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  1. Factors affecting patient outcome in primary cutaneous aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is an uncommon infection of the skin. There is a paucity of organized literature regarding this entity in regard to patient characteristics, associated Aspergillus species, and treatment modalities on outcome (disease recurrence, disease dissemination, and mortality). We reviewed all published reports of PCA from 1967 to 2015. Cases were deemed eligible if they included the following: patient baseline characteristics (age, sex, underlying condition), evidence of proven or probable PCA, primary treatment strategy, and outcome. We identified 130 eligible cases reported from 1967 to 2015. The patients were predominantly male (63.8%) with a mean age of 30.4 ± 22.1 years. Rates of PCA recurrence, dissemination, and mortality were 10.8%, 18.5%, and 31.5%, respectively. In half of the cases, there was an association with a foreign body. Seven different Aspergillus species were reported to cause PCA. Systemic antifungal therapy without surgery was the most common form of therapy (60% of cases). Disease dissemination was more common in patients with underlying systemic conditions and occurred on average 41.4 days after PCA diagnosis (range of 3–120 days). In a multivariate linear regression model of mortality including only patients with immunosuppressive conditions, dissemination and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. Nearly one-third of patients with PCA die with the disease. Dissemination and host status are critical in patient outcome. PMID:27367980

  2. Relationship of Negative Affect and Outcome of an Opioid Therapy Trial Among Low Back Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Edwards, Robert R.; Liu, Xiaoxia; Ross, Edgar L.; Michna, Edward; Warnick, Meredith; Wasan, Ajay D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Patients with chronic noncancer pain frequently report symptoms of depression and anxiety (negative affect), which are associated with higher ratings of pain intensity and a greater likelihood of being prescribed chronic opioid therapy. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to test the hypothesis that initial levels of negative affect can predict treatment-related outcomes in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of extended-release (ER) hydromorphone among opioid-tolerant patients with chronic low back pain. Methods Four hundred fifty-nine (N = 459) patients participated in the titration/conversion phase of a multicenter study, of which 268 were randomized to receive once-daily hydromorphone or placebo. All patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) at baseline and were divided evenly into Low (N = 157), Moderate (N = 155), and High (N = 147) negative affect groups based on their scores. Group differences in numerical pain intensity measures at home and in the clinic, Roland–Morris Disability ratings, and measures of symptoms from the Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) throughout the trial were analyzed. Results Two hundred sixty-eight of the initial 459 subjects who entered the 2 to 4-week titration/conversion phase (pretreatment) were successfully randomized to either placebo or ER hydromorphone; a total of 110 patients then completed this double-blind phase of the study. Those in the Moderate and High negative affect groups tended to drop out more often during the titration/conversion phase because of the adverse effects or lack of efficacy of their prescribed opioid than those in the Low negative mood group (P < 0.05). Overall, those patients in the Moderate and High groups reported significantly higher pain intensity scores in at-home and in-clinic pain intensity ratings (P < 0.05), greater disability on the Roland–Morris Scale (P < 0.01), and more withdrawal symptoms on the SOWS (P < 0.05) than those in

  3. Factors affecting the outcome of related allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Mouhab; Siddiqui, Khawar; Al-Jefri, Abdullah; El-Solh, Hassan; Al-Ahmari, Ali; Khairy, Ashraf; Markiz, Samer; Shahin, Hasan; Al-Musa, Abdulrahman; Al-Seraihy, Amal

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can cure bone marrow failure in patients with Fanconi Anemia (FA), and it is generally accepted that these patients should receive low-intensity conditioning because of the underlying DNA repair defect in their cells. Outcomes for recipients of matched related HCT have generally been favorable, but only a few studies have scrutinized the factors that may affect the eventual outcome of these patients. This retrospective analysis of 94 pediatric patients with FA who underwent related HCT at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center was carried out to attempt to identify factors that may affect outcome. Results showed overall survival (OS) probabilities of 92.5%, 89%, and 86% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In univariate analysis, use of higher dose cyclophosphamide (CY) (60 mg/kg) conditioning was associated with a better 10-year OS than lower dose CY (20 mg/kg) conditioning (91% versus 82%, respectively; P = .035), and use of radiation-containing regimens was associated with a significantly lower 10-year OS than nonradiation regimens (76% versus 91%, respectively; P = .005). Of the 4 regimens used in this study, the fludarabine-based regimen was associated with the highest survival (95.2%; P = .034). The use of the higher dose CY (60 mg/kg) was associated with a significantly increased incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) (20% versus 5.6% respectively; P = .049). Three patients (3%) developed squamous cell carcinoma (2 oropharyngeal and 1 genitourinary), at 9.4, 5.4, and 13.3 years after HCT; 2 of them had radiation-containing conditioning. In conclusion, our data suggest that although using a higher dose CY (60 mg/kg) conditioning regimen may be associated with better survival, it is also associated with a significantly increased risk of HC. The addition of fludarabine to the low-dose CY (20 mg/kg) is associated with the best survival. On the other hand, radiation-containing regimens are associated with

  4. Outcomes and Risk Factors Affecting Mortality in Patients Who Underwent Colorectal Emergency Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Nam Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Emergency colorectal surgery has a high risk of mortality and morbidity because of incomplete bowel preparation, bacterial proliferation, and contamination. In this study, we investigated the outcomes and the risk factors affecting mortality in patients who had undergone emergency surgery for the treatment of various colorectal diseases. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data to survey the clinical results for patients who had undergone emergency colorectal surgery from January 2014 to December 2014. We analyzed various clinicopathologic factors, which were divided into 3 categories: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative. Results A total of 50 patients had undergone emergency colorectal surgery during the time period covered by this study. Among them, 10 patients (20%) died during the postoperative period. A simple linear regression analysis showed that the risk factors for mortality were old age, preoperative hypotension, and a high American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) score. Moreover, a multiple linear regression analysis showed a high ASA score and preoperative hypotension to be independent risk factors. Conclusion In this study, emergency colorectal surgery showed a relatively high mortality rate. Furthermore, the independent risk factors for mortality were preoperative hypotension and high ASA score; thus, patients with these characteristics need to be evaluated more carefully and receive better care if the mortality rate is to be reduced.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea affects the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun-jie; Gao, Xiao-fei; Ge, Zhen; Jiang, Xiao-Min; Xiao, Ping-xi; Tian, Nai-liang; Kan, Jing; Lee, Chi-Hang; Chen, Shao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of evidence regarding the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease. We sought to investigate whether OSA affects the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing PCI. Patients and methods All enrolled individuals treated with PCI were evaluated for OSA by polysomnography. The primary end point was defined as major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) at 2 years, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), and/or target vessel revascularization. Results A total of 340 consecutive patients undergoing PCI were assigned to the OSA (n=152, apnea–hypopnea index ≥15) and non-OSA (n=188, apnea–hypopnea index <15) groups. The incidence of OSA in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing PCI was 44.7%. Patients in the OSA group had more three-vessel disease (34.9%), increased number of total implanted stents (3.3±2.0), and longer total stent length (83.8±53.1 mm) when compared to the non-OSA group (23.4%, P=0.020; 2.8±1.9, P=0.007; 68.7±48.4, P=0.010). After a median follow-up of 2 years, the incidence of MACEs was significantly higher in patients with OSA (25.0% vs 16.0%, P=0.038), mainly driven by the increased periprocedural MI (19.2% vs 11.2%, P=0.038) in the OSA group. By Cox regression multivariable analysis, the independent predictor of MACEs was OSA (hazard ratio: 1.962, 95% confidence interval: 1.036–3.717, P=0.039). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of moderate-to-severe OSA in patients undergoing PCI, and OSA was associated with significantly increased MACE rate, mainly due to the increase in periprocedural MI rate. PMID:27284240

  6. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed. PMID:25288430

  7. Symptom Interval and Patient Delay Affect Survival Outcomes in Adolescent Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Song Lee; Hahn, Seung Min; Kim, Hyo Sun; Shin, Yoon Jung; Kim, Sun Hee; Lee, Yoon Sun; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Unique features of adolescent cancer patients include cancer types, developmental stages, and psychosocial issues. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between diagnostic delay and survival to improve adolescent cancer care. Materials and Methods A total of 592 patients aged 0–18 years with eight common cancers were grouped according to age (adolescents, ≥10 years; children, <10 years). We retrospectively reviewed their symptom intervals (SIs, between first symptom/sign of disease and diagnosis), patient delay (PD, between first symptom/sign of disease and first contact with a physician), patient delay proportion (PDP), and overall survival (OS). Results Mean SI was significantly longer in adolescents than in children (66.4 days vs. 28.4 days; p<0.001), and OS rates were higher in patients with longer SIs (p=0.001). In children with long SIs, OS did not differ according to PDP (p=0.753). In adolescents with long SIs, OS was worse when PDP was ≥0.6 (67.2%) than <0.6 (95.5%, p=0.007). In a multivariate analysis, adolescents in the long SI/PDP ≥0.6 group tended to have a higher hazard ratio (HR, 6.483; p=0.069) than those in the long SI/PDP <0.6 group (HR=1, reference). Conclusion Adolescents with a long SI/PDP ≥0.6 had lower survival rates than those with a short SI/all PDP or a long SI/PDP <0.6. They should be encouraged to seek prompt medical assistance by a physician or oncologist to lessen PDs. PMID:26996554

  8. Sleep apnoea adversely affects the outcome in patients who undergo posterior lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Stundner, O.; Chiu, Y-L.; Sun, X.; Ramachandran, S-K.; Gerner, P.; Vougioukas, V.; Mazumdar, M.; Memtsoudis, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of sleep apnoea, little information is available regarding its impact on the peri-operative outcome of patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion. Using a national database, patients who underwent lumbar fusion between 2006 and 2010 were identified, sub-grouped by diagnosis of sleep apnoea and compared. The impact of sleep apnoea on various outcome measures was assessed by regression analysis. The records of 84 655 patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion were identified and 7.28% also had a diagnostic code for sleep apnoea. Compared with patients without sleep apnoea, these patients were older, more frequently female, had a higher comorbidity burden and higher rates of peri-operative complications, post-operative mechanical ventilation, blood transfusion, and intensive care. Patients with sleep apnoea also had longer and more costly periods of hospitalisation. In the regression analysis, sleep apnoea emerged as an independent risk factor for the development of peri-operative complications (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.50, Confidence Interval (CI) 1.38;1.62), blood transfusions (OR 1.12, CI 1.03;1.23), mechanical ventilation (OR 6.97, CI 5.90;8.23), critical care services (OR 1.86, CI 1.71;2.03), prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost (OR 1.28, CI 1.19;1.37; OR 1.10, CI 1.03;1.18). Patients with sleep apnoea who undergo posterior lumbar fusion pose significant challenges to clinicians. PMID:24493191

  9. Favorable outcome of patients affected by rhabdoid tumors due to rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome (RTPS).

    PubMed

    Kordes, Uwe; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Modena, Piergiorgio; Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica; Reinhard, Harald; Hasselblatt, Martin; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Frühwald, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome is usually associated with shorter survival in patients with malignant rhabdoid tumors regardless of anatomical origin. Here we present four children harboring truncating heterozygous SMARCB1/INI1 germline mutations with favorable outcome. All four patients received multi-modality treatment, three according to therapeutic recommendations by the EU-RHAB registry, two without radiotherapy, and mean event-free survival accounts for 7 years. In conclusion, intensive treatment with curative intent is justified for children with rhabdoid tumors even if an underlying rhabdoid predisposition syndrome is demonstrated. PMID:24123847

  10. Psychosocial outcome following genetic risk counselling for familial colorectal cancer. A comparison of affected patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Jost, R; Haunstetter, C M; Sattel, H; Schroeter, C; Bertsch, U; Cremer, F; Kienle, P; Tariverdian, M; Kloor, M; Gebert, J; Brechtel, A

    2008-11-01

    Few studies have reported prospective data on psychosocial outcomes after genetic counselling in families with suspected hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). This prospective study examines the impact of multidisciplinary risk counselling on the psychosocial outcome of 139 affected cancer patients and 233 family members without cancer at risk for HNPCC. Participants completed questionnaires specific to HNPCC before and 8 weeks after attending the familial cancer clinic. Affected patients' levels of distress were closely related to their health status and exceeded that of unaffected individuals, as did worry regarding their relatives' risk. A significant reduction in general anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), distress specific to familial CRC (Impact of Events Scale) and general cancer worry (Distress Hereditary Disorder) was demonstrated after counselling in both affected patients and unaffected individuals. Reduction in distress was more pronounced in affected patients given a high risk of HNPCC compared with those at intermediate risk. Among unaffected individuals, distress declined regardless of what clinical risk they were assigned. Their perceptions of risk and cancer-related threat declined, while confidence in effective surveillance increased. These results suggest the beneficial effects of multidisciplinary counselling even when high-risk information is conveyed. A patient's previous cancer experience is likely to contribute to clinically relevant distress (15% of those patients), indicating the need for appropriate counselling. PMID:18954412

  11. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  12. Dose impaired relaxation of left ventricle affect early outcomes in CABG patients?

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Jamshid; Rezakhanloo, Fereshteh

    2010-01-01

    Although systolic dysfunction is revealed as a prognostic factor in cardiac surgery, the role of diastolic dysfunction as a predictive factor is less evaluated. In this retrospective study from 872 patients that underwent isolated coronary artery bypass graft (Jan 2008-Feb 2009), 388 patients had normal left ventricular ejection fraction (>50%). These are divided in two groups, Group 1: 361 patients without diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation) and Group 2: 27 patients with diastolic dysfunction (impaired relaxation). Mean age in group 1 was 57.72 year and in group 2 was 61.16 year (P = 0.07). Risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertention and dyslipidemia were similar. Although overall complication rate was higher in group 2 (11.1% vs. 2.8% P value 0.05), but when each complication was studied individually no significant statistical difference was found. Also no significant statistical difference was found in mortality (2.2% in group 1 vs 7.4% in group 2 P = 0.1). In conclusion, from clinical standpoint diastolic dysfunction can be an important factor in assessing surgical outcome in patients whom underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:21137652

  13. Severity of lung fibrosis affects early surgical outcomes of lung cancer among patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mimae, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norihiko; Takamochi, Kazuya; Aokage, Keiju; Shimada, Yoshihisa; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Okada, Morihito

    2016-07-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is defined as upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis, which are representative lung disorders that increase the prevalence of lung cancer. This unique disorder may affect the morbidity and mortality during the early period after surgery. The present study aimed to identify which clinicopathological features significantly affect early surgical outcomes after lung resection in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in those with CPFE.We retrospectively assessed 2295 patients with NSCLC and found that 151 (6.6%) had CPFE. All were surgically treated between January 2008 and December 2010 at 4 institutions.The postoperative complication rates for patients with and without CPFE were 39% and 17%, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates were higher among patients with than without CPFE (7.9% vs 1%). Acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was the main cause of death among 12 patients with CPFE who died within 90 days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis selected CPFE, gender, age, and clinical stage as independent predictive factors for postoperative complications, and CPFE, clinical stage, and sex for 90-day mortality. The severity of lung fibrosis on preoperative CT images was an independent predictive factor for 90-day mortality among patients with CPFE.The key predictive factor for postoperative mortality and complications of lung resection for NSCLC was CPFE. The severity of lung fibrosis was the principal predictor of early outcomes after lung surgery among patients with CPFE and NSCLC. PMID:27442681

  14. Factors affecting short- and long-term outcomes of manipulation under anaesthesia in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Owen, John M; Sayers, Adrian E; Woods, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to evaluate and determine the factors that affect short- and long-term outcome following manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) of patients with adhesive capsulitis. Methods Patients recruited from January 1999 to January 2010 were retrospectively analyzed and classified as having primary or secondary adhesive capsulitis. All patients were assessed for range of movement (ROM) and Oxford Shoulder Scores (OSS) before and immediately postoperatively, as well as for OSS more than 1 year post MUA. Results In total, 295 patients (315 shoulders) were sequentially recruited, and information was collected at baseline, as well as at a mean follow-up of 28 days and 3.6 years. A significant improvement in OSS and ROM was noted 1 month post MUA (p < 0.0001) with females benefiting more than males (p < 0.0025). Long-term follow-up revealed that the improvement in OSS was maintained (p < 0.0001). Secondary adhesive capsulitis significantly reduced the efficacy of MUA as assessed by ROM (p < 0.0001). Other factors (age, initial ROM and OSS, and length of symptoms prior to MUA) did not significantly affect the outcome over the short- or long-term. Conclusions The findings of the present study show that all patient groups had a significantly improved ROM and OSS in the short-term with long-term maintenance of improved OSS.

  15. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  16. Patient-centered medical home: how it affects psychosocial outcomes for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jortberg, Bonnie T; Miller, Benjamin F; Gabbay, Robert A; Sparling, Kerri; Dickinson, W Perry

    2012-12-01

    Fragmentation of the current U.S. health care system and the increased prevalence of chronic diseases in the U.S. have led to the recognition that new models of care are needed. Chronic disease management, including diabetes, is often accompanied by a myriad of associated psychosocial issues that need to be addressed as part of a comprehensive treatment plan. Diabetes care should be aligned with comprehensive whole-person health care. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has emerged as a model for enhanced primary care that focuses on comprehensive integrated care. PCMH demonstration projects have shown improvements in quality of care, patient experience, care coordination, access to care, and quality measures for diabetes. Key PCMH transformative features associated with psychosocial issues related to diabetes reviewed in this article include integration of mental and behavioral health, care management/coordination, payment reform, advanced access, and putting the patient at the center of health care. This article also reviews the evidence supporting comprehensive and integrated care for addressing psychosocial issues associated with diabetes in the medical home. PMID:22961115

  17. Treatment Outcome of Tuberculosis Patients under Directly Observed Treatment Short Course and Factors Affecting Outcome in Southern Ethiopia: A Five-Year Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Gebrezgabiher, Gebremedhin; Romha, Gebremedhin; Ejeta, Eyasu; Asebe, Getahun; Zemene, Endalew; Ameni, Gobena

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major public health and socio-economic issues in the 21st century globally. Assessment of TB treatment outcomes, and monitoring and evaluation of its risk factors in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course (DOTS) are among the major indicators of the performance of a national TB control program. Hence, this institution-based retrospective study was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of TB patients and investigate factors associated with unsuccessful outcome at Dilla University Referral Hospital, southern Ethiopia. Five years (2008 to 2013) TB record of TB clinic of the hospital was reviewed. A total 1537 registered TB patients with complete information were included. Of these, 942 (61.3%) were male, 1015 (66%) were from rural areas, 544 (35.4%) were smear positive pulmonary TB (PTB+), 816 (53.1%) were smear negative pulmonary TB (PTB-) and 177(11.5%) were extra pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. Records of the 1537 TB patients showed that 181 (11.8%) were cured, 1129(73.5%) completed treatment, 171 (11.1%) defaulted, 52 (3.4%) died and 4 (0.3%) had treatment failure. The overall mean treatment success rate of the TB patients was 85.2%. The treatment success rate of the TB patients increased from 80.5% in September 2008-August 2009 to 84.8% in September 2012-May 2013. Tuberculosis type, age, residence and year of treatment were significantly associated with unsuccessful treatment outcome. The risk of unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among TB patients from rural areas (AOR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.21-2.20) compared to their urban counterparts. Unsuccessful treatment outcome was also observed in PTB- patients (AOR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.26-2.50) and EPTB (AOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.28-3.37) compared to the PTB+ patients. In conclusion, it appears that DOTS have improved treatment success in the hospital during five years. Regular follow-up of patients with poor treatment outcome and provision of health information on TB treatment to

  18. Intracranial ependymoma: factors affecting outcome.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Buttarelli, Francesca R; Antonelli, Manila; Gandola, Lorenza; Modena, Piergiorgio; Giangaspero, Felice

    2009-03-01

    Ependymomas account for 2-9% of all neuroepithelial tumors, amounting to 6-12% of all intracranial tumors in children and up to 30% of those in children younger than 3 years. Recent findings provide evidence that intracranial and spinal ependymomas share similar molecular profiles with the radial glia of their corresponding locations. The management of intracranial ependymoma is still not optimal. The 5-year progression-free survival for children with ependymoma ranges between 30 and 50% with a worse prognosis for patients with residual disease after surgery. The prognostic relevance of most factors are still being debated. Recent studies, in which the current WHO classification criteria were applied, reported the relationship between histological grade and outcome. Biomolecular studies have identified that gain of 1q25 and EGFR overexpression correlate to poor prognosis, whereas low expression of nucleolin correlated with a favorable outcome. Ependymomas have been considered a 'surgical disease', where completeness of excision can be reached in approximately half of the cases. At present the standard treatment is radiation therapy for all patients after gross-total or near-total resection. For high-risk patients, with residual tumor, an interesting, although experimental, approach could be chemotherapy followed by secondary surgery and postoperative conformal irradiation. PMID:19284379

  19. Treatment factors affecting outcomes in HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a pooled analysis of 1546 patients

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaonan; Wang, Dan; Tamari, Roni; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Mounier, Nicolas; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Spina, Michele; Tirelli, Umberto; Weiss, Rudolf; Galicier, Lionel; Boue, Francois; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Wyen, Christoph; Oriol, Albert; Navarro, José-Tomás; Dunleavy, Kieron; Little, Richard F.; Ratner, Lee; Garcia, Olga; Morgades, Mireia; Remick, Scot C.; Noy, Ariela; Sparano, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited comparative data exist for the treatment of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We analyzed pooled individual patient data for 1546 patients from 19 prospective clinical trials to assess treatment-specific factors (type of chemotherapy, rituximab, and concurrent combination antiretroviral [cART] use) and their influence on the outcomes complete response (CR), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In our analysis, rituximab was associated with a higher CR rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.89; P < .001), improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50; P < .001), and OS (HR 0.51; P < .0001). Compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), initial therapy with more dose-intense regimens resulted in better CR rates (ACVBP [doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin and prednisolone]: OR 1.70; P < .04), PFS (ACVBP: HR 0.72; P = .049; “intensive regimens”: HR 0.35; P < .001) and OS (“intensive regimens”: HR 0.54; P < .001). Infusional etoposide, prednisone, infusional vincristine, infusional doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (EPOCH) was associated with significantly better OS in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (HR 0.33; P = .03). Concurrent use of cART was associated with improved CR rates (OR 1.89; P = .005) and trended toward improved OS (HR 0.78; P = .07). These findings provide supporting evidence for current patterns of care where definitive evidence is unavailable. PMID:24014242

  20. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients' assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  1. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  2. Perioperative blood transfusion affects hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific immune responses and outcome following liver transplantation in HCV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijay; Bharat, Ankit; Vachharajani, Neeta; Crippin, Jeffrey; Shenoy, Surendra; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Chapman, William C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives:Perioperative factors can affect outcomes of liver transplantation (LT) in recipients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This study was conducted to investigate whether the immunomodulatory effects of packed red blood cells (PRBC) and platelets administered in the perioperative period might affect immune responses to HCV and thus outcomes in LT recipients. Methods:Data for a total of 257 HCV LT recipients were analysed. Data on clinical demographics including perioperative transfusion (during and within the first 24 h), serum cytokine concentration, HCV-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) producing cells, and outcomes including graft and patient survival were analysed. Results:Patient survival was higher in HCV LT recipients who did not receive transfusions (Group 1, n = 65) than in those who did (Group 2, n = 192). One-year patient survival was 95% in Group 1 and 88% in Group 2 (P = 0.02); 5-year survival was 77% in Group 1 and 66% in Group 2 (P = 0.05). Group 2 had an increased post-transplant viral load (P = 0.032) and increased incidence of advanced fibrosis at 1 year (P = 0.04). After LT, Group 2 showed increased IL-10, IL-17, IL-1β and IL-6, and decreased IFN-γ, and a significantly increased rate of IL-17 production against HCV antigen. Increasing donor age (P = 0.02), PRBC transfusion (P < 0.01) and platelets administration were associated with worse survival. Conclusions:Transfusion had a negative impact on LT recipients with HCV. The associated early increase in pro-HCV IL-17 and IL-6, with decreased IFN-γ, suggests that transfusion may be associated with the modulation of HCV-specific responses, increased fibrosis and poor transplant outcomes. PMID:23869514

  3. Simulation: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Abi; Siassakos, Dimitrios; Crofts, Joanna; Draycott, Tim

    2013-06-01

    Effective training has been shown to improve perinatal care and outcome, decrease litigation claims and reduce midwifery sick leave. To be effective, training should be incentivised, in a realistic context, and delivered to inter-professional teams similar to those delivering actual care. Teamwork training is a useful addition, but it should be based on the characteristics of effective teamwork as derived from the study of frontline teams. Implementation of simulation and teamwork training is challenging, with constraints on staff time, facilities and finances. Local adoption and adaptation of effective programmes can help keep costs down, and make them locally relevant whilst maintaining effectiveness. Training programmes need to evolve continually in line with new evidence. To do this, it is vital to monitor outcomes and robustly evaluate programmes for their impact on patient care and outcome, not just on participants. PMID:23721770

  4. Does age affect surgical outcomes in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy? Results from the prospective multicenter AOSpine International study on 479 patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroaki; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Nagoshi, Narihito; Nouri, Aria; Kopjar, Branko; Arnold, Paul M; Bartels, Ronald; Defino, Helton; Kale, Shashank; Zhou, Qiang; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-01-01

    Background In general, older patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM) are felt to have lower recovery potential following surgery due to increased degenerative pathology, comorbidities, reduced physiological reserves and age-related changes to the spinal cord. This study aims to determine whether age truly is an independent predictor of surgical outcome and to provide evidence to guide practice and decision-making. Methods A total of 479 patients with DCM were prospectively enrolled in the CSM-International study at 16 centres. Our sample was divided into a younger group (<65 years) and an elderly (≥65 years) group. A mixed model analytic approach was used to evaluate differences in the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA), Nurick, Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores between groups. We first created an unadjusted model between age and surgical outcome and then developed two adjusted models that accounted for variations in (1) baseline characteristics and (2) both baseline and surgical factors. Results Of the 479 patients, 360 (75.16%) were <65 years and 119 (24.84%) were ≥65 years. Elderly patients had a worse preoperative health status (p<0.0001) and were functionally more severe (p<0.0001). The majority of younger patients (64.96%) underwent anterior surgery, whereas the preferred approach in the elderly group was posterior (58.62%, p<0.0001). Elderly patients had a greater number of decompressed levels than younger patients (p<0.0001). At 24 months after surgery, younger patients achieved a higher postoperative mJOA (p<0.0001) and a lower Nurick score (p<0.0001) than elderly patients. After adjustments for patient and surgical characteristics, these differences in postoperative outcome scores decreased but remained significant. Conclusions Older age is an independent predictor of functional status in patients with DCM. However, patients over 65 with DCM still achieve functionally significant

  5. Factors affecting outcomes in colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Selehi, Seema; Leung, Edmund; Wong, Ling

    2008-01-01

    There are many factors that influence successful outcomes in colonoscopy. The aims of this study were to evaluate these factors and determine ways to improve outcomes. All participants (N=229) who underwent planned colonoscopy between July and September 2004 were retrospectively included. Participants included 118 men and 111 women with a mean age of 59 years. Completion rate was 92%. Reasons of failure included poor bowel preparation (2.2%, p< .025), bowel looping (2.2%, p< .025), participant discomfort (1.3%), and obstructing lesion (1.3%). Mean midazolam dose was 3.8 mg. Three participants (1.3%) had midazolam alone, and all had complete colonoscopy. One hundred thirty-three participants (60.7%) had additional meperidine, with a completion rate of 94%. Eighty three participants (37.9%) had additional meperidine and Buscopan, with a completion rate reduced to 89.2%. There was no correlation between sedatives used and completion rate. Completion rate of colonoscopy in our unit was acceptable at 92%. A combination of midazolam and meperidine gave the best completion rates (94%). The two main reasons for incompletion were poor bowel preparation and excessive bowel looping. PMID:18300826

  6. Predictive Factors Affecting the Short Term and Long Term Exodrift in Patients with Intermittent Exotropia after Bilateral Rectus Muscle Recession and Its Effect on Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Jason C. S.; Chong, Gabriela S. L.; Wu, Patrick K. W.; Wong, Ursula S. F.; Chan, Clement W. N.; Ko, Simon T. C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the predictive factors that affect short term and long term postoperative drift in intermittent exotropia after bilateral lateral rectus recession and to evaluate its effect on surgical outcome. Methods. Retrospective review of 203 patients with diagnosis of intermittent exotropia, who had surgical corrections with more than 3 years of followup. Different preoperative parameters were obtained and evaluated using Pearson's correlation analysis. Results. The proportion of exodrift increased from 62% at 6 weeks to 84% at 3 years postoperatively. The postoperative drift was 4.3 ± 8.1 PD at 6 weeks, 5.8 ± 8.4 PD at 6 months, 7.2 ± 8.3 PD at 1 year, 7.4 ± 8.4 PD at 2 years, and 7.7 ± 8.5 PD at 3 years. Preoperative deviation and initial overcorrection were significant factors affecting the postoperative drift at 3 years (r = 0.177, P = 0.011, r = −0.349, and P < 0.001, resp.). Conclusions. Postoperative exodrift along three years occurs in a majority of patients after bilateral lateral rectus recession for intermittent exotropia. The long term surgical success is significantly affected by this postoperative exodrift. A larger preoperative deviation and a larger initial overcorrection are associated with a larger early and late postoperative exodrift. PMID:25093170

  7. Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mark

    This review explores which facility attributes affect academic outcomes the most and in what manner and degree. The research is examined in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size. The review concludes that school facilities affect learning.…

  8. Overexpression of miR-378 is frequent and may affect treatment outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Lin, Jiang; Qian, Wei; Ma, Ji-chun; Qian, Si-xuan; Li, Yun; Yang, Jing; Li, Jian-yong; Wang, Cui-zhu; Chai, Hai-yan; Chen, Xing-xing; Deng, Zhao-qun

    2013-07-01

    MicroRNA miR-378 plays important roles in tumorigenesis by enhancing cell survival, reducing apoptosis, promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis and promoting cell migration and invasion. Abnormal expression of miR-378 has been observed in various types of cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression status of miR-378 and its clinical significance in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using real-time quantitative PCR. miR-378 overexpression was identified in 26 of 84 (31%) AML patients. The patients with miR-378 overexpression had lower hemoglobin level than those without miR-378 overexpression (66 versus 78 g/L, respectively, P=0.010). The frequency of miR-378 overexpression in FAB-M2 subtype was higher than other subtypes (44% versus 20%, P=0.032). Moreover, the frequency of miR-378 overexpression was higher in patients with t(8;21) than in others (64% versus 24%, P=0.012). The status of miR-378 expression was not correlated with the mutations of eight genes (FLT3-ITD, NPM1, C-KIT, IDH1/IDH2, DNMT3A, C/EBPA and U2AF1). The difference in relapse-free survival was observed between patients with and without miR-378 overexpression (P=0.049). These findings suggest that miR-378 up-regulation is a common event and might have an adverse impact on prognosis in AML. PMID:23582927

  9. The Cumulative Cisplatin Dose Affects the Long-Term Survival Outcomes of Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Chen, Lei; Li, Wen-Fei; Guo, Rui; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Fan; Liu, Li-Zhi; Tian, Li; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic value of the cumulative cisplatin dose (CCD) remains controversial for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) receiving only concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). We retrospectively reviewed 549 consecutive patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) at Sun Yat-sen university cancer center. Patient survival between different CCD groups were compared. The cut-off value of pre-treatment plasma EBV DNA (pre-DNA) and CCD based on disease-free survival (DFS) were 1460 copies/ml (AUC, 0.691; sensitivity, 0.717; specificity, 0.635) and 240 mg/m2 (AUC, 0.506; sensitivity, 0.526; specificity, 0.538), respectively. Of the entire cohort, 92/549 (16.8%) patients received a CCD ≥ 240 mg/m2 and 457 (83.2%) patients, <240 mg/m2. For CCD ≥ 240 mg/m2 vs. < 240 mg/m2, the estimated 4-year DFS, overall survival (OS), locoregional-free survival (LRFFS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rates were 89.1% vs. 81.3% (P = 0.097), 92.4% vs. 90.0% (P = 0.369), 95.6% vs. 91.2% (P = 0.156), and 91.3% vs. 88.4% (P = 0.375), respectively. For the whole cohort, multivariate analysis identified the CCD was an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR, 0.515; 95% CI, 0.267–0.995; P = 0.048). However, CCD (≥240 mg/m2) had no prognostic value in subgroup analysis with stratification by the cut-off value of pre-DNA (P > 0.05 for all rates). PMID:27071833

  10. Early Adolescent Affect Predicts Later Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kansky, Jessica; Allen, Joseph P.; Diener, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjective well-being as a predictor for later behavior and health has highlighted its relationship to health, work performance, and social relationships. However, the majority of such studies neglect the developmental nature of well-being in contributing to important changes across the transition to adulthood. Methods To examine the potential role of subjective well-being as a long-term predictor of critical life outcomes, we examined indicators of positive and negative affect at age 14 as a predictor of relationship, adjustment, self worth, and career outcomes a decade later at ages 23 to 25, controlling for family income and gender. We utilized multi-informant methods including reports from the target participant, close friends, and romantic partners in a demographically diverse community sample of 184 participants. Results Early adolescent positive affect predicted less relationship problems (less self-reported and partner-reported conflict, greater friendship attachment as rated by close peers), healthy adjustment to adulthood (lower levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness). It also predicted positive work functioning (higher levels of career satisfaction and job competence) and increased self-worth. Negative affect did not significantly predict any of these important life outcomes. In addition to predicting desirable mean levels of later outcomes, early positive affect predicted beneficial changes across time in many outcomes. Conclusions The findings extend early research on the beneficial outcomes of subjective well-being by having an earlier assessment of well-being, including informant reports in measuring a large variety of outcome variables, and by extending the findings to a lower socioeconomic group of a diverse and younger sample. The results highlight the importance of considering positive affect as an important component of subjective well-being distinct from negative affect. PMID:27075545

  11. Patient Background Factors Affecting the Therapeutic Outcomes in Response to Eszopiclone in Adult Patients with Chronic Insomnia: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Double-Blind Phase III Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuichi; Kamijo, Atsushi; Nagai, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To identify whether baseline demographic factors or subjective sleep variables are associated with the outcomes following treatment with eszopiclone using data from a recent randomized controlled trial of 78 Japanese subjects with insomnia who were treated with 2 mg eszopiclone per day. Methods: We performed a post hoc analysis of factors including sleep latency (SL), wake time after sleep onset (WASO) (both assessed via sleep diaries), and several demographic variables. Subjects with a SL or WASO > 30 min at baseline and with evaluable SL/WASO data at Week 4 were included in SL and WASO remitter analyses, respectively; those with a SL or WASO ≤ 30 min at Week 4 were defined as SL or WASO remitters, respectively. Threshold baseline SL and WASO values for identification of remitters were determined. Results: No relationships between subjectively assessed therapeutic outcomes and demographic factors were identified. Patients with shorter SL and lower WASO values at baseline showed better outcomes following treatment with eszopiclone in terms of SL and WASO changes, respectively. Baseline SL of 75 min and baseline WASO of 80 min were selected as arbitrary cutoff values for determination of SL and WASO remitters/non-remitters, respectively. Conclusions: These findings may help clinicians to predict their patients' outcomes in response to standard doses of eszopiclone in clinical practice. Citation: Inoue Y, Kamijo A, Nagai R. Patient background factors affecting the therapeutic outcomes in response to eszopiclone in adult patients with chronic insomnia: a post hoc analysis of a double-blind phase III study in Japan. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1171–1178. PMID:26094929

  12. Motivated behavioral outcomes affect ratings of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Larry C; Hardy, David J

    2014-12-01

    A relatively new theory of motivation posits that purposeful human behavior may be partly explained by multidimensional individual differences "traits of action" (motives). Its 15 motives can be characterized according to their purpose: individual integrity, competitiveness, and cooperativeness. Existing evidence supports the model on which the motives are based and the reliability and validity of strategies to assess them. This experiment tested whether the hypothetical results of consistent, motivated cooperative and competitive behavior could affect ratings of attractiveness. Male and female participants (N = 98; M age = 18.8, SD = 1.4) were shown 24 opposite-sex facial photos ranging in attractiveness. The photos were paired with one of three conditions representing theoretical outcomes that would result from low, control, and high levels of cooperative and competitive motives. As predicted, outcome descriptions representing high motive strength of six motives statistically significantly affected ratings of attractiveness. This result was independent of sex of participant and consistent with the theory. PMID:25457092

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation strategies and factors that affect the outcome.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Anna; Skalidi, Nikoleta; Velegrakis, Georgios A

    2012-11-01

    Ever since the introduction of Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, vestibular rehabilitation (VR) has been gaining popularity in the treatment of the dizzy patient. Numerous studies support the effectiveness of VR in improving balance/walking skills, eye-head coordination and the quality of life of the patient. Different rehabilitation protocols have been used to treat patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Assessment of the patients' progress is based on the patients' selfperception of dizziness and their functional skills. Factors such as age, medication, time of onset of vertigo and home based VR have been evaluated on their effect on the rehabilitation's outcome. The aim of this review is to evaluate rehabilitation strategies and discuss the factors that affect the outcome. PMID:22526580

  14. Clinical outcome of patients with follicular lymphoma receiving chemoimmunotherapy in the PRIMA study is not affected by FCGR3A and FCGR2A polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Ghesquières, Hervé; Cartron, Guillaume; Seymour, John Francis; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Offner, Fritz; Soubeyran, Pierre; Perrot, Aurore; Brice, Pauline; Bouabdallah, Réda; Sonet, Anne; Dupuis, Jehan; Casasnovas, Olivier; Catalano, John Vincent; Delmer, Alain; Jardin, Fabrice; Verney, Aurélie; Dartigues, Peggy; Salles, Gilles

    2012-09-27

    In patients with follicular lymphoma treated with single-agent rituximab, single nucleotide polymorphisms in the FCGR3A gene are known to influence response and progression-free survival. The prognostic role of FCGR3A and FCGR2A polymorphisms in patients with follicular lymphoma treated with rituximab and chemotherapy combination remains controversial and has not been evaluated in the context of rituximab maintenance. FCGR3A and FCGR2A single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated in, respectively, 460 and 455 patients treated in the PRIMA study to investigate whether these were associated with response rate and patient outcome after rituximab chemotherapy induction and 2-year rituximab maintenance. In this representative patient cohort, complete and unconfirmed complete responses after rituximab chemotherapy were observed in 65%, 67%, 66% (P = .86) and 60%, 72%, 66% (P = .21) of FCGR3A VV, VF, FF and FCGR2A HH, HR, RR carriers, respectively. After 2 years of rituximab maintenance (or observation), response rates did not differ among the different genotypes. Progression-free survival measured from either treatment initiation or randomization to observation or maintenance was not influenced by these polymorphisms. These data indicate that FCGR3A and FCGR2A polymorphisms do not influence response rate and outcome when rituximab is combined with chemotherapy or used as maintenance treatment. The PRIMA study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00140582. PMID:22885164

  15. An Audit-Based, Infectious Disease Specialist-Guided Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Profoundly Reduced Antibiotic Use Without Negatively Affecting Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nilholm, Hannah; Holmstrand, Linnea; Ahl, Jonas; Månsson, Fredrik; Odenholt, Inga; Tham, Johan; Melander, Eva; Resman, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antimicrobial stewardship programs are increasingly implemented in hospital care. They aim to simultaneously optimize outcomes for individual patients with infections and reduce financial and health-associated costs of overuse of antibiotics. Few studies have examined the effects of antimicrobial stewardship programs in settings with low proportions of antimicrobial resistance, such as in Sweden. Methods. An antimicrobial stewardship program was introduced during 5 months of 2013 in a department of internal medicine in southern Sweden. The intervention consisted of audits twice weekly on all patients given antibiotic treatment. The intervention period was compared with a historical control consisting of patients treated with antibiotics in the same wards in 2012. Studied outcome variables included 28-day mortality and readmission, length of hospital stay, and use of antibiotics. Results. A reduction of 27% in total antibiotic use (2387 days of any antibiotic) was observed in the intervention period compared with the control period. The reduction was due to fewer patients started on antibiotics as well as to significantly shorter durations of antibiotic courses (P < .001). An earlier switch to oral therapy and a specific reduction in use of third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones was also evident. Mortality, total readmissions, and lengths of stay in hospital were unchanged compared with the control period, whereas readmissions due to a nonresolved infection were fewer during the intervention of 2013. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that an infectious disease specialist-guided antimicrobial stewardship program can profoundly reduce antibiotic use in a low-resistance setting with no negative effect on patient outcome. PMID:26380341

  16. Premature Progesterone Elevation Does Not Affect Pregnancy Outcome in High-Responder Patients Undergoing Short-Interval Coasting in IVF Cycles.

    PubMed

    Acet, Mustafa; Aktün, Lebriz Hale; Başaranoğlu, Serdar; Yorgunlar, Betül; Acet, Tuba; Deregözü, Aysegul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND We aimed to present the relationship between premature progesterone elevation (PPE) and clinical outcomes in high-responder patients who had a coasting period of <4 days in length due to their high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and who were treated with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-agonist) protocol in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study was conducted at the University Hospital Assisted Reproductive Technology Center. The outcomes of 101 patients undergoing IVF- intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles who showed a high response to COH (estradiol >4000 pg/ml and/or >20 follicles each ≥10 mm in diameter and at least 20% ≥15 mm) and who were coasted for <4 days were evaluated. Number of oocytes, 2 pronuclei (PN) embryos, implantation rate, and live birth rate were measured. RESULTS The incidence of PPE was 32.6%. Compared with those without PPE, patients with PPE had a higher number of oocytes retrieved. Total mature and fertilized oocytes and the mean number of embryos transferred were not significantly different between groups. Live birth rates (41.9% vs. 38.7%) and implantation rates (26.5% vs. 23%) were also not significantly divergent in the PPE and non-PPE groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS P concentrations ≥1.3 ng/ml on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration, designated in this study as PPE, does not appear to be related to adverse effects in terms of clinical outcomes in high-responder patients undergoing coasting <4 days due to their high risk of developing OHSS treated with a long-acting GnRH-a protocol in IVF-embryo transfer cycles. PMID:26634938

  17. Surgical technique affects outcomes in acromioclavicular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Grassbaugh, Jason A; Cole, Chad; Wohlrab, Kurt; Eichinger, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Optimal treatment for acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation is unknown. Numerous surgical procedures for AC injuries have been described with little comparison. This study sought to compare the clinical and radiographic results of various surgical techniques in order to identify the optimal surgical technique. Ninety patients met inclusion criteria of AC reconstruction at this institution. A retrospective review of outcomes was performed using the electronic records system. Radiographs were measured for pre- and postoperative grade and percent elevation versus the contralateral side. Overall revision rate was 9%. Suture button fixation had a revision rate of 0% compared to 14% (p = .01). Reconstruction procedures performed with distal clavicle excision showed a higher revision rate, 17% compared to 0% (p = .003). There were no statistically significant clinical differences. AC reconstructions performed with suture button construct were superior to other surgical techniques. Procedures performed with distal clavicle excision were inferior to those without. PMID:23449059

  18. Felt affect in good- and poor-outcome schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sovani, Anuradha; Thatte, Shubha; Deshpande, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Family members and caregivers may misinterpret blunted affect as a true lack of emotion in patients with schizophrenia. Aim: To assess felt affect or experienced emotion among low- and high-functioning schizophrenics. Methods: Two hundred people with schizophrenia were assessed using the Global Assessment of Functioning scale of DSM-IV and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Results: The findings reveal that people with good- and poor-outcome schizophrenia show no significant differences in the emotions experienced, implying that felt affect is comparable regardless of the severity of symptoms in chronic schizophrenia. In fact, low-functioning patients scored a mean (SD) of 46.07 (13.13) on the PANAS, in contrast to a slightly lower scored by high-functioning patients (44.33 [12.03]). Conclusion: Although patients may show flat affect, and therefore be mistakenly considered withdrawn and apathetic by the observer, they do, in fact, experience as much, or perhaps even more emotion than their higher-functioning counterparts.

  19. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per; Vindbjerg, Erik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of treatment in trials with trauma-affected refugees vary considerably not only between studies but also between patients within a single study. However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment, as few studies have analysed predictors of treatment outcome. Objective The objective of the study was to examine possible psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees. Method The participants were 195 adult refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who were enrolled in a 6- to 7-month treatment programme at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients’ past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90, Global Assessment of Functioning scales, and pain rated on visual analogue scales. The relations between treatment outcomes and the total score as well as subscores of the CTP Predictor Index were analysed. Results Overall, the total score of the CTP Predictor Index was significantly correlated to pre- to post treatment score changes on the majority of the ratings mentioned above. While employment status was the only single item significantly correlated to HTQ-score changes, a number of single items from the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with changes in depression and anxiety symptoms, but the size of the correlation coefficients were modest. Conclusions The total score of the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with outcomes on most

  20. Factors affecting outcomes in patients reaching end-stage kidney disease worldwide: differences in access to renal replacement therapy, modality use, and haemodialysis practices.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bruce M; Akizawa, Tadao; Jager, Kitty J; Kerr, Peter G; Saran, Rajiv; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2016-07-16

    More than 2 million people worldwide are being treated for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). This Series paper provides an overview of incidence, modality use (in-centre haemodialysis, home dialysis, or transplantation), and mortality for patients with ESKD based on national registry data. We also present data from an international cohort study to highlight differences in haemodialysis practices that affect survival and the experience of patients who rely on this therapy, which is both life-sustaining and profoundly disruptive to their quality of life. Data illustrate disparities in access to renal replacement therapy of any kind and in the use of transplantation or home dialysis, both of which are widely considered preferable to in-centre haemodialysis for many patients with ESKD in settings where infrastructure permits. For most patients with ESKD worldwide who are treated with in-centre haemodialysis, overall survival is poor, but longer in some Asian countries than elsewhere in the world, and longer in Europe than in the USA, although this gap has reduced. Commendable haemodialysis practice includes exceptionally high use of surgical vascular access in Japan and in some European countries, and the use of longer or more frequent dialysis sessions in some countries, allowing for more effective volume management. Mortality is especially high soon after ESKD onset, and improved preparation for ESKD is needed including alignment of decision making with the wishes of patients and families. PMID:27226132

  1. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  2. Vitamin D deficiency plays an important role in cardiac disease and affects patient outcome: Still a myth or a fact that needs exploration?

    PubMed Central

    Fanari, Zaher; Hammami, Sumaya; Hammami, Muhammad Baraa; Hammami, Safa; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that a low vitamin D status may be an important and hitherto neglected factor of cardiovascular disease. This review is an overview of the current body of literature, and presents evidence of the mechanisms through which vitamin D deficiency affects the cardiovascular system in general and the heart in particular. Available data indicate that the majority of congestive heart failure patients have 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, the low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level has a higher impact on hypertension, coronary artery disease an on the occurrence of relevant cardiac events. A serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level below 75 nmol/l (30 ng/l) is generally regarded as vitamin D insufficiency in both adults and children, while a level below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l) is considered deficiency. Levels below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l) are linked independently to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26557744

  3. Vitamin D deficiency plays an important role in cardiac disease and affects patient outcome: Still a myth or a fact that needs exploration?

    PubMed

    Fanari, Zaher; Hammami, Sumaya; Hammami, Muhammad Baraa; Hammami, Safa; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that a low vitamin D status may be an important and hitherto neglected factor of cardiovascular disease. This review is an overview of the current body of literature, and presents evidence of the mechanisms through which vitamin D deficiency affects the cardiovascular system in general and the heart in particular. Available data indicate that the majority of congestive heart failure patients have 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency. Furthermore, the low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level has a higher impact on hypertension, coronary artery disease an on the occurrence of relevant cardiac events. A serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level below 75 nmol/l (30 ng/l) is generally regarded as vitamin D insufficiency in both adults and children, while a level below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l) is considered deficiency. Levels below 50 nmol/l (20 ng/l) are linked independently to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26557744

  4. Do waiting times affect health outcomes? Evidence from coronary bypass.

    PubMed

    Moscelli, Giuseppe; Siciliani, Luigi; Tonei, Valentina

    2016-07-01

    Long waiting times for non-emergency services are a feature of several publicly-funded health systems. A key policy concern is that long waiting times may worsen health outcomes: when patients receive treatment, their health condition may have deteriorated and health gains reduced. This study investigates whether patients in need of coronary bypass with longer waiting times are associated with poorer health outcomes in the English National Health Service over 2000-2010. Exploiting information from the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), we measure health outcomes with in-hospital mortality and 28-day emergency readmission following discharge. Our results, obtained combining hospital fixed effects and instrumental variable methods, find no evidence of waiting times being associated with higher in-hospital mortality and weak association between waiting times and emergency readmission following a surgery. The results inform the debate on the relative merits of different types of rationing in healthcare systems. They are to some extent supportive of waiting times as an acceptable rationing mechanism, although further research is required to explore whether long waiting times affect other aspects of individuals' life. PMID:27299977

  5. Demotivation: Affective States and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falout, Joseph; Elwood, James; Hood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Demotivation can negatively influence the learner's attitudes and behaviors, degrade classroom group dynamics and teacher's motivation, and result in long-term and widespread negative learning outcomes. 900 university EFL learners were surveyed to investigate the demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in Japan, and…

  6. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    PubMed

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey). PMID:24467959

  7. Affective Outcomes of a World Geography Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Alfred S., Jr.; Maier, Joan N.

    2006-01-01

    Affective goals and objectives, rarely stated in geographic education standards, textbooks or course syllabi, include improving students' attitudes toward other people. World geography courses expose students to other parts of the world and to people different from themselves. Although affective goals may not be stated for such courses, could it…

  8. Trait Affect and Job Search Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Stephane; Saks, Alan M.; Zikic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the role of trait affect in job search. One hundred and twenty-three university students completed measures of positive and negative affectivity, conscientiousness, job search self-efficacy, job search clarity, and job search intensity during their last year of school while on the job market. At the end of the school…

  9. Choice of Approach Does Not Affect Clinical and Radiologic Outcomes: A Comparative Cohort of Patients Having Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Patients Having Lateral Lumbar Interbody Fusion at 24 Months

    PubMed Central

    Malham, Gregory M.; Parker, Rhiannon M.; Blecher, Carl M.; Chow, Fiona Y.; Seex, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected registry data. Objective  This study aimed to compare the clinical and radiologic outcomes between comparative cohorts of patients having anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and patients having lateral lumbar interbody fusion (LLIF). Methods  Ninety consecutive patients were treated by a single surgeon with either ALIF (n = 50) or LLIF (n = 40). Inclusion criteria were patients age 45 to 70 years with degenerative disk disease or grade 1 to 2 spondylolisthesis and single-level pathology from L1 to S1. Patient-reported outcome measures included pain (visual analog scale), disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), and quality of life (Short Form 36 physical component score [PCS] and mental component scores [MCS]). Assessment of fusion and measurement of lordosis and posterior disk height were performed on computed tomography scans. Results  At 24 months, patients having ALIF had significant improvements in back (64%) and leg (65%) pain and ODI (60%), PCS (44%), and MCS (26%; p < 0.05) scores. Patients having LLIF had significant improvements in back (56%) and leg (57%) pain and ODI (52%), PCS (48%), and MCS (12%; p < 0.05) scores. Fourteen complications occurred in the ALIF group, and in the LLIF group, there were 17 complications (p > 0.05). The fusion rate was 100% for ALIF and 95% for LLIF (p = 0.1948). ALIF added ∼6 degrees of lordosis and 3 mm of height, primarily measured at L5–S1, and LLIF added ∼3 degrees of lordosis and 2 mm of height between L1 to L5. Mean follow-up was 34.1 months. Conclusions  In comparative cohorts of patients having ALIF and patients having LLIF at 24 months postoperatively, there were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, complication rates, or fusion rates. PMID:27433432

  10. Implicit emotion regulation affects outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Tang, Ping; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Yue-jia

    2015-06-01

    Efficient implicit emotion regulation processes, which run without awareness, are important for human well-being. In this study, to investigate the influence of implicit emotion regulation on psychological and electrophysiological responses to gains and losses, participants were required to select between two Chinese four-character idioms to match the meaning of the third one before they performed a monetary gambling task. According to whether their meanings were related to emotion regulation, the idioms fell into two categories. Event-related potentials and self-rating emotional experiences to outcome feedback were recorded during the task. Priming emotion regulation reduced subjective emotional experience to both gains and losses and the amplitudes of the feedback-related negativity, while the P3 component was not influenced. According to these results, we suggest that the application of implicit emotion regulation effectively modulated the subjective emotional experience and the motivational salience of current outcomes without the cost of cognitive resources. This study implicates the potential significance of implicit emotion regulation in decision-making processes. PMID:25332404

  11. Rockford, Ill.: Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Thomas F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes the operational tests of the two-way interactive cable television system using a firefighter training series administered to the Rockford (Illinois) fire department. Cognitive and affective measurement instruments described indicate a significant difference favoring two-way systems of in-service training programs. (JMF)

  12. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  13. Do gravidity and age affect pregnancy outcome?

    PubMed

    Santow, G; Bracher, M

    1989-01-01

    Fetal loss has generally been found to vary with gravidity, previous experience of fetal loss, and maternal age, but the literature is divided on the reasons for these associations. In this paper we examine pregnancy histories obtained retrospectively from a nationally representative one-in-one-thousand sample of women in Australia aged 20 to 59 years. The relations of fetal loss ratios with both gravidity and previous outcome are consistent with heterogeneity of risk over the study population and a stopping rule, whereby high-risk women undertake more pregnancies than low-risk women to achieve the same number of live births. Evidence is presented that elevated loss ratios in the teens indicate not higher risk but a selection for short gestation intervals, while loss ratios beyond the mid-thirties do not point unequivocally to a substantial increase in risk at the older reproductive ages. PMID:2814570

  14. Evaluation of Factors Affecting the Surgical Outcome in Tympanoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Naderpour, Masoud; Jabbari Moghadam, Yalda; Ghanbarpour, Ensieh; Shahidi, Nikzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tympanoplasty is a standard procedure to repair tympanic membrane perforation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of tympanoplasty (hearing improvement and tympanic membrane closure rate) in patients suffering from chronic perforation of the tympanic membrane by considering the prognostic factors. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study, based on the results of tympanoplasty with temporal graft fascia in 60 patients in the ENT department of the Medical Science University of Tabriz, we evaluated prognostic factors, such as age, sex, smoking, size, and site of perforation, for the outcome of this surgery. Results: The rate of surgical success- integration of the graft- was 93.3%. Improvement of hearing, as demonstrated through audiometry, occurred in 93% of cases. We did not find any factors to be statistically significant to affect surgical outcome. Conclusion: Even by considering the influence of different factors on the results of a tympanoplasty operation, according to the statistical results of this study, there is not a significant difference in the results of the operation, neither in the health of the tympanic membrane after surgery nor in hearing development. PMID:27280095

  15. [Patient-reported and patient-weighted outcomes in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Scheibler, F; Finger, R P; Grosselfinger, R; Dintsios, C-M

    2010-03-01

    Considering patients' values and preferences in comparative effectiveness research (CER) is one of the main challenges in ophthalmology (value-based medicine). This article defines core terms in CER. The concept of patient-relevant (or patient-important) outcomes is distinguished from patient-reported outcomes (PRO) by means of examples in the field of ophthalmology. In order to be able to give a consistant recommendation if an intervention leads to conflicting results for different outcomes (trade-off), a ranking of outcomes will be necessary. Examples of studies in glaucoma patients are provided that demonstrate the possibilities of ranking of outcomes based on patient preferences. PMID:20024566

  16. Course and cognitive outcome in major affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge of the course and outcome of major affective illness has clinical as well as theoretical implications. In understanding the pathophysiology of the major affective disorders, an essential question in the interplay between biological, psychological and social factors is whether the individual is changed biologically by experiencing an affective episode or not. A biological change may be reflected in a changed risk of experiencing new episodes and changed chances of recovery from these episodes for the individual, and may possibly also be reflected in persisting altered cognitive function as an expression of brain function affected during a longer period. Previous studies of the course of affective episodes are flawed by a number of drawbacks such as various definitions of recovery and recurrence, various kinds of bias and confounders, low statistical power, and statistical analyses conducted without survival models and without paying attention to diagnostic instability or the individual heterogeneity of the course of episodes. Totally, these drawbacks and pitfalls affect the results of previous studies in unpredictable ways and make it hazardous to draw conclusions about the effect of prior affective episodes on the subsequent course of unipolar and bipolar disorder. The present thesis avoided most of these pitfalls or adjusted for them in analyses of hospital data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, collected nationwide from 1971 to 1993. Hospitalisation was used as an expression of an affective episode. On average, a progressive course with increasing risk of recurrence with every new episode was found for unipolar and bipolar affective disorders. Initially, the two types of disorders followed markedly different courses, but later in the course of the illness the risk of recurrence was the same for the two disorders. However, analyses with frailty models revealed that for unipolar men, this progressive course was due to a subgroup of patients

  17. Melanin content in melanoma metastases affects the outcome of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brożyna, Anna A; Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Jan; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2016-04-01

    Melanin possess radioprotective and scavenging properties, and its presence can affect the behavior of melanoma cells, its surrounding environment and susceptibility to the therapy, as showed in vitro experiments. To determine whether melanin presence in melanoma affects the efficiency of radiotherapy (RTH) we evaluated the survival time after RTH treatment in metastatic melanoma patients (n = 57). In another cohort of melanoma patients (n = 84), the relationship between melanin level and pT and pN status was determined. A significantly longer survival time was found in patients with amelanotic metastatic melanomas in comparison to the melanotic ones, who were treated with either RTH or chemotherapy (CHTH) and RTH. These differences were more significant in a group of melanoma patients treated only with RTH. A detailed analysis of primary melanomas revealed that melanin levels were significantly higher in melanoma cells invading reticular dermis than the papillary dermis. A significant reduction of melanin pigmentation in pT3 and pT4 melanomas in comparison to pT1 and T2 tumors was observed. However, melanin levels measured in pT3-pT4 melanomas developing metastases (pN1-3, pM1) were higher than in pN0 and pM0 cases. The presence of melanin in metastatic melanoma cells decreases the outcome of radiotherapy, and melanin synthesis is related to higher disease advancement. Based on our previous cell-based and clinical research and present research we also suggest that inhibition of melanogenesis can improve radiotherapy modalities. The mechanism of relationship between melanogenesis and efficacy of RTH requires additional studies, including larger melanoma patients population and orthotopic, imageable mouse models of metastatic melanoma. PMID:26910282

  18. Melanin content in melanoma metastases affects the outcome of radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brożyna, Anna A.; Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Jan; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2016-01-01

    Melanin possess radioprotective and scavenging properties, and its presence can affect the behavior of melanoma cells, its surrounding environment and susceptibility to the therapy, as showed in vitro experiments. To determine whether melanin presence in melanoma affects the efficiency of radiotherapy (RTH) we evaluated the survival time after RTH treatment in metastatic melanoma patients (n = 57). In another cohort of melanoma patients (n = 84), the relationship between melanin level and pT and pN status was determined. A significantly longer survival time was found in patients with amelanotic metastatic melanomas in comparison to the melanotic ones, who were treated with either RTH or chemotherapy (CHTH) and RTH. These differences were more significant in a group of melanoma patients treated only with RTH. A detailed analysis of primary melanomas revealed that melanin levels were significantly higher in melanoma cells invading reticular dermis than the papillary dermis. A significant reduction of melanin pigmentation in pT3 and pT4 melanomas in comparison to pT1 and T2 tumors was observed. However, melanin levels measured in pT3-pT4 melanomas developing metastases (pN1-3, pM1) were higher than in pN0 and pM0 cases. The presence of melanin in metastatic melanoma cells decreases the outcome of radiotherapy, and melanin synthesis is related to higher disease advancement. Based on our previous cell-based and clinical research and present research we also suggest that inhibition of melanogenesis can improve radiotherapy modalities. The mechanism of relationship between melanogenesis and efficacy of RTH requires additional studies, including larger melanoma patients population and orthotopic, imageable mouse models of metastatic melanoma. PMID:26910282

  19. How do COPD comorbidities affect ICU outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ongel, Esra Akkutuk; Karakurt, Zuhal; Salturk, Cuneyt; Takir, Huriye Berk; Burunsuzoglu, Bunyamin; Kargin, Feyza; Ekinci, Gulbanu H; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Adiguzel, Nalan; Yilmaz, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) frequently require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for application of mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to determine whether comorbidities and clinical variables present at ICU admission are predictive of ICU mortality. Methods A retrospective, observational cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital’s respiratory ICU using data collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Previously diagnosed COPD patients who were admitted to the ICU with ARF were included. Patients’ demographics, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), ICU admission data, application of noninvasive and invasive MV (NIV and IMV, respectively), cause of ARF, length of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded from their files. Patients were grouped according to mortality (survival versus non-survival), and all the variables were compared between the two groups. Results During the study period, a total of 1,013 COPD patients (749 male) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 70±10 years met the inclusion criteria. Comorbidities of the non-survival group (female/male, 40/131) were significantly higher compared with the survival group (female/male, 224/618): arrhythmia (24% vs 11%), hypertension (42% vs 34%), coronary artery disease (28% vs 11%), and depression (7% vs 3%) (P<0.001, P<0.035, P<0.001, and P<0.007, respectively). Logistic regression revealed the following mortality risk factors: need of IMV, BMI <20 kg/m2, pneumonia, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, hypertension, chronic hypoxia, and higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The respective odds ratios, confidence intervals, and P-values for each of these were as follows: 27.7, 15.7–49.0, P<0.001; 6.6, 3.5–412.7, P<0.001; 5.1, 2.9–8.8, P<0.001; 2.9, 1.5–5.6, P<0.001; 2.7, 1.4–5.2, P<0.003; 2.6, 1.5–4.4, P<0.001; 2.2, 1.2–3.9, P<0

  20. The Neural Basis of Risky Choice with Affective Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Renata S.; Pachur, Thorsten; Hertwig, Ralph; Endestad, Tor; Biele, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Both normative and many descriptive theories of decision making under risk are based on the notion that outcomes are weighted by their probability, with subsequent maximization of the (subjective) expected outcome. Numerous investigations from psychology, economics, and neuroscience have produced evidence consistent with this notion. However, this research has typically investigated choices involving relatively affect-poor, monetary outcomes. We compared choice in relatively affect-poor, monetary lottery problems with choice in relatively affect-rich medical decision problems. Computational modeling of behavioral data and model-based neuroimaging analyses provide converging evidence for substantial differences in the respective decision mechanisms. Relative to affect-poor choices, affect-rich choices yielded a more strongly curved probability weighting function of cumulative prospect theory, thus signaling that the psychological impact of probabilities is strongly diminished for affect-rich outcomes. Examining task-dependent brain activation, we identified a region-by-condition interaction indicating qualitative differences of activation between affect-rich and affect-poor choices. Moreover, brain activation in regions that were more active during affect-poor choices (e.g., the supramarginal gyrus) correlated with individual trial-by-trial decision weights, indicating that these regions reflect processing of probabilities. Formal reverse inference Neurosynth meta-analyses suggested that whereas affect-poor choices seem to be based on brain mechanisms for calculative processes, affect-rich choices are driven by the representation of outcomes’ emotional value and autobiographical memories associated with them. These results provide evidence that the traditional notion of expectation maximization may not apply in the context of outcomes laden with affective responses, and that understanding the brain mechanisms of decision making requires the domain of the decision

  1. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  2. Outcomes in cochlear implantation: variables affecting performance in adults and children.

    PubMed

    Cosetti, Maura K; Waltzman, Susan B

    2012-02-01

    This article highlights variables that affect cochlear implant performance, emerging factors warranting consideration, and variables shown not to affect performance. Research on the outcomes following cochlear implantation has identified a wide spectrum of variables known to affect pos0timplantation performance. These variables relate to the device itself as well as individual patient characteristics. Factors believed to affect spiral ganglion cell survival and function have been shown to influence postoperative performance. Binaural hearing affects performance. Social and educational factors also affect postoperative performance. Novel variables capable of affecting performance continue to emerge with increased understanding of auditory pathway development and neural plasticity. PMID:22115688

  3. Toxicities affecting Quality of Life After Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Study of Patient-Reported, Observer-Rated, and Objective Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Klaudia U; Schipper, Mathew; Feng, Felix Y; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Cornwall, Benjamin; Lee, Connie SY; Chepeha, Douglas B; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2012-01-01

    Purpose After conventional radiotherapy for head and neck cancer, xerostomia has traditionally been the major effector of patient-reported quality of life (QOL), and recent publications suggest that dysphagia has an even stronger effect. We hypothesized that IMRT aiming to spare the salivary glands and swallowing structures reduced, or eliminated, the effects of these toxicities on QOL. Methods and Materials Prospective longitudinal study: 72 patients with Stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer treated uniformly with definitive chemo-IMRT sparing the salivary glands and swallowing structures. Overall QOL was assessed by summary scores of the Head Neck QOL (HNQOL) and University of Washington QOL (UWQOL) questionnaires, as well as HNQOL “Overall Bother” question. QOL, observer-rated toxicities (CTCAE v2), and objective evaluations (videofluoroscopy assessing dysphagia and saliva flow rates assessing xerostomia) were recorded pre-therapy through 2 years post-therapy. Correlations between toxicities/objective evaluations and overall QOL were assessed using longitudinal repeated measures of analysis and Pearson correlations. Results All observer-rated toxicities and QOL scores worsened 1-3 months after therapy and improved through 12 months, with minor further improvements through 24 months. At 12 months, dysphagia grades 0-1, 2, and 3, were observed in 95%, 4%, and 1% of patients, respectively. Using all post-therapy observations, observer-rated dysphagia was highly correlated with all overall QOL measures (p<0.0001), while xerostomia, mucosal, and voice toxicities were significantly correlated with some, but not all, overall QOL measures, with lower correlation coefficients than dysphagia. Late overall QOL (≥6 or ≥12 months post-therapy) was primarily associated with observer-rated dysphagia, and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. Videofluoroscopy scores, but not salivary flows, were significantly correlated with some of the overall QOL measures. Conclusion After

  4. Toxicities Affecting Quality of Life After Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Study of Patient-Reported, Observer-Rated, and Objective Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Cornwall, Benjamin; Lee, Connie S.Y.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the salivary glands and swallowing structures would reduce or eliminate the effects of xerostomia and dysphagia on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: In this prospective, longitudinal study, 72 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated uniformly with definitive chemo-IMRT sparing the salivary glands and swallowing structures. Overall QOL was assessed by summary scores of the Head Neck QOL (HNQOL) and University of Washington QOL (UWQOL) questionnaires, as well as the HNQOL “Overall Bother” question. Quality of life, observer-rated toxicities (Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effects scale, version 2), and objective evaluations (videofluoroscopy assessing dysphagia and saliva flow rates assessing xerostomia) were recorded from before therapy through 2 years after therapy. Correlations between toxicities/objective evaluations and overall QOL were assessed using longitudinal repeated measures of analysis and Pearson correlations. Results: All observer-rated toxicities and QOL scores worsened 1-3 months after therapy and improved through 12 months, with minor further improvements through 24 months. At 12 months, dysphagia grades 0-1, 2, and 3, were observed in 95%, 4%, and 1% of patients, respectively. Using all posttherapy observations, observer-rated dysphagia was highly correlated with all overall QOL measures (P<.0001), whereas xerostomia and mucosal and voice toxicities were significantly correlated with some, but not all, overall QOL measures, with lower correlation coefficients than dysphagia. Late overall QOL (≥6 or ≥12 months after therapy) was primarily associated with observer-rated dysphagia, and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. Videofluoroscopy scores, but not salivary flows, were significantly correlated with some of the overall QOL measures. Conclusion: After chemo-IMRT, although late dysphagia was on average mild

  5. Affective instability in patients with chronic pain: a diary approach.

    PubMed

    Rost, Silke; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Vögele, Claus; Crombez, Geert

    2016-08-01

    Affective instability, conceptualized as fluctuations in mood over time, has been related to ill-health and psychopathology. In this study, we examined the role of affective instability on daily pain outcomes in 70 patients with chronic pain (Mage = 49.7 years; 46 females) using an end-of-day diary. During a baseline phase, patients completed self-reported questionnaires of pain severity, pain duration, disability, depression, and anxiety. During a subsequent diary phase, patients filled out an electronic end-of-day diary over 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain severity, disability, cognitive complaints, negative affect (NA) and positive affect. Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood (separately for NA and positive affect), which takes into account the size of affective changes over consecutive days. Results indicated that NA instability was positively associated with daily disability, beyond the effects of daily pain severity. Furthermore, NA instability moderated the relationship between daily pain severity and daily disability and the relationship between daily pain severity and daily cognitive complaints. Positive affect instability, however, showed to be unrelated to all outcomes. Current findings extend previous results and reveal the putative role of affective instability on pain-related outcomes and may yield important clinical implications. Indeed, they suggest that targeting NA instability by improving emotion regulation skills may be a strategy to diminish disability and cognitive complaints in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27075427

  6. Negotiating outcomes with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Zander, K S

    1996-09-01

    Negotiating outcomes is a complex skill that is crucial to attaining quality care, particularly in an environment characterized by an accelerated speed of care and regimented options for care. In this environment, patients and their families need a realistic view of achievable outcomes. Caregivers must be able to reformulate and renegotiate outcomes quickly with patients and their families. Caregivers act as a catalyst in the outcome-achievement process and, to be successful, seek new and creative strategies to accomplish this. Being a catalyst also involves determining the patients' personal feelings about their illnesses and the proposed interventions, assisting patients in planning how to translate their new knowledge into behaviors, and to build in feedback mechanisms. PMID:8920372

  7. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Manson, Neil A; Green, Alana J; Abraham, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m(2), reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk-benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike. PMID:26933611

  8. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Manson, Neil A.; Green, Alana J.; Abraham, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m2, reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk–benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike. PMID:26933611

  9. Institutional Factors Affecting Biophysical Outcomes in Forest Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Although there is considerable interest in the impact of diverse policies affecting the biophysical outcomes in forests, gaining a substantial sample over time of forests under different institutional arrangements has been difficult. This article analyzes data from 46 forests located in six countries over time. In forests where policies have been…

  10. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of School Bond Elections in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lode, Marlin D.

    In spite of a nationwide concern for the crumbling infrastructure of school buildings, the prospects of passing bond issues to repair or replace buildings are elusive. This study examined positive and negative factors that affected the outcomes of school bond elections in four purposefully-selected school districts in Iowa. Variables that…

  11. Dispositional Affect in Unique Subgroups of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Danielle B.; Mehta, Swati; Pope, Janet E.; Harth, Manfred; Shapiro, Allan; Teasell, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis may experience increased negative outcomes if they exhibit specific patterns of dispositional affect. Objective. To identify subgroups of patients with rheumatoid arthritis based on dispositional affect. The secondary objective was to compare mood, pain catastrophizing, fear of pain, disability, and quality of life between subgroups. Methods. Outpatients from a rheumatology clinic were categorized into subgroups by a cluster analysis based on dispositional affect. Differences in outcomes were compared between clusters through multivariate analysis of covariance. Results. 227 patients were divided into two subgroups. Cluster 1 (n = 85) included patients reporting significantly higher scores on all dispositional variables (experiential avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, worry, fear of pain, and perfectionism; all p < 0.001) compared to patients in Cluster 2 (n = 142). Patients in Cluster 1 also reported significantly greater mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing (all p < 0.001). Clusters did not differ on quality of life or disability. Conclusions. The present study identifies a subgroup of rheumatoid arthritis patients who score significantly higher on dispositional affect and report increased mood impairment, pain anxiety sensitivity, and pain catastrophizing. Considering dispositional affect within subgroups of patients with RA may help health professionals tailor interventions for the specific stressors that these patients experience. PMID:27445594

  12. Change in patient affect/defense ratio from early to late sessions in brief psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Taurke, E A; Flegenheimer, W; McCullough, L; Winston, A; Pollack, J; Trujillo, M

    1990-09-01

    The current study examined changes in the ratio of patients' affective and defensive behaviors during the course of brief psychodynamic psychotherapy. Treatments of 16 patients were videotaped. For each patient, four sessions were evaluated with a minute-by-minute coding system of process variables. When patients were grouped according to outcome scores, significant differences between the high outcome and the average-to-low outcome groups emerged. During the early phase of treatment, patients in both groups showed an average of one affective response per five defensive responses. By the late phase of treatment, the high outcome patients showed a marked shift to one affective response per two defensive responses, while the low outcome patients remained the same. An incidental finding was a negative correlation between good outcome and the ratio of defensive behavior to total patient activity. PMID:2246376

  13. Promoting positive outcomes in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Troia, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    Obese patients are seen in every practice setting. Obesity is a chronic disease that may lead to physical and emotional problems, which may have an impact on the social and psychological functioning of the patient. With appropriate preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative precautions; monitoring; and restructuring the environment to promote care and safety, the incidence of poor surgical outcomes can be minimized. This paper will address the significance of obesity, related diseases, and proper care of the obese patient. PMID:12035338

  14. Patient-reported Outcomes in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Christopher H.; Quittner, Alexandra L.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, there has been tremendous progress in the area of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A PRO instrument is defined as any measure of a patient's health status that is elicited directly from the patient and assesses how the patient “feels or functions with respect to his or her health condition.” The advances seen in clinical research regarding PROs has been mirrored in research in cystic fibrosis (CF). A large number of instruments have been used for both therapeutic and nontherapeutic clinical research for many chronic conditions. This review will summarize a history of the development of PROs and how PROs are viewed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. We will then review the current state of the art of patient-reported outcomes in CF, specifically addressing the evaluation of different PRO instruments in terms of their reliability and validity. Finally, we will delineate further areas for development of PROs in CF. We believe that the future of CF research will incorporate a more diverse selection of PRO outcome measures; these outcome measures ultimately may be incorporated into clinical care to standardize symptom assessment and provide information regarding the need for specific clinical interventions to improve the quality of care delivered to these patients. PMID:17652505

  15. Birth order, family environments, academic and affective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    2003-06-01

    Relations were examined among birth order, family social status, family learning environments, and a set of affective and academic outcomes. Data were collected as part of an Australian longitudinal study (4,171 females and 3,718 males). Analysis suggested that birth order continued to have small but significant associations with adolescents' self-concept and educational aspirations and with young adults' educational attainment, after taking into account differences in family social status and family learning environments. PMID:12931949

  16. The cosmetic outcome of external dacryocystorhinostomy scar and factors affecting it

    PubMed Central

    Waly, Mostafa A; Shalaby, Osama E; Elbakary, Molham A; Hashish, Aiman A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the cosmetic outcome of external dacryocystorhinostomy (Ex-DCR) and to detect the factors affecting it. Patients and Methods: Prospective randomized interventional study included forty patients who were treated by 40 Ex-DCRs. In twenty patients, medial canthal vertical incision was used and in the other twenty cases, subciliary incision was used. The skin was closed using vicryl 6-0 or prolene 6-0 interrupted sutures, and each one was randomly used in twenty patients (10 patients of each incision type). Cosmetic outcome was evaluated 6 months postoperative by the patients and by an oculoplastic surgeon on a four grades scale. Cosmetic results and its correlation to patients’ age, sex, skin complexion, type of incision, and type of skin sutures were studied. Results: The mean scar grading was 0.98 ± 1.0 and 1.3 ± 1.0 in patients’ and examiner's assessment. About 27.5% described their scars as cosmetically significant. The cosmetic outcome was significantly affected by the type of incision with only 5% significant scars in subciliary incision group. Prolene 6-0 suture was associated with better cosmetic results with 15% significant scars. 50% of dark-skinned patients showed cosmetically significant scars. Although no correlation was found between patients’ age and cosmetic outcome, pediatric patients showed higher tendency to scar visibility with mean scar grade 1.2 ± 1.0 and 1.5 ± 0.9 in patients’ and examiner's assessment. Conclusion: Dark skinned and pediatric patients are more prone to visible Ex-DCR scar. The use of subciliary approach and prolene 6-0 skin sutures is associated with more favorable cosmetic outcome. PMID:27221676

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    van Tuyl, Lilian H D; Michaud, Kaleb

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and their measures have a long and important history for determining the status and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This article describes the history and evolution of PROs for RA and the current state of the field, with key examples of accepted and widely used measures, and offers some reflection on the roles of PROs for the study and management of RA. PMID:27133486

  18. Patient reported outcome measures in septorhinoplasty surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, LR; Ward, MJ; Sunkaraneni, VS; Harries, PG; Salib, RJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical procedures incorporating a cosmetic element such as septorhinoplasty and otoplasty are currently under threat in the National Health Service (NHS) as they are deemed to be procedures of ‘limited clinical benefit’ by many primary care providers. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), which assess the quality of care delivered from the patients’ perspective, are becoming increasingly important in documenting the effectiveness of such procedures. Methods The Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE) questionnaire, a validated PROM tool, was used to assess patient satisfaction in 141 patients undergoing septorhinoplasty surgery over a 90-month period at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust. Results Overall, 100 patients with a mean follow-up period of 36 months completed the study. The mean ROE score was 73.3%. In addition, 75% of patients questioned were happy with the final result of their operation and 83% would undergo the procedure again if required. These benefits occurred irrespective of age, sex and primary versus revision surgery, and were maintained for up to 71 months following surgery. Conclusions This study has shown that patients are generally satisfied with their functional and cosmetic outcomes following septorhinoplasty surgery. These results help support the case for septorhinoplasty surgery to continue being funded as an NHS procedure. PMID:25519270

  19. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; Ogdie, Alexis

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures are an important component to assessing disease impact and therapy response in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Overall, there are few PsA-specific PROs. Most PROs used in PsA are borrowed from other diseases (eg, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis) or general population PROs. PROs are used in PsA clinical trials and in the clinical management of PsA. In this review, we discuss the most commonly used PRO in PsA, including their inclusion in composite measures. Future studies may be helpful to determine the best performing PROs in patients with PsA. PMID:27133489

  20. Health Literacy: An Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcome.

    PubMed

    Yin, H Shonna; Jay, Melanie; Maness, Leslie; Zabar, Sondra; Kalet, Adina

    2015-09-01

    We have previously proposed that by identifying a set of Educationally Sensitive Patient Outcomes (ESPOs), medical education outcomes research becomes more feasible and likely to provide meaningful guidance for medical education policy and practice. ESPOs are proximal outcomes that are sensitive to provider education, measurable, and linked to more distal health outcomes. Our previous model included Patient Activation and Clinical Microsystem Activation as ESPOs. In this paper, we discuss how Health Literacy, defined as "the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions," is another important ESPO. Between one-third and one-half of all US adults have limited health literacy skills. Providers can be trained to adopt a "universal precautions approach" to addressing patient health literacy, through the acquisition of specific skills (e.g., teachback, "chunking" information, use of plain language written materials) and by learning how to take action to improve the "health literacy environment." While there are several ways to measure health literacy, identifying which measurement tools are most sensitive to provider education is important, but challenging and complex. Further research is needed to test this model and identify additional ESPOs. PMID:26173523

  1. 'The patient': at the center of patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Awad, A George

    2015-01-01

    The recent emphasis of including patient reports in their own care management is reviewed in terms of the factors that contributed to its popularity. The role change of patients as being active participants in their own care as a result of the rising consumerism and advocacy has led to increased pressures for including patients in the therapeutic decision-making process. As consumers of clinical services, their perspectives and attitudes towards health and illness acquired more importance. The rising cost of healthcare has added another dimension in cost containment by empowering patients and sharing responsibility in their recovery, which hopefully can improve outcomes. Challenges in the development and implementation of patient-reported outcomes in psychiatry are reviewed and include the still unresolved subjective/objective dichotomy, identification of the most appropriate and relevant patient-reported outcomes. Few outcomes are identified and include: subjective tolerability of medication, self-reported health-related quality of life, preferences, patients' attitudes towards health and illness, satisfaction with medication and overall satisfaction of quality of care, and functional state, with particular focus on social functioning. PMID:26289737

  2. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients’ functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients’ functional status at the time of critical illness. PMID:26862493

  3. Impact of Patient Sex on Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teitsma, Xavier M.; van der Hoeven, Henk; Tamminga, Rob; de Bie, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Combined Quality Care Anterior Cruciate Ligament registry provides data for clinical research regarding primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Purpose: To explore the data with regard to the clinical outcomes between sexes after ACL reconstruction in a Dutch population. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data involving patients diagnosed with an ACL tear and eligible for surgery were recorded. Isokinetic muscle strength, functional muscle performance, and anterior-posterior translation of the knee joint were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively. Patients completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, and Tegner rating scales during each examination using a web-based questionnaire. Results: Approximately 90% of ACL injuries occurred during sport activities. The mean (SD) age at surgery was 28 (11) years for both men and women, and the majority of patients were treated with hamstring tendon autografts (94%). Four percent received bone–patellar tendon–bone autografts, and 2% of the patients received other grafts. Preoperatively, the KOOS, Lysholm, and Tegner scores were significantly higher in males. Twelve months postoperatively, both sexes showed comparable isokinetic strength (P = .336), knee laxity (P = .680), and hop test for distance (P = .122) when comparing the injured with the uninjured side. Self-reported knee function was comparable between sexes as assessed by the KOOS (P = .202), Lysholm (P = .872), and Tegner (P = .767) questionnaires during the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: One year after ACL surgery, all patients had improved greatly, showing only minor differences between sexes. The male group showed slightly better results when evaluating self-reported knee questionnaires. Comparable outcomes and knee function between sexes can therefore be presumed with patients who are treated with hamstring tendon autografts in a Dutch

  4. [Patient-reported outcomes: definition and measurement].

    PubMed

    Botturi, Davide; Rodella, Stefania

    2014-06-01

    The concept of "patient-reported outcomes" have been proposed by the Food and Drug Administration in the year 2000, in order to describe one of the different and potential sources of information on the drug's safety and effectiveness. It represents an "umbrella" term, which covers a multiplicity of meanings and primarily identifies a conceptual approach and a methodology specifically oriented to the patients' point of view on outcomes, instead of the traditional clinical and professional perspective. The patient-reported outcomes measures are frequently self-completed questionnaires. The measures can be classified in general and specific. The first one, general, relates to the assessment of the quality of life or the health status, in the general population or in subgroups with particular health problems (eg. SF-36 Health Survey, EQ-5D). The second one, specific, mainly relates to the assessment of particular types of symptoms (eg. pain, anxiety, fear, depression) and functions (eg. daily living activities), in population's subgroups with definite health problems, undergoing or not to a healthcare procedure (eg. Adult Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire, Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument, Oxford Hip Score, Oxford Knee Score). For the selection of an instrument a series of criteria needs to be taken into account, among which the psychometric properties, the expert judgement, the interpretability, the acceptability, and the feasibility of the entire process. PMID:25002284

  5. [Affect processing in psychosomatic patients. I].

    PubMed

    Ahrens, S

    1984-01-01

    The present article reports the results of an empirical investigation concerned with specific characteristics of psychosomatic patients. Subjects suffering from ulcus duodeni or from colitis ulcerosa designated as psychosomatic patients. Controls were chosen from among neurotic patients and from among patients with only somatic illness. Against the background of the criticism with regard to the scientific approaches so far, our own approach was conceived as an experiment. Film episodes of two contrating (friendly versus unfriendly) interactions between physician and patient were offered to the test subjects as triggering situations. The contents of these film segments were organized in a manner calculated to produce an affective embarrassment in the psychosomatic patients. The reactions of the test subjects were inventoried on two levels. One of the levels of investigation was geared to cognitive processes by the application of Hofstätter's list of polarities (1955, 1973). In this case the psychosomatic patients distinguished themselves from the two control groups in that they misinterpreted the differences in the affective contents of both film sequences. On the other level of investigation subconscious processes were recorded by the application of Gottschalk's analysis of verbal contents. In this context all three groups in the investigation reacted in a similar manner to friendly connotations in the behaviour of the physician, namely with hidden aggressions. The results infer an affective resonance of the investigated psychosomatic patients on a subconscious level which, however, does not become evident on the conscious cognitive level. PMID:6485587

  6. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  7. The impact of nursing on patient and organizational outcomes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Amelia M

    2007-01-01

    The impact of nursing on patient and organizational outcomes has received significant attention from researchers in the past 10 years. Although some research has been based on a theoretical framework, to date, there has not been one, consistent framework that can guide this research. In addition, the frameworks that have been used do not identify nursing as the pivotal concept in the model. The purpose of this article is to identify a framework to guide such research with an emphasis on nursing as the essential concept. Unit culture, nurse staffing, staffing mix, and other variables do not have a direct effect on outcomes. It is only through these variables' influence on the delivery of nursing care that outcomes are affected. PMID:17402676

  8. Race Affects Outcome among Infants with Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Robert H; Balint, Jane; Horslen, Simon; Wales, Paul W.; Soden, Jason; Duggan, Christopher; Li, Ruosha; Belle, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intestinal failure is a rare, devastating condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine if ethnic and racial differences were associated with patient survival and likelihood of receiving an intestinal transplant in a contemporary cohort of children with intestinal failure. Methods This was an analysis of a multicenter cohort study with data collected from chart review conducted by the Pediatric Intestinal Consortium (PIFCon). Entry criteria included infants < 12 mo receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) for > 60 continuous days and followed for at least 2 years. Outcomes included death and intestinal transplant (ITx). Race and ethnicity were recorded as they were in the medical record. For purposes of statistical comparisons and regression modeling, categories of race were consolidated into “white” and “non-white” children. Results Of 272 subjects enrolled, 204 white and 46 non-white children were available for analysis. The 48 month cumulative incidence probability (CIP) of death without ITx was 0.40 for non-white and 0.16 for white children (p<0.001); the CIP of ITx was 0.07 for non-white vs 0.31 for white children (p=0.003). The associations between race and outcomes remained after accounting for low-birth weight, diagnosis, and being seen at a transplant center. Conclusion Race is associated with death and receiving an ITx in a large cohort of children with intestinal failure. This study highlights the need to investigate reasons for this apparent racial disparity in outcome among children with intestinal failure. PMID:24918984

  9. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome.

    PubMed

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual's inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test-retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable across

  10. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  11. Hospital volume affects outcome after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Pamilo, Konsta J; Peltola, Mikko; Paloneva, Juha; Mäkelä, Keijo; Häkkinen, Unto; Remes, Ville

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The influence of hospital volume on the outcome of total knee joint replacement surgery is controversial. We evaluated nationwide data on the effect of hospital volume on length of stay, re-admission, revision, manipulation under anesthesia (MUA), and discharge disposition for total knee replacement (TKR) in Finland. Patients and methods 59,696 TKRs for primary osteoarthritis performed between 1998 and 2010 were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register and the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. Hospitals were classified into 4 groups according to the number of primary and revision knee arthroplasties performed on an annual basis throughout the study period: 1–99 (group 1), 100–249 (group 2), 250–449 (group 3), and ≥ 450 (group 4). The association between hospital procedure volume and length of stay (LOS), length of uninterrupted institutional care (LUIC), re-admissions, revisions, MUA, and discharge disposition were analyzed. Results The greater the volume of the hospital, the shorter was the average LOS and LUIC. Smaller hospital volume was not unambiguously associated with increased revision, re-admission, or MUA rates. The smaller the annual hospital volume, the more often patients were discharged home. Interpretation LOS and LUIC ought to be shortened in lower-volume hospitals. There is potential for a reduction in length of stay in extended institutional care facilities. PMID:25323798

  12. Patient care outcomes: implications for the Military Health Services System.

    PubMed

    Jennings, B M

    1993-05-01

    Policy makers are targeting patient outcomes and the effectiveness of interventions as possible ways to curb spiraling health care costs. Quality assurance/improvement programs are focusing on patient outcomes as a way to evaluate and improve care delivery. Consequently, members of the Military Health Services System need a solid understanding of the current emphasis on the outcomes of care to be knowledgeable participants in the health care changes precipitated by highlighting patient outcomes. PMID:8502389

  13. Midterm Outcome of Femoral Artery Stenting and Factors Affecting Patency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae Seoung; Park, Keun-Myoung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Shin, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early and midterm results of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting with self-expanding nitinol stents and to identify the factors affecting patency. Materials and Methods: SFA stenting was performed in 165 limbs of 117 patients from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients were followed-up for the first occurrence of occlusion or stenosis based on computed tomography and duplex scan results and a decrease in ankle brachial index of >15%. Results: During the follow-up period (mean, 15.3±3.2 months), no early thrombotic reocclusions occurred within 30 days, but in-stent restenosis developed in 78 limbs. The primary patency rates at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months were 78%, 66%, 42%, and 22%, respectively, and the secondary patency rates were 85%, 72%, 58%, and 58%, respectively. TASC II C or D lesions, stent length >8 cm, number of patent tibial arteries and diabetes were significantly associated with reintervention. Conclusion: The midterm results of stenting for SFA occlusive disease were disappointing because the primary and secondary patency rates at two years were 22% and 58%, respectively. Reintervention after SFA stenting remains a major problem, particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus or long TASC II C or D lesions. PMID:26719837

  14. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient's perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient's recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  15. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Systemic Sclerosis (Scleroderma).

    PubMed

    Pellar, Russell E; Tingey, Theresa M; Pope, Janet Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disease that can damage multiple organs and reduce quality of life. Patient-reported outcome measures capture the patient's perspective. Some measures are specific to systemic sclerosis and others are general. Patient-reported outcomes in systemic sclerosis are important to aid in understanding the impact of systemic sclerosis on patients. PMID:27133491

  16. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  17. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  18. PSEUDOBULBAR AFFECT IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Vidović, Viktor; Rovazdi, Merisanda Časar; Kraml, Oto; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pseudobulbar affect (PBA) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to analyze the link between PBA and patient age, sex, clinical course of MS, disease duration and degree of disability. The study was conducted on 79 MS patients that underwent inpatient rehabilitation at the Lipik Special Hospital for Medical Rehabilitation in the period from August 15, 2014 to February 15, 2015. PBA is a term used for an emotional disinhibition syndrome characterized by sudden and involuntary episodes of crying or laughing which are not in proportion to the stimulus applied or occur without stimulus. The condition can be present in patients with various neurological disorders, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, patients having recovered from stroke, or following traumatic brain injury. The estimated prevalence in patients with MS ranges from 10% to 46.2%. As a measuring instrument in the study, we used the Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS), where a sum 17 denoted positive finding. The total number of respondents was 79, of which 33 (41.8%) met the CNS-LS criteria for the diagnosis of PBA. There was no statistically significant correlation between PBA, age and degree of disability, although PBA was more common in women and in patients with a secondary progressive form of the disease. We found that 42.4% of respondents with positive CNS-LS criteria for PBA did not inform their neurologist on the presence of sudden mood changes. The high frequency of PBA and the fact that a significant proportion of patients did not inform the neurologist on their affective disturbances call for an active approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26415311

  19. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1) patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2) surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. Principal Findings We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333) of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623) of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150) used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150) as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150), primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61) of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59) in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22) in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months). Conclusions There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs. PMID:22916183

  20. Gender Affects Early Postoperative Outcomes of Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hee-Uk; Jung, Jae-Won; Lee, Young-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Background The literature does not provide consistent information on the impact of patients' gender on recovery after rotator cuff repair. The purpose of this study was to determine whether gender affects pain and functional recovery in the early postoperative period after rotator cuff repair. Methods Eighty patients (40 men and 40 women) were prospectively enrolled. Pain intensity and functional recovery were evaluated, using visual analog scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion on each of the first 5 postoperative days, at 2 and 6 weeks and at 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. Perioperative medication-related adverse effects and postoperative complications were also assessed. Results The mean VAS pain score was significantly higher for women than men at 2 weeks after surgery (p = 0.035). For all other periods, there was no significant difference between men and women in VAS pain scores, although women had higher scores than men. Mean forward flexion in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks after surgery (p = 0.033) and the mean degree of external rotation in women was significantly lower than men at 6 weeks (p = 0.007) and at 3 months (p = 0.017) after surgery. There was no significant difference in medication-related adverse effects or postoperative complications. Conclusions Women had more pain and slower recovery of shoulder motion than men during the first 3 months after rotator cuff repair. These findings can serve as guidelines for pain management and rehabilitation after surgery and can help explain postoperative recovery patterns to patients with scheduled rotator cuff repair. PMID:26217471

  1. A retrospective study of patient outcomes and satisfaction following pinnaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Nicholas; Smith, Caroline P; Cullen, Jim R; McCluney, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Up to 5% of all children have prominent ears. Psychological distress and bullying adversely affect these children and can cause significant social exclusion. In times of austerity, cosmetic procedures such as surgical correction of prominent ears are felt to be an unnecessary cost to the health service. Materials and methods A retrospective case note review of all patients undergoing pinnaplasty was undertaken. Postoperative outcomes were compared against the Royal College of Surgeons of England standards. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory, a validated post-intervention questionnaire, was then posted out to all patients. Results A total of 72 patients were identified. Average age at procedure was 13 years. Eleven patients were above the age of 19 years. Twenty-eight patients were male and forty-four female. Sixty-two cases underwent bilateral pinnaplasty. No patients developed hematoma, and there were no readmissions within 30 days of surgery. Twenty-nine patients responded to the questionnaire (40%), of whom 27 reported a positive impact on their psychosocial well-being with a mean score of 36. Conclusion Pinnaplasty offers patients an opportunity to alleviate the psychological distress of bullying and harassment secondary to the appearance of prominent ears. PMID:27307775

  2. Patient-Centered Endodontic Outcomes: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Hamedy, Reza; Shakiba, Bita; Fayazi, Sara; Pak, Jacklyn G; White, Shane N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Root canal treatment (RCT) success criteria inform us of the path to bony healing and of prognostic factors, but tell little about how the patient perceives, feels, or values RCT. Patients choose, undergo, and pay for RCT, they live with the result, and inform their community. The purpose of this narrative review was to appraise patient-centered outcomes of initial non-surgical RCT and nonsurgical retreatment, in adults. Materials and Methods Patient-centered RCT outcome themes were identified in the extant literature: quality of life, satisfaction, anxiety, fear, pain, tooth survival and cost. Narrative review was applied because the disparate themes and data were unsuited to systematic review or meta-analysis. Results Application of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) demonstrated that disease of pulpal origin affects quality of life with moderate severity, primarily through physical pain and psychological discomfort, and that RCT results in broad improvement of quality of life. Satisfaction with RCT is extremely high, but cost is the primary reason for dissatisfaction. Anxiety and fear affect RCT patients, profoundly influencing their behaviors, including treatment avoidance, and their pain experience. Fear of pain is “fair” to “very much” prior to RCT. Pain is widely feared, disliked, and remembered; however, disease of pulpal origin generally produces moderate, but not severe pain. RCT causes a dramatic decrease in pain prevalence and severity over the week following treatment. Survival rates of teeth after RCT are very high; complication rates are low. Cost is a barrier to RCT, but initial costs, lifetime costs, cost effectiveness, cost utility, and cost benefit all compare extremely well to the alternatives involving replacement using implants or fixed prostheses. Conclusion Dentists must strive to reduce anxiety, fear, experienced and remembered pain, and to accurately inform and educate their patients with respect to technical

  3. Relationship between Illness Perceptions, Treatment Adherence, And Clinical Outcomes in Patients On Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous data indicate that negative perception of disease and non-adherence to recommended treatment may lead to unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). However, a paucity of research addresses clinical outcomes in the end stage renal disease (ESRD) population as a function of patients’ illness perceptions and their degree of adherence to recommended treatment. The study was conducted to examine illness perceptions and treatment adherence rates in patients on maintenance HD, and to determine if illness perceptions and adherence behaviors influence clinical outcomes. One hundred fifty-one patients completed the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the ESRD-Adherence Questionnaire. Illness perceptions did not independently predict any clinical outcomes in patients on maintenance HD; however, specific adherence behaviors affected clinical outcomes. Therefore, strategies to enhance adherence should be rigorously pursued in this population to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:20629465

  4. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  5. Learning Outcomes in Affective Domain within Contemporary Architectural Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savic, Marko; Kashef, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary architectural education has shifted from the traditional focus on providing students with specific knowledge and skill sets or "inputs" to outcome based, student-centred educational approach. Within the outcome based model, students' performance is assessed against measureable objectives that relate acquired knowledge…

  6. Does Treatment Duration Affect Outcome After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, David J.; Li Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.; Chen, David Y.T.; Pollack, Alan; Buyyounouski, Mark K.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The protraction of external beam radiotherapy (RT) time is detrimental in several disease sites. In prostate cancer, the overall treatment time can be considerable, as can the potential for treatment breaks. We evaluated the effect of elapsed treatment time on outcome after RT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 1989 and November 2004, 1,796 men with prostate cancer were treated with RT alone. The nontreatment day ratio (NTDR) was defined as the number of nontreatment days divided by the total elapsed days of RT. This ratio was used to account for the relationship between treatment duration and total RT dose. Men were stratified into low risk (n = 789), intermediate risk (n = 798), and high risk (n = 209) using a single-factor model. Results: The 10-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rate was 68% for a NTDR <33% vs. 58% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.02; BF was defined as a prostate-specific antigen nadir + 2 ng/mL). In the low-risk group, the 10-year FFBF rate was 82% for NTDR <33% vs. 57% for NTDR {>=}33% (p = 0.0019). The NTDR was independently predictive for FFBF (p = 0.03), in addition to T stage (p = 0.005) and initial prostate-specific antigen level (p < 0.0001) on multivariate analysis, including Gleason score and radiation dose. The NTDR was not a significant predictor of FFBF when examined in the intermediate-risk group, high-risk group, or all risk groups combined. Conclusions: A proportionally longer treatment duration was identified as an adverse factor in low-risk patients. Treatment breaks resulting in a NTDR of {>=}33% (e.g., four or more breaks during a 40-fraction treatment, 5 d/wk) should be avoided.

  7. Maximizing patient adherence for optimal outcomes in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Bewley, A; Page, B

    2011-06-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, disabling disease in which adherence to treatment is often poor. The aim of this article is to highlight the problem of adherence to long-term treatment in psoriasis and the factors that contribute to it, and to discuss how adherence, and thus outcomes, can be improved. This article is based on a presentation given by the authors at a satellite symposium held during the 19th Congress of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 6-10 October, 2010, in Gothenburg, Sweden. Adherence to topical medication is a major problem in psoriasis. Not only are prescriptions not being filled by patients (primary adherence) but topical medications are not being used as recommended (secondary adherence). The issue is complex due to the many factors which affect adherence, including efficacy, ease of use and convenience of application, and the healthcare professional-patient relationship. Due to the nature of the disease, patients suffer poor self-image and feel stigmatized, particularly when psoriasis is present on a visible part of the body. Consequently, the negative impact of psoriasis on patient quality of life underlies many adherence issues. It is therefore important for treatment to address the psychological aspects as well as the physical symptoms of psoriasis. Improvements in several areas of disease management may lead to benefits in medication adherence and hence clinical benefit. Prescribing therapy in line with patient preference for treatment vehicle and improving the healthcare professional-patient relationship may be key factors. Nurses have an important role in educating patients and delivering long-term care. This individualized, personal, approach may help improve treatment adherence, outcomes, and the quality of life for patients with psoriasis. PMID:21507078

  8. Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

  9. Effects of a safe patient handling and mobility program on patient self-care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Darragh, Amy R; Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

  10. Assessment of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cormier, Janice N.; Askew, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Assessment of patient reported outcomes (PROs) has been shown to provide important information to assist with clinical decision-making. There has been significant progress in the field of PROs over the last two decades with the introduction of a variety of validated disease- and symptom-specific instruments. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Melanoma (FACT-M) is a melanoma-specific module to accompany the FACT-General which has been validated to assess health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with all stages of melanoma. Melanoma-specific health state utilities, which are essential for calculating quality adjusted life years and performing cost-effectiveness studies, have also been reported from a number of studies. Assessment of PROs should be incorporated into routine clinical practice to inform clinicians and researchers of the patient perspective for clinical decision-making and to evaluate the effects of psychosocial and medical interventions. PMID:21111967

  11. Improving outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Tidman, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Psoriasis is a heterogeneous inflammatory disorder that targets the skin and joints. It affects 1.3-2% of the population. The diagnosis of plaque psoriasis is usually straightforward, a helpful diagnostic clue is the tendency for silver scales to appear after gentle scratching of a lesion. Stress, streptococcal infection and drugs including beta-blockers, antimalarials and lithium may precipitate or exacerbate psoriasis. Psoriasis, especially when severe, predisposes to metabolic syndrome, and patients with psoriasis are at increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidaemia. Additionally, psoriasis sufferers appear at increased risk of uveitis, inflammatory boweldisease, lymphoma, non-melanoma skin cancer, COPD and venous thromboembolism. Psoriasis should be assessed on the basis of: severity, impact on physical, psychological and social wellbeing, symptoms of arthritis and the presence of comorbidities. Poor response to topical therapy may be as much to do with lack of compliance as with lack of efficacy. The number of treatments each day should be kept to a minimum, and patients should be reviewed after four weeks when initiating or changing topical therapy to improve adherence to treatment and assess response. The majority of patients with psoriasis can be managed in primary care, although specialist care may be necessary at some point in up to 60% of cases. Patients with erythrodermic or generalised pustular psoriasis should be referred for a same day dermatological opinion, and if psoriatic arthritis is suspected, early referral for a rheumatological opinion is recommended. PMID:23469725

  12. Spirituality and religiousness as predictive factors of outcome in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Sylvia; Perroud, Nader; Gillieron, Christiane; Brandt, Pierre-Yves; Rieben, Isabelle; Borras, Laurence; Huguelet, Philippe

    2011-04-30

    Spirituality and religiousness have been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. This study assesses the predictive value of helpful vs. harmful use of religion to cope with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder at 3 years. From an initial cohort of 115 outpatients, 80% were reassessed for positive, negative and general symptoms, clinical global impression, social adaptation and quality of life. For patients with helpful religion at baseline, the importance of spirituality was predictive of fewer negative symptoms, better clinical global impression, social functioning and quality of life. The frequencies of religious practices in community and support from religious community had no effect on outcome. For patients with harmful religion at baseline, no relationships were elicited. This result may be due to sample size. Indeed, helpful spiritual/religious coping concerns 83% of patients, whereas harmful spiritual/religious coping concerns only 14% of patients. Our study shows that helpful use of spirituality is predictive of a better outcome. Spirituality may facilitate recovery by providing resources for coping with symptoms. In some cases, however, spirituality and religiousness are a source of suffering. Helpful vs. harmful spiritual/religious coping appears to be of clinical significance. PMID:20869123

  13. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  14. Patient reported outcomes in hip arthroplasty registries.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    -retest). I found that the translated PRO had good feasibility, an excellent response rate, no floor effect, but a high ceiling effect (as was expected with our postoperative patients) and few patients missed too many items to calculate a sum score. The translated PRO had high test-retest reliability and very high internal consistency, and appears to be a valid and reliable tool for outcome studies on THA patients in a hip registry setting. The MCII and PASS study included 1,335 patients, and I estimated that one year after THA, an improvement of 38-55% from mean baseline PRO score and absolute follow-up scores of 57-91% of the maximum score correspond to a minimal important improvement and acceptable symptom state, respectively. PMID:24814747

  15. Does therapist’s attitude affect clinical outcome of lumbar facet joint injections?

    PubMed Central

    Middendorp, Marcus; Kollias, Konstantinos; Ackermann, Hanns; Splettstößer, Annina; Vogl, Thomas J; Khan, M Fawad; Maataoui, Adel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the clinical outcome of intra-articular lumbar facet joint injections is affected by the therapist’s attitude. METHODS: A total of 40 patients with facet joint-associated chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. All patients received computed tomography-guided, monosegmental intra-articular facet joint injections. Following the therapeutic procedure, the patients of the experimental group (EG) held a conversation with the radiologist in a comfortable atmosphere. During the dialog, the patients were encouraged to ask questions and were shown four images. The patients of the control group (CG) left the clinic without any further contact with the radiologist. Outcome was assessed using a pain-based Verbal Numeric Scale at baseline, at 1 wk and at 1, 3, and 6 mo after first treatment. RESULTS: The patient demographics showed no differences between the groups. The patients of the EG received 57 interventional procedures in total, while the patients of the CG received 70 interventional procedures. In both groups, the pain scores decreased significantly over the entire observation period. Compared to the CG, the EG showed a statistically significant reduction of pain at 1 wk and 1 mo post-treatment, while at 3 and 6 mo after treatment, there were no significant differences between both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show a significant effect on pain relief during the early post-interventional period in the EG as compared to the CG. The basic principle behind the higher efficacy might be the phenomenon of hetero-suggestion. PMID:27358691

  16. Laryngomalacia: patient outcomes following aryepiglottoplasty at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, A Erim; Süslü, Nilda; Günaydın, R Onder; Atay, Gamze; Akyol, Umut

    2013-01-01

    Laryngomalacia is the most common cause of stridor in neonates and infants. Most cases are mild and resolve spontaneously without treatment. Only severe cases with intolerable symptoms require surgical intervention; in such cases, supraglottoplasty is considered the treatment of choice. The aim of this study was to review and present the outcomes in patients with laryngomalacia who underwent aryepiglottoplasty-a type of supraglottoplasty. The medical records of children diagnosed as laryngomalacia who were followed up at Hacettepe University Hospital, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The study included 16 children who required surgical intervention. The mean age of the 16 children included in the study was 133 days (range: 7 days-48 months). Among the patients, 9 (56%) were male and 7 (44%) were female. In all, 7 patients (44%) had a comorbid condition. Laryngomalacia diagnoses were as follows: type I: n = 2, 13%; type II: n = 13, 81%; type III: n= 1, 6%. Stridor completely resolved in 10 of the children who underwent aryepiglottoplasty. Three patients required tracheotomy and 3 required revision supraglottoplasty; these six cases were considered as failed surgical treatment. The aryepiglottoplasty success rate was 63%. None of the patients had any intraoperative or postoperative complications. Despite the primarily benign nature of laryngomalacia, comorbid conditions can exacerbate symptoms and negatively affect the prognosis. Aryepiglottoplasty can be performed with high success and low complication rates in properly selected patients. PMID:24382534

  17. The Expectation Game: Patient Comprehension Is a Determinant of Outcome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Michael J; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Lubowitz, James H

    2015-12-01

    Patient comprehension of orthopaedic procedures is low and their expectations for successful outcomes are often unrealistic. Surgeons need to understand this and guide patients toward sensible expectations. PMID:26652147

  18. The impact of patient preselection on reported IVF outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H

    2016-04-01

    We, in this manuscript, address the fact that increasing numbers of published studies in reproductive medicine selectively report outcomes for only favorably selected patients; while failing to note that, so reported outcome data,therefore, cannot be applied to unselected patient populations. Almost all favorablepatient selection methods, starting with prolonged embryo culture to blastocyst stage, have, thus, been widely misrepresented in the literature since they almost universally report outcomes only in reference to embryo transfer. These outcome reports, however, do not include outcomes for poorer prognosis patients who do not reach embryo transfer. Study outcomes are universally applicable only if performed in unselected patient populations and reported with reference point cycle start (intent to treat). All other studies greatly exaggerate clinical pregnancy and live birth rates if applied to general populations, unless specifically noting that they can be extrapolated only to women who reach embryo transfer. PMID:26861966

  19. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  20. Classifying outcomes of care for injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nathaniel; Sobolev, Boris; Townson, Andrea; Evans, David C.; Anton, Hugh; Simons, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many trauma survivors face challenges of impaired functioning, limited activities and reduced participation. Recovery from injury after acute care, therefore, becomes an important public health issue. This commentary discusses a framework for evaluating outcomes of acute care. PMID:25421077

  1. How much do immigration and trade affect labor market outcomes?

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J; Freeman, R B; Katz, L F

    1997-01-01

    "This paper provides new estimates of the impact of immigration and trade on the U.S. labor market.... We examine the relation between economic outcomes for native workers and immigrant flows to regional labor markets.... We...use the factor proportions approach to examine the contributions of immigration and trade to recent changes in U.S. educational wage differentials and attempt to provide a broader assessment of the impact of immigration on the incomes of U.S. natives." Comments and discussion by John DiNardo, John M. Abowd, and others are included (pp. 68-85). PMID:12321914

  2. Connectivity-Based Predictions of Hand Motor Outcome for Patients at the Subacute Stage After Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Julia; Domin, Martin; Grothe, Matthias; Horn, Ulrike; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Lotze, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Connectivity-based predictions of hand motor outcome have been proposed to be useful in stroke patients. We intended to assess the prognostic value of different imaging methods on short-term (3 months) and long-term (6 months) motor outcome after stroke. Methods: We measured resting state functional connectivity (rsFC), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and grip strength in 19 stroke patients within the first days (5–9 days) after stroke. Outcome measurements for short-term (3 months) and long-term (6 months) motor function was assessed by the Motricity Index (MI) of the upper limb and the box and block test (BB). Patients were predominantly mildly affected since signed consent was necessary at inclusion. We performed a multiple stepwise regression analysis to compare the predictive value of rsFC, DWI and clinical measurements. Results: Patients showed relevant improvement in both motor outcome tests. As expected grip strength at inclusion was a predictor for short- and long-term motor outcome as assessed by MI. Diffusion-based tract volume (DTV) of the tracts between ipsilesional primary motor cortex and contralesional anterior cerebellar hemisphere showed a strong trend (p = 0.05) for a predictive power for long-term motor outcome as measured by MI. DTV of the interhemispheric tracts between both primary motor cortices was predictive for both short- and long-term motor outcome in BB. rsFC was not associated with motor outcome. Conclusions: Grip strength is a good predictor of hand motor outcome concerning strength-related measurements (MI) for mildly affected subacute patients. Therefore additional connectivity measurements seem to be redundant in this group. Using more complex movement recruiting bilateral motor areas as an outcome parameter, DTV and in particular interhemispheric pathways might enhance predictive value of hand motor outcome. PMID:27014032

  3. Treatment Outcome in Patients Receiving Assertive Community Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C. L.; Roosenschoon, B. J.; Wiersma, D.

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study of severely mentally ill patients treated in assertive community treatment (ACT) teams, we investigated how treatment outcome was associated with demographic factors, clinical factors, and motivation for treatment. To determine psychosocial outcome, patients were routinely assessed using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Trends over time were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures. The HoNOS total score was modeled as a function of treatment duration and patient-dependent covariates. Data comprised 637 assessments of 139 patients; mean duration of follow-up was 27.4 months (SD = 5.4). Substance abuse, higher age, problems with motivation, and lower educational level were associated with higher HoNOS total scores (i.e., worse outcome). To improve treatment outcome, we recommend better implementation of ACT, and also the implementation of additional programs targeting subgroups which seem to benefit less from ACT. PMID:19847646

  4. The Synergistic Effect of Affective Factors on Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady Michael; Lin, Huann-shyang; Yore, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how affective and self-related factors impact participation in science learning and environmental awareness and responsibility. Using PISA 2006 datasets from Taiwan and Canada having similar level of science competency, the model for this study verifies and expands an earlier model by examining the relationships among…

  5. Cognitive and Affective Learning Outcomes of Gifted Elementary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delcourt, Marcia A. B.; Cornell, Dewey G.; Goldberg, Marc D.

    2007-01-01

    This project was a 2-year investigation of elementary school children placed in programs for high-ability learners. The primary purpose of the study was to investigate academic and affective changes in students during their first 2 years in a gifted program. Students were assessed during the fall of one year and the spring of the next year.…

  6. Higher Education for Sustainability: Seeking Affective Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to interpret aspects of education for sustainability in relation to educational theories of the affective domain (values, attitudes and behaviours) and suggest how the use of these theories, and relevant experience, in other educational areas could benefit education for sustainability.…

  7. Family-School Links: How Do They Affect Educational Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan, Ed.; Dunn, Judith F., Ed.

    This book explores issues related to the links between families and schools and how they affect children's educational achievement, and is organized as follows: Part 1, titled "Families and Schools: How Can They Work Together To Promote Children's School Success?" contains the following chapters: chapter 1, "Family Involvement in Chidrens' and…

  8. Secondary science classroom dissections: Informing policy by evaluating cognitive outcomes and exploring affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allspaw, Kathleen M.

    Animal protection organizations claim that dissection is pedagogically unsound and that it will cause students to lose respect for non-human animals. Science teacher organizations support curricula that teach respect for animal life and include dissection. Prior research compared dissection to dissection alternatives. Four of the six studies revealed no difference between groups on tests of cognitive outcomes. One study revealed that dissection was superior, and one revealed that the alternative was superior. No differences in attitudes toward science, dissection or school were found. Attitudes toward non-human animals were not measured. This study focused on the dissections of earthworms and frogs in middle and high school classrooms. Pre and post-tests of conceptual understanding revealed failing scores and no significant pre/post differences. Because these tests required critical thinking skills, and the dissection activities did not, it is difficult to determine if the poor performance on these tests indicates the inability of the students to think critically, and/or if it indicates the ineffectiveness of dissection. Further studies of dissections that focus on critical thinking would be necessary to make this distinction. Classroom observations, student written narratives, and student and adult interviews revealed mixed attitudes toward non-human animals. Student behaviors during dissection were similar to those behaviors exhibited during non-dissection activities. Most students and adults readily supported worm dissections while they expressed some trepidation about frog dissections. Students and adults universally expressed affection for their pets and opposed the use of their own pets for dissection/research. There was slight support for the use of dogs and cats for dissection/research, but only those students who expressed hate for cats said that they could dissect cats. None of the students or adults expressed a willingness to dissect dogs. Some students

  9. Lifestyle-Related Diseases Affect Surgical Outcomes after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

    PubMed

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Hyperlipidemia (HL) and hypertension (HT) lead to systemic atherosclerosis. Not only atherosclerosis but also bone fragility and/or low bone mineral density result from diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The purpose of this study was to examine whether these lifestyle-related diseases affected surgical outcomes after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Methods The subjects comprised 122 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF for degenerative lumbar spinal disorders. The clinical results were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score before surgery and at 2 years postoperatively. The fusion status was graded as union in situ, collapsed union, or nonunion at 2 years after surgery. The abdominal aorta calcification (AAC) score was assessed using preoperative lateral radiographs of the lumbar spine. Results HL did not significantly affect the JOA score recovery rate. On the other hand, HT and CKD (stage 3 to 4) had a significant adverse effect on the recovery rate. The recovery rate was also lower in the DM group than in the non-DM group, but the difference was not significant. The AAC score was negatively correlated with the JOA score recovery rate. The fusion status was not significantly affected by HL, HT, DM, or CKD; however, the AAC score was significantly higher in the collapsed union and nonunion group than in the union in situ group. Conclusions At 2 years after PLIF, the presence of HT, CKD, and AAC was associated with significantly worse clinical outcomes, and advanced AAC significantly affected fusion status. PMID:26835195

  10. Moving the Needle: Simulation's Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Tiffany; Seymour, Neal; Stefanidis, Dimitrios

    2015-08-01

    This review investigates the available literature that addresses the impact simulator training has on patient outcomes. The authors conducted a comprehensive literature search of studies reporting outcomes of simulation training and categorized studies based on the Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation. Kirkpatrick level 4 studies reporting patient outcomes were identified and included in this review. Existing evidence is promising, demonstrating patient benefits as a result of simulation training for central line placement, obstetric emergencies, cataract surgery, laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair, and team training. PMID:26210974

  11. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  12. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Camuzeaux, Stephane S.M.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B.; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I.; Livingston, John H.; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F.; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W. Kling; Pitt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin

  13. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome.

    PubMed

    Mills, Philippa B; Camuzeaux, Stephane S M; Footitt, Emma J; Mills, Kevin A; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B; Varadkar, Sophia M; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I; Livingston, John H; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W Kling; Pitt, Matthew; Clayton, Peter T

    2014-05-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5'-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin mononucleotide or

  14. Clinical outcomes and mortality in elderly peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sakacı, Tamer; Ahbap, Elbis; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Ucar, Zuhal Atan; Sınangıl, Ayse; Sevınc, Mustafa; Kara, Ekrem; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu Ozdemır; Caglayan, Feyza Bayraktar; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Ünsal, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and identify the predictors of mortality in elderly patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study including all incident peritoneal dialysis cases in patients ≥65 years of age treated from 2001 to 2014. Demographic and clinical data on the initiation of peritoneal dialysis and the clinical events during the study period were collected. Infectious complications were recorded. Overall and technique survival rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients who began peritoneal dialysis during the study period were considered for analysis, and 50 of these patients were included in the final analysis. Peritoneal dialysis exchanges were performed by another person for 65% of the patients, whereas 79.9% of patients preferred to perform the peritoneal dialysis themselves. Peritonitis and catheter exit site/tunnel infection incidences were 20.4±16.3 and 24.6±17.4 patient-months, respectively. During the follow-up period, 40 patients were withdrawn from peritoneal dialysis. Causes of death included peritonitis and/or sepsis (50%) and cardiovascular events (30%). The mean patient survival time was 38.9±4.3 months, and the survival rates were 78.8%, 66.8%, 50.9% and 19.5% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after peritoneal dialysis initiation, respectively. Advanced age, the presence of additional diseases, increased episodes of peritonitis, the use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, and low albumin levels and daily urine volumes (<100 ml) at the initiation of peritoneal dialysis were predictors of mortality. The mean technique survival duration was 61.7±5.2 months. The technique survival rates were 97.9%, 90.6%, 81.5% and 71% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years, respectively. None of the factors analyzed were predictors of technique survival. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was higher in elderly patients. Factors affecting mortality in elderly patients included advanced age, the presence of comorbid

  15. Physician's Death Anxiety and Patient Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Richard; Aderman, David

    1978-01-01

    It was shown that terminal patients of physicians with high death anxiety survive longer during their final hospital stay than terminal patients of physicians with low death anxiety. Physicians high in death anxiety seem to be less willing to accept patients' terminality and use heroic measures to keep them alive. (Author)

  16. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm. PMID:27442399

  17. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  18. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  19. Psychosocial Environment and Affective Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms: Testing a Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation,…

  20. Factors affecting medication discontinuation in patients with overactive bladder symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Donguk

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find out the factors affecting medication discontinuation in patients with overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms. Methods The clinical data of 125 patients with OAB symptoms who had taken antimuscarinics and behavioral therapy were retrospectively reviewed. Antimuscarinics related outcomes were evaluated by an independent observer with telephone interview. All patients were asked about duration of medication and reason of continuation or discontinuation of antimuscarinics. To determine pre-treatment factors predicting self-report discontinuation of antimuscarinics, variables of only those with P-values <0.25 on the univariate analysis were included in the Cox proportional hazard modeling. Results Mean follow-up was 39.6 months and the proportion of discontinuation of antimuscarinics was 60.0% (75/125). The mean duration of medication was 21.2 months in the continuation group and 3.3 months in the discontinuation group. The reasons of discontinuation of antimuscarinics were improved OAB symptoms (46.7%), tolerable OAB symptoms (33.3%), no change of OAB symptoms (1.3%), side-effects (8.0%) and no desire to take long-term medication (10.7%). The variables affecting remaining cumulative probability of antimuscarinics were age, history of anti-incontinence surgery or vaginal surgery, and having stress predominant urinary incontinence on urodynamic study. Conclusion The lower rate of cumulative continuation of antimuscarinics encourages us to give a more detailed counseling and education to the patients with OAB symptoms before prescription. And explorations about newer agent and non-pharmacologic treatment with good efficacy and lower side-effects are needed. PMID:26623416

  1. The Effect of Community Pharmacy–Based Interventions on Patient Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Blalock, Susan J.; Roberts, Andrew W.; Lauffenburger, Julie C.; Thompson, Trey; O'Connor, Shanna K.

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects that pharmacist-provided patient care services can have on patient health outcomes. However, the effectiveness of patient care services delivered by pharmacists in community pharmacy settings, where organizational barriers may affect service implementation or limit effectiveness, remains unclear. The authors systematically reviewed the literature on the effectiveness of pharmacist-delivered patient care services in community pharmacy settings in the United States. Of the 749 articles retrieved, 21 were eligible for inclusion in the review. Information concerning 134 outcomes was extracted from the included articles. Of these, 50 (37.3%) demonstrated statistically significant, beneficial intervention effects. The percentage of studies reporting favorable findings ranged from 50% for blood pressure to 0% for lipids, safety outcomes, and quality of life. Our findings suggest that evidence supporting the effectiveness of pharmacist-provided direct patient care services delivered in the community pharmacy setting is more limited than in other settings. PMID:23035056

  2. Intervention Outcomes among HIV-affected Families Over 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rice, Eric; Comulada, W. Scott; Best, Karin; Elia, Carla; Peters, Katherine; Li, Li; Green, Sara; Valladares, Ena

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of a family-based intervention over time among HIV-affected families. Mothers Living with HIV (MLH; n=339) in Los Angeles and their school-aged children were randomized to either an intervention or control condition and followed for 18 months. MLH and their children in the intervention received 16 cognitive-behavioral, small-group sessions designed to help them maintain physical and mental health, parent while ill, address HIV-related stressors, and reduce HIV-transmission behaviors. At recruitment, MLH reported few problem behaviors related to physical health, mental health, or sexual or drug transmission acts. Compared to MLH in the control condition, intervention MLH were significantly more likely to monitor their own CD4 cell counts and their children were more likely to decrease alcohol and drug use. Most MLH and their children had relatively healthy family relationships. Family-based HIV interventions should be limited to MLH who are experiencing substantial problems. PMID:22020758

  3. Prediction and diagnosis of clinical outcomes affecting restoration margins.

    PubMed

    Dennison, J B; Sarrett, D C

    2012-04-01

    The longevity of dental restorations is largely dependent on the continuity at the interface between the restorative material and adjacent tooth structure (the restoration margin). Clinical decisions on restoration repair or replacement are usually based upon the weakest point along that margin interface. Physical properties of a restorative material, such as polymerisation shrinkage, water sorption, solubility, elastic modulus and shear strength, all have an effect on stress distribution and can significantly affect margin integrity. This review will focus on two aspects of margin deterioration in the oral environment: the in vitro testing of margin seal using emersion techniques to simulate the oral environment and to predict clinical margin failure and the relationship between clinically observable microleakage and secondary caries. The many variables associated with in vitro testing of marginal leakage and the interpretation of the data are presented in detail. The most recent studies of marginal leakage mirror earlier methodology and lack validity and reliability. The lack of standardised testing procedures makes it impossible to compare studies or to predict the clinical performance of adhesive materials. Continual repeated in vitro studies contribute little to the science in this area. Clinical evidence is cited to refute earlier conclusions that clinical microleakage (penetrating margin discoloration) leads to caries development and is an indication for restoration replacement. Margin defects, without visible evidence of soft dentin on the wall or base of the defect, should be monitored, repaired or resealed, in lieu of total restoration replacement. PMID:22066463

  4. Patient-Centered Outcomes Research (PCOR): How Can We Optimize Outcomes in CNS Research?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anil; Battaglia, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient-centered outcomes research increases patient involvement in health-related decisions with better information of benefits, risks, and options as it pertains to patient health. Patient-centered outcomes research is valuable for improving patient options in general; however, the vulnerability of patients with certain central nervous system conditions and their variable capacity to consent may pose significant challenges. Methods/review: Authors acknowledge the historical issues and address needs regarding better dissemination of knowledge in central nervous system conditions like dementia, depression, and schizophrenia. Authors propose ethical safeguards necessary to carry out sound patient-centered outcomes research in this unique population. Discussion/recommendations: To facilitate ethical patient-centered outcomes research, researchers must 1) assess the individual’s mental capacity to provide consent, 2) determine vulnerability and risk of conducting research in specific subgroups, and 3) consider appointment of legally authorized representatives and/or consent monitors to ensure accurate understanding of research and ongoing direct communication with patients, especially when their future prognosis is unpredictable. PMID:26000203

  5. Factors affecting long-term outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukaemia: a retrospective study of 172 adult patients reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Greinix, Hildegard T; Nachbaur, David; Krieger, Otto; Eibl, Margit; Knöbl, Paul; Kalhs, Peter; Lutz, Dieter; Linkesch, Werner; Niederwieser, Dietger; Hinterberger, Wolfgang; Lechner, Klaus; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Gritsch, Beate

    2002-06-01

    Between 1982 and 2000, 172 patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) received haematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCT) from related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 40) donors at four Austrian transplant centres and their results were reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry. Conditioning for SCT consisted of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation in 156 (91%) patients. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was with standard cyclosporine and methotrexate in 95 (55%) patients. Median post-transplant follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 0.2--16.7). Multivariate analysis of transplant-related mortality (TRM) identified four variables associated with a lower risk: disease status of first complete remission (CR) at SCT, patient age of 45 years and younger, transplant performed during or after 1995, and lack of acute GVHD. Variables associated with significantly improved leukaemia-free survival were: bone marrow as the stem cell source, disease status of first CR at SCT, and occurrence of chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, transplantation performed during or after 1995, first CR at SCT, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD and lack of acute GVHD grades III to IV were associated with increased overall survival. Based on these analyses, options for the improvement of results obtained with allogeneic SCT in patients with AML could be defined. PMID:12060131

  6. Delay of Treatment Initiation Does Not Adversely Affect Survival Outcome in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Han, Wonshik; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kim, Jisun; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Eunshin; Kim, Jongjin; Noh, Dong-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies examining the relationship between time to treatment and survival outcome in breast cancer have shown inconsistent results. The aim of this study was to analyze the overall impact of delay of treatment initiation on patient survival and to determine whether certain subgroups require more prompt initiation of treatment. Materials and Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of stage I-III patients who were treated in a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2008. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression model were used to evaluate the impact of interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation in breast cancer and various subgroups. Results A total of 1,702 patients were included. Factors associated with longer delay of treatment initiation were diagnosis at another hospital, medical comorbidities, and procedures performed before admission for surgery. An interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation as a continuous variable or with a cutoff value of 15, 30, 45, and 60 days had no impact on disease-free survival (DFS). Subgroup analyses for hormone-responsiveness, triple-negative breast cancer, young age, clinical stage, and type of initial treatment showed no significant association between longer delay of treatment initiation and DFS. Conclusion Our results show that an interval between diagnosis and treatment initiation of 60 days or shorter does not appear to adversely affect DFS in breast cancer. PMID:26511801

  7. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Jacob, Gitta A.; Brändle, Laura S.; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes. PMID:25152662

  8. Hot Climate and Perioperative Outcome in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna; Katyal, Sunil; Gautam, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extreme hot climatic conditions constitute a major public health threat. Recent studies have shown higher rate of perioperative complications during hot weather. Although a lot of researches have been carried out to evaluate effect of hot climatic conditions and its correlation with other medical conditions, but very little has been studied in trauma patients. Aim To evaluate the impact of hot climatic conditions on perioperative morbidity in trauma patients. Materials and Methods We enrolled 100 trauma patients scheduled for surgery after approval by the Hospital and University Ethical Committee. Patients were grouped as Control Group (C) when outdoor temperature ranged in comfortable zone i.e., 20-290C and Study Group (S) when outdoor temperature ranged 400C or more. Patients living in regular air conditioned atmosphere (more than 18 hours per day) and with co-morbid conditions or on drugs interfering with temperature regulation were excluded. Student’s t-test, z-test and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics, age (control group C=38.2±12.93 years and in group S= 40.14 ± 15.98 years), sex, socioeconomic status and type of surgery. Mean Trauma Index Score (TIS) were 6.20±1.56 and 5.80±1.31 respectively. All patients were of low risk as per Shoe Maker’s risk criteria. Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) stay was similar. Mean duration of hospital stay was 12.16 ± 8.50 days in group C and 10.98 ± 6.90 days in group S (p-value 0.21). 20% patients in group C whereas 54% in group S had complications (p= 0.009). There was a higher incidence of infections as well as respiratory distress in group S. On multiple logistic regression analysis peak environmental temperature was found to be the single independent risk factor for predicting perioperative morbidity. Conclusion High ambient temperature adversely affects the outcome of surgery even in low risk young trauma patients

  9. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  10. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier.

    PubMed

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants' comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)-no feedback-was on average "slightly uncomfortable", the other three conditions were "slightly comfortable" (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  11. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  12. Outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Clinical experience with 68 patients.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Raffaele; Boniardi, Marco; Sansonna, Fabio; Maggioni, Dario; De Carli, Stefano; Costanzi, Andrea; Scandroglio, Ildo; Ferrari, Giovanni Carlo; Di Lernia, Stefano; Magistro, Carmelo; Loli, Paola; Grossrubatscher, Erika

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy (LA). Pathology, size and bilateral site of lesions were considered. Between December 1998 and May 2007 in our institution a total of 68 patients of mean age of 53 years underwent unilateral (n=57) or bilateral (n=11) LA. Adrenal masses averaged 5.4cm in size (range 1.2-13cm) and 56.7g in weight (range 10-265) including 71 benign and 8 malignant lesions. A total of 79 adrenal glands were resected, 44 right sided and 35 left sided. Removal was complete in 77 cases and partial (sparing adrenalectomy) in 1 patient affected by bilateral pheochomocytoma. Three left adrenalectomies for pheochromocytoma were robot-assisted. The transperitoneal lateral approach was preferred and the posterior retroperitoneal approach was adopted in 5 patients. The mean duration of surgery for each LA was 138+/-90min and 3.8 trocar were used on average (range 3-6). Conversion was needed in 3 cases owing to difficult dissection of large masses. Estimated mean blood loss for each LA was 95+/-30ml and it was greater for bilateral LA. Mortality was nil and morbidity was 5.8%. The average length of hospital stay (LOS) in surgical unit was 4+/-2.4 days (range 2-8). Patients affected by hormone secreting or bilateral lesions, by unilateral or bilateral pheochromocytoma and by bilateral Cushing's disease were transferred to the endocrinological ward so that their overall hospital stay was prolonged to 9+/-2.8 days on average (range 7-17). Mean duration of follow-up of patients was 38 months (range 2-100) and demonstrated acceptable endocrine results. Three primary cortical carcinomas were discovered as chance findings on histologic examination. While long-term results after LA for cortical carcinomas were poor and LA is not recommended in such cases, long-term results after LA for adrenal metastases were encouraging. PMID:17949973

  13. Ophthalmological outcomes of patients treated for pineal region tumors.

    PubMed

    Hankinson, Elizabeth V; Lyons, Christopher J; Hukin, Juliette; Cochrane, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The ophthalmological outcomes of children treated for pineal tumors have received limited attention in the literature. METHODS This paper reviews the outcomes of 29 children treated for pineal and posterior third ventricular tumors in the contemporary era using chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and resection as defined by the histology and/or marker profile of the tumor. RESULTS At the time of diagnosis, all patients except 1 had hydrocephalus and all had ophthalmological involvement. Papilledema was found in 69% of patients. Seventy-five percent of patients had partial or complete Parinaud's syndrome, and diplopia or blurred vision was noted in the remaining patients. Visual acuity was impaired in 8 patients. Outcomes were dependent on the histology of the tumor and the treatment required. Those patients who did not requiring resection showed a lower rate of ophthalmological worsening during treatment and greater long-term improvement, in particular with respect to up-gaze palsy. Patients who underwent resection for postchemotherapy residual disease or primary resection showed greater worsening during treatment and lesser degrees of recovery. All patients with impaired visual acuity improved with treatment. CONCLUSIONS As the mortality of germ cell and other pineal tumors decreases, posttreatment morbidity remains, specifically that related to convergence nystagmus, accommodation, and diplopia. In addition to survival, ophthalmological morbidity should be reported in studies concerning the outcomes of treatment for pineal neoplasms. PMID:26799411

  14. The History of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Leigh F

    2016-05-01

    The rheumatology community began incorporating patient-reported outcomes in the early 1980s, helping shift the care of chronic diseases from a narrower biomedical model to a broader biopsychosocial model of health. Early efforts were focused primarily in clinical trials and clinical research, but over the last decade there has been increasing use in routine rheumatology clinical care. More than 250 valid and reliable scales to assess domains of importance to patients with rheumatic conditions have been developed. The approach to measurement continues to be refined. Rheumatology has much to be proud of in contributions to the important field of patient-reported outcomes. PMID:27133485

  15. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  16. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-Ping; Tao, Lu-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  17. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Asrani, Varsha M.; Yoon, Harry D.; Megill, Robin D.; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner. To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, −8.99; 95% CI, −17.72 to −0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, −26.04; 95% CI, −51.25 to −0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, −0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did

  18. Postoperative Speech Outcomes and Complications in Submucous Cleft Palate Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae Seo; Nam, Su Bong; Kang, Kyung Dong; Sung, Ji Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The postoperative speech outcomes of submucous cleft palate (SMCP) surgery are known to be poorer than those of other types of cleft palate. We attempted to objectively characterize the postoperative complications and speech outcomes of the surgical treatment of SMCP through a comparison with the outcomes of incomplete cleft palate (ICP). Methods This study included 53 SMCP patients and 285 ICP patients who underwent surgical repair from 1998 to 2015. The average age of the patients at the time of surgery was 3.9±1.9 years for the SMCP patients and 1.3±0.9 years for the ICP patients. A retrospective analysis was performed of the complications, the frequency of subsequent surgical correction for velopharyngeal dysfunction (VPD), and speech outcomes. Results In both the SMCP and ICP patients, no cases of respiratory difficulty, bleeding, or wound disruption were noted. Delayed wound healing and fistula occurred in 18.9% and 5.7% of the SMCP patients and in 14% and 3.2% of the ICP patients, respectively. However, no statistically significant difference in either delayed wound healing or fistula occurrence was observed between the two groups. The rate of surgical correction for VPD in the SMCP group was higher than in the ICP group. In the subset of 26 SMCP patients and 62 ICP patients who underwent speech evaluation, the median speech score value was 58.8 in the SMCP group and 66 in the ICP group, which was a statistically significant difference. Conclusions SMCP and ICP were found to have similar complication rates, but SMCP had significantly worse speech outcomes. PMID:27218023

  19. Effect of Part-time Practice on Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Parkerton, Patricia H; Wagner, Edward H; Smith, Dean G; Straley, Hugh L

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND Primary care physicians are spending fewer hours in direct patient care, yet it is not known whether reduced hours are associated with differences in patient outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether patient outcomes vary with physicians' clinic hours. DESIGN Cross-sectional retrospective design assessing primary care practices in 1998. SETTING All 25 outpatient-clinics of a single medical group in western Washington. PARTICIPANTS One hundred ninety-four family practitioners and general internists, 80% of whom were part-time, who provided ambulatory primary care services to specified HMO patient panels. Physician appointment hours ranged from 10 to 35 per week (30% to 100% of full time). MEASUREMENTS Twenty-three measures of individual primary care physician performance collected in an administrative database were aggregated into 4 outcome measures: cancer screening, diabetic management, patient satisfaction, and ambulatory costs. Multivariate regression on each of the 4 outcomes controlled for characteristics of physicians (administrative role, gender, seniority) and patient panels (size, case mix, age, gender). MAIN RESULTS While the effects were small, part-time physicians had significantly higher rates for cancer screening (4% higher, P = .001), diabetic management (3% higher, P = .033), and for patient satisfaction (3% higher, P = .035). After controlling for potential confounders, there was no significant association with patient satisfaction (P = .212) or ambulatory costs (P = .323). CONCLUSIONS Primary care physicians working fewer clinical hours were associated with higher quality performance than were physicians working longer hours, but with patient satisfaction and ambulatory costs similar to those of physicians working longer hours. The trend toward part-time clinical practice by primary care physicians may occur without harm to patient outcomes. PMID:12950480

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Kratz, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is classified as a chronic pain condition accompanied by symptoms of fatigue, sleep problems, problems with cognition, negative mood, limited functional status, and the presence of other chronic overlapping pain conditions. Comprehensive assessment of all of these components can be challenging. This paper provides an overview of patient-reported approaches that can be taken to assess FM in the contexts of diagnosis, symptom monitoring, phenotyping/characterization, and for purposes of clinical trials. PMID:27133492

  1. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  2. Nurse Value-Added and Patient Outcomes in Acute Care

    PubMed Central

    Yakusheva, Olga; Lindrooth, Richard; Weiss, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to (1) estimate the relative nurse effectiveness, or individual nurse value-added (NVA), to patients’ clinical condition change during hospitalization; (2) examine nurse characteristics contributing to NVA; and (3) estimate the contribution of value-added nursing care to patient outcomes. Data Sources/Study Setting Electronic data on 1,203 staff nurses matched with 7,318 adult medical–surgical patients discharged between July 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011 from an urban Magnet-designated, 854-bed teaching hospital. Study Design Retrospective observational longitudinal analysis using a covariate-adjustment value-added model with nurse fixed effects. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were extracted from the study hospital's electronic patient records and human resources databases. Principal Findings Nurse effects were jointly significant and explained 7.9 percent of variance in patient clinical condition change during hospitalization. NVA was positively associated with having a baccalaureate degree or higher (0.55, p = .04) and expertise level (0.66, p = .03). NVA contributed to patient outcomes of shorter length of stay and lower costs. Conclusions Nurses differ in their value-added to patient outcomes. The ability to measure individual nurse relative value-added opens the possibility for development of performance metrics, performance-based rankings, and merit-based salary schemes to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. PMID:25256089

  3. Death is not the only healthcare outcome important to patients.

    PubMed

    Kellett, John

    2016-07-01

    Unfortunately throughout history there have been wide variations in the way death has been handled by the medical profession in different times and places, and even today within the same hospital there are big difference between what doctors say they do and what actually happens. It is not currently possible to determine when severely ill patients become irreversibly unsalvageable and when attempts at resuscitation after death are futile. Without this knowledge it is impossible to honestly advise patients and their loved ones. There is little data available to show what proportions of patients are less sick or feel better on discharge from hospital than they were on admission and no robust systems for predicting such outcomes. Death is not the only healthcare outcome important to patients. Regaining or preserving health is the ultimate goal for patients, yet most hospital outcomes are reported only in terms of mortality. Developing models that predict a good clinical outcome may be more clinically useful than those that predict death. Patients are more likely to want to know their chances of getting better than their chances of dying. Also expressing treatment options in terms of its benefits (i.e. the chance of getting better) versus the risks (i.e. the chances the treatment will kill you) may be far more acceptable to patients than providing their risks versus the chance that they are going to die anyway. PMID:27062683

  4. Does Alcohol Consumption during Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis Treatment Affect Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Duraisamy, Karthickeyan; Mrithyunjayan, Sunilkumar; Ghosh, Smita; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan; Balakrishnan, Shibu; Subramoniapillai, Jayasankar; Oeltmann, John E.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale India reports the largest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases in the world; yet, no longitudinal study has assessed factors related to treatment outcomes under programmatic conditions in the public sector. Objectives To describe demographic, clinical, and risk characteristics associated with treatment outcomes for all patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis registered in the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme, Kerala State, India from January 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010. Methods Cox regression methods were used to calculate adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess factors associated with an unsuccessful treatment outcome. Measurements and Main Results Of 179 patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis registered, 112 (63%) had successful treatment outcomes (77 bacteriologically cured, 35 treatment completed) and 67 (37%) had unsuccessful treatment outcomes (30 died, 26 defaulted, 9 failed treatment, 1 stopped treatment because of drug-related adverse events, and 1 developed extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis). The hazard for unsuccessful outcome was significantly higher among patients who consumed alcohol during treatment (adjusted hazard ratio, 4.3; 95% CI, 1.1–17.6) than those who did not. Persons who consumed alcohol during treatment, on average, missed 18 more intensive-phase doses (95% CI, 13–22) than those who did not. Although many patients had diabetes (33%), were ever smokers (39%), or had low body mass index (47%), these factors were not associated with outcome. Conclusion Overall treatment success was greater than global and national averages; however, outcomes among patients consuming alcohol remained poor. Integration of care for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and alcoholism should be considered to improve treatment adherence and outcomes. PMID:24735096

  5. Risk Factors and Outcomes of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tujios, Shannan R.; Hynan, Linda S.; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Larson, Anne M.; Seremba, Emmanuel; Sanders, Corron M.; Lee, William M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) frequently develop renal dysfunction, yet its overall incidence and outcomes have not been fully assessed. We investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) among patients with ALF, using defined criteria to identify risk factors and to evaluate its effect on overall outcomes. METHODS We performed a retrospective review of data from 1604 patients enrolled in the Acute Liver Failure Study Group, from 1998 through 2010. Patients were classified by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, as well as for etiology of liver failure (acetaminophen-based, ischemic, and all others). RESULTS Seventy percent of patients with ALF developed AKI, and 30% received renal replacement therapy (RRT). Patients with severe AKI had higher international normalized ratio values than those without renal dysfunction (P < .001), and a higher proportion had advanced-grade coma (coma grades 3 or 4; P < .001) or presented with hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy (P < .001). A greater proportion of patients with acetaminophen-induced ALF had severe kidney injury than of patients with other etiologies of ALF; 34% required RRT, compared with 25% of patients with ALF not associated with acetaminophen or ischemia (P < .002). Of the patients with ALF who were alive at 3 weeks after study entry, significantly fewer with AKI survived for 1 year. Although AKI reduced the overall survival time, more than 50% of patients with acetaminophen-associated or ischemic ALF survived without liver transplantation (even with RRT), compared with 19% of patients with ALF attribute to other causes (P < .001). Only 4% of patients requiring RRT became dependent on dialysis. CONCLUSIONS Based on a retrospective analysis of data from more than 1600 patients, AKI is common in patients with ALF and affects short- and long-term outcomes, but rarely results in chronic kidney disease. Acetaminophen-induced kidney injury is frequent, but patients have

  6. Prescription drug insurance coverage and patient health outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Huybrechts, Krista F; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Fulchino, Lisa A; Isaman, Danielle L; Kowal, Mary K; Brennan, Troyen A

    2015-02-01

    Previous reviews have shown that changes in prescription drug insurance benefits can affect medication use and adherence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify studies addressing the association between prescription drug coverage and health outcomes. Studies were included if they collected empirical data on expansions or restrictions of prescription drug coverage and if they reported clinical outcomes. We found 23 studies demonstrating that broader prescription drug insurance reduces use of other health care services and has a positive impact on patient outcomes. Coverage gaps or caps on drug insurance generally led to worse outcomes. States should consider implementing the Affordable Care Act expansions in drug coverage to improve the health of low-income patients receiving state-based health insurance. PMID:25521879

  7. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  8. Contemporary Outcome in Patients With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Murbræch, Klaus; Andreassen, Arne Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2015-09-15

    Outcome is better in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) than in ischemic heart failure (HF), but morbidity and mortality are nevertheless presumed to be substantial. Most data on the prognosis in IDC stem from research performed before the widespread use of current evidence-based treatment, including implantable devices. We report outcome data from a cohort of patients with IDC treated according to current HF guidelines and compare our results with previous figures: 102 consecutive patients referred to our tertiary care hospital with idiopathic IDC and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% were included in a prospective cohort study. After extensive baseline work-up, follow-up was performed after 6 and 13 months. Vital status and heart transplantation were recorded. Over the first year of follow-up, the patients were on optimal pharmacological treatment, and 24 patients received implantable devices. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 26 ± 10% to 41 ± 11%, peak oxygen consumption increased from 19.5 ± 7.1 to 23.4 ± 7.8 ml/kg/min, and functional class improved substantially (all p values <0.001). After a median follow-up of 3.6 years, 4 patients were dead, and heart transplantation had been performed in 9 patients. According to our literature search, survival in patients with IDC has improved substantially over the last decades. In conclusion, patients with IDC have a better outcome than previously reported when treated according to current guidelines. PMID:26233575

  9. Propionic acidemia: clinical course and outcome in 55 pediatric and adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propionic acidemia is an inherited disorder caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. Although it is one of the most frequent organic acidurias, information on the outcome of affected individuals is still limited. Study design/methods Clinical and outcome data of 55 patients with propionic acidemia from 16 European metabolic centers were evaluated retrospectively. 35 patients were diagnosed by selective metabolic screening while 20 patients were identified by newborn screening. Endocrine parameters and bone age were evaluated. In addition, IQ testing was performed and the patients’ and their families’ quality of life was assessed. Results The vast majority of patients (>85%) presented with metabolic decompensation in the neonatal period. Asymptomatic individuals were the exception. About three quarters of the study population was mentally retarded, median IQ was 55. Apart from neurologic symptoms, complications comprised hematologic abnormalities, cardiac diseases, feeding problems and impaired growth. Most patients considered their quality of life high. However, according to the parents’ point of view psychic problems were four times more common in propionic acidemia patients than in healthy controls. Conclusion Our data show that the outcome of propionic acidemia is still unfavourable, in spite of improved clinical management. Many patients develop long-term complications affecting different organ systems. Impairment of neurocognitive development is of special concern. Nevertheless, self-assessment of quality of life of the patients and their parents yielded rather positive results. PMID:23305374

  10. Advances in Patient-Reported Outcomes: The NIH PROMIS® Measures

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Joan E.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Rothrock, Nan; Crane, Paul K.; Forrest, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are questionnaire measures of patients’ symptoms, functioning, and health-related quality of life. They are designed to provide important clinical information that generally cannot be captured with objective medical testing. In 2004, the National Institutes of Health launched a research initiative to improve the clinical research enterprise by developing state-of-the-art PROs. The NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement System (PROMIS) and Assessment Center are the products of that initiative. Adult, pediatric, and parent-proxy item banks have been developed by using contemporary psychometric methods, yielding rapid, accurate measurements. PROMIS currently provides tools for assessing physical, mental, and social health using short-form and computer-adaptive testing methods. The PROMIS tools are being adopted for use in clinical trials and translational research. They are also being introduced in clinical medicine to assess a broad range of disease outcomes. Recent legislative developments in the United States support greater efforts to include patients’ reports of health experience in order to evaluate treatment outcomes, engage in shared decision-making, and prioritize the focus of treatment. PROs have garnered increased attention by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for evaluating drugs and medical devices. Recent calls for comparative effectiveness research favor inclusion of PROs. PROs could also potentially improve quality of care and disease outcomes, provide patient-centered assessment for comparative effectiveness research, and enable a common metric for tracking outcomes across providers and medical systems. PMID:25848562

  11. Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes Into Health Care To Engage Patients And Enhance Care.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Chenok, Kate E; Love, Rebecca M; Petersen, Carolyn; Holve, Erin; Segal, Courtney D; Franklin, Patricia D

    2016-04-01

    The provision of patient-centered care requires a health care environment that fosters engagement between patients and their health care team. One way to encourage patient-centered care is to incorporate patient-reported outcomes into clinical settings. Collecting these outcomes in routine care ensures that important information only the patient can provide is captured. This provides insights into patients' experiences of symptoms, quality of life, and functioning; values and preferences; and goals for health care. Previously embraced in the research realm, patient-reported outcomes have started to play a role in successful shared decision making, which can enhance the safe and effective delivery of health care. We examine the opportunities for using patient-reported outcomes to enhance care delivery and outcomes as health care information needs and technology platforms change. We highlight emerging practices in which patient-reported outcomes provide value to patients and clinicians and improve care delivery. Finally, we examine present and future challenges to maximizing the use of patient-reported outcomes in the clinic. PMID:27044954

  12. Predictors of Outcome in Patients with Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Undergoing Unilateral Open-Door Laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Won; Jin, Sung-Won; Choi, Jong-Il; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze prognostic factors affecting surgical outcomes of expansive laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Methods Using the Frankel scale and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale, we retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 45 consecutive patients who underwent modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite spacers and malleable titanium miniplates between June 2008 and May 2014. The patients were assigned to the good and poor clinical outcome groups, with good outcome defined as a JOA recovery rate >75%. Results The mean preoperative JOA scale was significantly higher in the good outcome group (14.95±3.21 vs. 10.78±6.07, p<0.001), whereas the preoperative cervical range of motion (ROM) in this group was significantly lower (29.89°±10.11 vs. 44.35°± 8.88, p<0.001). In univariate analysis, a high preoperative JOA scale (odds ratio (OR) 1.271, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.005-1.607) and low preoperative cervical ROM(OR 0.858, 95% CI 0.786-0.936) were statistically correlated with good outcomes. Furthermore, these factors demonstrated an independent association with clinical outcomes (preoperative JOA scale: OR 1.344, 95% CI 1.019-1.774, p=0.036; preoperative cervical ROM: OR 0.860, 95% CI 0.788-0.940, p=0.001). Conclusion In this study, a high preoperative JOA scale was associated with good clinical outcome after laminoplasty, whereas a higher preoperative cervical spine ROM was associated with poor clinical outcome. This may suggests that cervical mobility and preoperative neurological status affect clinical outcomes of laminoplasty. PMID:26834814

  13. Treatment Outcome and Associated Factors among Tuberculosis Patients in Debre Tabor, Northwestern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Melese, Addisu; Zeleke, Balew; Ewnete, Biniam

    2016-01-01

    potential sociodemographic factors that could affect the treatment outcomes of TB patients were also recommended. PMID:27597896

  14. Treatment Outcome and Associated Factors among Tuberculosis Patients in Debre Tabor, Northwestern Ethiopia: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Zeleke, Balew; Ewnete, Biniam

    2016-01-01

    other potential sociodemographic factors that could affect the treatment outcomes of TB patients were also recommended. PMID:27597896

  15. Correlation of Patient-reported Symptom Outcomes and Treadmill Test Outcomes after Treatment for Aortoiliac Claudication

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Cohen, David J.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Massaro, Joseph M.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Mohler, Emile R.; Cerezo, Joselyn; Oldenburg, Niki C.; Thum, Claudia C.; Goldberg, Suzanne; Hirsch, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine the relationship between objective treadmill test outcomes and subjective symptom outcomes among patients with claudication treated with stent revascularization (ST) compared with supervised exercise (SE). Materials and Methods Five scales of the Peripheral Artery Questionnaire and Walking Impairment Questionnaire were correlated with peak walking time and treadmill claudication onset time. Results The correlation between change in disease-specific quality of life (QOL) and change in peak walking time differed according to treatment group, with statistically significant correlations for all five scales for the ST group and weaker trends for the SE group, only one of which was statistically significant. In contrast, improvements in disease-specific QOL correlated well with increases in claudication onset time, with no significant interaction with treatment group for any of the five scales. Conclusions Disease-specific QOL results at 6 months in the CLEVER (Claudication: Exercise Vs. Endoluminal Revascularization) study show that improved maximal treadmill walking in patients with claudication treated with SE correlated poorly with self-reported symptom relief. Conversely, patients treated with ST showed good correlation between improved maximal treadmill walking and self-reported symptom improvement. The correlation between claudication onset time and self-reported symptom relief was good across treatment groups. This finding indicates that traditional objective treadmill test outcomes may not correlate well with symptom relief in patients with claudication. Future studies should investigate these data and improve understanding of patient relevance of traditional objective treadmill-based treatment outcomes. PMID:23906799

  16. The effects of different sources of occupational stress on affective, motivational, and psychosomatic outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ovalle, N.K. II.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of role conflict, role ambiguity, and five additional potential sources of occupational stress on an affective outcome (job satisfaction), a motivational outcome (intent to quit), and two psychosomatic outcomes (mental and physical anxiety). In addition to role conflict and role ambiguity, the five additional sources of occupational stress centered on job characteristics, work pressures, rewards and opportunities, interaction of the job and home life, and lack of job challenge. Data were collected from 85 technicians and managers in a service organization. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that each of the sources of stress have significant yet different effects on the outcomes. Moreover, role conflict and ambiguity did not have as much of an effect across all outcomes as the other five sources of stress. These findings could be used to improve the measurement, understanding, and treatment of occupational stress. Other implications are discussed. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Obesity and Outcomes in Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Leiter, Amanda; Doucette, John; Krege, Susan; Lin, Chia-Chia; Hahn, Noah; Ecke, Thorsten; Sonpavde, Guru; Bamias, Aristotle; Oh, William K.; Galsky, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity has been associated with worse outcomes in patients with clinically localized urothelial cancer. However, this impact has not been evaluated in metastatic disease. Objective: To assess the impact of obesity on outcomes of patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. Methods: Data from 537 patients were aggregated from eight phase II and phase III clinical trials investigating first-line cisplatin-based combination therapy in metastatic urothelial cancer. Chemotherapy regimen, adverse events, treatment response, and survival outcomes were compared across body mass index (BMI) and body surface area (BSA) categories. Results: BMI was classified according to WHO criteria (<18.5 underweight, 18.5–24.99 normal weight, 25–29.99 overweight, >30 obese). BSA was classified as either below or greater than or equal to (average for this cohort (1.87 m2 for males and 1.66 m2 for females). There was no significant difference in number of chemotherapy cycles, adverse events, and response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) across BMI and BSA categories. There was no significant difference in adverse events across BMI categories, but the incidences of embolic events and renal failure were higher in patients with an average or higher BSA than those with a lower than average BSA (6.6% vs. 3.1% for renal failure p = 0.06; 5.9% vs. 2.7% for renal failure, p = 0.07). There was no significant difference in response rate or survival outcomes (overall and progression-free) amongst BMI and BSA categories. Conclusions: Obese patients with metastatic urothelial cancer on cisplatin-based therapies have similar response rates, survival outcomes, and tolerability of cisplatin-based therapy to non-obese patients. PMID:27500201

  18. Obesity Does Not Influence Outcomes in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients following Curative Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Le-Qun; Xiang, Bang-De

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether obesity affects surgical outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is controversial. Here we retrospectively evaluated the impact of obesity on outcomes in HCC patients after curative hepatectomy. Methods Patients with Child-Pugh A liver function who underwent curative hepatectomy between 2006 and 2010 were categorized as obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2, n = 68) and non-obese (<25 kg/m2, n = 242). To reduce interference from baseline differences between the two groups, propensity score-matched analysis was performed in the ratio 1:2 using a caliper width of 0.1. Surgical outcomes were compared for 61 obese and 115 non-obese patients. Results Obese patients had higher levels of albumin and aspartate aminotransferase, and more solitary tumors compared to the non-obese patients (all P<0.05). In the propensity-matched cohort, baseline characteristics did not differ between the two groups (all P>0.05). Obese and non-obese patients had comparable 30-day mortality (1.6% vs. 2.6%, P = 1.000), 90-day mortality (3.3% vs. 4.3%, P = 1.000), and incidence of postoperative complications (19.7% vs. 18.3%, P = 0.819). Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was similar for obese patients (83.6%, 63.6%, 41.6%) as for non-obese patients (80.9%, 65.9%, 49.1%; P = 0.358). Disease-free survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was also similar for obese patients (71.5%, 36.3%, 24.3%) as for non-obese ones (60.2%, 43.7%, 27.7%; P = 0.969). Conclusion Our propensity score-matched analysis strengthens the case that obesity does not adversely affect surgical outcomes of HCC patients undergoing curative hepatectomy. PMID:25965529

  19. Patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research: improving health outcomes for individual patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient-centered medicine is developing alongside the concepts of personalized medicine and tailored therapeutics. The main objective of patient-centered medicine is to improve health outcomes of individual patients in everyday clinical practice, taking into account the patient’s objectives, preferences, values as well as the available economic resources. Discussion Patient-centered medicine implies a paradigm shift in the relationship between doctors and patients, but also requires the development of patient-oriented research. Patient-oriented research should not be based on the evaluation of medical interventions in the average patient, but on the identification of the best intervention for every individual patient, the study of heterogeneity and the assignment of greater value to observations and exceptions. The development of information-based technologies can help to close the gap between clinical research and clinical practice, a fundamental step for any advance in this field. Summary Evidence-based medicine and patient centered medicine are not contradictory but complementary movements. It is not possible to practice patient-centered medicine that is not based on evidence, nor is it possible to practice evidence-based medicine at a distance from the individual patient. PMID:23294526

  20. Outcomes of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    McGrath-Cadell, Lucy; McKenzie, Pamela; Emmanuel, Sam; Muller, David W M; Graham, Robert M; Holloway, Cameron J

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon but serious condition presenting as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or cardiac arrest. The pathophysiology and outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the characteristics and outcomes of patients presenting with SCAD. Methods In a retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with SCAD, data were collected regarding clinical presentation, patient characteristics, vascular screening, coronary artery involvement and clinical outcomes. Results 40 patients with SCAD (95% women, mean age 45±10 years) were included. At least 1 traditional cardiovascular risk factor was present in 40% of patients. Migraine was reported in 43% of patients. Events preceding SCAD included parturition (8%), physical stress (13%), emotional stress (10%) and vasoconstrictor substance-use (8%). 65% of patients had a non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation, 30% had an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 13% had a cardiac arrest. The left anterior descending artery was most frequently involved (68% of patients), and 13% had involvement of multiple coronary territories. Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was identified in 7 (37%) of 19 patients screened. 68% of patients were managed medically, 30% had percutaneous coronary intervention and 5% had coronary artery bypass grafting. Over a median 16-month follow-up period, 8% of patients had at least 1 recurrent SCAD event. There were no deaths. Conclusions Patients with SCAD in this study often had multiple coronary territories involved (13%) and extracardiac vascular abnormalities, suggesting a systemic vascular process, which may explain the high incidence of migraine. All patients with SCAD should be screened for FMD and followed closely due to the possibility of recurrence. PMID:27621835

  1. How Does Outcomes Research Help Advance Our Knowledge of Patient Outcomes in Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery?

    PubMed

    Alvino, Donna Marie L; Chang, David C; Fong, Zhi Ven

    2016-04-01

    Randomized controlled trials have historically been regarded as the gold standard of modern clinical research tools, allowing us to elucidate the efficacy of novel therapeutics in an unparalleled manner. However, when attempting to generalize trial results to broader populations, it becomes apparent that the unexplained outcome variability exists among treatment recipients, suggesting that randomized controlled trials harbor inherent limitations. Herein, we explore the benefits of health services (outcomes) research utilization in addressing variation in patient outcomes following surgical intervention in the non-randomized setting, with a specific focus on hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery outcomes. To achieve this, we have constructed a framework that outlines the complex interactions existing between therapeutic, patient, and provider factors that subsequently lead to variation in outcomes. By exploring examples in the current literature, we have highlighted the areas where the knowledge is currently lacking and can be further strengthened through the application of outcomes research. Furthermore, we have attempted to demonstrate the utility of alternative study designs in the investigation of novel clinical questions currently unanswered in the field of hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery. PMID:26861969

  2. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    PubMed

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes. PMID:26935320

  3. Roundtable on public policy affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Crane, Robert M; Raymond, Brian

    2011-03-01

    On April 15, 2010, patient safety experts were assembled to discuss the adequacy of the public policy response to the Institute of Medicine report "To Err is Human" 10 years after its publication. The experts concluded that additional government actions should be considered. Actions that deserve consideration include the development of an educational campaign to improve public and provider understanding of the issue as a means to support change similar to successful public health campaigns, support the evolution of payment reform away from fee for service, create a clearer aim or goal for patient safety activities, support the development and use of better safety measures to judge status and improvement, and support for additional learning of what works particularly on implementation issues. Participants included: Moderator Robert Crane, senior advisor, Kaiser Permanente Participants Doug Bonacum, vice president, Safety Management, Kaiser Permanente Janet Corrigan, PhD, president and CEO, National Quality Forum Helen Darling, MA, president and CEO, National Business Group on Health Susan Edgman-Levitan, PA, executive director, John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation, Massachusetts General Hospital David M. Lawrence, MD, MPH, chairman and CEO (Retired), Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Inc Lucian Leape, MD, adjunct professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health Diane C. Pinakiewicz, president, National Patient Safety Foundation Robert M. Wachter, MD, professor and associate chairman, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco. PMID:22026014

  4. Predictors of Functional Outcome Among Stroke Patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Abanto, Carlos; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Tirschwell, David L.; Montano, Silvia; Quispe, Yrma; Gonzales, Isidro; Valencia, Ana; Calle, Pilar; Garate, Arturo; Zunt, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the aging population in low- and middle-income countries, cerebrovascular disease is expected to remain a leading cause of death. Little has been published about stroke in Peru. Aims We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized stroke patients at a referral center hospital in Lima, Peru to explore factors associated with functional outcome among stroke patients. Methods We identified 579 patients hospitalized for ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage stroke at the National Institute of Neurologic Sciences in Lima, Peru in 2008 and 2009. A favorable outcome was defined as a modified Rankin score of ≤2 at discharge. Results The mean age was 63.3 years; 75.6% had ischemic stroke; the average length of stay was 17.3 days. At hospital discharge, 231 (39.9%) had a favorable outcome. The overall mortality rate was 5.2%. In multivariate models, the likelihood of having a favorable outcome decreased linearly with increasing age (p=0.02) and increasing NIHSS (p=0.02). Favorable outcome was also associated with male gender (relative risk [RR]=1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0, 1.5) and divorced status (RR=1.3, 95% CI: 1.1, 1.7). Patients on Salud Integral de Salud (public assistance-type insurance, SIS) (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5,1.0) were also less likely to have a favorable outcome. Conclusions Favorable outcome after stroke was independently associated with younger age, lower NIHSS score, male gender, being divorced, and not being on SIS insurance. These findings suggest further study of worse functional outcomes in patients with SIS insurance and confirm the importance of risk adjustment for age, stroke severity (NIHSS) and other socioeconomic factors in outcomes studies. Future studies should preferentially assess outcome at 30-days and 6-months to provide more reliable comparisons and allow additional study of Peruvian end-of-life decision-making and care. PMID:23352681

  5. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  6. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Shiho; Tanemura, Rumi; Yoshizumi, Miho; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes) test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. PMID:25395854

  7. [Clinical Outcomes of Cardiovascular Surgery in Jehovah's Witness Patients].

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kosuke; Yamashita, Masafumi; Toyohira, Hitoshi; Yotsumoto, Goichi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuhisa; Moriyama, Yukinori; Imoto, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular surgery in Jehovah's Witness is challenging for surgeons on the ground that they refuse blood transfusion. We report 11 cases of cardiovascular surgery. All of the patients underwent elective surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Two cases underwent minimally invasive procedures. The mean preoperative hemoglobin level was 13.0 g/dl, and hematopoietic medicines were preoperatively administrated in 4 patients. Although 10 patients recovered satisfactory without blood transfusion, 1 surgical case was lost due to uncontrollable postoperative bleeding. The clinical outcomes of the Jehovah's Witness patients are considered to be satisfactory. However, careful indication is recommended in high risk cases. PMID:27075280

  8. Customer-driven outcomes: a patient and family perspective.

    PubMed

    Weston, Marla J; Weston, Richard R

    2006-01-01

    Experiencing the healthcare system during an acute surgical event highlighted factors that contributed to customer-driven outcomes. Communicating intentions of and rationale for interventions increased the patient and family's confidence, and engaged the whole mind-body connection into the healing process. Utilizing the family as a repository of patient information incorporated their perspective, knowledge, and wisdom into the delivery and evaluation of patient care. Lastly, fostering the relationship between the nurse and the patient and family strengthened the therapeutic process, thus providing a foundation for customizing care. PMID:16648725

  9. Intrathecal pain pumps: indications, patient selection, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bolash, Robert; Mekhail, Nagy

    2014-10-01

    Intrathecal drug delivery represents an advanced modality for refractory chronic pain patients as well as intractable spasticity. This article reviews the advantages and indications for intrathecal therapy, as well as recommendations for proper patient selection using a multidisciplinary team to provide a global assessment of the impact of chronic pain on the patient's well-being. The goals and expectations of trialing are discussed alongside advantages and disadvantages of several trialing techniques. A discussion of outcomes is presented for patients with chronic pain due to both malignant and nonmalignant causes. PMID:25240660

  10. A Genomic Score Prognostic of Outcome in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Warren, H Shaw; Elson, Constance M; Hayden, Douglas L; Schoenfeld, David A; Cobb, J Perren; Maier, Ronald V; Moldawer, Lyle L; Moore, Ernest E; Harbrecht, Brian G; Pelak, Kimberly; Cuschieri, Joseph; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G; Finnerty, Celeste C; Brownstein, Bernard H; Hennessy, Laura; Mason, Philip H; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injuries frequently lead to infection, organ failure, and death. Health care providers rely on several injury scoring systems to quantify the extent of injury and to help predict clinical outcome. Physiological, anatomical, and clinical laboratory analytic scoring systems (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE], Injury Severity Score [ISS]) are utilized, with limited success, to predict outcome following injury. The recent development of techniques for measuring the expression level of all of a person’s genes simultaneously may make it possible to develop an injury scoring system based on the degree of gene activation. We hypothesized that a peripheral blood leukocyte gene expression score could predict outcome, including multiple organ failure, following severe blunt trauma. To test such a scoring system, we measured gene expression of peripheral blood leukocytes from patients within 12 h of traumatic injury. cRNA derived from whole blood leukocytes obtained within 12 h of injury provided gene expression data for the entire genome that were used to create a composite gene expression score for each patient. Total blood leukocytes were chosen because they are active during inflammation, which is reflective of poor outcome. The gene expression score combines the activation levels of all the genes into a single number which compares the patient’s gene expression to the average gene expression in uninjured volunteers. Expression profiles from healthy volunteers were averaged to create a reference gene expression profile which was used to compute a difference from reference (DFR) score for each patient. This score described the overall genomic response of patients within the first 12 h following severe blunt trauma. Regression models were used to compare the association of the DFR, APACHE, and ISS scores with outcome. We hypothesized that patients with a total gene response more different from uninjured volunteers would tend to have poorer

  11. Desperation and Other Affective States in Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendin, Herbert; Maltsberger, John T.; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Szanto, Katalin; Rabinowicz, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Data collected from 26 therapists who were treating patients when they died by suicide were used to identify intense affective states in such patients preceding the suicide. Eleven therapists provided comparable data on 26 patients they had treated who were seriously depressed but not suicidal. Although the two groups had similar numbers diagnosed…

  12. A comparison of governance types and patient satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, L R

    2001-04-01

    Given our dynamic healthcare marketplace, it is imperative to examine the context in which nurses function. A unit level study was conducted to investigate the influence of governance type on organizational culture, nurse work satisfaction, nurse retention, and patient satisfaction. The results of the study will be of value to nurse executives wanting to redesign the context for nursing service to improve outcomes, including nurse and patient satisfaction. PMID:11324332

  13. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  14. Factors Affecting Exercise Test Performance in Patients After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kotarska, Katarzyna; Wunsch, Ewa; Jodko, Lukasz; Raszeja-Wyszomirska, Joanna; Bania, Izabela; Lawniczak, Malgorzata; Bogdanos, Dimitrios; Kornacewicz-Jach, Zdzislawa; Milkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. In addition, low physical activity is a risk factor for cardiac and cerebrovascular complications. Objectives This study examined potential relationships between physical activity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and an exercise test in liver-graft recipients. Patients and Methods A total of 107 participants (62 men/45 women) who had received a liver transplantation (LT) at least 6 months previously were evaluated. Physical activity was assessed using three different questionnaires, while HRQoL was assessed using the medical outcomes study short form (SF)-36 questionnaire, and health behaviors were evaluated using the health behavior inventory (HBI). The exercise test was performed in a standard manner. Results Seven participants (6.5%) had a positive exercise test, and these individuals were older than those who had a negative exercise test (P = 0.04). A significant association between a negative exercise test and a higher level of physical activity was shown by the Seven-day physical activity recall questionnaire. In addition, HRQoL was improved in various domains of the SF-36 in participants who had a negative exercise test. No correlations between physical activity, the exercise test and healthy behaviors, as assessed via the HBI were observed. Conclusions Exercise test performance was affected by lower quality of life and lower physical activity after LT. With the exception of hypertension, well known factors that affect the risk of coronary artery disease had no effect on the exercise test results. PMID:27226801

  15. [The phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients].

    PubMed

    Leichsenring, Falk

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the phenomenology and psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The first part demonstrates that in most current conceptions of the borderline disorder affective disturbances are regarded as to be characteristic. In this context, the strong overlap between borderline disorders and affective disorders found in many empirical studies is described and different hypotheses are presented to explain this phenomenon. The second part of this review is concerned with the psychodynamics of affects in borderline patients. The role of affects in thinking, behaviour, self perception and the regulation of object relations is discussed. Borderline and other severe personality disorders are assessed from the perspective of affective disturbances. The psychodynamic functions of particularly characteristic affects such as anger, anxiety, depression and boredom are discussed. The close connection between affective and cognitive functioning in borderline patients is described and evaluated with regard to modern theories of affect and cognition. Finally, the role of affects in the treatment of borderline patients is discussed. PMID:15510348

  16. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  17. Adolescents' Cognitive "Habitus", Learning Environments, Affective Outcomes of Schooling, and Young Adults' Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marjoribanks, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    A moderation-mediation model was constructed to examine relationships among adolescents' cognitive "habitus" (their cognitive dispositions), learning environments, affective outcomes of schooling, and young adults' educational attainment. Data were collected as part of a longitudinal survey of Australian youth (4,171 females, 3,718 males). The…

  18. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  19. Factors Affecting Academic Outcomes of Underprepared Community College Students. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, J. Charles

    This study examined the factors affecting the four-year academic performance and outcomes of 1,249 underprepared students at Prince George's Community College (Maryland). The fall 1994 freshmen required remediation in reading, writing, or mathematics. Subjects were defined as achievers if, by summer 1998, they had earned a degree or certificate…

  20. Affective Learning Outcomes in Workplace Training: A Test of Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Online Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Ally, Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    Research employing an experimental design pilot-tested two delivery platforms, WebCT™ and vClass™, for the generation of affective learning outcomes in the workplace. Using a sample of volunteer participants in the help-desk industry, participants were randomly assigned to one of the two types of delivery software. Thirty-eight subjects…

  1. Teacher Interpersonal Behaviour and Secondary Students' Cognitive, Affective and Moral Outcomes in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivan, Atara; Chan, Dennis W. K.

    2013-01-01

    This study validated the Chinese version of the Questionnaire on Teacher Interaction (QTI) in the Hong Kong context as well as examined the relationship between students' perceptions of interpersonal teacher behaviour and their cognitive, affective and moral learning outcomes. Data were collected with the QTI and four other measures of student…

  2. Technology Integration before Student Outcomes: Factors Affecting Teacher Adoption of Technology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Alankar

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1920s, ICTs have been endorsed as solutions to challenges of access and quality in education. Proponents have also supported technology use in education on grounds that it could potentially impact cognitive, affective, and pedagogical outcomes. Based on these perceived benefits, many developed and developing countries have been…

  3. Coping with Challenge and Hindrance Stressors in Teams: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Affective Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Matthew J.; Ellis, Aleksander P. J.; Stein, Jordan H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the challenge-hindrance framework to examine the discrete and combined effects of different environmental stressors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes at the team level. Results from 83 teams working on a command and control simulation indicated that the introduction of a challenge stressor…

  4. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project. PMID:25486914

  5. Chronic urinary retention in men: how we define it, and how does it affect treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Negro, Carlo L A; Muir, Gordon H

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Chronic urinary retention (CUR) is a poorly defined entity, as the key element of definition, significant postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), has not a worldwide and moreover evidenced-based definition. There is no agreement on which is the threshold value to define a significant PVR and different society produced guidelines with different thresholds ranging from 300 mL to 1000 mL. Diagnosis is difficult, and management has not been defined yet. There is a lack of studies on the best management of these patients, as this group of patients has always been considered at high risk of failure. Only one study compares conservative with the surgical management but it is not a randomised controlled trail. This review offers a systematic appraisal of the most recent publications on CUR. It indicates the absence of a real worldwide agreed definition, as the two keys element of it are not satisfactorily defined yet: significant PVR, is suffering from a lack of evidenced-based definition, and percussable or palpable bladder is a very nebulous concept as it is not a criteria of certainty as different individual variables affect it. This has an important effect on management which is not structured. Most of the trials involving benign prostatic hyperplasia treatments (either medical or surgical) tend to exclude this group of patients, which is a clinically important group, comprising up to a quarter of men undergoing TURP in the UK. Urinary retention describes a bladder that does not empty completely or does not empty at all. Historically, urinary retention has been classified as either acute or chronic the latter is generally classified as high pressure or low pressure according to the bladder filling pressure on urodynamic. A MEDLINE® search for articles written in English and published before January 2010 was done using a list of terms related to urinary retention: 'urinary retention', 'chronic urinary retention

  6. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  7. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Retreatment Tuberculosis Patients in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Ade, Serge; Adjibodé, Omer; Wachinou, Prudence; Toundoh, Narcisse; Awanou, Bérénice; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Affolabi, Dissou; Adè, Gabriel; Harries, Anthony D.; Anagonou, Séverin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine among retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin baseline characteristics, culture, and drug sensitivity testing (DST) results and treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective national cohort study of all retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin in 2013 using registers and treatment cards. Results. Of 3957 patients with tuberculosis, 241 (6%) were retreatment cases. Compared to new pulmonary bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (NPBCT) patients, there were significantly higher numbers of males (P = 0.04), patients from “Atlantique-Littoral” (P = 0.006), patients aged 45–64 years (P = 0.007), and HIV-positive patients (P = 0.04) among those retreated. Overall, 171 (71%) patients submitted sputum for DST, of whom (163) 95% were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Xpert MTB/RIF and/or culture and 17 (10%) were rifampicin resistant (9 with MDR-TB and 8 monoresistant to rifampicin). For those without MDR-TB (n = 224), treatment success was 93%. Worse outcomes occurred in those with unknown HIV status (RR: 0.27; 0.05–1.45; P < 0.01) while better outcomes occurred in those who relapsed (RR: 1.06, 95 CI: 1.02–1.10, P = 0.04). Conclusion. In 2013, a high proportion of retreatment patients received DST. Treatment success was good although more needs to be done to systematically increase the final follow-up smear examination. Reasons of high losses to follow-up from “Oueme-Plateau” should be investigated. PMID:27110400

  8. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  9. Regional anesthesia for the trauma patient: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gadsden, Jeff; Warlick, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a significant health problem and a leading cause of death in all age groups. Pain related to trauma is frequently severe, but is often undertreated in the trauma population. Opioids are widely used to treat pain in injured patients but have a broad range of undesirable effects in a multitrauma patient such as neurologic and respiratory impairment and delirium. In contrast, regional analgesia confers excellent site-specific pain relief that is free from major side effects, reduces opioid requirement in trauma patients, and is safe and easy to perform. Specific populations that have shown benefits (including morbidity and mortality advantages) with regional analgesic techniques include those with fractured ribs, femur and hip fractures, and patients undergoing digital replantation. Acute compartment syndrome is a potentially devastating sequela of soft-tissue injury that complicates high-energy injuries such as proximal tibia fractures. The use of regional anesthesia in patients at risk for compartment syndrome is controversial; although the data is sparse, there is no evidence that peripheral nerve blocks delay the diagnosis, and these techniques may in fact facilitate the recognition of pathologic breakthrough pain. The benefits of regional analgesia are likely most influential when it is initiated as early as possible, and the performance of nerve blocks both in the emergency room and in the field has been shown to provide quality pain relief with an excellent safety profile. PMID:26316813

  10. Patient-reported outcomes in lupus clinical trials with biologics.

    PubMed

    Annapureddy, N; Devilliers, H; Jolly, M

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic advances in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are greatly needed. Despite advances in our knowledge of pathogenesis of the disease and targets, treatment remains a significant challenge. Finding effective and relatively safe medications remains one of the top priorities. SLE significantly impairs quality of life (QoL), and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measure a unique aspect of the disease not captured by disease activity. Inclusion of PRO measurements is encouraged in SLE clinical trials, as they allow capturing benefits of a proposed intervention in language patients can relate to and in areas deemed pertinent and important to and by patients. Availability of patient-reported and patient-centric clinical trials data may facilitate patients in informed and shared decision making, and allow for comparative cost-effectiveness evaluation for future resource allocation and reimbursements. Herein we review clinical trials with biologic therapies wherein PRO tools were included in the study design. PMID:27497256

  11. Graphical representation of clinical outcomes for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P

    2016-01-01

    The causes of death in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are diverse: infections, hemorrhage, complications of chronic anemia and repeated blood transfusions, and complications of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Since most patients with MDS are diagnosed late in life, some individuals with MDS will succumb to an unrelated condition, such as one of the disorders that are common in geriatric populations. Currently, only a small proportion of patients with MDS - less than 5% - undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation, a procedure that offers the only possibility of cure. This brief review summarizes outcomes for patients diagnosed with MDS using a pictographical format that illustrates both the challenges patients face and the pressing need for development of novel therapies, as well as highlighting the potential for increased use of allogeneic stem cell transplant. This informational graphic may be useful for teaching or in counseling certain patients. PMID:26098015

  12. Patients with comorbidities: what shall we do to improve the outcome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Iemma, D

    2009-05-01

    The number of patients submitted to major surgery affected by one or more comorbidities is progressively increasing. Outcome is the final output measured as morbidity, mortality and quality of life, of diagnostic tests, procedures, therapy tools started in the preoperative period and fitted on single patients or groups of patients or typology of surgical acts. Strategies to improve outcome can be divided in some fundamental steps: preoperative evaluation; optimization and no discontinuation of preoperative drug treatments, mainly in cardiac patient; choice of adequate monitoring techniques, checking of patient metabolic state and oxidative balance; choice of the best anesthesia; postoperative care, particularly due to identify the best management of the critical patient between the different levels of assistance. In conclusion, a patient with comorbidities scheduled for major surgery needs a full anesthetist-intensivist involvement, which broadens the role of the anesthetist in the perioperative medicine. Outcome is the result of many interventions during patient course, including economic costs and the importance of an appropriate treatment. PMID:19412152

  13. The association between osteoporosis and patient outcomes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Luis A; DiBonaventura, Marco; Kawaguchi, Isao

    2016-07-01

    Objective To quantify the burden of osteoporosis and examine the interplay between osteoporosis and various comorbidities as it relates to patient outcomes. Methods Data from the 2011 Japan National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS; n = 30 000), an internet health survey fielded to a nationally representative sample of the Japanese population were used. Only women between the ages of 50-90 years were included in the analyses (n = 6950). Results Compared with matched controls (n = 404), patients with osteoporosis (n = 404) had lower MCS scores (48.94 vs 51.63), PCS scores (45.57 vs 49.12) (all p < 0.05). The presence of osteoporosis was associated with worse patient outcomes among those with hypertension, high cholesterol, and insomnia, among other conditions. Conclusions The results suggest a significant quality-of-life and economic burden for patients with osteoporosis in Japan. Moreover, in a complex co-morbid environment, the presence of osteoporosis contributes more to patient outcomes than other chronic conditions. PMID:26929988

  14. Bariatric surgery: three surgical techniques, patient care, risks, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Carrie A; Wool, Daniel B

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a serious health concern. Bariatric surgery is a recognized and accepted approach for addressing weight loss and health conditions that occur as a result of morbid or severe obesity. Lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, and regular exercise are required for optimal and lasting surgical weight loss. Perioperative care of bariatric patients requires the use of interventions that differ from those used for nonobese patients, including bariatric-specific equipment, intraoperative monitoring of blood glucose, and postoperative monitoring for respiratory compromise. This articles outlines the risks and typical outcomes associated with three common bariatric procedures-laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass-to help perioperative nurses and other health care providers successfully advise patients and monitor their care for optimal outcomes. PMID:26227518

  15. Opportunities for Patient-centered Outcomes Research in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Zygmont, Matthew E; Lam, Diana L; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Burton, Kirsteen R; Lenchik, Leon; McArthur, Tatum A; Sekhar, Aarti K; Itri, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Recently created in 2010, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) supports patient-centered comparative effectiveness research with a focus on prioritizing high-impact studies and improving trial design methodology. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on patient-centered outcomes research in Radiology aims to review recently funded imaging-centric projects that adhere to the methodologies established by PCORI. We provide an overview of the successful application of PCORI standards to radiology topics, highlight how these methodologies differ from other forms of radiology research, and identify opportunities for new projects as well as potential barriers for involvement. Our hope is that review of specific case examples in radiology will clarify the use and value of PCORI methods mandated and supported nationally by the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26683507

  16. A Review of Psychosocial Outcomes for Patients Seeking Cosmetic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Honigman, Roberta J.; Phillips, Katharine A.; Castle, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on psychological and psychosocial outcomes for individuals undergoing cosmetic surgery, to address whether elective cosmetic procedures improve psychological well-being and psychosocial functioning and whether there are identifiable predictors of an unsatisfactory psychological outcome. They conducted a search of appropriate computerized databases for studies that evaluated psychological and psychosocial status both before and after elective cosmetic surgery. They identified 37 relevant studies of varying cosmetic procedures that utilized disparate methodologies. Overall, patients appeared generally satisfied with the outcome of their procedures, although some exhibited transient and some exhibited longer-lasting psychological disturbance. Factors associated with poor psychosocial outcome included being young, being male, having unrealistic expectations of the procedure, previous unsatisfactory cosmetic surgery, minimal deformity, motivation based on relationship issues, and a history of depression, anxiety, or personality disorder. Body dysmorphic disorder was also recognized by some studies as a predictor of poor outcome, a finding reinforced by reference to the psychiatric literature. The authors conclude that although most people appear satisfied with the outcome of cosmetic surgical procedures, some are not, and attempts should be made to screen for such individuals in cosmetic surgery settings. PMID:15083026

  17. Functional outcomes in patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection.

    PubMed

    Jares, Tyler M; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kowalski, Todd J

    2014-02-01

    When Lyme disease is treated with appropriate antibiotic therapy in the early stages, long-term outcomes are good. However, a few patients have persistent symptoms despite appropriate therapy. Whether these patients' symptoms are any different from those of patients with reinfection is unclear. Our objective was to compare long-term symptoms and functional outcomes of patients with Borrelia burgdorferi reinfection with those of patients with only 1 episode of infection and with no history of infection. We compared outcomes of Lyme reinfection patients, characterized by recurrent erythema migrans (EM) lesions, with those of patients with 1 episode of Lyme disease (Lyme control) and with no history of Lyme disease (non-Lyme control) by retrospective medical record review and a survey consisting of a 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and a 10-item symptom questionnaire. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for continuous variables and χ(2) analysis for categorical variables were used. In cases of low cell counts, Fisher's exact tests were used. Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparisons when ANOVA was significant. Reinfection was identified in 23/673 (3.4%) patients who had a diagnosis of Lyme disease in our health system during 2000-2004. Of the 23, 15 had long-term follow-up data and were age- and sex-matched to 45 Lyme control and 60 non-Lyme control group patients. Clinical characteristics were similar in the reinfection and Lyme control groups. SF-36 results were similar between groups for all domains except energy/vitality (VT). The SF-36 domain of VT was significantly different between groups: 63.0 vs. 54.5 vs. 64.5 in the reinfection, Lyme control, and non-Lyme control groups, respectively (p=0.047). Clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with recurrent EM lesions were similar to those of the control groups and consistent with B. burgdorferi reinfection, not persistent infection. Patients with Lyme reinfection should be treated with

  18. A review of health outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Armstrong, April W

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis, a chronic inflammatory skin condition, is a complex disease in terms of its significant comorbidities and impact on patients' quality of life. The objective of this article is to elucidate the health outcomes of the disease, including its economic and psychosocial burden on the patient. Current treatments options and the economic considerations of treatment costs are reviewed. Psoriasis is a multidimensional disease, so patients benefit from having a multidisciplinary team of dermatologists and other physicians for management of it and of associated comorbid conditions. PMID:22117868

  19. Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Summaries for Patients Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes The full report is titled “Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes. A Cohort Study.” ...

  20. Issues impacting therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Atin; Goindi, Shishu

    2014-01-01

    The quest for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients has evaded the healthcare professionals for long and often lack of child specific dosage forms and the associated events that follow with it have been considered to be major contributor towards suboptimal outcomes. Consequently, there have been sustained efforts over the years to address this issue with the enactment of legislations like Best Pharmaceutical for Children Act (BPCA), Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) and Pediatric Regulation by European Union (EU) to incentivise the participation of pharmaceutical industry towards development of child friendly dosage forms. Initiatives taken in past by organisations like World Health Organisation (WHO) and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) to spur the development of child friendly dosage forms has helped to address issues pertaining to management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and malaria in pediatric patients. Present efforts aimed at developing child friendly dosage forms include oro-dispersible platforms including thin films and mini-tablets. Despite these leaps and advancements in developing better dosage forms for children, lower therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients continue to remain an unresolved issue because of detrimental effects of additional factors such as parents understanding of label instructions and complexities involved in executing pediatric clinical studies thus requiring a concerted effort from pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers, parents and healthcare providers to work for better treatment outcomes in children. PMID:25088338

  1. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21633409

  2. Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160304.html Health Insurance Status May Affect Cancer Patients' Survival 2 studies ... certain cancers in America could depend on your health insurance status. Despite improvements in cancer diagnosis and treatment, ...

  3. Sublethal Microcystin Exposure and Biochemical Outcomes among Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D.; Soares, Raquel M.; Servaites, Jerome C.; Delgado, Alvima G.; Magalhães, Valéria F.; Carmichael, Wayne W.; Azevedo, Sandra M. F. O.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are commonly-occurring contaminants of surface waters worldwide. Microcystins, potent hepatotoxins, are among the best characterized cyanotoxins. During November, 2001, a group of 44 hemodialysis patients were exposed to microcystins via contaminated dialysate. Serum microcystin concentrations were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which measures free serum microcystin LR equivalents (ME). We describe serum ME concentrations and biochemical outcomes among a subset of patients during 8 weeks following exposure. Thirteen patients were included; 6 were males, patients’ median age was 45 years (range 16–80), one was seropositive for hepatitis B surface antigen. The median serum ME concentration was 0.33 ng/mL (range: <0.16–0.96). One hundred thirty nine blood samples were collected following exposure. Patients’ biochemical outcomes varied, but overall indicated a mixed liver injury. Linear regression evaluated each patient’s weekly mean biochemical outcome with their maximum serum ME concentration; a measure of the extrinsic pathway of clotting function, prothrombin time, was negatively and significantly associated with serum ME concentrations. This group of exposed patients’ biochemical outcomes display evidence of a mixed liver injury temporally associated with microcystin exposure. Interpretation of biochemical outcomes are complicated by the study population’s underlying chronic disease status. It is clear that dialysis patients are a distinct ‘at risk’ group for cyanotoxin exposures due to direct intravenous exposure to dialysate prepared from surface drinking water supplies. Careful monitoring and treatment of water supplies used to prepare dialysate is required to prevent future cyanotoxin exposure events. PMID:23894497

  4. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M; Locke, David G; Reband, Agnes M; Pine, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts.We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation.A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume.Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing provider

  5. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Goldenberg, Paula C; DeArmey, Stephanie L; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were 6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc(4). Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p<0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein. PMID:19775921

  6. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, Priya S.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; DeArmey, Stephanie L.; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S.; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were ≤6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc4. Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p < 0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein. PMID:19775921

  7. Surgical outcome and prognostic factors in patients with gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Eun Kyung; Kim, Kun Kuk; Lee, Jung Nam; Lee, Woon Kee; Chung, Min; Kim, Yeon Suk

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Gallbladder carcinoma is usually associated with an unfavorable prognosis, and the clinical outcome has not improved much. This study was conducted to evaluate outcomes with gallbladder carcinoma according to the type of surgery performed, and the prognostic factors for survival. Methods One hundred and six patients with gallbladder carcinoma, who underwent surgery for the purpose of curative resection between January 1999 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results Out of 106 patients, curative resection was achieved in 75 (70.8%). The cumulative 1-, 2- and 5-year survival rates of the gallbladder carcinoma patients were 93.4%, 80.9% and 63.0%, respectively. Radical resections, including extended cholecystectomy, were more beneficial for long term survival of patients. The 5-year survival rate in patients who underwent curative resection (56.9%) was significantly higher than in those who underwent palliative resection (0%, p=0.000). Multivariate analysis revealed that curative resection, preoperative CA19-9, T-stage, N-stage and differentiation of histology were independently significant prognostic factors. Conclusions Curative resection and early detection of patients with gallbladder carcinoma were the most important factors for long term survival. Radical resection improves survival for patients with localized gallbladder carcinoma and can help to access exact prognosis and treatments. PMID:26155265

  8. Arterial Stiffening and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is more efficient to handily assess arteriosclerosis than aortic PWV. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is also a novel blood pressure-independent arterial stiffness parameter. In dialysis patients, both baPWV and CAVI are increased compared to general subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that increased baPWV is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In addition, higher baPWV is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. CAVI is similarly associated with CVD. However, baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in HD patients. Besides these outcomes, a close relationship exists between sarcopenia, abdominal visceral obesity and arterial stiffening. Reduction of thigh muscle mass is inversely correlated with baPWV and CAVI in males. Abdominal fatness is also associated with increased arterial stiffness in females. These observations provide further evidence of higher risk of CV events in HD patients with sarcopenic obesity. In addition, arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral small vessel disease and decreased cognitive function in the elderly. However, it is unknown whether arterial stiffness may be useful as an early indicator of cognitive decline in dialysis patients. Because dialysis patients are at risk of developing dementia, more studies are needed to elucidate the causal link between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. PMID:26587457

  9. A semiparametric bivariate probit model for joint modeling of outcomes in STEMI patients.

    PubMed

    Ieva, Francesca; Marra, Giampiero; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Radice, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyse the relationship among in-hospital mortality and a treatment effectiveness outcome in patients affected by ST-Elevation myocardial infarction. The main idea is to carry out a joint modeling of the two outcomes applying a Semiparametric Bivariate Probit Model to data arising from a clinical registry called STEMI Archive. A realistic quantification of the relationship between outcomes can be problematic for several reasons. First, latent factors associated with hospitals organization can affect the treatment efficacy and/or interact with patient's condition at admission time. Moreover, they can also directly influence the mortality outcome. Such factors can be hardly measurable. Thus, the use of classical estimation methods will clearly result in inconsistent or biased parameter estimates. Secondly, covariate-outcomes relationships can exhibit nonlinear patterns. Provided that proper statistical methods for model fitting in such framework are available, it is possible to employ a simultaneous estimation approach to account for unobservable confounders. Such a framework can also provide flexible covariate structures and model the whole conditional distribution of the response. PMID:24799953

  10. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Parker Jones, ‘Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Price, Cathy J.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find ‘good’ prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2–80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1–431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1–77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9–219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills

  11. Developing core outcomes sets: methods for identifying and including patient-reported outcomes (PROs)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Synthesis of patient-reported outcome (PRO) data is hindered by the range of available PRO measures (PROMs) composed of multiple scales and single items with differing terminology and content. The use of core outcome sets, an agreed minimum set of outcomes to be measured and reported in all trials of a specific condition, may improve this issue but methods to select core PRO domains from the many available PROMs are lacking. This study examines existing PROMs and describes methods to identify health domains to inform the development of a core outcome set, illustrated with an example. Methods Systematic literature searches identified validated PROMs from studies evaluating radical treatment for oesophageal cancer. PROM scale/single item names were recorded verbatim and the frequency of similar names/scales documented. PROM contents (scale components/single items) were examined for conceptual meaning by an expert clinician and methodologist and categorised into health domains. A patient advocate independently checked this categorisation. Results Searches identified 21 generic and disease-specific PROMs containing 116 scales and 32 single items with 94 different verbatim names. Identical names for scales were repeatedly used (for example, ‘physical function’ in six different measures) and others were similar (overlapping face validity) although component items were not always comparable. Based on methodological, clinical and patient expertise, 606 individual items were categorised into 32 health domains. Conclusion This study outlines a methodology for identifying candidate PRO domains from existing PROMs to inform a core outcome set to use in clinical trials. PMID:24495582

  12. The effects of subchorionic hematoma on pregnancy outcome in patients with threatened abortion

    PubMed Central

    Şükür, Yavuz Emre; Göç, Göksu; Köse, Osman; Açmaz, Gökhan; Özmen, Batuhan; Atabekoğlu, Cem Somer; Koç, Acar; Söylemez, Feride

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematomas on pregnancy outcomes in patients with vaginal bleeding within the first half of pregnancy. Material and Methods Patients diagnosed with threatened abortion due to painless vaginal bleeding and who were followed up in an in-patient service during the first vaginal bleeding between January 2009 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of subchorionic hematoma. Miscarriage rates and pregnancy outcomes of ongoing pregnancies were compared between the groups. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the groups regarding demographic parameters, including age, parity, previous miscarriage history, and gestational age at first vaginal bleeding. While 13 of 44 pregnancies (29.5%) with subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage, 25 of 198 pregnancies (12.6%) without subchorionic hematoma resulted in miscarriage (p=.010). The gestational age at miscarriage and the duration between first vaginal bleeding and miscarriage were similar between the groups. The outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies, such as gestational week at delivery, birth weight, and delivery route, were also similar between the groups. Conclusion Ultrasonographically detected subchorionic hematoma increases the risk of miscarriage in patients with vaginal bleeding and threatened abortion during the first 20 weeks of gestation. However, it does not affect the pregnancy outcome measures of ongoing pregnancies. PMID:25584033

  13. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan F.; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G.; Du, Shan S.; Yue, Zhen Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  14. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ying; Zhang, Yan F; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G; Du, Shan S; Yue, Zhen Z

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  15. Pathways to poor educational outcomes for HIV/AIDS-affected youth in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Mark; Boyes, Mark E; Cluver, Lucie D; Zhang, Yuning

    2014-01-01

    A recent systematic review of studies in the developing world has critically examined linkages from familial HIV/AIDS and associated factors such as poverty and child mental health to negative child educational outcomes. In line with several recommendations in the review, the current study modelled relationships between familial HIV/AIDS, poverty, child internalising problems, gender and four educational outcomes: non-enrolment at school, non-attendance, deficits in grade progression and concentration problems. Path analyses reveal no direct associations between familial HIV/AIDS and any of the educational outcomes. Instead, HIV/AIDS-orphanhood or caregiver HIV/AIDS-sickness impacted indirectly on educational outcomes via the poverty and internalising problems that they occasioned. This has implications for evidence-based policy inferences. For instance, by addressing such intervening variables generally, rather than by seeking to target families affected by HIV/AIDS, interventions could avoid exacerbating stigmatisation, while having a more direct and stronger impact on children's educational outcomes. This analytic approach also suggests that future research should seek to identify causal paths, and may include other intervening variables related to poverty (such as child housework and caring responsibilities) or to child mental health (such as stigma and abuse), that are linked to both familial HIV/AIDS and educational outcomes. PMID:23965029

  16. Benchmarking Outcomes in the Critically Injured Burn Patient

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthew B.; Goverman, Jeremy; Hayden, Douglas L.; Fagan, Shawn P.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Alexander, Andrew K.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Arnoldo, Brett; Wispelwey, Bram; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Honari, Shari E.; Mason, Philip H.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Herndon, David N.; Tompkins, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine and compare outcomes with accepted benchmarks in burn care at six academic burn centers. Background Since the 1960s, U.S. morbidity and mortality rates have declined tremendously for burn patients, likely related to improvements in surgical and critical care treatment. We describe the baseline patient characteristics and well-defined outcomes for major burn injuries. Methods We followed 300 adults and 241 children from 2003–2009 through hospitalization using standard operating procedures developed at study onset. We created an extensive database on patient and injury characteristics, anatomic and physiological derangement, clinical treatment, and outcomes. These data were compared with existing benchmarks in burn care. Results Study patients were critically injured as demonstrated by mean %TBSA (41.2±18.3 for adults and 57.8±18.2 for children) and presence of inhalation injury in 38% of the adults and 54.8% of the children. Mortality in adults was 14.1% for those less than 55 years old and 38.5% for those age ≥55 years. Mortality in patients less than 17 years old was 7.9%. Overall, the multiple organ failure rate was 27%. When controlling for age and %TBSA, presence of inhalation injury was not significant. Conclusions This study provides the current benchmark for major burn patients. Mortality rates, notwithstanding significant % TBSA and presence of inhalation injury, have significantly declined compared to previous benchmarks. Modern day surgical and medically intensive management has markedly improved to the point where we can expect patients less than 55 years old with severe burn injuries and inhalation injury to survive these devastating conditions. PMID:24722222

  17. Does Cognitive Impairment Affect Rehabilitation Outcome in Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Bera, Rossana; Giladi, Nir; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Pezzoli, Gianni; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cognitive status is generally considered as a major determinant of rehabilitation outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). No studies about the effect of cognitive impairment on motor rehabilitation outcomes in PD have been performed before. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of cognitive decline on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with PD. Methods: We retrospectively identified 485 patients with PD hospitalized for a 4-week Multidisciplinary Intensive Rehabilitation Treatment (MIRT) between January 2014 and September 2015. According to Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), patients were divided into: group 1—normal cognition (score 27–30), group 2—mild cognitive impairment (score 21–26), group 3—moderate or severe cognitive impairment (score ≤ 20). According to Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), subjects were divided into patients with normal (score ≥13.8) and pathological (score <13.8) executive functions. The outcome measures were: Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Parkinson’s Disease Disability Scale (PDDS), Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results: All scales had worse values with the increase of cognitive impairment and passing from normal to pathological executive functions. After rehabilitation, all the outcome measures improved in all groups (p < 0.0001). Between groups, the percentage of improvement was significantly different for total UPDRS (p = 0.0009, best improvement in normal MMSE group; p = 0.019, best improvement in normal FAB group), and BBS (p < 0.0001, all pairwise comparisons significant, best improvement in patients with worse MMSE score; p < 0.0001, best improvement in patients with pathological FAB). TUG (p = 0.006) and BBS (p < 0.0001) improved in patients with pathological FAB score, more than in those with normal FAB score. Conclusions: Patients gain benefit in the rehabilitative outcomes, regardless of cognition

  18. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified "risk" factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial "maximizing" factors-characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients' strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  19. Perioperative problems in patients with brainstem tumors and their influence on patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Sachidanand J; Pandia, Mihir Prakash; Rath, Girija Prasad; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Dash, Hari Hara; Dube, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with brainstem tumors have many associated systemic abnormalities and are prone to develop perioperative complications. We studied the problems associated with brainstem tumors and their influence on the postoperative neurological outcome. Material and Methods: Retrospective review of records of patients who underwent surgery for brainstem tumors over a period of 8 years was done. Preoperative variables, perioperative complications and neurological outcome as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale at the time of hospital discharge were noted. Association between perioperative factors and the unfavorable neurological outcome was evaluated. Results: Data of 70 patients were retrieved, 7 patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete data and data analysis was carried out for 63 patients. We found that lower cranial nerve palsies (32%) and hydrocephalus (43%) were common preoperatively. Various intraoperative problems encountered were hemodynamic instability (56%), major blood loss requiring blood transfusion (40%) and venous air embolism (11%), and postoperative problems were meningitis (51%), hypokalemia (38%), chest infection (21%), seizure (11%), deterioration of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, 11%), hyponatremia (8%), hydrocephalus (6%), respiratory distress (3%) and operatives site hematoma (3%). Fifty-six (89%) patients had favorable outcome at hospital discharge whereas, 7 (11%) had an unfavorable outcome. There was no association between pre- and intra-operative factors and the neurological outcome. Deterioration of GCS, chest infection, and the need for reintubation and tracheostomy were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. Conclusion: Patients of brainstem tumors are at increased risk of perioperative complications. Some of the postoperative complications were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. PMID:27275044

  20. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  1. Patient characteristics affecting the prognosis of total hip and knee joint arthroplasty: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Pasqualina L.; Hawker, Gillian A.; Hudak, Pamela L.; Glazier, Richard; Mahomed, Nizar N.; Kreder†, Hans J.; Coyte, Peter C.; Wright, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Total joint arthroplasty is a highly efficacious and cost-effective procedure for moderate to severe arthritis in the hip and knee. Although patient characteristics are considered to be important determinants of who receives total joint arthroplasty, no systematic review has addressed how they affect the outcomes of total joint arthroplasty. This study addresses how patient characteristics influence the outcomes of hip and knee arthroplasty in patients with osteoarthritis. Methods We searched 4 bibliographic databases (MEDLINE 1980–2001, CINAHL 1982–2001, EMBASE 1980–2001, HealthStar 1998–1999) for studies involving more than 500 patients with osteoarthritis and 1 or more of the following outcomes after total joint arthroplasty: pain, physical function, postoperative complications (short-and long-term) and time to revision. Prognostic patient characteristics of interest included age, sex, race, body weight, socioeconomic status and work status. Results Sixty-four of 14 276 studies were eligible for inclusion and had extractable data. Younger age (variably defined) and male sex increased the risk of revision 3-fold to 5-fold for hip and knee arthroplasty. The influence of weight on the risk of revision was contradictory. Mortality was greatest in the oldest age group and among men. Function for older patients was worse after hip arthroplasty (particularly in women). Function after knee arthroplasty was worse for obese patients. Conclusion Although further research is required, our findings suggest that, after total joint arthroplasty, younger age and male sex are associated with increased risk of revision, older age and male sex are associated with increased risk of mortality, older age is related to worse function (particularly among women), and age and sex do not influence the outcome of pain. Despite these findings, all subgroups derived benefit from total joint arthroplasty, suggesting that surgeons should not restrict access to these

  2. New aspects on patients affected by dysferlin deficient muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Klinge, Lars; Aboumousa, Ahmed; Eagle, Michelle; Hudson, Judith; Sarkozy, Anna; Vita, Gianluca; Charlton, Richard; Roberts, Mark; Straub, Volker; Barresi, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the dysferlin gene lead to limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, Miyoshi myopathy and distal anterior compartment myopathy. A cohort of 36 patients affected by dysferlinopathy is described, in the first UK study of clinical, genetic, pathological and biochemical data. The diagnosis was established by reduction of dysferlin in the muscle biopsy and subsequent mutational analysis of the dysferlin gene. Seventeen mutations were novel; the majority of mutations were small deletions/insertions, and no mutational hotspots were identified. Sixty-one per cent of patients (22 patients) initially presented with limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2B, 31% (11 patients) with a Miyoshi phenotype, one patient with proximodistal mode of onset, one patient with muscle stiffness after exercise and one patient as a symptomatic carrier. A wider range of age of onset was noted than previously reported, with 25% of patients having first symptoms before the age of 13 years. Independent of the initial mode of presentation, in our cohort of patients the gastrocnemius muscle was the most severely affected muscle leading to an inability to stand on tiptoes, and lower limbs were affected more severely than upper limbs. As previous anecdotal evidence on patients affected by dysferlinopathy suggests good muscle prowess before onset of symptoms, we also investigated pre-symptomatic fitness levels of the patients. Fifty-three per cent of the patients were very active and sporty before the onset of symptoms which makes the clinical course of dysferlinopathy unusual within the different forms of muscular dystrophy and provides a challenge to understanding the underlying pathomechanisms in this disease. PMID:19528035

  3. Case series: Pregnancy Outcome in Patients with Uterine Fibroids

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Kusuma; Shreelatha, S.; Vana, Harshini

    2015-01-01

    Fibroids in pregnancy is a commonly encountered clinical entity. Objective of this study was to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome in women having pregnancy with uterine fibroids. We present the clinical, obstetric data, perinatal outcomes of 15 patients from a prospective study. Fifteen pregnant women with fibroid >3cm were prospectively included in study. Major proportion of patient with fibroids were in younger age group of 25-30 years when compared to older age group of 31-35 years (66% vs 33%). Fibroids were more frequent in multi-gravidae, compared to primigravidae. In almost half of patients, (53.3%) fibroids were diagnosed before pregnancy. Common complications encountered during pregnancy in decreasing order of frequency were pain abdomen (46.6%), followed by threatened preterm labour (26.6%) and anaemia (26.6%). Out of 15, three (20%) women had abortion. In remaining, 11/12 patients attained term pregnancy between 37 to 40 weeks. Two patients required antenatal myomectomy. Caesarean section was done in 75% of women who attained term pregnancy and one patient had technical difficulty during caesarean section. Post partum heamorrhage was seen in 5/15 (33.3%) of patients. Out of 12, five babies were low birth weight. Four babies required NICU admission. There was no perinatal mortality. In our small patient series high incidence of caesarean section rates and increased incidence of threatened preterm labour, anaemia, and postpartum haemorrhage, was observed in pregnant patients with fibroids and hence, the pregnancy with fibroids should be considered as high risk pregnancy. PMID:26557577

  4. Case series: Pregnancy Outcome in Patients with Uterine Fibroids.

    PubMed

    Radhika, B H; Naik, Kusuma; Shreelatha, S; Vana, Harshini

    2015-10-01

    Fibroids in pregnancy is a commonly encountered clinical entity. Objective of this study was to evaluate the maternal and fetal outcome in women having pregnancy with uterine fibroids. We present the clinical, obstetric data, perinatal outcomes of 15 patients from a prospective study. Fifteen pregnant women with fibroid >3cm were prospectively included in study. Major proportion of patient with fibroids were in younger age group of 25-30 years when compared to older age group of 31-35 years (66% vs 33%). Fibroids were more frequent in multi-gravidae, compared to primigravidae. In almost half of patients, (53.3%) fibroids were diagnosed before pregnancy. Common complications encountered during pregnancy in decreasing order of frequency were pain abdomen (46.6%), followed by threatened preterm labour (26.6%) and anaemia (26.6%). Out of 15, three (20%) women had abortion. In remaining, 11/12 patients attained term pregnancy between 37 to 40 weeks. Two patients required antenatal myomectomy. Caesarean section was done in 75% of women who attained term pregnancy and one patient had technical difficulty during caesarean section. Post partum heamorrhage was seen in 5/15 (33.3%) of patients. Out of 12, five babies were low birth weight. Four babies required NICU admission. There was no perinatal mortality. In our small patient series high incidence of caesarean section rates and increased incidence of threatened preterm labour, anaemia, and postpartum haemorrhage, was observed in pregnant patients with fibroids and hence, the pregnancy with fibroids should be considered as high risk pregnancy. PMID:26557577

  5. Onychomycosis: Evaluation, Treatment Options, Managing Recurrence, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease seen in podiatric practice. Effective long-term management remains problematic. We need to treat onychomycosis effectively to prevent its progression into a severe, debilitating, and painful condition, and to manage recurrence. With new agents now available and greater discussion on management strategies, this article reviews the appropriate evaluation of the disease, treatment options, and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:27215153

  6. Music as intervention: a notable endeavor to improve patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    White, J M

    2001-03-01

    Music interventions have been used in medicine and nursing throughout history. Music therapy is an easy-to-administer, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive intervention that has been used to reduce heart rate, blood pressure, myocardial oxygen consumption, gastrointestinal function, anxiety, and pain. A review of theoretic and empirical base for the use of music therapy to improve patient outcomes in a variety of areas of clinical practice is presented. Implications for practice and future research are suggested. PMID:11342404

  7. Postibrutinib outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter; Maddocks, Kami; Leonard, John P; Ruan, Jia; Goy, Andre; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Rule, Simon; Advani, Ranjana; Iberri, David; Phillips, Tycel; Spurgeon, Stephen; Kozin, Eliana; Noto, Katherine; Chen, Zhengming; Jurczak, Wojciech; Auer, Rebecca; Chmielowska, Ewa; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bloehdorn, Johannes; Portell, Craig; Williams, Michael E; Dreyling, Martin; Barr, Paul M; Chen-Kiang, Selina; DiLiberto, Maurizio; Furman, Richard R; Blum, Kristie A

    2016-03-24

    Despite unprecedented clinical activity in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), primary and acquired resistance to ibrutinib is common. The outcomes and ideal management of patients who experience ibrutinib failure are unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients with MCL who experienced disease progression while receiving ibrutinib across 15 international sites. Medical records were evaluated for clinical characteristics, pathological and radiological data, and therapies used pre- and postibrutinib. A total of 114 subjects met eligibility criteria. The median number of prior therapies was 3 (range, 0-10). The Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (MIPI) scores at the start of ibrutinib were low, intermediate, and high in 46%, 31%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Of patients with available data prior to ibrutinib and postibrutinib, 34 of 47 and 11 of 12 had a Ki67 >30%. The median time on ibrutinib was 4.7 months (range 0.7-43.6). The median overall survival (OS) following cessation of ibrutinib was 2.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-4.9). Of the 104 patients with data available, 73 underwent subsequent treatment an average of 0.3 months after stopping ibrutinib with a median OS of 5.8 months (95% CI, 3.7-10.4). Multivariate Cox regression analysis of MIPI before postibrutinib treatment, and subsequent treatment with bendamustine, cytarabine, or lenalidomide failed to reveal any association with OS. Poor clinical outcomes were noted in the majority of patients with primary or secondary ibrutinib resistance. We could not identify treatments that clearly improved outcomes. Future trials should focus on understanding the mechanisms of ibrutinib resistance and on treatment after ibrutinib. PMID:26764355

  8. Examining intrinsic versus extrinsic exercise goals: cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Standage, Martyn; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2009-04-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT), this study had two purposes: (a) examine the associations between intrinsic (relative to extrinsic) exercise goal content and cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes; and (b) test the mediating role of psychological need satisfaction in the Exercise Goal Content --> Outcomes relationship. Using a sample of 410 adults, hierarchical regression analysis showed relative intrinsic goal content to positively predict physical self-worth, self-reported exercise behavior, psychological well-being, and psychological need satisfaction and negatively predict exercise anxiety. Except for exercise behavior, the predictive utility of relative intrinsic goal content on the dependent variables of interest remained significant after controlling for participants' relative self-determined exercise motivation. Structural equation modeling analyses showed psychological need satisfaction to partially mediate the effect of relative intrinsic goal content on the outcome variables. Our findings support further investigation of exercise goals commensurate with the goal content perspective advanced in SDT. PMID:19454771

  9. Are physicians' ratings of pain affected by patients' physical attractiveness?

    PubMed

    Hadjistavropoulos, H D; Ross, M A; von Baeyer, C L

    1990-01-01

    The degree to which physical attractiveness and nonverbal expressions of pain influence physicians' perceptions of pain was investigated. Photographs of eight female university students were represented in four experimental conditions created by the manipulation of cosmetics, hairstyles, and facial expressions: (a) attractive-no pain, (b) attractive-pain, (c) unattractive-no pain, and (d) unattractive-pain. Each photograph was accompanied by a brief description of the patient's pain problem that was standard across conditions. Medical residents (N = 60) viewed the photographs and rated each patient's pain, distress, negative affective experience, health, personality, blame for the situation, and the physician's own solicitude for the patient. The results showed that physicians' ratings of pain were influenced both by attractiveness of patients and by nonverbal expressions of pain. Unattractive patients, and patients who were expressing pain, were perceived as experiencing more pain, distress, and negative affective experiences than attractive patients and patients who were not expressing pain. Unattractive patients also received higher ratings of solicitude on the doctor's part and lower ratings of health than attractive patients. Physician's assessments of pain appear to be influenced by the physical attractiveness of the patient. PMID:2367884

  10. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  11. Patient outcomes in the GHMonitor: the effect of delivery device on compliance and growth.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Paul; O'Brien, Fanny; Blethen, Sandra

    2005-02-01

    To determine the effect of method of growth hormone (GH) administration on patient outcomes, we studied data from the GHMonitor, an electronic database registry of North American children treated with Saizen GH (somatropin [rDNA origin] for injection). Data from 631 children, 305 treated with needle and syringe and 326 treated with cool.click needle-free device, were analyzed. The groups were balanced for factors known to affect GH treatment response. There was no difference in response to GH over 2 years of treatment whether assessed by growth rate, change in height SD score, or change in height age. Although the majority of patients were compliant with GH therapy (84.6% of needle-free delivery system [NFDS] and 76.3% of needle and syringe patients missed <3 doses per month), significantly more patients using needle and syringe missed over one-half of their prescribed GH dose (13.4% needle and syringe patients versus 6% of NFDS patients, P=.002). In this group of poorly compliant patients, growth rates were significantly lower than in patients who missed fewer doses. Thus in patients where compliance is an issue, use of the NFDS may result in better outcomes. PMID:16456500

  12. The impact of shorter prehospital transport times on outcomes in patients with abdominal vascular injuries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most deaths in patients with abdominal vascular injuries (ABVI) are caused by exsanguination and irreversible shock. Therefore, time to definitive hemorrhage control is an important factor affecting survival. The study goals were: (1) document current outcomes in patients with ABVI, and (2) compare outcomes to those from the era preceding improvements in an urban prehospital system. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with ABVI at an urban level 1 trauma center was completed. Patients injured prior to prehospital transport improvements (1991–1994) were compared to those following a reduction in transport times (1995–2004). Results Of 388 patients, 70 (18%) arrived prior to prehospital improvements (1991–1994). Patient/injury demographics were similar in both groups (age, sex, penetrating mechanism; p > 0.05). The number of patients presenting with ABVI increased (23 vs. 35 per year; p < 0.05) concurrent to a reduction in transport times (27 vs. 20 minutes; p < 0.05). Patients were more frequently unstable (63% vs. 91%; p < 0.05). Regardless of the specific vessel, mortality increased (37% vs. 67%; p < 0.05) following prehospital improvements. Conclusions A reduction in urban transport times resulted in an increase in (1) the number of patients arriving with abdominal vascular injuries, (2) the proportion presenting in physiologic extremis, and (3) overall mortality. PMID:24360286

  13. Defining lactation acuity to improve patient safety and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mannel, Rebecca

    2011-05-01

    While substantial evidence exists identifying risks factors associated with premature weaning from breastfeeding, there are no previously published definitions of patient acuity in the lactation field. This article defines evidence-based levels of lactation acuity based on maternal and infant characteristics. Patient acuity, matching severity of illness to intensity of care required, is an important determinant of patient safety and outcomes. It is often used as part of a patient classification system to determine staffing needs and acceptable workloads in health care settings. As acuity increases, more resources, including more skilled clinicians, are needed to provide optimal care. Developing an evidence-based definition of lactation acuity can help to standardize terminology, more effectively distribute health care staff resources, encourage research to verify the validity and reliability of lactation acuity, and potentially improve breastfeeding initiation and duration rates. PMID:21527797

  14. [Personality changes of neurotic patients as outcome of the treatment].

    PubMed

    Jodzio, K

    1993-01-01

    The present article attempted to assess the importance of outcomes which appeared during the treatment of 30 neurotic patients. This study specially concentrates on measures of emotional empathy, self-confidence and introspection. There were two surveys in the clinical group: before and after the treatment was completed. Data were compared with a control group, also consisting of 30 persons (15 male and 15 female) matched for age and education. All patients attending group psychotherapy were also treated by pharmacotherapy. As it appeared from the analysis before treatment high empathy in patients was found, but this declined after therapy, however it was still significantly higher than in the control group. The first survey revealed also that patients demonstrated lower levels of self-confidence and introspection. After treatment there were no important differences between the groups. Relationships between the studied qualities were not statistically significant. PMID:8134493

  15. Comparing predicted and actual affective responses to process versus outcome: an emotion-as-feedback perspective.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Jessica Y Y; Wong, Kin Fai Ellick; Tang, Suki K Y

    2013-10-01

    One of the conjectures in affective forecasting literature is that people are advised to discount their anticipated emotions because their forecasts are often inaccurate. The present research distinguishes between emotional reactions to process versus those to outcome, and highlights an alternative view that affective misforecasts could indeed be adaptive to goal pursuit. Using an ultimatum game, Study 1 showed that people overpredicted how much they would regret and be disappointed by the amount of effort they exerted, should the outcomes turned out worse than expected; nonetheless, people could accurately predict their emotional responses to unfavorable outcomes per se. In a natural setting of a university examination, Study 2 demonstrated that actual regret and disappointment toward favorable outcomes were more intense than the level people expected, but this discrepancy was not observed in their emotional responses to efforts they had invested. These two distinct patterns of results substantiate the argument that the deviation between predicted and actual emotions is dependent on the referents of the emotional reactions. PMID:23831563

  16. Is there a relationship between service integration and differentiation and patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Robin P.; Mills, Mary Etta; Johantgen, Meg; Pronovost, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the level of service integration within Maryland hospitals and service differentiation across the hospital system or network and its affect on heart failure patient clinical and economic outcomes. Data sources/Study setting Maryland Health Services Cost Review Commission Inpatient Data for 1997 and 1998 were used for secondary data analysis. Study design Retrospective cross sectional. Independent variables were the level of service integration and differentiation created from the 1998 American Hospital Association Annual Survey based on the work of Bazzoli et al. [1]. The primary dependent variables were readmission, in-hospital mortality, length of stay and costs. Data collection/Extraction methods Patients discharged from Maryland hospitals with a diagnosis that grouped to DRG 127 (heart failure) were extracted. Multivariate linear and logistic models clustered by hospital were used to analyse results at the patient level. Principal findings A higher likelihood of readmission was found as the level of Community Differentiation increased. Although costs were higher as Total Differentiation increased in 1998, these results were not validated by 1997 data. No significant relationship was found between integration of services and outcomes. Conclusions Similar outcomes were achieved regardless of the level of service integration or differentiation. Community hospitals produce similar patient outcomes at the same cost for this diagnosis. PMID:16896419

  17. Patient-powered research networks: building capacity for conducting patient-centered clinical outcomes research

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Wahba, Sarita; Fleurence, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently launched PCORnet to establish a single inter-operable multicenter data research network that will support observational research and randomized clinical trials. This paper provides an overview of the patient-powered research networks (PPRNs), networks of patient organizations focused on a particular health condition that are interested in sharing health information and engaging in research. PPRNs will build on their foundation of trust within the patient communities and draw on their expertise, working with participants to identify true patient-centered outcomes and direct a patient-centered research agenda. The PPRNs will overcome common challenges including enrolling a diverse and representative patient population; engaging patients in governance; designing the data infrastructure; sharing data securely while protecting privacy; prioritizing research questions; scaling small networks into a larger network; and identifying pathways to sustainability. PCORnet will be the first distributed research network to bring PCOR to national scale. PMID:24821741

  18. Patient-powered research networks: building capacity for conducting patient-centered clinical outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Sarah E; Wahba, Sarita; Fleurence, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) recently launched PCORnet to establish a single inter-operable multicenter data research network that will support observational research and randomized clinical trials. This paper provides an overview of the patient-powered research networks (PPRNs), networks of patient organizations focused on a particular health condition that are interested in sharing health information and engaging in research. PPRNs will build on their foundation of trust within the patient communities and draw on their expertise, working with participants to identify true patient-centered outcomes and direct a patient-centered research agenda. The PPRNs will overcome common challenges including enrolling a diverse and representative patient population; engaging patients in governance; designing the data infrastructure; sharing data securely while protecting privacy; prioritizing research questions; scaling small networks into a larger network; and identifying pathways to sustainability. PCORnet will be the first distributed research network to bring PCOR to national scale. PMID:24821741

  19. Cardiac asthma in elderly patients: incidence, clinical presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Stéphane; Becquemin, Marie-Hélène; Delerme, Samuel; Bennaceur, Mohamed; Isnard, Richard; Achkar, Rony; Riou, Bruno; Boddaert, Jacques; Ray, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Background Cardiac asthma is common, but has been poorly investigated. The objective was to compare the characteristics and outcome of cardiac asthma with that of classical congestive heart failure (CHF) in elderly patients. Methods Prospective study in an 1,800-bed teaching hospital. Results Two hundred and twelve consecutive patients aged ≥ 65 years presenting with dyspnea due to CHF (mean age of 82 ± 8 years) were included. Findings of cardiac echocardiography and natriuretic peptides levels were used to confirm CHF. Cardiac asthma patients were defined as a patient with CHF and wheezing reported by attending physician upon admission to the emergency department. The CHF group (n = 137) and the cardiac asthma group (n = 75), differed for tobacco use (34% vs. 59%, p < 0.05), history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (16% vs. 47%, p < 0.05), peripheral arterial disease (10% vs. 24%, p < 0.05). Patients with cardiac asthma had a significantly lower pH (7.38 ± 0.08 vs. 7.43 ± 0.06, p < 0.05), and a higher PaCO2 (47 ± 15 vs. 41 ± 11 mmHg, p < 0.05) at admission. In the cardiac asthma group, patients had greater distal airway obstruction: forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 1.09 vs. 1.33 Liter (p < 0.05), and a forced expiratory flow at 25% to 75% of vital capacity of 0.76 vs. 0.99 Liter (p < 0.05). The in-hospital (23% vs. 19%) and one year mortality (48% vs. 43%) rates were similar. Conclusion Patients with cardiac asthma represented one third of CHF in elderly patients. They were more hypercapnic and experienced more distal airway obstruction. However, outcomes were similar. PMID:17498318

  20. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-12-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  1. Using standardized patients to evaluate hospital-based intervention outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Guan, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    Background The standardized patient approach has proved to be an effective training tool for medical educators. This article explains the process of employing standardized patients in an HIV stigma reduction intervention in healthcare settings in China. Methods The study was conducted in 40 hospitals in two provinces of China. One year after the stigma reduction intervention, standardized patients made unannounced visits to participating hospitals, randomly approached service providers on duty and presented symptoms related to HIV and disclosed HIV-positive test results. After each visit, the standardized patients evaluated their providers’ attitudes and behaviours using a structured checklist. Standardized patients also took open-ended observation notes about their experience and the evaluation process. Results Seven standardized patients conducted a total of 217 assessments (108 from 20 hospitals in the intervention condition; 109 from 20 hospitals in the control condition). Based on a comparative analysis, the intervention hospitals received a better rating than the control hospitals in terms of general impression and universal precaution compliance as well as a lower score on stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours toward the standardized patients. Conclusion Standardized patients are a useful supplement to traditional self-report assessments, particularly for measuring intervention outcomes that are sensitive or prone to social desirability. PMID:24369433

  2. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  3. Outcome of Extended Thymectomy in Myasthenia Crisis Patient.

    PubMed

    Aftabuddin, M; Bhandari, S

    2016-07-01

    Myasthenic crisis is a life-threatening condition. We studied the demographic, frequency, causes and clinical presentation of isolated Myasthenic crisis, steps of treatment and to review our experience of extended thymectomy on patients with at least one episode myasthenic crisis. A prospective and retrospective study was conducted on patients with at least one episode of myasthenic crisis, from March 2010 to September 2014, at the Department of Cardiac Surgery, BSMMU, Dhaka, Bangladesh who were referred for thymectomy. Eighteen patients (13.6% of the total 132 patients with myasthenia gravis were admitted with single to multiple episodes of myasthenic crisis, median crisis was 2.5 episodes. Mean age of the patient was 35.5 (18-72) years with male predominance. All eighteen patients had undergone extended thymectomy after completion of 5 cycle plasmapheresis, of which 2 had experienced postoperative respiratory crisis, required invasive ventilator support for median 14 days. One patient required invasive ventilator support after third post operative day. Six patients had thymoma and 12 had thymic hyperplasia. Three patients needed Intravenous immunoglobin. Nine patients needed post operative anti acetylcholinesterase inhibitor after median 2.5 post days. Post thymectomy remission and decreases the frequency of myasthenic crisis was seen in follow up and post operative medication requirement reduced significantly as compared to the preoperative requirement. This report highlights that the patients who had extended thymectomy after episodes of myasthenia crisis are benefitted even in the histhopathology report does not confirmed thymoma. After thymectomy, there was remission of myasthenic crisis. Patients with myasthenic crisis should have judicious drug adjustments under supervision and should be treated aggressively during impending myasthenic crisis. With modern management of myasthenia gravis, early surgery with myasthenic crisis is safe with good long

  4. Patient reported outcome measures for cardiac ablation procedures: a multicentre pilot to develop a new questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Kathleen L.; White, Judith; Carolan-Rees, Grace; Patrick, Hannah; O'Callaghan, Peter; Murray, Stephen; Cunningham, David; Wood, Kathryn A.; Lencioni, Mauro; Griffith, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Aim To assess the feasibility of administering Patient Reported Outcomes Measures (PROMs) in patients treated with ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, and to conduct the first stage of development and testing of a new PROM tool. Methods and results A new tool was developed by a multidisciplinary team and tested alongside an adaptation of the patient perception of arrhythmia questionnaire (PPAQ) and EQ-5D-5L in a multicentre retrospective audit involving 791 consecutive cardiac arrhythmia patients treated with catheter ablation at three UK centres over 13 months. Data were recorded in the National Cardiac Rhythm Management Database, part of the National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research. The response rate was 71.9% (n = 569). Patients reported significant improvements across all outcomes and impacts, with reductions in symptoms of 51.7% (heart racing), 33.9% (fatigue) 31.8% (heart flutters), 43.5% (dizziness), 38.6% (breathlessness), 44.2% (chest pressure), 33.1% (trouble concentrating), 15.9% (headache), 28.3% (neck pressure), and 23.4% (fainting) (P < 0.001). The mean number of social days affected reduced by 7.49 days/month (P < 0.001); mean work/school days affected/month reduced by 6.26 (P < 0.001); mean GP/hospital visits reduced by 1.36 days/month (P < 0.001). The procedure met patient expectations in 72% of responders. Conclusions The high response rate suggests that the use of PROMs in this patient group is feasible, with rates equalling those of the National PROMs Programme. The results showed that patients experienced significant improvements in their quality of life following ablation, while feedback allowed the tools to be improved. Further work is required to validate these tools; however, the findings suggest that PROMs could be useful in the audit of ablation techniques. PMID:24627541

  5. Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Ansaar T. Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help

  6. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs. PMID:26422517

  7. Pediatric hydrocephalus: Does the shunt device pressure selection affect the outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Arvind; Sharma, Anuj; Gupta, Charitesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of low- versus medium-pressure shunts in pediatric hydrocephalus in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Forty patients of pediatric hydrocephalus were randomized into two groups. The Chhabra differential pressure VP shunt (low or medium) was inserted in every patient. Postoperative follow-up was performed for symptomatic improvement and radiological evaluation (by sonography or computed tomography scan) for ventricle hemispheric ratio (VHR). Comparative analysis of pre- and postoperative VHR and need of redo surgery for shunt malformation were carried out to establish outcomes. Results: Nineteen patients had a low-pressure and 21 patients had a medium-pressure shunt inserted. The age of the patients ranged from 1 day to 10 years. The average preoperative VHR in group A was 55.37%, which reduced to 40% postoperatively (P = 0.00005); likewise, the pre- and postoperative VHR in group B were 61.57% and 42%, respectively, which was statistically significant (P = 0.0006). The complications of shunts and incidence of redo shunt surgery in both groups were not found to be statistically significant (P = 0.5614). Conclusions: The study found no significant difference in the outcome of patients with low- or medium-pressure shunt placement in pediatric hydrocephalus. PMID:22529548

  8. Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Carey, ML; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, RW; Campbell, S; Douglas, HE

    2011-01-01

    The psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients may be influenced by individual-level, social and treatment centre predictors. This paper aimed to examine the extent to which individual, social and treatment centre variables have been examined as predictors or targets of intervention for psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients. Medline was searched to find studies in which the psychological outcomes of cancer patient were primary variables. Papers published in English between 1999 and 2009 that reported primary data relevant to psychosocial outcomes for cancer patients were included, with 20% randomly selected for further coding. Descriptive studies were coded for inclusion of individual, social or treatment centre variables. Intervention studies were coded to determine if the unit of intervention was the individual patient, social unit or treatment centre. After random sampling, 412 publications meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, 169 were descriptive and 243 interventions. Of the descriptive papers 95.0% included individual predictors, and 5.0% social predictors. None of the descriptive papers examined treatment centre variables as predictors of psychosocial outcomes. Similarly, none of the interventions evaluated the effectiveness of treatment centre interventions for improving psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for the overwhelming dominance of individual predictors and individual-focused interventions in psychosocial literature are discussed. PMID:20646035

  9. Antiretroviral adherence and treatment outcomes among adult Ethiopian patients.

    PubMed

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Gee, Peter; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Developing appropriate strategies to sustain optimal medication adherence among the increasing number of HIV-positive patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa is a major challenge. The objective of this study was to determine patient, regimen, disease, patient-provider, and healthcare-related factors associated with adherence with ART over a one-year period, and assess the impact of adherence on treatment outcomes. We performed a prospective, observational study among 246 patients who were initiated on ART in Ethiopia. Of 172 who completed follow-up, 130 (75.6%) had ≥95% adherence. In the multivariate analyses, a higher baseline BMI (OR, 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.4) and use of reminder devices (OR, 9.1; 95% CI 2.0, 41.6) remained positively associated with adherence, while a higher HIV symptom and adverse drug reaction distress score was an independent negative predictor of adherence (OR, 0.90; 95% CI 0.9, 1.0) CD4 count increase was significantly higher in the adherent patients compared to non-adherent patients at 12 months (159 cells/µL [interquartile range (IQR), 72-324 cells/µL] vs. 132 cells/µL [IQR, 43-190 cells/µL]; p = 0.026). Our findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving adherence and thereby treatment outcomes in patients initiated on ART should promote the use of reminder devices, and monitor HIV symptoms and adverse reaction distress and nutritional status. PMID:26829232

  10. Older Age Does Not Affect Healing Time and Functional Outcomes After Fracture Nonunion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, David P.; Shulman, Brandon S.; Karia, Raj; Spitzer, Allison B.; Konda, Sanjit R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients are at risk of fracture nonunion, given the potential setting of osteopenia, poorer fracture biology, and comorbid medical conditions. Risk factors predicting fracture nonunion may compromise the success of fracture nonunion surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of patient age on clinical and functional outcome following long bone fracture nonunion surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data identified 288 patients (aged 18-91) who were indicated for long bone nonunion surgery. Two-hundred and seventy-two patients satisfied study inclusion criteria and analyses were performed comparing elderly patients aged ≥65 years (n = 48) with patients <65 years (n = 224) for postoperative wound complications, Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA) functional status, healing, and surgical revision. Regression analyses were performed to look for associations between age, smoking status, and history of previous nonunion surgery with healing and functional outcome. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 91.5% (249 of 272) of patients. Results: Despite demographic differences in the aged population, including a predominance of medical comorbidities (P < .01) and osteopenia (P = .02), there was no statistical differences in the healing rate of elderly patients (95.8% vs 95.1%, P = .6) or time to union (6.2 ± 4.1 months vs. 7.2 ± 6.6, P = .3). Rates of postoperative wound complications and surgical revision did not statistically differ. Elderly patients reported similar levels of function up to 12 months after surgery. Regression analyses failed to show any significant association between age and final union or time to union. There was a strong positive association between smoking and history of previous nonunion surgery with time to union. Age was associated (positively) with 12-month SMFA activity score. Conclusions: Smoking and failure of previous surgical

  11. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery. PMID:26973406

  12. Lack of association between MDM2 promoter SNP309 and clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; De Wilde, Bram; Zeka, Fjoralba; Laureys, Geneviève; Norga, Koen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Coco, Simona; Versteeg, Rogier; Noguera, Rosa; Schulte, Johannes H; Eggert, Angelika; Stallings, Raymond L; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-10-01

    While a polymorphism located within the promoter region of the MDM2 proto-oncogene, SNP309 (T > G), has previously been associated with increased risk and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma and other tumor entities, a protective effect has also been reported in certain other cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of MDM2 SNP309 with outcome in 496 patients with neuroblastoma and its effect on MDM2 expression. No significant difference in overall or event-free survival was observed among patients with neuroblastoma with or without MDM2 SNP309. The presence of SNP309 does not affect MDM2 expression in neuroblastoma. PMID:24391119

  13. Laparoscopic surgery for patients with colorectal cancer produces better short-term outcomes with similar survival outcomes in elderly patients compared to open surgery.

    PubMed

    Moon, Soo Yun; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Soo Young; Han, Eon Chul; Kang, Sung-Bum; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Park, Kyu Joo; Oh, Jae Hwan

    2016-06-01

    The number of operations on elderly colorectal cancer (CRC) patients has increased with the aging of the population. The aim of this study was to evaluate surgical outcomes in elderly patients who underwent laparoscopic or open surgery for CRC. We analyzed the data of 280 patients aged 80 or over who underwent surgery for CRC between January 2001 and December 2010. Seventy-one pairs were selected after propensity score matching for laparoscopic or open surgery. Operative time, return to normal bowel function, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications, overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and prognostic factors affecting survival were investigated. In matched cohorts, operative time in the laparoscopic group was longer than in the open group (P < 0.001). In the laparoscopic group, time to flatus passage (P < 0.001) and length of postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.037) were shorter than in the open group. The rate of operation-related morbidity was higher in the open group (P = 0.019). There was no difference in OS and RFS between two groups. This study suggests that laparoscopic surgery for CRC in elderly patients may be safe and feasible, with better short-term outcomes. OS and RFS, however, were not different in both groups. PMID:26923309

  14. Pregnancy outcome of assisted reproductive technology cycle in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangi, Monna; Tamizharasi, M.; Reddy, N. Sanjeeva

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Ovulation induction in patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a challenge to the treating physician. The threshold for ovarian response in HH may differ substantially from that of normal patients. To reach that threshold levels of follicle stimulating hormone, in a step-up protocol longer duration of stimulation is required in some cases so as to prevent multiple pregnancy and to eliminate the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. AIM: To evaluate the duration of stimulation, quality of oocytes, and embryo, and the pregnancy outcome in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) cycles in patients with HH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over the period of 4 years, we had 14 patients with HH in whom 21 cycles of ovulation induction were done. Of these 7 patients underwent oocyte retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). We present a retrospective study of these 7 patients who underwent ART to evaluate the duration of stimulation, quality of oocytes and embryo, and the pregnancy outcome. RESULTS: In the study group on ovulation induction with gonadotropins, only one patient had the duration of stimulation of the standard 12 days, the remaining 6 patients took ≥12 days to respond to stimulation (maxium being 54 days). Mean ET in these patients was 8.9 mm. Six patients had >70% good quality MII oocytes. One patient responded poorly and had only 2 good quality MII oocytes (50%). After ICSI procedure, resultant embryos were of grade 1 and 2 in all the patients irrespective of the duration of stimulation. Fertilization rate in these patients was 85% (except in one 50% fertilization rate), and the cumulative pregnancy rate was 68.6%. CONCLUSION: In the patients with HH the quality of oocytes and embryos, and the pregnancy rate is not affected even if the duration of stimulation is prolonged. PMID:26538857

  15. Partial compliance in schizophrenia and the impact on patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Pierre-Michel

    2008-11-30

    This review evaluates the impact of partial compliance on treatment outcomes in schizophrenia and discusses strategies that may be implemented to enhance compliance. As such, a search of English language articles evaluating compliance in schizophrenia was performed using Medline and EMBASE, with no time limits. Abstracts and posters presented at key psychiatry congresses were also reviewed. Results demonstrated that partial compliance with antipsychotic medication is a significant barrier to achieving optimal outcomes in schizophrenia. The problem increases with the duration of treatment, and is difficult to monitor. The impact of partial compliance is significant, leading to increases in psychotic symptoms, the risk of relapse and rehospitalization, and even suicide. Compliance is a complex phenomenon, influenced by aspects of the illness itself such as cognitive impairment and patients' health beliefs. The patient's environment and therapeutic alliance also influence medication compliance. Behavioural and pharmacological measures should be used together to improve compliance. While atypical antipsychotics have demonstrated improvements in psychotic symptoms, insight and cognition, these may not be enough to ensure compliance with oral daily medication. Long-acting risperidone may therefore bring together the benefits of the atypical antipsychotics with the long-acting injection delivery system required to build a platform for improved outcomes. PMID:18849080

  16. The Establishment of the GENEQOL Consortium to Investigate the Genetic Disposition of Patient-Reported Quality-of-Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Veenhoven, Ruut; Cleeland, Charles S.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Abertnethy, Amy P.; Baas, Frank; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Chauhan, Cynthia; Dueck, Amylou C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Hall, Per; Klepstad, Pål; Martin, Nicholas G.; Miaskowski, Christine; Mosing, Miriam; Movsas, Benjamin; Van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Patrick, Donald L.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Ropka, Mary E.; Shi, Quiling; Shinozaki, Gen; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Yang, Ping; Zwinderman, Ailko H.

    2010-01-01

    To our knowledge, no comprehensive, interdisciplinary initiatives have been taken to examine the role of genetic variants on patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. The overall objective of this paper is to describe the establishment of an international and interdisciplinary consortium, the GENEQOL Consortium, which intends to investigate the genetic disposition of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. We have identified five primary patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes as initial targets: negative psychological affect, positive psychological affect, self-rated physical health, pain, and fatigue. The first tangible objective of the GENEQOL Consortium is to develop a list of potential biological pathways, genes and genetic variants involved in these quality-of-life outcomes, by reviewing current genetic knowledge. The second objective is to design a research agenda to investigate and validate those genes and genetic variants of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes, by creating large datasets. During its first meeting, the Consortium has discussed draft summary documents addressing these questions for each patient-reported quality-of-life outcome. A summary of the primary pathways and robust findings of the genetic variants involved is presented here. The research agenda outlines possible research objectives and approaches to examine these and new quality-of-life domains. Intriguing questions arising from this endeavor are discussed. Insight into the genetic versus environmental components of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes will ultimately allow us to explore new pathways for improving patient care. If we can identify patients who are susceptible to poor quality of life, we will be able to better target specific clinical interventions to enhance their quality of life and treatment outcomes. PMID:19456223

  17. Predictive Factors Affecting Long-Term Outcome of Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Mi-Jin; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few long-term outcome reports of unilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession for exotropia including a large number of subjects. Previous reports on unilateral LR recession commonly show extremely low rates of initial overcorrection and large exodrifts after surgery suggesting that the surgical dose may be increased. However, little is known of the long-term outcome of a large unilateral LR recession for exotropia. Objectives To determine long-term outcomes and predictive factors of recurrence after a large unilateral LR recession in patients with exotropia. Data Extraction Retrospective analysis was performed on 92 patients aged 3 to 17 years who underwent 10 mm unilateral LR recession for exotropia of ≤ 25 prism diopters (Δ) with prism and alternate cover testing and were followed up for more than 2 years after surgery. Final success rates within 10Δ of exophoria/tropia and 5Δ of esophoria/tropia at distance in the primary position, improvement in stereopsis and the predictive factors for recurrence were evaluated. Results At 24 months after surgery, 54% of patients had ocular alignment meeting the defined criteria of success, 45% had recurrence and 1% had overcorrection. After a mean follow-up of 39 months, 36% showed success, 63% showed recurrence and 1% resulted in overcorrection. The average time of recurrence was 23.4±14.7 months (range, 1–60 months) and the rate of recurrence per person-year was 23% after unilateral LR recession. Predictive factors of recurrence were a larger preoperative near angle of deviation (>16Δ) and larger initial postoperative exodeviation (>5Δ) at distance. Conclusions Long-term outcome of unilateral LR recession for exotropia showed low success rates with high recurrence, thus should be reserved for patients with a small preoperative near angle of exodeviation. PMID:26418819

  18. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  19. Clinical Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients With Intermittent Exotropia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Chen, Jingchang; Shen, Tao; Kang, Ying; Deng, Daming; Lin, Xiaoming; Wu, Heping; Chen, Qiwen; Ye, Xuelian; Li, Jianqun; Yan, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The clinical characteristics and surgical outcomes in a large sample of patients with intermittent exotropia (IXT) as well as an analysis of risk factors associated with surgical failures are presented in this article. Data from IXT patients who received surgical management at the Eye Hospital, in the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, of Sun Yat-Sen University, China from January 2009 to December 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Included within this analysis were data from pre- and postoperative ocular motility, primary alignment, and binocular vision. A total of 1228 patients with IXT were reviewed. Males (50.4%) and females (49.6%) were nearly equally represented in this sample. Thirty-two patients (2.6%) had a family history of strabismus. The mean age at onset was 6.77 ± 6.43 years (range 7 months –48.5 years), mean duration at presentation was 7.35 ± 6.68 years (range 6 months–47 years), and mean age at surgery was 13.7 ± 8.8 years (range 3–49 years). The mean refractive error was −0.84 ± 2.69 diopter in the right eye and −0.72 ± 2.58 diopter in the left eye. Amblyopia (4.2%), oblique muscle dysfunction (7.0%), and dissociated vertical deviation (4.7%) were also present in these patients. The most common subtype of IXT was the basic type (88.1%). Orthophoria was observed in 80.5% of patients and the ratios of surgical undercorrection and overcorrection were 14.7% and 4.8%, respectively, as determined with a mean follow-up time of 7.8 ± 3.7 months. When combining ocular alignment with binocular vision as the success criteria, the success rate decreased to 35.6%. Multivariate risk factor analysis showed that only the loss of stereoacuity (P = 0.002) was associated with a poor outcome. There were no differences in the long-term results between bilateral lateral rectus recession and unilateral lateral rectus recession with medial rectus resection. Most IXT patients displayed normal vision, with few having positive

  20. Bad actions or bad outcomes? Differentiating affective contributions to the moral condemnation of harm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan M; Hannikainen, Ivar A; Cushman, Fiery A

    2014-06-01

    Moral condemnation of harmful behavior is influenced by both cognitive and affective processes. However, despite much recent research, the proximate source of affect remains unclear. One obvious contender is empathy; simulating the victim's pain could lead one to judge an action as wrong ("outcome aversion"). An alternative, less obvious source is one's own aversion to performing the action itself ("action aversion"). To dissociate these alternatives, we developed a scale that assessed individual aversions to (a) witnessing others experience painful outcomes (e.g., seeing someone fall down stairs); and (b) performing actions that are harmless yet aversive (e.g., stabbing a fellow actor with a fake stage knife). Across 4 experiments, we found that moral condemnation of both first-person and third-party harmful behavior in the context of moral dilemmas is better predicted by one's aversion to action properties than by an affective response to victim suffering. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated both action aversion and the degree of expected suffering across a number of actions and found that both factors make large, independent contributions to moral judgment. Together, these results suggest we may judge others' actions by imagining what it would feel like to perform the action rather than experience the consequences of the action. Accordingly, they provide a counterpoint to a dominant but largely untested assumption that empathy is the key affective response governing moral judgments of harm. PMID:24512250

  1. Shared medical appointments: balancing efficiency with patient satisfaction and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shelly P; Elias, Beth L

    2016-07-01

    The shared medical appointment (SMA) is one model of care that holds promise for achieving the goal of balancing efficiency, cost, and quality. The results of recent studies of SMAs suggest that improved physiologic health, self-efficacy, and patient education and feasibility emerge as positive outcomes. In order to discover the potential applicability of the SMA format to otolaryngology, a pilot nasal symptoms SMA (NSSMA) model was implemented. The NSSMA was piloted in a private otolaryngology practice serving a metropolitan area in the Mid-Atlantic region. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank test demonstrated a significant improvement in the SNOT-20 score (T = -2.073; P = .019). Descriptive analyses for patient satisfaction results indicate high levels of patient satisfaction with the NSSMA. Also, Wilcoxon Signed Rank test for posttest knowledge scores were significantly higher than pretest scores (T = 1.667; P = .048). For busy practices managing large panels, the SMA serves as an opportunity to balance cost and quality. PMID:27442205

  2. Strategies for Monitoring Outcomes in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Practical strategies are available for primary care physicians to monitor psychiatric and medical outcomes as well as treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder. Current depressive symptoms can be assessed with tools like the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire or Beck Depression Inventory. Lifetime presence or absence of manic or hypomanic symptoms can be assessed using the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ). These measures can be completed quickly by patients prior to appointments. Sensitivity of such ratings, particularly the MDQ, can be increased by having a significant other also rate the patient. Clinicians should also screen mood disorder patients for psychiatric comorbidities that are common in this population such as anxiety and substance use disorders. While patients with bipolar disorder may commonly be nonadherent with prescribed medication regimens, strategies that can help include having frank discussions with the patient, selecting medication collaboratively, adding psychotherapy with a psychoeducation element, monitoring appointment-keeping, using patient self-reports of medication-taking, enlisting the aid of significant others, and measuring plasma drug levels. Medical monitoring is needed to assess the safety and tolerability of psychotropic medications. All of the approved medications for bipolar disorder have at least 1 boxed warning for serious side effects, but are also associated with other common management-limiting side effects such as sedation, tremor, unsteadiness, restlessness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, weight gain, and metabolic problems. Routine monitoring is particularly needed for obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disorders, which lead to high rates of medical morbidity and mortality in patients with bipolar disorder. Monitoring protocols such as the one recommended by the American Diabetes Association for patients taking second-generation antipsychotics can be used for regular assessment

  3. Pretransfer computed tomography delays arrival to definitive care without affecting pediatric trauma outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, Aodhnait S.; Antiel, Ryan M.; Polites, Stephanie F.; Ishitani, Michael B.; Moir, Christopher R.; Zielinski, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Children with thoracic or abdominal trauma, presenting to referring hospitals, may undergo CT imaging prior to transfer to a pediatric trauma center (PTC). We sought to determine if children who undergo pretransfer imaging experience a delay in definitive care and worse clinical outcomes. Methods Pediatric blunt trauma patients transferred to our level I PTC were identified in this IRB approved study. Those transferred with CT imaging of the chest or abdomen/pelvis prior to transfer were compared to those transferred without imaging. Results Of 246 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 5.3 years (64% male), 128 patients (52%) underwent chest (n = 85) and/or abdominal (n = 115) CT studies prior to transfer. Among those patients with pretransfer CT, 14% of CT scans were repeated. On multivariate analysis accounting for distance, time from injury to arrival at our PTC was significantly greater in children who underwent pretransfer CT (320 ± 216 vs. 208 ± 149 minutes, p < 0.001). Median length of stay (3 vs. 3 days) and mortality (3% vs. 3%) were similar between groups (all p > 0.05). Conclusions A substantial number of pediatric blunt trauma patients underwent CT scans prior to transfer, which is associated with a delay in transfer but not worse outcomes. PMID:26778842

  4. Designing of Intelligent Multilingual Patient Reported Outcome System (IMPROS)

    PubMed Central

    Pourasghar, Faramarz; Partovi, Yeganeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: By self-reporting outcome procedure the patients themselves record disease symptoms outside medical centers and then report them to medical staff in specific periods of time. One of the self-reporting methods is the application of interactive voice response (IVR), in which some pre-designed questions in the form of voice tracks would be played and then the caller responses the questions by pressing phone’s keypad bottoms. Aim: The present research explains the main framework of such system designing according to IVR technology that is for the first time designed and administered in Iran. Methods: Interactive Voice Response system was composed by two main parts of hardware and software. Hardware section includes one or several digital phone lines, a modem card with voice playing capability and a PC. IVR software on the other hand, acts as an intelligent control center, records call information and controls incoming data. Results: One of the main features of the system is its capability to be administered in common PCs, utilizing simple and cheap modems, high speed to take responses and it’s appropriateness to low literate patients. The system is applicable for monitoring chronic diseases, cancer and also in psychological diseases and can be suitable for taking care of elders and Children who require long term cares. Other features include user-friendly, decrease in direct and indirect costs of disease treatment and enjoying from high level of security to access patients’ profiles. Conclusions: Intelligent multilingual patient reported outcome system (IMPROS) by controlling diseases gives the opportunity to patients to have more participation during treatment and it improves mutual interaction between patient and medical staff. Moreover it increases the quality of medical services, Additional to empowering patients and their followers. PMID:26635441

  5. Provider and patient directed financial incentives to improve care and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, Ilona S; Lawson, Brittany C T; Long, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long-term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long-term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  6. A Literature Review of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: Perioperative Considerations and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Putnis, S.E; Wartemberg, G.K; Khan, W.S; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications. PMID:26587066

  7. A Literature Review of Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: Perioperative Considerations and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Putnis, S E; Wartemberg, G K; Khan, W S; Agarwal, S

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a spondyloarthropathy affecting the sacro-iliac joints with subsequent progression to the spine and the hip joints. The hip joints are affected by synovitis, enthesial inflammation, involvement of medullary bone, progressive degeneration and secondary osteoarthritis. Clinical presentation is usually in the form of pain and stiffness progressing to disabling fixed flexion contractures and in some instances, complete ankylosis. Hip arthroplasty should be considered for hip pain, postural and functional disability, or pain in adjacent joints due to hip stiffness. We conducted a literature review to determine peri-operative considerations and outcome in ankylosing spondylitis patients undergoing hip arthroplasty. In this review, we have discussed pre-operative surgical planning, thromboprophylaxis, anaesthetic considerations and heterotopic ossification. Outcomes of arthroplasty include range of movement, pain relief, survivorship and complications. PMID:26587066

  8. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries.

    PubMed

    Rolfson, Ola; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-07-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  9. Outcome of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Matched Case–control Study

    PubMed Central

    Thanapirom, Kessarin; Ridtitid, Wiriyaporn; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Thungsuk, Rattikorn; Noophun, Phadet; Wongjitrat, Chatchawan; Luangjaru, Somchai; Vedkijkul, Padet; Lertkupinit, Comson; Poonsab, Swangphong; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Hansomburana, Piyathida; Pornthisarn, Bubpha; Thongbai, Thirada; Mahachai, Varocha; Treeprasertsuk, Sombat

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: The risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) increases in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) due to the frequent use of antiplatelets. There is some data reporting on treatment outcomes in CAD patients presenting with UGIB. We aim to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of UGIB in patients with CAD, compared with non-CAD patients. Patients and Methods: We conducted a prospective multi-center cohort study (THAI UGIB-2010) that enrolled 981 consecutive hospitalized patients with acute UGIB. A matched case–control analysis using this database, which was collected from 11 tertiary referral hospitals in Thailand between January 2010 and September 2011, was performed. Result: Of 981 hospitalized patients with UGIB, there were 61 CAD patients and 244 gender-matched non-CAD patients (ratio 1:4). UGIB patients with CAD were significantly older, and had more frequently used antiplatelets and warfarin than in non-CAD patients. Compared with non-CAD, the CAD patients had significantly higher Glasgow–Blatchford score, full and pre-endoscopic Rockall score and full. Peptic ulcer in CAD patients was identified more often than in non-CAD patients. UGIB patients with CAD and non-CAD had similar outcomes with regard to mortality rate, re-bleeding, surgery, embolization, and packed erythrocyte transfusion. However, CAD patients had longer duration of hospital stays than non-CAD patients. Two CAD patients died from cardiac arrest after endoscopy, whereas three non-CAD patients died from pneumonia and acute renal failure during their hospitalization. Conclusion: In Thailand, patients presenting with UGIB, concomitant CAD did not affect clinical outcome of treatment, compared with non-CAD patients, except for longer hospital stay. PMID:27184638

  10. Using patient management as a surrogate for patient health outcomes in diagnostic test evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Before a new test is introduced in clinical practice, evidence is needed to demonstrate that its use will lead to improvements in patient health outcomes. Studies reporting test accuracy may not be sufficient, and clinical trials of tests that measure patient health outcomes are rarely feasible. Therefore, the consequences of testing on patient management are often investigated as an intermediate step in the pathway. There is a lack of guidance on the interpretation of this evidence, and patient management studies often neglect a discussion of the limitations of measuring patient management as a surrogate for health outcomes. Methods We discuss the rationale for measuring patient management, describe the common study designs and provide guidance about how this evidence should be reported. Results Interpretation of patient management studies relies on the condition that patient management is a valid surrogate for downstream patient benefits. This condition presupposes two critical assumptions: the test improves diagnostic accuracy; and the measured changes in patient management improve patient health outcomes. The validity of this evidence depends on the certainty around these critical assumptions and the ability of the study design to minimise bias. Three common designs are test RCTs that measure patient management as a primary endpoint, diagnostic before-after studies that compare planned patient management before and after testing, and accuracy studies that are extended to report on the actual treatment or further tests received following a positive and negative test result. Conclusions Patient management can be measured as a surrogate outcome for test evaluation if its limitations are recognised. The potential consequences of a positive and negative test result on patient management should be pre-specified and the potential patient benefits of these management changes clearly stated. Randomised comparisons will provide higher quality evidence about

  11. Does Augmented Reality Affect High School Students' Learning Outcomes in Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Jonathan Christopher

    Some teens may prefer using a self-directed, constructivist, and technologic approach to learning rather than traditional classroom instruction. If it can be demonstrated, educators may adjust their teaching methodology. The guiding research question for this study focused on how augmented reality affects high school students' learning outcomes in chemistry, as measured by a pretest and posttest methodology when ensuring that the individual outcomes were not the result of group collaboration. This study employed a quantitative, quasi-experimental study design that used a comparison and experimental group. Inferential statistical analysis was employed. The study was conducted at a high school in southwest Colorado. Eighty-nine respondents returned completed and signed consent forms, and 78 participants completed the study. Results demonstrated that augmented reality instruction caused posttest scores to significantly increase, as compared to pretest scores, but it was not as effective as traditional classroom instruction. Scores did improve under both types of instruction; therefore, more research is needed in this area. The present study was the first quantitative experiment controlling for individual learning to validate augmented reality using mobile handheld digital devices that affected individual students' learning outcomes without group collaboration. This topic was important to the field of education as it may help educators understand how students learn and it may also change the way students are taught.

  12. Paternal investment and status-related child outcomes: timing of father's death affects offspring success.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Mary K; Scelza, Brooke A

    2012-09-01

    Recent work in human behavioural ecology has suggested that analyses focusing on early childhood may underestimate the importance of paternal investment to child outcomes since such investment may not become crucial until adolescence or beyond. This may be especially important in societies with a heritable component to status, as later investment by fathers may be more strongly related to a child's adult status than early forms of parental investment that affect child survival and child health. In such circumstances, the death or absence of a father may have profoundly negative effects on the adult outcomes of his children that cannot be easily compensated for by the investment of mothers or other relatives. This proposition is tested using a multigenerational dataset from Bangalore, India, containing information on paternal mortality as well as several child outcomes dependent on parental investment during adolescence and young adulthood. The paper examines the effects of paternal death, and the timing of paternal death, on a child's education, adult income, age at marriage and the amount spent on his or her marriage, along with similar characteristics of spouses. Results indicate that a father's death has a negative impact on child outcomes, and that, in contrast to some findings in the literature on father absence, the effects of paternal death are strongest for children who lose their father in late childhood or adolescence. PMID:22429791

  13. Assessment of the effect of interval from presentation to surgery on outcome in patients with peri-ampullary malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Amr, Bassem; Shahtahmassebi, Golnaz; Briggs, Christopher D.; Bowles, Matthew J.; Aroori, Somaiah; Stell, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Delay between diagnosis of peri-ampullary cancer (PC) and surgery may allow tumour progression and affect outcome. The aim of this study was to explore associations of interval to surgery (IS) with pathological outcomes and survival in patients with PC. Method A database review of all patients undergoing surgery between 2006 and 2014 was undertaken. IS was measured from diagnosis by imaging. Potential association between IS and survival was measured using Cox regression analysis, and between IS and pathological outcome with multivariate logistic analysis. Results 388 patients underwent surgery. The median IS was 49 days (1–551 days), and was not associated with any of the evaluated outcomes in patients with pancreatic (149) or distal bile duct (46) cancer. For patients with ampullary cancer (71) longer IS was associated with improved survival, with median survival of 27.5 months for patients waiting ≤ median IS (35) and 38.3 months for patients waiting > median IS (36) for surgery (p = 0.041). A higher rate of margin positivity (31.4%) was also noted among patients who waited less than the median IS compared to those waiting longer than this interval (11.4%) (p = 0.032). Conclusion For patients with ampullary cancer there is a paradoxical improvement in outcome among those with a longer IS, which may be explained by progression to inoperability of more aggressive lesions. PMID:27037205

  14. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Pediatric Patients with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Melissa A.; Padilla, Benjamin E.; Goldsby, Robert E.; DuBois, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare malignancy that typically affects pediatric and young adult patients. There are limited data on the clinical features of pediatric DSRCT. We selected patients aged 0-21 years reported to the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program from 1991-2011. We estimated overall survival using Kaplan-Meier approaches and compared outcomes using the log rank test. The median age of the 95 pediatric patients was 15.3 years (range: 0-21). The majority of tumors originated in the abdomen and pelvis (84.4%) and the majority of patients had distant metastasis (72.6%). A minority of patients received radiation (34%). Overall survival at 5 years was poor (18.1%; 95% confidence interval 10.1-27.9%). Radiation therapy was associated with superior survival. Pediatric patients with DSRCT have significant disease burden. Outcomes for children are poor, though patients selected for radiation appear to have improved survival. PMID:27134714

  15. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  16. Scoring Systems for Outcome Prediction of Patients with Perforation Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Litake, Manjusha Madhusudhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peritonitis continues to be one of the major infectious problems confronting a surgeon. Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), Physiological and Operative Severity Score for en Umeration of Mortality (POSSUM) and Morbidity and sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute have been devised for risk assessment and for prediction of postoperative outcome. Aim The aim of this study was to find the accuracy of these scores in predicting outcome in terms of mortality in patients undergoing exploratory laprotomy for perforation peritonitis. Materials and Methods The prospective study was carried out in 100 diagnosed cases of perforation at our centre in a single unit over a period of 21 months from December 2012 to August 2014. Study was conducted on all cases of peritonitis albeit primary, tertiary, iatrogenic and those with age less than 12 years were excluded from the study. All the relevant data were collected and three scores were computed from one set of data from the patient. The main outcome measure was survival of the patient. The Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves were obtained for the three scores. Area Under the Curves (AUC) was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at a cut off point obtained from the ROC curves. Results POSSUM had an AUC of 0.99, sepsis score had an AUC of 0.98 and MPI had an AUC of 0.95. The cut off point score of 51 for POSSUM had an accuracy of 93.8 and positive predictive value of 70.5, the score of 29 for MPI had an accuracy of 82.8 and positive predictive value of 46 and the score of 22 for sepsis score had an accuracy of 95.9 and positive predictive value of 86.67. Conclusion POSSUM score was found to be superior in prediction of mortality as compared to sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute and MPI. POSSUM and MPI over predicted mortality in some cases. None of these scores are strictly preoperative. PMID:27134924

  17. Mini incision open pyeloplasty - Improvement in patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vishwajeet; Garg, Manish; Sharma, Pradeep; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the subjective and objective outcomes of mini-incision dismembered Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty in the treatment of primary ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Materials and Methods: Between January 2008 to January 2013, Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty was performed in 71 patients diagnosed with primary UPJO. Small subcostal muscle splitting incision was used in all cases. Sixteen patients with renal calculi underwent concomitant pyelolithotomy. Subjective outcome was assessed using visual pain analogue score (VAS). For objective assessment, the improvement in differential renal function (DRF) and radio-tracer wash out time (T1/2) on Tc-99m DTPA scan and decrease in hydronephrosis (HDN) on renal ultrasound (USG) and urography (IVU) were assessed. Results: Mean incision length was 5.2 cm. The average operating time and postoperative hospital stay was 63 (52-124) minutes and 2.5 (2–6) days respectively. Concomitant renal calculi were successfully removed in all the patients. Overall complication rates were 8.4% and overall success rate was 98.6% at median follow-up of 16 months. There was significant improvement in pain score (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in HDN after the procedure. While preoperative mean T1/2 was 26.7±6.4 minutes, postoperative half-time decreased to 7.8±4.2 minutes at 6 months and to 6.7±3.3 minutes at 1 year. Mean pre-operative DRF was 26.45% and it was 31.38% and 33.19% at 6 months and 1 year respectively. Conclusions: Mini-incision pyeloplasty is a safe and effective technique with combined advantage of high success rates of standard open pyeloplasty with decreased morbidity of laparoscopic approach. Excellent functional and objective outcomes can be achieved without extra technical difficulty. PMID:26689518

  18. Treatment choices and outcomes of patients with manometrically diagnosed achalasia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, J C; Finley, C; Hanna, W C; Miller, L; Ferri, L; Urbach, D R; Darling, G E

    2016-07-01

    This prospective population-based study was designed to evaluate treatment choices in patients with new manometrically diagnosed achalasia and their outcomes. Patients referred to the esophageal function laboratory were enrolled after a new manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients completed an initial achalasia symptom score validated questionnaire on their symptom severity, duration, treatment pre-diagnosis and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) survey. Treatment decisions were made by the referring physician and the patient. Follow-up questionnaires were completed every 3 months for 1 year. Patients who chose not to undergo treatment at 1-year follow-up completed another questionnaire after 5 years. Between January 2004 and January 2005, 83 of 124 eligible patients were enrolled. Heller myotomy was performed on 31 patients, three patients received botulinum toxin injections, and 25 patients received 29 pneumatic balloon dilatations. Twenty-four patients chose to receive no treatment. Following treatment, patients treated with surgery, dilatation and botulinum toxin had an average improvement in achalasia symptom score of 23 +/- 12.2, 17 +/- 10.9, and 9 +/- 14, respectively. Patients receiving no treatment had worsening symptoms with a symptom score change of -3.5 +/- 11.4. Surgery and dilatation resulted in significant improvement (P < 0.01) relative to no treatment. In univariate logistic regression, symptom severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00 to 1.08), sphincter tone (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.09), difficulty swallowing liquids (OR 3.21, 95% 1.15 to 8.99), waking from sleep (OR 2.75, 95% 1.00 to 7.61), and weight loss (OR 5.99, 95% CI 1.93 to 18.58) were all significant in predicting that patients would select treatment. In the multivariate analysis, older age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09) and weight loss (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.02 to 15.2) were statistically significant for undergoing treatment. At 5 years

  19. Outcomes in Patients With Early-Stage Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Asai, Masao; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sumi, Minako; Itami, Jun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between February 1988 and February 2007, 77 patients with Stage I or Stage II HPC underwent definitive RT in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Eleven of the patients received local irradiation, and the other 66 patients received elective bilateral neck irradiation and booster irradiation to the primary lesion. The median follow-up period for all the patients was 33 months from the start of RT, ranging from 3 to 229 months. Results: The rates of overall survival, HPC-specific survival, HPC recurrence-free survival, and local control with laryngeal voice preservation for the 77 patients at 5 years were 47%, 74%, 57%, and 70%, respectively. The survival rates were not affected by the patient characteristics or treatment factors, but the RT field was significantly correlated with local control in a multivariate analysis. Seven of the patients had Grade 3 or greater complications, but these complications occurred after salvage surgery in 6 of the patients. Of the 77 patients, 83% had synchronous or metachronous malignancies, but these malignancies did not influence the survival of the patients if the malignancies were detected at an early stage. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate treatment method for early-stage HPC. However, because synchronous or metachronous malignancies occur at a relatively high frequency, careful follow-up and the early detection of such malignancies are critical.

  20. Patient-reported outcome measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    El-Matary, Wael

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in both research and clinical health settings. With the recent development of United States Food and Drug Administration guidance on PROMs, more attention is being devoted to their role and importance in health care. Several methodological challenges in the development, validation and implementation of PROMs must be resolved to ensure their appropriate utilization and interpretation. The present review discusses recent developments and updates in PROMs, with specific focus on the area of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25390615

  1. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  2. Cellular Intrinsic Mechanism Affecting the Outcome of AML Treated with Ara-C in a Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dongming; Su, Guangsong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei J.; Singleton, Timothy P.; Yin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. PMID:25314317

  3. Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation Experience and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Balasubramani, G. K.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Lave, Judith R.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Previous studies suggest improved patient outcomes for providers who perform high volumes of complex medical procedures. Out-of-hospital tracheal intubation is a difficult procedure. We seek to determine the association between rescuer procedural experience and patient survival after out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. Methods We analyzed probabilistically linked Pennsylvania statewide emergency medicine services, hospital discharge, and death data of patients receiving out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. We defined tracheal intubation experience as cumulative tracheal intubation during 2000 to 2005; low=1 to 10 tracheal intubations, medium=11 to 25 tracheal intubations, high=26 to 50 tracheal intubations, and very high=greater than 50 tracheal intubations. We identified survival on hospital discharge of patients intubated during 2003 to 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we evaluated the association between patient survival and out-of-hospital rescuer cumulative tracheal intubation experience, adjusted for clinical covariates. Results During 2003 to 2005, 4,846 rescuers performed tracheal intubation. These individuals performed tracheal intubation on 33,117 patients during 2003 to 2005 and 62,586 patients during 2000 to 2005. Among 21,753 cardiac arrests, adjusted odds of survival was higher for patients intubated by rescuers with very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted odds ratio (OR) versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.89), high 1.13 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.31), and medium 1.02 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.15). Among 8,162 medical nonarrests, adjusted odds of survival were higher for patients intubated by rescuers with high and very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted OR versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.55 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.22), high 1.29 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.59), and medium 1.16 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.38). Among 3,202 trauma nonarrests, survival was not

  4. Outcome of orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, F; Mistry, P; Sabin, C; Lee, C

    1998-01-01

    Background—Many patients with haemophilia have developed cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma due to transfusion acquired chronic viral hepatitis. 
Aims—To assess the long term outcome of all haemophilic patients reported to have undergone orthotopic liver transplantation. 
Methods—Transplant centres of patients identified by medical database search were contacted and survival data assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. 
Results—Twenty six haemophilic men (median age 46 years, range 5-63 years) underwent orthotopic liver transplantation in 16centres between 1982 and 1996. Indications for transplantation were hepatitis C cirrhosis (69%), hepatitis B with or without C cirrhosis (15%), viral hepatitis related hepatocellular carcinoma (12%), and biliary atresia (4%). Six patients (23%) were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Postoperatively, the median time to normal clotting factor levels was 24 hours (range 0-48 hours) and exogenous clotting factors were stopped at a median of 24 hours (range 0-480 hours). Four patients (15%) had bleeding complications. The one and three year survival of HIV positive recipients (67% and 23%) was significantly poorer (p=0.0003) than that of HIV negative recipients (90% and 83%). Coagulopathy was cured in all patients surviving more than 12 days post-transplant. Six of the 20 patients (30%) with hepatitis C cirrhosis pretransplant had evidence of disease recurrence at a mean of nine months post-transplant. 
Conclusions—Hepatitis C cirrhosis is the most common indication for orthotopic liver transplantation in patients with haemophilia. Transplantation results in long term cure of haemophilia but may be complicated by the effects of HIV infection or recurrent viral hepatitis. 

 Keywords: liver transplantation; haemophilia; hepatitis C; cirrhosis; HIV PMID:9659174

  5. Diagnostic Issues, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcomes for Patients with Fungemia▿

    PubMed Central

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Sulim, Sofia; Holm, Anette; Nielsen, Lene; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Drenck, Niels Erik; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated microbiological, clinical, and management issues and outcomes for Danish fungemia patients. Isolates and clinical information were collected at six centers. A total of 334 isolates, 316 episodes, and 305 patients were included, corresponding to 2/3 of the national episodes. Blood culture positivity varied by system, species, and procedure. Thus, cases with concomitant bacteremia were reported less commonly by BacT/Alert than by the Bactec system (9% [11/124 cases] versus 28% [53/192 cases]; P < 0.0001), and cultures with Candida glabrata or those drawn via arterial lines needed longer incubation. Species distribution varied by age, prior antifungal treatment (57% occurrence of C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or C. krusei in patients with prior antifungal treatment versus 28% occurrence in those without it; P = 0.007), and clinical specialty (61% occurrence of C. glabrata or C. krusei in hematology wards versus 27% occurrence in other wards; P = 0.002). Colonization samples were not predictive for the invasive species in 11/100 cases. Fifty-six percent of the patients had undergone surgery, 51% were intensive care unit (ICU) patients, and 33% had malignant disease. Mortality increased by age (P = 0.009) and varied by species (36% for C. krusei, 25% for C. parapsilosis, and 14% for other Candida species), severity of underlying disease (47% for ICU patients versus 24% for others; P = 0.0001), and choice but not timing of initial therapy (12% versus 48% for patients with C. glabrata infection receiving caspofungin versus fluconazole; P = 0.023). The initial antifungal agent was deemed suboptimal upon species identification in 15% of the cases, which would have been 6.5% if current guidelines had been followed. A large proportion of Danish fungemia patients were severely ill and received suboptimal initial antifungal treatment. Optimization of diagnosis and therapy is possible. PMID:21715585

  6. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients. PMID:22811342

  7. Analysis of donor heterogeneity as a factor affecting the clinical outcome of oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sarah E; Faddy, Malcolm; Levett, Stephen; Sharma, Vinay; Gosden, Roger

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated factors that may affect the clinical outcome of oocyte donation on the basis of data from a clinical programme involving 243 treatment cycles analysed retrospectively. In each cohort, oocytes were distributed randomly to one, two or three recipients, which enabled the outcomes in terms of pregnancy and live birth rates to be compared among donors. The results were compared with respect to age of the donor and recipient, number of oocytes collected, fertilization and cleavage rates, qualitative embryo criteria (morphological grade) and other clinical criteria. Most variables had no significant effect on either outcome, although the live birth rate varied inversely with recipient age. Unsurprisingly, the pregnancy rate was correlated positively with the number of embryos transferred. Most of the variation in pregnancy and live birth rates (85-90%) could not be accounted for by any specific donation characteristic, indicating that interdonor heterogeneity was the result of idiopathic factors. The factor most predictive of a recipient's cycle outcome was a history of previous success of the donor, which accounted for approximately 30% of the variation in live birth rates. Pregnancy success rates varied widely among oocyte donors, as has been found among sperm donors. This observation highlights the need to identify markers that predict developmental competence and help to identify the genetic and environmental bases of differential fertility. In conclusion, the quality of oocytes varied widely among women presumed to be fertile by clinical criteria, and the causative factors set a major limitation on the prospects of improving the outcome of egg donation. PMID:12477962

  8. Association between hemodynamic presentation and outcome in sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Yeon; Shin, Tae Gun; Jo, Ik Joon; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to compare outcomes of sepsis patients according to their hemodynamic presentation: cryptic shock (CS), cryptic to overt shock (COS), and overt shock (OS). We analyzed the sepsis registry for adult patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary hospital and met the criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock between August 2008 and March 2012. We classified the patients as having CS, COS, or OS. "Cryptic shock" was defined as severe sepsis with a lactate level of 4 mmol/L or greater and normotension, "COS" was defined as initial CS that progressed to septic shock within 72 h, and "OS" was defined as septic shock on ED arrival. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. We performed a multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess variables related to in-hospital mortality and a multivariable Cox regression analysis to assess predictive factors for progression to OS in patients who initially showed CS. A total of 591 patients were included. We assigned 187 (31.6%) patients to the CS group, 157 (26.6%) patients to the COS group, and 247 (41.8%) patients to the OS group. There was a significant difference in unadjusted in-hospital mortality among groups (7.0% in the CS group, 27.4% in the COS group, and 21.9% in the OS group; P < 0.01). Multivariable analysis showed an odds ratio (OR) for in-hospital mortality of 0.17 (95% confidence interval, 0.07 - 0.40; P < 0.01) for the CS group and 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.46 - 1.49; P = 0.54) for the COS group compared with the OS group. A higher blood lactate concentration and respiratory failure were significant risk factors for progression to OS. In conclusion, CS without deterioration to hypotension during initial treatment showed significantly lower mortality than OS. The mortality from CS that progressed to apparent hypotension, however, was comparable to the mortality associated with OS. PMID:24978884

  9. OCCURRENCE OF MULTI-ORGAN DYSFUNCTION IN PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS - INCIDENCE AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Jeschke, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the incidence of single or multiple organ failure postburn and its resultant clinical outcomes during acute hospitalization. Summary Background Data Patient outcomes are inherently dependent on intact organ function; however, burn injury affects the structure and function of almost every organ, but especially lung, liver, kidney and heart. Therefore, single-organ failure and/or multiorgan failure (MOF) are thought to contribute significantly to postburn morbidity and mortality but to date no large trial examining the effects of MOF on postburn outcomes exists. Methods Incidence of MOF was monitored in 821 pediatric burn patients during acute hospitalization. Patients were divided into groups based on the incidence of single organ specific failure, MOF, and non-MOF. The DENVER2 score was used to assess organ specific scores for lung, liver, kidney and heart. The patient’s demographics, injury characteristics, and outcome parameters were recorded. Results Respiratory failure has the highest incidence in the early phase of postburn injury, and decreases starting 5 days postburn. Cardiac failure was noted to have the highest incidence throughout hospital stay. Incidence of hepatic failure increases with the length of hospital stay and is associated with a high mortality during the late phase of the acute hospital stay. Renal failure has an unexpectedly low incidence but is associated with a high mortality during the first three weeks postburn injury. Three or more organ failure is associated with very high mortality. Conclusion This is the first large study in burn patients to determine the incidence of organ specific failure and outcome. The results of this study confirmed the expected chronologic incidence of organ-specific failure and yield the long-term mortality of liver and renal failure. (NCT00673309) PMID:23511841

  10. Novel psoriasis therapies and patient outcomes, part 1: topical medications.

    PubMed

    Feely, Meghan A; Smith, Barry L; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, advances in our understanding of inflammatory mediators and the underlying pathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have shed light on potential therapeutic targets, which has led to the development of several new promising treatments. In this article, key clinical trials, mechanisms of action, patient outcomes, and relevant safety information for these novel topical medications will be evaluated. This article is the first in a 3-part series on treatments presently in the pipeline for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis including topical agents, biologic treatments, and systemic therapies in phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials. With novel approaches to the disease process, these therapies may afford more targeted individualized treatment regimens and offer hope to patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis who have reported a suboptimal therapeutic response to conventional therapies. PMID:25844785

  11. Preparing the patient for surgery to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Levett, Denny Z H; Edwards, Mark; Grocott, Mike; Mythen, Monty

    2016-06-01

    The time between contemplation of surgery and the procedure offers a window of opportunity to optimize patients' nutritional, functional and psychological state prior to surgery. Traditionally, preoperative pathways have focused on the underlying disease process and 'fitness for surgery' with physical pre-assessment and risk counselling late in the pathway when little time is available to intervene. With an increasingly elderly and co-morbid surgical population, early physiological assessment and multidisciplinary collaborative decision-making is increasingly important. Multimodal prehabilitation programmes may improve surgical outcome, facilitating rapid recovery from surgery and limiting post-operative functional dependence. Patient education and engagement is important if compliance with behavioural change is to be achieved and maintained. To date, there has been evidence supporting preoperative exercise training, smoking cessation, reduction in alcohol intake, anaemia management and psychosocial support. Further research is needed to identify the most effective elements of these complex preoperative interventions, as well as their optimum timing and duration. PMID:27396803

  12. Improving Health Outcomes for Low Health Literacy Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Friel, Catherine J

    2016-09-01

    According to the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (2003), only 12% of U.S. adults have a proficient level of health literacy, with adults 65 years and older more likely to have a below basic or a basic health literacy level. An estimated 5.8 million individuals in the United States have heart failure (HF) and it is one of the most common reasons for those aged 65 and over to be hospitalized. Many patients with HF are at risk for poor health outcomes due to low health literacy. This article reviews the literature with regard to the effectiveness of methods used to address low health literacy among HF patients and describes a pilot study implemented by a home care agency in the northeast to address high HF readmission rates. PMID:27580282

  13. Pre- and perioperative predictors of short-term clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy.

    PubMed

    Olbert, Peter J; Hegele, Axel; Schrader, Andres J; Scherag, André; Hofmann, Rainer

    2007-10-01

    Percutaneous nephrolitholapaxy (PCNL) with modern stone disintegration technologies is the treatment of choice for patients with extensive stone burden or stones refractory to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. However, little is known about factors predicting unfavourable outcome in terms of perioperative complications, residual stone burden or prolonged hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate preoperative, patient- and stone-related parameters that might influence the perioperative course and short-term clinical outcomes. In a prospective study, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), bidimensional size, side, pre-existent urinary tract infection, pre-existent hydronephrosis and previous kidney surgery were used as independent variables in both univariate and multiple regression models in 109 PCNL patients in order to predict the partition of patients rendered stone free at hospital discharge, duration of surgery, length of inpatient hospital stay and the occurrence of major complications. Univariate and multiple regression analysis revealed that stone size was the only factor influencing duration of surgery (P < 0.001) and hospitalization (P = 0.02), but had no predictive potential for major complications. Univariate analysis showed a trend towards longer inpatient hospital stay and clinically relevant residuals in patients with lower BMI (P = 0.05 and 0.06); however, after controlling for the other confounding variables, this was only reproducible for residual stone burden. The other patient- and stone-related factors did not adversely affect the outcome measures. In our patient sample treated with PCNL by LithoClast Master/Ultra we found evidence that large stone burden is a prognostic factor predicting longer surgery and prolonged hospitalization. In addition, patients with lower BMIs might be at higher risk of not being stone free at hospital discharge accompanied by prolonged inpatient treatment. PMID:17786419

  14. Conceptualising the Impact of Arousal and Affective State on Training Outcomes of Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Melissa J.; Branson, Nicholas; Cody, Denis; McGreevy, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary This article discusses the impacts of arousal and emotional state on training animals using methods based on reward and punishment. Three-dimensional graphs are provided to offer a visual means to illustrate how arousal and emotional state may influence the effectiveness of reward and punishment depending on the behaviour being trained. Dogs and horses are used to illustrate this with reference to commonly trained behaviours in a predatory and a prey animal. Abstract Animal training relies heavily on an understanding of species-specific behaviour as it integrates with operant conditioning principles. Following on from recent studies showing that affective states and arousal levels may correlate with behavioural outcomes, we explore the contribution of both affective state and arousal in behavioural responses to operant conditioning. This paper provides a framework for assessing how affective state and arousal may influence the efficacy of operant training methods. It provides a series of three-dimensional conceptual graphs as exemplars to describing putative influences of both affective state and arousal on the likelihood of dogs and horses performing commonly desired behaviours. These graphs are referred to as response landscapes, and they highlight the flexibility available for improving training efficacy and the likely need for different approaches to suit animals in different affective states and at various levels of arousal. Knowledge gaps are discussed and suggestions made for bridging them. PMID:26487403

  15. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  16. An Analysis of Inhalation Injury Diagnostic Methods and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jessica A; Ching, Yiu-Hei; Shivers, Steven C; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Payne, Wyatt G; Smith, David J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient outcomes according to the method of diagnosing burn inhalation injury. After approval from the American Burn Association, the National Burn Repository Dataset Version 8.0 was queried for patients with a diagnosis of burn inhalation injury. Subgroups were analyzed by diagnostic method as defined by the National Burn Repository. All diagnostic methods listed for each patient were included, comparing mortality, hospital days, intensive care unit (ICU) days, and ventilator days (VDs). Z-tests, t-tests, and linear regression were used with a statistical significance of P value of less than .05. The database query yielded 9775 patients diagnosed with inhalation injury. The greatest increase in mortality was associated with diagnosis by bronchoscopy or carbon monoxide poisoning. A relative increase in hospital days was noted with diagnosis by bronchoscopy (9 days) or history (2 days). A relative increase in ICU days was associated with diagnosis according to bronchoscopy (8 days), clinical findings (2 days), or history (2 days). A relative increase in VDs was associated with diagnosis by bronchoscopy (6 days) or carbon monoxide poisoning (3 days). The combination of diagnosis by bronchoscopy and clinical findings increased the relative difference across all comparison measures. The combination of diagnosis by bronchoscopy and carbon monoxide poisoning exhibited decreased relative differences when compared with bronchoscopy alone. Diagnosis by laryngoscopy showed no mortality or association with poor outcomes. Bronchoscopic evidence of inhalation injury proved most useful, predicting increased mortality, hospital, ICU, and VDs. A combined diagnosis determined by clinical findings and bronchoscopy should be considered for clinical practice. PMID:26594867

  17. Autoregulation monitoring and outcome prediction in neurocritical care patients: Does one index fit all?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bernhard; Reinhard, Matthias; Lezaic, Vesna; McLeod, Damian D; Weinhold, Marco; Mattes, Heinz; Klingelhöfer, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Indexes PRx and Mx have been formerly introduced to assess cerebral autoregulation and have been shown to be associated with 3-month clinical outcome. In a mixed cohort of neurocritical care patients, we retrospectively investigated the impact of selected clinical characteristics on this association. Forty-one patients (18-77 years) with severe traumatic (TBI, N = 20) and non-traumatic (N = 21) brain injuries were studied. Cerebral blood flow velocity, arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure were repeatedly recorded during 1-h periods. Calculated PRx and Mx were correlated with 3-month clinical outcome score of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) in different subgroups with specific clinical characteristics. Both PRx and Mx correlated significantly with outcome (PRx: r = 0.38, p < 0.05; AUC = 0.64, n.s./Mx: r = 0.48, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.80, p < 0.005) in the overall group, and in patients with hemicraniectomy (N = 17; PRx: r = 0.73, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.89, p < 0.01/Mx: r = 0.69, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.87, p < 0.05). Mx, not PRx, correlated significantly with mRS in patients with heart failure (N = 17; r = 0.69, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.92, p < 0.005), and in non-traumatic patients (r = 0.49, p < 0.05; AUC = 0.79, p < 0.05). PRx, not Mx, correlated significantly with mRS in TBI patients (r = 0.63, p < 0.01; AUC = 0.89, p < 0.01). Both indexes did not correlate with mRS in diabetes patients (N = 15), PRx failed in hypocapnic patients (N = 26). Both PRx and Mx were significantly associated with 3-month clinical outcome, even in patients with hemicraniectomy. PRx was more appropriate for TBI patients, while Mx was better suited for non-traumatic patients and patients with heart failure. Prognostic values of indexes were affected by diabetes (both Mx and PRx) and hypocapnia (PRx only). PMID:26085437

  18. The Association of Visual Impairment With Clinical Outcomes in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu Ah; Kim, Suk Young; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Visual impairment limits people's ability to perform daily tasks and affects their quality of life. We evaluated the impact of visual impairment on clinical outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients. HD patients were selected from the Clinical Research Center registry a prospective cohort study on dialysis patients in Korea. Visual impairment was defined as difficulty in daily life due to decreased visual acuity or blindness. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and the secondary outcomes were cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization. A total of 3250 patients were included. Seven hundred thirty (22.5%) of the enrolled patients had visual impairment. The median follow-up period was 30 months. The Kaplan–Meier curve and log-rank test showed that all-cause mortality rates (P < 0.001) as well as cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization rates (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with visual impairment than in patients without visual impairment. In the multivariable analysis, visual impairment had significant predictive power for all-cause mortality (Hazard ratio [HR], 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–2.61, P = 0.004) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.45 [1.00–1.90], P = 0.008) after adjusting for confounding variables. Of these 3250 patients, 634 patients from each group were matched by propensity scores. In the propensity score matched analysis, patients with visual impairment had independently significant associations with increased all-cause mortality (HR 1.69 [1.12–2.54], P = 0.01) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.48 [1.08–2.02], P = 0.01) compared with patients without visual impairment after adjustment for confounding variables. Our data demonstrated that visual impairment was an independent risk factor for clinical adverse outcomes in HD patients. PMID:27175661

  19. Gender Differences in Outcomes of Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Harness-Brumley, Cayce L.; Elliott, Alan C.; Rosenbluth, Daniel B.; Raghavan, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening genetic disease in which women have been described to have worse outcomes than males, particularly in response to respiratory infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, as advancements in therapies have improved life expectancy, this gender disparity has been challenged. The objective of this study is to examine whether a gender-based survival difference still exists in this population and determine the impact of common CF respiratory infections on outcomes in males versus females with CF. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 32,766 patients from the United States Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry over a 13-year period. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare overall mortality and pathogen based survival rates in males and females. Results: Females demonstrated a decreased median life expectancy (36.0 years; 95% confidence interval [CI] 35.0–37.3) compared with men (38.7 years; 95% CI 37.8–39.6; p<0.001). Female gender proved to be a significant risk factor for death (hazard ratio 2.22, 95% CI 1.79–2.77), despite accounting for variables known to influence CF mortality. Women were also found to become colonized earlier with several bacteria and to have worse outcomes with common CF pathogens. Conclusions: CF women continue to have a shortened life expectancy relative to men despite accounting for key CF-related comorbidities. Women also become colonized with certain common CF pathogens earlier than men and show a decreased life expectancy in the setting of respiratory infections. Explanations for this gender disparity are only beginning to be unraveled and further investigation into mechanisms is needed to help develop therapies that may narrow this gender gap. PMID:25495366

  20. Outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia.

    PubMed Central

    Neumayer, U.; Somerville, J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of pregnancies in patients with complex pulmonary atresia, comparing those with and without previous radical surgical repair. DESIGN: A retrospective study of all pregnancies in women with complex pulmonary atresia registered on the Grown-up Congenital Heart Unit database between 1977 and 1994. SETTING: Referral centre for adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease. PATIENTS: Forty one pregnancies occurred in 15 patients. They were divided into two groups; group I, 26 pregnancies in nine patients before radical repair (cyanotic); group II, 15 pregnancies in seven women after radical surgical repair. RESULTS: In group I there were three terminations, 13 miscarriages, eight healthy children, and two neonatal deaths. Five children were born prematurely and all had low birthweights. In group II there were two miscarriages, 11 normal children, and two children with congenital heart disease. None was premature and all had normal birthweights. There were major complications in both groups: in group I there were two thromboembolic complications and one episode of heart failure; in group II there was one pulmonary embolism and one arrhythmic complication, five pregnancies in three patients were complicated by left ventricular failure that was persistent in one case and progressive in another, leading to death 13 months after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with complex pulmonary atresia, with or without surgical repair, who have no or mild symptoms, can have successful pregnancies. Surgical repair decreases fetal complications significantly. In both groups thrombotic disorders and heart failure must be prevented. Patients with residual systemic-pulmonary collaterals after surgical repair are particularly at risk of left ventricular failure. PMID:9290396

  1. An Integrated Care Initiative to Improve Patient Outcome in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Amberg, Norbert; Woltmann, Rainer; Walther, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The optimal treatment of schizophrenia patients requires integration of medical and psychosocial inputs. In Germany, various health-care service providers and institutions are involved in the treatment process. Early and continuous treatment is important but often not possible because of the fragmented medical care system in Germany. The Integrated Care Initiative Schizophrenia has implemented a networked care concept in the German federal state of Lower Saxony that integrates various stakeholders of the health care system. In this initiative, office-based psychiatrists, specialized nursing staff, psychologists, social workers, hospitals, psychiatric institutional outpatient’s departments, and other community-based mental health services work together in an interdisciplinary approach. Much emphasis is placed on psychoeducation. Additional efforts cover socio-therapy, visiting care, and family support. During the period from October 2010 (start of the initiative) to December 2012, first experiences and results of quality indicators were collected of 713 registered patients and summarized in a quality monitoring report. In addition, standardized patient interviews were conducted, and duration of hospital days was recorded in 2013. By the end of 2012, patients had been enrolled for an average of 18.7 months. The overall patient satisfaction measured in a patient survey in June 2013 was high and the duration of hospital days measured in a pre–post analysis in July 2013 was reduced by 44%. Two years earlier than planned, the insurance fund will continue the successfully implemented Integrated Care Initiative and adopt it in the regular care setting. This initiative can serve as a learning case for how to set up and measure integrated care systems that may improve outcomes for patients suffering from schizophrenia. PMID:26779043

  2. Correlation of Clinical Outcomes with β-Glucan Levels in Patients with Invasive Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Charles R.; Mohr, John; Rodriguez, Jose; Finkelman, Malcolm; Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis

    2012-01-01

    The correlation of β-glucan (BG) levels with clinical outcomes in invasive candidiasis (IC) remains unknown. Patients with proven IC were followed prospectively from diagnosis to outcome with twice-weekly serum BG sampling. Correlation of BG with clinical outcome was assessed in each patient. BG levels tend to decrease in successfully treated patients and increase in treatment failures. BG levels may be useful as surrogates for outcome evaluation of IC. PMID:22461680

  3. Outcomes After Whole Brain Reirradiation in Patients With Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Jimenez, Rachel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Loeffler, Jay S.; Oh, Kevin S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases are often treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for purposes of palliation. The treatment of those who experience subsequent intracranial disease progression can include a second course of WBRT, although there is controversy surrounding its safety and efficacy. This study examines the outcomes in patients at Massachusetts General Hospital who underwent reirradiation. Patients and Methods: We examined the medical records of 17 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital with brain metastases who were initially treated with WBRT between 2002 and 2008 and were subsequently retreated with a second course of WBRT. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range, 28-40 Gy), with a fraction size of 2 to 3 Gy (median, 2.5 Gy). The median dose at reirradiation was 21.6 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy), with a fraction size of 1.5 to 2 Gy (median, 1.8 Gy). Results: The second course of WBRT was administered upon radiographic disease progression in all patients. Of 10 patients with complete follow-up data, 8 patients experienced complete or partial symptom resolution, and 2 did not show clinical improvement. The time to radiographic progression was 5.2 months. The median overall survival for all patients after diagnosis of metastases was 24.7 months. The median survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 5.2 months (95% CI, 1.3-8.7). In 6 patients with stable extracranial disease, the median survival time after retreatment was 19.8 months (95% CI, 2.7-{infinity}), compared with 2.5 months (95% CI, 0.8-5.5) for those with extracranial disease progression (p = 0.05). Acute adverse reactions occurred in 70.5% of patients but were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: In select patients and especially those with stable extracranial disease, reirradiation may be an appropriate and effective intervention to provide symptomatic relief and slow intracranial disease progression. Side effects were minimal and did not

  4. Outcomes in patients with brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi; Mellon, Eric; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica; Shridhar, Ravi; Pimiento, Jose; Meredith, Ken; Tran, Nam D.; Saeed, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    or more brain metastases (MS, 0.3 months, P<0.01). For the 36 patients with 1–2 brain metastases and KPS ≥70, MS was 11.1 months. Conclusions While the prognosis for esophageal cancer metastatic to brain remains poor overall, we found that patients with good performance status and limited number of brain lesions have superior survival. Aggressive management may further improve outcomes in these patients. PMID:27563446

  5. Predicted and experienced affective responses to the outcome of the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, Michael B; Corser, Grant C; Gohm, Carol L; VonWaldner, Kristen L; Foreman, Elizabeth L

    2010-12-01

    People typically have intense feelings about politics. Therefore, it was no surprise that the campaign and eventual election of Barack Obama were highly anticipated and emotionally charged events, making it and the emotion experienced afterward a useful situation in which to replicate prior research showing that people typically overestimate the intensity and duration of their future affective states. Consequently, it was expected that Obama supporters and McCain supporters might overestimate the intensity of their affective responses to the outcome of the election. Data showed that while McCain supporters underestimated how happy they would be following the election, Obama supporters accurately predicted how happy they would be following the election. These data provide descriptive information on the accuracy of people's predicted reactions to the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The findings are discussed in the context of the broad literature and this specific and unique event. PMID:21323142

  6. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Ana; Balo, Aránzazu; Lorenzo–López, Laura; Lodeiro–Fernández, Leire; Rodríguez–Villamil, José Luis; Millán–Calenti, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting. Patients and methods Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0%) were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities) and affective status (depressive symptoms). Results Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients) had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting. Conclusion Our findings revealed a similar global cognitive decline rate between patients receiving day care services and those residing in a nursing home at the 1-year follow-up, and slightly different trajectories in other outcomes such as naming function and

  7. Do Physicians' Financial Incentives Affect Medical Treatment and Patient Health?

    PubMed

    Clemens, Jeffrey; Gottlieb, Joshua D

    2014-04-01

    We investigate whether physicians' financial incentives influence health care supply, technology diffusion, and resulting patient outcomes. In 1997, Medicare consolidated the geographic regions across which it adjusts physician payments, generating area-specific price shocks. Areas with higher payment shocks experience significant increases in health care supply. On average, a 2 percent increase in payment rates leads to a 3 percent increase in care provision. Elective procedures such as cataract surgery respond much more strongly than less discretionary services. Non-radiologists expand their provision of MRIs, suggesting effects on technology adoption. We estimate economically small health impacts, albeit with limited precision. PMID:25170174

  8. Differential outcomes of type A dissection with malperfusion according to affected organ system

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Joshua C.; Magruder, J. Trent; Crawford, Todd C.; Sciortino, Christopher M.; Zehr, Kenton J.; Mandal, Kaushik; Conte, John V.; Cameron, Duke E.; Black, James H.

    2016-01-01

    type A dissection can be managed in many patients by aortic replacement alone with low overall mortality. Most cases of renal and cerebral malperfusion resolved following aortic surgery. Revascularization was frequently necessary in patients with extremity malperfusion. Patients presenting with intestinal ischemia had very poor outcomes. A patient-specific approach is recommended in such complex patients.

  9. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: Treatment and outcomes of 93 patients

    PubMed Central

    Brode, Sarah K; Varadi, Robert; McNamee, Jane; Malek, Nina; Stewart, Sharon; Jamieson, Frances B; Avendano, Monica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) poses a threat to its control. There is scanty evidence regarding optimal management of MDR TB. The majority of Canadian cases of MDR TB are diagnosed in Ontario; most are managed by the Tuberculosis Service at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. The authors reviewed 93 cases of MDR TB admitted from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2011. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients were foreign born. Fifty-six percent had a previous diagnosis of TB and most (70%) had only pulmonary involvement. Symptoms included productive cough, weight loss, fever and malaise. The average length of inpatient stay was 126 days. All patients had a peripherally inserted central catheter for the intensive treatment phase because medications were given intravenously. Treatment lasted for 24 months after bacteriologic conversion, and included a mean (± SD) of 5±1 drugs. A successful outcome at the end of treatment was observed in 84% of patients. Bacteriological conversion was achieved in 98% of patients with initial positive sputum cultures; conversion occurred by four months in 91%. CONCLUSIONS: MDR TB can be controlled with the available anti-TB drugs. PMID:25493698

  10. Mechanisms of Behavioral and Affective Treatment Outcomes in a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Boys.

    PubMed

    Burke, Jeffrey D; Loeber, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Evidence for effective treatment for behavioral problems continues to grow, yet evidence about the effective mechanisms underlying those interventions has lagged behind. The Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) program is a multicomponent intervention for boys between 6 and 11. This study tested putative treatment mechanisms using data from 252 boys in a randomized controlled trial of SNAP versus treatment as usual. SNAP includes a 3 month group treatment period followed by individualized intervention, which persisted through the 15 month study period. Measures were administered in four waves: at baseline and at 3, 9 and 15 months after baseline. A hierarchical linear modeling strategy was used. SNAP was associated with improved problem-solving skills, prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills, and reduced parental stress. Prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills and reduced parental stress partially mediated improvements in child aggression. Improved emotion regulation skills partially mediated treatment-related child anxious-depressed outcomes. Improvements in parenting behaviors did not differ between treatment conditions. The results suggest that independent processes may drive affective and behavioral outcomes, with some specificity regarding the mechanisms related to differing treatment outcomes. PMID:25619927

  11. Treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with severe acute malnutrition treated at outpatient therapeutic care program

    PubMed Central

    Mengesha, Melkamu Merid; Deyessa, Negussie; Tegegne, Balewgizie Sileshi; Dessie, Yadeta

    2016-01-01

    Background The outpatient therapeutic care program (OTP) of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) has been decentralized to health post level in Ethiopia since 2008–2009. However, there is a lack of evidence regarding treatment outcomes and factors related to the duration of stay on treatment after its decentralization to health post level. Objective This study was aimed to assess treatment outcome and factors affecting time to recovery in children with SAM treated at OTP. Design Health facility–based retrospective cohort study was conducted using data from 348 patient cards. The outcome variable was time to recovery. Descriptive analysis was done using percentages for categorical data and mean/median for continuous variables. A robust method of analyzing time to event data, the Cox proportional-hazard regression, was used. All statistical tests in this study are declared significant at p<0.05. Result 89.1% of children with kwashiorkor and 69.4% of children with marasmus were recovered. Of the total children studied, 22% were readmitted cases. The median time of recovery was 35 days for children with kwashiorkor and 49 days for children with marasmus. Children older than 3 years were 33% less likely to achieve nutritional recovery [adjusted hazard ratio, AHR=0.67, 95% confidence interval, CI (0.46, 0.97)]. Similarly, marasmic children stayed longer on treatment [AHR=0.42, 95% CI (0.32, 0.56)]. However, children who gained Mid-Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) ≥ 0.24 mm/day were 59% more likely to recover faster [AHR=1.59, 95% CI (1.23, 2.06)]. Conclusions Close monitoring of weight and MUAC gain to assess nutritional improvement with due emphasis given to children with lower admission weight, children of age 3 years and above and marasmic children will have a positive effect on treatment duration and outcome. PMID:27396484

  12. Epidemiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis patients affected by oral bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This literature review aims to evaluate the epidemiologic profile of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that developed a bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis that affect the jaws (BRONJ), including demographic aspects, as well as clinical and therapeutic issues. A search of PUBMED/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases from January 2003 to September 2011 was conducted with the objective of identifying publications that contained case reports regarding oral BRONJ in RA patients. Patients with RA who develop oral BRONJ are usually women above 60 years taking steroids and long-term alendronate. Most of them have osteoporosis, and lesions, triggered by dental procedures, are usually detected at stage II in the mandible. Although there is no accepted treatment protocol, these patients seem to have better outcomes with conservative approaches that include antibiotic therapy, chlorhexidine, and drug discontinuation. PMID:22376948

  13. Demographic characteristics and outcome of burn patients requiring skin grafts: a tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Shlash, Saud Othman Al; Madani, Jamal Omran Al; Deib, Jamal Ismail El; Alsubhi, Fatemah Suliman; Saifi, Sara Saud Al; Helmi, Ayman Mohammed Adel; Al-Mutairi, Sultan Khalaf; Khurram, Javed Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Split thickness skin graft (STSG) and full thickness skin graft (FTSG) are the integral part of burn wound management. However the impact of these graft types on the outcome still remain a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics and outcome of graft surgery of the patients undergone STSG and FTSG at Plastic Surgery Department of Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This retrospective study included 85 burn patients who received STSG (56 cases) and FTSG (29 cases) at PSMMC during 2010-2015. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, etiology of burn, and area of burn) and outcome (graft loss, graft contraction, skin pigmentation, altered sensation, infection rate and duration of hospital stay) were recorded among the patients who received STSG or FTSG. Out of 85 patients 50 patients were male and 35 female with a ratio of 1.42:1. The patients under the age of 10 years comprised the largest burn group with 28 cases (32.9%) out of total 85 patients. The number of patients above the age of 30 years was relatively smaller. Flame (49.3%) and scald (27%) burns constituted the majority of burn cases. The incidence of contraction among STSG (12.5%) and in FTSG (17.2%) cases was similar. Altered sensation was observed in 7.05% of STSG patients and 13.7% of FTSG cases. Loss of graft was observed in 16% of STSG and 20.6% of FTSG patients. The pigmentation was quite similar in STSG (21.4%) and FTSG (24. 1%). The hospitalization time in FTSG (28 days) patients was also comparable with STSG (26.9 days) group. This study showed that majority of the skin graft cases at PSMMC were male under the age of 30 years mostly affected by flame or scald burns. The outcome following STSG and FTSG surgery was comparable with no significant advantage of one over the other. It may be deduced that both STSG and FTSG have relative merits and demerits and either of these grafting procedure may be

  14. Exposure of Prebiopsy Antibiotics Influence Bacteriological Diagnosis and Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Infectious Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chih; Wong, Chak-Bor; Wang, I-Chun; Fu, Tsai-Sheng; Chen, Lih-Huei; Chen, Wen-Jer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The benefit of prebiopsy empirical antibiotics for patients with infectious spondylitis and the effect on clinical outcome are not well known. This study assessed the impact of prebiopsy empirical antibiotics in patients with infectious spondylitis. We retrospectively reviewed 41 adult in-patients with infectious spondylitis who received percutaneous endoscopic debridement and drainage (PEDD) at a tertiary care hospital from August 2002 to August 2012. The average patient age was 55.2 years old and causative bacteria were identified in 32 out of 41 biopsy specimens (78.0%) via the PEDD procedure, which has good diagnostic efficacy comparable to open biopsy. Seventeen patients (41.5%) received prebiopsy empirical antimicrobial therapy, and these patients were less likely to have positive cultures than those who did not receive preoperative antibiotics (64.7% vs 87.5%, P = 0.04). Patients with positive cultures had a better infection control rate (78.1% vs 67.7%) and were less likely to undergo subsequent open surgery. Patients given preoperative antibiotics were more likely to need subsequent open surgery (35.3% vs 16.7%, P = 0.02). From multivariate logistic analysis showed age at diagnosis to be an independent risk factor for the need of further surgery. There were no major complications following the PEDD procedure, except 2 patients had transient paresthesia in the affected lumbar segments. Prebiopsy empirical antibiotic therapy was associated with lower positive culture rate and an increased need for subsequent open surgery. Patients with positive cultures were more likely to have initially adequate treatment, better infection control, and better clinical outcome. PMID:27082590

  15. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  16. External dacryocystorhinostomy outcomes in patients with a history of dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Daniel R.; Dhar, Sonya; Lee, Irene; Allard, Felicia; Freitag, Suzanne K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate nonidiopathic causes of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) failure. Methods The medical records of all patients with acute or chronic dacryocystitis who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy performed by the senior author over a 5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, with attention to microbiology, pathology, and associated medical and history. Results A total of 52 lacrimal systems of 49 patients were included, with a minimum follow-up of 2 months (average, 15.5 months). Surgical success was achieved in 42 systems (87%). Of 7 failures, 6 had a condition potentially associated with an increased risk of failure, including MRSA infection, Gram-negative infection, rhinosinusitis, lymphoma, inflammatory bowel disease, and early loss of lacrimal stents. Conclusions External DCR is a successful procedure for the treatment of nasolacrimal obstruction associated with dacryocystitis. Various factors may affect surgical success, and awareness of these factors may enable better patient counseling and surgical planning. PMID:27330467

  17. Lymphedema Outcomes in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Little, Leila G.; Skoracki, Roman J.; Rosenthal, David I.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Lewin, Jan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to describe the presentation of external head and neck lymphedema in patients treated for head and neck cancer and examine their initial response to complete decongestive therapy. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Subjects and Methods Patients evaluated for head and neck cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center after treatment 01/2007-01/2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Response to complete decongestive therapy was evaluated per changes in lymphedema severity rating or surface tape measures. Predictors of therapy response were examined using regression models. Results 1,202 patients were evaluated. Most patients (62%) had soft, reversible pitting edema (MDACC Stage 1b). Treatment response was evaluated in 733 patients after receiving therapy; 439 (60%) improved after complete decongestive therapy. Treatment adherence independently predicted complete decongestive therapy response (p<0.001). Conclusions These data support the effectiveness of a head and neck cancer-specific regimen of lymphedema therapy for cancer patients with external head and neck lymphedema. Our findings suggest that head and neck lymphedema is distinct from lymphedema that affects other sites, requiring adaptations in traditional methods of management and measurement. PMID:25389318

  18. Nocturnal melatonin secretion in multiple sclerosis patients with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R; Awerbuch, G I

    1993-02-01

    The pineal gland has been implicated recently in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic demyelinating disease of CNS. Since nocturnal melatonin secretion is low in some groups of patients with mental depression, we predicted lower melatonin secretion in MS patients with history of affective illness compared to those without psychiatric disorders. To test this hypothesis, we studied single nocturnal plasma melatonin levels and the incidence of pineal calcification (PC) on CT scan in a cohort of 25 MS patients (4 men, 21 women; mean age = 39.4 years, SD = 9.3), 15 of whom had a history of coexisting psychiatric disorders with predominant affective symptomatology. Other factors that may be related to depression such as vitamin B12, folic acid, zinc, magnesium, and homocysteine, were also included in the analysis. Neither any of the metabolic factors surveyed nor the incidence of PC distinguished the psychiatric from the control group. However, the mean melatonin level in the psychiatric patients was significantly lower than in the control group. Since low melatonin secretion in patients with depression may be related to a phase-advance of the circadian oscillator regulating the offset of melatonin secretion, we propose that the depression of MS likewise may reflect the presence of dampened circadian oscillators. Furthermore, since exacerbation of motor symptoms in MS patients may be temporally related to worsening of depression, we propose that circadian phase lability may also underlie the relapsing-remitting course of the disease. Consequently, pharmacological agents such as lithium or bright light therapy, which have been shown to phase-delay circadian rhythms, might be effective in the treatment of affective symptoms in MS as well as preventing motor exacerbation and hastening a remission from an acute attack. PMID:8063528

  19. Clinical factors affecting quality of life of patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Panaszek, Bernard; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been increased interest in the subjective quality of life (QoL) of patients with bronchial asthma. QoL is a significant indicator guiding the efforts of professionals caring for patients, especially chronically ill ones. The identification of factors affecting the QoL reported by patients, despite their existing condition, is important and useful to provide multidisciplinary care for these patients. Aim To investigate the clinical factors affecting asthma patients’ QoL. Methods The study comprised 100 patients (73 female, 27 male) aged 18–84 years (mean age was 45.7) treated in the Allergy Clinic of the Wroclaw Medical University Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatrics and Allergology. All asthma patients meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Data on sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. In this study, we used medical record analysis and two questionnaires: the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) to assess the QoL of patients with asthma and the Asthma Control Test to measure asthma control. Results Active smokers were shown to have a significantly lower QoL in the “Symptoms” domain than nonsmokers (P=0.006). QoL was also demonstrated to decrease significantly as the frequency of asthma exacerbations increased (R=−0.231, P=0.022). QoL in the domain “Activity limitation” was shown to increase significantly along with the number of years of smoking (R=0.404; P=0.004). Time from onset and the dominant symptom of asthma significantly negatively affected QoL in the “Activity limitation” domain of the AQLQ (R=−0.316, P=0.001; P=0.029, respectively). QoL scores in the “Emotional function” and “Environmental stimuli” subscale of the AQLQ decreased significantly as time from onset increased (R=−0.200, P=0.046; R=−0.328, P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion Patients exhibiting better symptom control have higher QoL scores. Asthma patients’ Qo

  20. Nonsurgical scar management of the face: does early versus late intervention affect outcome?

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Sen, Soman; Palmieri, Tina; Greenhalgh, David

    2013-01-01

    Special emphasis is placed on the clinical management of facial scarring because of the profound physical and psychological impact of facial burns. Noninvasive methods of facial scar management include pressure therapy, silicone, massage, and facial exercises. Early implementation of these scar management techniques after a burn injury is typically accepted as standard burn rehabilitation practice, however, little data exist to support this practice. This study evaluated the timing of common noninvasive scar management interventions after facial skin grafting in children and the impact on outcome, as measured by scar assessment and need for facial reconstructive surgery. A retrospective review of 138 patients who underwent excision and grafting of the face and subsequent noninvasive scar management during a 10-year time frame was conducted. Regression analyses were used to show that earlier application of silicone was significantly related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale scores, specifically in the subscales of vascularity and pigmentation. Early use of pressure therapy and implementation of facial exercises were also related to lower Modified Vancouver Scar Scale vascularity scores. No relationship was found between timing of the interventions and facial reconstructive outcome. Early use of silicone, pressure therapy, and exercise may improve scar outcome and accelerate time to scar maturity. PMID:23816994

  1. Patterns of Emotion Attribution are Affected in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Romero-Ferreiro, María Verónica; Aguado, Luis; Rodriguez-Torresano, Javier; Palomo, Tomás; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in facial affect recognition have been repeatedly reported in schizophrenia patients. The hypothesis that this deficit is caused by poorly differentiated cognitive representation of facial expressions was tested in this study. To this end, performance of patients with schizophrenia and controls was compared in a new emotion-rating task. This novel approach allowed the participants to rate each facial expression at different times in terms of different emotion labels. Results revealed that patients tended to give higher ratings to emotion labels that did not correspond to the portrayed emotion, especially in the case of negative facial expressions (p < .001, η 2 = .131). Although patients and controls gave similar ratings when the emotion label matched with the facial expression, patients gave higher ratings on trials with "incorrect" emotion labels (p s < .05). Comparison of patients and controls in a summary index of expressive ambiguity showed that patients perceived angry, fearful and happy faces as more emotionally ambiguous than did the controls (p < .001, η 2 = .135). These results are consistent with the idea that the cognitive representation of emotional expressions in schizophrenia is characterized by less clear boundaries and a less close correspondence between facial configurations and emotional states. PMID:26255714

  2. Factors Affecting Hemodialysis Patients' Satisfaction with Their Dialysis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Al Eissa, M.; Al Sulaiman, M.; Jondeby, M.; Karkar, A.; Barahmein, M.; Shaheen, F. A. M.; Al Sayyari, A.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To assess the degree of satisfaction among hemodialysis patients and the factors influencing this satisfaction. Methods. Patients were recruited from 3 Saudi dialysis centers. Demographic data was collected. Using 1 to 10 Likert scale, the patients were asked to rate the overall satisfaction with, and the overall impact of, their dialysis therapy on their lives and to rate the effect of the dialysis therapy on 15 qualities of life domains. Results. 322 patients were recruited (72.6% of the total eligible patients). The mean age was 51.7 years (±15.4); 58% have been on dialysis for >3 years. The mean Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3.2 (±2), and Kt/V was 1.3 (±0.44). The mean satisfaction score was (7.41 ± 2.75) and the mean score of the impact of the dialysis on the patients' lives was 5.32 ± 2.55. Male patients reported worse effect of dialysis on family life, social life, energy, and appetite. Longer period since the commencement of dialysis was associated with adverse effect on finances and energy. Lower level of education was associated with worse dialysis effect on stress, overall health, sexual life, hobbies, and exercise ability. Conclusion. The level of satisfaction is affected by gender, duration on dialysis, educational level, and standard of care given. PMID:21152200

  3. Critical Factors Affecting the Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: A Delphi Study of the Opinions of Community College Personnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify critically important factors that affect the meaningful assessment of student learning outcomes and study why these factors were critically important. A three-round Delphi process was used to solicit the opinions of individuals who were actively involved in student learning outcomes assessment…

  4. Factors affecting treatment outcome in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction: A retrospective analysis from South India

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Sahil; Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Yadalla, Dayakar; Rajagopalan, Jayagayathri; Velis, Girish Bharat; Talele, Deepti; Kushwaha, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate outcomes for different treatment modalities in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction (CNLDO) in an Indian population. Design: Retrospective, interventional, case series. Materials and Methods: In an institutional setting, case records of patients with CNLDO from January 2008 to 2012, were reviewed, and data on patient demographics, clinical presentation, and treatment details (sac massage, probing, and/or dacryocystorhinostomy) were recorded. Success of treatment was defined as complete resolution of symptoms and negative regurgitation on pressure over lacrimal sac (ROPLAS) area. Results: Two hundred and ninety-eight eyes of 240 patients with a mean age of 22.2 ± 26.14 months (median = 12 months, interquartile range = 17) were analyzed. Sac massage (n = 226) was successful in 67 eyes (30%). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that children with mucoid ROPLAS were almost 6 times more likely (odds ratio [OR] = 5.55 vs. clear ROPLAS, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.35–13.09, P < 0.001) to experience failure of sac massage. Overall probing (n = 193) was successful for 143 (74%) eyes. Multivariable logistic regression showed that older children were 25% more likely to experience probing failure (OR = 1.25 for every 6 months increment in age, 95%, CI = 1.09–1.42, P = 0.001). Conclusion: Sac massage is successful in only a third of our patients and those with mucoid ROPLAS are more likely to experience failure. Probing is successful in three-quarter of our subjects, and its success declines with a progressive increase in age. Lower socioeconomic status, poor general health, and recurrent respiratory infections are unique to our population and may influence outcomes. PMID:26654998

  5. Prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function using diffusion tensor tractography in acute hemiparetic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Imura, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Yuki; Inagawa, Tetsuji; Imada, Naoki; Izumi, Hiroaki; Emoto, Katsuya; Tani, Itaru; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yuichiro; Oki, Shuichi; Maeda, Tadanori; Araki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The efficacy of diffusion tensor imaging in the prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function remains unclear. We evaluated the most appropriate diffusion tensor parameters and methodology to determine whether the region of interest- or tractography-based method was more useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Diffusion tensor imaging data within 10 days after stroke onset were collected and analyzed for 25 patients. The corticospinal tract was analyzed. Fractional anisotropy, number of fibers, and apparent diffusion coefficient were used as diffusion tensor parameters. Motor outcomes and activities of daily living function were evaluated on the same day as diffusion tensor imaging and at 1 month post-onset. [Results] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract significantly correlated with the motor outcome and activities of daily living function within 10 days post-onset and at 1 month post-onset. Tthere were no significant correlations between other diffusion tensor parameters and motor outcomes or activities of daily living function. [Conclusion] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract obtained using the tractography-based method was useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients. PMID:26157225

  6. OPTIMIZED FLUID MANAGEMENT IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Leonard, Katrina R; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major determinants for survival of severely burned patients is appropriate fluid resuscitation. At present, fluid resuscitation is calculated based on bodyweight or body surface area, burn size, and urinary output. However, recent evidence suggests that fluid calculation is inadequate and that over- and under-resuscitation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that optimizing fluid administration during the critical initial phase using a transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution monitoring device (PiCCO) would have beneficial effects on the outcome of burned patients. Methods A cohort of seventy-six severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) who received adjusted fluid resuscitation using the PiCCO (P) system were compared to 76 conventionally monitored patients (C). Clinical hemodynamic measurements, organ function (DENVER2 score), and biomarkers were recorded prospectively for the first 20 days after burn injury. Results Both cohorts were similar in demographic and injury characteristics. Patients in the PiCCO group received significantly less fluids (p<0.05) with similar urinary output, resulting in a significantly lower positive fluid balance (p<0.05). The central venous pressure (CVP) in the P group was maintained in a more controlled range (p<0.05), associated with a significantly lower heart rate and significantly lower incidence of cardiac and renal failure, p<0.05. Conclusions Fluid resuscitation guided by transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution during hospitalization represents an effective adjunct and is associated with beneficial effects on post-burn morbidity. PMID:22703982

  7. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. PMID:25548526

  8. Validating English- and Spanish-language patient-reported outcome measures in underserved patients with rheumatic disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are among the most common and debilitating health problems in the United States. These diseases are chronic, can result in severe decrements of physical and psychosocial functioning and affect patients' overall quality of life. A consensus regarding the best patient outcomes to be measured in randomized, controlled trials and prospective natural history studies is essential to provide best estimates of efficacy and safety of interventions across diverse patient populations. Methods Face-to-face English- and Spanish-language cognitive interviews were conducted among urban Hispanic and African American patients with rheumatic disease to develop a questionnaire booklet. Six measures validating patient-reported outcomes were included: the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale, the Short Acculturation Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Inventory of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practices. A sample of patients (n = 15) attending the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Community Health Center participated in the initial interviews. Revised measures were further tested for reliability in a separate sample of patients (n = 109) upon enrollment at the health center. Results Cognitive interviews provided feedback for questionnaire modifications and methods to enhance content validity and data quality, including discarding redundant questions, providing visual aids and concrete examples when appropriate and increasing the use of racially and ethnically concordant interviewers. The cognitive interviews further elucidated that some contextual assumptions and language usage in the original questionnaires may not have taken each respondent's environmental and sociocultural context into consideration. Internal reliability for previously tested measures remained high (Cronbach's α = 0

  9. Feasibility of Frequent Patient-Reported Outcome Surveillance in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A.; Deal, Allison M.; Abernethy, Amy; Basch, Ethan; Battaglini, Claudio; Kim, Yoon Hie; Whitley, Julia; Shatten, Charlotte; Serody, Jon; Shea, Thomas; Reeve, Bryce B.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), provide a patient-centered description of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related toxicity. These data characterize the patient experience after HCT and may have prognostic usefulness for long-term outcomes after HCT. We conducted a study of 32 patients after HCT (10 autologous HCT recipients, 11 full-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients, and 11 reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients) to determine the feasibility of weekly electronic PRO collection from HCT until day (D) + 100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms, and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health scale to measure physical and mental HRQOL. The vast majority (94%) of patients used the electronic PRO system, with only 6% opting for paper-and-pencil only. The median weekly percentage of participants who completed the surveys was 100% in all cohorts through hospital discharge, and remained 100% for the autologous HCT and reduced-intensity allogeneic HCT cohorts through D+100. Patients were satisfied with the electronic system, giving high marks for readability, comfort, and questionnaire length. Symptom severity varied by absolute level and type of symptom across the 3 cohorts, with the full-intensity allogeneic HCT cohort exhibiting the greatest median overall symptom severity, peaking at D+7. Median physical health HRQOL scores decreased with time in the 3 cohorts, and HRQOL was generally correlated with overall symptom severity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of frequent electronic PROs in the early post-HCT period. Future studies in larger populations to explore predictive models using frequent PRO data for outcomes, including long-term HRQOL and survival, are warranted. PMID:23253558

  10. Factors affecting medication adherence in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karakurt, Papatya; Kaşikçi, Mağfiret

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study descriptive study was to evaluate concordance with medication and those factors that affect the use of medicine in patients with hypertension. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed by 750 patients with hypertension between December 25, 2003, and April 30, 2004, in an outpatient hypertension clinic in Erzincan, Turkey. It was found that 57.9% of the patients did not use their medicines as prescribed. Forgetfulness, aloneness, and negligence were ranked as the top three reasons for this non-concordance, accounting for almost half (49.3%) of all patients with hypertension studied; price (expensive medicines) accounted for another quarter (26.5%). A statistically significant relationship with non-concordance was found for age, education level and profession. Patients' lack of knowledge related to the complications of hypertension was also found to have a statistically significant relationship with not taking medicines as prescribed. Gender, location of residence and salary were not found to be statistically related to concordance. These results indicate the need to educate patients with hypertension on how to use their medicine regularly and indicate also the target populations for this. PMID:23127428

  11. Improving Outcomes in Patients Receiving Dialysis: The Peer Kidney Care Initiative.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, James B; Gilbertson, David T; Liu, Jiannong; Collins, Allan J

    2016-07-01

    The past decade has witnessed a marked reduction in mortality rates among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. However, the reasons for this welcome development are uncertain, and greater understanding is needed to translate advances in care into additional survival gains. To fill important knowledge gaps and to enable dialysis provider organizations to learn from one another, with the aim of advancing patient care, the Peer Kidney Care Initiative (Peer) was created in 2014 by the chief medical officers of 14 United States dialysis provider organizations and the Chronic Disease Research Group. Areas of particular clinical importance were targeted to help shape the public health agenda in CKD and ESRD. Peer focuses on the effect of geographic variation on outcomes, the implications of seasonality for morbidity and mortality, the clinical significance of understudied disorders affecting dialysis patients, and the debate about how best to monitor and evaluate progress in care. In the realm of geovariation, Peer has provided key observations on regional variation in the rates of ESRD incidence, hospitalization, and pre-ESRD care. Regarding seasonality, Peer has reported on variation in both infection-related and non-infection-related hospitalizations, suggesting that ambient environmental conditions may affect a range of health outcomes in dialysis patients. Specific medical conditions that Peer highlights include Clostridium difficile infection, which has become strikingly more common in patients in the year after dialysis initiation, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the treatments for which have the potential to contribute to sudden cardiac death. Finally, Peer challenges the nephrology community to consider alternatives to standardized mortality ratios in assessing progress in care, positing that close scrutiny of trends over time may be the most effective way to drive improvements in patient care. PMID:27006497

  12. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  13. Antihypertensive medication exposure and cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Shireman, Theresa I.; Phadnis, Milind A.; Wetmore, James B.; Zhou, Xinhua; Rigler, Sally K.; Spertus, John A.; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Mahnken, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Our understanding of the effectiveness of cardioprotective medications in maintenance dialysis patients is based upon drug exposures assessed at a single point in time. We employed a novel, time-dependent approach to modeling medication use over time to examine outcomes in a large national cohort. Methods We linked Medicaid prescription claims with United States Renal Data System registry data and Medicare claims for 52,922 hypertensive maintenance dialysis patients. All-cause mortality and a combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) endpoint were modeled as functions of exposure to cardioprotective antihypertensive medications (renin angiotensin system antagonists, β-adrenergic blockers, and calcium channel blockers) measured with three time-dependent covariates (weekly exposure status; proportion of prior weeks with exposure; and number of switches in exposure status) and with propensity-adjustment. Results Current cardioprotective medication exposure status as compared to not exposed was associated with lower adjusted hazard ratios (AHR) for mortality, though the magnitude depended upon the proportion of prior weeks with medication (duration) and the number of switches between active and non-active use (switches) (AHR range, 0.54-0.90). Combined CVD-endpoints depended upon the proportion of weeks on medication: AHR = 1.18 for 10% and AHR = 0.90 for 90% of weeks. Combined CVD-endpoint was also lower for patients with fewer switches. Conclusions Effectiveness depends not only on having a drug available but is tempered by duration and stability of use, likely reflecting variation in clinical stability and patient behavior. PMID:25139551

  14. Improving health outcomes with better patient understanding and education.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert John

    2010-01-01

    A central plank of health care reform is an expanded role for educated consumers interacting with responsive health care teams. However, for individuals to realize the benefits of health education also requires a high level of engagement. Population studies have documented a gap between expectations and the actual performance of behaviours related to participation in health care and prevention. Interventions to improve self-care have shown improvements in self-efficacy, patient satisfaction, coping skills, and perceptions of social support. Significant clinical benefits have been seen from trials of self-management or lifestyle interventions across conditions such as diabetes, coronary heart disease, heart failure and rheumatoid arthritis. However, the focus of many studies has been on short-term outcomes rather that long term effects. There is also some evidence that participation in patient education programs is not spread evenly across socio economic groups. This review considers three other issues that may be important in increasing the public health impact of patient education. The first is health literacy, which is the capacity to seek, understand and act on health information. Although health literacy involves an individual's competencies, the health system has a primary responsibility in setting the parameters of the health interaction and the style, content and mode of information. Secondly, much patient education work has focused on factors such as attitudes and beliefs. That small changes in physical environments can have large effects on behavior and can be utilized in self-management and chronic disease research. Choice architecture involves reconfiguring the context or physical environment in a way that makes it more likely that people will choose certain behaviours. Thirdly, better means of evaluating the impact of programs on public health is needed. The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework has been

  15. Prognostic significance of two sub-categorization methods for the treatment of binge eating disorder: negative affect and overvaluation predict, but do not moderate, specific outcomes.

    PubMed

    Masheb, R M; Grilo, C M

    2008-04-01

    Given the absence of known predictors and moderators for binge eating disorder (BED) treatment outcome and recent findings regarding meaningful sub-categorizations of BED patients, we tested the predictive validity of two subtyping methods. Seventy-five overweight patients with BED who participated in a randomized clinical trial of guided self-help treatments (cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBTgsh) and behavioral weight loss (BWLgsh)) were categorized in two ways. First, a cluster analytic approach yielded dietary-negative affect (29%) and pure dietary (71%) subtypes. Second, research conventions for categorizing patients based upon shape or weight self-evaluation yielded clinical overvaluation (51%) and subclinical overvaluation (49%) subtypes. At the end of treatment, participants subtyped as dietary-negative affect reported more frequent binge episodes compared to the pure dietary subtype, and those with clinical overvaluation reported greater eating disorder psychopathology compared to the subclinical overvaluation group. Neither method predicted binge remission, depressive symptoms, or weight loss. Neither sub-categorization moderated the effects of guided self-help CBT and BWL treatments on any BED outcomes, suggesting that these two specific treatments perform comparably across BED subtypes. In conclusion, dietary-negative affect subtyping and overvaluation subtyping each predicted, but did not moderate, specific and important dimensions of BED treatment outcome. PMID:18328464

  16. Comparable low-level mosaicism in affected and non affected tissue of a complex CDH patient.

    PubMed

    Veenma, Danielle; Beurskens, Niels; Douben, Hannie; Eussen, Bert; Noomen, Petra; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Grijseels, Els; Lequin, Maarten; de Krijger, Ronald; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Van Opstal, Dian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the detailed clinical and cytogenetic analysis of a prenatally detected complex Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) patient with a mosaic unbalanced translocation (5;12). High-resolution whole genome SNP array confirmed a low-level mosaicism (20%) in uncultured cells, underlining the value of array technology for identification studies. Subsequently, targeted Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization in postmortem collected tissues demonstrated a similar low-level mosaicism, independently of the affected status of the tissue. Thus, a higher incidence of the genetic aberration in affected organs as lung and diaphragm cannot explain the severe phenotype of this complex CDH patient. Comparison with other described chromosome 5p and 12p anomalies indicated that half of the features presented in our patient (including the diaphragm defect) could be attributed to both chromosomal areas. In contrast, a few features such as the palpebral downslant, the broad nasal bridge, the micrognathia, microcephaly, abnormal dermatoglyphics and IUGR better fitted the 5p associated syndromes only. This study underlines the fact that low-level mosaicism can be associated with severe birth defects including CDH. The contribution of mosaicism to human diseases and specifically to congenital anomalies and spontaneous abortions becomes more and more accepted, although its phenotypic consequences are poorly described phenomena leading to counseling issues. Therefore, thorough follow-up of mosaic aberrations such as presented here is indicated in order to provide genetic counselors a more evidence based prediction of fetal prognosis in the future. PMID:21203572

  17. A steroid-induced bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head in an underage patient affected by multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Nistri, Lorenzo; Bracco, Laura; Giannini, Marta; Amato, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis are often treated by pulsed intravenous corticosteroids to manage acute relapses with positive outcomes. The intravenous administration is frequently associated to avascular necrosis of several bones, particularly the femur. The present report regards a case of an underage MS patient with a bilateral ANFH secondary to pulsed administrations of steroids, managed by a conservative approach on a hip, and by a novel surgical technique on the contralateral side. PMID:26811707

  18. A steroid-induced bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head in an underage patient affected by multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Carulli, Christian; Nistri, Lorenzo; Bracco, Laura; Giannini, Marta; Amato, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis are often treated by pulsed intravenous corticosteroids to manage acute relapses with positive outcomes. The intravenous administration is frequently associated to avascular necrosis of several bones, particularly the femur. The present report regards a case of an underage MS patient with a bilateral ANFH secondary to pulsed administrations of steroids, managed by a conservative approach on a hip, and by a novel surgical technique on the contralateral side. PMID:26811707

  19. Impaired High-Density Lipoprotein Anti-Oxidant Function Predicts Poor Outcome in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schrutka, Lore; Goliasch, Georg; Meyer, Brigitte; Wurm, Raphael; Koller, Lorenz; Kriechbaumer, Lukas; Heinz, Gottfried; Pacher, Richard; Lang, Irene M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Oxidative stress affects clinical outcome in critically ill patients. Although high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles generally possess anti-oxidant capacities, deleterious properties of HDL have been described in acutely ill patients. The impact of anti-oxidant HDL capacities on clinical outcome in critically ill patients is unknown. We therefore analyzed the predictive value of anti-oxidant HDL function on mortality in an unselected cohort of critically ill patients. Method We prospectively enrolled 270 consecutive patients admitted to a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU) and determined anti-oxidant HDL function using the HDL oxidant index (HOI). Based on their HOI, the study population was stratified into patients with impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and the residual study population. Results During a median follow-up time of 9.8 years (IQR: 9.2 to 10.0), 69% of patients died. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant and independent association between impaired anti-oxidant HDL function and short-term mortality with an adjusted HR of 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.24; p = 0.001) as well as 10-year mortality with an adj. HR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.02–1.40; p = 0.032) when compared to the residual study population. Anti-oxidant HDL function correlated with the amount of oxidative stress as determined by Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (r = 0.38; p<0.001). Conclusion Impaired anti-oxidant HDL function represents a strong and independent predictor of 30-day mortality as well as long-term mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26978526

  20. Bilateral Synchronous Sporadic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Retroperitoneoscopic Strategies and Intermediate Outcomes of 60 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhao; Ma, Xin; Song, Erlin; Gao, Jiangping; Dong, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presentation, management, pathology, and functional and oncological outcomes of patients undergoing retroperitoneoscopic treatment of bilateral synchronous sporadic RCC at our institution. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the records of 60 patients with bilateral synchronous sporadic RCC who underwent retroperitoneoscopic treatment at the General Hospital of People's Liberation Army from 2008 to 2014. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated and compared among different surgical procedures. The overall survival and recurrence free survival were assessed based on information from recent follow-up. Results Fifty-six patients underwent bilateral retroperitoneoscopic surgeries in staged procedures, and four patients underwent bilateral retroperitoneoscopic surgeries in simultaneous procedures. Among the former group of patients, 34 underwent bilateral partial nephrectomy, 12 underwent radical nephrectomy followed by partial nephrectomy, and 10 underwent partial nephrectomy followed by radical nephrectomy. Bilateral partial nephrectomy can better preserve renal function (p = 0.040) and the sequence of partial nephrectomy and radical nephrectomy did not affect functional outcomes (p = 0.790). One patient undergoing simultaneous procedures developed acute renal failure and required temporary hemodialysis. At 3 and 5 years, overall survival rates were 93.0% and 89.4%, and recurrence free survival rates were 90.5% and 81.6%. High nuclear grade (p = 0.014) was related to disease recurrence. Conclusions Staged bilateral partial nephrectomy was efficient in preserving renal function. The survival of patients with bilateral synchronous sporadic renal tumors was similar to that of patients with unilateral nonmetastatic tumors. Nuclear grade was an independent prognostic factor of disease recurrence. PMID:27136191

  1. [Wallerian degeneration demonstrated by MRI and functional outcome in patients suffering from supratentorial cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Shirotani, Toshiki; Takahara, Takashi; Arimoto, Hirohiko; Inohara, Masashi; Ono, Kenichiro; Shimizu, Akira

    2002-07-01

    An early diagnosis of the outcome of patients with cerebrovascular disease is important for selecting the optimal treatment strategy. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prognosis of Wallerian degeneration on MRI in stroke patients with hemiparesis. The subjects consisted of 87 stroke patients, 50 hemorrhagic patients and 37 ischemic patients, who were evaluated by MRI at 1 to 6,275 days after stroke onset. Among the 36 patients who were evaluated by consecutive MRI, 161 films were obtained and analyzed. Wallerian degeneration was diagnosed when a small prolonged T 2 lesion was seen in the corticospinal tract of the brainstem on at least two contiguous slices. The atrophic rate of the midbrain was calculated as: (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain--the area of the affected side of the midbrain)/2 x (the area of the unaffected side of the midbrain). The patients' ability to perform the activities of daily living was scored by the Barthel index (BI). Wallerian degeneration in the ipsilateral brainstem was seen for two to three months in 32 cases (37%) and in 58 films (36%) and disappeared about 3 years after the onset of stroke. Wallerian degeneration correlated with the BI scores from 2 to 6 months after stroke (p < 0.05), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. From 2 to 6 months after stroke, the shrinkage of the midbrain on MRI correlated with the BI scores (p < 0.001), although no relationship was observed at 7 months or later. It was therefore both Wallerian degeneration and a shrunken midbrain observed on MRIs, evaluated from 2 to 6 months after stroke were thus suggested to indicate a poor outcome in such patients. PMID:12187715

  2. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  3. Through what mechanisms do protected areas affect environmental and social outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Paul J.; Hanauer, Merlin M.

    2015-01-01

    To develop effective protected area policies, scholars and practitioners must better understand the mechanisms through which protected areas affect social and environmental outcomes. With strong evidence about mechanisms, the key elements of success can be strengthened, and the key elements of failure can be eliminated or repaired. Unfortunately, empirical evidence about these mechanisms is limited, and little guidance for quantifying them exists. This essay assesses what mechanisms have been hypothesized, what empirical evidence exists for their relative contributions and what advances have been made in the past decade for estimating mechanism causal effects from non-experimental data. The essay concludes with a proposed agenda for building an evidence base about protected area mechanisms. PMID:26460122

  4. Parenting Cognition and Affective Outcomes Following Parent Management Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Colalillo, Sara; Johnston, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Parent management training (PMT) is considered the gold standard in the treatment of child behavior problems. The secondary effects of these interventions, particularly on parent well-being, are infrequently studied, despite evidence that parents of children with behavior problems often experience personal difficulties. This narrative review examined the affective and parenting cognition outcomes of PMT for mothers and fathers of children ages 2-13 years, across 48 controlled treatment studies. Substantial support was found for reductions in parenting stress, and increases in perceived parenting competence following PMT. Evidence indicated fewer improvements in domains more distal from parenting, including parent depressive symptoms and marital relationship dysfunction. A number of studies suggested parent gender as a moderator of parent outcomes of PMT; however, the underrepresentation of fathers in existing research limits conclusions in this regard. Avenues for future research are highlighted to address current gaps in the literature, and to further our understanding of the ways in which both children and parents may benefit from PMT. PMID:27389605

  5. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery. PMID:27025938

  6. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Stacy; Conner, Emma; Miller, Melodi; Messina, Nena

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user’s family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can improve the outcomes of these children long after the intervention has ended. PMID:25670915

  7. Patient Participation and Physical Activity during Rehabilitation and Future Functional Outcomes in Patients following Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lenze, Eric J.; Munin, Michael C.; Harrison, Christopher C; Brach, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the association between physical activity recorded by Actigraphy during therapy sessions (therapy) to therapist rated patient participation and self reported future functional outcomes. We hypothesized those participants who were more active during rehab would have higher participation scores and better functional outcomes following hip fracture compared to those who were less active. Design Longitudinal study with 3 and 6 month follow-up. Setting Participants were recruited from skilled nursing (SN) and inpatient rehabilitation (IR) facilities. Participants Participants included 18 community dwelling older adults admitted to SN or IR facilities after hip fracture. Participants were included if they were ≥ 60 years of age and ambulatory with or without assistance from a device or another person. Intervention Not Applicable Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was quantified during participants’ rehab using the Actigraph accelerometer worn consecutively over 5 days. The Pittsburgh Participation Rating Scale was used to quantify patient participation during their inpatient therapy sessions. Self reported functional outcomes were measured by the Hip Fracture Functional Recovery Scale (HFRS) at baseline, 3 and 6 months following fracture. Results Participants with higher Actigraphy counts during rehab were ranked by their therapists as having excellent participation compared to those who were less active. Participants who were more active reported better functional abilities at both 3 and 6 month time points and achieved 78% and 91% recovery of self reported pre-fracture function compared to those who were less active achieving 64% and 73% recovery. Conclusion Actigraphy provides an objective measure of physical activity exhibiting predictive validity for future functional outcomes and concurrent validity against patient participation in patients after hip fracture. PMID:19345777

  8. The Chauvet 2014 Meeting Report: Psychiatric and Psychosocial Evaluation and Outcomes of Upper Extremity Grafted Patients.

    PubMed

    Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila G; Kumnig, Martin; Morelon, Emmanuel; Moreno, Elisa; Petruzzo, Palmina; Seulin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Under the auspices for the International Society on Hand and Composite Tissue Allotransplantation, a section of The Transplantation Society (IHCTAS), a meeting was convened on March 21-22, 2014 in Paris to review the following areas that were deemed significant in the understanding of the psychosocial evaluation and outcomes of upper extremity transplant recipients: required domains of the evaluation, screening instruments, clinical monitoring pretransplant, clinical monitoring posttransplant, patient and team expectations, body image, psychiatric complications, functional goals and quality of life, ethics and media relations. Experts in the fields of psychiatry and psychology, transplantation, social work, ethics, and transplant administration met and reviewed center experiences and literature. The attendees highlighted the importance and the complexity of the psychiatric assessment in this field of transplantation. Moreover, the necessity to develop common instruments and evaluation protocols to predict psychosocial outcomes as well as to understand whether we are transplanting the right patients and how the transplantation is affecting the patients were pointed out. Psychiatric complications in upper extremity transplanted patients have been reported by the majority of teams. Preexisting psychiatric difficulties, the initial trauma of amputation, or adjusting to the transplantation process itself (especially the medical follow-up and rehabilitation process) appeared to be important factors. Monitoring during the whole follow-up was recommended to detect psychiatric issues and to facilitate and ensure long-term adherence. The participants proposed an annual meeting format to build upon the findings of this inaugural meeting to be called the Chauvet Workgroup meeting. PMID:26636738

  9. Clinical Outcomes of 174 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Radiation-Induced Temporal Lobe Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Tai-Chung; Wong, Frank C.S.; Leung, To-Wai; Ng, S.H.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively study the clinical outcomes of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) treated with steroids, surgery, or observation only. Methods and Patients: We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 consecutive patients diagnosed with TLN between 1990 and 2008. Before 1998, symptomatic patients were treated with oral steroids, while asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. After 1998, most symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with a large volume of necrosis were treated by intravenously pulsed-steroid therapy with a standardized protocol. We examined factors affecting grade 4 complication-free survival and overall survival. Outcomes of the three treatment groups, those receiving conservative treatment, those receiving oral steroid, and those receiving intravenous pulse steroid, were compared. Results: The mean follow-up time was 115 months. Rates of grade 4 complication-free survival at 2 years and at 5 years after diagnosis of TLN were 72.2% and 54.1%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 35.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that being symptomatic at diagnosis (relative risk [RR], 4.5; p = 0.0001), re-irradiation of the nasopharynx (NP) (RR, 1.56; p = 0.008), salvage brachytherapy to the NP (RR, 1.75; p = 0.012), and a short latency period before the diagnosis of TLN (RR, 0.96, p < 0.0001) were independent prognosticators of poor grade 4 complication-free survival. Patients with all four factors had a 100% risk of developing grade 4 complications within 5 years; whereas if no factor was present, the risk was 12.5%. Intravenous pulse steroid therapy was associated with a higher clinical response rate compared with conventional steroid therapy (p < 0.0001); however, it did not affect complication-free survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: TLN patients with good prognosticators could be observed without active treatment. Although

  10. Predicting postoperative visual outcomes in cataract patients with maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Macky, Tamer A; Mohamed, Abdel Moniem Hasaballah; Emarah, Ahmed M; Osman, Amr Abdellatif; Gado, Ahmed S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of the potential acuity meter (PAM) in predicting postcataract surgery visual acuity outcome in patients with healed inactive maculopathies. Study Design: Prospective interventional clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Patients scheduled for phacoemulsification had preoperative and 1 month postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), PAM test, fluorescein angiography, and macular optical coherence tomography. Patients were grouped to following preoperative BCVA: PRE1: 0.29 and better, PRE2: 0.25–0.13, and PRE3: 0.1 or worse; age: G1 <60, G2 = 60–70, and G3 >70 years. PAM accuracy was divided into: Grade 1: Postoperative BCVA ≤1 or less line error of the PAM score, Grade 2: Between 1 and 2 lines error, and Grade 3: ≥3 lines or more error. Results: This study enrolled 57 patients with a mean age of 71.05 ± 6.78 years where 34 were females. There were 21 (36.84%) patients with diabetic maculopathy and 36 (63.16%) with age-related macular degeneration. The mean preoperative BCVA was 0.198 ± 0.12 (0.1–0.5). The mean PAM score was 0.442 ± 0.24 (0.1–1.3). The mean postoperative BCVA was 0.4352 ± 0.19 (0.17–1.00). The PAM score was in Grade 1, 2, and 3 in 46 (80.7%), 54 (94.7%), and 56 (98.2), respectively. There was a highly significant correlation between the PAM score and the postoperative BCVA (P < 0.001, Chi-square test). There was no correlation between the PAM test accuracy and age, gender, diagnosis, and preoperative BCVA (P = 0.661, 0.667, 0. 0.991, 0.833, Chi-square test; respectively). Conclusion: The PAM is an accurate method of predicting postoperative visual acuity for eyes with nuclear cataracts Grade I and II and inactive maculopathies. PMID:26655002

  11. Intradialytic Hypoxemia and Clinical Outcomes in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Meyring-Wösten, Anna; Zhang, Hanjie; Ye, Xiaoling; Fuertinger, Doris H.; Chan, Lili; Kappel, Franz; Artemyev, Mikhail; Ginsberg, Nancy; Wang, Yuedong; Thijssen, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Intradialytic hypoxemia has been recognized for decades, but its associations with outcomes have not yet been assessed in a large patient cohort. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Our retrospective cohort study was conducted between January of 2012 and January of 2015. We recorded blood oxygen saturation every minute during hemodialysis in patients with arteriovenous access. A 6-month baseline period with at least 10 treatments with oxygen saturation measurements preceded a 12-month follow-up. Patients were stratified by the presence or absence of prolonged intradialytic hypoxemia defined as oxygen saturation <90% for at least one third of the treatment time. Demographic, laboratory, and treatment data and hospitalization and mortality rates were compared between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used to assess baseline predictors of all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results In total, 100 (10%) of 983 patients had prolonged intradialytic hypoxemia. These patients were older (+3.6 years; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 6.3), had longer dialysis vintage (+1.2 years; 95% confidence interval, 0.3 to 2.1), and had higher prevalence of congestive heart failure (+10.8%; 95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 20.7) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (+13%; 95% confidence interval, 5 to 21.2). They also resembled an inflammatory phenotype, with lower serum albumin levels (−0.1 g/dl; 95% confidence interval, −0.2 to 0) and higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios (+1; 95% confidence interval, 0.5 to 1.6). They had lower hemoglobin levels (−0.2 g/dl; 95% confidence interval, −0.4 to 0) and required more erythropoietin (+1374 U per hemodialysis treatment; 95% confidence interval, 343 to 2405). During follow-up, all-cause hospitalization (1113 hospitalizations; univariate hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.22 to 1.73) and mortality (89 deaths; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.98; 95% confidence interval, 1

  12. Patient-reported outcomes: instrument development and selection issues.

    PubMed

    Turner, Ralph R; Quittner, Alexandra L; Parasuraman, Bhash M; Kallich, Joel D; Cleeland, Charles S

    2007-01-01

    At its most elemental, patient-reported outcomes (PRO) assessment involves asking the patients questions and evaluating their answers. Instrument developers need to be clear about what they want to know, from whom they want to know it and why, whether what they learned is credible, and whether they can interpret what they learned in the context of the research objectives. Because credible instrument development is neither inexpensive nor technically trivial, researchers must first determine that no available measure meets their research objectives. We suggest that the tasks of either reviewing current instruments or developing new ones originate from the same basic premise: PRO assessment requires a well-articulated conceptual framework. Once defined in the context of the research objectives, the conceptual framework needs to be adapted to the population of interest. We discuss how qualitative methods enrich the conceptual framework and facilitate the technical measurement tasks of item development, testing, and reduction. We recognize that PRO assessment stands at a technological crossroads with the increasingly frequent application of "modern" psychometric methods and discuss how innovations such as item banks and computer-adaptive testing will influence PRO instrument development. Although items are the essential building blocks for instruments, scales are the primary unit of analysis for PRO assessment, and we discuss methods for scoring and combining them. Finally, PRO assessment is meaningless if the key figure chooses not to cooperate. We consider how respondent burden influences the quality of PRO assessment. PMID:17995478

  13. Utility of Patient-Reported Outcome Instruments in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Anita A; Spertus, John; Pang, Peter; Pierson, Renee F; Cody, Robert J; Pina, Ileana L; Hernandez, Adrian; Butler, Javed

    2016-03-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are defined as reports coming directly from patients about how they feel or function in relation to a health condition and its therapy. Although there are numerous compelling reasons why PRO could be an important help in clinical care, they have not evolved into clinical tools integrated into care. The purpose of this review is to assess existing PRO instruments for heart failure with respect to their psychometric properties and potential for use in clinical care. We performed a systematic search of articles published between July 2008 and January 2015 within the MEDLINE, PROMIS, PROQOLID, and Cochrane Library databases. Included instruments had to be developed and tested for heart failure and have had their development processes and psychometric properties described. A total of 31 instruments were identified, 9 of which met all inclusion criteria. After evaluating each remaining instrument in terms of psychometric and clinical criteria and symptom coverage, only 2 instruments-Minnesota Living with Heart Failure and Kansas City Cardiomyopathy questionnaire-met all evaluation criteria. Although clinically useful PRO instruments exist, increasing education to providers on the value and interpretability of PRO instruments, as well as a more streamlined approach to their implementation in the clinical setting is necessary. A clinical trial comparing the routine use of disease-specific PRO with clinical care could further support their incorporation into practice. PMID:26874386

  14. Interpreting and reporting results based on patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Revicki, Dennis A; Erickson, Pennifer A; Sloan, Jeff A; Dueck, Amylou; Guess, Harry; Santanello, Nancy C

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the incorporation of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) into clinical trials and focuses on issues associated with the interpretation and reporting of PRO data. The primary focus and context of this information relates to the evidentiary support and reporting for a labeling or advertising claim of a PRO benefit for a new or approved pharmaceutical product. This manuscript focuses on issues associated with assessing clinical significance and common pitfalls to avoid in presenting results related to PROs. Specifically, the questions addressed by this manuscript involve: What are the best methods to assess clinical significance for PROs? How should investigators present PRO data most effectively in a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) application? In labeling or in a scientific publication? Guidelines for interpreting clinical significance of PROs and for comprehensively reporting on the methods, measures and results of clinical trials that incorporate PROs are important for clinicians, regulatory agencies, and most of all to patients. Clear specifications for considering a finding on a PRO measure, as clinically meaningful, need to be determined by instrument developers and psychometricians; they need to be reported for all clinical trials involving PRO end points. Clinical trial reports need to be comprehensive, clear, and sufficient to enable any reader to understand the methods, PRO measures, statistical analysis, and results. PMID:17995470

  15. Long-term perspectives for 46,XY patients affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome or congenital micropenis.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Amy B; Migeon, Claude J

    2002-08-01

    Controversy concerning optimal treatment for individuals affected by syndromes of abnormal sex differentiation can best be resolved with knowledge about long-term medical, surgical, and psychosexual outcomes of patients. Follow-up information has recently been gathered on older cohorts of the following patient groups: (1) those affected by complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) raised female and (2) those affected by congenital micropenis raised male or female. As a group, women with CAIS were satisfied with their female gender and sexual function. However, a need for better patient education was identified for this specific population. Most patients with congenital micropenis, whether raised male or female, were satisfied with their gender. Regardless of sex of rearing, dissatisfaction with the appearance and function of the genitalia as judged by both physicians and subjects was evident. For patients with congenital micropenis, male sex of rearing was concluded to be optimal because genital reconstructive surgery is not required with this choice. PMID:12428209

  16. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3-6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients' mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  17. Outcome Comparisons Between Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis With and Without Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ju-Yeh; Chen, Likwang; Chao, Chia-Ter; Peng, Yu-Sen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Kao, Tze-Wah; Chien, Kuo-Liong; Wu, Hon-Yen; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Polycystic kidney disease (PCKD) is the most common hereditary cause of end-stage renal disease. The complications associated with this disease may affect the performance of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes between patients on PD with PCKD and without PCKD. We extracted an incident cohort of adult (≥20 years old) patients on long-term PD from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with PCKD were identified by specific diagnosis codes. We recorded baseline comorbidities, socioeconomic status, timing of referral to a nephrologist, prior hemodialysis history before PD, and the type of PD modalities. We compared the risk of death, technique failure, peritonitis, hospitalization, and outpatient visiting as well as overall medical expenditure between the patients with PCKD and a groups of patients without PCKD who were propensity-score matched (1:3). The analysis was carried out by various Cox regression models that considered competing risk and time-varying coefficients. We enrolled 139 patients with PCKD and 7739 patients without PCKD who started long-term PD between 1999 and 2010. Patients with PCKD were less comorbid and more often treated with automated PD. In the propensity-score matched analysis, both overall survival and technique survival did not differ between the patients and the result was similar for hospitalization and peritonitis after adjusting for the application of automated PD. Furthermore, the overall annual medical expenditures were similar between the patients with and without PCKD. PD patients with PCKD are comparable to PD patients without PCKD in terms of risk of death, peritonitis, technique failure, and hospitalization in the present study. Furthermore, the medical expenses of the 2 groups after initiation of PD are also indistinguishable. PMID:26632899

  18. Collaboration Between Surgeons and Medical Oncologists and Outcomes for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Collaboration between specialists is essential for achieving high-value care in patients with complex cancer needs. We explore how collaboration between oncologists and surgeons affects mortality and cost for patients requiring multispecialty cancer care. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with stage III colon cancer from SEER-Medicare diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Patients were assigned to a primary treating surgeon and oncologist. Collaboration between surgeon and oncologist was measured as the number of patients shared between them; this has been shown to reflect advice seeking and referral relationships between physicians. Outcomes included hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer–specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results: A total of 9,329 patients received care from 3,623 different surgeons and 2,319 medical oncologists, representing 6,827 unique surgeon–medical oncologist pairs. As the number of patients shared between specialists increased from to one to five (25th to 75th percentile), patients experienced an approximately 20% improved survival benefit from all-cause and colon cancer–specific mortalities. Specifically, for each additional patient shared between oncologist and surgeon, all-cause mortality improved by 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.92 to 0.97), and colon cancer–specific mortality improved by 5% (subhazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97). There was no association with cost. Conclusion: Specialist collaboration is associated with lower mortality without increased cost among patients with stage III colon cancer. Facilitating formal and informal collaboration between specialists may be an important strategy for improving the care of patients with complex cancers. PMID:25873063

  19. Relationship between Patients' In-Process Evaluations of Therapy and Psychotherapy Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Harold S.; Schwartz, Allan J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated relationship between patients' session-by-session evaluations of brief psychotherapy and outcome. Results indicated that patients' in-process evaluations were correlated significantly and positively with some positive treatment outcome measures, especially achievement of patients' specified treatment goals, but only during initial and…

  20. Setting the vision: Applied patient reported outcomes and smart, connected digital healthcare systems to improve patient-centered outcomes prediction in critical illness

    PubMed Central

    Wysham, Nicholas G.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Cox, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction models in critical illness are generally limited to short-term mortality and uncommonly include patient-centered outcomes. Current outcome prediction tools are also insensitive to individual context or evolution in healthcare practice, potentially limiting their value over time. Improved prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness could enhance decision making quality in the ICU. Recent Findings Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have emerged as precise methodological measures of patient-centered variables and have been successfully employed using diverse platforms and technologies, enhancing the value of research in critical illness survivorship and in direct patient care. The learning health system is an emerging ideal characterized by integration of multiple data sources into a smart and interconnected health information technology infrastructure with the goal of rapidly optimizing patient care. We propose a vision of a smart, interconnected learning health system with integrated electronic PROs (ePRO) to optimize patient-centered care including critical care outcome prediction. Summary A learning health system infrastructure integrating ePROs may aid in the management of critical illness associated conditions and yield tools to improve prognostication of patient-centered outcomes in critical illness. PMID:25159475

  1. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients. PMID:26709552

  2. Carotid artery stenting and patient outcomes: The CABANA surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, L Nelson; White, Christopher J; Foster, Malcolm T; Powell, Richard J; Zemel, Gerald; Diaz-Cartelle, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized CABANA study was to evaluate periprocedural clinical outcomes in high surgical risk patients with carotid artery stenosis treated with the Carotid WALLSTENT plus FilterWire EZ Embolic Protection System by a diverse group of clinicians. Background There is a need for additional evidence evaluating carotid artery stenting (CAS) performed by operators with various experience and training levels. Methods The study enrolled symptomatic (≥50% carotid artery stenosis) and asymptomatic (≥80% carotid stenosis) patients at high risk for carotid endarterectomy. Study centers were grouped into three tiers based on previous CAS experience while individual operators were grouped by their CAS training. The primary endpoint was the 30-day composite of major adverse events [MAEs; including stroke, death, and myocardial infarction (MI)]. Individual event rates were evaluated across the overall study, and by center experience and physician training tier. Results Of 1,097 enrolled patients, 1,025 were evaluable for 30-day MAE rate. The stroke rate (3.3%) was a major contributing factor in the overall MAE rate (4.6%). Mortality was 1.3% and the MI rate was 0.5%. There was no statistically significant association between MAE rates among the center experience tiers (P = 0.61) nor among the operator training categories (P = 0.26). Conclusions CAS with the Carotid WALLSTENT and FilterWire EZ yielded a low 30-day MAE rate that did not differ significantly across operator experience and training levels. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00741091. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24948033

  3. Factors affecting the postoperative limb alignment and clinical outcome after Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Ju; Bae, Ji-Hoon; Lim, Hong Chul

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the postoperative mechanical axis deviation and clinical outcome according to bearing size, femoral component position, and tibial resection angle after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). A total of 104 patients with 124 knees underwent Oxford phase 3 UKA. The overall changes in mechanical axis deviation and tibiofemoral angle were significantly different according to bearing size (P = .001 and < .001), but they were not significantly different according to the tibial resection angle and femoral component position. The postoperative mechanical axis fell into the zone C or zone 2 in 108 knees (87%) and into the zone 3 or zone 4 in 16 cases (13%). One hundred eight cases, which had the mechanical axis passing the zone C or zone 2, did not show any progression of arthritis. Limb alignment is a function of the thickness of the bearing rather than alignments of femoral and tibial implant. PMID:22285234

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Total Health Care Expenditure in Prediction of Patient Satisfaction: Results From a National Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Wei; Bounsanga, Jerry; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D; Crum, Anthony B; Voss, Maren W; Hon, Shirley D

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care quality is often linked to patient satisfaction. Yet, there is a lack of national studies examining the relationship between patient satisfaction, patient-reported outcomes, and medical expenditure. Objective The aim of this study is to examine the contribution of physical health, mental health, general health, and total health care expenditures to patient satisfaction using a longitudinal, nationally representative sample. Methods Using data from the 2010-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, analyses were conducted to predict patient satisfaction from patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditures. The study sample consisted of adult participants (N=10,157), with sampling weights representative of 233.26 million people in the United States. Results The results indicated that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure were associated with patient satisfaction such that higher physical and mental function, higher general health status, and higher total health care expenditure were associated with higher patient satisfaction. Conclusions We found that patient-reported outcomes and total health care expenditure had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction. As more emphasis is placed on health care value and quality, this area of research will become increasingly needed and critical questions should be asked about what we value in health care and whether we can find a balance between patient satisfaction, outcomes, and expenditures. Future research should apply big data analytics to investigate whether there is a differential effect of patient-reported outcomes and medical expenditures on patient satisfaction across different medical specialties. PMID:27227131

  5. [Familial incidence of affective diseases in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1988-03-01

    Analysis of family history information about first-, second- and third-degree relatives of 45 anorectic patients and 38 control subjects with different types of neurosis showed significantly more depression and eating disorders in the families of the anorectic group. Our data revealed the same prevalence of psychiatric disorders in general for both groups; the alcoholism rate was higher in the anorectic group without a statistic significance. These findings might provide further evidence of a possible genetic relationship between anorexia nervosa and affective illness. PMID:3388987

  6. Evaluation of macrophage antiviral activity in patients affected by neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Merendino, R A; Iannello, D; Arena, A; Bonina, L; Greco, V; Mesiti, M; Chillemi, S; Mastroeni, P

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic antiviral activity of macrophages has been studied in healthy donors and in patients affected by breast cancer and melanoma. In vitro differentiated macrophages from blood-derived monocytes were infected with measles virus, herpes simplex virus type 2 and adenovirus 17. The challenge was carried out with different multiplicities of infection and the synthesis of virus was tested by evaluating the single cycle growth curve in 24 h. The results obtained show that the restriction of virus infectivity by macrophages is strongly influenced by the multiplicity of infection. This was particularly evident with the adenovirus 17. Moreover, macrophages from patients with melanoma and breast cancer showed an impairment of the intrinsic antiviral activity in comparison with normal subjects. PMID:2842553

  7. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. PMID:26297554

  8. Endocrinological disorders affecting neurosurgical patients: An intensivists perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Haldar, Rudrashish

    2014-01-01

    Management of critically ill neurosurgical patients is often complicated by the presence or development of endocrinological ailments which complicate the clinical scenario and adversely affect the prognosis of these patients. The anatomical proximity to the vital centers regulating the endocrinological physiology and alteration in the neurotransmitter release causes disturbances in the hormonal homeostasis. This paves the way for development of diverse disorders where single or multiple hormones may be involved which can have deleterious effect on the different organ system. Understanding and awareness of these disorders is important for the treating intensivist to recognize these changes early in their course, so that appropriate and timely therapeutic measures can be initiated along with the treatment of the primary malady. PMID:25364671

  9. Analysis of Sorafenib Outcome: Focusing on the Clinical Course in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Sadahisa; Chiba, Tetsuhiro; Ooka, Yoshihiko; Suzuki, Eiichiro; Inoue, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Toru; Tawada, Akinobu; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment outcomes of sorafenib therapy may greatly vary depending not only on tumor spread but also on past clinical processes prior to sorafenib therapy and timing of sorafenib administration in the past clinical course of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We evaluated the efficacy of sorafenib in patients with HCC, taking into account of their past clinical courses. Methods Patients with HCC treated with sorafenib as a first-line systemic therapy, whose courses documented from the time of the initial diagnosis, were retrospectively analyzed. Results Of the 123 patients receiving sorafenib therapy at an advanced-stage, baseline characteristics differed including the rate of hepatitis C virus, Child–Pugh class, and status of intrahepatic lesions according to stage progression processes. Overall survival (OS) in patients progressed directly from the early-stage (15.3 months) was significantly longer than that in patients diagnosed at the advanced-stage (5.3 months, P = 0.022) and progressed from the intermediate-stages (6.0 months, P = 0.041). Of 105 patients diagnosed at the intermediate-stage on past clinical courses, OS of starting sorafenib therapy before progression to the advanced-stage (67 patients) was significantly longer than for patients starting sorafenib therapy only after progression to the advanced-stage (38 patients) (P = 0.015). Conclusion Characteristic differences between past stage progression processes might affect prognosis in advanced-stage HCC patients receiving sorafenib. Switching to sorafenib therapy before progression to the advanced-stage appears more effective than that after progression to the advanced-stage in patients diagnosed in the intermediate-stage on past clinical courses prior to sorafenib administration. PMID:27537374

  10. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3–6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients’ mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function. PMID:25652616

  11. Intensive Perioperative Glucose Control Does Not Improve Outcomes of Patients Submitted to Open-Heart Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raquel Pei Chen; Galas, Filomena Regina Barbosa Gomes; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahão; Bello, Carmen Narvaes; Piccioni, Marilde Albuquerque; Auler, José Otávio Costa

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between different target levels of glucose and the clinical outcomes of patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. METHODS: We designed a prospective study in a university hospital where 109 consecutive patients were enrolled during a six-month period. All patients were scheduled for open-heart surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups. One group consisted of 55 patients and had a target glucose level of 80–130 mg/dl, while the other contained 54 patients and had a target glucose level of 160–200 mg/dl. These parameters were controlled during surgery and for 36 hours after surgery in the intensive care unit. Primary outcomes were clinical outcomes, including time of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit, infection, hypoglycemia, renal or neurological dysfunction, blood transfusion and length of stay in the hospital. The secondary outcome was a combined end-point (mortality at 30 days, infection or length of stay in the intensive care unit of more than 3 days). A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: The anthropometric and clinical characteristics of the patients from each group were similar, except for weight and body mass index. The mean glucose level during the protocol period was 126.69 mg/dl in the treated group and 168.21 mg/dl in the control group (p<0.0016). There were no differences between groups regarding clinical outcomes, including the duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay in the intensive care unit, blood transfusion, postoperative infection, hypoglycemic event, neurological dysfunction or 30-day mortality (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In 109 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, both protocols of glycemic control in an intraoperative setting and in the intensive care unit were found to be safe, easily achieved and not to

  12. WHAT ARE THE OUTCOMES OF TREATMENT AMONG PATIENTS WITH SARCOPENIA?

    PubMed Central

    Studenski, S

    2016-01-01

    Treatment outcomes for clinical trials of interventions on sarcopenia depend on the goals of the intervention, especially whether the treatment is considered therapeutic or preventive. Key issues regarding outcomes are the selection of a primary outcome and options for secondary outcomes. While clinical significance and face validity are key concerns when making this determination, other factors to be incorporated into the decision include measurement characteristics, feasibility and cost, risks of missing outcomes and options for alternative strategies to determine them. Primary should be highly responsive to changes in sarcopenia and clinically important. Like many problems of aging, functional abilities, especially mobility, may be the most clinically relevant states. PMID:19657559

  13. Does varicocelectomy affect DNA fragmentation in infertile patients?

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Onur; Sarici, Hasmet; Kabar, Mucahit; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Resorlu, Berkan; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of varicocelectomy on DNA fragmentation index and semen parameters in infertile patients before and after surgical repair of varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 72 men with at least 1-year history of infertility, varicocele and oligospermia were examined. Varicocele sperm samples were classified as normal or pathological according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. The acridine orange test was used to assess the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: DFI decreased significantly after varicocelectomy from 34.5% to 28.2% (P = 0.024). In addition all sperm parameters such as mean sperm count, sperm concentration, progressive motility and sperm morphology significantly increased from 19.5 × 106 to 30.7 × 106, 5.4 × 106/ml to 14.3 × 106/ml, and 19.9% to 31.2% (P < 0.001) and 2.6% to 3.1% (P = 0.017). The study was limited by the loss to follow-up of some patients and unrecorded pregnancy outcome due to short follow-up. Conclusion: Varicocele causes DNA-damage in spermatozoa. We suggest that varicocelectomy improves sperm parameters and decreases DFI. PMID:25878412

  14. Do Physical Symptoms Predict the Outcome of Surgical Fusion in Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with discogenic low back pain (DLBP). Overview of Literature Specific diagnosis of DLBP remains difficult. Worsening of pain on flexion is a reported symptom of DLBP. This study sought to determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with DLBP. Methods We investigated 127 patients with low back pain (LBP) and no dominant radicular pain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to select patients with disc degeneration at only one level. If pain was provoked during discography, we performed fusion surgery (87 patients). Visual analogue scale score and responses to a questionnaire regarding symptoms including worsening of pain on flexion or extension were assessed. Symptom sites before surgery were categorized into LBP alone, or LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain. We followed 77 patients (average 3.0 years) and compared symptoms before surgery with surgical outcome. Results Sixty-three patients with a good outcome showed postsurgical pain relief (≥60% pain relief) and 14 patients with a poor outcome did not (<60% pain relief). In patients with good outcomes, worsening of LBP was evident in 65% of cases on flexion and in 35% on extension. However, these findings were not significantly different from those in patients with poor outcomes. The percentage of patients with LBP alone was significantly lower and the percentage of patients with LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain was significantly higher in the group with good surgical outcome compared with patients in the group with poor surgical outcome (p<0.05). Conclusions Worsening of pain on extension may be a symptom of DLBP. Surgical outcomes were superior in patients with both LBP and either referred inguinal or leg pain compared with those having LBP alone. PMID:27340531

  15. Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes for Comorbid Patients in Psychiatric Day Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Magura, Stephen; Rosenblum, Andrew; Betzler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The study’s purpose was to determine treatment outcomes for patients who present with drug use vs. those presenting with no drug use at admission to a psychiatric day treatment program. Consecutively admitted patients completed confidential interviews which included psychological distress and quality of life measures and provided urine specimens for toxicology at admission and six month follow-up. Subjects positive by past 30 day self-report or urinalysis were categorized as drug users. Major psychiatric diagnoses were: major depression 25%; bipolar, 13%; other mood 13%; schizoaffective 13%; schizophrenia 13%. Drug use at admission was: cocaine 35%; marijuana 33%; opiates 18%, (meth)amphetamines, 6% For each of these drugs, the percentage of patients positive at admission who remitted from using the drug significantly exceeded the percentage negative at baseline who initiated using the drug. Overall, there were significant decreases in psychological distress and significant improvement on quality of life, but no change on positive affect. There were no significant differences between drug users and non-drug users on symptom reduction and improvement in quality of life. Psychiatric day treatment appears to benefit comorbid patients by reducing the net number of patients who actively use certain common drugs and by improving psychological status and quality of life to the same degree as for non-drug using patients. PMID:20333262

  16. Recurrence and pseudorecurrence after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair: predictors and patient-focused outcomes.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stacey A; Hicks, Stephanie C; Brahmbhatt, Reshma; Liang, Mike K

    2014-02-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) is gaining popularity as an option to repair abdominal wall hernias. Bulging after repair remains common after this technique. This study evaluates the incidence and factors associated with bulging after LVHR. Between 2000 and 2010, 201 patients underwent LVHR at two affiliated institutions. Patients who developed recurrence or pseudorecurrence (seroma or eventration) were analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses to identify predictors of these complications. Of the 201 patients who underwent LVHR, 40 (19.9%) patients developed a seroma, 63 (31.3%) patients had radiographically proven eventration, and 25 (12.4%) patients had a hernia recurrence. On multivariate analysis, seromas were associated with number of prior ventral hernia repairs, surgical site infections, and prostate disease. Mesh eventration was associated with hernia size and surgical technique. Tissue eventration was associated with primary hernias and surgical technique. Hernia recurrence was associated with incisional hernias and mesh type used. Recurrence and pseudorecurrence are important complications after LVHR. Large hernia size, infections, and surgical technique are important clinical factors that affect outcomes after LVHR. PMID:24480213

  17. Impact of Coronary Dominance on In-Hospital Outcomes after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kuno, Toshiki; Numasawa, Yohei; Miyata, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Sueyoshi, Koichiro; Ohki, Takahiro; Negishi, Koji; Kawamura, Akio; Kohsaka, Shun; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the manner in which coronary dominance affects in-hospital outcomes of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background Previous studies have shown that left dominant coronary anatomies are associated with worse prognoses in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods Data were analyzed from 4873 ACS patients undergoing PCI between September 2008 and April 2013 at 14 hospitals participating in the Japanese Cardiovascular Database Registry. The patients were grouped based on diagnostic coronary angiograms performed prior to PCI; those with right- or co-dominant anatomy (RD group) and those with left-dominant anatomy (LD group). Results The average patient age was 67.6±11.8 years and both patient groups had similar ages, coronary risk factors, comorbidities, and prior histories. The numbers of patients presenting with symptoms of heart failure, cardiogenic shock, or cardiopulmonary arrest were significantly higher in the LD group than in the RD group (heart failure: 650 RD patients [14.7%] vs. 87 LD patients [18.8%], P = 0.025; cardiogenic shock: 322 RD patients [7.3%] vs. 48 LD patients [10.3%], P = 0.021; and cardiopulmonary arrest: 197 RD patients [4.5%] vs. 36 LD patients [7.8%], P = 0.003). In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among LD patients than among RD patients (182 RD patients [4.1%] vs. 36 LD patients [7.8%], P = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that LD anatomy was an independent predictor for in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 1.75; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–2.89; P = 0.030). Conclusion Among ACS patients who underwent PCI, LD patients had significantly worse in-hospital outcomes compared with RD patients, and LD anatomy was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality. PMID:23991136

  18. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Hospitalized Following Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Festic, Emir; Park, Pauline K.; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Dabbagh, Ousama; Adesanya, Adebola; Gajic, Ognjen; Bartz, Raquel R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary aspiration is an important recognized cause of ARDS. Better characterization of patients who aspirate may allow identification of potential risks for aspiration that could be used in future studies to mitigate the occurrence of aspiration and its devastating complications. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of the Lung Injury Prediction Score cohort to better characterize patients with aspiration, including their potential risk factors and related outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 5,584 subjects at risk for ARDS and who required hospitalization, 212 (3.8%) presented with aspiration. Subjects who aspirated were likely to be male (66% vs 56%, P < .007), slightly older (59 years vs 57 years), white (73% vs 61%, P = .0004), admitted from a nursing home (15% vs 5.9%, P < .0001), have a history of alcohol abuse (21% vs 8%, P < .0001), and have lower Glasgow Coma Scale (median, 13 vs 15; P < .0001). Aspiration subjects were sicker (higher APACHE [Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation] II score), required more mechanical ventilation (54% vs 32%, P < .0001), developed more moderate to severe ARDS (12% vs 3.8%, P < .0001), and were twofold more likely to die in-hospital, even after adjustment for severity of illness (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6). Neither obesity nor gastroesophageal reflux was associated with aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Aspiration was more common in men with alcohol abuse history and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale who were admitted from a nursing home. It is independently associated with a significant increase in the risk for ARDS as well as morbidity and mortality. Findings from this study may facilitate the design of future clinical studies of aspiration-induced lung injury. PMID:24811480

  19. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  20. Efficient phagocytosis and laccase activity affect the outcome of HIV-associated cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; Robertson, Emma; Beale, Mathew A.; Johnston, Simon A.; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Loyse, Angela; Jarvis, Joseph N.; Gilbert, Andrew S.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Harrison, Thomas S.; May, Robin C.; Bicanic, Tihana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a leading cause of HIV-associated mortality globally. High fungal burden in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at diagnosis and poor fungal clearance during treatment are recognized adverse prognostic markers; however, the underlying pathogenic factors that drive these clinical manifestations are incompletely understood. We profiled a large set of clinical isolates for established cryptococcal virulence traits to evaluate the contribution of C. neoformans phenotypic diversity to clinical presentation and outcome in human cryptococcosis. Methods. Sixty-five C. neoformans isolates from clinical trial patients with matched clinical data were assayed in vitro to determine murine macrophage uptake, intracellular proliferation rate (IPR), capsule induction, and laccase activity. Analysis of the correlation between prognostic clinical and host immune parameters and fungal phenotypes was performed using Spearman’s r, while the fungal-dependent impact on long-term survival was determined by Cox regression analysis. Results. High levels of fungal uptake by macrophages in vitro, but not the IPR, were associated with CSF fungal burden (r = 0.38, P = 0.002) and long-term patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5, P = 0.012). High-uptake strains were hypocapsular (r = –0.28, P = 0.05) and exhibited enhanced laccase activity (r = 0.36, P = 0.003). Fungal isolates with greater laccase activity exhibited heightened survival ex vivo in purified CSF (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) and resistance to clearance following patient antifungal treatment (r = 0.39, P = 0.003). Conclusion. These findings underscore the contribution of cryptococcal-phagocyte interactions and laccase-dependent melanin pathways to human clinical presentation and outcome. Furthermore, characterization of fungal-specific pathways that drive clinical manifestation provide potential targets for the development of therapeutics and the management of CM. Funding. This work

  1. Gender-related affecting factors of prediabetes on its 10-year outcome

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaomin; Qiu, Miaoyan; Zhang, Xuan'e; Wang, Haiyan; Tong, Wenxin; Ju, Liping; Gu, Lei; Sun, Siming; Zhang, Hongli; Wang, Weiqing; Tian, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the gender-related affecting factors of prediabetes on its 10-year outcome, in a longitudinal study. Methods and results This longitudinal population-based study was performed in the Ping Liang community, Yangpu district, Shanghai, between November 2002 and October 2014. There were 334 participants with prediabetes enrolled in the final analysis. While a certain proportion of the prediabetic population progress to diabetes, the majority remain at the same level or even revert to normal glucose regulation. No gender difference was observed in the change of glucose regulation. However, results from an adjusted logistic regression analysis in males showed that physical activity was significantly associated with both elevated odds of reverting to normal glucose regulation (active vs inactive, OR 3.00, 95% CI 1.09 to 8.30) and developing diabetes (OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.92). Age, baseline 2 h glucose, triglycerides and smoking status were also risk factors significantly associated with diabetes development; while for females, waist circumference played a key role in the outcome. Every unit elevation of waist circumference was associated with lower odds of reverting to normal glucose regulation (OR, 0.94; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98) and higher odds of progressing to diabetes (OR, 1.05; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.10). Baseline hypertension and family history of diabetes carried higher risk for developing diabetes as well. Conclusions Physical activity in males and waist circumference in females are important factors predicting both progression to diabetes and regression to normal glucose regulation, indicating that more exercise for males and lower waist circumference for females are beneficial for prediabetes to achieve reversion. PMID:27239315

  2. Climate change affects the outcome of competitive interactions-an application of principal response curves.

    PubMed

    Heegaard, Einar; Vandvik, Vigdis

    2004-05-01

    It has been hypothesised that climate change may affect vegetation by changing the outcome of competitive interactions. We use a space-for-time approach to evaluate this hypothesis in the context of alpine time-of-snowmelt gradients. Principal response curves, a multivariate repeated-measurement analysis technique, are used to analyse for compositional differences in local ridge-to-snowbed gradients among 100 m altitudinal bands from 1,140 to 1,550 m a.s.l., corresponding to a temperature gradient of 2.5 degrees C (local lapse rate is 0.6 degrees C). The interaction between time-of-snowmelt and altitude is strongly significant statistically, indicating that the altitudinal gradient cannot be explained simply by the physiological responses of the species, but that there are also changes in the outcome of competitive interactions. At higher altitudes, there is a decrease in the time-of-snowmelt ranges of species which have intermediate times-of-snowmelt optima, whereas snowbed (chinophilous) species have wider time-of-snowmelt ranges. As snowbed species can survive, grow and reproduce at very early snow-free sites at high altitudes, the most likely explanation for their absence from all but the latest time-of-snowmelt habitats at lower altitudes is competitive exclusion by more vigorous lee-side species. This suggests that with future climate change snowbed species will experience, in addition to habitat fragmentation and reduced size of habitats due to increased temperature and snowmelt, an indirect effect due to competitive exclusion from late-snowmelt sites by species that have their optima outside snowbeds. PMID:15021981

  3. Communicating the results of randomized clinical trials: do patients understand multidimensional patient-reported outcomes?

    PubMed

    McNair, Angus G K; Brookes, Sara T; Davis, Christopher R; Argyropoulos, Miltiadis; Blazeby, Jane M

    2010-02-10

    PURPOSE Evidence suggests that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) from randomized trials in oncology may not influence clinical decision making and patient choice. Reasons for this are currently unclear and little is known about patients' interpretation of PROs. This study assessed patients' understanding of multidimensional PROs in a graphical format. PATIENTS AND METHODS Semistructured interviews in which patients interpreted a series of graphs depicting simple, then multiple different hypothetical PROs associated with two treatments with identical chances of survival were audio recorded. The interviewer and a blinded observer (listening to audio recordings) scored patients' understanding of the graphs. Logistic regression examined the associations between patient understanding of the graphs and clinical and sociodemographic details. Results One hundred thirty-two patients with esophageal and gastric cancer were interviewed and 115 understood the first two graphs depicting different PROs of two treatments (87%; 95% CI,81 to 93). Simultaneous interpretation of adverse and beneficial treatment effects was achieved by 74 (66%; 95% CI, 57 to 75). Graphs showing complex, longitudinal data were correctly interpreted by 97 (73%; 95% CI, 66 to 81) and 108 (81%; 95% CI, 75 to 88), respectively. Univariable analyses demonstrated associations between patient understanding and patient age, educational level, and cancer site (P < or = .02 for all); however, in a multivariable model each of these associations was attenuated. CONCLUSION Most patients understand graphical multidimensional PROs, although a smaller majority were able to interpret more complex, or simultaneous, presentations. Additional work is needed to define methods for communicating clinical and PRO data from trials to allow patients to make informed treatment choices. PMID:20065187

  4. Correlation between headaches and affective symptoms in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hye; Joo, Eun Yeon; Seo, Dae-Won; Hong, Seung Bong

    2016-07-01

    Headaches are a neglected entity in patients with epilepsy (PWE), although PWE have a high chance of suffering from seizure-related as well as seizure-unrelated headaches. We aimed to identify the prevalence and characteristics of headaches and investigate the correlation between headaches and affective symptoms in PWE. Consecutive PWE who visited our tertiary outpatient clinic were interviewed about headaches and epilepsy. Affective symptoms were evaluated using the Korean version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and suicidality portion of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. We classified headaches as interictal or seizure-related headaches (SRHs; pre- and postictal). Tension-type headache and migraine were defined based on International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. From the initial cohort of 177 patients (92 men, mean age: 37.1years), 73 (41.2%) reported suffering from interictal (N=34, 19.2%), preictal (N=3, 1.7%), and postictal (N=48, 27.1%) headaches. Univariate analysis revealed significantly higher BDI and BAI scores in the headache group. Tension-type headaches were the most frequent, and half of the interictal headaches and most of the SRHs were untreated. Spearman's partial correlation analyses showed that headaches overall were significantly related with depression and anxiety. Interictal headaches were correlated with depression only, and postictal headaches were correlated with depression as well as suicidality, separately. These results show that investigating and controlling headaches may relieve affective symptoms and ultimately improve the quality of life of PWE. PMID:27236023

  5. Patient-reported outcomes as primary end points in clinical trials of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Williet, Nicolas; Sandborn, William J; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is moving from the Crohn's Disease Activity Index to patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and objective measures of disease, such as findings from endoscopy. PROs will become an important aspect of assessing activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and for labeling specific drugs for this disease. PROs always have been considered in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis, and have included measurements of quality of life, disability, or fatigue. Several disease-specific scales have been developed to assess these PROs and commonly are used in clinical trials. Outcomes reported by patients in clinical trials of IBD initially focused on quality of life, measured by the Short-Form 36 questionnaire or disease-specific scales such as the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire or its shorter version. Recently considered factors include fatigue, depression and anxiety, and work productivity, as measured by the Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue, the Hospital Anxiety Depression, and the Work Productivity Activity Impairment Questionnaire, respectively. However, few data are available on how treatment affects these factors in patients with IBD. Although disability generally is recognized in patients with IBD, it is not measured. The international IBD disability index currently is being validated. None of the PROs currently used in IBD were developed according to FDA guidance for PRO development. PROs will be a major primary end point of future trials. FDA guidance is needed to develop additional PROs for IBD that can be incorporated into trials, to better compare patients' experience with different therapies. PMID:24534550

  6. AB101. Neonatal form of Isovaleric acidemia in Vietnamese patients: clinical history and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Vu, Dung Chi; Can, Ngoc Thi Bich; Bui, Thao Phuong; Nguyen, Mai Chi; Yamaguchi, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Isovaleric academia (IVA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of leucine metabolism caused by a deficiency of the mitochondrial enzyme isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD). The clinical presentation of IVA appears to be highly variable ranging from severely affected to asymptomatic subjects. This is the first report of Vietnamese patients with IVA. Describe clinical features and outcome of Vietnamese patients with IVA. Methods Case series report including three Vietnamese patients who were diagnosed IVA with the criteria of elevation of C5 and urinary isovalerylglycines, 3-OH-isovalerate using Tandem Mass and GC/MS. Results Three probands (2 female and 1 male) from three unrelated families were born to non-consanguinity parents. The age of onset was within the first 2 weeks of age (8, 9 and 10 days). The male patient had older brother died due to unknown comma at 18 days old. The initial symptom was poor feeding (3/3). After 1-2 days of the onset, they appeared lethargy/comma (3/3), convulsion (1/3) and respiratory failure required mechanical ventilation in one case. The investigations revealed metabolic acidosis (PH: 7.2-7.3) in 3 cases, thrombopenia in 3 cases; ketonuria in 3 cases and hyperammonemia in 3 cases. Management for acute crisis and long-term follow up of IVA was started after 2-3 days of the onset: coma was released after 2-3 days of treatment. All patients have normal development at 16 months of age; at 15 months of age and at 10 months of age, respectively. Conclusions Three Vietnamese patients with IVA presented early initial symptoms within 2 weeks of age and have good outcome.

  7. Evaluation of a Telehealth Service for COPD and HF patients: Clinical outcome and patients' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada; Robinson, Patricia; Wallace, Catherine Russell

    2015-07-01

    NHS Croydon Health Services and NHS Croydon Clinical Commissioning Group have been providing telehealth services for the past 36 months. The aim of this study was to measure the impact of telehealth when implemented as a service within a standard patient care pathway. To measure the clinical outcomes, the number of A&E visits and hospital admissions, recorded on the NHS Secondary Uses Service database, were compared before and after the implementation of the telehealth service. The number of all events despite its cause and the number of events related to the patients' diagnosed condition were collected. To elicit patients' perceptions about the telehealth service, a cross sectional survey of patients registered on the triage manager database was used to explore their perceptions, concerns and general satisfaction with the telehealth service via a 4 point likert scale questionnaire. The data of 48 patients were collected and telehealth reduced the number of both A&E and hospital admission due to all causes by 13% (P = 0.42) and 22% (P = 0.048), respectively. When only the events directly related to the patient's diagnosed condition were considered, a reduction by 36% (P = 0.03) and 28% (P = 0.02) was recorded for A&E visits and hospital admission respectively. 27 patients consented to participate in the survey. Overall, patients were very satisfied with telehealth services. Patients agreed that telehealth had improved their health, it was a convenient form of health care delivery for them and they were more involved in the decisions about their care or treatment. In addition, since being on telehealth, patients' confidence in managing their health increased from somewhat confident to confident. Telehealth, when provided as a service within a standard care pathway, seems to decrease hospital admissions and A&E visits. Good patient satisfaction suggests that the current service is accepted and it could be further expanded to include a larger number of

  8. Application of Bother in patient reported outcomes instruments across cultures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the applicability of the term bother, as used in Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) instruments that will be translated into foreign languages from English for the United States. Bother is versatile in English for the U.S., in that it can describe negative mental states and physical sensations, as well as social disturbances. Bother has many different meanings across cultures, due to this versatility. Alternatives for bother were explored for future PRO instrument development. Methods A PRO instrument used to evaluate the degree of bother resulting from psoriasis was analyzed. This disease can negatively impact patients physically, emotionally and socially. Translations of bother were analyzed to determine its meaning when translated into other languages. Cognitive debriefing was conducted on psoriasis patients with the instrument containing bother. Following cognitive debriefing, a questionnaire was distributed to linguists and cognitive debriefing subjects to collect definitions of bother in each target language, and detail any difficulty with translation. To establish alternatives to bother and demonstrate the breakdown of concepts within bother, translations of the Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) were analyzed. This instrument was selected for its focus on psoriasis and use of terminology that lacks the ambiguity of bother. Results An analysis of back-translations revealed that bother yielded a back-translation that was conceptually different from the source 20% of the time (5/26). Analysis of alternative terminology found in the DLQI revealed much greater conceptual equivalence when translated into other languages. Conclusion When developing the wording of PRO instruments, the terminology chosen should be applicable across languages to allow for international pooling and comparison of data. While all linguists and subjects of cognitive debriefing understood bother to have a negative connotation, a

  9. Patient Ethnicity Affects Triage Assessments and Patient Prioritization in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Jacob M; Coulombe, Patrick; Alcock, Joe; Kruger, Eric; Stith, Sarah S; Strenth, Chance; Parshall, Mark; Cichowski, Sara B

    2016-04-01

    prospective research will be needed to determine how this specific person-level mechanism affects healthcare quality and outcomes. PMID:27057847

  10. Applications of Text Messaging, and Bibliotherapy for Treatment of Patients Affected by Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Taleban, Roya; Zamani, Ahmadreza; Moafi, Mohammad; Jiryaee, Nasrin; Khadivi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intensity of depressive symptoms could be exacerbated due to the paucity of appropriate treatments. We assessed the effectiveness of bibliotherapy and text messaging, which aimed at amelioration of patient's behavior and consciousness, which could lead to suicide prevention. Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial implemented in rural health centers of Isfahan district (Iran). Health centers were assigned in three trials consisting of the booklet, text messaging, and control groups. Each group consisted of 70 patients. Inclusion criteria were being affected by depressive symptom, <18 years, and cell phone accessibility. Mental retardation, drug and alcohol abuse, visual disability, dementia, suicide attempt history, electrotherapy, and receiving psychological interventions were our not met criteria. Our patient outcomes comprised intensity of depressive symptom and treatment compliance. The first two trials were requested to study instructive booklets in 30 days while the second cohort was demanded to study the booklet in accordance with the daily delivered text messaging. Results: Out of 210 individuals, 198 patients finished this study. The intensity of depressive symptom was significantly affected through time and group factors as well as time-group interaction (F = 12.30, P < 0.001). Based on treatment compliance, the interactive effect of group factor and the time factor was statistically significant. Conclusions: It seems that bibliotherapy could efficiently decrease the intensity of depressive symptoms. Nevertheless, in comparison with our booklet trial, the text messaging group achieved neither durable nor significant success; thus, bibliotherapy could be utilized as a complementary methodology aiming depression treatment. PMID:27076884

  11. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  12. Peritumoral SPARC expression and patient outcome with resectable intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Tung; Chu, Yin-Yi; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Huang, Shih-Chiang; Chen, Ming Huang; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Chen, Yen-Yang; Ma, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Chen, Tsung-Wen; Yeh, Ta-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) affects thousands worldwide with increasing incidence. SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) plays an important role in cellular matrix interactions, wound repair, and cellular migration, and has been reported to prevent malignancy from growth. SPARC undergoes epigenetic silencing in pancreatic malignancy, but is frequently expressed by stromal fibroblasts adjacent to infiltrating pancreatic adenocarcinomas. CCA is also a desmoplastic tumor, similar to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. SPARC’s clinical influence on clinicopathological characteristics of mass-forming (MF)-CCA still remains unclear. In this study, we evaluate the expression of SPARC in tumor and stromal tissue to clarity its relation with prognosis. Methods Seventy-eight MF-CCA patients who underwent hepatectomy with curative intent were enrolled for an immunohistochemical study of SPARC. The expression of immunostaining of SPARC was characterized for both tumor and stromal tissues. We conducted survival analysis with 16 clinicopathological variables. The overall survival (OS) was analyzed by Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Results Thirty-three men and 45 women with MF-CCA were studied. Within total 78 subjects, 12 (15.4%) were classified as tumor negative/stroma negative, 37 (47.4%) as tumor positive/stroma negative, four (5.1%) as tumor negative/stroma positive, and 25 (32.1%) as tumor positive/stroma positive. With a median follow-up of 13.6 months, the 5-year OS was 14.9%. Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed that SPARC tumor positive and stromal negative immunostaining and curative hepatectomy predicted favorable OS in patients with MF-CCA after hepatectomy. Conclusion MF-CCA patients with SPARC tumor positive and stromal negative expression may have favorable OS rates after curative hepatectomy. PMID:26251613

  13. Cardiovascular and Affective Outcomes of Active Gaming: Using the Nintendo Wii as a Cardiovascular Training Tool

    PubMed Central

    Naugle, Keith E.; Naugle, Kelly M.; Wikstrom, Erik A.

    2014-01-01

    Naugle, KE, Naugle, KM, and Wikstrom, EA. Cardiovascular and affective outcomes of active gaming: Using the Nintendo Wii as a cardiovascular training tool. J Strength Cond Res 28(2): 443–451, 2014–Active-video gaming is purported to produce similar cardiovascular responses as aerobic fitness activities. This study compared the emotional and cardiovascular effects of Wii games with those of traditional exercise in college-aged adults with different exercise backgrounds. Specifically, the percentage of heart rate reserve, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), level of enjoyment, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule scores were compared between subjects who reported exercising frequently at high intensities (high-intensity exerciser group: age = 20.18 years [0.87]; Height = 165.23 cm [9.97]; Mass = 62.37 kg [11.61]), N = 11 and those who exercise more often at lower intensities (low-intensity exercisers group: age = 20.72 years [1.19]; Height = 164.39 cm [8.05]; Mass = 68.04 kg [10.71]), N = 11. The subjects completed six 20-minute exercises sessions: treadmill walking, stationary cycling, and Wii's Tennis, Boxing, Cycling, and Step. The low-intensity exerciser group achieved a greater percentage of heart rate reserve (a) during traditional exercise compared with that during Wii boxing, (b) playing Wii boxing compared with that for Wii tennis, and (c) playing Wii boxing compared with that when the high-intensity exercisers group played any Wii games (p < 0.05). The RPE was greater for boxing and cycling compared with that for tennis and step (p < 0.05). Ratings of enjoyment and the increase in positive emotion were greater for boxing and for tennis compared with those for traditional exercises (p < 0.05). Results suggest that Wii boxing shows the greatest potential as a cardiovascular fitness tool among the Wii games, particularly for individuals who typically exercise at lower intensities. PMID:23660574

  14. Variable Gene Dispersal Conditions and Spatial Deforestation Patterns Can Interact to Affect Tropical Tree Conservation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with ‘Near’ distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  15. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Nashmia; Pappalardo, Andrea A; Arora, Vineet M; Press, Valerie G

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results); none showed true harm (0; “negative”); and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”). Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and simplification of treatment regimens. We also found discordance between physicians and patients regarding patients’ needs, beliefs, and expectations about asthma. Although some studies show promise regarding the benefits of patient-focused care, these methods require additional study on feasibility and strategies for implementation in real world settings. Further, it is imperative that future studies must be, themselves, patient-centered (eg, pragmatic comparative effectiveness studies) and applicable to a variety of patient populations and settings. Despite the need for

  16. Iron Levels in Hepatocytes and Portal Tract Cells Predict Progression and Outcome of Patients with Advanced Chronic Hepatitis C1

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, Richard W.; Sterling, Richard K.; Naishadham, Deepa; Stoddard, Anne M.; Rogers, Thomas; Morishima, Chihiro; Morgan, Timothy R.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Iron might influence severity and progression of non-hemochromatotic liver diseases. We assessed the relationships between iron, variants in HFE, and progression and outcomes using data from the HALT-C Trial. We determined whether therapy with pegylated interferon (PegIFN) affects iron variables. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to groups given long-term therapy with PegIFN (n=400) or no therapy (n=413) for 3.5 y and followed for up to 8.7 y (median 6.0 y). Associations between patient characteristics and iron variables, at baseline and over time, were made using Kaplan-Meier analyses, Cox regression models, and repeated measures analysis of covariance. Iron was detected by Prussian blue staining. Results Patients with poor outcomes (increase in Child-Turcotte-Pugh score to ≥ 7, development of ascites, encephalopathy, variceal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, death) had significantly higher baseline scores for stainable iron in hepatocytes and cells in portal tracts than those without outcomes. Staining for iron in portal triads correlated with lobular and total Ishak inflammatory and fibrosis scores (P<0.0001). High baseline levels of iron in triads increased the risk for poor outcome (hazard ratio=1.35, P=0.02). Iron staining decreased in hepatocytes but increased in portal stromal cells over time (P<0.0001). Serum levels of iron and total iron binding capacity decreased significantly over time (P <0.0001), as did serum ferritin (P=0.0003). Long-term therapy with PegIFN did not affect levels of iron staining. Common variants in HFE did not correlate with outcomes, including development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Conclusions Degree of stainable iron in hepatocytes and portal tract cells predicts progression and clinical and histological outcomes of patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C. Long-term therapy with low-dose PegIFN did not improve outcomes or iron variables. PMID:21335007

  17. Long-Term Outcomes and Complications in Patients With Craniopharyngioma: The British Columbia Cancer Agency Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Andrea C.; Howard, A. Fuchsia; Nichol, Alan; Sidhu, Keerat; Abdulsatar, Farah; Hasan, Haroon; Goddard, Karen

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: We report long-term outcomes and complications of craniopharyngioma patients referred to our institution. Methods and Materials: Between 1971 and 2010, 123 consecutive patients received primary treatment for craniopharyngioma in British Columbia and were referred to our institution. The median age was 30 years (range, 2-80 years). Thirty-nine percent of patients were treated primarily with subtotal resection (STR) and radiation therapy (RT), 28% with STR alone, 15% with gross total resection, 11% with cyst drainage (CD) alone, 5% with CD+RT, and 2% with RT alone. Eight percent of patients received intracystic bleomycin (ICB) therapy. Results: Median follow-up was 8.9 years, and study endpoints were reported at 10 years. Ten-year Kaplan-Meier progression-free survival (PFS) was 46%. Patients treated with STR+RT or CD+RT had the highest PFS (82% and 83%, respectively). There were no significant differences between PFS after adjuvant versus salvage RT (84% vs 74%, respectively; P=.6). Disease-specific survival (DSS) was 88%, and overall survival (OS) was 80%. Primary treatment modality did not affect DSS or OS, while older age was a negative prognostic factor for OS but not DSS. Kaplan-Meier rates for visual deterioration, anterior pituitary hormone deficiency, diabetes insipidus, seizure disorder, and cerebrovascular events (CVE) due to treatment, not tumor progression, were 27%, 76%, 45%, 16%, and 11%, respectively. The CVE rate was 29% in patients who received ICB compared to 10% in those who did not (P=.07). Conclusions: We report favorable PFS in patients with craniopharyngioma, especially in those who received RT after surgery. DSS and OS rates were excellent regardless of primary treatment modality. We observed a high incidence of hypopituitarism, visual deterioration, and seizure disorder. Eleven percent of patients experienced CVEs after treatment. There was a suggestion of increased CVE risk in patients treated with ICB.

  18. Short-term outcomes in heart failure patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the community

    PubMed Central

    O’Kelly, Noel; Robertson, William; Smith, Jude; Dexter, Jonathan; Carroll-Hawkins, Collette; Ghosh, Sudip

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To establish the short term outcomes of heart failure (HF) patients in the community who have concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: We evaluated 783 patients (27.2%) with left ventricular systolic dysfunction under the care of a regional nurse-led community HF team between June 2007 and June 2010 through a database analysis. RESULTS: One hundred and one patients (12.9%) also had a diagnosis of COPD; 94% of patients were treated with loop diuretics, 83% with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, 74% with β-blockers; 10.6% with bronchodilators; and 42% with aldosterone antagonists. The mean age of the patients was 77.9 ± 5.7 years; 43% were female and mean New York Heart Association class was 2.3 ± 0.6. The mean follow-up was 28.2 ± 2.9 mo. β-blocker utilization was markedly lower in patients receiving bronchodilators compared with those not taking bronchodilators (overall 21.7% vs 81%, P < 0.001). The 24-mo survival was 93% in patients with HF alone and 89% in those with both comorbidities (P = not significant). The presence of COPD was associated with increased risk of HF hospitalization [hazard ratio (HR): 1.56; 95% CI: 1.4-2.1; P < 0.001] and major adverse cardiovascular events (HR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.03-1.75; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: COPD is a common comorbidity in ambulatory HF patients in the community and is a powerful predictor of worsening HF. It does not however appear to affect short-term mortality in ambulatory HF patients. PMID:22451854

  19. Do different reperfusion methods affect the outcomes of stroke induced by MCAO in adult rats?

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xia-Lin; Deng, Hou-Liang; Wu, Ping; Xu, En

    2016-09-01

    There are two patterns of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) models used in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) I/R models, which differ in the use of unilateral or bilateral carotid artery reperfusion. The primary difference between the two patterns of I/R models is the complexity of the surgery procedure. However, researchers in this field have no idea whether there are any differences in outcomes of these two methods. In this study, we investigated the effects of the two methods on neurological deficits, infarct volume, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression. Through evaluating the current way of bilateral common carotid artery reperfusion, we tried to find whether it could be replaced by an easier way. We found that there were no statistical significant differences between the different methods in infarct volume, neurological deficits, BBB integrity, and the level of BDNF (P > 0.05). These data demonstrated that different methods did not affect the neurological deficits, infarct volume, BBB integrity, and the BDNF protein level, which provides reference when we use an experimental stroke. These results suggest that the two methods have similar capability for inducing cerebral I/R injury and can be interchanged. PMID:26268737

  20. Perceptions of Intragroup Rejection and Coping Strategies: Malleable Factors Affecting Hispanic Adolescents’ Emotional and Academic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Michael T.; Crano, William D.; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding psychosocial factors that affect the academic achievement of Hispanic adolescents remains a nationwide priority in the United States. Extending previous studies of the stressful effects of perceived discrimination, this year-long longitudinal study examined the correlates of perceived ethnic in-group rejection, coping strategies and fatalistic beliefs, on depressive symptoms, grades, and college aspirations of 2,214 Hispanic adolescents (54 % female) in Southern California. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping and on self-perception theory, structural equation models revealed that high perceived intragroup rejection (10th grade) and low levels of active coping (11th grade) were associated with depressive symptoms in 11th grade. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between intragroup rejection and both academic outcomes. Avoidant coping strategies (e.g., watching TV) also predicted depressive symptoms and were positively related to fatalism. In addition, fatalism was negatively related to grades and aspiration to attend college. The findings suggest the need to help adolescents find adequate outlets for communication and to create awareness about the potential effects of intragroup rejection. PMID:24234042

  1. Linking patient outcome to high throughput protein expression data identifies novel regulators of colorectal adenocarcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    French, Christi L.; Ye, Fei; Revetta, Frank; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J.; Washington, M. Kay; Deane, Natasha G.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2015-01-01

    A key question in cancer systems biology is how to use molecular data to predict the biological behavior of tumors from individual patients. While genomics data have been heavily used, protein signaling data are more directly connected to biological phenotype and might predict cancer phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis, and patient survival. In this study, we mined publicly available data for colorectal adenocarcinoma from the Cancer Genome Atlas and identified protein expression and signaling changes that are statistically associated with patient outcome. Our analysis identified a number of known and potentially new regulators of colorectal cancer. High levels of insulin growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) were associated with both recurrence and death, and this was validated by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray for a secondary patient dataset. Interestingly, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) was the protein most frequently associated with death in our analysis, and GATA3 expression was significantly decreased in tumor samples from stage I-II deceased patients. Experimental studies using engineered colon cancer cell lines show that exogenous expression of GATA3 decreases three-dimensional colony growth and invasiveness of colon cancer cells but does not affect two-dimensional proliferation. These findings suggest that protein data are useful for biomarker discovery and identify GATA3 as a regulator of colorectal cancer  aggressiveness. PMID:26097693

  2. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) AGENCY... appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the...

  3. 75 FR 27343 - Board of Governors of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCOR)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE Board of Governors of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCOR) AGENCY: Government... appointing 19 members to the Board of Governors of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute....

  4. Patient Ethnicity Affects Triage Assessments and Patient Prioritization in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M.; Coulombe, Patrick; Alcock, Joe; Kruger, Eric; Stith, Sarah S.; Strenth, Chance; Parshall, Mark; Cichowski, Sara B.

    2016-01-01

    . Additional prospective research will be needed to determine how this specific person-level mechanism affects healthcare quality and outcomes. PMID:27057847

  5. Levosimendan vs. dobutamine: outcomes for acute heart failure patients on β-blockers in SURVIVE†

    PubMed Central

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Filippatos, Gerasimos S.; Cleland, John G.; Salon, Jeffrey E.; Thakkar, Roopal; Padley, Robert J.; Huang, Bidan; Cohen-Solal, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Aims Many chronic heart failure (CHF) patients take β-blockers. When such patients are hospitalized for decompensation, it remains unclear how ongoing β-blocker treatment will affect outcomes of acute inotrope therapy. We aimed to assess outcomes of SURVIVE patients who were on β-blocker therapy before receiving a single intravenous infusion of levosimendan or dobutamine. Methods and results Cox proportional hazard regression revealed all-cause mortality benefits of levosimendan treatment over dobutamine when the SURVIVE population was stratified according to baseline presence/absence of CHF history and use/non-use of β-blocker treatment at baseline. All-cause mortality was lower in the CHF/levosimendan group than in the CHF/dobutamine group, showing treatment differences by hazard ratio (HR) at days 5 (3.4 vs. 5.8%; HR, 0.58, CI 0.33–1.01, P = 0.05) and 14 (7.0 vs. 10.3%; HR, 0.67, CI 0.45–0.99, P = 0.045). For patients who used β-blockers (n = 669), mortality was significantly lower for levosimendan than dobutamine at day 5 (1.5 vs. 5.1% deaths; HR, 0.29; CI 0.11–0.78, P = 0.01). Conclusion Levosimendan may be better than dobutamine for treating patients with a history of CHF or those on β-blocker therapy when they are hospitalized with acute decompensations. These findings are preliminary but important for planning future studies. PMID:19158152

  6. Factors Affecting Patients Undergoing Cosmetic Surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Rafie, Seyyed Reza

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although, there have been extensive research on the motivations driving patient to undergo cosmetic procedures, there is still a big question mark on the persuasive factors which may lead individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery. The present study evaluated various factors affecting patients undergoing cosmetic surgery in Bushehr, Southern Iran. METHODS From 24th March 2011 to 24th March 2012, eighty-one women and 20 men who wished to be operated in Fatemeh Zahra Hospital in Bushehr, Southern Iran and Pars Clinic, Iran were enrolled by a simple random sampling method. They all completed a questionnaire to consider reasons for cosmetic procedures. The collected data were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Demographical, sociological and psychological factors such as age, gender, educational level, marital status, media, perceived risks, output quality, depression and self-improvement were determined as factors affecting tendency of individuals to undergo cosmetic surgery in this region. Trend to undergo cosmetic surgery was more prevalent in educational below bachelor degree, married subjects, women population of 30-45 years age group. Education level, age, marital status and gender were respectively the influential factors in deciding to undergo cosmetic surgery. Among the socio-psychological factors, self-improvement, finding a better job opportunity, rivalry, media, health status as well as depression were the most persuasive factors to encourage people to undergo cosmetic surgery too. Cost risk was not important for our samples in decision making to undergo cosmetic surgery. CONCLUSION We need to fully understand the way in which the combination of demographic, social and psychological factors influence decision-making to undergo cosmetic surgery. PMID:25734051

  7. Palliative care outcome measures in COPD patients: a conceptual review.

    PubMed

    Antoniu, Sabina Antonela; Boiculese, Lucian Vasile

    2016-04-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), palliative care is appropriate in very advanced stages based on recognition of its need when conventional therapy is no longer able to control symptoms, disease morbidity, or to improve/maintain an acceptable quality of life. Palliative care aims to improve quality of life, or, if applied specifically at the end-of-life, to ensure comfortable care. In COPD palliative care effectiveness of interventions should be quantified with outcome measures able to better capture the holistic nature of approaches and not only the specific features of disease. These should include: physical outcomes, psychological outcomes, social outcomes, spiritual outcomes. Such measures are discussed in this review along with arguments supporting their use. PMID:26967768

  8. Oocyte donation in Turner's syndrome: an analysis of the factors affecting the outcome.

    PubMed

    Khastgir, G; Abdalla, H; Thomas, A; Korea, L; Latarche, L; Studd, J

    1997-02-01

    A total of 29 women with Turner's syndrome (19 monosomy and 10 mosaic) had 68 cycles of oocyte donation that included 29 cycles of initial attempt and 39 cycles of subsequent attempts. Oral oestradiol valerate was used either in a variable dose (42 cycles) or in a constant dose (26 cycles) regimen for the endometrial preparation which was monitored by pelvic ultrasonography. The embryos/zygotes were transferred either fresh (50 cycles) or after cryopreservation (18 cycles) into the Fallopian tube (41 cycles) and uterine cavity (27 cycles) as appropriate. There were 28 clinical pregnancies including two sets of triplets resulting in a pregnancy rate of 41.2% per treatment cycle and an implantation rate of 17.1% per embryo transferred. The recipient's age, chromosomal constitution or associated uterine or tubal anomaly had no influence on the treatment outcome. The implantation and pregnancy rates were higher in the subsequent than initial cycles (22.6 versus 9.99%, P < 0.05; 51.3 versus 27.6%, P < 0.05). An endometrial thickness of > or = 6.5 mm was an important predictor of pregnancy but the endometrial echo pattern failed to predict the outcome. Although the total dose of oestradiol before embryo transfer was higher in the pregnant cycles than the non-pregnant ones and its gradation (< 50 mg, 50-100 mg, < 100 mg) influenced the implantation (3.4, 17.5, 26.3% respectively, P < 0.05) and pregnancy rates (10, 42.2, 61.5% respectively, P < 0.05), the effect was indirect by altering the endometrial thickness. The number of oocytes fertilized affected the pregnancy rate irrespective of the number of embryos transferred. The implantation and pregnancy rates were higher when fresh rather than frozen-thawed embryos were transferred (20.3 versus 8.2%, P < 0.05; 48 versus 22.2%, P < 0.05) but the route of transfer was of no statistical importance. The overall miscarriage rate was higher (50%), and was related to the presence of hypoplastic or bicornuate uterus and to a low

  9. Virus and Host Factors Affecting the Clinical Outcome of Bluetongue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Caporale, Marco; Di Gialleonorado, Luigina; Janowicz, Anna; Wilkie, Gavin; Shaw, Andrew; Savini, Giovanni; Van Rijn, Piet A.; Mertens, Peter; Di Ventura, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bluetongue is a major infectious disease of ruminants caused by bluetongue virus (BTV), an arbovirus transmitted by Culicoides. Here, we assessed virus and host factors influencing the clinical outcome of BTV infection using a single experimental framework. We investigated how mammalian host species, breed, age, BTV serotypes, and strains within a serotype affect the clinical course of bluetongue. Results obtained indicate that in small ruminants, there is a marked difference in the susceptibility to clinical disease induced by BTV at the host species level but less so at the breed level. No major differences in virulence were found between divergent serotypes (BTV-8 and BTV-2). However, we observed striking differences in virulence between closely related strains of the same serotype collected toward the beginning and the end of the European BTV-8 outbreak. As observed previously, differences in disease severity were also observed when animals were infected with either blood from a BTV-infected animal or from the same virus isolated in cell culture. Interestingly, with the exception of two silent mutations, full viral genome sequencing showed identical consensus sequences of the virus before and after cell culture isolation. However, deep sequencing analysis revealed a marked decrease in the genetic diversity of the viral population after passaging in mammalian cells. In contrast, passaging in Culicoides cells increased the overall number of low-frequency variants compared to virus never passaged in cell culture. Thus, Culicoides might be a source of new viral variants, and viral population diversity can be another factor influencing BTV virulence. IMPORTANCE Bluetongue is one of the major infectious diseases of ruminants. It is caused by an arbovirus known as bluetongue virus (BTV). The clinical outcome of BTV infection is extremely variable. We show that there are clear links between the severity of bluetongue and the mammalian host species infected

  10. WPSS is a strong prognostic indicator for clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome in Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand the predictive factors and improve clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), we retrospectively analyzed the post-transplant outcome of 60 Southeast Asian patients with MDS. Multivariate analysis showed that WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) significantly affect overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (CINRM). Stratified by WPSS into very low/low, intermediate, high, and very high-risk categories, 3-year OS was 100, 61, 37, and 18% (p = 0.02); PFS was 100, 55, 32, and 18% (p = 0.014); CIR was 12, 24, 38, and 59% (p = 0.024); CINRM was 0, 6, 12, and 26% (p = 0.037), respectively. WHO classification, Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R), IPSS-R-defined cytogenetic risk groups, donor gender, and acute and chronic graft vs host disease (GVHD) also influenced different aspects of transplant outcome. We found that WPSS is a powerful predictor of post-transplant outcome. WPSS provides an important model not only for prognostication but also for exploration of further post-transplant measures such as immunological maneuvers or novel therapy to improve the poor outcome of high-risk patients. PMID:25519475

  11. Does Time Affect Patient Satisfaction and Health-Related Quality of Life After Reduction Mammoplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Wess A.; Homel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objective: A total of 62,611 patients with breast hypertrophy underwent breast reduction surgery in 2013 in the United States to improve their symptoms and health-related quality of life. While multiple studies utilizing various outcome instruments demonstrate the efficacy of reductive surgery, it is presently unknown how the postoperative course affects patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life as measured by the BREAST-Q. Our objective was to determine the temporal relationship of patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life after reduction mammoplasty. Methods: Patients prospectively completed the BREAST-Q reduction mammoplasty module at 3 time points during their treatment: preoperatively, at less than 3 months postoperatively, and at more than 3 months (<12 months) postoperatively. A single surgeon (N.P.P.) performed all of the breast reduction procedures. Results: Each time point contained 20 questionnaires. Mean preoperative BREAST-Q scores were significantly lower than scores at the less than 3-month postoperative time point for the scales Satisfaction With Breasts, Psychosocial Well-being, Sexual Well-being, and Physical Well-being (P < .001). There was no significant difference in BREAST-Q scores between the postoperative time points in these measures. Conclusion: Breast reduction surgery offers a vast improvement in patients’ satisfaction and health-related quality of life that is maintained throughout the postoperative period. These findings can assist surgeons in managing patient expectations after reduction mammoplasty and help improve the probability of obtaining prior authorization for insurance coverage. PMID:26819650

  12. Does labelling a rare cancer diagnosis 'good' affect the patient's experience of treatment and recovery?

    PubMed

    Ridgway, E; Grose, J; Charles, A; Hewett, J; Jarvis, M; Benjamin, S

    2016-05-01

    Doctors sometimes tell patients with rare but highly treatable cancers that they have 'good' cancer which some patients have found unhelpful, but this has been little explored. The aim of this study was to explore how patients reacted to being told they had a 'good' cancer. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 25 people with rare but prognostically favourable cancers who had received treatment at two hospitals within a cancer network. Results showed that despite good treatment outcomes, patients are still very shocked to hear the word cancer and react in similar ways to those with other forms of cancer. The potential effects of treatment should be recognised as having a detrimental effect on patient well-being whatever the prognosis. We should therefore avoid using 'good' and 'cancer' in the same sentence. In addition, the impact on all family members should not be underestimated. The data can be used to improve clinical practice and improve support for people affected by cancer. PMID:25335904

  13. CYP4F2 affects phenotypic outcome in adrenoleukodystrophy by modulating the clearance of very long-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    van Engen, Catherine E; Ofman, Rob; Dijkstra, Inge M E; van Goethem, Tessa Jacobs; Verheij, Eveline; Varin, Jennifer; Vidaud, Michel; Wanders, Ronald J A; Aubourg, Patrick; Kemp, Stephan; Barbier, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder caused by the accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) due to mutations in the ABCD1 gene. The phenotypic spectrum ranges from a fatal cerebral demyelinating disease in childhood (cerebral ALD) to a progressive myelopathy without cerebral involvement in adulthood (adrenomyeloneuropathy). Because ABCD1 mutations have no predictive value with respect to clinical outcome a role for modifier genes was postulated. We report that the CYP4F2 polymorphism rs2108622 increases the risk of developing cerebral ALD in Caucasian patients. The rs2108622 polymorphism (c.1297G>A) results in an amino acid substitution valine for methionine at position 433 (p.V433M). Using cellular models of VLCFA accumulation, we show that p.V433M decreases the conversion of VLCFA into very long-chain dicarboxylic acids by ω-oxidation, a potential escape route for the deficient peroxisomal β-oxidation of VLCFA in ALD. Although p.V433M does not affect the catalytic activity of CYP4F2 it reduces CYP4F2 protein levels markedly. These findings open perspectives for therapeutic interventions in a disease with currently limited treatment options. PMID:27425035

  14. Factors affecting the outcome of fractures of the femoral neck in children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Yeranosian, M; Horneff, J G; Baldwin, K; Hosalkar, H S

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the femoral neck in children are rare, high-energy injuries with high complication rates. Their treatment has become more interventional but evidence of the efficacy of such measures is limited. We performed a systematic review of studies examining different types of treatment and their outcomes, including avascular necrosis (AVN), nonunion, coxa vara, premature physeal closure (PPC), and Ratliff's clinical criteria. A total of 30 studies were included, comprising 935 patients. Operative treatment and open reduction were associated with higher rates of AVN. Delbet types I and II fractures were most likely to undergo open reduction and internal fixation. Coxa vara was reduced in the operative group, whereas nonunion and PPC were not related to surgical intervention. Nonunion and coxa vara were unaffected by the method of reduction. Capsular decompression had no effect on AVN. Although surgery allows a more anatomical union, it is uncertain whether operative treatment or the type of reduction affects the rate of AVN, nonunion or PPC, because more severe fractures were operated upon more frequently. A delay in treatment beyond 24 hours was associated with a higher incidence of AVN. PMID:23307688

  15. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  16. Factors affecting the outcome of maternity care. II. Neonatal outcomes and resources beyond the hospital of birth.

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, M; Szczepura, A; Lodwick, A; Stilwell, J

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of data about perinatal mortality and indicators of resources at maternity hospitals in the West Midlands region between 1977 and 1983 showed that paediatric staff ratios were inversely related to in-house mortality rates. In this paper, the outcomes for and resources used by transferred babies are added to those of the hospital of birth for three of the study years--1978, 1980, and 1982. Patterns of transfer differ between units and over time in the region, and a regional neonatal intensive care policy was introduced in 1980. Analysis of the new variables showed that in 1978 paediatric staffing was significantly inversely related to neonatal mortality. In later years, neonatal mortality of births at maternity units is explained entirely by the proportion of low or very low weight births. PMID:3221167

  17. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of “Transfer-Out” Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Gondar, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belayneh, Tadesse; Kassu, Afework; Tigabu, Desalgne; Asmare, Gashaw; Tilaye, Sofanit; Klinkenberg, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    Background. During tuberculosis treatment, patients may transfer to continue treatment at another health facility. To ensure adherence until treatment completion, keeping track of patients is paramount. This study aimed to investigate treatment outcomes of patients who transferred out from the University of Gondar Hospital. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort evaluation of patients registered from 2009 to 2013. Treatment outcomes were collected from the TB registers of receiving units using a standardized data capture format. Results. During the study period 3,707 patients initiated treatment and 47.5% (1,760) transferred out. The study evaluated the outcome of 26% (457/1,760) patients, of whom 403 (88%) arrived in the receiving units. Overall, 79% were successfully treated and 13.8% transferred out for a second time. For all transferred-out cases, treatment outcomes were not reported to the referring unit. Conclusion and Recommendation. About half of the patients were transferred out to complete treatment elsewhere. Although successful treatment outcome was obtained in 79% of patients, these results were not fed back to the referring unit. Implementing a clear mechanism to communicate the arrival of and treatment outcome for transfer-out patients and appropriate patient education on treatment unit selection before treatment and during transfer-out are recommended. PMID:27313887

  18. Patient-centered outcomes of a value-based insurance design program for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Daniel J; Robinson, Edmondo J; Anthony, Karen B; Stillman, Paula L

    2013-04-01

    Value-based insurance design (VBID) initiatives have been associated with modest improvements in adherence based on evaluations of administrative claims data. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to report the patient-centered outcomes of a VBID program that eliminated co-payments for diabetes-related medications and supplies for employees and dependents with diabetes at a large health system. The authors compared self-reported values of medication adherence, cost-related nonadherence, health status, and out-of-pocket health care costs for patients before and 1 year after program implementation. Clinical metrics and satisfaction with the program also are reported. In all, 188 patients completed the follow-up evaluation. Overall, patients reported a significant reduction in monthly out-of-pocket costs (P<0.001), which corresponded to a significant reduction in cost-related nonadherence from 41% to 17.5% (P<0.001). Self-reported medication adherence increased for hyperglycemic medications (P=0.011), but there were no apparent changes in glycemic control. Overall, 89% of participants agreed that the program helped them take better care of their diabetes. The authors found that a VBID program for employees and dependents with diabetes was associated with self-reported reductions in cost-related nonadherence and improvements in medication adherence. Importantly, the program was associated with high levels of satisfaction among participants and strongly perceived by participants to facilitate medication utilization and self-management for diabetes. These findings suggest that VBID programs can accomplish the anticipated goals for medication utilization and are highly regarded by participants. Patient-centered outcomes should be included in VBID evaluations to allow decision makers to determine the true impact of VBID programs on participants. PMID:23405873

  19. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Kyaw, N. T. T.; Oo, M. M.; Aung, T. K.; Aung, S. T.; Oo, H. N.; Win, T.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Integrated HIV Care programme, Mandalay, Myanmar. Objectives: To determine time to starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) and its association with TB treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enrolled from 2011 to 2014. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 1708 TB-HIV patients, 1565 (92%) started ATT first and 143 (8%) started ART first. Treatment outcomes were missing for 226 patients and were thus not included. In those starting ATT first, the median time to starting ART was 8.6 weeks. ART was initiated after 8 weeks in 830 (53%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 7%, with anaemia being an independent predictor. In patients starting ART first, the median time to starting ATT was 21.6 weeks. ATT was initiated within 3 months in 56 (39%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 12%, and in 20% of those starting ATT within 3 months. Patients with CD4 count <100/mm3 had a four times higher risk of an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusions: Timing of ART in relation to ATT was not an independent risk factor for unsuccessful outcome. Extensive screening for TB with rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests in HIV-infected persons and close monitoring of anaemia and immunosuppression are recommended to further improve TB treatment outcomes among patients with TB-HIV. PMID:27358804

  20. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-01

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases. PMID:27197911

  1. Acute care of older patients in the emergency department: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, John J; Kennelly, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Older patients in the emergency department (ED) are a vulnerable population who are at a higher risk of functional decline and hospital reattendance subsequent to an ED visit, and have a high mortality rate in the months following an ED attendance. The delivery of acute care in a busy environment to this population presents its own unique challenge. The purpose of this review is to detail the common geriatric syndromes encountered in the ED as well as the appropriate strategies and instruments, which can be utilized to support the clinical decision matrix and improve outcomes. PMID:27147890

  2. The effect of playing a science center-based mobile game: Affective outcomes and gender differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana

    Situated in a hands-on science center, The Great STEM Caper was a collaborative mobile game built on the ARIS platform that was designed to engage 5th-9th grade players in NGSS science and engineering practices while they interacted with various exhibits. Same gender partners sharing one iPad would search for QR codes placed at specific exhibits; scanning a code within the game would launch a challenge for that exhibit. The primary hypothesis was that in- game victories would be equivalent to "mastery experiences" as described by Bandura (1997) and would result in increased science self-efficacy. Gender differences in gameplay behaviors and perceptions were also studied. The study included two groups, one that played the game during their visit and one that explored the science center in the traditional way. The Motivation to Learn Science Questionnaire was administered to participants in both groups both before and after their visit to the science center. Participants wore head-mounted GoPro cameras to record their interactions within the physical and social environment. No differences in affective outcomes were found between the game and comparison groups or between boys and girls in the game group. The MLSQ was unable to measure any significant change in science self-efficacy, interest and enjoyment of science, or overall motivation to learn science in either group. However, girls outperformed boys on every measure of game achievement. Lazzaro's (2004) four types of fun were found to be a good fit for describing the gender differences in game perceptions and behaviors. Girls tended to enjoy hard fun and collaborative people fun while boys enjoyed easy fun and competitive people fun. While boys associated game achievement with enjoyment and victory, girls perceived their game achievement as difficult, rather than enjoyable or victorious.

  3. Fighting while parasitized: can nematode infections affect the outcome of staged combat in beetles?

    PubMed

    Vasquez, David; Willoughby, Anna; Davis, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal parasites may be felt most strongly when hosts engage in intense, energy-demanding behaviors. One such behavior is fighting with conspecifics, which is common among territorial animals, including many beetle species. We examined the effects of parasites on the fighting ability of a saproxylic beetle, the horned passalus (Odontotaenius disjunctus, Family: Passalidae), which is host to a non-lethal nematode, Chondronema passali. We pitted pairs of randomly-chosen (but equally-weighted) beetles against each other in a small arena and determined the winner and aggression level of fights. Then we examined beetles for the presence, and severity of nematode infections. There was a non-significant tendency (p = 0.065) for the frequency of wins, losses and draws to differ between beetles with and without C. passali; non-parasitized individuals (n = 104) won 47% of their fights while those with the parasite (n = 88) won 34%, a 13% difference in wins. The number of nematodes in a beetle affected the outcome of fights between infected and uninfected individuals in an unexpected fashion: fighting ability was lowest in beetles with the lowest (p = 0.033), not highest (p = 0.266), nematode burdens. Within-fight aggression was highest when both beetles were uninfected and lowest when both were infected (p = 0.034). Collectively, these results suggest the nematode parasite, C. passali, is associated with a modest reduction in fighting ability in horned passalus beetles, consistent with the idea that parasitized beetles have lower energy available for fighting. This study adds to a small but growing body of evidence showing how parasites negatively influence fighting behavior in animals. PMID:25830367

  4. Linking Affective Commitment, Career Self-Efficacy, and Outcome Expectations: A Test of Social Cognitive Career Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Amanda M.; Dahling, Jason J.; Garcia, Pablo A.

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested a model based on the satisfaction model of social cognitive career theory (SCCT) that links college students' affective commitment to their major (the emotional identification that students feel toward their area of study) with career decision self-efficacy (CDSE) and career outcome expectations. Results indicate that CDSE…

  5. Cognitive and Socio-Affective Outcomes of Project-Based Learning: Perceptions of Greek Second Chance School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koutrouba, Konstantina; Karageorgou, Elissavet

    2013-01-01

    The present questionnaire-based study was conducted in 2010 in order to examine 677 Greek Second Chance School (SCS) students' perceptions about the cognitive and socio-affective outcomes of project-based learning. Data elaboration, statistical and factor analysis showed that the participants found that project-based learning offered a second…

  6. Culture Matters. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of Participation in Vocational Education and Training by Australian Indigenous Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, John; Ardler, William; Morley-Warner, Terri; Solomon, Nicky; Spindler, Laraine

    The factors affecting the outcomes of indigenous Australians' participation in vocational education and training (VET) were examined in a study in which 7 Aboriginal researchers in 5 Australian states and territories interviewed 70 indigenous Australians enrolled in VET and 48 coordinators and teachers in technical and further education (TAFE)…

  7. Patient Outcomes According to Adherence to Treatment Guidelines for Rhythm Control of Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Dingxin; Leef, George; Alam, Mian Bilal; Rattan, Rohit; Munir, Mohamad Bilal; Patel, Divyang; Khattak, Furqan; Vaghasia, Nishit; Adelstein, Evan; Jain, Sandeep K.; Saba, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background Although guidelines for antiarrhythmic drug therapy in atrial fibrillation (AF) were published in 2006, it remains uncertain whether adherence to these guidelines affects patient outcomes. Methods and Results We retrospectively evaluated the records of 5976 consecutive AF patients who were prescribed at least 1 antiarrhythmic drug between 2006 and 2013. Patients with 1 or more prescribed antiarrhythmic drugs that did not comply with guideline recommendations comprised the non–guideline‐directed group (=2920); the remainder constituted the guideline‐directed group (=3056). Time to events was assessed using the survival analysis method and adjusted for covariates using Cox regression. Rates of adherence to the guidelines increased significantly with a higher degree of prescriber specialization in arrhythmias (49%, 55%, and 60% for primary care physicians, general cardiologists, and cardiac electrophysiologists, respectively, P=0.001) for the first prescribed antiarrhythmic drug. Compared to the non–guideline‐directed group, the guideline‐directed group had higher rates of heart failure, but lower baseline CHADS2‐VASc scores (P<0.001) and lower rates of coronary artery disease, valvular disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, pulmonary disease, and renal insufficiency (P<0.05 for all). During 45±26 months follow‐up, the guideline‐directed group had a lower risk of AF recurrence (hazard ratio=0.86, 95% CI=0.80 to 0.93), fewer hospital admissions for AF (hazard ratio=0.87, 95% CI=0.79 to 0.97), and fewer procedures for recurrent AF, including electrical cardioversion, pacemaker implantation, and atrioventricular nodal ablation (P<0.01 for all). The mortality and stroke risks were similar between the groups. Conclusions Adherence to published guidelines in the antiarrhythmic management of AF is associated with improved patient outcomes. PMID:25845930

  8. Patient-reported Outcomes in Asian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Treated With Ledipasvir and Sofosbuvir

    PubMed Central

    Younossi, Zobair M.; Stepanova, Maria; Chan, Henry L.Y.; Lee, Mei H.; Yu, Ming-Lung; Dan, Yock Y.; Choi, Moon S.; Henry, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prevalence of chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) infection in patients of Asian ancestry ranges between 1% and 20%. Interferon (IFN)- and ribavirin (RBV)-containing regimens for CH-C have a negative impact on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) during treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of IFN-free RBV-free sofosbuvir (SOF)-based regimens on PROs in CH-C patients of Asian ancestry. In this observational retrospective study, the PRO data from 12 multicenter multinational phase 3 clinical trials (2012–2015, conducted in Europe, North America, Australia, and New Zealand) of SOF-based regimens with and without IFN, ledipasvir (LDV), and/or RBV were used. At baseline, during treatment, and post-treatment, patients completed 4 validated PRO questionnaires (SF-36, C