robert J.; Blomberg, Anders; Sandström, Thomas; MacNee, William; Boon, Nicholas A.; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E.; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine particulate air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously demonstrated that exposure to dilute diesel exhaust causes vascular dysfunction in humans. Objectives We conducted a study to determine whether exposure to ambient particulate matter causes vascular dysfunction. Methods Twelve male patients with stable coronary heart disease and 12 age-matched volunteers were exposed to concentrated ambient fine and ultrafine particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 2 hr using a randomized, double-blind cross-over study design. We measured peripheral vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and inflammatory variables—including circulating leukocytes, serum C-reactive protein, and exhaled breath 8-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine—6–8 hr after both exposures. Results Particulate concentrations (mean ± SE) in the exposure chamber (190 ± 37 μg/m3) were higher than ambient levels (31 ± 8 μg/m3) and levels in filtered air (0.5 ± 0.4 μg/m3; p < 0.001). Chemical analysis of CAPs identified low levels of elemental carbon. Exhaled breath 8-isoprostane concentrations increased after exposure to CAPs (16.9 ± 8.5 vs. 4.9 ± 1.2 pg/mL, p < 0.05), but markers of systemic inflammation were largely unchanged. Although there was a dose-dependent increase in blood flow and plasma tissue plasminogen activator release (p < 0.001 for all), CAPs exposure had no effect on vascular function in either group. Conclusions Despite achieving marked increases in particulate matter, exposure to CAPs—low in combustion-derived particles—did not affect vasomotor or fibrinolytic function in either middle-aged healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. These findings contrast with previous exposures to dilute diesel exhaust and highlight the importance of particle composition in determining the vascular effects of particulate matter in humans. PMID:18560524

  19. Immunological responses as affected by dietary protein and arginine concentrations in starting broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jahanian, R

    2009-09-01

    The study presented here aimed to investigate the effect of dietary protein content on Arg needs and immunological responses of broiler chicks during the starter period. A total of 715 one-day-old male Ross broiler chicks were randomly assigned to 5 replicate pens for each of 11 experimental diets during a 21-d feeding trial. The dietary treatments included a corn-soybean meal control diet or experimental diets (corn-soybean meal-corn gluten meal) containing 5 dietary Arg levels of 80, 90, 100, 110, or 120% of NRC recommendations and 2 dietary protein levels of 19 and 22.35% of diet. Increasing dietary CP content significantly (P<0.001) increased daily feed consumption and weight gain. Also, feeding diets deficient in Arg to the chicks led to a noticeable decline in feed intake, and dietary Arg supplementation overcame decreased feed consumption and weight gain observed in Arg-deficient chicks. Feed efficiency was affected only by dietary Arg concentration so that chicks on Arg-deficient diets markedly (P<0.001) increased feed conversion ratio. Contrast comparisons showed that the highly variable responses of chicks to dietary Arg level were mainly attributed to dietary protein concentration: more dietary protein content and higher Arg demands. Among lymphoid organs, thymus (P<0.001) and spleen (P<0.05) were affected by dietary Arg deficiency, whereas diets low in CP content decreased (P<0.001) relative weights of thymus and bursa of Fabricius. Increase in dietary CP level from 19 to 22.35% caused an increase (P<0.001) in the proportion of lymphocytes and consequently lower (P<0.05) heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. Broiler chicks on Arg-deficient diets decreased the proportion of heterophils in peripheral blood. Furthermore, skin reaction to phytohemagglutinin P was impaired when the diets were low in CP and Arg contents. Similarly, a decrease in dietary CP and Arg levels diminished the antibody production response to Newcastle disease virus. The broken

  20. Identification of QTL affecting seed mineral concentrations and content in the model legume Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing the amount of bioavailable micronutrients such as iron and zinc in plant foods for human consumption is a challenge, especially in developing countries where plant foods comprise a significant portion of the diet. Legume seeds have the potential to provide the essential nutrients require...

  1. Identification of major genes affecting nutritional element concentrations in rice grains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofortification is the process by which the nutritional quality of food crops is improved through conventional plant breeding and/or use of biotechnology. Biofortification differs from conventional fortification in that biofortification aims to increase nutrient levels in crops during plant growth...

  2. Factors affecting low summer dissolved oxygen concentrations in Mississippi Delta bayous

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streams in watersheds supporting intensive row-crop agriculture are vulnerable to ecological degradation due to non-point source pollutants such as nutrients. Low gradient streams such as bayous are especially susceptible to pollutants due to increased water residence time, and they often exhibit po...

  3. Factors affecting low summer dissolved oxygen concentrations in Mississippi Delta bayous

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streams in watersheds supporting intensive row-crop agriculture are vulnerable to ecological degradation due to non-point source discharge of pollutants such as nutrients. Low gradient streams such as bayous are especially susceptible due to increased water residence time, and often result in poor w...

  4. Nitrogen source and concentration affect utilization of glucose by mixed ruminal microbes in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Availability of ruminally degradable protein (RDP) changes the utilization of carbohydrates by ruminal microbes. However, the effects are not well described, though such information is needed to understand the potential impact on nutrient supplies for ruminants. The objective of this study was to co...

  5. Effects of concentrate crude protein content on nutrient digestibility, energy utilization, and methane emissions in lactating dairy cows fed fresh-cut perennial grass.

    PubMed

    Hynes, D N; Stergiadis, S; Gordon, A; Yan, T

    2016-11-01

    Although many studies have investigated mitigation strategies for methane (CH4) output from dairy cows fed a wide variety of diets, research on the effects of concentrate crude protein (CP) content on CH4 emissions from dairy cows offered fresh grass is limited. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of cow genotype and concentrate CP level on nutrient digestibility, energy utilization, and CH4 emissions in dairy cows offered fresh-grass diets. Twelve multiparous lactating dairy cows (6 Holstein and 6 Holstein × Swedish Red) were blocked into 3 groups for each breed and assigned to a low-, medium-, or high-CP concentrate diet [14.1, 16.1, and 18.1% CP on a dry matter (DM) basis, respectively], in a 3-period changeover study (25d per period). Total diets contained (DM basis) 32.8% concentrates and 67.2% perennial ryegrass, which was harvested daily. All measurements were undertaken during the final 6d of each period: digestibility measurements for 6d and calorimetric measurements in respiration chambers for 3d. Feed intake and milk production data were reported in a previous paper. We observed no significant interaction between concentrate CP level and cow genotype on any parameter. Concentrate CP level had no significant effect on any energy utilization parameter, except for urinary energy output, which was positively related to concentrate CP level. Similarly, concentrate CP content had no effect on CH4 emission (g/d), CH4 per kg feed intake, or nutrient digestibility. Cross breeding of Holstein cows significantly reduced gross energy, digestible energy, and metabolizable energy intake, heat production, and milk energy output. However, cow genotype had no significant effect on energy utilization efficiency or CH4 parameters. Furthermore, the present study yielded a value for gross energy lost as CH4 (5.6%) on fresh grass-based diets that was lower than the widely accepted value of 6.5%. The present findings indicate that reducing concentrate CP

  6. The effects of feeding increasing concentrations of corn oil on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of added fat source is common in high-concentrate finishing diets. The objective of our experiment was to determine if feeding increasing concentrations of added dietary corn oil would decrease enteric methane production, increase the ME:DE ratio, and improve recovered energy (RE) in finish...

  7. The effects of feeding increasing concentrations of corn oil on energy metabolism and nutrient balance in finishing beef steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of added fat source is common in high-concentrate finishing diets. The objective of our experiment was to determine if feeding increasing concentrations of added dietary corn oil would decrease enteric methane production, increase the ME:DE ratio, and improve retained energy in finishing be...

  8. Direct measurements of the tile drain and groundwater contributions to surface water contamination: from field-scale concentration patterns in groundwater to catchment-scale dynamics in stream water nutrient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Geer, F.; Rozemeijer, J.; Van der Velde, Y.; Broers, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    Enhanced knowledge of water and nutrient pathways in catchments improves the understanding of dynamics in water quality and supports the selection of appropriate water pollution mitigation options. For this study, we physically separated tile drain effluent and groundwater discharge from an agricultural field before it entered a 43.5 meter ditch transect. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling, we directly quantified the flow route contributions to surface water discharge and solute loading. Our multi-scale experimental approach allowed us to relate these measurements to field-scale NO3 concentration patterns in shallow groundwater and to continuous NO3 records at the catchment outlet. Our mapping of nutrient concentrations in shallow groundwater at the experimental field revealed a highly variable spatial pattern, with NO3 concentrations ranging from 0 to 219 mg/l. Our measurement setup allowed us to compare NO3 concentrations of the individual tile drains to the spatial NO3 concentration pattern in shallow groundwater. These results show that tile drain effluent sampling is an efficient way to obtain information on shallow groundwater composition. The catchment-scale monitoring revealed a large spatial heterogeneity in tile drain effluent NO3 concentrations, which ranged from 0 mg/l up to 390 mg/l. A distinct similarity was found between the temporal patterns in NO3 concentrations in tile drain effluent at the field-scale, in tile drain effluent throughout the catchment, and in stream water at the catchment outlet. They all showed a seasonal pattern with higher concentrations in winter, which is related to the increased contribution of near-surface flow routes to the tile drain and stream discharge in winter. Our measurements indicated that tile drains play a major role in lateral water and solute transport from the agricultural field towards the surface water system. On average, the tile drains contributed 80% of the

  9. Concentrations and transport of suspended sediment, nutrients, and pesticides in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during the 2011 Mississippi River flood, April through July

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, Heather L.; Coupe, Richard H.; Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2014-01-01

    High streamflow associated with the April–July 2011 Mississippi River flood forced the simultaneous opening of the three major flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin for the first time in history in order to manage the amount of water moving through the system. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected samples for analysis of field properties, suspended-sediment concentration, particle-size, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and up to 136 pesticides at 11 water-quality stations and 2 flood-control structures in the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin from just above the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers downstream from April through July 2011. Monthly fluxes of suspended sediment, suspended sand, total nitrogen, nitrate plus nitrite, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were estimated at 9 stations and 2 flood-control structures during the flood period. Although concentrations during the 2011 flood were within the range of what has been observed historically, concentrations decreased during peak streamflow on the lower Mississippi River. Prior to the 2011 flood, high concentrations of suspended sediment and nitrate were observed in March 2011 at stations downstream of the confluence of the upper Mississippi and Ohio Rivers, which probably resulted in a loss of available material for movement during the flood. In addition, the major contributor of streamflow to the lower Mississippi-Atchafalaya River subbasin during April and May was the Ohio River, whose water contained lower concentrations of suspended sediment, pesticides, and nutrients than water from the upper Mississippi River. Estimated fluxes for the 4-month flood period were still quite high and contributed approximately 50 percent of the estimated annual suspended sediment, nitrate, and total phosphorus fluxes in 2011; the largest fluxes were estimated at

  10. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  11. Computational modelling of the scaffold-free chondrocyte regeneration: a two-way coupling between the cell growth and local fluid flow and nutrient concentration.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Shakhawath; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture process in a perfusion bioreactor provides enhanced nutrient supply as well as the flow-induced shear stress that may have a positive influence on the cell growth. Mathematical and computational modelling of such a culture process, by solving the coupled flow, mass transfer and cell growth equations simultaneously, can provide important insight into the biomechanical environment of a bioreactor and the related cell growth process. To do this, a two-way coupling between the local flow field and cell growth is required. Notably, most of the computational and mathematical models to date have not taken into account the influence of the cell growth on the local flow field and nutrient concentration. The present research aimed at developing a mathematical model and performing a numerical simulation using the lattice Boltzmann method to predict the chondrocyte cell growth without a scaffold on a flat plate placed inside a perfusion bioreactor. The model considers the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field, and the simulation has been performed for 174 culture days. To incorporate the cell growth into the model, a control-volume-based surface growth modelling approach has been adopted. The simulation results show the variation of local fluid velocity, shear stress and concentration distribution during the culture period due to the growth of the cell phase and also illustrate that the shear stress can increase the cell volume fraction to a certain extent.

  12. Galactoglucomannan Oligosaccharide Supplementation Affects Nutrient Digestibility, Fermentation End-Product Production, and Large Bowel Microbiota of the Dog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide (GGMO) obtained from fiberboard production was evaluated as a dietary supplement for dogs. The GGMO substrate contained high concentrations of oligosaccharides containing mannose, xylose, and glucose, with the mannose component accounting for 35% of dry matter. ...

  13. The Novel Membrane-Bound Proteins MFSD1 and MFSD3 are Putative SLC Transporters Affected by Altered Nutrient Intake.

    PubMed

    Perland, Emelie; Hellsten, Sofie V; Lekholm, Emilia; Eriksson, Mikaela M; Arapi, Vasiliki; Fredriksson, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Membrane-bound solute carriers (SLCs) are essential as they maintain several physiological functions, such as nutrient uptake, ion transport and waste removal. The SLC family comprise about 400 transporters, and we have identified two new putative family members, major facilitator superfamily domain containing 1 (MFSD1) and 3 (MFSD3). They cluster phylogenetically with SLCs of MFS type, and both proteins are conserved in chordates, while MFSD1 is also found in fruit fly. Based on homology modelling, we predict 12 transmembrane regions, a common feature for MFS transporters. The genes are expressed in abundance in mice, with specific protein staining along the plasma membrane in neurons. Depriving mouse embryonic primary cortex cells of amino acids resulted in upregulation of Mfsd1, whereas Mfsd3 is unaltered. Furthermore, in vivo, Mfsd1 and Mfsd3 are downregulated in anterior brain sections in mice subjected to starvation, while upregulated specifically in brainstem. Mfsd3 is also attenuated in cerebellum after starvation. In mice raised on high-fat diet, Mfsd1 was specifically downregulated in brainstem and hypothalamus, while Mfsd3 was reduced consistently throughout the brain.

  14. Chronic loss of melanin-concentrating hormone affects motivational aspects of feeding in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mul, Joram D; la Fleur, Susanne E; Toonen, Pim W; Afrasiab-Middelman, Anthonieke; Binnekade, Rob; Schetters, Dustin; Verheij, Michel M M; Sears, Robert M; Homberg, Judith R; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; Adan, Roger A H; DiLeone, Ralph J; De Vries, Taco J; Cuppen, Edwin

    2011-05-05

    Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) form a hypothalamic-limbic neuropeptide feeding circuit mediated by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH). MCH promotes feeding behavior via MCH receptor-1 (MCH1R) in the AcbSh, although this relationship has not been fully characterized. Given the AcbSh mediates reinforcing properties of food, we hypothesized that MCH modulates motivational aspects of feeding.Here we show that chronic loss of the rat MCH-precursor Pmch decreased food intake predominantly via a reduction in meal size during rat development and reduced high-fat food-reinforced operant responding in adult rats. Moreover, acute AcbSh administration of Neuropeptide-GE and Neuropeptide-EI (NEI), both additional neuropeptides derived from Pmch, or chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of NEI, did not affect feeding behavior in adult pmch(+/+) or pmch(-/-) rats. However, acute administration of MCH to the AcbSh of adult pmch(-/-) rats elevated feeding behavior towards wild type levels. Finally, adult pmch(-/-) rats showed increased ex vivo electrically evoked dopamine release and increased limbic dopamine transporter levels, indicating that chronic loss of Pmch in the rat affects the limbic dopamine system.Our findings support the MCH-MCH1R system as an amplifier of consummatory behavior, confirming this system as a possible target for the treatment of obesity. We propose that MCH-mediated signaling in the AcbSh positively mediates motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Thereby it provides a crucial signal by which hypothalamic neural circuits control energy balance and guide limbic brain areas to enhance motivational or incentive-related aspects of food consumption.

  15. Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, M.; Mantero, J.; Mosqueda, F.; Hurtado, S.; Manjón, G.; Vaca, F.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-01

    The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H2SO4, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the 238U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased. A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning

  16. Daily changes of GABA and taurine concentrations in various hypothalamic areas are affected by chronic hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Duvilanski, Beatriz H; Alvarez, M Pilar; Castrillón, Patricia O; Cano, Pilar; Esquifino, Ana I

    2003-03-01

    This study was designed to characterize, in anterior, mediobasal, and posterior hypothalamic and median eminence, the 24h changes of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine (TAU) contents in adult male rats and to analyze whether chronic hyperprolactinemia may affect these patterns. Rats were turned hyperprolactinemic by a pituitary graft. Plasma prolactin (PRL) levels increased after pituitary grafting at all time points examined. A disruption of the circadian rhythm was observed in pituitary-grafted rats, whereas GABA and TAU content followed daily rhythms in all areas studied in controls. In the mediobasal hypothalamus, two peaks for each amino acid were found at midnight and midday. In the anterior hypothalamus, GABA and TAU showed only one peak of concentration at midnight. In the posterior hypothalamus, the values of both GABA and TAU were higher during the light as compared to the dark phase of the photoperiod. In the median eminence GABA content peaked at 20:00h, the time when TAU exhibited the lowest values. Hyperprolactinemia abolished the 24h changes of GABA in the mediobasal hypothalamus and reduced its content as compared to controls. Hyperprolactinemia advanced the diurnal peak of TAU to 12:00h in the mediobasal hypothalamus and did not modify the 24:00h peak. In the anterior hypothalamus, hyperprolactinemia increased GABA and TAU contents during the light phase while it decreased them during the dark phase of the photoperiod. In the posterior hypothalamus hyperprolactinemia did not modify GABA or TAU patterns as compared to controls. In the median eminence hyperprolactinemia increased the 20:00h peak of GABA and shift advanced the decrease in TAU content at 20:00h and its maximum at 24:00h as compared to controls. These data show that GABA and TAU content exhibit specific daily patterns in each hypothalamic region studied. PRL differentially affects the daily pattern of these amino acids in each hypothalamic region analyzed.

  17. Chronic Loss of Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Affects Motivational Aspects of Feeding in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Joram D.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Toonen, Pim W.; Afrasiab-Middelman, Anthonieke; Binnekade, Rob; Schetters, Dustin; Verheij, Michel M. M.; Sears, Robert M.; Homberg, Judith R.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Adan, Roger A. H.; DiLeone, Ralph J.; De Vries, Taco J.; Cuppen, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Current epidemic obesity levels apply great medical and financial pressure to the strenuous economy of obesity-prone cultures, and neuropeptides involved in body weight regulation are regarded as attractive targets for a possible treatment of obesity in humans. The lateral hypothalamus and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) form a hypothalamic-limbic neuropeptide feeding circuit mediated by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH). MCH promotes feeding behavior via MCH receptor-1 (MCH1R) in the AcbSh, although this relationship has not been fully characterized. Given the AcbSh mediates reinforcing properties of food, we hypothesized that MCH modulates motivational aspects of feeding. Here we show that chronic loss of the rat MCH-precursor Pmch decreased food intake predominantly via a reduction in meal size during rat development and reduced high-fat food-reinforced operant responding in adult rats. Moreover, acute AcbSh administration of Neuropeptide-GE and Neuropeptide-EI (NEI), both additional neuropeptides derived from Pmch, or chronic intracerebroventricular infusion of NEI, did not affect feeding behavior in adult pmch+/+ or pmch−/− rats. However, acute administration of MCH to the AcbSh of adult pmch−/− rats elevated feeding behavior towards wild type levels. Finally, adult pmch−/− rats showed increased ex vivo electrically evoked dopamine release and increased limbic dopamine transporter levels, indicating that chronic loss of Pmch in the rat affects the limbic dopamine system. Our findings support the MCH-MCH1R system as an amplifier of consummatory behavior, confirming this system as a possible target for the treatment of obesity. We propose that MCH-mediated signaling in the AcbSh positively mediates motivational aspects of feeding behavior. Thereby it provides a crucial signal by which hypothalamic neural circuits control energy balance and guide limbic brain areas to enhance motivational or incentive-related aspects of food consumption. PMID

  18. Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, M.; Hurtado, S.; Mantero, J.; Manjon, G.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Mosqueda, F.; Vaca, F.

    2008-08-07

    The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the {sup 238}U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased.A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning.

  19. Concentrations of nutrients, pesticides, and suspended sediment in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek basin, Kentucky, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crain, Angela S.

    2006-01-01

    Water samples were collected in streams and springs in the karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin in 2004 as part of study in cooperation with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. A total of 48 water samples were collected at 7 sites (4 springs, 2 streams, and 1 karst window) from April through November 2004. The karst terrane of the Sinking Creek Basin (also known as Boiling Spring Basin) encompasses about 125 square miles in Breckinridge County and portions of Meade and Hardin Counties in Kentucky. Fourteen pesticides were detected of the 52 pesticides analyzed in the stream and spring samples. Of the 14 detected pesticides, 12 were herbicides and 2 were insecticides. The most commonly detected pesticides?atrazine, simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor?were those most heavily used on crops during the study. Atrazine was detected in 100 percent of all samples; simazine, metolachlor, and acetochlor were detected in more than 35 percent of all samples. The pesticide-transformation compound, deethylatrazine, was detected in 98 percent of the samples. Only one nonagricultural herbicide, prometon, was detected in more than 30 percent of the samples. Malathion, the most commonly detected insecticide, was found in 4 percent of the samples, which was followed by carbofuran (2 percent). Most of the pesticides were present in low concentrations; however, atrazine was found in springs exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (USEPA) standards for drinking water. Atrazine exceeded the USEPA?s maximum contaminant level 2 times in 48 detections. Concentrations of nitrate greater than 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) were not found in water samples from any of the sites. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate ranged from 0.21 to 3.9 mg/L at the seven sites. The median concentration of nitrite plus nitrate for all sites sampled was 1.5 mg/L. Concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate generally were higher in the springs than in the main stem of Sinking Creek. Forty

  20. Gender, Season and Management Affect Fecal Glucocorticoid Metabolite Concentrations in Captive Goral (Naemorhedus griseus) in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Khonmee, Jaruwan; Brown, Janine L.; Rojanasthien, Suvichai; Aunsusin, Anurut; Thumasanukul, Dissakul; Kongphoemphun, Adisorn; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Tipkantha, Wanlaya; Punyapornwithaya, Veerasak; Thitaram, Chatchote

    2014-01-01

    Chinese goral (Naemorhedus griseus) are a threatened species in Thailand and the focus of captive breeding for possible reintroduction. However, little is known of their biology or what factors in the captive environment affect welfare. Our objective was to determine the impact of gender, season, and management on goral adrenal activity. We hypothesized that differences in fecal glucocorticoid concentrations would be related to animal density. Fecal samples were collected 3 days/week for 1 year from 63 individuals (n = 32 males, 31 females) at two facilities that house the majority of goral in Thailand: Omkoi Wildlife Sanctuary (Omkoi), an off-exhibit breeding center that houses goral in individual pens (16 pens; n = 8 males, 8 females) and in small family groups (8 pens; n = 8 males, 8 females); and the Chiang Mai Night Safari (NS), a zoo that maintains 31 goral (n = 17 males, 14 females) in one large pen. Glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations were higher in male than female goral at Omkoi throughout the year, and there was a seasonal effect on adrenal activity (p<0.05). Goral at Omkoi and NS were used to test the effect of animal density on fecal glucocorticoid excretion of goral housed in similar-sized enclosures. Overall, the highest levels were found at NS (n = 31 adults/pen; 27 m2 per animal) compared to Omkoi (n = 2 adults/pen; 400 m2 per animal) (p<0.05). Overall findings support our hypothesis that animal density and aspects of the captive environment impact adrenal steroid activity in captive goral. In addition, gender and season also had significant effects on glucocorticoid metabolite production. Potential stressors pertaining to the welfare of this species were identified, which will guide future efforts to improve management and create self-sustaining and healthy populations of this threatened species. PMID:24637886

  1. Drought stress and leaf herbivory affect root terpenoid concentrations and growth of Tanacetum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Sandra; Müller, Caroline

    2014-10-01

    Plant responses of both shoots and roots to combined abiotic and biotic stress have been rarely investigated. However, stresses such as drought and aboveground herbivory might lead to conflicting resource allocation patterns and pronounced shifts in shoot vs. root defenses. In the present study, the effects of water availability and leaf herbivory by caterpillars of a generalist on various shoot and root traits of the aromatic plant Tanacetum vulgare L. were investigated. This species contains terpenoids in leaves and roots, which can differ in composition among individuals, forming so-called chemotypes. To test for intraspecific variation, responses were investigated in two chemotypes, the thujone and the carvyl acetate chemotype. Furthermore, effects of differences in plant quality on the herbivores were studied. Shoot biomass significantly decreased due to drought and herbivory, whereas the root/shoot ratio increased following drought but was unaffected by herbivory. No shifts in C/N ratios were found. In contrast to our expectation, leaf terpenoid concentrations decreased only slightly due to drought, whereas root terpenoids were significantly induced by both drought and herbivory. Chemotypes showed distinct responses to drought at least in the root/shoot ratio, with a higher drought sensitivity of the carvyl acetate chemotype. The body mass of the caterpillars was unaffected by the irrigation treatment but depended on chemotype and terpenoid concentration of the plants. Thus, both qualitative and quantitative defenses strongly affect herbivore development. The present results offer new insights into the above- and belowground organ-specific responses of plants. They highlight the importance of roots in response to various environmental challenges.

  2. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses. Part I: Blood nutrient concentration and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that feed additives such as chelated minerals, organic Se, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract would improve nutrient digestibility when included in an equine diet. Horses (Quarter Horse geldings 4.5 to 16 yr of age; mean BW 522 kg ± 46 kg) were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) commercially available sources of the aforementioned additives followed by a 14-d collection period of feces and urine. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn and Co were utilized versus sulfated forms, at a 100% replacement rate. No significant differences among apparent the digestibility of DM, ADF, or NDF (P= 0.665, P = 0.866, P = 0.747, respectively) were detected between dietary treatments. Likewise, no differences in apparent digestibility of Cu (P = 0.724), Zn (P = 0.256), Mn (P = 0.888), Co (P = 0.71), or Se (P = 0.588) were observed. No differences were observed in serum Cu, Mn, or Co concentrations between ADD and CTRL at acclimation or collection time points (P > 0.05). While no difference in serum Zn concentrations were observed between ADD and CTRL groups at acclimation (P > 0.05), they were statistically higher at the collection time period for horses consuming CTRL (P < 0.0001). Whole blood Se concentration was greater in the CTRL group versus the ADD group both at acclimation (P = 0.041) and collection (P = 0.005) time periods. In reference to time, serum Cu concentrations increased (P = 0.012) for animals consuming CTRL, but not ADD (P > 0.05). Serum Zn concentrations of horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.021) and CTRL (P < 0.0001) increased over time from acclimation to collection time points. No time differences (P > 0.05) were observed in serum Mn concentrations. Serum Co concentrations increased over time in horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.001) and CTRL (P = 0.021). From acclimation to collection, whole blood Se concentration increased for horses

  3. Reducing crude protein and rumen degradable protein with a constant concentration of rumen undegradable protein in the diet of dairy cows: Production performance, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen efficiency, and blood metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Yekdangi, M; Ghorbani, G R; Khorvash, M; Khan, M A; Ghaffari, M H

    2016-02-01

    The goals of ruminant protein nutrition are to provide adequate amounts of RDP for optimal ruminal efficiency and to obtain the desired animal productivity with a minimum amount of dietary CP. The aim of the present study was to examine effects of decreasing dietary protein by decreasing RDP with the optimum concentration of RUP on production performance, nutrient digestibility, N retention, rumen fermentation parameters, and blood metabolites in high-producing Holstein cows in early lactation. Nine multiparous lactating cows (second parities, averaging 50 ± 12 d in milk and milk yield of 48 ± 5 kg/d) were used in a triplicate 3 × 3 Latin square design with 3 rations: 1) a total mixed ration (TMR) containing 16.4% CP (10.9% RDP based on DM), 2) a TMR containing 15.6% CP (10% RDP), and 3) a TMR containing 14.8% CP (9.3% RDP). The level of RUP was constant at 5.5% DM across the treatments. All diets were calculated to supply a postruminal lysine to methionine ratio of about 3:1. Dry matter intake, milk yield and composition, 4% fat-corrected milk, and energy-corrected milk were not significantly affected by decreasing dietary CP and RDP levels. Cows fed 16.4% CP diets had greater ( < 0.01) CP and RDP intakes, which resulted in a trend toward greater concentrations of plasma urea N compared with other treatments. Daily N intake linearly decreased ( < 0.01) with decreasing dietary CP and RDP levels, whereas the intake of RUP and fecal N excretion (g/d) did not change. Apparent digestibility of nutrients, ruminal pH, and NH-N concentration were not affected with decreasing dietary CP and RDP levels. Apparent N efficiency increased, and RDP N intake and predicted urine N output decreased with decreased concentration of dietary CP and RDP in the diets ( < 0.01). Blood metabolites were not affected by treatments. In conclusion, to improve the efficiency of N utilization by early-lactation dairy cows, 9.3% RDP in rations provides adequate protein to optimize milk

  4. Types and concentrations of metal ions affect local structure and dynamics of RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Xiao, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The roles that metal ions play in the structure and dynamics of RNA molecules are long-standing problems that have been studied extensively but are still not well understood. Here we show that metal ions have distributions around RNA molecules that strongly depend on the types and concentrations of the metal ions and also the electrostatic surface of the molecule. In particular, the ion distributions may not balance all the local electronegativity of the molecule. These ion distributions do not only greatly affect local structures but also lead to different local dynamics of RNA. We studied the effects of different ion solutions on the structure and dynamics of RNA by taking the pre Q1 riboswitch aptamer domain as an illustrative example and using molecular dynamics simulations. Since the local structures and dynamics of RNAs are important to their functions, our results also indicate that the selection of proper ion conditions is necessary to model them correctly, in contrast to the use of diverse ion solutions in current molecular dynamics simulations.

  5. Galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide Supplementation affects Nutrient Digestibility, Fermentation End-product Production, and Large Bowel Microbiota of the Dog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A galactoglucomannan oligosaccharide (GGMO) obtained from fiberboard production was evaluated as a dietary supplement for dogs. The GGMO substrate contained high concentrations of mannose, xylose, and glucose oligosaccharides. Adult dogs assigned to a 6x6 Latin square design were fed six diets, ea...

  6. Trends In Nutrient and Sediment Concentrations and Loads In Major River Basins of the South-Central United States, 1993-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, Richard A.; Demcheck, Dennis K.

    2008-01-01

    Nutrient and sediment data collected at 115 sites by Federal and State agencies from 1993 to 2004 were analyzed by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine trends in concentrations and loads for selected rivers and streams that drain into the northwestern Gulf of Mexico from the south-central United States, specifically from the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf Basins. Trends observed in the study area were compared to determine potential regional patterns and to determine cause-effect relations with trends in hydrologic and human-induced factors such as nutrient sources, streamflow, and implementation of best management practices. Secondary objectives included calculation of loads and yields for the study period as a basis for comparing the delivery of nutrients and sediment to the northwestern Gulf of Mexico from the various rivers within the study area. In addition, loads were assessed at seven selected sites for the period 1980-2004 to give hydrologic perspective to trends in loads observed during 1993-2004. Most study sites (about 64 percent) either had no trends or decreasing trends in streamflow during the study period. The regional pattern of decreasing trends in streamflow during the study period appeared to correspond to moist conditions at the beginning of the study period and the influence of three drought periods during the study period, of which the most extreme was in 2000. Trend tests were completed for ammonia at 49 sites, for nitrite plus nitrate at 69 sites, and for total nitrogen at 41 sites. For all nitrogen constituents analyzed, no trends were observed at half or more of the sites. No regional trend patterns could be confirmed because there was poor spatial representation of the trend sites. Decreasing trends in flow-adjusted concentrations of ammonia were observed at 25 sites. No increasing trends in concentrations of ammonia were noted at any sites. Flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite plus nitrate decreased at 7

  7. Growth and nutrient removal of three macrophytes in response to concentrations and ratios of N and P.

    PubMed

    Liao, JianXiong; Zhang, DeNan; Mallik, Azim; Huang, YuQing; He, ChengXin; Xu, GuangPing

    2017-01-13

    Wastewater from different sources show great differences in concentrations and ratios of N and P. In order to choose suitable plant species to remove excess N and/or P from polluted waters, it is important to know the performances of these plants under different N and P concentrations. In this study, we investigated the growth and N and P removal of three macrophytes, Coix lacryma-jobi, Iris wilsonii and Arundo donax under six N and P combination treatments. C. lacryma-jobi preferred higher N and P concentrations (16 mg N L(-1) and 3.2 mg P L(-1)), and increasing N supply could increase its P removal rate. I. wilsonii exhibited a growth preference at a combination of moderate N and P concentrations (8 mg N L(-1) and 0.8 mg P L(-1)). A. donax could grow well at all combinations of N and P and had significantly higher relative growth rate (RGR) and N and P removal rates than the other two species. These results showed A. donax is a promising species to treat various polluted waters and the other two species can be used specifically to treat certain types of wastewater.

  8. Circulating fat-soluble vitamin concentrations and nutrient composition of aquatic prey eaten by American oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) in the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson-Bremer, Daphne; Norton, Terry M.; Sanders, Felicia J.; Winn, Brad; Spinks, Mark D.; Glatt, Batsheva A.; Mazzaro, Lisa; Jodice, Patrick G.; Chen, Tai C.; Dierenfeld, Ellen S.

    2014-01-01

    The American oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus palliatus) is currently listed as a species of high concern by the United States Shorebird Conservation Plan. Because nutritional status directly impacts overall health and reproduction of individuals and populations, adequate management of a wildlife population requires intimate knowledge of a species' diet and nutrient requirements. Fat-soluble vitamin concentrations in blood plasma obtained from American oystercatchers and proximate, vitamin, and mineral composition of various oystercatcher prey species were determined as baseline data to assess nutritional status and nutrient supply. Bird and prey species samples were collected from the Cape Romain region, South Carolina, USA, and the Altamaha River delta islands, Georgia, USA, where breeding populations appear relatively stable in recent years. Vitamin A levels in blood samples were higher than ranges reported as normal for domestic avian species, and vitamin D concentrations were lower than anticipated based on values observed in poultry. Vitamin E levels were within ranges previously reported for avian groups with broadly similar feeding niches such as herons, gulls, and terns (eg, aquatic/estuarine/marine). Prey species (oysters, mussels, clams, blood arks [Anadara ovalis], whelks [Busycon carica], false angel wings [Petricola pholadiformis]) were similar in water content to vertebrate prey, moderate to high in protein, and moderate to low in crude fat. Ash and macronutrient concentrations in prey species were high compared with requirements of carnivores or avian species. Prey items analyzed appear to meet nutritional requirements for oystercatchers, as estimated by extrapolation from domestic carnivores and poultry species; excesses, imbalances, and toxicities—particularly of minerals and fat-soluble vitamins—may warrant further investigation.

  9. Abiotic variables affect STX concentration in a meso-oligotrophic subtropical coastal lake dominated by Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (Cyanophyceae).

    PubMed

    Brentano, Débora Monteiro; Giehl, Eduardo L Hettwer; Petrucio, Maurício Mello

    2016-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is capable of producing toxins including saxitoxin (STX). Few studies have verified the influence of environmental variables on the production of STX and most have only been studied in the laboratory. The goal of this work was to identify the abiotic variables related to STX concentration in situ. The relationship among STX concentration and the physical variables, nutrients and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration was examined in a meso-oligotrophic subtropical coastal lake dominated by C. raciborskii. A generalized linear model was developed, incorporating all variables measured monthly over a 45-month monitoring period. Conductivity and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentration provided the greatest explanatory power for STX concentration in situ. Previous studies suggested that C. raciborskii cells exposed to stress associated with higher ionic concentrations appear to activate the biosynthesis of STX suggesting that STX can elicit changes cell permeability and may contribute to the homeostasis of this organism. An increase of DIN concentration results in a higher concentration of STX which may be related to a reduced metabolic demand, since the uptake of inorganic nitrogen requires less energy than N2-fixation. Thus, increased DIN can favor the growth of C. raciborskii population or improve cellular homeostasis, both potentially increasing STX concentration in the aquatic system, which was observed through a delayed response pattern. The developed model, while providing only a moderate predictive power, can assist in the understanding of the environmental variables associated with increases in STX concentration, and in monitoring and minimizing the risks of toxic blooms.

  10. Plant assemblage composition and soil P concentration differentially affect communities of AM and total fungi in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Klabi, Rim; Bell, Terrence H; Hamel, Chantal; Iwaasa, Alan; Schellenberg, Mike; Raies, Aly; St-Arnaud, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Adding inorganic P- and N-fixing legumes to semi-arid grasslands can increase forage yield, but soil nutrient concentrations and plant cover may also interact to modify soil fungal populations, impacting short- and long-term forage production. We tested the effect of plant assemblage (seven native grasses, seven native grasses + the domesticated N-fixing legume Medicago sativa, seven native grasses + the native N-fixing legume Dalea purpurea or the introduced grass Bromus biebersteinii + M. sativa) and soil P concentration (addition of 0 or 200 P2O5 kg ha(-1) at sowing) on the diversity and community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and total fungi over two consecutive years, using 454-pyrosequencing of 18S rDNA and ITS amplicons. Treatment effects were stronger in the wet year (2008) than the dry year (2009). The presence of an N-fixing legume with native grasses generally increased AM fungal diversity, while the interaction between soil P concentration and plant assemblage modified total fungal community structure in 2008. Excluding interannual variations, which are likely driven by moisture and plant productivity, AM fungal communities in semi-arid grasslands appear to be primarily affected by plant assemblage composition, while the composition of other fungi is more closely linked to soil P.

  11. In Vivo Determination of Parameters of Nitrate Utilization in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Seedlings Grown with Low Concentration of Nitrate in the Nutrient Solution 1

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Gianni R.; Collet, Gérald F.

    1981-01-01

    Six genotypes of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) differing in grain protein concentration were grown on a nutrient solution containing low concentrations of NO3− (2 millimolar). Total NO3− uptake varied between genotypes but was not related to grain protein content. An in vivo nitrate reductase assay was used to determine the affinity of the enzyme for NO3−, and large phenotypic variations were observed. In vivo estimations of the concentration and size of the metabolic pool were variable. However, the three genotypes with the higher ratios of metabolic pool size to leaf total NO3− concentration were the high protein varieties. It is proposed that a high affinity of nitrate reductase for nitrate might be a biochemical marker for the capacity of the plant to continue assimilating NO3− for a longer period during the last stage of growth. The potential use of such physiological criteria as markers is discussed, in particular with respect to breeding programs for the development of plants with efficient nitrogen utilization. PMID:16662085

  12. Nutrient and suspended-sediment concentrations, trends, loads, and yields from the nontidal part of the Susquehanna, Potomac, Patuxent, and Choptank rivers, 1985-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darrell, Linda C.; Majedi, Brenda F.; Lizarraga, Joy S.; Blomquist, Joel D.

    1999-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay River-Input Monitoring Program was established to characterize the water quality of four major rivers in Maryland, and to quantify the load and the long-term trends in concentrations of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and suspended sediment transported from the nontidal part of each river to the Chesapeake Bay. As part of the River-Input Monitoring Program, nutrient and suspended-sediment data and streamflow data were collected from 1985 through 1996 at the Susquehanna, Potomac, Patuxent, and Choptank Rivers above the points of tidal influence. The data were used to determine the effectiveness of strategies aimed at reducing nutrients entering Chesapeake Bay from its tributaries. Of the four rivers studied, the Patuxent River had the highest median concentrations of total nitrogen (2.6 milligrams per liter), total phosphorus (0.17 milligrams per liter), and suspended sediment (45 milligrams per liter) during the 12-year period. From 1985?96, flow-adjusted concentrations of total nitrogen decreased in all but the Potomac River, flow-adjusted concentrations of total phosphorus decreased in all four rivers, and flow-adjusted concentrations of suspended sediment decreased in all but the Susquehanna River. The rivers that contributed the greatest amount of streamflow to Chesapeake Bay, the Susquehanna and Potomac, also contributed the greatest nutrient loads and suspended-sediment loads to the Bay. The Susquehanna River transported the highest average-annual loads of total phosphorus (4.7 million pounds per year) and total nitrogen (146 million pounds per year), while the Potomac River transported the highest average-annual load of suspended sediment (4.1 billion pounds per year) to the Bay. Annual loads and annual mean streamflow were normalized by basin drainage area to account for some of the hydrologic differences among the river basins. An increase in precipitation from south to north is still apparent, however, when comparing the water

  13. Short-term effect of nutrient availability and rainfall distribution on biomass production and leaf nutrient content of savanna tree species.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Eduardo R M; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Kirkman, Kevin; de Bie, Steven; Prins, Herbert H T; van Langevelde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Changes in land use may lead to increased soil nutrient levels in many ecosystems (e.g. due to intensification of agricultural fertilizer use). Plant species differ widely in their response to differences in soil nutrients, and for savannas it is uncertain how this nutrient enrichment will affect plant community dynamics. We set up a large controlled short-term experiment in a semi-arid savanna to test how water supply (even water supply vs. natural rainfall) and nutrient availability (no fertilisation vs. fertilisation) affects seedlings' above-ground biomass production and leaf-nutrient concentrations (N, P and K) of broad-leafed and fine-leafed tree species. Contrary to expectations, neither changes in water supply nor changes in soil nutrient level affected biomass production of the studied species. By contrast, leaf-nutrient concentration did change significantly. Under regular water supply, soil nutrient addition increased the leaf phosphorus concentration of both fine-leafed and broad-leafed species. However, under uneven water supply, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration declined with soil nutrient supply, this effect being more accentuated in broad-leafed species. Leaf potassium concentration of broad-leafed species was lower when growing under constant water supply, especially when no NPK fertilizer was applied. We found that changes in environmental factors can affect leaf quality, indicating a potential interactive effect between land-use changes and environmental changes on savanna vegetation: under more uneven rainfall patterns within the growing season, leaf quality of tree seedlings for a number of species can change as a response to changes in nutrient levels, even if overall plant biomass does not change. Such changes might affect herbivore pressure on trees and thus savanna plant community dynamics. Although longer term experiments would be essential to test such potential effects of eutrophication via changes in leaf nutrient concentration

  14. Short-Term Effect of Nutrient Availability and Rainfall Distribution on Biomass Production and Leaf Nutrient Content of Savanna Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eduardo R. M.; Tomlinson, Kyle W.; Carvalheiro, Luísa G.; Kirkman, Kevin; de Bie, Steven; Prins, Herbert H. T.; van Langevelde, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Changes in land use may lead to increased soil nutrient levels in many ecosystems (e.g. due to intensification of agricultural fertilizer use). Plant species differ widely in their response to differences in soil nutrients, and for savannas it is uncertain how this nutrient enrichment will affect plant community dynamics. We set up a large controlled short-term experiment in a semi-arid savanna to test how water supply (even water supply vs. natural rainfall) and nutrient availability (no fertilisation vs. fertilisation) affects seedlings’ above-ground biomass production and leaf-nutrient concentrations (N, P and K) of broad-leafed and fine-leafed tree species. Contrary to expectations, neither changes in water supply nor changes in soil nutrient level affected biomass production of the studied species. By contrast, leaf-nutrient concentration did change significantly. Under regular water supply, soil nutrient addition increased the leaf phosphorus concentration of both fine-leafed and broad-leafed species. However, under uneven water supply, leaf nitrogen and phosphorus concentration declined with soil nutrient supply, this effect being more accentuated in broad-leafed species. Leaf potassium concentration of broad-leafed species was lower when growing under constant water supply, especially when no NPK fertilizer was applied. We found that changes in environmental factors can affect leaf quality, indicating a potential interactive effect between land-use changes and environmental changes on savanna vegetation: under more uneven rainfall patterns within the growing season, leaf quality of tree seedlings for a number of species can change as a response to changes in nutrient levels, even if overall plant biomass does not change. Such changes might affect herbivore pressure on trees and thus savanna plant community dynamics. Although longer term experiments would be essential to test such potential effects of eutrophication via changes in leaf nutrient

  15. Blood lactate concentrations are mildly affected by mobile gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, F; Wochatz, M; Otto, C; Cassel, M; Mayer, F; Scharhag, J

    2014-06-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of wearing a mobile respiratory gas analysis system during a treadmill test on blood lactate (bLa) concentrations and commonly applied bLa thresholds. A total of 16 recreational athletes (31±3 years, VO2max: 58±6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) performed one multistage treadmill test with and one without gas exchange measurements (GEM and noGEM). The whole bLa curve, the lactate threshold (LT), the individual anaerobic thresholds according to Stegmann (IATSt) and Dickhuth (IATDi), and a fixed bLa concentration of 4 mmol ∙ l(-1) (OBLA) were evaluated. The bLa curve was shifted slightly leftward in GEM compared to noGEM (P<0.05), whereas the heart rate response was not different between conditions (P=0.89). There was no difference between GEM and noGEM for LT (2.61±0.34 vs. 2.64±0.39 m · s(-1), P=0.49) and IATSt (3.47±0.42 vs. 3.55±0.47 m · s(-1), P=0.12). However, IATDi (3.57±0.39 vs. 3.66±0.44 m · s(-1), P<0.01) and OBLA (3.85±0.46 vs. 3.96±0.47 m · s(-1), P<0.01) occurred at slower running velocities in GEM. The bLa response to treadmill tests is mildly affected by wearing a mobile gas analysis system. This also applies to bLa thresholds located at higher exercise intensities. While the magnitude of the effects is of little importance for recreational athletes, it might be relevant for elite athletes and scientific studies.

  16. Use of flow-normalization to evaluate nutrient concentration and flux changes in Lake Champlain tributaries, 1990-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Medalie, Laura; Hirsch, Robert M.; Archfield, Stacey A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey evaluated 20 years of total phosphorus (P) and total nitrogen (N) concentration data for 18 Lake Champlain tributaries using a new statistical method based on weighted regressions to estimate daily concentration and flux histories based on discharge, season, and trend as explanatory variables. The use of all the streamflow discharge values for a given date in the record, in a process called "flow-normalization," removed the year-to-year variation due to streamflow and generated a smooth time series from which trends were calculated. This approach to data analysis can be of great value to evaluations of the success of restoration efforts because it filters out the large random fluctuations in the flux that are due to the temporal variability in streamflow. Results for the full 20 years of record showed a mixture of upward and downward trends for concentrations and yields of P and N. When the record was broken into two 10-year periods, for many tributaries, the more recent period showed a reversal in N from upward to downward trends and a similar reversal or reduction in magnitude of upward trends for P. Some measures of P and N concentrations and yields appear to be related to intensity of agricultural activities, point-source loads of P, or population density. Total flow-normalized P flux aggregated from the monitored tributaries showed a decrease of 30 metric tons per year from 1991 to 2009, which is about 15% of the targeted reduction established by the operational management plan for the Lake Champlain Basin.

  17. Disruption of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1R) affects thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shinjae; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Di Cosmo, Caterina; Van Sande, Jacqueline; Wang, Zhiwei; Refetoff, Samuel; Civelli, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide produced in the hypothalamus and the zona incerta that acts on one receptor, MCH receptor 1 (MCH1R), in rodents. The MCH system has been implicated in the regulation of several centrally directed physiological responses, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Yet a possible direct effect of the MCH system on thyroid function has not been explored in detail. We now show that MCH1R mRNA is expressed in thyroid follicular cells and that mice lacking MCH1R [MCH1R-knockout (KO)] exhibit reduced circulating iodothyronine (T(4), free T(4), T(3), and rT(3)) levels and high TRH and TSH when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Because the TSH of MCH1R-KO mice displays a normal bioactivity, we hypothesize that their hypothyroidism may be caused by defective thyroid function. Yet expression levels of the genes important for thyroid hormones synthesis or secretion are not different between the MCH1R-KO and WT mice. However, the average thyroid follicle size of the MCH1R-KO mice is larger than that of WT mice and contained more free and total T(4) and T(3) than the WT glands, suggesting that they are sequestered in the glands. Indeed, when challenged with TSH, the thyroids of MCH1R-KO mice secrete lower amounts of T(4). Similarly, secretion of iodothyronines in the plasma upon (125)I administration is significantly reduced in MCH1R-KO mice. Therefore, the absence of MCH1R affects thyroid function by disrupting thyroid hormone secretion. To our knowledge, this study is the first to link the activity of the MCH system to the thyroid function.

  18. Influence of an Escherichia coli-derived phytase on nutrient utilization in broiler starters fed diets containing varying concentrations of phytic acid.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, V; Morel, P C H; Partridge, G G; Hruby, M; Sands, J S

    2006-01-01

    The influence of an Escherichia coli-derived phytase, on nutrient utilization was investigated in broilers fed starter diets containing different concentrations of phytate. The study was conducted as a 3 x 4 factorial arrangement of treatments with 3 concentrations of phytic acid (10.4, 11.8, and 13.6 g/kg; equivalent to 2.8, 3.3, and 3.8 g of phytate P/kg) and phytase (0, 500, 750, and 1,000 FTU/kg). One unit of phytase (FTU) is defined as the quantity of enzyme that releases 1 micromol of inorganic phosphorus/min from 0.00015 mol/L of sodium phytate at pH 5.5 at 37 degrees C. The dietary phytic acid concentrations were manipulated by the inclusion of rice bran. Increasing dietary concentrations of phytic acid resulted in reductions (P < 0.01) in AME. Phytase additions tended to increase AME (P = 0.07), regardless of dietary phytate concentrations. Apparent ileal digestibility coefficients of protein and most amino acids were influenced by phytate (P < 0.05 to 0.001) and phytase (P < 0.001). Phytase improved ileal protein and amino acid digestibility at all phytate concentrations, but the trend in responses to increasing phytase additions was different at different phytate concentrations as shown by significant phytate x phytase interactions (P < 0.01 to 0.001). At the lowest phytate concentration, the ileal digestibility coefficients increased with increasing phytase supplementation. At the medium and high phytate concentrations, the greatest responses were observed at 500 FTU/kg of phytase, with little improvement attributable to further additions. Ileal digestibility of P was lowered (P < 0.01) by increasing phytate concentrations and increased (P < 0.001) with increasing additions of phytase. A significant phytate x phytase interaction (P < 0.05) was also observed, where the improvements in P absorption with added phytase were found to be greater at high phytate concentrations. These data demonstrate the anti-nutritive effects of phytic acid and the potential

  19. Concentrations and loads of suspended sediment and nutrients in surface water of the Yakima River basin, Washington, 1999-2000 [electronic resource] : with an analysis of trends in concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebbert, James C.; Embrey, Sandra S.; Kelley, Janet A.

    2003-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in concentrations and loads of suspended sediment and nutrients in surface water of the Yakima River Basin were assessed using data collected during 1999?2000 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Samples were collected at 34 sites located throughout the Basin in August 1999 using a Lagrangian sampling design, and also were collected weekly and monthly from May 1999 through January 2000 at three of the sites. Nutrient and sediment data collected at various time intervals from 1973 through 2001 by the USGS, Bureau of Reclamation, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Roza-Sunnyside Board of Joint Control were used to assess trends in concentrations. During irrigation season (mid-March to mid-October), concentrations of suspended sediment and nutrients in the Yakima River increase as relatively pristine water from the forested headwaters moves downstream and mixes with discharges from streams, agricultural drains, and wastewater treatment plants. Concentrations of nutrients also depend partly on the proportions of mixing between river water and discharges: in years of ample water supply in headwater reservoirs, more water is released during irrigation season and there is more dilution of nutrients discharged to the river downstream. For example, streamflow from river mile (RM) 103.7 to RM 72 in August 1999 exceeded streamflow in July 1988 by a factor of almost 2.5, but loads of total nitrogen and phosphorus discharged to the reach from streams, drains, and wastewater treatment plants were only 1.2 and 1.1 times larger. In years of ample water supply, canal water, which is diverted from either the Yakima or Naches River, makes up more of the flow in drains and streams carrying agricultural return flows. The canal water dilutes nutrients (especially nitrate) transported to the drains and streams in runoff from fields and in discharges from subsurface field drains and the

  20. Nutrient concentrations in Upper and Lower Echo, Fallen Leaf, Spooner, and Marlette Lakes and associated outlet streams, California and Nevada, 2002-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lico, Michael S.

    2004-01-01

    Five lakes and their outlet streams in the Lake Tahoe Basin were sampled for nutrients during 2002-03. The lakes and streams sampled included Upper Echo, Lower Echo, Fallen Leaf, Spooner, and Marlette Lakes and Echo, Taylor, and Marlette Creeks. Water samples were collected to determine seasonal and spatial concentrations of dissolved nitrite plus nitrate, dissolved ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, dissolved orthophosphate, total phosphorus, and total bioreactive iron. These data will be used by Tahoe Regional Planning Agency in revising threshold values for waters within the Lake Tahoe Basin. Standard U.S. Geological Survey methods of sample collection and analysis were used and are detailed herein. Data collected during this study and summary statistics are presented in graphical and tabular form.

  1. Impact of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation on the decadal variability of the Gulf Stream path and regional chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Franks, A.; Zhang, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we show that the underlying physical driver for the decadal variability in the Gulf Stream (GS) path and the regional biogeochemical cycling is linked to the low frequency variability in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). There is a significant anticorrelation between AMOC variations and the meridional shifts of the GS path at decadal time scale in both observations and two Earth system models (ESMs). The chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations in the GS region are found significantly correlated with the AMOC fingerprint and anticorrelated with the GS path at decadal time scale through coherent isopycnal changes in the GS front in the ESMs. Our results illustrate how changes in the large-scale ocean circulation, such as AMOC, are teleconnected with regional decadal physical and biogeochemical variations near the North American east coast. Such linkages are useful for predicting future physical and biogeochemical variations in this region.

  2. Nutrient-enhanced production of remarkably high concentrations of ethanol by Saccharomyces bayanus through soy flour supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Viegas, C.A.; Sa-Correia, I.; Novais, J.M.

    1985-11-01

    The supplementation of a simple medium with soy flour led to an increase in the specific growth rate and viable cell concentration of saccharomyces bayanus during fermentation. Increasing the amount of soy flour led to an increase in the maximum number of viable yeast cells and the percentage of glucose fermented. It was possible in 64 h to reach 12.8% (wt/vol) ethanol by adding 4% soy flour (wt/vol) to a simple medium with 300 g of glucose per liter. The aqueous extract from soy flour was nearly as effective as whole-soy flour, whereas the lipidic fraction had no positive effect.

  3. Oxygen deficiency and salinity affect cell-specific ion concentrations in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Kotula, Lukasz; Clode, Peta L; Striker, Gustavo G; Pedersen, Ole; Läuchli, André; Shabala, Sergey; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen deficiency associated with soil waterlogging adversely impacts root respiration and nutrient acquisition. We investigated the effects of O2 deficiency and salinity (100 mM NaCl) on radial O2 concentrations and cell-specific ion distributions in adventitious roots of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Microelectrode profiling measured O2 concentrations across roots in aerated, aerated saline, stagnant or stagnant saline media. X-ray microanalysis at two positions behind the apex determined the cell-specific elemental concentrations of potassium (K), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl) across roots. Severe O2 deficiency occurred in the stele and apical regions of roots in stagnant solutions. O2 deficiency in the stele reduced the concentrations of K, Na and Cl in the pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells at the subapical region. Near the root apex, Na declined across the cortex in roots from the aerated saline solution but was relatively high in all cell types in roots from the stagnant saline solution. Oxygen deficiency has a substantial impact on cellular ion concentrations in roots. Both pericycle and xylem parenchyma cells are involved in energy-dependent K loading into the xylem and in controlling radial Na and Cl transport. At root tips, accumulation of Na in the outer cell layers likely contributed to reduction of Na in inner cells of the tips.

  4. Race-ethnicity is a strong correlate of circulating fat-soluble nutrient concentrations in a representative sample of the US population1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rosemary L; Sternberg, Maya R; Pfeiffer, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    Sociodemographic and lifestyle factors exert important influences on nutritional status; however, information on their association with biomarkers of fat-soluble nutrients is limited, particularly in a representative sample of adults. Serum or plasma concentrations of vitamin A (VIA), vitamin E (VIE), carotenes (CAR), xanthophylls (XAN), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), saturated- (SFA), monounsaturated- (MUFA), polyunsaturated- (PUFA) and total fatty acids (tFA) were measured in adults (≥20 y) during all or part of NHANES 2003–2006. Simple and multiple linear regression were used to assess 5 sociodemographic variables (age, sex, race-ethnicity, education, income) and 5 lifestyle behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, BMI, physical activity, supplement use) and their relation to biomarker concentrations. Adjustment for total serum cholesterol and lipid-altering drug use was added to the full regression model. Adjustment for latitude and season was added to the full model for 25OHD. Based on simple linear regression, race-ethnicity, BMI and supplement use were significantly related to all fat-soluble biomarkers. Sociodemographic variables as a groupexplained 5–17% of biomarker variability, whereas together, sociodemographic and lifestyle variables explained 22–23% (25OHD, VIE, XAN), 17% (VIA), 15% (MUFA), 10–11% (SFA, CAR, tFA) and 6% (PUFA). Although lipid adjustment explained additional variability for all biomarkers except 25OHD, it appeared to be largely independent of sociodemographic and lifestyle variables. After adjusting for sociodemographic, lifestyle and lipid-related variables, major differences in biomarkers were associated with race-ethnicity (from −44% to 57%); smoking (up to −25%); supplement use (up to 21%); and BMI (up to −15%). Latitude and season attenuated some race-ethnic differences. Of the sociodemographic and lifestyle variables examined, with or without lipid-adjustment, most fat-soluble nutrient biomarkers were significantly

  5. Impacts of variations in elemental nutrient concentration of Chardonnay musts on Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation kinetics and wine composition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Simon A; Dillon, Simon; Kolouchova, Radka; Henschke, Paul A; Chambers, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Chardonnay, being the predominant white wine-grape cultivar in the Australian wine sector, is subject to widely varying winemaking processes with the aim of producing a variety of wine styles. Therefore, juice composition might not always be ideal for optimal fermentation outcomes. Our aim was to better understand the composition of Chardonnay juice and how compositional parameters impact on fermentation outcomes. This was achieved through a survey of 96 commercially prepared Chardonnay juices during the 2009 vintage. Common juice variables were estimated using near infrared spectroscopy, and elemental composition was determined using radial view inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The influence of elemental composition on fermentation outcomes was assessed by fermentation of a defined medium formulated to reflect the composition and range of concentrations as determined by the juice survey. Yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strain effects were also assessed. Key parameters influencing fermentation outcomes were verified by laboratory scale fermentation of Chardonnay juice. This exploration of Chardonnay juice identified interactions between juice pH and potassium concentration as key factors impacting on fermentation performance and wine quality. Outcomes differed depending on yeast strain.

  6. Nutrient removal of a floating plant system receiving low- pollution wastewater: Effects of plant species and influent concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, J. J.; Zhao, J. N.; Xue, L. H.; Yang, L. Z.

    2016-08-01

    Plant floating bed was adopted in this study to compare the purification effect of four plant species (Oenanthe javanica, Ipomoea aquatica, Hydrocotyle vulgaris, and Iris sibirica) receiving high and low treated domestic sewage. The experiment was conducted for eight months during the low temperature season. The results indicated that the average removal rates of TN and NH4+-N in I. aquatica floating bed were relatively high both under high and low influent concentration during the first stage of the experiment. During the second stage, H. vulgaris showed the best performance for nitrogen treatment, and the average removal rates of TN were 70.7% and 87.7% under high and low influent concentration, while the average removal rates of NH4 +-N were as high as 98.9% and 98.9%, accordingly. Moreover, H. vulgaris contributed most for plant assimilation to nitrogen removal among different plant floating systems. It was also found that the existence of hydrophytes effectively controlled the rise of water pH value and algae growth and reproduction, which helped to improve the aquatic environment. The results provide engineering parameters for the future design of an ecological remediation technology for low-pollution wastewater purification.

  7. Effect of feeding sorghum straw based complete rations with different roughage to concentrate ratio on dry matter intake, nutrient utilization, and nitrogen balance in Nellore ram lambs.

    PubMed

    Malisetty, Venkateswarlu; Yerradoddi, Ramana Reddy; Devanaboina, Nagalakshmi; Mallam, Mahender; Mitta, Pavani

    2014-06-01

    An experiment was conducted by feeding sorghum straw (Sorghum bicolor) based complete rations at roughage concentrate ratio 70:30 (CR-I), 60:40 (CR-II), 50:50 (CR-III), and 40:60 (CR-IV) for 180 days to find out suitable ratio of sorghum straw in the complete ration (mash form) on nutrient utilization and nitrogen balance in Nellore ram lambs. The DMI (g/day) increased significantly (P < 0.05) as level of concentrate increased in complete rations. No significant difference was found in digestibilities of proximate nutrients. However, CP digestibility was higher either significantly or nonsignificantly by 2.12, 5.50, and 9.36 %, respectively, in lambs fed with CR-II (P > 0.05), CR-III (P > 0.05), and CR-IV (P < 0.05) rations in comparison to lambs fed with CR-I ration. Furthermore, CP digestibility was higher by 7.09 and 3.66 % in lambs fed with CR-IV ration than those fed with CR-II (P < 0.05) and CR-III (P > 0.05) ration. The average CWC digestibility coefficients were comparable among four rations. The N intake (g/day) was significantly (P < 0.01) different and progressively increased by 31.46, 48.69, and 82.86 % in ram lambs fed with CR-II, CR-III, and CR-IV rations, respectively, in comparison to CR-I ration. The N balance (g/day) was higher either significantly or nonsignificantly by 34.46 (P > 0.05), 133.46 (P < 0.01), and 198.87 % (P < 0.01) with CR-II, CR-III, and CR-IV rations, respectively, in comparison to CR-I ration. Based on results, it is inferred that the level of sorghum straw in complete ration had no effect on digestibility of nutrients barring crude protein in Nellore ram lambs.

  8. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  9. Needle life span, photosynthetic rate and nutrient concentration of Picea glehnii, P. jezoensis and P. abies planted on serpentine soil in northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Masazumi; Sasa, Kaichiro; Koike, Takayoshi

    2002-07-01

    We investigated the adaptation of three spruce species (Picea glehnii Masters, P. jezoensis Carr. and P. abies Karst.) to growth in northern Japan on serpentine soils (characterized by high concentrations of heavy metals and Mg, a low Ca/Mg ratio and low fertility) and fertile brown forest soils. Among species, seedling survival on serpentine soil was highest in P. glehnii. Shoot growth of P. glehnii was similar whether grown on serpentine or brown forest soil, whereas shoot growth of the other species was significantly less on serpentine soil than on brown forest soil. On serpentine soil, needle life span of P. glehnii was at least 3 years longer than that of the other two species. Needle area per shoot of P. glehnii was significantly higher on serpentine soil than on brown forest soil up to a shoot age of 8 years. In all three species, light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Pmax) decreased with needle age independently of soil type. However, on serpentine soil, Pmax in P. glehnii was higher, particularly in older needles, than in the other species. Furthermore, on serpentine soil, needle concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were higher in P. glehnii than in the other species. We conclude that P. glehnii is better adapted to serpentine soil than P. jezoensis and P. abies at least in part because of its greater needle life span and higher needle nutrient concentrations.

  10. Putative Membrane-Bound Transporters MFSD14A and MFSD14B Are Neuronal and Affected by Nutrient Availability

    PubMed Central

    Lekholm, Emilia; Perland, Emelie; Eriksson, Mikaela M.; Hellsten, Sofie V.; Lindberg, Frida A.; Rostami, Jinar; Fredriksson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Characterization of orphan transporters is of importance due to their involvement in cellular homeostasis but also in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. The tissue and cellular localization, as well as function, is still unknown for many of the solute carriers belonging to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) Pfam clan. Here, we have characterized two putative novel transporters MFSD14A (HIAT1) and MFSD14B (HIATL1) in the mouse central nervous system and found protein staining throughout the adult mouse brain. Both transporters localized to neurons and MFSD14A co-localized with the Golgi marker Giantin in primary embryonic cortex cultures, while MFSD14B staining co-localized with an endoplasmic retention marker, KDEL. Based on phylogenetic clustering analyses, we predict both to have organic substrate profiles, and possible involvement in energy homeostasis. Therefore, we monitored gene regulation changes in mouse embryonic primary cultures after amino acid starvations and found both transporters to be upregulated after 3 h of starvation. Interestingly, in mice subjected to 24 h of food starvation, both transporters were downregulated in the hypothalamus, while Mfsd14a was also downregulated in the brainstem. In addition, in mice fed a high fat diet (HFD), upregulation of both transporters was seen in the striatum. Both MFSD14A and MFSD14B were intracellular neuronal membrane-bound proteins, expressed in the Golgi and Endoplasmic reticulum, affected by both starvation and HFD to varying degree in the mouse brain. PMID:28179877

  11. Trends in nutrient concentrations, loads, and yields in streams in the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins, California, 1975-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kratzer, Charles R.; Kent, Robert; Seleh, Dina K.; Knifong, Donna L.; Dileanis, Peter D.; Orlando, James L.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive database was assembled for the Sacramento, San Joaquin, and Santa Ana Basins in California on nutrient concentrations, flows, and point and nonpoint sources of nutrients for 1975-2004. Most of the data on nutrient concentrations (nitrate, ammonia, total nitrogen, orthophosphate, and total phosphorus) were from the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System database (35.2 percent), the California Department of Water Resources (21.9 percent), the University of California at Davis (21.6 percent), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's STOrage and RETrieval database (20.0 percent). Point-source discharges accounted for less than 1 percent of river flows in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, but accounted for close to 80 percent of the nonstorm flow in the Santa Ana River. Point sources accounted for 4 and 7 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the Sacramento River at Freeport for 1985-2004. Point sources accounted for 8 and 17 percent of the total nitrogen and total phosphorus loads, respectively, in the San Joaquin River near Vernalis for 1985-2004. The volume of wastewater discharged into the Santa Ana River increased almost three-fold over the study period. However, due to improvements in wastewater treatment, the total nitrogen load to the Santa Ana River from point sources in 2004 was approximately the same as in 1975 and the total phosphorus load in 2004 was less than in 1975. Nonpoint sources of nutrients estimated in this study included atmospheric deposition, fertilizer application, manure production, and tile drainage. The estimated dry deposition of nitrogen exceeded wet deposition in the Sacramento and San Joaquin Valleys and in the basin area of the Santa Ana Basin, with ratios of dry to wet deposition of 1.7, 2.8, and 9.8, respectively. Fertilizer application increased appreciably from 1987 to 2004 in all three California basins, although manure production increased in the

  12. Factors affecting water strider (Hemiptera: Gerridae) mercury concentrations in lotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jardine, T.D.; Kidd, K.A.; Cunjak, R.A.; Arp, P.A.

    2009-07-15

    Water striders (Hemiptera: Gerridae) have been considered as a potential sentinel for mercury (Hg) contamination of freshwater ecosystems, yet little is known about factors that control Hg concentrations in this invertebrate. Striders were collected from 80 streams and rivers in New Brunswick, Canada, in August and September of 2004 through 2007 to assess the influence of factors such as diet, water chemistry, and proximity to point sources on Hg concentrations in this organism. Higher than average Hg concentrations were observed in the southwest and Grand Lake regions of the province, the latter being the location of a coal-fired power plant that is a source of Hg (similar to 100 kg annually), with elevated Hg concentrations in the lichen Old Man's Beard (Usnea spp.) in its immediate vicinity. Across all streams, pH and total organic carbon of water were relatively weak predictors of strider Hg concentrations. Female striders that were larger in body size than males had significantly lower Hg concentrations within sites, suggestive of growth dilution. There was no relationship between percent aquatic carbon in the diet and Hg concentrations in striders. For those striders feeding solely on terrestrial carbon, Hg concentrations were higher in animals occupying a higher trophic level. Mercury concentrations were highly variable in striders collected monthly over two growing seasons, suggesting short-term changes in Hg availability. These measurements highlight the importance of considering both deposition and postdepositional processes in assessing Hg bioaccumulation in this species.

  13. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration affects interactions between Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larvae and two host plant species outdoors

    SciTech Connect

    Caulfield, F.; Bunce, J.A. )

    1994-08-01

    Beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Huebner), larvae were placed on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) and pigweed (Amaranthus hybridus L.) plants in outdoor chambers in which the plants were growing at either the ambient ([approximately] 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) or ambient plus 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] ([approximately] 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1]) carbon dioxide concentration. A series of experiments was performed to determine if larvae reduced plant growth differently at the two carbon dioxide concentrations in either species and if the insect growth or survival differed with carbon dioxide concentration. Leaf nitrogen, water, starch, and soluble carbohydrate contents were measured to assess carbon dioxide concentration effects on leaf quality. Insect feeding significantly reduced plant growth in sugarbeet plants at 350 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] but not at 700 [mu]l liter[sup [minus]1] nor in pigweed at either carbon dioxide concentration. Larval survival was greater on sugarbeet plants at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration. Increased survival occurred only if the insects were at the elevated carbon dioxide concentration and consumed leaf material grown at the elevated concentration. Leaf quality was only marginally affected by growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration in these experiments. The results indicate that in designing experiments to predict effects of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on plant-insect interactions, both plants and insects should be exposed to the experimental carbon dioxide concentrations, as well as to as realistic environmental conditions as possible.

  14. Decrease in herbicide concentrations and affected factors in lagoons located around Lake Biwa.

    PubMed

    Sudo, M; Nishino, M; Okubo, T

    2006-01-01

    The contamination levels and changes in the concentrations in four lagoons around Lake Biwa of paddy-use herbicide were studied. Four lagoons, Sone-numa (52 days of HRT (hydraulic residence time) estimated from the lagoon volume and the average discharge at the outlet, 21 ha area), Yanagihira-ko (40 days, 5.0 ha), Noda-numa (11 days, 6.0 ha), and Iba-naiko (2 days, 55.5 ha), were selected as monitoring sites. Intensive water sampling was carried out once a week from May to June at the outlet of each lagoon. Although twelve of the monitored herbicides were detected, the maximum concentrations did not exceed the guidelines for water-supply law in Japan. The relation between half-lives in herbicide concentrations and characteristics of a lagoon such as HRT and chlorophyll-a concentrations were examined. The shorter half-lives of herbicide concentrations in lagoons with shorter HRT means that replacement by influent water effectively decreased the pesticide concentrations. Shorter half-lives in lagoons with high chlorophyll-a concentrations between the lagoons with similar HRT suggest that biological degradation during the residence time worked more efficiently in the lagoon with high chlorophyll-a concentrations.

  15. How do health insurer market concentration and bargaining power with hospitals affect health insurance premiums?

    PubMed

    Trish, Erin E; Herring, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    The US health insurance industry is highly concentrated, and health insurance premiums are high and rising rapidly. Policymakers have focused on the possible link between the two, leading to ACA provisions to increase insurer competition. However, while market power may enable insurers to include higher profit margins in their premiums, it may also result in stronger bargaining leverage with hospitals to negotiate lower payment rates to partially offset these higher premiums. We empirically examine the relationship between employer-sponsored fully-insured health insurance premiums and the level of concentration in local insurer and hospital markets using the nationally-representative 2006-2011 KFF/HRET Employer Health Benefits Survey. We exploit a unique feature of employer-sponsored insurance, in which self-insured employers purchase only administrative services from managed care organizations, to disentangle these different effects on insurer concentration by constructing one concentration measure representing fully-insured plans' transactions with employers and the other concentration measure representing insurers' bargaining with hospitals. As expected, we find that premiums are indeed higher for plans sold in markets with higher levels of concentration relevant to insurer transactions with employers, lower for plans in markets with higher levels of insurer concentration relevant to insurer bargaining with hospitals, and higher for plans in markets with higher levels of hospital market concentration.

  16. Concentrations of dissolved solids and nutrients in water sources and selected streams of the Santa Ana Basin, California, Octoger 1998 - September 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, Robert; Belitz, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and nutrients in selected Santa Ana Basin streams were examined as a function of water source. The principal water sources are mountain runoff, wastewater, urban runoff, and stormflow. Rising ground water also enters basin streams in some reaches. Data were collected from October 1998 to September 2001 from 6 fixed sites (including a mountain site), 6 additional mountain sites (including an alpine indicator site), and more than 20 synoptic sites. The fixed mountain site on the Santa Ana River near Mentone appears to be a good representative of reference conditions for water entering the basin. TDS can be related to water source. The median TDS concentration in base-flow samples from mountain sites was 200 mg/L (milligrams per liter). Base-flow TDS concentrations from sites on the valley floor typically ranged from 400 to 600 mg/L; base flow to most of these sites is predominantly treated wastewater, with minor contributions of rising ground water and urban runoff. Sparse data suggest that TDS concentrations in urban runoff are about 300 mg/L. TDS concentrations appear to increase on a downstream gradient along the main stem of the Santa Ana River, regardless of source inputs. The major-ion compositions observed in samples from the different sites can be related to water source, as well as to in-stream processes in the basin. Water compositions from mountain sites are categorized into two groups: one group had a composition close to that of the alpine indicator site high in the watershed, and another group had ionic characteristics closer to those in tributaries on the valley floor. The water composition at Warm Creek, a tributary urban indicator site, was highly variable but approximately intermediate to the compositions of the upgradient mountain sites. Water compositions at the Prado Dam and Imperial Highway sites, located 11 miles apart on the Santa Ana River, were similar to one another and appeared to be a mixture

  17. Lutein supplementation increases breast milk and plasma lutein concentrations in lactating women and infant plasma concentrations but does not affect other carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Christina L; Oliver, Jeffery S; Renzi, Lisa M; Marriage, Barbara J

    2014-08-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid that varies in breast milk depending on maternal intake. Data are lacking with regard to the effect of dietary lutein supplementation on breast milk lutein concentration during lactation and subsequent plasma lutein concentration in breast-fed infants. This study was conducted to determine the impact of lutein supplementation in the breast milk and plasma of lactating women and in the plasma of breast-fed infants 2-3 mo postpartum. Lutein is the dominant carotenoid in the infant brain and the major carotenoid found in the retina of the eye. Eighty-nine lactating women 4-6 wk postpartum were randomly assigned to be administered either 0 mg/d of lutein (placebo), 6 mg/d of lutein (low-dose), or 12 mg/d of lutein (high-dose). The supplements were consumed for 6 wk while mothers followed their usual diets. Breast milk carotenoids were measured weekly by HPLC, and maternal plasma carotenoid concentrations were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Infant plasma carotenoid concentrations were assessed at the end of the study. No significant differences were found between dietary lutein + zeaxanthin intake and carotenoid concentrations in breast milk and plasma or body mass index at baseline. Total lutein + zeaxanthin concentrations were greater in the low- and high-dose-supplemented groups than in the placebo group in breast milk (140% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), maternal plasma (170% and 250%, respectively; P < 0.0001), and infant plasma (180% and 330%, respectively; P < 0.05). Lutein supplementation did not affect other carotenoids in lactating women or their infants. Lactating women are highly responsive to lutein supplementation, which affects plasma lutein concentrations in the infant. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01747668.

  18. Diel mercury-concentration variations in streams affected by mining and geothermal discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, D.A.; McCleskey, B.R.; Gammons, C.H.; Cleasby, T.E.; Parker, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Diel variations of concentrations of unfiltered and filtered total Hg and filtered methyl Hg were documented during 24-h sampling episodes in water from Silver Creek, which drains a historical gold-mining district near Helena, Montana, and the Madison River, which drains the geothermal system of Yellowstone National Park. The concentrations of filtered methyl Hg had relatively large diel variations (increases of 68 and 93% from morning minima) in both streams. Unfiltered and filtered (0.1-??m filtration) total Hg in Silver Creek had diel concentration increases of 24% and 7%, respectively. In the Madison River, concentrations of unfiltered and filtered total Hg did not change during the sampling period. The concentration variation of unfiltered total Hg in Silver Creek followed the diel variation in suspended-particle concentration. The concentration variation of filtered total and methyl Hg followed the solar photocycle, with highest concentrations during the early afternoon and evening and lowest concentrations during the morning. None of the diel Hg variations correlated with diel variation in streamflow or major ion concentrations. The diel variation in filtered total Hg could have been produced by adsorption-desorption of Hg2+ or by reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0 and subsequent evasion of Hg0. The diel variation in filtered methyl Hg could have been produced by sunlight- and temperature-dependent methylation. This study is the first to examine diel Hg cycling in streams, and its results reinforce previous conclusions that diel trace-element cycling in streams is widespread but often not recognized and that parts of the biogeochemical Hg cycle respond quickly to the daily photocycle. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interspecific differences in egg production affect egg trace element concentrations after a coal fly ash spill.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, James U; Beck, Michelle L; Jackson, Brian P; Hopkins, William A

    2013-12-03

    In oviparous vertebrates, trace elements transfer from mother to offspring during egg production. For animals that produce eggs slowly, like turtles, the trace element concentration of each egg reflects an integration of dietary and stored accumulation over the duration of vitellogenesis. Because turtles also produce eggs synchronously, all eggs within a clutch should exhibit uniform trace element concentrations. In contrast, for animals that produce eggs in sequence and primarily from current dietary resources, like many birds, the trace element concentrations of eggs should be less uniform within a clutch, and likely reflect short-term changes in dietary exposure. We tested the hypothesis that stinkpot turtle (Sternotherus odoratus) clutches exhibit lower variability and higher repeatability in barium, selenium, strontium, and thallium concentrations than those of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from a site impacted by a recent coal ash spill. All four trace elements exhibited significantly lower variability and significantly higher repeatability in stinkpot clutches than in swallow clutches. Mean trace element concentrations of stinkpot eggs were also significantly higher than those of swallow eggs although both species feed primarily on aquatic invertebrates. Variability in swallow egg trace element concentrations was partially due to significant laying order effects. Our results support the hypothesis that interspecific variation in the source of resources and in the synchronicity and rate of egg production can lead to interspecific differences in the variability of egg trace element concentrations.

  20. Duodenal luminal nutrient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rønnestad, Ivar; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to numerous chemical substances and microorganisms, including macronutrients, micronutrients, bacteria, endogenous ions, and proteins. The regulation of mucosal protection, digestion, absorption and motility is signaled in part by luminal solutes. Therefore, luminal chemosensing is an important mechanism enabling the mucosa to monitor luminal conditions, such as pH, ion concentrations, nutrient quantity, and microflora. The duodenal mucosa shares luminal nutrient receptors with lingual taste receptors in order to detect the five basic tastes, in addition to essential nutrients, and unwanted chemicals. The recent ‘de-orphanization’ of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors provides an essential component of the mechanism by which the mucosa senses luminal nutrients. In this review, we will update the mechanisms of and underlying physiological and pathological roles in luminal nutrient sensing, with a main focus on the duodenal mucosa. PMID:25113991

  1. Short-term dietary concentrate supplementation during estrus synchronization treatment in beef cows increased IGF-I serum concentration but did not affect the reproductive response.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Torres, A M; López-Cedillo, Z B; Hernández-Coronado, C G; Rosete-Fernández, J V; Mendoza, G D; Guzmán, A

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate if short-term dietary concentrate supplementation increased IGF-I serum concentration and resulted in a reproductive response during estrus synchronization treatment in non-lactating beef cows. Thirty non-lactating beef cows (Bos indicus × Bos taurus) were allocated to the same pastureland and fed native tropical grasses as a basal diet. Cows were synchronized using a 7-day CO-Synch plus controlled internal drug release (CIDR) protocol and received fixed time artificial insemination (FTAI). Cows were divided into two groups; the control group (n = 16) received 0.5 kg of concentrate/cow/day, whereas the supplemented group (n = 14) received 4.0 kg of concentrate/cow/day. The period of supplementation was 10 days from the day of CIDR insert to FTAI. The concentration of IGF-I increased (P < 0.05) in the supplemented group, while no significant changes were observed in the control group. Moreover, at the time of insemination, IGF-I serum concentrations were higher in supplemented cows compared with control cows (P < 0.05). Notably, metabolite and insulin concentrations did not differ (P > 0.05) between treatment groups or sampling day. The response to estrus induction, measured as estrus presentation, ovulation rate, and pregnancy rate, was similar between experimental groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, our results indicated that supplementation with dietary concentrate for 10 days in non-lactating beef cows changed the endocrine milieu, specifically increasing IGF-I serum concentration. However, these endocrine changes did not affect response to estrous induction treatment.

  2. Exploring high charge of phosphate as new draw solute in a forward osmosis-membrane distillation hybrid system for concentrating high-nutrient sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Ho, Su-Thing; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Ray, Saikat Sinha; Hsu, Hung-Te

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, a high charge of phosphate was used as the draw solute in a forward osmosis-membrane distillation (FO-MD) hybrid system for concentrating high-nutrient sludge. A high water flux (12.5L/m(2)h) and a low reverse salt flux (0.84g/m(2)) were simultaneously achieved at pH9 by using 0.1M Na3PO4 as the draw solute and deionized water as the feed solution in the FO process. The specific reverse salt flux of 0.1M Na3PO4 (Js/Jw=0.07g/L) was considerably less than that of 0.1M NaCl (Js/Jw=0.37g/L) because the complexion between Na(+) and HPO4(2-) at pH9 led to the reduction of free Na(+) ions, which subsequently reduced the reverse salt diffusion substantially. Moreover, for a feed solution with an initial sludge concentration of 3500mg/L, the sludge concentration could be concentrated to 19,800 and 22,000mg/L in the pressure-retarded osmosis (PRO) and FO membrane orientations, respectively, after 15h of operation. Four types of MD membranes were selected for draw solution recovery; of these, a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane with a pore size of 0.45μm was the most effective in achieving a high water flux (10.28L/m(2)h) and high salt rejection (approximately 100%) in a diluted Na3PO4 draw solution.

  3. A comparative study of nutrients utilization, alkaline phosphatase activity and creatinine concentration in the serum of sheep and goats fed diets based on olive leaves.

    PubMed

    Yáñez-Ruiz, D R; Molina-Alcaide, E

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare, in goats and wethers, the nutritive utilization of diets including olive leaves (OL) and the possible detrimental effect of that by-product. Three different diets were studied: OL, OL plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) (OLP) and OL supplemented with barley [164 g/kg dry matter (DM)] and faba beans (59 g/kg DM) (OLSUP). Apparent digestibility of nutrients and energy and nitrogen balances were determined along with creatinine concentrations and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the serum. The apparent digestibility of OL was low and similar in goats and wethers (54.4% and 53.5%, 22.2% and 21.6% and, 47.7% and 46.6% for DM, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre in goats and wethers, respectively). The addition of PEG did not improve (p > 0.05) digestibility of OL, although a slightly beneficial effect on the digestion of structural carbohydrates was observed (up to 8.4% and 7.10% in goats and wethers, respectively). The supplementation of OL with barley and faba beans increased (p < 0.001) the apparent digestibility of nutrients and the energy value. The consumption of the OL led to high ALP activity in the serum. Despite the higher sensitivity of wethers to Cu levels, our results show a similar digestive use of OL by wethers and goats and suggest the need of further comparative investigations focusing on the effect of the presence of high Cu levels in the by-product on the animal health.

  4. Interaction of Eu(III) with mammalian cells: Cytotoxicity, uptake, and speciation as a function of Eu(III) concentration and nutrient composition.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Susanne; Heller, Anne; Weiss, Stephan; Bok, Frank; Bernhard, Gert

    2015-10-01

    In case of the release of lanthanides and actinides into the environment, knowledge about their behavior in biological systems is necessary to assess and prevent adverse health effects for humans. We investigated the interaction of europium with FaDu cells (human squamous cell carcinoma cell line) combining analytical methods, spectroscopy, and thermodynamic modeling with in-vitro cell experiments under defined conditions. Both the cytotoxicity of Eu(III) onto FaDu cells and its cellular uptake are mainly concentration-dependent. Moreover, they are governed by its chemical speciation in the nutrient medium. In complete cell culture medium, i.e., in the presence of fetal bovine serum, Eu(III) is stabilized in solution in a wide concentration range by complexation with serum proteins resulting in low cytotoxicity and cellular Eu(III) uptake. In serum-free medium, Eu(III) precipitates as hardly soluble phosphate species, exhibiting a significantly higher cytotoxicity and slightly higher cellular uptake. The presence of a tenfold excess of citrate in serum-free medium causes the formation of Eu(HCit)2(3-) complexes in addition to the dominating Eu(III) phosphate species, resulting in a decreased Eu(III) cytotoxicity and cellular uptake. The results of this study underline the crucial role of a metal ion's speciation for its toxicity and bioavailability.

  5. Dietary calcium concentration and cereals differentially affect mineral balance and tight junction proteins expression in jejunum of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U; Mann, Evelyne; Ertl, Reinhard; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Wagner, Martin; Klein, Dieter; Ritzmann, Mathias; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2015-04-14

    Ca plays an essential role in bone development; however, little is known about its effect on intestinal gene expression in juvenile animals. In the present study, thirty-two weaned pigs (9·5 (SEM 0·11) kg) were assigned to four diets that differed in Ca concentration (adequate v. high) and cereal composition (wheat-barley v. maize) to assess the jejunal and colonic gene expression of nutrient transporters, tight junction proteins, cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, nutrient digestibility, Ca balance and serum acute-phase response. To estimate the impact of mucosal bacter