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  1. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  2. Factors affecting patient outcome in primary cutaneous aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Tatara, Alexander M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary cutaneous aspergillosis (PCA) is an uncommon infection of the skin. There is a paucity of organized literature regarding this entity in regard to patient characteristics, associated Aspergillus species, and treatment modalities on outcome (disease recurrence, disease dissemination, and mortality). We reviewed all published reports of PCA from 1967 to 2015. Cases were deemed eligible if they included the following: patient baseline characteristics (age, sex, underlying condition), evidence of proven or probable PCA, primary treatment strategy, and outcome. We identified 130 eligible cases reported from 1967 to 2015. The patients were predominantly male (63.8%) with a mean age of 30.4 ± 22.1 years. Rates of PCA recurrence, dissemination, and mortality were 10.8%, 18.5%, and 31.5%, respectively. In half of the cases, there was an association with a foreign body. Seven different Aspergillus species were reported to cause PCA. Systemic antifungal therapy without surgery was the most common form of therapy (60% of cases). Disease dissemination was more common in patients with underlying systemic conditions and occurred on average 41.4 days after PCA diagnosis (range of 3–120 days). In a multivariate linear regression model of mortality including only patients with immunosuppressive conditions, dissemination and human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome were statistically significantly associated with increased mortality. Nearly one-third of patients with PCA die with the disease. Dissemination and host status are critical in patient outcome. PMID:27367980

  3. Successful Pregnancy Outcome in a Patient with Solitary Kidney Affected by Angiomyolipoma: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Kavita; Nanda, Sakshi; Choudhary, Sumesh; Gandhi, Khushali

    2016-01-01

    Renal angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumour and its occurrence during pregnancy is even rare. It is usually diagnosed incidentally. It can increase in size during pregnancy and can present acutely as rupture with retroperitoneal haemorrhage, mechanism of which is still unclear. We present a case of successful pregnancy outcome in a patient with congenital solitary kidney affected by angiomyolipoma, diagnosed incidentally at 19 years of age. The patient had conceived twice. Her antenatal and post partum period was uneventful both the times. PMID:27891407

  4. Exposing physicians to reduced residency work hours did not adversely affect patient outcomes after residency.

    PubMed

    Jena, Anupam B; Schoemaker, Lena; Bhattacharya, Jay

    2014-10-01

    In 2003, work hours for physicians-in-training (residents) were capped by regulation at eighty hours per week, leading to the hotly debated but unexplored issue of whether physicians today are less well trained as a result of these work-hour reforms. Using a unique database of nearly all hospitalizations in Florida during 2000-09 that were linked to detailed information on the medical training history of the physician of record for each hospitalization, we studied whether hospital mortality and patients' length-of-stay varied according to the number of years a physician was exposed to the 2003 duty-hour regulations during his or her residency. We examined this database of practicing Florida physicians, using a difference-in-differences analysis that compared trends in outcomes of junior physicians (those with one-year post-residency experience) pre- and post-2003 to a control group of senior physicians (those with ten or more years of post-residency experience) who were not exposed to these reforms during their residency. We found that the duty-hour reforms did not adversely affect hospital mortality and length-of-stay of patients cared for by new attending physicians who were partly or fully exposed to reduced duty hours during their own residency. However, assessment of the impact of the duty-hour reforms on other clinical outcomes is needed.

  5. Sleep apnoea adversely affects the outcome in patients who undergo posterior lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Stundner, O.; Chiu, Y-L.; Sun, X.; Ramachandran, S-K.; Gerner, P.; Vougioukas, V.; Mazumdar, M.; Memtsoudis, S. G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of sleep apnoea, little information is available regarding its impact on the peri-operative outcome of patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion. Using a national database, patients who underwent lumbar fusion between 2006 and 2010 were identified, sub-grouped by diagnosis of sleep apnoea and compared. The impact of sleep apnoea on various outcome measures was assessed by regression analysis. The records of 84 655 patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion were identified and 7.28% also had a diagnostic code for sleep apnoea. Compared with patients without sleep apnoea, these patients were older, more frequently female, had a higher comorbidity burden and higher rates of peri-operative complications, post-operative mechanical ventilation, blood transfusion, and intensive care. Patients with sleep apnoea also had longer and more costly periods of hospitalisation. In the regression analysis, sleep apnoea emerged as an independent risk factor for the development of peri-operative complications (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.50, Confidence Interval (CI) 1.38;1.62), blood transfusions (OR 1.12, CI 1.03;1.23), mechanical ventilation (OR 6.97, CI 5.90;8.23), critical care services (OR 1.86, CI 1.71;2.03), prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost (OR 1.28, CI 1.19;1.37; OR 1.10, CI 1.03;1.18). Patients with sleep apnoea who undergo posterior lumbar fusion pose significant challenges to clinicians. PMID:24493191

  6. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  7. Antimuscarinic Agent Treatment Affecting Patient-Reported Outcomes in Overactive Bladder Syndrome With Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated improvements in overactive bladder symptoms and depressive symptoms after solifenacin treatment in overactive bladder patients with or without depressive symptoms. Methods We performed a prospective study of patients who had been diagnosed with overactive bladder from July 2013 to June 2014. Based on the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire, the test subjects were divided into group 1, without depressive symptoms (0–9 points), and group 2, with depressive symptoms (10 or more points). The patients were administered 5 mg of solifenacin for 3 months. The following outcomes were analyzed at the first visit, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks: the overactive bladder symptom score (OABSS), International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), patients’ perceptions of their bladder condition, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Results A total of 72 patients participated, and 52 patients completed the study. Most outcome measures showed improvements in both groups at weeks 4 and 12. Especially in group 2, the questionnaires showed significant improvements from baseline to week 12, indicating that solifenacin was effective at treating overactive bladder symptoms (group 1 vs. group 2: OABSS, −2.67±0.80 vs. −3.00±0.77; P<0.01; IPSS-total, −2.14±2.15 vs. −4.94±1.70; P<0.01). Statistically significant decreases in the Beck Depression Inventory score from baseline to weeks 4 and 12 were observed in group 2 (group 1 vs. group 2: 1.43±0.74 vs. −2.68±4.05 at week 4, P<0.001; 0.10±3.37 vs. −5.52±5.82 at week 12, P<0.001). Conclusions In overactive bladder patients with depressive symptoms, solifenacin can help improve quality of life and depressive symptoms at the same time. PMID:28043114

  8. Does obesity affect outcomes of treatment for lumbar stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis? Analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Rihn, Jeffrey A.; Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Anderson, David T.; Zhao, Wenyan; Lurie, Jon; Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Freedman, Mitch K.; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective subgroup analysis of prospectively collected data according to treatment received. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine if obesity affects treatment outcomes for lumbar stenosis (SpS) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Summary of Background Data Obesity is thought to be associated with increased complications and potentially less favorable outcomes following the treatment of degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. This, however, remains a matter of debate in the existing literature. Methods An as-treated analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) for the treatment of SpS or DS. A comparison was made between patients with a body mass index (BMI) <30 (“non-obese”, n=373 SpS, 376 DS) and those with a BMI ≥ 30 (“obese”, n=261 SpS, 225 DS). Baseline patient characteristics, intraoperative data, and complications were documented. Primary and secondary outcomes were measured at baseline and regular follow-up time intervals up to 4 years. The difference in improvement over baseline between surgical and nonsurgical treatment (i.e. treatment effect) was determined at each follow-up interval for the obese and nonobese groups. Results At 4-years follow-up, operative and nonoperative treatment provided improvement in all primary outcome measures over baseline in patients with BMI of < 30 and ≥ 30. For SpS patients, there were no differences in the surgical complication or reoperation rates between groups. DS patients with BMI ≥ 30 had a higher postoperative infection rate (5% vs. 1%, p=0.05) and twice the reoperation rate at 4-years follow-up (20% vs. 11%, p=0.01) than those with BMI < 30. At 4-years, surgical treatment of SpS and DS was equally effective in both BMI groups in terms of the primary outcome measures, with the exception that obese DS patients had less improvement from baseline in the SF36 physical function score compared to nonobese patients (22

  9. Severity of lung fibrosis affects early surgical outcomes of lung cancer among patients with combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mimae, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norihiko; Takamochi, Kazuya; Aokage, Keiju; Shimada, Yoshihisa; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Okada, Morihito

    2016-07-01

    Combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) is defined as upper lobe emphysema and lower lobe fibrosis, which are representative lung disorders that increase the prevalence of lung cancer. This unique disorder may affect the morbidity and mortality during the early period after surgery. The present study aimed to identify which clinicopathological features significantly affect early surgical outcomes after lung resection in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and in those with CPFE.We retrospectively assessed 2295 patients with NSCLC and found that 151 (6.6%) had CPFE. All were surgically treated between January 2008 and December 2010 at 4 institutions.The postoperative complication rates for patients with and without CPFE were 39% and 17%, respectively. The 90-day mortality rates were higher among patients with than without CPFE (7.9% vs 1%). Acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia was the main cause of death among 12 patients with CPFE who died within 90 days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis selected CPFE, gender, age, and clinical stage as independent predictive factors for postoperative complications, and CPFE, clinical stage, and sex for 90-day mortality. The severity of lung fibrosis on preoperative CT images was an independent predictive factor for 90-day mortality among patients with CPFE.The key predictive factor for postoperative mortality and complications of lung resection for NSCLC was CPFE. The severity of lung fibrosis was the principal predictor of early outcomes after lung surgery among patients with CPFE and NSCLC.

  10. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Post-Operative Outcome of Patients Undergoing Carpal Tunnel Release?

    PubMed Central

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Mortazavi, Sahameddin; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Risk factors associated with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome include repetitive use of hand and wrist, advanced age, obesity, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease. Decompression of the median nerve is the last treatment of choice usually indicated when negative results to conservative treatments remain for three months. In this study, we aimed to find out whether hypothyroid patients would respond to CTS surgical decompression differently in comparison to healthy individuals. Methods This case control study was conducted on patients with CTS in need of surgical release who were refered to Shahid Faghihi hospital, International Branch of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran from January 2013 to January 2015. Twenty-five hypothyroid and 22 euthyroid patients were recruited. Hypothyroidism was diagnosed based on clinical symptoms and serum TSH level. All patients were followed for three weeks after surgery and a Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) was completed for them pre and post operation. An electrophysiological study was performed during the same follow up period. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results The CTS grade reported by electrophysiological study, decreased significantly 3 weeks after operation in comparison with preoperative grades (p<0.001). A significant decrease was observed in the immediate postoperative BCTQ scores compared to preoperative (p<0.001). Also a decrease was detected in the three weeks of postoperative follow up compared to immediate postoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001) and preoperative BCTQ scores (p<0.001). Postoperative BCTQ scores of euthyroid patients decreased more in comparison to hypothyroid patients (p<0.001). Conclusion It seems that, hypothyroidism has an effect on postoperative outcome of carpal tunnel release. PMID:27790353

  11. Factors affecting short- and long-term outcomes of manipulation under anaesthesia in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Owen, John M; Sayers, Adrian E; Woods, David A

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study aimed to evaluate and determine the factors that affect short- and long-term outcome following manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) of patients with adhesive capsulitis. Methods Patients recruited from January 1999 to January 2010 were retrospectively analyzed and classified as having primary or secondary adhesive capsulitis. All patients were assessed for range of movement (ROM) and Oxford Shoulder Scores (OSS) before and immediately postoperatively, as well as for OSS more than 1 year post MUA. Results In total, 295 patients (315 shoulders) were sequentially recruited, and information was collected at baseline, as well as at a mean follow-up of 28 days and 3.6 years. A significant improvement in OSS and ROM was noted 1 month post MUA (p < 0.0001) with females benefiting more than males (p < 0.0025). Long-term follow-up revealed that the improvement in OSS was maintained (p < 0.0001). Secondary adhesive capsulitis significantly reduced the efficacy of MUA as assessed by ROM (p < 0.0001). Other factors (age, initial ROM and OSS, and length of symptoms prior to MUA) did not significantly affect the outcome over the short- or long-term. Conclusions The findings of the present study show that all patient groups had a significantly improved ROM and OSS in the short-term with long-term maintenance of improved OSS. PMID:27582942

  12. Efficacy and Factors Affecting Outcome of Gemcitabine Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, P.-I.; Chao, Yee; Li, C.-P.; Lee, R.-C.; Chi, K.-H.; Shiau, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-W.; Yen, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and prognostic factors of gemcitabine (GEM) concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2002 and December 2005, 55 patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer treated with GEM (400 mg/m{sup 2}/wk) concurrently with radiotherapy (median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 26-61.2) at Taipei Veterans General Hospital were enrolled. GEM (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) was continued after CCRT as maintenance therapy once weekly for 3 weeks and repeated every 4 weeks. The response, survival, toxicity, and prognostic factors were evaluated. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.8 months, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 52% and 19%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) and median time to progression (TTP) was 12.4 and 5.9 months, respectively. The response rate was 42% (2 complete responses and 21 partial responses). The major Grade 3-4 toxicities were neutropenia (22%) and anorexia (19%). The median OS and TTP was 15.8 and 9.5 months in the GEM CCRT responders compared with 7.5 and 3.5 months in the nonresponders, respectively (both p < 0.001). The responders had a better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (86 {+-} 2 vs. 77 {+-} 2, p = 0.002) and had received a greater GEM dose intensity (347 {+-} 13 mg/m{sup 2}/wk vs. 296 {+-} 15 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, p = 0.02) than the nonresponders. KPS and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 were the most significant prognostic factors of OS and TTP. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that GEM CCRT is effective and tolerable for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The KPS and GEM dose correlated with response. Also, the KPS and CA 19-9 level were the most important factors affecting OS and TTP.

  13. Stair dimension affects knee kinematics and kinetics in patients with good outcome after TKA similarly as in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Trinler, Ursula K; Baty, Florent; Mündermann, Annegret; Fenner, Verena; Behrend, Henrik; Jost, Bernhard; Wegener, Regina

    2016-10-01

    Joint biomechanics during stair walking may contain important information on functional deficits in patients with orthopaedic conditions but depend on the stair dimension. The goal of this study was to compare knee kinematics and kinetics between patients with good outcome 2 years after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and age-matched controls during stair ascent and descent at two different stair heights. Principal component analysis was used to detect differences in gait mechanics between 15 patients and 15 controls at different stair conditions. Linear mixed models showed differences in knee kinematic and kinetic patterns (in flexion/extension and abduction/adduction) between stair heights. The knee adduction angle was more affected by stair heights in stair ascending whereas knee adduction moment and knee power were more affected during stair descent. Some stair by height and subject effects were small but not significant. Overall, good outcome after TKA is reflected in close-to-normal knee biomechanics during stair walking. Specific stair configuration must be considered when comparing joint biomechanics between subject groups and studies. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1753-1761, 2016.

  14. Does uninsurance affect the health outcomes of the insured? Evidence from heart attack patients in California.

    PubMed

    Daysal, N Meltem

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-2006). My results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically significant effect that increases the mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I show that these results are not driven by alternative explanations, including reverse causality, patient composition effects, sample selection or unobserved trends and that they are robust to a host of specification checks. The primary channel for the observed spillover effects is increased hospital uncompensated care costs. Although data limitations constrain my capacity to check how hospitals change their provision of care to insured heart attack patients in response to reduced revenues, the evidence I have suggests a modest increase in the quantity of cardiac services without a corresponding increase in hospital staff.

  15. Intraoperative medial pivot affects deep knee flexion angle and patient-reported outcomes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Yusuke; Onodera, Tomohiro; Kasahara, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Majima, Tokifumi

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between clinical results including patient-reported outcomes and intraoperative knee kinematic patterns after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). A cross-sectional survey of forty consecutive medial osteoarthritis patients who had a primary TKA using a CT-based navigation system was conducted. Subjects were divided into two groups based on intraoperative kinematic patterns: a medial pivot group (n = 20) and a non-medial pivot group (n = 20). Subjective outcomes with the new Knee Society Score and clinical outcomes were evaluated. The functional activities, patient satisfaction and the knee flexion angle of the medial pivot group were significantly better than those of the non-medial pivot group. An intraoperative medial pivot pattern positively influences deep knee flexion and patient-reported outcomes.

  16. Sleep apnoea adversely affects the outcome in patients who undergo posterior lumbar fusion: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Stundner, O; Chiu, Y-L; Sun, X; Ramachandran, S-K; Gerner, P; Vougioukas, V; Mazumdar, M; Memtsoudis, S G

    2014-02-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of sleep apnoea, little information is available regarding its impact on the peri-operative outcome of patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion. Using a national database, patients who underwent lumbar fusion between 2006 and 2010 were identified, sub-grouped by diagnosis of sleep apnoea and compared. The impact of sleep apnoea on various outcome measures was assessed by regression analysis. The records of 84,655 patients undergoing posterior lumbar fusion were identified and 7.28% (n = 6163) also had a diagnostic code for sleep apnoea. Compared with patients without sleep apnoea, these patients were older, more frequently female, had a higher comorbidity burden and higher rates of peri-operative complications, post-operative mechanical ventilation, blood product transfusion and intensive care. Patients with sleep apnoea also had longer and more costly periods of hospitalisation. In the regression analysis, sleep apnoea emerged as an independent risk factor for the development of peri-operative complications (odds ratio (OR) 1.50, confidence interval (CI) 1.38;1.62), blood product transfusions (OR 1.12, CI 1.03;1.23), mechanical ventilation (OR 6.97, CI 5.90;8.23), critical care services (OR 1.86, CI 1.71;2.03), prolonged hospitalisation and increased cost (OR 1.28, CI 1.19;1.37; OR 1.10, CI 1.03;1.18). Patients with sleep apnoea who undergo posterior lumbar fusion pose significant challenges to clinicians.

  17. Oral anticancer drugs: how limited dosing options and dose reductions may affect outcomes in comparative trials and efficacy in patients.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R; Fojo, Tito

    2014-05-20

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials.

  18. Oral Anticancer Drugs: How Limited Dosing Options and Dose Reductions May Affect Outcomes in Comparative Trials and Efficacy in Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vinay; Massey, Paul R.; Fojo, Tito

    2014-01-01

    Historically, cancer medicine has avoided the problem of unequal dosing by comparing maximum-tolerated doses of intravenous regimens with proportionate dose reductions for toxicity. However, in recent years, with the development of numerous oral anticancer agents, dosing options are arbitrarily and increasingly limited by the size of pills. We contend that an underappreciated consequence of pill size is unequal dosing in comparative clinical trials and that this can have an impact on outcomes. We discuss how comparative effectiveness trials can be unbalanced and how the use of doses that are not sustainable might affect outcomes, especially marginal ones. We further argue that because of their poor tolerability and their limited dosing options, which often result in large dose adjustments in response to toxicity, the real-world clinical effectiveness of oral anticancer agents may be diminished and may not emulate results achieved in registration trials. PMID:24711558

  19. Delay in diagnosis affects the clinical outcome in a cohort of cvid patients with marked reduction of iga serum levels.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Vincenzo; Pecoraro, Antonio; Mormile, Ilaria; Quaremba, Giuseppe; Genovese, Arturo; Buccelli, Claudio; Paternoster, Mariano; Spadaro, Giuseppe

    2017-03-25

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID) represent a collection of diseases leading to an absent or strongly impaired antibody production. CVID presents a wide range of immunological abnormalities and clinical manifestations, including infections, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, and malignancies. The aim of this observational study was to analyze the epidemiological and clinical features of a cohort of 75 Italian CVID patients, and evaluate the correlation with comorbidity and mortality. Clinical data were retrospectively collected: the cohort was followed-up for a maximum of 30years (mean time of 10.24years, median of 9years). An higher age at the diagnosis of CVID and an higher age at onset of symptoms were significantly associated with a reduction of patients survival if stratified per median of IgA (less than or >8.00mg/dl). Thus IgA levels at diagnosis are correlated with patients survival contributing to identify a subset with a worse prognostic outcome.

  20. Treatment factors affecting outcomes in HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a pooled analysis of 1546 patients

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaonan; Wang, Dan; Tamari, Roni; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Mounier, Nicolas; Kaplan, Lawrence D.; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Spina, Michele; Tirelli, Umberto; Weiss, Rudolf; Galicier, Lionel; Boue, Francois; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Wyen, Christoph; Oriol, Albert; Navarro, José-Tomás; Dunleavy, Kieron; Little, Richard F.; Ratner, Lee; Garcia, Olga; Morgades, Mireia; Remick, Scot C.; Noy, Ariela; Sparano, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    Limited comparative data exist for the treatment of HIV-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We analyzed pooled individual patient data for 1546 patients from 19 prospective clinical trials to assess treatment-specific factors (type of chemotherapy, rituximab, and concurrent combination antiretroviral [cART] use) and their influence on the outcomes complete response (CR), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In our analysis, rituximab was associated with a higher CR rate (odds ratio [OR] 2.89; P < .001), improved PFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50; P < .001), and OS (HR 0.51; P < .0001). Compared with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), initial therapy with more dose-intense regimens resulted in better CR rates (ACVBP [doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin and prednisolone]: OR 1.70; P < .04), PFS (ACVBP: HR 0.72; P = .049; “intensive regimens”: HR 0.35; P < .001) and OS (“intensive regimens”: HR 0.54; P < .001). Infusional etoposide, prednisone, infusional vincristine, infusional doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide (EPOCH) was associated with significantly better OS in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (HR 0.33; P = .03). Concurrent use of cART was associated with improved CR rates (OR 1.89; P = .005) and trended toward improved OS (HR 0.78; P = .07). These findings provide supporting evidence for current patterns of care where definitive evidence is unavailable. PMID:24014242

  1. Portal hypertension in polycystic liver disease patients does not affect wait-list or immediate post-liver transplantation outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Rajoriya, Neil; Tripathi, Dhiraj; Leithead, Joanna A; Gunson, Bridget K; Lord, Sophie; Ferguson, James W; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish the impact of portal hypertension (PH) on wait-list/post-transplant outcomes in patients with polycystic liver disease (PCLD) listed for liver transplantation. METHODS A retrospective single-centre case controlled study of consecutive patients listed for liver transplantation over 12 years was performed from our centre. PH in the PCLD cohort was defined by the one or more of following parameters: (1) presence of radiological or endoscopic documented varices from our own centre or the referral centre; (2) splenomegaly (> 11 cm) on radiology in absence of splenic cysts accounting for increased imaging size; (3) thrombocytopenia (platelets < 150 × 109/L); or (4) ascites without radiological evidence of hepatic venous outflow obstruction from a single cyst. RESULTS Forty-seven PCLD patients (F: M = 42: 5) were listed for liver transplantation (LT) (single organ, n = 35; combined liver-kidney transplantation, n = 12) with 19 patients (40.4%) having PH. When comparing the PH group with non-PH group, the mean listing age (PH group, 50.6 (6.4); non-PH group, 47.1 (7.4) years; P = 0.101), median listing MELD (PH group, 12; non-PH group, 11; P = 0.422) median listing UKELD score (PH group, 48; non-PH group, 46; P = 0.344) and need for renal replacement therapy (P = 0.317) were similar. In the patients who underwent LT alone, there was no difference in the duration of ICU stay (PH, 3 d; non-PH, 2 d; P = 0.188), hospital stay length (PH, 9 d; non-PH, 10 d; P = 0.973), or frequency of renal replacement therapy (PH, 2/8; non-PH, 1/14; P = 0.121) in the immediate post-transplantation period. CONCLUSION Clinically apparent portal hypertension in patients with PCLD listed for liver transplantation does not appear to have a major impact on wait-list or peri-transplant morbidity. PMID:28018103

  2. Vitamin D Daily short-term Supplementation does not Affect Glycemic Outcomes of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chrysostomou, Stavri

    2017-01-27

    There is currently insufficient evidence of a beneficial effect to recommend vitamin D supplementation for optimizing glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Taking into consideration the significant extra-skeletal effect of vitamin D on pancreatic β-cell function and insulin secretion and the large number of scientific evidence supporting the inverse association between vitamin D status and hyperglycemia, this review article aims to examine whether vitamin D supplementation therapies are beneficial to patients with T2DM considering specific factors through randomized controlled trials (RCTs). EBSCOhost and Medline databases were searched from the beginning of 2009 until the end of 2014 for RCTs in patients with T2DM. Parameters, such as baseline vitamin D levels, frequency/dosage of supplementation, length of the study and type of supplementation, were independently assessed, based on their effect on glycemic status. Although all different types of supplementation were safe and effective in the achievement of vitamin D sufficiency in a dose-dependent way, the impact on glycemic status was different. 14 RCTs were included with daily supplementations ranging from 400-11.200 IU/daily, 40.000-50.000 IU/weekly and 100.000-300.000 IU/intramuscularly or once given, for a period from 8 to 24 weeks. Daily supplementation of vitamin D (up to 11.200 IU) showed no effect, whereas combined supplementation, with calcium (≥300 mg), and with vitamin D doses similar to the RDA, showed positive effects. Additionally, high weekly doses of vitamin D (40.000-50.000 IU) were effective on glycemic outcomes but available data are limited.

  3. Deltoid muscle volume affects clinical outcome of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Seo, Anna; Kim, Jeong Jun; Lee, Chang-Hwa; Baek, Seung-Hun; Kim, Shin Yoon; Jeong, Eun Taek; Oh, Kyung-Soo

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the interrelation between preoperative deltoid muscle status by measuring the 3-dimensional deltoid muscle volume and postoperative functional outcomes after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty(RTSA). Thirty-five patients who underwent RTSA participated in this study. All patients underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) as well as pre- and postoperative radiography and various functional outcome evaluations at least 1 year. The primary outcome parameter was set as age- and sex-matched Constant scores. The 3-dimensional deltoid muscle model was generated using a medical image processing software and in-house code, and the deltoid muscle volume was calculated automatically. Various clinical and radiographic factors comprising the deltoid muscle volume adjusted for body mass index(BMI) were analyzed, and their interrelation with the outcome parameters was appraised using a multivariate analysis. As a result, all practical consequences considerably improved following surgery(all p<0.01). Overall, 20 and 15 indicated a higher and a lower practical consequence than the average, respectively, which was assessed by the matched Constant scores. The deltoid muscle volume adjusted for BMI(p = 0.009), absence of a subscapularis complete tear (p = 0.040), and greater change in acromion-deltoid tuberosity distance(p = 0.013) were associated with higher matched Constant scores. Multivariate analysis indicated that the deltoid muscle volume was the single independent prognostic factor for practical consequences(p = 0.011). In conclusion, the preoperative deltoid muscle volume significantly affected the functional outcome following RTSA in patients with cuff tear arthropathy or irreparable cuff tears. Therefore, more attention should be paid to patients with severe atrophied deltoid muscle who are at a high risk for poor practical consequences subsequent to RTSA. PMID:28355234

  4. Factors associated with an unfavourable outcome after Salter innominate osteotomy in patients with unilateral developmental dysplasia of the hip: does occult dysplasia of the contralateral hip affect the outcome?

    PubMed

    Kaneko, H; Kitoh, H; Mishima, K; Matsushita, M; Kadono, I; Ishiguro, N; Hattori, T

    2014-10-01

    Salter innominate osteotomy is an effective reconstructive procedure for the treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), but some children have a poor outcome at skeletal maturity. In order to investigate factors associated with an unfavourable outcome, we assessed the development of the contralateral hip. We retrospectively reviewed 46 patients who underwent a unilateral Salter osteotomy at between five and seven years of age, with a mean follow-up of 10.3 years (7 to 20). The patients were divided into three groups according to the centre-edge angle (CEA) of the contralateral hip at skeletal maturity: normal (> 25°, 22 patients), borderline (20° to 25°, 17 patients) and dysplastic (< 20°, 7 patients). The CEA of the affected hip was measured pre-operatively, at eight to nine years of age, at 11 to 12 years of age and at skeletal maturity. The CEA of the affected hip was significantly smaller in the borderline and dysplastic groups at 11 and 12 years of age (p = 0.012) and at skeletal maturity (p = 0.017) than in the normal group. Severin group III was seen in two (11.8%) and four hips (57.1%) of the borderline and dysplastic groups, respectively (p < 0.001). Limited individual development of the acetabulum was associated with an unfavourable outcome following Salter osteotomy.

  5. Teleophthalmology: improving patient outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Omana Kesary; Ramesh, Sathyamangalam VenkataSubbu

    2016-01-01

    Teleophthalmology is gaining importance as an effective eye care delivery modality worldwide. In many developing countries, teleophthalmology is being utilized to provide quality eye care to the underserved urban population and the unserved remote rural population. Over the years, technological innovations have led to improvement in evidence and teleophthalmology has evolved from a research tool to a clinical tool. The majority of the current teleophthalmology services concentrate on patient screening and appropriate referral to experts. Specialty care using teleophthalmology services for the pediatric group includes screening as well as providing timely care for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Among geriatric eye diseases, specialty teleophthalmology care is focused toward screening and referral for diabetic retinopathy (DR), glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), and other sight-threatening conditions. Comprehensive vision screening and refractive error services are generally covered as part of most of the teleophthalmology methods. Over the past decades, outcome assessment of health care system includes patients’ assessments on their health, care, and services they receive. Outcomes, by and large, remain the ultimate validators of the effectiveness and quality of medical care. Teleophthalmology produces the same desired clinical outcome as the traditional system. Remote portals allow specialists to provide care over a larger region, thereby improving health outcomes and increasing accessibility of specialty care to a larger population. A high satisfaction level and acceptance is reported in the majority of the studies because of increased accessibility and reduced traveling cost and time. Considering the improved quality of patient care and patient satisfaction reported for these telemedicine services, this review explores how teleophthalmology helps to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26929592

  6. Do School Facilities Affect Academic Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Mark

    This review explores which facility attributes affect academic outcomes the most and in what manner and degree. The research is examined in six categories: indoor air quality, ventilation, and thermal comfort; lighting; acoustics; building age and quality; school size; and class size. The review concludes that school facilities affect learning.…

  7. Early Adolescent Affect Predicts Later Life Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kansky, Jessica; Allen, Joseph P.; Diener, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjective well-being as a predictor for later behavior and health has highlighted its relationship to health, work performance, and social relationships. However, the majority of such studies neglect the developmental nature of well-being in contributing to important changes across the transition to adulthood. Methods To examine the potential role of subjective well-being as a long-term predictor of critical life outcomes, we examined indicators of positive and negative affect at age 14 as a predictor of relationship, adjustment, self worth, and career outcomes a decade later at ages 23 to 25, controlling for family income and gender. We utilized multi-informant methods including reports from the target participant, close friends, and romantic partners in a demographically diverse community sample of 184 participants. Results Early adolescent positive affect predicted less relationship problems (less self-reported and partner-reported conflict, greater friendship attachment as rated by close peers), healthy adjustment to adulthood (lower levels of depression, anxiety, and loneliness). It also predicted positive work functioning (higher levels of career satisfaction and job competence) and increased self-worth. Negative affect did not significantly predict any of these important life outcomes. In addition to predicting desirable mean levels of later outcomes, early positive affect predicted beneficial changes across time in many outcomes. Conclusions The findings extend early research on the beneficial outcomes of subjective well-being by having an earlier assessment of well-being, including informant reports in measuring a large variety of outcome variables, and by extending the findings to a lower socioeconomic group of a diverse and younger sample. The results highlight the importance of considering positive affect as an important component of subjective well-being distinct from negative affect. PMID:27075545

  8. Does preoperative abduction value affect functional outcome of combined muscle transfer and release procedures in obstetrical palsy patients with shoulder involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Atakan; Ozkan, Turker; Onel, Defne

    2004-01-01

    Background Obstetric palsy is the injury of the brachial plexus during delivery. Although many infants with plexopathy recover with minor or no residual functional deficits, some children don't regain sufficient limb function because of functional limitations, bony deformities and joint contractures. Shoulder is the most frequently affected joint with internal rotation contracture causing limitation of abduction, external rotation. The treatment comprises muscle release procedures such as posterior subscapularis sliding or anterior subscapularis tendon lengtening and muscle transfers to restore the missing external rotation and abduction function. Methods We evaluated whether the preoperative abduction degree affects functional outcome. Between 1998 and 2002, 46 children were operated on to restore shoulder abduction and external rotation. The average age at surgery was 7.6 years and average follow up was 40.8 months. We compared the postoperative results of the patients who had preoperative abduction less than 90° (Group I: n = 37) with the patients who had preoperative abduction greater than 90° (Group II: n = 9), in terms of abduction and external rotation function with angle measurements and Mallet classification. We inquired whether patients in Group I needed another muscle transfer along with latissimus dorsi and teres major transfers. Results In Group I the average abduction improved from 62.5° to 131.4° (a 68.9° ± 22.9°gain) and the average external rotation improved from 21.4° to 82.6° (a 61.1° ± 23°gain). In Group II the average abduction improved from 99.4°to 140°(a40.5° ± 16°gain) and the average external rotation improved from 33.2°to 82.7° (a 49.5° ± 23.9° gain). Although there was a significant difference between Group I and II for preoperative abduction (p = 0.000) and abduction gain in degrees (p = 0.001), the difference between postoperative values of both groups was not significant (p = 0.268). There was also no significant

  9. Vestibular rehabilitation strategies and factors that affect the outcome.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadou, Anna; Skalidi, Nikoleta; Velegrakis, Georgios A

    2012-11-01

    Ever since the introduction of Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises, vestibular rehabilitation (VR) has been gaining popularity in the treatment of the dizzy patient. Numerous studies support the effectiveness of VR in improving balance/walking skills, eye-head coordination and the quality of life of the patient. Different rehabilitation protocols have been used to treat patients with peripheral and central vestibular disorders. Assessment of the patients' progress is based on the patients' selfperception of dizziness and their functional skills. Factors such as age, medication, time of onset of vertigo and home based VR have been evaluated on their effect on the rehabilitation's outcome. The aim of this review is to evaluate rehabilitation strategies and discuss the factors that affect the outcome.

  10. Does the Length of Disability between Injury and Functional Restoration Program Entry Affect Treatment Outcomes for Patients with Chronic Disabling Occupational Musculoskeletal Disorders?

    PubMed

    Asih, Sali; Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J

    2017-02-21

    Purpose Functional restoration programs (FRPs), for patients with chronic disabling occupational musculoskeletal disorders (CDOMDs), have consistently demonstrated positive socioeconomic treatment outcomes, including decreased psychosocial distress and increased work return. The pre-treatment length of disability (LOD), or time between injury and treatment admission, has been shown to influence FRP work outcomes. Some studies have found that shorter LOD is associated with better work outcomes. However, few studies have actually examined cohorts with LOD duration longer than 18 months. This present study evaluated the effects of extended LOD (beyond 18 months) on important treatment outcomes. Methods A total cohort of 1413 CDOMD patients entered an FRP. Of those, 312 did not complete the program, so they were eliminated from outcome analyses. The 1101 patients who completed the FRP were classified based on LOD: Late Rehabilitation (LR, 3-6 months, n = 190); Chronic Disability (CD, 7-17 months, n = 494); and Late Chronic Disability (LCD). The LCD, in turn, consisted of four separate subgroups: 18-23 months (LCD-18, n = 110); 24-35 months (LCD-24, n = 123); 36-71 months (LCD-36, n = 74); and 72+ months (LCD-72, n = 110). Patients were evaluated upon admission and were reassessed at discharge. Those patients who chose to pursue work goals post-treatment (n = 912) were assessed 1-year later. Results Longer LOD was associated with less likelihood of completing the FRP (p < .001). Compared to the other LOD groups, a relatively large percentage of patients (47%) in the longest- disability group were receiving social security disability benefits. Associations were found between longer LOD and more severe patient-reported pain, disability, and depressive symptoms at treatment admission. At discharge, symptom severity decreased for these patient-reported variables in all LOD groups (p < .001). Using binary logistic regressions, it was found

  11. TMD DIAGNOSTIC GROUPS AFFECT OUTCOMES INDEPENDENTLY OF TREATMENT IN PATIENTS AT-RISK FOR DEVELOPING CHRONICITY: A TWO-YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY+

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Celeste; Dougall, Angela Liegey; Haggard, Rob; Buschang, Peter; Karbowski, Steve; Riggs, Richard; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess whether a biobehavioral intervention would be more effective for patients with myogenous temporomandibular disorder (m-TMD) when compared to other patients receiving either a self-care intervention or no intervention. Three outcomes were assessed: psychosocial distress; pain; and functioning. Methods Participants (n=435) were from community dental clinics in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex seeking treatment for their acute TMD symptoms, and were recruited between 2008 and 2013. Outcome evaluations were conducted immediately post-intervention, as well as at 1- and 2-years after the interventions. For the current study, analyses using two-level hierarchical Multilevel Linear Models (MLMs) were conducted. Results Contrary to expectations, patients did not respond differently to the intervention based on their TMD diagnosis. However, acute m-TMD patients, especially those who had other comorbid TMD diagnoses, reported the highest levels of pain and pain-related symptoms and disability. They also exhibited poorer jaw functioning, especially if they were at high-risk for chronic TMD. Conclusion This study supports the finding that acute m-TMD tends to result in more severe symptom presentations, particularly if diagnosed in combination with other TMD diagnoses. Additionally, patients do not appear to respond better to biobehavioral treatment or self-care on the basis of their diagnoses. PMID:27472521

  12. An Audit-Based, Infectious Disease Specialist-Guided Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Profoundly Reduced Antibiotic Use Without Negatively Affecting Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nilholm, Hannah; Holmstrand, Linnea; Ahl, Jonas; Månsson, Fredrik; Odenholt, Inga; Tham, Johan; Melander, Eva; Resman, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antimicrobial stewardship programs are increasingly implemented in hospital care. They aim to simultaneously optimize outcomes for individual patients with infections and reduce financial and health-associated costs of overuse of antibiotics. Few studies have examined the effects of antimicrobial stewardship programs in settings with low proportions of antimicrobial resistance, such as in Sweden. Methods. An antimicrobial stewardship program was introduced during 5 months of 2013 in a department of internal medicine in southern Sweden. The intervention consisted of audits twice weekly on all patients given antibiotic treatment. The intervention period was compared with a historical control consisting of patients treated with antibiotics in the same wards in 2012. Studied outcome variables included 28-day mortality and readmission, length of hospital stay, and use of antibiotics. Results. A reduction of 27% in total antibiotic use (2387 days of any antibiotic) was observed in the intervention period compared with the control period. The reduction was due to fewer patients started on antibiotics as well as to significantly shorter durations of antibiotic courses (P < .001). An earlier switch to oral therapy and a specific reduction in use of third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones was also evident. Mortality, total readmissions, and lengths of stay in hospital were unchanged compared with the control period, whereas readmissions due to a nonresolved infection were fewer during the intervention of 2013. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that an infectious disease specialist-guided antimicrobial stewardship program can profoundly reduce antibiotic use in a low-resistance setting with no negative effect on patient outcome. PMID:26380341

  13. Premature Progesterone Elevation Does Not Affect Pregnancy Outcome in High-Responder Patients Undergoing Short-Interval Coasting in IVF Cycles.

    PubMed

    Acet, Mustafa; Aktün, Lebriz Hale; Başaranoğlu, Serdar; Yorgunlar, Betül; Acet, Tuba; Deregözü, Aysegul

    2015-11-30

    BACKGROUND We aimed to present the relationship between premature progesterone elevation (PPE) and clinical outcomes in high-responder patients who had a coasting period of <4 days in length due to their high risk of developing ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) and who were treated with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-agonist) protocol in in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study was conducted at the University Hospital Assisted Reproductive Technology Center. The outcomes of 101 patients undergoing IVF- intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles who showed a high response to COH (estradiol >4000 pg/ml and/or >20 follicles each ≥10 mm in diameter and at least 20% ≥15 mm) and who were coasted for <4 days were evaluated. Number of oocytes, 2 pronuclei (PN) embryos, implantation rate, and live birth rate were measured. RESULTS The incidence of PPE was 32.6%. Compared with those without PPE, patients with PPE had a higher number of oocytes retrieved. Total mature and fertilized oocytes and the mean number of embryos transferred were not significantly different between groups. Live birth rates (41.9% vs. 38.7%) and implantation rates (26.5% vs. 23%) were also not significantly divergent in the PPE and non-PPE groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS P concentrations ≥1.3 ng/ml on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) administration, designated in this study as PPE, does not appear to be related to adverse effects in terms of clinical outcomes in high-responder patients undergoing coasting <4 days due to their high risk of developing OHSS treated with a long-acting GnRH-a protocol in IVF-embryo transfer cycles.

  14. Psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees

    PubMed Central

    Sonne, Charlotte; Carlsson, Jessica; Bech, Per; Vindbjerg, Erik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Elklit, Ask

    2016-01-01

    Background The effects of treatment in trials with trauma-affected refugees vary considerably not only between studies but also between patients within a single study. However, we know little about why some patients benefit more from treatment, as few studies have analysed predictors of treatment outcome. Objective The objective of the study was to examine possible psychosocial predictors of treatment outcome for trauma-affected refugees. Method The participants were 195 adult refugees with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who were enrolled in a 6- to 7-month treatment programme at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry (CTP), Denmark. The CTP Predictor Index used in the study included 15 different possible outcome predictors concerning the patients’ past, chronicity of mental health problems, pain, treatment motivation, prerequisites for engaging in psychotherapy, and social situation. The primary outcome measure was PTSD symptoms measured on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures included the Hopkins Symptom Check List-25, the WHO-5 Well-being Index, Sheehan Disability Scale, Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales, the somatisation scale of the Symptoms Checklist-90, Global Assessment of Functioning scales, and pain rated on visual analogue scales. The relations between treatment outcomes and the total score as well as subscores of the CTP Predictor Index were analysed. Results Overall, the total score of the CTP Predictor Index was significantly correlated to pre- to post treatment score changes on the majority of the ratings mentioned above. While employment status was the only single item significantly correlated to HTQ-score changes, a number of single items from the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with changes in depression and anxiety symptoms, but the size of the correlation coefficients were modest. Conclusions The total score of the CTP Predictor Index correlated significantly with outcomes on most

  15. Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes Affect the Outcome of Patients with Operable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer in Combination with Mutated Amino Acid Classes

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Lakis, Sotiris; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Zagouri, Flora; Alexopoulou, Zoi; Gogas, Helen; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Pentheroudakis, George; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Chatzopoulos, Kyriakos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene; Razis, Evangelia; Psyrri, Amanda; Kosmidis, Paris; Papadimitriou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) density is an outcome predictor in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Herein we asked whether TILs are related to coding mutation load and to the chemical class of the resulting mutated amino acids, i.e., charged, polar, and hydrophobic mutations. Methods We examined paraffin tumors from TNBC patients who had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy mostly within clinical trials (training cohort, N = 133; validation, N = 190) for phenotype concordance; TILs density; mutation load and types. Results Concordance of TNBC phenotypes was 42.1% upon local / central, and 72% upon central / central pathology assessment. TILs were not associated with mutation load, type and class of mutated amino acids. Polar and charged mutation patterns differed between TP53 and PIK3CA (p<0.001). Hydrophobic mutations predicted for early relapse in patients with high nodal burden and <50% TILs tumors (training: HR 3.03, 95%CI 1.11–8.29, p = 0.031; validation: HR 2.90, 95%CI 0.97–8.70, p = 0.057), especially if compared to patients with >50% TILs tumors (training p = 0.003; validation p = 0.015). Conclusions TILs density is unrelated to mutation load in TNBC, which may be regarded as an unstable phenotype. If further validated, hydrophobic mutations along with TILs density may help identifying TNBC patients in higher risk for relapse. PMID:27685159

  16. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  17. Factors affecting outcomes in patients reaching end-stage kidney disease worldwide: differences in access to renal replacement therapy, modality use, and haemodialysis practices.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bruce M; Akizawa, Tadao; Jager, Kitty J; Kerr, Peter G; Saran, Rajiv; Pisoni, Ronald L

    2016-07-16

    More than 2 million people worldwide are being treated for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). This Series paper provides an overview of incidence, modality use (in-centre haemodialysis, home dialysis, or transplantation), and mortality for patients with ESKD based on national registry data. We also present data from an international cohort study to highlight differences in haemodialysis practices that affect survival and the experience of patients who rely on this therapy, which is both life-sustaining and profoundly disruptive to their quality of life. Data illustrate disparities in access to renal replacement therapy of any kind and in the use of transplantation or home dialysis, both of which are widely considered preferable to in-centre haemodialysis for many patients with ESKD in settings where infrastructure permits. For most patients with ESKD worldwide who are treated with in-centre haemodialysis, overall survival is poor, but longer in some Asian countries than elsewhere in the world, and longer in Europe than in the USA, although this gap has reduced. Commendable haemodialysis practice includes exceptionally high use of surgical vascular access in Japan and in some European countries, and the use of longer or more frequent dialysis sessions in some countries, allowing for more effective volume management. Mortality is especially high soon after ESKD onset, and improved preparation for ESKD is needed including alignment of decision making with the wishes of patients and families.

  18. Treatment of invasive fungal infections in high risk hematological patients. The outcome with liposomal amphotericin B is not negatively affected by prior administration of mold-active azoles.

    PubMed

    De la Serna, Javier; Jarque, Isidro; López-Jiménez, Javier; Fernández-Navarro, Jose María; Gómez, Valle; Jurado, Manuel; Pascual, Adriana; Serrano, Josefina; Romero, Mónica; Vallejo, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    There are concerns of a reduced effect of liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB) given sequentially after mold-active azoles due to a possible antagonism in their antifungal mechanism. To investigate this possible effect in the clinic, we retrospectively studied 182 high risk hematologic patients with invasive fungal infections (IFI) who were treated with L-AmB. Overall, 96 patients (52.7%) had possible, 52 (28.6%) probable and 34 (18.7%) proven IFI according to EORTC classification. Most had suspected or proven invasive aspergillosis. We compared patients with prior exposure to mold-active azoles (n=100) to those having not (n=82). The group with prior mold-active azoles included more patients with poor risk features for IFI as acute myeloid leukemia (p<0.05) and prolonged neutropenia (p<0.05). A favorable response in the IFI, defined as a complete or partial response, was achieved in 75% and 74.4% of patients in the whole cohort, and in 66% and 74.4% of patients with probable or proven IFI in the two groups. None of these differences were significant. Multivariate analysis showed that refractory baseline disease and renal dysfunction were adverse factors for response in the IFI (p<0.05). Survival was poorer for patients with prior broad spectrum azoles (p<0.05), and for those who did not recover from neutropenia (p<0.05). In conclusion, the effectiveness of treatment of breakthrough fungal infection with L-AmB is not likely to be affected by prior exposure to mold-active azoles prophylaxis, but survival largely depends on host and disease factors.

  19. Demotivation: Affective States and Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falout, Joseph; Elwood, James; Hood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Demotivation can negatively influence the learner's attitudes and behaviors, degrade classroom group dynamics and teacher's motivation, and result in long-term and widespread negative learning outcomes. 900 university EFL learners were surveyed to investigate the demotivating factors in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) in Japan, and…

  20. Trait Affect and Job Search Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Stephane; Saks, Alan M.; Zikic, Jelena

    2006-01-01

    The present study examines the role of trait affect in job search. One hundred and twenty-three university students completed measures of positive and negative affectivity, conscientiousness, job search self-efficacy, job search clarity, and job search intensity during their last year of school while on the job market. At the end of the school…

  1. Radiation-induced sarcomas of bone: factors that affect outcome.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Grimer, R J; Spooner, D; Carter, S R; Tillman, R M; Abudu, A

    2007-06-01

    We identified 42 patients who presented to our unit over a 27-year period with a secondary radiation-induced sarcoma of bone. We reviewed patient, tumour and treatment factors to identify those that affected outcome. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 45.6 years (10 to 84) and the mean latent interval between radiotherapy and diagnosis of the sarcoma was 17 years (4 to 50). The median dose of radiotherapy given was estimated at 50 Gy (mean 49; 20 to 66). There was no correlation between radiation dose and the time to development of a sarcoma. The pelvis was the most commonly affected site (14 patients (33%)). Breast cancer was the most common primary tumour (eight patients; 19%). Metastases were present at diagnosis of the sarcoma in nine patients (21.4%). Osteosarcoma was the most common diagnosis and occurred in 30 cases (71.4%). Treatment was by surgery and chemotherapy when indicated: 30 patients (71.4%) were treated with the intention to cure. The survival rate was 41% at five years for those treated with the intention to cure but in those treated palliatively the mean survival was only 8.8 months (2 to 22), and all had died by two years. The only factor found to be significant for survival was the ability to completely resect the tumour. Limb sarcomas had a better prognosis (66% survival at five years) than central ones (12% survival at five years) (p = 0.009). Radiation-induced sarcoma is a rare complication of radiotherapy. Both surgical and oncological treatment is likely to be compromised by the treatment received previously by the patient.

  2. Implicit emotion regulation affects outcome evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiwei; Tang, Ping; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Wenbo; Luo, Yue-jia

    2015-06-01

    Efficient implicit emotion regulation processes, which run without awareness, are important for human well-being. In this study, to investigate the influence of implicit emotion regulation on psychological and electrophysiological responses to gains and losses, participants were required to select between two Chinese four-character idioms to match the meaning of the third one before they performed a monetary gambling task. According to whether their meanings were related to emotion regulation, the idioms fell into two categories. Event-related potentials and self-rating emotional experiences to outcome feedback were recorded during the task. Priming emotion regulation reduced subjective emotional experience to both gains and losses and the amplitudes of the feedback-related negativity, while the P3 component was not influenced. According to these results, we suggest that the application of implicit emotion regulation effectively modulated the subjective emotional experience and the motivational salience of current outcomes without the cost of cognitive resources. This study implicates the potential significance of implicit emotion regulation in decision-making processes.

  3. Attributions of responsibility and affective reactions to decision outcomes.

    PubMed

    Zeelenberg, M; van der Pligt, J; de Vries, N K

    2000-06-01

    Immediate affective reactions to outcomes are more intense following decisions to act than following decisions not to act. This finding holds for both positive and negative outcomes. We relate this "actor-effect" to attribution theory and argue that decision makers are seen as more responsible for outcomes when these are the result of a decision to act as compared to a decision not to act. Experiment 1 (N = 80) tests the main assumption underlying our reasoning and shows that affective reactions to decision outcomes are indeed more intense when the decision maker is seen as more responsible. Experiment 2 (N = 40) tests whether the actor effect can be predicted on the basis of differential attributions following action and inaction. Participants read vignettes in which active and passive actors obtained a positive or negative outcome. Action resulted in more intense affect than inaction, and positive outcomes resulted in more intense affect than negative outcomes. Experiment 2 further shows that responsibility attributions and affective reactions to outcomes are highly correlated; that is, more extreme affective reactions are associated with more internal attributions. We discuss the implications for research on post-decisional reactions.

  4. [Patient evaluation and outcome measures].

    PubMed

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Both the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis require systematic evaluation of the indicators that provide information on the degree of involvement of the disease and allow its quantification. Reliable measures of disease progression help decision-making by clinicians and provide valid information on treatment response and the effectiveness of the distinct therapeutic interventions. The instruments recommended in research, as outcome measures in osteoarthritis, are pain evaluation, assessment of physical function, and self-reported global evaluation. In studies lasting more than 1 year, structural changes are evaluated through simple X-ray. Self-reported quality of life assessment and physician global assessment are also recommended as options. These indicators should be incorporated into routine clinical practice for adequate evaluation and correct follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The recommended pain evaluation method for use in clinical practice is the visual analog scale (VAS). The best instrument to evaluate physical function in patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis is the WOMAC scale (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). For patient-reported global assessment in routine practice, the recommended scales are VAS or the SF-12 (12-item short-form health survey).

  5. Patient Reported Outcomes from Sacroiliac Joint Fusion

    PubMed Central

    McGowan, Shane M.; Audley, Brittany N.; Sokunbi, Gbolabo; Puccio, Steven T.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective, case series. Purpose The purpose of this study is to determine morbidity, complications, and patient reported outcomes from minimally invasive sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. Overview of Literature Lumbar back pain emanating from the SIJ can be surgically treated via a percutaneous approach in the appropriately selected patient with minimal morbidity and acceptable functional outcomes. Methods Patients diagnosed by >2 physical examination maneuvers and subjective relief from a computed tomography–guided lidocaine-bupivacaine-steroid injection underwent SIJ fusion after failing conservative management with a combination of oral anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and pelvic belt stabilization. Perioperative data collected include estimated blood loss (EBL) and operative time. Oswestry disability index, 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), visual analogue score, and functional status were analyzed. All complications were noted. Results The study cohort of 45 cases (69% female) achieved postoperative survey follow-up at 9.9 and 32.3 months. SF-12 physical component summary statistically improved while all other scores were equivalent. Mean EBL and operative time were 22 mL and 36 minutes, respectively. Initial survey showed that 64% of patients discontinued narcotics (29/45), 71% do not use an assistive device (32/45), and 15.6% do not work due to pain (7/45). 73% of patients stated they would have the surgery again (33/45). For the second survey, 65% of patients discontinued narcotics (26/40), 70% did not use an assistive device (28/40), and 17.5% did not work due to pain (7/40). A history of thoracolumbar instrumentation (16/45) did not significantly affect outcomes. Three complications described by screw malposition with neurologic deficit (6.7%) were treated with screw repositioning (1 case) and removal of a single superior implant (2 cases) with time to revision of 2.2 months. All three ultimately had resolution of

  6. How do COPD comorbidities affect ICU outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ongel, Esra Akkutuk; Karakurt, Zuhal; Salturk, Cuneyt; Takir, Huriye Berk; Burunsuzoglu, Bunyamin; Kargin, Feyza; Ekinci, Gulbanu H; Mocin, Ozlem; Gungor, Gokay; Adiguzel, Nalan; Yilmaz, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Background and aim Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF) frequently require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for application of mechanical ventilation (MV). We aimed to determine whether comorbidities and clinical variables present at ICU admission are predictive of ICU mortality. Methods A retrospective, observational cohort study was performed in a tertiary teaching hospital’s respiratory ICU using data collected between January 2008 and December 2012. Previously diagnosed COPD patients who were admitted to the ICU with ARF were included. Patients’ demographics, comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), ICU admission data, application of noninvasive and invasive MV (NIV and IMV, respectively), cause of ARF, length of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality were recorded from their files. Patients were grouped according to mortality (survival versus non-survival), and all the variables were compared between the two groups. Results During the study period, a total of 1,013 COPD patients (749 male) with a mean age (standard deviation) of 70±10 years met the inclusion criteria. Comorbidities of the non-survival group (female/male, 40/131) were significantly higher compared with the survival group (female/male, 224/618): arrhythmia (24% vs 11%), hypertension (42% vs 34%), coronary artery disease (28% vs 11%), and depression (7% vs 3%) (P<0.001, P<0.035, P<0.001, and P<0.007, respectively). Logistic regression revealed the following mortality risk factors: need of IMV, BMI <20 kg/m2, pneumonia, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, hypertension, chronic hypoxia, and higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHE II) scores. The respective odds ratios, confidence intervals, and P-values for each of these were as follows: 27.7, 15.7–49.0, P<0.001; 6.6, 3.5–412.7, P<0.001; 5.1, 2.9–8.8, P<0.001; 2.9, 1.5–5.6, P<0.001; 2.7, 1.4–5.2, P<0.003; 2.6, 1.5–4.4, P<0.001; 2.2, 1.2–3.9, P<0

  7. Melanin content in melanoma metastases affects the outcome of radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brożyna, Anna A; Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Roszkowski, Krzysztof; Filipiak, Jan; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2016-04-05

    Melanin possess radioprotective and scavenging properties, and its presence can affect the behavior of melanoma cells, its surrounding environment and susceptibility to the therapy, as showed in vitro experiments. To determine whether melanin presence in melanoma affects the efficiency of radiotherapy (RTH) we evaluated the survival time after RTH treatment in metastatic melanoma patients (n = 57). In another cohort of melanoma patients (n = 84), the relationship between melanin level and pT and pN status was determined. A significantly longer survival time was found in patients with amelanotic metastatic melanomas in comparison to the melanotic ones, who were treated with either RTH or chemotherapy (CHTH) and RTH. These differences were more significant in a group of melanoma patients treated only with RTH. A detailed analysis of primary melanomas revealed that melanin levels were significantly higher in melanoma cells invading reticular dermis than the papillary dermis. A significant reduction of melanin pigmentation in pT3 and pT4 melanomas in comparison to pT1 and T2 tumors was observed. However, melanin levels measured in pT3-pT4 melanomas developing metastases (pN1-3, pM1) were higher than in pN0 and pM0 cases. The presence of melanin in metastatic melanoma cells decreases the outcome of radiotherapy, and melanin synthesis is related to higher disease advancement. Based on our previous cell-based and clinical research and present research we also suggest that inhibition of melanogenesis can improve radiotherapy modalities. The mechanism of relationship between melanogenesis and efficacy of RTH requires additional studies, including larger melanoma patients population and orthotopic, imageable mouse models of metastatic melanoma.

  8. Thematic Teaching: Integrating Cognitive and Affective Outcomes in Elementary Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodeur, Doris R.

    1998-01-01

    Defines thematic teaching, also known as interdisciplinary or authentic instruction, as representing cross-disciplinary programs which integrate cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes. Highlights include integrating thematic teaching into elementary school classrooms, cognitive and social learning theories, motivation, cooperative…

  9. Patient-centered outcomes research to improve asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Anise, Ayodola; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2016-12-01

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is funding 8 comparative effectiveness research projects to improve patient-centered outcomes for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients with uncontrolled asthma. These projects aim to compare multilevel interventions with known efficacy at the community, home, and health system levels to enhance patient and clinician uptake of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines and improve outcomes. The National Asthma Education Prevention Program guidelines provide clinicians with a range of acceptable approaches for the diagnosis and management of asthma and define general practices that meet the needs of most patients. Yet disparities in asthma care and outcomes remain pervasive for African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute AsthmaNet consortium has identified several top research priorities for pediatric and adult populations, including a recommendation to examine tailored approaches based on race/ethnicity. In addition, the guidelines emphasize the need for studies that focus on multicomponent interventions recognizing that single interventions are generally ineffective. This article will describe the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded asthma projects and how they are individually and collectively addressing evidence gaps in asthma care by focusing on multicomponent and tailored approaches for improving outcomes and reducing disparities for African American and Hispanic/Latino patients.

  10. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  11. Defining and Assessing Affective Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Claire L.

    1990-01-01

    The affective aspect of the curriculum is defined as the development of appropriate and measurable values such as ethical behavior, honesty, tolerance, and becoming a life-long learner. In outcome assessment of the affective category, the goal is to evaluate the transition of the student to a professional. (MLW)

  12. The presence or severity of pulmonary hypertension does not affect outcomes for single-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Julliard, Walker A; Meyer, Keith C; De Oliveira, Nilto C; Osaki, Satoru; Cornwell, Richard C; Sonetti, David A; Maloney, James D

    2016-05-01

    Advanced lung disease (ALD) that requires lung transplantation (LTX) is frequently associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Whether the presence of PH significantly affects the outcomes following single-lung transplantation (SLT) remains controversial. Therefore, we retrospectively examined the outcomes of 279 consecutive SLT recipients transplanted at our centre, and the patients were split into four groups based on their mean pulmonary artery pressure values. Outcomes, including long-term survival and primary graft dysfunction, did not differ significantly for patients with versus without PH, even when PH was severe. We suggest that SLT can be performed safely in patients with ALD-associated PH.

  13. Psychological Factors Affecting Rehabilitation and Outcomes Following Elective Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Flanigan, David C; Everhart, Joshua S; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery often requires many months of rehabilitation to achieve a successful outcome, regardless of subspecialty. Several important psychological factors strongly influence pain perceptions, rehabilitation compliance, and patient outcomes after common orthopaedic surgeries that require extensive rehabilitation, including total joint arthroplasty, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and spine surgery for degenerative disease. Early recognition of patients exhibiting psychological distress, fear-avoidance behavior, or poor perceived self-efficacy or pessimistic personality traits can be used to improve preoperative risk stratification for poor rehabilitation or surgical outcomes. Several intervention strategies exist to address these psychological factors when they appear to contribute suboptimal postoperative rehabilitation or recovery.

  14. Toxicities Affecting Quality of Life After Chemo-IMRT of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Prospective Study of Patient-Reported, Observer-Rated, and Objective Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Klaudia U.; Schipper, Matthew; Feng, Felix Y.; Lyden, Teresa; Haxer, Mark; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol-Anne; Cornwall, Benjamin; Lee, Connie S.Y.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) aiming to spare the salivary glands and swallowing structures would reduce or eliminate the effects of xerostomia and dysphagia on quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: In this prospective, longitudinal study, 72 patients with stage III-IV oropharyngeal cancer were treated uniformly with definitive chemo-IMRT sparing the salivary glands and swallowing structures. Overall QOL was assessed by summary scores of the Head Neck QOL (HNQOL) and University of Washington QOL (UWQOL) questionnaires, as well as the HNQOL “Overall Bother” question. Quality of life, observer-rated toxicities (Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effects scale, version 2), and objective evaluations (videofluoroscopy assessing dysphagia and saliva flow rates assessing xerostomia) were recorded from before therapy through 2 years after therapy. Correlations between toxicities/objective evaluations and overall QOL were assessed using longitudinal repeated measures of analysis and Pearson correlations. Results: All observer-rated toxicities and QOL scores worsened 1-3 months after therapy and improved through 12 months, with minor further improvements through 24 months. At 12 months, dysphagia grades 0-1, 2, and 3, were observed in 95%, 4%, and 1% of patients, respectively. Using all posttherapy observations, observer-rated dysphagia was highly correlated with all overall QOL measures (P<.0001), whereas xerostomia and mucosal and voice toxicities were significantly correlated with some, but not all, overall QOL measures, with lower correlation coefficients than dysphagia. Late overall QOL (≥6 or ≥12 months after therapy) was primarily associated with observer-rated dysphagia, and to a lesser extent with xerostomia. Videofluoroscopy scores, but not salivary flows, were significantly correlated with some of the overall QOL measures. Conclusion: After chemo-IMRT, although late dysphagia was on average mild

  15. Factors Affecting the Outcomes of School Bond Elections in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lode, Marlin D.

    In spite of a nationwide concern for the crumbling infrastructure of school buildings, the prospects of passing bond issues to repair or replace buildings are elusive. This study examined positive and negative factors that affected the outcomes of school bond elections in four purposefully-selected school districts in Iowa. Variables that…

  16. Using Student Support Systems to Increase Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soled, Suzanne Wegener; Bosma, Jennifer F.

    1992-01-01

    Student support systems (small groups of students who meet to learn), help combat the problem of large student-to-teacher ratios and increase cognitive and affective outcomes. Small groups allow large amounts of participation and interaction, rapid error correction, individualized practice, and self-paced work that actively involves students in…

  17. Institutional Factors Affecting Biophysical Outcomes in Forest Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Eric A.

    2009-01-01

    Although there is considerable interest in the impact of diverse policies affecting the biophysical outcomes in forests, gaining a substantial sample over time of forests under different institutional arrangements has been difficult. This article analyzes data from 46 forests located in six countries over time. In forests where policies have been…

  18. Affective instability in patients with chronic pain: a diary approach.

    PubMed

    Rost, Silke; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M L; Koval, Peter; Sütterlin, Stefan; Vögele, Claus; Crombez, Geert

    2016-08-01

    Affective instability, conceptualized as fluctuations in mood over time, has been related to ill-health and psychopathology. In this study, we examined the role of affective instability on daily pain outcomes in 70 patients with chronic pain (Mage = 49.7 years; 46 females) using an end-of-day diary. During a baseline phase, patients completed self-reported questionnaires of pain severity, pain duration, disability, depression, and anxiety. During a subsequent diary phase, patients filled out an electronic end-of-day diary over 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain severity, disability, cognitive complaints, negative affect (NA) and positive affect. Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood (separately for NA and positive affect), which takes into account the size of affective changes over consecutive days. Results indicated that NA instability was positively associated with daily disability, beyond the effects of daily pain severity. Furthermore, NA instability moderated the relationship between daily pain severity and daily disability and the relationship between daily pain severity and daily cognitive complaints. Positive affect instability, however, showed to be unrelated to all outcomes. Current findings extend previous results and reveal the putative role of affective instability on pain-related outcomes and may yield important clinical implications. Indeed, they suggest that targeting NA instability by improving emotion regulation skills may be a strategy to diminish disability and cognitive complaints in patients with chronic pain.

  19. Factors affecting outcome in poor grade subarachnoid haemorrhage: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Kranthi, Sannepaneni; Sahu, Barada P.; Aniruddh, Purohit

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is usually associated with unfavorable outcomes and optimal management is deemed complicated. Most centres follow an expectant management strategy or a less aggressive approach till patients improve to good clinical grades. This approach has been associated with higher mortality and morbidity. However, not all patients with poor clinical condition fare badly. Identification and early aggressive management of this select group of patients may lead to favorable outcomes. Settings and Design: Prospective non-randomized study. Materials and Methods: We prospectively analyzed 19 cases presented in WFNS grade 4 and 5 and factors affecting their outcome at a tertiary care centre in south India. This study was aimed at identifying those few poor grade patients who are probable candidates for a good outcome. Statistical Analysis Used: All the variables were analyzed for possible correlations with the SPSS version 13 software. The Chi-square test with a P < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: Of 19 cases, 13 were operated and good outcome was seen in 53.8% of the patients who underwent surgery and aggressive management. All 7 patients who were managed conservatively died. 15.8% of the patients had low density changes (P = 0.625). Absence of such changes was associated with a good long term outcome (P = 0.004). 9 patients had intraventricular hemorrhage at presentation and 5 patients having hydrocephalus underwent extra-ventricular drainage. Statistically significant factors precluding good outcome were the presence of infarcts and thick SAH in the cisterns. Conclusions: Poor grade (WFNS 4 and 5) SAH patients with or without ICH, IVH, if operated within 3 days can give rise to favorable outcome in around 50%. However, presence of patchy infarcts associated with thick subarachnoid blood (Fisher grade 3) precludes long term survival or meaningful recovery. Hence, aggressive management is unlikely to alter the

  20. Daily affective experiences predict objective sleep outcomes among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Royette; Choo, Sungsub B; Grant, Kathryn; Adam, Emma K

    2016-02-01

    Adolescence is a sensitive period for changes in both sleep and affect. Although past research has assessed the association between affect and sleep among adolescents, few studies have examined both trait (typical) and day-to-day changes in affect, and fewer still have specifically examined negative social evaluative emotions (e.g. embarrassment) in relation to sleep. Both between- and within-person variations in daily affect were examined in relation to four objectively-measured sleep outcomes (sleep hours; sleep latency; sleep efficiency; and length of wake bouts) among adolescents. Participants (N = 77 high-school students; 42.9% female; M = 14.37 years) wore an actiwatch and completed daily-diaries for 3 days. The results of hierarchical linear models (controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, parental employment status, income, puberty and caffeine) indicated that negative social evaluative emotions and high-arousal affective experiences generally predicted poor sleep outcomes, whereas low-arousal affective experiences were associated with good sleep outcomes. Specifically, at the person level, adolescents reporting higher negative social evaluative emotions had shorter average sleep hours, and those experiencing higher anxiety–nervousness had longer wake bouts. In addition, individuals experiencing more dysphoria (sad, depressed, lonely) had longer average sleep hours and shorter wake bouts, while those experiencing more calmness had shorter sleep latencies. At the within-person level, individuals had longer sleep latencies following days that they had experienced high-arousal positive affect (e.g. excitement), and had longer wake bouts following days they had experienced more negative social evaluative emotions. The results highlight the detrimental effects of negative social evaluative emotions and high-arousal affective states for adolescent sleep.

  1. Daily Affective Experiences Predict Objective Sleep Outcomes among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Tavernier, Royette; Choo, Sungsub B; Grant, Kathryn; Adam, Emma K

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adolescence is a sensitive period for changes in both sleep and affect. Although past research has assessed the association between affect and sleep among adolescents, few studies have examined both trait (typical) and day-to-day changes in affect, and fewer still have specifically examined negative social evaluative emotions (NSEE; e.g., embarrassment) in relation to sleep. We examined both between- and within-person variations in daily affect in relation to four objectively-measured sleep outcomes (sleep hours, sleep latency, sleep efficiency, and length of wake bouts) among adolescents. Participants (N = 77 high school students, 42.9% female; M = 14.37 years) wore an actiwatch and completed daily diaries for 3 days. Results of hierarchical linear models (controlling for age, gender, race, ethnicity, parental employment status, income, puberty, and caffeine) indicated that NSEE and high arousal affective experiences generally predicted poor sleep outcomes, whereas low arousal affective experiences were associated with good sleep outcomes. Specifically, at the person level, adolescents reporting higher NSEE had shorter average sleep hours, and those experiencing higher anxiety-nervousness had longer wake bouts. In addition, individuals experiencing more dysphoria (sad, depressed, lonely) had longer average sleep hours and shorter wake bouts, while those experiencing more calmness had shorter sleep latencies. At the within person level, individuals had longer sleep latencies following days that they had experienced high arousal positive affect (e.g., excitement) and had longer wake bouts following days they had experienced more NSEE. Results highlight the detrimental effects of NSEE and high arousal affective states for adolescent sleep. PMID:26365539

  2. Elevated Patient Body Mass Index Does Not Negatively Affect Self-Reported Outcomes of Thoracolumbar Surgery: Results of a Comparative Observational Study with Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Manson, Neil A; Green, Alana J; Abraham, Edward P

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Quantify the effect of obesity on elective thoracolumbar spine surgery patients. Methods Five hundred consecutive adult patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery to treat degenerative pathologies with minimum follow-up of at least 1 year were included. Primary outcome measures included Numerical Rating Scales for back and leg pain, the Short Form 36 Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary, the modified Oswestry Disability Index, and patient satisfaction scores collected preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included perioperative and postoperative adverse events, postoperative emergency department presentation, hospital readmission, and revision surgeries. Patients were grouped according to World Health Organization body mass index (BMI) guidelines to isolate the effect of obesity on primary and secondary outcome measures. Results Mean BMI was 30 kg/m(2), reflecting a significantly overweight population. Each BMI group reported statistically significant improvement on all self-reported outcome measures. Contrary to our hypothesis, however, there was no association between BMI group and primary outcome measures. Patients with BMI of 35 to 39.99 visited the emergency department with complaints of pain significantly more often than the other groups. Otherwise, we did not detect any differences in the secondary outcome measures between BMI groups. Conclusions Patients of all levels of obesity experienced significant improvement following elective thoracolumbar spine surgery. These outcomes were achieved without increased risk of postoperative complications such as infection and reoperation. A risk-benefit algorithm to assist with surgical decision making for obese patients would be valuable to surgeons and patients alike.

  3. Critical care unit organization and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hass, Brian D

    2005-01-01

    The delivery of critical care medicine has seen many advances and changes over a relatively short period of time. This article explores some of the models of critical care delivery and the implications of these models on patient outcomes.

  4. Factors affecting treatment outcomes in drug-resistant tuberculosis cases in the Northern Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E; Draper, H R; Baitsiwe, P; Claassens, M M

    2014-09-21

    The Northern Cape Province has low cure rates (21%) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We audited the programme to identify factors affecting treatment outcomes. Cases admitted to two drug-resistant TB units from 2007 to 2009 had data extracted from clinical folders. Unfavourable treatment outcomes were found in 58% of the 272 cases. A multivariable regression analysis found that male sex was associated with unfavourable outcome (P = 0.009). Weight at diagnosis (P < 0.001) and oral drug adherence (P < 0.001) were also associated with an unfavourable outcome; however, injectable drug adherence was not (P = 0.395). Positive baseline smear and human immunodeficiency virus positive status were not associated with unfavourable outcome. Shorter, more patient-friendly regimens may go a long way to improving adherence and outcomes.

  5. Nursing care and patient outcomes: international evidence

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Robyn B.; Aiken, Linda H.; Clarke, Sean P.; Sloane, Douglas M.

    2010-01-01

    Countries across the globe are experiencing nursing shortages. In hospitals, supportive practice environments have positive effects on both nurse and patient outcomes. However, these relationships have been established primarily in the US. International studies of the effects of nurse staffing levels and the practice environment on nurse outcomes and the quality of care mirror the findings from the US, thus raising these issues to the international level. The solutions that have been successful in the US for improving practice environment and patient outcomes are solutions that should be successful in any country, thus putting them on a global scale. The Magnet hospital program is one model that has been shown to improve nurse and patient outcomes and is one solution to the shortage of hospital nurses. PMID:18218265

  6. Outcomes of polytrauma patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of diabetes mellitus in patients with multiple system injuries remains obscure. This study was designed to increase knowledge of outcomes of polytrauma in patients who have diabetes mellitus. Methods Data from the Trauma Audit and Research Network was used to identify patients who had suffered polytrauma during 2003 to 2011. These patients were filtered to those with known outcomes, then separated into those with diabetes, those known to have other co-morbidities but not diabetes and those known not to have any co-morbidities or diabetes. The data were analyzed to establish if patients with diabetes had differing outcomes associated with their diabetes versus the other groups. Results In total, 222 patients had diabetes, 2,558 had no past medical co-morbidities (PMC), 2,709 had PMC but no diabetes. The diabetic group of patients was found to be older than the other groups (P <0.05). A higher mortality rate was found in the diabetic group compared to the non-PMC group (32.4% versus 12.9%), P <0.05). Rates of many complications including renal failure, myocardial infarction, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis were all found to be higher in the diabetic group. Conclusions Close monitoring of diabetic patients may result in improved outcomes. Tighter glycemic control and earlier intervention for complications may reduce mortality and morbidity. PMID:25026864

  7. Socioeconomic status does not affect the outcome of liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hwan Y; Galabova, Violetta; Edwin, David; Thuluvath, Paul J

    2002-12-01

    The outcome of liver transplantation is dependent on many factors. It was suggested that racial disparities in outcome may be related to differences in socioeconomic status (SES). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the effect of SES on graft and patient survival. Two hundred seventy-six adult patients who underwent liver transplantation at our institution from July 1988 to June 2001 were included in the analysis. Educational and occupation statuses were coded using established criteria (Hollingshead Index of Social Status [HI]). SES then was calculated using the HI formula: SES = education level x 3 + occupation x 5, and categorized into four groups: group 1, score less than 29 (n = 71); group 2, score of 29 to 42 (n = 82); group 3, score of 42 to 53 (n = 69); and group 4, score greater than 53 (n = 54). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for graft and patient survival, and Cox regression analysis was used to determine the effect of confounding factors. Demographics of all four groups were similar. One-, 2-, and 5-year graft and patient survival did not differ significantly across groups by Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression survival analysis. In conclusion, SES did not predict graft and patient survival after liver transplantation.

  8. How temporal evolution of intracranial collaterals in acute stroke affects clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, Prakash; Low, Adrian F.; Tay, Edgar L.W.; Gopinathan, Anil; Nadarajah, Mahendran; Ting, Eric; Venketasubramanian, Narayanaswamy; Seet, Raymond C.S.; Ahmad, Aftab; Chan, Bernard P.L.; Teoh, Hock L.; Soon, Derek; Rathakrishnan, Rahul; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We compared intracranial collaterals on pretreatment and day 2 brain CT angiograms (CTA) to assess their evolution and relationship with functional outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Methods: Consecutive AIS patients who underwent pretreatment and day 2 CTA and received IV tPA during 2010–2013 were included. Collaterals were evaluated by 2 independent neuroradiologists using 3 predefined criteria: the Miteff system, the Maas system, and 20-point collateral scale by the Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score methodology. We stratified our cohort by baseline pre-tPA state of their collaterals and by recanalization status of the primary vessel for analysis. Good outcomes at 3 months were defined by a modified Rankin Scale score of 0–1. Results: This study included 209 patients. Delayed collateral recruitment by any grading system was not associated with good outcomes. All 3 scoring systems showed that collateral recruitment on the follow-up CTA from a baseline poor collateral state was significantly associated with poor outcome and increased bleeding risk. When the primary vessel remained persistently occluded, collateral recruitment was significantly associated with worse outcomes. Interestingly, collateral recruitment was significantly associated with increased mortality in 2 of the 3 grading systems. Conclusions: Not all collateral recruitment is beneficial; delayed collateral recruitment may be different from early recruitment and can result in worse outcomes and higher mortality. Prethrombolysis collateral status and recanalization are determinants of how intracranial collateral evolution affects functional outcomes. PMID:26740681

  9. Outcomes management for stroke patients using thrombolytics.

    PubMed

    Hickman, J L

    1998-03-01

    In the current health care market, there is a sharp awareness by both consumers and managed care providers that hospitals are only as good as the outcomes they can produce. Collaboration among disciplines that provide services, in this case treatment for stroke has enhanced patient outcomes. The synergy that has developed among those involved has thus far created a win-win situation. The key to successful outcomes is to have all those involved possessing a clear picture of their role, accepting it, and taking ownership of it.

  10. Affective Outcomes of Coursework on Computer Technology in Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Barbara; Delaney, Connie; Weiler, Kay

    1989-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine affective outcomes of the introduction to computer technology provided baccalaureate nursing students. Correlates of positive attitudes were also investigated. Third, the construct validity of the two parallel forms of the attitude measure employed was studied. A one group, pre-test, post-test design was used. Analysis using a paired t-test showed that students' attitudes were significantly higher after the coursework than before it. Significant relationships between attitudes toward computing and the following factors were revealed: area of greatest interest in computing, expectations of future use of computers, age, and basic nursing/RN student status. Outcomes of the study contribute to the construct validity of the attitude measures.

  11. Multihospital System Membership and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital membership in systems and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources The Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, for data on Medicare patients admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1985 and 1998 with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI); the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, for data on hospitals. Study Design A multivariate regression analysis. An observation is a fee-for-service Medicare AMI patient admitted to a study hospital. Dependent variables include patient transfers, catheterizations, angioplasties or bypass surgeries, 90-day mortality, and Medicare expenditures. Independent variables include system participation, other admission hospital and patient traits, and hospital and year fixed effects. The five-part system definition incorporates the size and location of the index admission hospital and the size and distance of its partners. Principal Findings While the effects of multihospital system membership on patients are in general limited, patients initially admitted to small rural system hospitals that have big partners within 100 miles experience lower mortality rates than patients initially admitted to independent hospitals. Regression results show that to the extent system hospital patients experience differences in treatments and outcomes relative to patients of independent hospitals, these differences remain even after controlling for the admission hospital's capacity to provide cardiac services. Conclusions Multihospital system participation may affect AMI patient treatment and outcomes through factors other than cardiac service offerings. Additional investigation into the nature of these factors is warranted. PMID:15230926

  12. Longitudinal deteriorations in patient reported outcomes in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Oga, Toru; Nishimura, Koichi; Tsukino, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Susumu; Hajiro, Takashi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2007-01-01

    Goals of effective management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) include relieving their symptoms and improving their health status. We examined how such patient reported outcomes would change longitudinally in comparison to physiological outcomes in COPD. One hundred thirty-seven male outpatients with stable COPD were recruited for the study. The subjects health status was evaluated using the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ). Their dyspnoea using the modified Medical Research Council (MRC) scale and their psychological status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were assessed upon entry and every 6 months thereafter over a 5-year period. Pulmonary function and exercise capacity as evaluated by peak oxygen uptake (VO2) on progressive cycle ergometry were also followed over the same time. Using mixed effects models to estimate the slopes for the changes, scores on the SGRQ, the CRQ, the MRC and the HADS worsened in a statistically significant manner over time. However, changes only weakly correlated with changes in forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) and peak (VO2). We demonstrated that although changes in pulmonary function and exercise capacity are well known in patients with COPD, patient reported outcomes such as health status, dyspnoea and psychological status also deteriorated significantly over time. In addition, deteriorations in patient reported outcomes only weakly correlated to changes in physiological indices. To capture the overall deterioration of COPD from the subjective viewpoints of the patients, patient reported outcomes should be followed separately from physiological outcomes.

  13. Are lifetime affective disorders predictive of long-term outcome in severe adolescent anorexia nervosa?

    PubMed

    Carrot, B; Radon, L; Hubert, T; Vibert, S; Duclos, J; Curt, F; Godart, N

    2017-03-03

    Depression and anxiety are commonly associated with anorexia nervosa (AN) and contribute to difficulties in social integration, a negative factor for outcome in AN. The link between those disorders and AN has been poorly studied. Thus, our objective was to investigate (1) the link between outcome nine years after hospitalisation for AN and the occurrence of lifetime anxious or depressive comorbidities; (2) the prognostic value of these comorbidities on patient outcome; 181 female patients were hospitalised for AN (between 13 and 22 years old), and were re-evaluated for their psychological, dietary, physical and social outcomes, from 6 to 12 years after their hospitalisation. The link between anxious and depressive disorders (premorbid to AN and lifetime) and the outcome assessment criteria were tested through multivariate analyses; 63% of the participants had good or intermediate outcome, 83% had presented at least one anxiety or depression disorder in the course of their lives, half of them before the onset of AN. Premorbid obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD), BMI at admission, and premenarchal AN all contribute to poor prognosis. Social phobia and agoraphobia affect the subjects' quality of life and increase eating disorder symptoms. These results encourage a systematic assessment of, and care for, anxiety and depression comorbidities among female adolescent patients with a particular focus on premorbid OCD.

  14. Impact of Patient Sex on Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Teitsma, Xavier M.; van der Hoeven, Henk; Tamminga, Rob; de Bie, Rob A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Combined Quality Care Anterior Cruciate Ligament registry provides data for clinical research regarding primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery. Purpose: To explore the data with regard to the clinical outcomes between sexes after ACL reconstruction in a Dutch population. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data involving patients diagnosed with an ACL tear and eligible for surgery were recorded. Isokinetic muscle strength, functional muscle performance, and anterior-posterior translation of the knee joint were documented preoperatively and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months postoperatively. Patients completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Lysholm, and Tegner rating scales during each examination using a web-based questionnaire. Results: Approximately 90% of ACL injuries occurred during sport activities. The mean (SD) age at surgery was 28 (11) years for both men and women, and the majority of patients were treated with hamstring tendon autografts (94%). Four percent received bone–patellar tendon–bone autografts, and 2% of the patients received other grafts. Preoperatively, the KOOS, Lysholm, and Tegner scores were significantly higher in males. Twelve months postoperatively, both sexes showed comparable isokinetic strength (P = .336), knee laxity (P = .680), and hop test for distance (P = .122) when comparing the injured with the uninjured side. Self-reported knee function was comparable between sexes as assessed by the KOOS (P = .202), Lysholm (P = .872), and Tegner (P = .767) questionnaires during the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: One year after ACL surgery, all patients had improved greatly, showing only minor differences between sexes. The male group showed slightly better results when evaluating self-reported knee questionnaires. Comparable outcomes and knee function between sexes can therefore be presumed with patients who are treated with hamstring tendon autografts in a Dutch

  15. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  16. Outcome of young patients with rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A.; Ruiz-García, Erika B.; León-Takahashi, Alberto M.; García-Pérez, Leticia

    2017-01-01

    Background There is an increase in the incidence of rectal carcinoma (RC) in young patients. Methods We analyzed 175 patients with sporadic RC which were divided in two groups according their age: 24 patients ≤40 years and 151 patients >40 years and the two groups were compared in order to determine if the outcomes (especially overall 5-year survival) were different. Results Overall 5-year survival was similar between groups (67.1% for patients over 40 years and 70.4% for those under 40 years, P=0.803). The only differences found were in some clinicopathologic features: patients <40 years showed more dissected lymph nodes (LNs) (21 vs. 15, P=0.035) and more LN metastasis (54.2% vs. 39.1%, P=0.048). In multivariate analysis factors associated with worse survival were incomplete resection and no use of neoadjuvant therapy. Age did not demonstrate prognostic value (P=0.077). Conclusions RC in people ≤40 years demonstrated greater number of LN harvested and LN metastases but oncologic outcomes, especially 5-year overall survival, were similar between groups. PMID:28280614

  17. Negative communication in psychosis: understanding pathways to poorer patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Deirdre; Onwumere, Juliana; Green, Catherine; Freeman, Daniel; Garety, Philippa; Kuipers, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    High expressed emotion (EE) is a robust predictor of elevated rates of relapse and readmission in schizophrenia. However, far less is known about how high EE leads to poorer patient outcomes. This study was designed to examine links between high EE (criticism), affect, and multidimensional aspects of positive symptoms in patients with psychosis. Thirty-eight individuals with nonaffective psychosis were randomly exposed to proxy high-EE or neutral speech samples and completed self-report measures of affect and psychosis symptoms. Patients reported significant increases in anxiety, anger, and distress after exposure to the proxy high-EE speech sample as well as increases in their appraisals of psychosis symptoms: voice controllability, delusional preoccupation, and conviction. These findings offer further evidence of the potential deleterious impact of a negative interpersonal environment on patient symptoms in psychosis.

  18. Outcomes of Care Systems for Chronic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth B.; Egri, Gladys; Caton, Carol L.M.

    1984-01-01

    In a study of the postdischarge treatment of 119 comparable chronic schizophrenics hospitalized and treated after release in six community mental health care systems, it was found that lower rehospitalization rates and longer community survivorship correlated significantly with patients' compliance in early postdischarge treatment plans and the frequency of aftercare visits prescribed for them during the early postrelease period. Rehospitalization rates and community survivorship experience were substantially better for patients of two of the six systems, without disproportionate reduction of their clinical or social functioning in the community. Characteristics of the community care systems with better outcomes are described. PMID:6694221

  19. The Impact of Information Culture on Patient Safety Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mikkonen, Santtu; Saranto, Kaija; Bates, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background An organization’s information culture and information management practices create conditions for processing patient information in hospitals. Information management incidents are failures that could lead to adverse events for the patient if they are not detected. Objectives To test a theoretical model that links information culture in acute care hospitals to information management incidents and patient safety outcomes. Methods Reason’s model for the stages of development of organizational accidents was applied. Study data were collected from a cross-sectional survey of 909 RNs who work in medical or surgical units at 32 acute care hospitals in Finland. Structural equation modeling was used to assess how well the hypothesized model fit the study data. Results Fit indices indicated a good fit for the model. In total, 18 of the 32 paths tested were statistically significant. Documentation errors had the strongest total effect on patient safety outcomes. Organizational guidance positively affected information availability and utilization of electronic patient records, whereas the latter had the strongest total effect on the reduction of information delays. Conclusions Patient safety outcomes are associated with information management incidents and information culture. Further, the dimensions of the information culture create work conditions that generate errors in hospitals.

  20. Does Segmental Kyphosis Affect Surgical Outcome after a Posterior Decompressive Laminectomy in Multisegmental Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarush; Prasad, Gautam; Deore, Tushar; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To compare results of laminectomy in multisegmental compressive cervical myelopathy (CSM) with lordosis versus segmental kyphosis. Overview of Literature Laminectomy is an established procedure for decompression in CSM with cervical lordosis. However in patients with segmental kyphosis, it is associated with risk of progression of kyphosis and poor outcome. Whether this loss of sagittal alignment affects functional outcome is not clear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 68 patients who underwent laminectomy for CSM from 1998 to 2009. As per preoperative magnetic resonance images, 36 patients had preoperative lordosis (Group 1) and 32 had segmental kyphosis (Group 2). We studied age at the time of surgery, duration of preoperative symptoms, recovery rate, magnitude of postoperative backward shifting of spinal cord and loss of sagittal alignment. Results Mean follow up was 5.05 years (range, 2–13 years) and mean age at the time of surgery 61.88 years. Group 1 had 20 men and 16 women and Group 2 had 19 men and 13 women. Mean recovery rate in Group 1 was 60.32%, in Group 2 was 63.7% without any statistical difference (p-value 0.21, one tailed analysis of variance). Two patients of Group 1 had loss of cervical lordosis by five degrees. In Group 2 seven patients had progression of segmental kyphosis by 5–10 degrees and two patients by more than 10 degrees. Mean cord shift was more in Group 1 (mean, 2.41 mm) as compared to Group 2 (mean, –1.97 mm) but it had no correlation to recovery rate. Patients with younger age (mean, 57 years) and less duration of preoperative symptoms (mean, 4.86 years) had better recovery rate (75%). Conclusions Clinical outcome in CSM is not related to preoperative cervical spine alignment. Thus, lordosis is not mandatory for planning laminectomy in CSM. Good outcome is expected in younger patients operated earliest after onset of symptoms. PMID:28243365

  1. Lipidomic analysis enables prediction of clinical outcomes in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Peter; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Stanojcic, Mile; Patsouris, David; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries have highlighted the novel metabolic functions of adipose tissue in enhancing hypermetabolism after trauma. As the exact function and expression profiles of serum lipids and free fatty acids (FFA) are essentially unknown, we determined the lipidomic expression profile after burn in correlation to clinical outcomes to identify important lipid mediators affecting post-burn outcomes. We conducted a prospective cohort study with 46 adult burn patients and 5 healthy controls at the Ross Tilley Burn Center in Toronto, Canada. Patients were stratified based on major demographic and clinical variables, including age, burn severity, mortality, and sepsis. Serum FFAs and inflammatory markers were measured during acute hospital stay. We found that FFAs were acutely elevated post-burn and returned to baseline over time. Greater burn severity and age were associated with an impaired acute response in unsaturated FFAs and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Elevations in saturated and mono-unsaturated FFAs correlated significantly to increased mortality. In summary, persistent elevation of unsaturated lipids was associated with a functionally altered inflammatory-immunological milieu and worse clinical outcomes. The present lipidomic analysis indicates profound alterations in the lipid profile after burn by characterizing key lipids as potential diagnostic and outcome indicators in critically injured patients. PMID:27982130

  2. Patient reported outcomes and patient empowerment in clinical genetics services.

    PubMed

    McAllister, M; Dearing, A

    2015-08-01

    Evaluation of clinical genetics services (CGS), including genetic counseling and genetic testing, has been problematic. Patient mortality and morbidity are unlikely to be directly improved by interventions offered in CGS. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are not routinely measured in CGS evaluation, but this may change as patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) become a key part of how healthcare services are managed and funded across the world. However, there is no clear consensus about which PROMs are most useful for CGS evaluation. This review summarizes the published research on how PROs from CGS have been measured and how patients may benefit from using those services, with a focus on patient empowerment. Many patient benefits (PROs) identified repeatedly in the research literature can be re-interpreted within a patient empowerment framework. Other important PROs identified include family functioning, social functioning, altruism, sense of purpose, enabling development of future research and treatment/participating in research. Well-validated measures are available to capture (dimensions of) patient empowerment. Although generic measures of family functioning are available, suitable measures capturing social functioning, development of future treatments, and altruism were not identified in this review. Patient empowerment provides one useful approach to measuring PROs from CGS.

  3. Lung perfusion and emphysema distribution affect the outcome of endobronchial valve therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Christian; Theilig, Dorothea; Herzog, Dominik; Poellinger, Alexander; Doellinger, Felix; Schreiter, Nils; Schreiter, Vera; Schürmann, Dirk; Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, Bettina; Hippenstiel, Stefan; Suttorp, Norbert; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2016-01-01

    The exclusion of collateral ventilation (CV) and other factors affect the clinical success of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR). However, despite its benefits, the outcome of ELVR remains difficult to predict. We investigated whether clinical success could be predicted by emphysema distribution assessed by computed tomography scan and baseline perfusion assessed by perfusion scintigraphy. Data from 57 patients with no CV in the target lobe (TL) were retrospectively analyzed after ELVR with valves. Pulmonary function tests (PFT), St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) were performed on patients at baseline. The sample was grouped into high and low levels at the median of TL perfusion, ipsilateral nontarget lobe (INL) perfusion, and heterogeneity index (HI). These groups were analyzed for association with changes in outcome parameters from baseline to 3 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, patients showed significant improvements in PFT, SGRQ, and 6MWT (all P≤0.001). TL perfusion was not associated with changes in the outcome. High INL perfusion was significantly associated with increases in 6MWT (P=0.014), and high HI was associated with increases in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), (P=0.012). Likewise, there were significant correlations for INL perfusion and improvement of 6MWT (r=0.35, P=0.03) and for HI and improvement in FEV1 (r=0.45, P=0.001). This study reveals new attributes that associate with positive outcomes for patient selection prior to ELVR. Patients with high perfusions in INL demonstrated greater improvements in 6MWT, while patients with high HI were more likely to respond in FEV1. PMID:27354783

  4. Cryotherapy in Treatment of Keloids: Evaluation of Factors Affecting Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Barara, Meenu; Mendiratta, Vibhu; Chander, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Keloids are cosmetically disfiguring benign fibrous outgrowths, which present as a major therapeutic dilemma due to their frequent recurrence. Despite a wide therapeutic armamentarium available for these scars, none has been found to be completely effective and satisfactory. Cryosurgery has offered some promise in the treatment of keloids.We conducted this study to evaluate the effect of cryotherapy in treatment of keloids and to relate the treatment outcome with the clinico-etiological factors. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based interventional study was conducted in 30 patients of keloids. Patients received two freeze thaw cycles of 15 seconds each at four weekly intervals for six sessions or flattening greater than 75%; whichever occurred earlier. Patients were assessed after three treatment sessions and at treatment completion regarding thickness and firmness of lesions. Patient satisfaction scale was used to evaluate the treatment outcome at completion of six treatment sessions. Paired Students t-test and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis. Results: Average flattening noted after 3 and 6 sessions of cryotherapy was 30.76% and 58.13%, respectively. The duration of lesions and thickness of keloids correlated significantly with the result of treatment. The site and aetiology did not influence the outcome of cryosurgical treatment. Conclusion: Cryotherapy seems to be an effective treatment modality for keloids of recent onset, particularly smaller lesions. Duration and thickness of the keloids were found to be the most important factors in determining treatment outcome with cryotherapy in our study. Larger studies are, however, required to confirm the efficacy of this treatment modality and to validate our findings of the factors affecting treatment outcome. PMID:23112514

  5. Diskography outcomes in patients following lumbar diskectomy.

    PubMed

    Siambanes, David; Kposowa, Augustine J; Michelsen, Steven

    2003-08-01

    The results of lumbar diskography at post-diskectomy and nonoperative disk levels in postoperative patients and patients without prior back surgery were reviewed over 3 years. Other possible predictive factors, including disk degeneration (per the Adam's classification), end-point resistance, gender, and age, also were reviewed. The results revealed that no statistically significant association was noted between the presence of a prior diskectomy and the outcome of diskography. However, disk degeneration classified as ruptured and fissured correlated statistically with positive diskography. Additionally, age between 30 and 39 years and male gender were statistically associated with a positive diskogram. Disk levels displaying a poor end point during diskography injection (not amendable to pressurization) were statistically related to ruptured or fissured disk levels and thus positive diskography. Based on these results, the assumption that disabling low-back pain presenting after lumbar procedure is due to diskogenic disease arising from the surgical level is not supported.

  6. Learning Outcomes in Affective Domain within Contemporary Architectural Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savic, Marko; Kashef, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary architectural education has shifted from the traditional focus on providing students with specific knowledge and skill sets or "inputs" to outcome based, student-centred educational approach. Within the outcome based model, students' performance is assessed against measureable objectives that relate acquired knowledge…

  7. Do Learning Style and Learning Environment Affect Learning Outcome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBartola, Leesa M.; Miller, Miriam K.; Turley, Catherine L.

    2001-01-01

    Kolb's Learning Style Inventory was completed by 29 allied health students on campus and 27 in distance education. Both groups had similar learning outcomes. Only the Diverger learning style showed a correlation between learning environment and outcome: 83% of Divergers with above average grades were in distance education. (Contains 20…

  8. Obesity Early in Adulthood Increases Risk but Does Not Affect Outcomes of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Manal M.; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Kaseb, Ahmed; Shalaby, Ahmed; Phan, Alexandria T.; El-Serag, Hashem B.; Hawk, Ernest; Morris, Jeff; Raghav, Kanwal Pratap Singh; Lee, Ju-Seog; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Bortus, Gehan; Torres, Harrys A.; Amos, Christopher I.; Wolff, Robert A.; Li, Donghui

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Despite the significant association between obesity and several cancers, it has been difficult to establish an association between obesity and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Patients with HCC often have ascites, making it a challenge to accurately determine body mass index (BMI), and many factors contribute to the development of HCC. We performed a case–control study to investigate whether obesity early in adulthood affects risk, age of onset, or outcomes of patients with HCC. METHODS We interviewed 622 patients newly diagnosed with HCC from January 2004 through December 2013, along with 660 healthy controls (frequency-matched by age and sex) to determine weights, heights, and body sizes (self-reported) at various ages before HCC development or enrollment as controls. Multivariable logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent effects of early obesity on risk for HCC and patient outcomes, respectively. BMI was calculated, and patients with a BMI ≥30 kg/m2 were considered obese. RESULTS Obesity in early adulthood (age, mid-20s to mid-40s) is a significant risk factor for HCC. The estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were 2.6 (1.4–4.4), 2.3 (1.2–4.4), and 3.6 (1.5–8.9) for the entire population, men, and women, respectively. Each unit increase in BMI at early adulthood was associated with a 3.89-month decrease in age at HCC diagnosis (P<.001). Moreover, there is a synergistic interaction between obesity and hepatitis virus infection. However, we found no effect of obesity on the overall survival of patients with HCC. CONCLUSION Early adulthood obesity is associated with increased risk of developing HCC at a young age in the absence of major HCC risk factors, with no effect on outcomes of patients with HCC. PMID:25836985

  9. Nurse managed prenatal programs affect outcomes for corporations.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P E; Bitowski, B E; Bell, P L

    1997-09-01

    Faced with higher medical costs and increased insurance premiums, corporations are focusing on health promotion and wellness. With increasing numbers of women in the workforce, corporations have identified the need for prenatal programs. By developing, initiating, and evaluating outcome-based prenatal programs nurses can target the health care needs of this select population. One such program documented several outcomes including improved employee health and an 86% reduction in maternal/newborn costs.

  10. Spirituality and religiousness as predictive factors of outcome in schizophrenia and schizo-affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Sylvia; Perroud, Nader; Gillieron, Christiane; Brandt, Pierre-Yves; Rieben, Isabelle; Borras, Laurence; Huguelet, Philippe

    2011-04-30

    Spirituality and religiousness have been shown to be highly prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. This study assesses the predictive value of helpful vs. harmful use of religion to cope with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder at 3 years. From an initial cohort of 115 outpatients, 80% were reassessed for positive, negative and general symptoms, clinical global impression, social adaptation and quality of life. For patients with helpful religion at baseline, the importance of spirituality was predictive of fewer negative symptoms, better clinical global impression, social functioning and quality of life. The frequencies of religious practices in community and support from religious community had no effect on outcome. For patients with harmful religion at baseline, no relationships were elicited. This result may be due to sample size. Indeed, helpful spiritual/religious coping concerns 83% of patients, whereas harmful spiritual/religious coping concerns only 14% of patients. Our study shows that helpful use of spirituality is predictive of a better outcome. Spirituality may facilitate recovery by providing resources for coping with symptoms. In some cases, however, spirituality and religiousness are a source of suffering. Helpful vs. harmful spiritual/religious coping appears to be of clinical significance.

  11. Improving adherence and outcomes in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Renu; Joshi, Disha; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2017-01-01

    Objective Nonadherence in diabetes is a problem leading to wasted resources and preventable deaths each year. Remedies for diminishing nonadherence are many but marginally effective, and outcomes remain suboptimal. Aim The aim of this study was to test a new iOS “app”, PatientPartner. Derived from complexity theory, this novel technology has been extensively used in other fields; this is the first trial in a patient population. Methods Physicians referred patients who were “severely non-adherent” with HbA1c levels >8. After consent and random assignment (n=107), subjects in the intervention group were immersed in the 12-min PatientPartner game, which assesses and trains subjects on parameters of thinking that are critical for good decision making in health care: information management, stress coping, and health strategies. The control group did not play PatientPartner. All subjects were called each week for 3 weeks and self-reported on their medication adherence, diet, and exercise. Baseline and 3-month post-intervention HbA1c levels were recorded for the intervention group. Results Although the control group showed no difference on any measures at 3 weeks, the intervention group reported significant mean percentage improvements on all measures: medication adherence (57%, standard deviation [SD] 18%–96%, SD 9), diet (50%, SD 33%–75%, SD 28), and exercise (29%, SD 31%–43%, SD 33). At 3 months, the mean HbA1c levels in the intervention group were significantly lower (9.6) than baseline (10.7). Conclusion Many programs to improve adherence have been proved to be expensive and marginally effective. Therefore, improvements from the single use of a 12-min-long “app” are noteworthy. This is the first ever randomized, controlled trial to demonstrate that an “app” can impact the gold standard biological marker, HbA1c, in diabetes. PMID:28243070

  12. A retrospective study of patient outcomes and satisfaction following pinnaplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Nicholas; Smith, Caroline P; Cullen, Jim R; McCluney, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Up to 5% of all children have prominent ears. Psychological distress and bullying adversely affect these children and can cause significant social exclusion. In times of austerity, cosmetic procedures such as surgical correction of prominent ears are felt to be an unnecessary cost to the health service. Materials and methods A retrospective case note review of all patients undergoing pinnaplasty was undertaken. Postoperative outcomes were compared against the Royal College of Surgeons of England standards. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory, a validated post-intervention questionnaire, was then posted out to all patients. Results A total of 72 patients were identified. Average age at procedure was 13 years. Eleven patients were above the age of 19 years. Twenty-eight patients were male and forty-four female. Sixty-two cases underwent bilateral pinnaplasty. No patients developed hematoma, and there were no readmissions within 30 days of surgery. Twenty-nine patients responded to the questionnaire (40%), of whom 27 reported a positive impact on their psychosocial well-being with a mean score of 36. Conclusion Pinnaplasty offers patients an opportunity to alleviate the psychological distress of bullying and harassment secondary to the appearance of prominent ears. PMID:27307775

  13. Functional dysphonia: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Behlau, Mara; Madazio, Glaucya; Oliveira, Gisele

    2015-01-01

    Functional dysphonia (FD) refers to a voice problem in the absence of a physical condition. It is a multifaceted voice disorder. There is no consensus with regard to its definition and inclusion criteria for diagnosis. FD has many predisposing and precipitating factors, which may include genetic susceptibility, psychological traits, and the vocal behavior itself. The assessment of voice disorders should be multidimensional. In addition to the clinical examination, auditory-perceptual, acoustic, and self-assessment analyses are very important. Self-assessment was introduced in the field of voice 25 years ago and has produced a major impact in the clinical and scientific scenario. The choice of treatment for FD is vocal rehabilitation by means of direct therapy; however, compliance has been an issue, except for cases of functional aphonia or when an intensive training is administered. Nevertheless, there are currently no controlled studies that have explored the different options of treatment regimens for these patients. Strategies to improve patient outcome involve proper multidisciplinary diagnosis in order to exclude neurological and psychiatric disorders, careful voice documentation with quantitative measurement and qualitative description of the vocal deviation for comparison after treatment, acoustic evaluation to gather data on the mechanism involved in voice production, self-assessment questionnaires to map the impact of the voice problem on the basis of the patient’s perspective, referral to psychological evaluation in cases of suspected clinical anxiety and/or depression, identification of dysfunctional coping strategies, self-regulation data to assist patients with their vocal load, and direct and intensive vocal rehabilitation to reduce psychological resistance and to reassure patient’s recovery. An international multicentric effort, involving a large population of voice-disordered patients with no physical pathology, could produce enough data for

  14. Does therapist’s attitude affect clinical outcome of lumbar facet joint injections?

    PubMed Central

    Middendorp, Marcus; Kollias, Konstantinos; Ackermann, Hanns; Splettstößer, Annina; Vogl, Thomas J; Khan, M Fawad; Maataoui, Adel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if the clinical outcome of intra-articular lumbar facet joint injections is affected by the therapist’s attitude. METHODS: A total of 40 patients with facet joint-associated chronic low back pain were randomly divided into two groups. All patients received computed tomography-guided, monosegmental intra-articular facet joint injections. Following the therapeutic procedure, the patients of the experimental group (EG) held a conversation with the radiologist in a comfortable atmosphere. During the dialog, the patients were encouraged to ask questions and were shown four images. The patients of the control group (CG) left the clinic without any further contact with the radiologist. Outcome was assessed using a pain-based Verbal Numeric Scale at baseline, at 1 wk and at 1, 3, and 6 mo after first treatment. RESULTS: The patient demographics showed no differences between the groups. The patients of the EG received 57 interventional procedures in total, while the patients of the CG received 70 interventional procedures. In both groups, the pain scores decreased significantly over the entire observation period. Compared to the CG, the EG showed a statistically significant reduction of pain at 1 wk and 1 mo post-treatment, while at 3 and 6 mo after treatment, there were no significant differences between both groups. CONCLUSION: Our results show a significant effect on pain relief during the early post-interventional period in the EG as compared to the CG. The basic principle behind the higher efficacy might be the phenomenon of hetero-suggestion. PMID:27358691

  15. Can a future choice affect a past measurement's outcome?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Yakir; Cohen, Eliahu; Elitzur, Avshalom C.

    2015-04-01

    An EPR experiment is studied where each particle within the entangled pair undergoes a few weak measurements (WMs) along some pre-set spin orientations, with the outcomes individually recorded. Then the particle undergoes one strong measurement along an orientation chosen at the last moment. Bell-inequality violation is expected between the two final measurements within each EPR pair. At the same time, statistical agreement is expected between these strong measurements and the earlier weak ones performed on that pair. A contradiction seemingly ensues: (i) Bell's theorem forbids spin values to exist prior to the choice of the orientation measured; (ii) A weak measurement is not supposed to determine the outcome of a successive strong one; and indeed (iii) Almost no disentanglement is inflicted by the WMs; and yet (iv) The outcomes of weak measurements statistically agree with those of the strong ones, suggesting the existence of pre-determined values, in contradiction with (i). Although the conflict can be solved by mere mitigation of the above restrictions, the most reasonable resolution seems to be that of the Two-State-Vector Formalism (TSVF), namely, that the choice of the experimenter has been encrypted within the weak measurement's outcomes, even before the experimenters themselves know what their choice will be.

  16. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  17. Effects of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program on Patient Self-Care Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Shiyko, Mariya; Margulis, Heather; Campo, Marc

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program on patient self-care outcomes. METHOD. We used a retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from the electronic medical records of 1,292 patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. Self-care scores from the FIM™ for patients who participated in rehabilitation before implementation of an SPHM program were compared with the scores of patients who participated after implementation of the program. RESULTS. Patients who received inpatient rehabilitation services with an SPHM program were as likely to achieve at least modified independence in self-care as those who received inpatient rehabilitation services without an SPHM program. CONCLUSION. SPHM programs may not affect self-care performance in adults receiving inpatient rehabilitation services. However, more work must be done to define specific and effective methods for integrating patient handling technologies into occupational therapy practice. PMID:25184472

  18. Isolated polycystic morphology: Does it affect the IVF treatment outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bezirganoglu, N; Seckin, K D; Baser, E; Karsli, M F; Yeral, M I; Cicek, M N

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare women who have normal ovarian ultrasonographic findings and women with ovulatory polycystic ovary (PCO), in terms of IVF treatment outcome. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral hospital and included 906 women who underwent IVF treatment. Of these, 224 of the women had PCO (24.7%) and 682 of the women had normal ovarian morphology (75.3%) at the time of ultrasonographic examination prior to IVF. The treatment outcomes were compared between the two groups. In the PCO group, the number of oocytes at the size of > 16 mm, the overall number of collected oocytes and the number of fertilised oocytes were found to be significantly higher. Furthermore, the rates of implantation, biochemical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy were significantly higher in the PCO group (p < 0.05). The detection of PCO morphology on baseline ultrasonography in IVF candidates may be associated with higher treatment success.

  19. Patient reported outcomes in hip arthroplasty registries.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Aksel

    2014-05-01

    -retest). I found that the translated PRO had good feasibility, an excellent response rate, no floor effect, but a high ceiling effect (as was expected with our postoperative patients) and few patients missed too many items to calculate a sum score. The translated PRO had high test-retest reliability and very high internal consistency, and appears to be a valid and reliable tool for outcome studies on THA patients in a hip registry setting. The MCII and PASS study included 1,335 patients, and I estimated that one year after THA, an improvement of 38-55% from mean baseline PRO score and absolute follow-up scores of 57-91% of the maximum score correspond to a minimal important improvement and acceptable symptom state, respectively.

  20. Patient-Reported Outcomes After Multiligament Knee Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Jessica M.; Anthony, Christopher A.; DeMik, David; Glass, Natalie; Amendola, Annunziato; Wolf, Brian R.; Bollier, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Background: Management of the medial collateral ligament (MCL) in the setting of a multiligamentous knee injury (MLKI) represents an area of great controversy. Purpose: Our study was designed to compare long-term patient-reported outcomes (PROs) after MCL repair versus reconstruction in the setting of a multiligamentous injury of the knee. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: At a single institution, 68 patients were identified over a 10-year period as having MCL intervention in the setting of MLKI. Of these patients, 34 (50%) were successfully contacted via telephone to collect Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. A retrospective chart review of these subjects was also conducted to identify patient and surgical factors affecting PROs. Results: At a mean 6-year follow-up (range, 2-11 years), the mean Lysholm score was 77.4 ± 23.1 and mean IKDC score was 72.6 ± 23.6. Univariate analyses identified time to surgery (P = .005) and MCL reconstruction (P = .001) as risk factors for Lysholm score ≤75. Univariate analyses identified patient age (P = .049), time to surgery (P = .018), and MCL reconstruction (P = .004) as risk factors for IKDC score ≤75. On subsequent multivariate analysis, MCL reconstruction was found to be a predictor of Lysholm or IKDC score of ≤75. Conclusion: Patients undergoing MCL repair in the setting of MLKI generally had higher PROs than those undergoing reconstructions at a mean 6 years of follow-up. Further work is needed to elucidate patient and surgical factors that may influence subjective outcomes after multiligament knee injuries. PMID:28357408

  1. Decisions That Affect Outcomes in the Distant Future.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    75-030-0713 and #78-072-0721 NSF Grant #FNn-72-04149-AO1 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK The Board of...lng expoctat in- about the. outcomes by charging or rebat in ; i, each cuotomr. P The concept of a social brokerage ftrm i sinilar to that ,f , charity ...contributes to charities . For this reason, we would ask the individual questions about other decisions and tradeoffs 104 .0. -e e ’. ". ’*- . " 0 Lvd 6 . he has

  2. How much do immigration and trade affect labor market outcomes?

    PubMed

    Borjas, G J; Freeman, R B; Katz, L F

    1997-01-01

    "This paper provides new estimates of the impact of immigration and trade on the U.S. labor market.... We examine the relation between economic outcomes for native workers and immigrant flows to regional labor markets.... We...use the factor proportions approach to examine the contributions of immigration and trade to recent changes in U.S. educational wage differentials and attempt to provide a broader assessment of the impact of immigration on the incomes of U.S. natives." Comments and discussion by John DiNardo, John M. Abowd, and others are included (pp. 68-85).

  3. Subjective Quality Information: Effects of Patient Experience Outcomes and Display Formats on Evaluation and Choice Intentions.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Martin; Renner, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the impact of subjective quality information in the form of aggregate patient experience outcomes on respondent evaluation and intended choice of hospitals. We compared clinical performance-based quality measures (i.e., wound infection rates) with participant evaluations and choice intentions when they were additionally provided with subjective quality information (i.e., patient experience outcomes in different display formats). Results suggest that patient experience outcomes significantly affected the evaluations and choice intentions. Additionally, we found significant effects of subjective information display formats. Limitations, directions for future research, and implications for publishing subjective quality information in health care markets are discussed.

  4. Family-School Links: How Do They Affect Educational Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan, Ed.; Dunn, Judith F., Ed.

    This book explores issues related to the links between families and schools and how they affect children's educational achievement, and is organized as follows: Part 1, titled "Families and Schools: How Can They Work Together To Promote Children's School Success?" contains the following chapters: chapter 1, "Family Involvement in…

  5. Learning with Computers in Small Groups: Cognitive and Affective Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mevarech, Zemira R.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examines the effects of cooperative and individualistic computer-assisted instruction (CAI) programs on cognitive and affective variables in Israeli grade six mathematics classes. Analyses of the data indicate that students who used CAI for drill and practice in pairs performed better than students who used the same program individually. (30…

  6. The Synergistic Effect of Affective Factors on Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Brady Michael; Lin, Huann-shyang; Yore, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how affective and self-related factors impact participation in science learning and environmental awareness and responsibility. Using PISA 2006 datasets from Taiwan and Canada having similar level of science competency, the model for this study verifies and expands an earlier model by examining the relationships among…

  7. Secondary science classroom dissections: Informing policy by evaluating cognitive outcomes and exploring affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allspaw, Kathleen M.

    Animal protection organizations claim that dissection is pedagogically unsound and that it will cause students to lose respect for non-human animals. Science teacher organizations support curricula that teach respect for animal life and include dissection. Prior research compared dissection to dissection alternatives. Four of the six studies revealed no difference between groups on tests of cognitive outcomes. One study revealed that dissection was superior, and one revealed that the alternative was superior. No differences in attitudes toward science, dissection or school were found. Attitudes toward non-human animals were not measured. This study focused on the dissections of earthworms and frogs in middle and high school classrooms. Pre and post-tests of conceptual understanding revealed failing scores and no significant pre/post differences. Because these tests required critical thinking skills, and the dissection activities did not, it is difficult to determine if the poor performance on these tests indicates the inability of the students to think critically, and/or if it indicates the ineffectiveness of dissection. Further studies of dissections that focus on critical thinking would be necessary to make this distinction. Classroom observations, student written narratives, and student and adult interviews revealed mixed attitudes toward non-human animals. Student behaviors during dissection were similar to those behaviors exhibited during non-dissection activities. Most students and adults readily supported worm dissections while they expressed some trepidation about frog dissections. Students and adults universally expressed affection for their pets and opposed the use of their own pets for dissection/research. There was slight support for the use of dogs and cats for dissection/research, but only those students who expressed hate for cats said that they could dissect cats. None of the students or adults expressed a willingness to dissect dogs. Some students

  8. SOCIOECONOMIC, CULTURAL, AND BEHAVIORAL FACTORS AFFECTING HISPANIC HEALTH OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    MORALES, LEO S.; LARA, MARIELENA; KINGTON, RAYNARD S.; VALDEZ, ROBERT O.; ESCARCE, JOSÉ J.

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher poverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of the epidemiological paradox. They find substantial support for the existence of the epidemiological paradox, particularly among Mexican Americans. Census undercounts of Hispanics, misclassification of Hispanic deaths, and emigration of Hispanics do not fully account for the epidemiological paradox. Identifying protective factors underlying the epidemiological paradox, while improving access to care and the economic conditions among Hispanics, are important research and policy implications of this review. PMID:12407964

  9. Socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors affecting Hispanic health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Morales, Leo S; Lara, Marielena; Kington, Raynard S; Valdez, Robert O; Escarce, José J

    2002-11-01

    Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher porverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of the epidemiological paradox. They find substantial support for the existence of the epidemiological paradox, particularly among Mexican Americans. Census undercounts of Hispanics, misclassification of Hispanic deaths, and emigration of Hispanics do not fully account for the epidemiological paradox. Identifying protective factors underlying the epidemiological paradox, while improving access to care and the economic conditions among Hispanics, are important research and policy implications of this review.

  10. Outcome of bacteraemia in patients admitted to the adult medical wards of the UKM hospital.

    PubMed

    Petrick, P; Kong, N C T; Nordiah, A J; Cheong, I K S; Tamil, M A

    2007-10-01

    The clinical outcome of bacteraemic patients is influenced by many factors. It is vital to know one's own local hospital epidemiological data so as to provide optimal care to the affected patients. This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the said patient population over a period of four months in the year 2005. One hundred and ninety one patients presented with bacteraemia over the study period. Fifty-two (27%) of the patients died. Mechanical ventilation, inappropriate empirical antibiotic usage, Chinese ethnicity and low serum albumin levels independently affected prognosis. These factors should alert physicians to those patients who require more intensive monitoring and care.

  11. Beyond the Basics of Clinical Outcomes Assessment: Selecting Appropriate Patient-Rated Outcomes Instruments for Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valier, Alison R.; Lam, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    The fifth edition of the "Athletic Training Education Competencies" emphasizes the concepts of clinical outcomes assessment. In athletic training, clinical outcomes assessment, especially as it relates to patient-rated outcomes (PRO) instruments, is new, which produces uncertainty with regard to how to integrate PROs into athletic…

  12. Patient Expectations as Predictors of Outcome In Patients with Acute Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Russell S.; Davis, Roger B.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Legedza, Anna; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Hrbek, Andrea; Buring, Julie E.; Post, Diana; Connelly, Maureen T.; Eisenberg, David M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have evaluated the association between patient expectations for recovery and clinical outcomes, and no study has evaluated whether asking patients to choose their therapy modifies such an association. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between patients’ expectations and functional recovery in patients with acute low back pain (LBP), and to determine whether that association is affected by giving patients choice of therapy. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care alone to usual care plus choice of chiropractic, acupuncture, or massage in 444 adults with acute LBP, lasting less than 21 days. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Primary outcome was functional disability (Roland score) at 5 and 12 weeks. Patients’ general expectations for improvement were associated with improvement in functional status (β = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.56, 1.36). A 1-point increase in general expectations was associated with a 0.96-point improvement in Roland score. The association of expectation with outcome was 2–3 times greater in the usual care group than the choice group. However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS In patients with acute LBP, higher expectations for recovery are associated with greater functional improvement. Eliciting patient expectations for improvement may be a simple way to identify patients with the highest (or lowest) likelihood of experiencing functional improvement. Incorporating questions about patient expectations in future trials may clarify the role of this important correlate of clinical outcomes. PMID:18066631

  13. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    include minor bruising/ hematoma (12.3%), diaphoresis with hypotension (2.6%), syncope (ə%), and cellulitis or phlebitis (ə%). Standard aseptic...PROBLEMS, AND DEVIATIONS Possible adverse events Possible adverse events following phlebotomy include: • Minor bruising/ hematoma (12.3...Lucht U. Metal sensitivity in patients treated for tibial fractures with plates of stainless steel. Acta Orthopedica Scandinavia 1977;48:245-9. Page 11

  14. Hot climate and perioperative outcome in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Parshotam Lal; Kathuria, Sunit; Chhabra, Sunita

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is well known that heat wave is a major cause of weather related mortality in extreme of ages. While auditing our hospital mortality record, we found higher surgical mortality in the months of summer season which inspired us to look into the impact of hot climate in elderly surgical patients. Materials and Methods: An observational prospective cohort study was undertaken to study the impact of hot climate on elderly (age > 60 yrs) surgical patients over one year when outside temperature was more than 20°C. 98 elderly patients requiring general anaesthesia for surgery were enrolled. Patients were grouped on the basis of peak outdoor temperature with a cut off value of 30°C. Group I- when peak outdoor temperature ranged between 20-30°C (comfortable zone) and Group II - when peak outdoor temperature ranged above 30°C. To reduce the bias, inclusion and exclusion criterion were defined. Meteorological factors, patient characteristics, surgical risk factors and other related data were noted. Data was analyzed using student's‘t’ and z-test for statistical significance. Results: There were statistically significant complications and prolonged hospital stay in group II as compared to I (13.21±6.44 Vs 9.81±3.54 days, P value =0.01) on univariate analysis. High risk patients had more complications in hot weather. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis showed higher adverse impact of poor physical and cardiac status than hot climate. Conclusion: Hot and humid weather adversely affect the perioperative outcome in elderly surgical patients. Patients with poor reserves are at greater perioperative risk during hot and humid climate. PMID:21814372

  15. Short-term outcome and patient satisfaction after sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Tobias; Finkensieper, Mira; Sharma, Shachi Jenny; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Wittekindt, Claus

    2013-11-01

    Sialendoscopy is an established, minimally invasive technique to diagnose and treat obstructive disorders of major salivary glands. Knowledge about patient satisfaction and quality of life is limited. All patients who underwent sialendoscopy were prospectively followed and evaluated. To determine the quality of life after sialendoscopy, an established questionnaire was evaluated (Short-Form-36 Health Survey-SF-36). To determine patient satisfaction, a self-made questionnaire was applied and evaluated. Furthermore, postoperative follow-up examination and the amount of patients who could be saved from sialadenectomy were determined. Main reasons for sialendoscopy were recurrent or permanent swelling of the affected salivary gland. 46 patients were included, 52 sialendoscopies were performed. Immediately after sialendoscopy operative ablation of the respective gland was averted in 98.1 % of the patients. After the follow-up period of 225.4 ± 79.0 days operative ablation of the respective gland was avoided in 89.9 % of the patients. Overall, 85.2 % reported an improvement of symptoms during follow-up, however, values for role-physical functioning (p = 0.025) and bodily pain (p = 0.011) still showed a significant difference when compared to a matched reference group of healthy individuals. Significant negative influence factors towards the outcome were younger age, long-term duration of symptoms and selected SF-36 items (vitality, social functioning, and mental health). Operative ablation of major salivary glands can be avoided by means of sialendoscopy in high percentages during short-term. There seems to be a high patient satisfaction in these selected cases. The duration of preoperative symptoms appears to be an important factor predisposing towards poor satisfaction.

  16. Epilepsy due to PNPO mutations: genotype, environment and treatment affect presentation and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Philippa B.; Camuzeaux, Stephane S.M.; Footitt, Emma J.; Mills, Kevin A.; Gissen, Paul; Fisher, Laura; Das, Krishna B.; Varadkar, Sophia M.; Zuberi, Sameer; McWilliam, Robert; Stödberg, Tommy; Plecko, Barbara; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Maier, Oliver; Calvert, Sophie; Riney, Kate; Wolf, Nicole I.; Livingston, John H.; Bala, Pronab; Morel, Chantal F.; Feillet, François; Raimondi, Francesco; Del Giudice, Ennio; Chong, W. Kling; Pitt, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The first described patients with pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency all had neonatal onset seizures that did not respond to treatment with pyridoxine but responded to treatment with pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Our data suggest, however, that the clinical spectrum of pyridox(am)ine 5’-phosphate oxidase deficiency is much broader than has been reported in the literature. Sequencing of the PNPO gene was undertaken for a cohort of 82 individuals who had shown a reduction in frequency and severity of seizures in response to pyridoxine or pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Novel sequence changes were studied using a new cell-free expression system and a mass spectrometry-based assay for pyridoxamine phosphate oxidase. Three groups of patients with PNPO mutations that had reduced enzyme activity were identified: (i) patients with neonatal onset seizures responding to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 6); (ii) a patient with infantile spasms (onset 5 months) responsive to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate (n = 1); and (iii) patients with seizures starting under 3 months of age responding to pyridoxine (n = 8). Data suggest that certain genotypes (R225H/C and D33V) are more likely to result in seizures that to respond to treatment with pyridoxine. Other mutations seem to be associated with infertility, miscarriage and prematurity. However, the situation is clearly complex with the same combination of mutations being seen in patients who responded and did not respond to pyridoxine. It is possible that pyridoxine responsiveness in PNPO deficiency is affected by prematurity and age at the time of the therapeutic trial. Other additional factors that are likely to influence treatment response and outcome include riboflavin status and how well the foetus has been supplied with vitamin B6 by the mother. For some patients there was a worsening of symptoms on changing from pyridoxine to pyridoxal 5’-phosphate. Many of the mutations in PNPO affected residues involved in binding flavin

  17. Intervention outcomes among HIV-affected families over 18 months.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Rice, Eric; Comulada, W Scott; Best, Karin; Elia, Carla; Peters, Katherine; Li, Li; Green, Sara; Valladares, Ena

    2012-07-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of a family-based intervention over time among HIV-affected families. Mothers living with HIV (MLH; n = 339) in Los Angeles and their school-aged children were randomized to either an intervention or control condition and followed for 18 months. MLH and their children in the intervention received 16 cognitive-behavioral, small-group sessions designed to help them maintain physical and mental health, parent while ill, address HIV-related stressors, and reduce HIV-transmission behaviors. At recruitment, MLH reported few problem behaviors related to physical health, mental health, or sexual or drug transmission acts. Compared to MLH in the control condition, intervention MLH were significantly more likely to monitor their own CD4 cell counts and their children were more likely to decrease alcohol and drug use. Most MLH and their children had relatively healthy family relationships. Family-based HIV interventions should be limited to MLH who are experiencing substantial problems.

  18. A national data infrastructure for patient-centered outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Dymek, Christine; Gingold, Janelle; Shanbhag, Avinash; Fridsma, Doug; Yong, Pierre L

    2015-01-01

    Concerted efforts are underway to improve healthcare decision-making through patient-centered outcomes research. These efforts are supported by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund, which was established within the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. This article focuses on describing national data infrastructure efforts that support patient-centered outcomes research. A national data infrastructure has the potential to decrease research costs and improve research throughput. We describe early and current efforts that demonstrated this potential, how the national effort is utilizing the lessons learned from these predecessor efforts and remaining challenges.

  19. Classifying outcomes of care for injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Nathaniel; Sobolev, Boris; Townson, Andrea; Evans, David C.; Anton, Hugh; Simons, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many trauma survivors face challenges of impaired functioning, limited activities and reduced participation. Recovery from injury after acute care, therefore, becomes an important public health issue. This commentary discusses a framework for evaluating outcomes of acute care. PMID:25421077

  20. Psychosocial Environment and Affective Outcomes in Technology-Rich Classrooms: Testing a Causal Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, Jeffrey P.; Fraser, Barry J.

    2009-01-01

    Research investigated classroom environment antecedent variables and student affective outcomes in Australian high schools. The Technology-Rich Outcomes-Focused Learning Environment Inventory (TROFLEI) was used to assess 10 classroom environment dimensions: student cohesiveness, teacher support, involvement, investigation, task orientation,…

  1. Food stoichiometry affects the outcome of Daphnia–parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    Aalto, Sanni L; Pulkkinen, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for growth in consumers. P-limitation and parasite infection comprise one of the most common stressor pairs consumers confront in nature. We conducted a life-table study using a Daphnia–microsporidian parasite model, feeding uninfected or infected Daphnia with either P-sufficient or P-limited algae, and assessed the impact of the two stressors on life-history traits of the host. Both infection and P-limitation negatively affected some life-history traits tested. However, under P-limitation, infected animals had higher juvenile growth rate as compared with uninfected animals. All P-limited individuals died before maturation, regardless of infection. The numbers of spore clusters of the microsporidian parasite did not differ in P-limited or P-sufficient hosts. P-limitation, but not infection, decreased body phosphorus content and ingestion rates of Daphnia tested in separate experiments. As parasite spore production did not suffer even under extreme P-limitation, our results suggest that parasite was less limited by P than the host. We discuss possible interpretations concerning the stoichiometrical demands of parasite and suggest that our results are explained by parasite-driven changes in carbon (C) allocation of the hosts. We conclude that the impact of nutrient starvation and parasite infection on consumers depends not only on the stoichiometric demands of host but also those of the parasite. PMID:23762513

  2. Hospital finances and patient safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Encinosa, William E; Bernard, Didem M

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals recently have experienced greater financial pressures. Whether these financial pressures have led to more patient safety problems is unknown. Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Data for Florida from 1996 to 2000, this study examines whether financial pressure at hospitals is associated with increases in the rate of patient safety events (e.g., medical errors) for major surgeries. Findings show that patients have significantly higher odds of having adverse patient safety events (nursing-related patient safety events, surgery-related patient safety events, and all likely preventable patient safety events) when hospital profit margins decline over time. The finding that a within-hospital erosion of hospital operating profits increases the rate of adverse patient safety events suggests that any cost-cutting efforts be carefully designed and managed.

  3. The Kupffer Cell Number Affects the Outcome of Living Donor Liver Transplantation from Elderly Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, Masaaki; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Soyama, Akihiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Adachi, Tomohiko; Natsuda, Koji; Kugiyama, Tota; Hara, Takanobu; Okada, Satomi; Imamura, Hajime; Miuma, Satoshi; Miyaaki, Hisamitsu

    2016-01-01

    Background There have been no previous reports how Kupffer cells affect the outcome of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) with an elderly donor. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of Kupffer cells on LDLT. Methods A total of 161 adult recipients underwent LDLT. The graft survival, prognostic factors for survival, and graft failure after LDLT were examined between cases with a young donor (<50, n = 112) and an elderly donor (≥50, N = 49). The Kupffer cells, represented by CD68-positive cell in the graft, were examined in the young and elderly donors. Results In a multivariable analysis, a donor older than 50 years, sepsis, and diabetes mellitus were significant predictors of graft failure after LDLT. The CD68 in younger donors was significantly more expressed than that in elderly donors. The group with a less number of CD68-positive cells in the graft had a significantly poor survival in the elderly donor group and prognostic factor for graft failure. Conclusions The worse outcome of LDLT with elderly donors might be related to the lower number of Kupffer cells in the graft, which can lead to impaired recovery of the liver function and may predispose patients to infectious diseases after LDLT. PMID:27819035

  4. Patient Care Outcomes: Implications for the Military Health Services Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-05

    assessment of "outcome". Stroke , 13, 873-876. 63. Ferguson, G. H., Hildman, T., & Nichols, B. (1987). The effect of nursing care planning systems on patient...Outcome assessment. (1987). New England Journal of Medicine, 317(4), 251-252. 177. Partridge, C. J. (1982). The outcome of physiotherapy and its...measurement. Physiotherapy , 68(11), 362-363. 178. Penckofer, S. H., & Holm, K. (1984). Early appraisal of coronary revascularization on quality of life

  5. The Effects of Vasospasm and Re-Bleeding on the Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage from Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Filipce, Venko; Caparoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Vasospasm and re-bleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm are devastating complication that can severely affect the outcome of the patients. We are presenting a series of total number of 224 patients treated and operated at our Department due to subarachnoid hemorrhage, out of which certain number developed vasospasm and re-bleeding. We are evaluating the effect of these complications on the outcome of the patients according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at the day of discharge. In our experience both vasospasm and ReSAH can significantly influence the outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage from ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

  6. Aggressive Chordomas: Clinical Outcome of 13 Patients.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Angelini, Andrea; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Pala, Elisa; Calabrò, Teresa; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Katzouraki, Galatia; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Pneumaticos, Spyros G; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Ruggieri, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    The authors reviewed the files of all patients with chordomas who were admitted and treated at their institutions from 1975 to 2012. Patients were categorized by early local recurrence and metastasis. Aggressive clinical behavior was defined as local recurrence and metastasis within 24 months of diagnosis and adequate treatment (wide en bloc resection with microscopically negative tumor margins). According to these criteria, 13 patients (14.3%) had aggressive chordomas, including 7 men and 6 women, with mean age of 54 years (range, 37-65 years) at diagnosis and treatment. All patients had preoperative tumor biopsy, followed by resection with partial (7 patients) or total sacrectomy (6 patients). In all cases, biopsy and histologic analysis of resected tumor specimens showed conventional chordomas. Resection margins were wide (grossly negative) in 6 patients and wide contaminated in 7 patients. Mean maximum tumor diameter was 11.8 cm (range, 5-21 cm). Mean follow-up was 43 months (range, 8-131 months). Rates of local recurrence, metastasis, and death were evaluated. At the last follow-up, all patients had local recurrence at a mean of 13 months (range, 5-22 months). Histologic examination of recurrent tumors showed a dedifferentiated chordoma with a fibrosarcoma component in 2 patients and no histologic change in the remaining patients. In addition, 8 patients had metastases at a mean of 13 months (range, 4-24 months) and died of their disease. All histologic findings of metastatic lesions were similar to those of primary tumors. Early diagnosis of aggressive tumors requires close follow-up of patients with chordomas. Metastasis is common, with resultant poor survival. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(2):e248-e254.].

  7. Visual Acuity Testing: Feedback Affects Neither Outcome nor Reproducibility, but Leaves Participants Happier

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Michael; Schäfer, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of visual acuity is a well standardized procedure at least for expert opinions and clinical trials. It is often recommended not giving patients feedback on the correctness of their responses. As this viewpoint has not been quantitatively examined so far, we quantitatively assessed possible effects of feedback on visual acuity testing. In 40 normal participants we presented Landolt Cs in 8 orientations using the automated Freiburg Acuity Test (FrACT, outcome measures were absolute visual acuity (logMAR), its test-retest agreement (limits of agreement) and participants’ comfort estimates on a 5-step symmetric Likert scale. Feedback influenced acuity outcome significantly (p = 0.02), but with a tiny effect size: 0.02 logMAR poorer acuity for (D) compared to (A), even weaker effects for (B) and (C). Test-retest agreement was high (limits of agreement: ± 1.0 lines) and did not depend on feedback (p>0.5). The comfort ranking clearly differed, by 2 steps on the Likert scale: the condition (A)–no feedback–was on average “slightly uncomfortable”, the other three conditions were “slightly comfortable” (p<0.0001). Feedback affected neither reproducibility nor the acuity outcome to any relevant extent. The participants, however, reported markedly greater comfort with any kind of feedback. We conclude that systematic feedback (as implemented in FrACT) offers nothing but advantages for routine use. PMID:26824693

  8. Patient Partnerships Transforming Sleep Medicine Research and Clinical Care: Perspectives from the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network

    PubMed Central

    Redline, Susan; Baker-Goodwin, Si; Bakker, Jessie P.; Epstein, Matthew; Hanes, Sherry; Hanson, Mark; Harrington, Zinta; Johnston, James C.; Kapur, Vishesh K.; Keepnews, David; Kontos, Emily; Lowe, Andy; Owens, Judith; Page, Kathy; Rothstein, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Due to an ongoing recent evolution in practice, sleep medicine as a discipline has been compelled to respond to the converging pressures to reduce costs, improve outcomes, and demonstrate value. Patient “researchers” are uniquely placed to participate in initiatives that address the specific needs and priorities of patients and facilitate the identification of interventions with high likelihood of acceptance by the “customer.” To date, however, the “patient voice” largely has been lacking in processes affecting relevant policies and practice guidelines. In this Special Report, patient and research leaders of the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network (SAPCON), a national collaborative group of patients, researchers and clinicians working together to promote patient-centered comparative effectiveness research, discuss these interrelated challenges in the context of sleep apnea, and the role patients and patient-centered networks may play in informing evidence-based research designed to meet patient's needs. We first briefly discuss the challenges facing sleep medicine associated with costs, outcomes, and value. We then discuss the key role patients and patient-centered networks can play in efforts to design research to guide better sleep health care, and national support for such initiatives. Finally, we summarize some of the challenges in moving to a new paradigm of patient-researcher-clinician partnerships. By forging strong partnerships among patients, clinicians and researchers, networks such as SAPCON can serve as a living demonstration of how to achieve value in health care. Citation: Redline S, Baker-Goodwin S, Bakker JP, Epstein M, Hanes S, Hanson M, Harrington Z, Johnston JC, Kapur VK, Keepnews D, Kontos E, Lowe A, Owens J, Page K, Rothstein N, Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network. Patient partnerships transforming sleep medicine research and clinical care: perspectives from the Sleep Apnea Patient-Centered Outcomes Network. J

  9. Hospital Nurses' Work Environment Characteristics and Patient Safety Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Scott, Linda D

    2016-08-01

    This integrative literature review assesses the relationship between hospital nurses' work environment characteristics and patient safety outcomes and recommends directions for future research based on examination of the literature. Using an electronic search of five databases, 18 studies published in English between 1999 and 2016 were identified for review. All but one study used a cross-sectional design, and only four used a conceptual/theoretical framework to guide the research. No definition of work environment was provided in most studies. Differing variables and instruments were used to measure patient outcomes, and findings regarding the effects of work environment on patient outcomes were inconsistent. To clarify the relationship between nurses' work environment characteristics and patient safety outcomes, researchers should consider using a longitudinal study design, using a theoretical foundation, and providing clear operational definitions of concepts. Moreover, given the inconsistent findings of previous studies, they should choose their measurement methodologies with care.

  10. Does pharmacotherapy improve cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Mittal, Mayank; Aggarwal, Kul; Littrell, Rachel L; Agrawal, Harsh; Alpert, Martin A

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) occurs commonly in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) including those treated with hemodialysis (HD), and is associated with poor outcomes in this population. Pharmacologic management of hypertension, dyslipidemia, acute and chronic coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation in the general population is supported by the results of high-quality, randomized, controlled clinical trials. Pharmacotherapy of these disorders in the general population is effective in improving clinical outcomes. In contrast, information concerning the effect of pharmacotherapy on mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CKD, and particularly in HD patients, is limited. Available data suggest that, in general, pharmacotherapy of hypertension and dyslipidemia, anti-platelet therapy of CVD, and anticoagulant therapy in patients with atrial fibrillation are less effective in HD patients than in the general population or even in patients with early stage of CKD.

  11. The impact of surgical wait time on patient-based outcomes in posterior lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Braybrooke, Jason; Ahn, Henry; Gallant, Aimee; Ford, Michael; Bronstein, Yigel; Finkelstein, Joel; Yee, Albert

    2007-11-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted on patients undergoing posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal disorders. The study purpose was to evaluate the effect of wait time to surgery on patient derived generic and disease specific functional outcome following surgery. A prolonged wait to surgery may adversely affect surgical outcome. Although there is literature on the effect of wait time to surgery in surgical fields such as oncology, cardiac, opthamologic, and total joint arthroplasty, little is known regarding the effect of wait time to surgery as it pertains to the spinal surgical population. Consecutive patients undergoing elective posterior lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative disorders were recruited. Short-Form 36 and Oswestry disability questionnaires were administered (pre-operatively, and at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year post-operatively). Patients completed a questionnaire regarding their experience with the wait time to surgery. The study cohort consisted of 70 patients with follow-up in 53/70 (76%). Time intervals from the onset of patient symptoms to initial consultation by family physician through investigations, spinal surgical consultation and surgery were quantified. Time intervals were compared to patient specific improvements in reported outcome following surgery using Cox Regression analysis. The effect of patient and surgical parameters on wait time was evaluated using the median time as a reference for those patients who had either a longer or shorter wait. Significant improvements in patient derived outcome were observed comparing post-operative to pre-operative baseline scores. The greatest improvements were observed in aspects relating to physical function and pain. A longer wait to surgery was associated with less improvement in outcome following surgery (SF-36 domains of BP, GH, RP, VT). A longer wait time to surgery negatively influences the results of posterior lumbar spinal surgery for degenerative conditions

  12. Toll-like Receptor 1 Polymorphisms Affect Innate Immune Responses and Outcomes in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wurfel, Mark M.; Gordon, Anthony C.; Holden, Tarah D.; Radella, Frank; Strout, Jeanna; Kajikawa, Osamu; Ruzinski, John T.; Rona, Gail; Black, R. Anthony; Stratton, Seth; Jarvik, Gail P.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Rieder, Mark; Sevransky, Jonathan; Maloney, James P.; Moss, Marc; Martin, Greg; Shanholtz, Carl; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Gao, Li; Brower, Roy; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Walley, Keith R.; Russell, James A.; Martin, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: Polymorphisms affecting Toll-like receptor (TLR)–mediated responses could predispose to excessive inflammation during an infection and contribute to an increased risk for poor outcomes in patients with sepsis. Objectives: To identify hypermorphic polymorphisms causing elevated TLR-mediated innate immune cytokine and chemokine responses and to test whether these polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to death, organ dysfunction, and infections in patients with sepsis. Methods: We screened single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 43 TLR-related genes to identify variants affecting TLR-mediated inflammatory responses in blood from healthy volunteers ex vivo. The SNP associated most strongly with hypermorphic responses was tested for associations with death, organ dysfunction, and type of infection in two studies: a nested case–control study in a cohort of intensive care unit patients with sepsis, and a case–control study using patients with sepsis, patients with sepsis-related acute lung injury, and healthy control subjects. Measurements and Main Results: The SNP demonstrating the most hypermorphic effect was the G allele of TLR1−7202A/G (rs5743551), which associated with elevated TLR1-mediated cytokine production (P < 2 × 10−20). TLR1−7202G marked a coding SNP that causes higher TLR1-induced NF-κB activation and higher cell surface TLR1 expression. In the cohort of patients with sepsis TLR1−7202G predicted worse organ dysfunction and death (odds ratio, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–3.09). In the case-control study TLR1−7202G was associated with sepsis-related acute lung injury (odds ratio, 3.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.59–7.27). TLR1−7202G also associated with a higher prevalence of gram-positive cultures in both clinical studies. Conclusions: Hypermorphic genetic variation in TLR1 is associated with increased susceptibility to organ dysfunction, death, and gram-positive infection in sepsis. PMID

  13. Intracerebral Hemorrhage Outcomes in Patients with Systemic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Santosh B.; Shastri, Aditi; Merkler, Alexander E.; Hanley, Daniel F.; Ziai, Wendy C.; Fink, Matthew E.; Iadecola, Costantino; Kamel, Hooman; Navi, Babak B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Single-center studies suggest that patients with cancer have similar outcomes after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) compared to patients without cancer. However, these studies were limited by small sample sizes and high rates of intratumoral hemorrhage. Our hypothesis was that systemic cancer patients without brain involvement fare worse after ICH than patients without cancer. Methods We identified all patients diagnosed with spontaneous ICH from 2002 through 2011 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Our predictor variable was systemic cancer. Our primary outcome was discharge disposition, dichotomized into favorable discharge (home/self-care or rehabilitation) or unfavorable discharge (nursing facility, hospice, or death). We used logistic regression to compare outcomes and performed secondary analyses by cancer subtype (i.e., non-metastatic solid tumors, non-metastatic hematologic tumors, and metastatic solid or hematologic tumors). Results Among 597,046 identified ICH patients, 22,394 (3.8%) had systemic cancer. Stroke risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes were more common in patients without cancer, while anticoagulant use and higher Charlson comorbidity scores were more common among cancer patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, and hospital-level characteristics, patients with cancer had higher odds of death (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.56–1.69) and lower odds of favorable discharge (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.56–0.63) than patients without cancer. Amongst cancer groups, patients with non-metastatic hematologic tumors and those with metastatic disease fared the worst. Conclusions Patients with systemic cancer have higher mortality and less favorable discharge outcomes after ICH than patients without cancer. Cancer subtype may influence outcomes after ICH. PMID:27569708

  14. Patient-important outcome for the assessment of fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Hoang-Kim, A; Miclau, T; Goldhahn, J; Nijman, T H; Poolman, R W

    2014-06-01

    Current evidence indicates that fracture healing assessment is limited to the use of one or two domains (such as pain, range of motion or mobility) in any single study. Functional outcome measures, which include physician-rated or observer-based impairment ratings and patient self-reported or observer-based activity limitation measures, better position the effectiveness of a given intervention towards patient-important outcomes. Health status measures, for example, cover a wide-range of physical, emotional, and social health dimensions. In this paper, we will examine the utility of metrics to assess fracture healing that are important to both the patient and provider, with selected examples from the recent literature. We recommend outcome measures with established and verified reliability and validity. Policy-makers and other stakeholders need to have an accurate assessment of treatment outcome that includes changes in function over time-adequate measures, should be re-applied at periodic intervals.

  15. Patient-reported outcomes in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Gregor; Hopwood, Christopher J; Jacob, Gitta A; Brändle, Laura S; Schulte-Vels, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) refers to measures that emphasize the subjective view of patients about their health-related conditions and behaviors. Typically, PROs include self-report questionnaires and clinical interviews. Defining PROs for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is particularly challenging given the disorder's high symptomatic heterogeneity, high comorbidity with other psychiatric conditions, highly fluctuating symptoms, weak correlations between symptoms and functional outcomes, and lack of valid and reliable experimental measures to complement self-report data. Here, we provide an overview of currently used BPD outcome measures and discuss them from clinical, psychometric, experimental, and patient perspectives. In addition, we review the most promising leads to improve BPD PROs, including the DSM-5 Section III, the Recovery Approach, Ecological Momentary Assessments, and novel experimental measures of social functioning that are associated with functional and social outcomes.

  16. Hot Climate and Perioperative Outcome in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhawna; Katyal, Sunil; Gautam, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extreme hot climatic conditions constitute a major public health threat. Recent studies have shown higher rate of perioperative complications during hot weather. Although a lot of researches have been carried out to evaluate effect of hot climatic conditions and its correlation with other medical conditions, but very little has been studied in trauma patients. Aim To evaluate the impact of hot climatic conditions on perioperative morbidity in trauma patients. Materials and Methods We enrolled 100 trauma patients scheduled for surgery after approval by the Hospital and University Ethical Committee. Patients were grouped as Control Group (C) when outdoor temperature ranged in comfortable zone i.e., 20-290C and Study Group (S) when outdoor temperature ranged 400C or more. Patients living in regular air conditioned atmosphere (more than 18 hours per day) and with co-morbid conditions or on drugs interfering with temperature regulation were excluded. Student’s t-test, z-test and chi-square tests were used for statistical analysis. Results Both groups were comparable in terms of demographics, age (control group C=38.2±12.93 years and in group S= 40.14 ± 15.98 years), sex, socioeconomic status and type of surgery. Mean Trauma Index Score (TIS) were 6.20±1.56 and 5.80±1.31 respectively. All patients were of low risk as per Shoe Maker’s risk criteria. Post Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) stay was similar. Mean duration of hospital stay was 12.16 ± 8.50 days in group C and 10.98 ± 6.90 days in group S (p-value 0.21). 20% patients in group C whereas 54% in group S had complications (p= 0.009). There was a higher incidence of infections as well as respiratory distress in group S. On multiple logistic regression analysis peak environmental temperature was found to be the single independent risk factor for predicting perioperative morbidity. Conclusion High ambient temperature adversely affects the outcome of surgery even in low risk young trauma patients

  17. The effects of different sources of occupational stress on affective, motivational, and psychosomatic outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Ovalle, N.K. II.

    1991-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of role conflict, role ambiguity, and five additional potential sources of occupational stress on an affective outcome (job satisfaction), a motivational outcome (intent to quit), and two psychosomatic outcomes (mental and physical anxiety). In addition to role conflict and role ambiguity, the five additional sources of occupational stress centered on job characteristics, work pressures, rewards and opportunities, interaction of the job and home life, and lack of job challenge. Data were collected from 85 technicians and managers in a service organization. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses indicated that each of the sources of stress have significant yet different effects on the outcomes. Moreover, role conflict and ambiguity did not have as much of an effect across all outcomes as the other five sources of stress. These findings could be used to improve the measurement, understanding, and treatment of occupational stress. Other implications are discussed. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  18. Modeling Safety Outcomes on Patient Care Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Anita; Effken, Judith; Carley, Kathleen; Lee, Ju-Sung

    In its groundbreaking report, "To Err is Human," the Institute of Medicine reported that as many as 98,000 hospitalized patients die each year due to medical errors (IOM, 2001). Although not all errors are attributable to nurses, nursing staff (registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and technicians) comprise 54% of the caregivers. Therefore, it is not surprising, that AHRQ commissioned the Institute of Medicine to do a follow-up study on nursing, particularly focusing on the context in which care is provided. The intent was to identify characteristics of the workplace, such as staff per patient ratios, hours on duty, education, and other environmental characteristics. That report, "Keeping Patients Safe: Transforming the Work Environment of Nurses" was published this spring (IOM, 2004).

  19. Outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Clinical experience with 68 patients.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Raffaele; Boniardi, Marco; Sansonna, Fabio; Maggioni, Dario; De Carli, Stefano; Costanzi, Andrea; Scandroglio, Ildo; Ferrari, Giovanni Carlo; Di Lernia, Stefano; Magistro, Carmelo; Loli, Paola; Grossrubatscher, Erika

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic adrenalectomy (LA). Pathology, size and bilateral site of lesions were considered. Between December 1998 and May 2007 in our institution a total of 68 patients of mean age of 53 years underwent unilateral (n=57) or bilateral (n=11) LA. Adrenal masses averaged 5.4cm in size (range 1.2-13cm) and 56.7g in weight (range 10-265) including 71 benign and 8 malignant lesions. A total of 79 adrenal glands were resected, 44 right sided and 35 left sided. Removal was complete in 77 cases and partial (sparing adrenalectomy) in 1 patient affected by bilateral pheochomocytoma. Three left adrenalectomies for pheochromocytoma were robot-assisted. The transperitoneal lateral approach was preferred and the posterior retroperitoneal approach was adopted in 5 patients. The mean duration of surgery for each LA was 138+/-90min and 3.8 trocar were used on average (range 3-6). Conversion was needed in 3 cases owing to difficult dissection of large masses. Estimated mean blood loss for each LA was 95+/-30ml and it was greater for bilateral LA. Mortality was nil and morbidity was 5.8%. The average length of hospital stay (LOS) in surgical unit was 4+/-2.4 days (range 2-8). Patients affected by hormone secreting or bilateral lesions, by unilateral or bilateral pheochromocytoma and by bilateral Cushing's disease were transferred to the endocrinological ward so that their overall hospital stay was prolonged to 9+/-2.8 days on average (range 7-17). Mean duration of follow-up of patients was 38 months (range 2-100) and demonstrated acceptable endocrine results. Three primary cortical carcinomas were discovered as chance findings on histologic examination. While long-term results after LA for cortical carcinomas were poor and LA is not recommended in such cases, long-term results after LA for adrenal metastases were encouraging.

  20. The effects of affective and cognitive empathy on adolescents' behavior and outcomes in conflicts with mothers.

    PubMed

    Van Lissa, Caspar J; Hawk, Skyler T; Meeus, Wim H J

    2017-02-09

    The current study investigated whether manipulations of affective and cognitive empathy have differential effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes in adolescent-mother conflict discussions. We further examined how these situational empathy inductions interact with preexisting empathic dispositions. To promote ecological validity, we conducted home visits to study conflict discussions about real disagreements in adolescent-mother relationships. We explored the roles of sex, age, and maternal support and power as covariates and moderators. Results indicated that the affective empathy manipulation had no significant effects on behavior, although a trend in the hypothesized direction suggested that affective empathy might promote active problem solving. The cognitive empathy manipulation led to lower conflict escalation and promoted other-oriented listening for adolescents low in dispositional cognitive empathy. State-trait interactions indicated that the empathy manipulations had significant effects on self-reported outcomes for adolescents lower in dispositional empathic concern. For these adolescents, both manipulations promoted outcome satisfaction, but only the cognitive manipulation promoted perceived fairness. This suggests that cognitive empathy, in particular, allows adolescents to distance themselves from the emotional heat of a conflict and listen to mothers' point of view, leading to outcomes perceived as both satisfying and fair. These findings are relevant for interventions and clinicians because they demonstrate unique effects of promoting affective versus cognitive empathy. Because even these minimal manipulations promoted significant effects on observed behavior and self-reported outcomes, particularly for low-empathy adolescents, stronger structural interventions are likely to have marked benefits.

  1. Physical outcomes of patients with burn injuries--a 12 month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Mark; McMahon, Margaret; Stiller, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    There is only limited research documenting functional ability, physical fitness, and health related quality of life after burn injury. The objective of this study was to measure a comprehensive range of physiotherapy-related outcomes over a 12-month period for patients with significant burn injuries. A prospective study was performed on consecutive patients admitted to the Royal Adelaide Hospital over a 12-month period. Outcomes were measured at admission and discharge from hospital and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, and comprised the: Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, Lower Extremity Functional Scale questionnaire, shuttle walk test, grip strength and scar appearance using the Matching Assessment with Photographs of Scars. A total of 86 patients (74 male, mean age 38 years) participated. There was a significant deterioration in all outcomes in the first few months after burn injury, with most outcomes improving towards baseline levels by 6 months. However, lower limb function (Lower Extremity Functional Scale) remained significantly reduced at 12 months and functional exercise capacity (shuttle walk test) was still markedly reduced at 6 months compared with predicted normal values. The total burn surface area significantly affected many of the outcomes. In conclusion, for this sample of patients after burn injury, there was an acceptable rate of recovery for physiotherapy-related outcomes, in that most measures had returned to near baseline levels by 6 months postinjury, with the exception of lower limb function and functional exercise capacity.

  2. Eye movement during facial affect recognition by patients with schizophrenia, using Japanese pictures of facial affect.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yuko; Ando, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Sayaka; Norikane, Kazuya; Kurayama, Shigeki; Abe, Hiroshi; Ishida, Yasushi

    2011-10-01

    A possible relationship between recognition of facial affect and aberrant eye movement was examined in patients with schizophrenia. A Japanese version of standard pictures of facial affect was prepared. These pictures of basic emotions (surprise, anger, happiness, disgust, fear, sadness) were shown to 19 schizophrenic patients and 20 healthy controls who identified emotions while their eye movements were measured. The proportion of correct identifications of 'disgust' was significantly lower for schizophrenic patients, their eye fixation time was significantly longer for all pictures of facial affect, and their eye movement speed was slower for some facial affects (surprise, fear, and sadness). One index, eye fixation time for "happiness," showed a significant difference between the high- and low-dosage antipsychotic drug groups. Some expected facial affect recognition disorder was seen in schizophrenic patients responding to the Japanese version of affect pictures, but there was no correlation between facial affect recognition disorder and aberrant eye movement.

  3. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT) Mr. Reginald Richard American Burn...and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT representing Acuity, Contractures and Time, is...wound leading to scar contracture begins almost immediately after the burning process stops. Rehabilitation treatment delivered prior to beginning

  4. Patient Satisfaction and Sustained Outcomes of Drug Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHIWEI; GERSTEIN, DEAN R.; FRIEDMANN, PETER D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between patients’ self-rated satisfaction with treatment services during and shortly after treatment with their drug use outcomes at one year follow-up, using a U.S. national panel survey of patients in 62 methadone, outpatient, short-term residential, and long-term residential programs. A favorable evaluation of treatment near the time of discharge had a significant positive relationship with drug use improvement outcomes approximately one year later, independent of the separately measured effects of treatment duration, counseling intensity, patient adherence to treatment protocols, pre-treatment drug use patterns, and other characteristics of patients and treatment programs. PMID:18420772

  5. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  6. Does the Time of Radiotherapy Affect Treatment Outcomes? A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Chan, S; Rowbottom, L; McDonald, R; Bjarnason, G A; Tsao, M; Danjoux, C; Barnes, E; Popovic, M; Lam, H; DeAngelis, C; Chow, E

    2017-04-01

    Circadian rhythm-dependent cell cycle progression produces daily variations in radiosensitivity. This literature review aims to summarise the data on whether radiotherapy outcomes differ depending on administration time. A literature search was conducted on Ovid Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and PubMed using key words such as 'radiotherapy', 'circadian rhythm', 'treatment outcome' and 'survival'. Articles evaluating the correlation between radiotherapy time and outcomes in cancer patients were included and relevant information was extracted. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. Four investigated lung cancer patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastases, with one study observing improved local control and survival in patients treated in the morning. Another two studies with breast and cervical cancer patients observed that the prevalence of toxicities was higher in afternoon and morning cohorts, respectively. Two studies in head and neck cancer patients found trends indicating morning patients experienced less oral mucositis. Increased toxicities and biochemical failure rates were associated with evening treatment in prostate cancer patients. As inconsistencies in the literature exist regarding the time dependency of radiotherapy outcomes, further investigation is warranted.

  7. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Williams, David A; Kratz, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is classified as a chronic pain condition accompanied by symptoms of fatigue, sleep problems, problems with cognition, negative mood, limited functional status, and the presence of other chronic overlapping pain conditions. Comprehensive assessment of all of these components can be challenging. This paper provides an overview of patient-reported approaches that can be taken to assess FM in the contexts of diagnosis, symptom monitoring, phenotyping/characterization, and for purposes of clinical trials.

  8. The Frequency and Outcome of Acute Kidney Injury in a Tertiary Hospital: Which Factors Affect Mortality?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Sukru; Arı, Derya; Ozkan, Gulsum; Cansız, Muammer; Kaynar, Kubra

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in hospitalized patients. Incidence and mortality rates vary from country to country, and according to different in-hospital monitoring units and definitions of AKI. The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting frequency of AKI and mortality in our hospital. We retrospectively evaluated data for 1550 patients diagnosed with AKI and 788 patients meeting the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline AKI criteria out of a total of 174 852 patients hospitalized in our institution between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Staging was performed based on KDIGO Clinical Practice for Acute Kidney Injury and RIFLE (Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of kidney function and End-stage renal failure). Demographic and biochemical data were recorded and correlations with mortality were assessed. The frequency of AKI in our hospital was 0.9%, with an in-hospital mortality rate of 34.6%. At multivariate analysis, diastolic blood pressure (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.87-0.92; P < 0.001), monitoring in the intensive care unit (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09-0.38; P < 0.001), urine output (OR 4.00, 95% CI 2.03-7.89; P < 0.001), duration of oliguria (OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.34-1.69; P < 0.001), length of hospitalization (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88; P < 0.001), dialysis requirement (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.12-4.71; P < 0.05), APACHE II score (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.24; P < 0.001), and albumin level (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.50; P < 0.001) were identified as independent determinants affecting mortality. Frequency of AKI and associated mortality rates in our regional reference hospital were compatible with those in the literature. This study shows that KDIGO criteria are more sensitive in determining AKI. Mortality was not correlated with staging based on RIFLE or KDIGO. Nonetheless, our identification of urine output as one of the independent determinants of mortality suggests that this

  9. Patient preferences and healthcare outcomes: an ecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Street, Richard L; Elwyn, Glyn; Epstein, Ronald M

    2012-04-01

    This article examines the nature of patients' preferences for healthcare and whether clinician accommodation of patient preferences influences health outcomes. First, we provide a conceptualization of patient preferences along with their key attributes. Second, we review research on the relationship between health outcomes and patient preferences for treatments and for the process of care (e.g., preferred involvement in decision-making). Third, following a critique of this literature, we present an ecological model of patient preferences that, while acknowledging that patient preferences may emerge from various contexts (e.g., family or media exposure), we focus on the important role that clinical encounters and patients' health-related experiences play in the elicitation and construction of patient preferences. Fourth, we propose two pathways, one behavioral (adherence) and the other psychological (sense of autonomy or satisfaction with decision), through which meeting patient preferences could lead to better health outcomes. Fifth, we discuss how preferences can be elicited and clarified through patient-centered conversations. We conclude with implications for future research and clinical practice.

  10. Outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy for cancer in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Scurtu, Radu; Bachellier, Philippe; Oussoultzoglou, Elie; Rosso, Edoardo; Maroni, Rodrigo; Jaeck, Daniel

    2006-06-01

    During the last decade, the outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for cancer showed a continuous improvement. Therefore, an increasing number of patients, especially elderly patients, have been considered for this procedure. However, the debate on the possible deleterious influence of patients' advanced age on their postoperative outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy still continues. From June 1995 to October 2003, 70 elderly patients (range, 70-84 years) underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreato-gastrostomy for cancer. Among them, 38 patients were 70-75 years old and 32 were > or =75 years. Patients were identified from a prospective database of a single institution, and their records were reviewed retrospectively. Patient and tumor characteristics, postoperative morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, readmission rate, and overall survival were compared between the two groups. There were no statistical differences regarding the postoperative mortality (P = 0.205), overall morbidity (P = 0.267), mean length of hospital stay (P = 0.345), and readmission rate (P = 1) between both groups. Only delayed gastric emptying was significantly more frequent in patients > or =75 years (P = 0.039). The median overall survival was 20 months. Survival was significantly influenced by the pathological type of the tumor, with worse results for patients with ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. In elderly patients, age does not seem to influence the postoperative outcome after pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreato-gastrostomy.

  11. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures.

  12. Patients with learning difficulties: outcome on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Borràs, Mercè; Sorolla, Carol; Carrera, Dolores; Martín, Marisa; Villagrassa, Esther; Fernández, Elvira

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we identified patients who had difficulties learning the minimum knowledge and skills required to carry out peritoneal dialysis (PD), and we compared the outcomes in this subgroup of patients with outcomes in the general PD population. We calculated the mean learning sessions needed by our total PD population during the training period. We then assigned patients to one of two groups according to the number of learning sessions they needed. Patients who required a number of sessions equal to or less than the mean were placed in the "standard learning" group; patients who required more sessions but who reached the minimum knowledge and skills were placed in the "learning difficulties " group. We compared these two groups in terms of age, sex, diabetes status, autonomy to perform PD, family support, education level, residual renal function, and Charlson comorbidity index. Outcomes on PD included time to first peritonitis episode, peritonitis rate, percentage of patients free of peritonitis during follow-up, survival time on PD, and transfer to hemodialysis. Patients with learning difficulties were older and had more comorbidities. Outcomes on PD in the learning difficulties group were similar to those in the standard learning group, except for time to first peritonitis.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Soh, Pauline; Ong, Clarissa; Esmond Seow, Lee Seng; Picco, Louisa; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article was to provide an overview of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and related measures that have been examined in the context of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The current review focused on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) that evaluated three broad outcome domains: functioning, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and OCD-related symptoms. The present review ultimately included a total of 155 unique articles and 22 PROMs. An examination of the PROs revealed that OCD patients tend to suffer from significant functional disability, and report lower HRQoL than controls. OCD patients report greater symptom severity than patients with other mental disorders and evidence indicates that PROMs are sensitive to change and may be even better than clinician-rated measures at predicting treatment outcomes. Nonetheless, it should be noted that the measures reviewed lacked patient input in their development. Future research on PROMs must involve patient perspectives and include rigorous psychometric evaluation of these measures. PMID:25152661

  14. Desperation and other affective states in suicidal patients.

    PubMed

    Hendin, Herbert; Maltsberger, John T; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Szanto, Katalin; Rabinowicz, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Data collected from 26 therapists who were treating patients when they died by suicide were used to identify intense affective states in such patients preceding the suicide. Eleven therapists provided comparable data on 26 patients they had treated who were seriously depressed but not suicidal. Although the two groups had similar numbers diagnosed with MDD, the suicide patients showed a significantly higher total number of intense affects in addition to depression. The acute affective state most associated with a suicide crisis was desperation. Hopelessness, rage, abandonment, self-hatred, and anxiety were also significantly more frequently evidenced in the suicide patients.

  15. Enhancing periodontal health through regenerative approaches: a commentary on the need for patient-reported outcomes.

    PubMed

    Inglehart, Marita R

    2015-02-01

    Starting in the 1970s, social scientists have discussed the importance of assessing subjective indicators of well-being and quality of life. Medical researchers followed this line of reasoning since the 1990s, emphasizing the significance of understanding how disease and its treatment affect patients' quality of life. Since the start of the 21(st) century, oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) received increasingly more attention. While research concerning the effects of periodontal disease and its surgical and non-surgical treatment on patients' lives has been considered in numerous studies, research including patient-reported outcomes when assessing how periodontal health can be enhanced through regenerative approaches is largely missing. This commentary proposes to consider 1) OHRQoL and 2) patients' treatment satisfaction as patient-reported outcomes in conjunction with objectively measured patient-centered factors, and discusses the value of such an approach.

  16. Does crossover innervation really affect the clinical outcome? A comparison of outcome between unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Oruç, Melike; Ozer, Kadri; Çolak, Özlem; Kankaya, Yüksel; Koçer, Uğur

    2016-09-01

    Digital nerve injuries are the mostly detected nerve injury in the upper extremity. However, since the clinical phenomenon of crossover innervation at some degree from uninjured digital nerve to the injured side occurs after digital nerve injuries is sustained, one could argue that this concept might even result in the overestimation of the outcome of the digital nerve repair. With this knowledge in mind, this study aimed to present novel, pure, focused and valuable clinical data by comparing the outcomes of bilateral and unilateral digital nerve repair. A retrospective review of 28 fingers with unilateral or bilateral digital nerve repair using end-to-end technique in 19 patients within 2 years was performed. Weber's two-point discrimination, sharp/dull discrimination, warm/cold sensation and Visual Analog Scale scoring were measured at final 12-month follow ups in all patients. There was no significant difference in recovery of sensibility after unilateral and bilateral digital nerve repairs. Though there is crossover innervation microscopically, it is not important in the clinical evaluation period. According to clinical findings from this study, crossover innervations appear to be negligible in the estimation of outcomes of digital neurorrhaphy.

  17. Prescription Drug Insurance Coverage and Patient Health Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Huybrechts, Krista F.; Choudhry, Niteesh K.; Fulchino, Lisa A.; Isaman, Danielle L.; Kowal, Mary K.; Brennan, Troyen A.

    2015-01-01

    Previous reviews have shown that changes in prescription drug insurance benefits can affect medication use and adherence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to identify studies addressing the association between prescription drug coverage and health outcomes. Studies were included if they collected empirical data on expansions or restrictions of prescription drug coverage and if they reported clinical outcomes. We found 23 studies demonstrating that broader prescription drug insurance reduces use of other health care services and has a positive impact on patient outcomes. Coverage gaps or caps on drug insurance generally led to worse outcomes. States should consider implementing the Affordable Care Act expansions in drug coverage to improve the health of low-income patients receiving state-based health insurance. PMID:25521879

  18. Outcomes after hip arthroscopy in patients with workers' compensation claims.

    PubMed

    Salvo, John P; Hammoud, Sommer; Flato, Russell; Sgromolo, Nicole; Mendelsohn, Elliot S

    2015-02-01

    Patients with a workers' compensation claim have been shown to have inferior outcomes after various orthopedic procedures. In hip arthroscopy, good to excellent results have been shown in the athletic and prearthritic population in short-term and long-term follow-up. In the current study, the authors' hypothesis was that patients with a workers' compensation claim would have inferior outcomes after hip arthroscopy compared with patients without a workers' compensation claim. All patients with a workers' compensation claim who underwent hip arthroscopy over a 2-year period were studied. Postoperative functional outcomes were assessed with the Hip Outcome Score and modified Harris Hip Score. A cohort of 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim was selected for comparison. Twenty-six patients were identified who had a workers' compensation claim and underwent hip arthroscopy performed by a single surgeon at the authors' institution with at least 6 months of follow-up. These patients were compared with 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim. The workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 66.5±28.8 and the non-workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 89.4±12.0. This difference was statistically significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.003). The workers' compensation group had an average modified Harris Hip Score of 72.5±20.7 (mean±SD), and the non-workers' compensation group had a modified Harris Hip Score of 75.6±15.3. This difference was not significantly significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.9). At latest follow-up, 15 patients in the workers' compensation group (58%) were working. Patients returned to work an average of 6.8 months after surgery. The current study showed that postoperative functional outcomes in the workers' compensation group, as measured by Hip Outcome Score, were significantly inferior to those in the non-workers' compensation group. No statistical difference in postoperative modified

  19. Patient reported outcomes as endpoints in medical research.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Diane L

    2004-04-01

    This review covers a number of the many design and analytic issues associated with clinical trials that incorporate patient reported outcomes as primary or secondary endpoints. We use a clinical trial designed to evaluate a new therapy for the prevention of migraines to illustrate how endpoints are defined by the objectives of the study, the methods for handling longitudinal assessments with multiple scales or outcomes, and the methods of analysis in the presence of missing data.

  20. Supportive housing and forensic patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Salem, Leila; Crocker, Anne G; Charette, Yanick; Seto, Michael C; Nicholls, Tonia L; Côté, Gilles

    2015-06-01

    In Canada, Review Boards are mandated to evaluate individuals found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD) on an annual basis and render 1 of 3 dispositions: (a) custody, (b) conditional discharge, or (c) absolute discharge. To promote social reintegration, conditional discharge can be ordered with the condition to live in supportive housing. However, NCRMD accused face great barriers to housing access as a result of the stigma associated with the forensic label. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of housing in the clinical and criminal trajectories of forensic patients as they reintegrate into the community. Data for this study were extracted from a national study of individuals found NCRMD in Canada (Crocker, Nicholls, Seto, Côté, et al., in press). The present study focuses on a random sample of NCRMD accused in the province of Québec, who were under a conditional discharge disposition during the study period (n = 837). Controlling for sociodemographic, clinical, and criminal variables, survival analysis showed that individuals placed in independent housing following a conditional discharge from the Review Board were 2.5 times more likely to commit a new offense, nearly 3 times more likely to commit an offense against a person, and 1.4 times more likely to be readmitted for psychiatric treatment compared with individuals residing in supportive housing. These results point to the influence housing can have on the trajectories of forensic patients, above and beyond a range of clinical, criminological, and sociodemographic factors.

  1. Improving learning outcomes: integration of standardized patients & telemedicine technology.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Diane C; Guthrie, John T; Adamo, Graceanne

    2004-01-01

    Innovative use of standardized patients (SPs) in a telemedicine environment can improve learning outcomes and clinical competencies. This randomized, cross-over study examined the relationship of technology-based strategies and the improvement of knowledge outcomes and competencies. Results showed that the innovative use of SPs and telemedicine, compared to a traditional distance learning teaching methodology, significantly improved learning outcomes. In addition, there was a significant increase in performance motivation and an interesting decrease in student satisfaction that may be linked to the pressure of performance-based learning. This article addresses knowledge improvement only.

  2. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  3. Contemporary Outcome in Patients With Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Broch, Kaspar; Murbræch, Klaus; Andreassen, Arne Kristian; Hopp, Einar; Aakhus, Svend; Gullestad, Lars

    2015-09-15

    Outcome is better in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) than in ischemic heart failure (HF), but morbidity and mortality are nevertheless presumed to be substantial. Most data on the prognosis in IDC stem from research performed before the widespread use of current evidence-based treatment, including implantable devices. We report outcome data from a cohort of patients with IDC treated according to current HF guidelines and compare our results with previous figures: 102 consecutive patients referred to our tertiary care hospital with idiopathic IDC and a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% were included in a prospective cohort study. After extensive baseline work-up, follow-up was performed after 6 and 13 months. Vital status and heart transplantation were recorded. Over the first year of follow-up, the patients were on optimal pharmacological treatment, and 24 patients received implantable devices. Left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 26 ± 10% to 41 ± 11%, peak oxygen consumption increased from 19.5 ± 7.1 to 23.4 ± 7.8 ml/kg/min, and functional class improved substantially (all p values <0.001). After a median follow-up of 3.6 years, 4 patients were dead, and heart transplantation had been performed in 9 patients. According to our literature search, survival in patients with IDC has improved substantially over the last decades. In conclusion, patients with IDC have a better outcome than previously reported when treated according to current guidelines.

  4. Continuous Electroencephalography (cEEG) Monitoring and Outcomes of Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Wang, Guoqiao; Cutter, Gary R.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.

    2017-01-01

    Background It is not clear whether performing continuous EEG (cEEG) in critically ill patients during intensive care unit (ICU) treatment affects outcomes at discharge. Material/Methods We prospectively matched 234 patients who received cEEG (cases) by admission diagnosis and sex to 234 patients who did not receive cEEG (controls) and followed them until discharge. Patients admitted due to seizures were excluded. The primary measures of outcome were Glasgow Coma Scale at Discharge (GCSD) and disposition at discharge, and the secondary measures of outcome were AED modifications, Glasgow Outcomes Scale, and Modified-Rankin Scale. These outcomes were compared between the cases and controls. Results Some differences in primary outcome measures between the groups emerged on univariate analyses, but these differences were small and not significant after controlling for covariates. Cases had longer ICU stays (p=0.002) and lower admission GCS (p=0.01) but similar GCSD (p=0.10). Of the secondary outcome measures, the mean (SD) number of AED modifications for cases was 2.2±3.1 compared to 0.4±0.8 for controls (p<0.0001); 170 (72.6%) cases had at least 1 AED modification compared to only 56 (24.1%) of the controls (p<0.0001). Conclusions Performing cEEG did not improve discharge outcome but it significantly influenced AED prescription patterns. Further studies assessing long-term outcomes are needed to better define the role of cEEG in this patient population. PMID:28160596

  5. Reducing PICC migrations and improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Elen Hughes, Meinir

    Inadvertent migration of central venous catheters can lead to several issues including delayed therapy and clinical morbidities such as thrombosis. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are particularly at risk of movement. An innovative new device which allows anchorage of the catheter has proved very successful in the minimisation of catheter migration. The SecurAcath device incorporates a small blunt anchor which lies beneath the skin in order to secure the catheter in place and prevent inadvertent movement. An evaluation of 31 patients with a SecurAcath device in situ to secure a PICC found only one case of insignificant catheter migration. Some initial problems with infection and pain were encountered and interventions were put in place to minimise their incidence. SecurAcath removal proved to be the most significant challenge but this can be overcome with suitable guidance and training.

  6. Affective Temperament Profiles of Overactive Bladder Patients

    PubMed Central

    SARIBACAK, Ali; ALTINBAŞ, Kürşat; YILMAZ, Hasan; ÖZKAN, Alp; ÖZKAN, Levend; ORAL, Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder (OAB) is generally characterized by urinary urgency with or without incontinence and increased frequency of voiding and nocturia. Although animal studies have demonstrated the relationship between defective serotonergic neurotransmission and OAB, its etiology is still unclarified. Temperament profiles are hypothesized to be related with serotonergic activity and are studied in many psychosomatic disorders. Thus, we assume that OAB is related with a certain type of temperament. Method 29 patients, who were admitted to the urology outpatient clinic at Kocaeli University and clinically diagnosed with OAB syndrome, were recruited for the study. Temperament profiles were evaluated with the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis Pisa Paris and San Diego Autoquestionnaire (TEMPS-A). Depressive, hyperthymic, cyclothymic, anxious and irritable temperament scores in patients were compared with those in 25 healthy controls. Results Patient and control groups were similar in terms of age (p=.65), sex (p=.64) and educational level (p=.90). Anxious temperament scores were higher (p=.02) and hyperthymic temperament scores were lower (p=.02) in patients with OAB compared to controls. Depressive, cyclothymic and irritable temperament scores were similar in both groups. There was no significant differences between men and women in both groups in terms of different temperament profile scores. Conclusion Hypothetically, there might be an association between anxious temperament and OAB syndrome reflecting serotonergic dysfunction. However, OAB syndrome must be considered from the aspect of the interdependence of psychosomatic implications in a narrow sense and psychosomatic dimensions due to the psychological predisposition in the individual case.

  7. Competition within Computer-Assisted Cooperative Learning Environments: Cognitive, Affective, and Social Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Fu-Yun

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effects and implications of embedding the element of competition in computer-assisted cooperative learning situations on student cognitive, affective, and social outcomes. Results of statistical analyses of Taiwanese fifth graders show that cooperation without inter-group competition engendered better attitudes and promoted more…

  8. Technology Integration before Student Outcomes: Factors Affecting Teacher Adoption of Technology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandyopadhyay, Alankar

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1920s, ICTs have been endorsed as solutions to challenges of access and quality in education. Proponents have also supported technology use in education on grounds that it could potentially impact cognitive, affective, and pedagogical outcomes. Based on these perceived benefits, many developed and developing countries have been…

  9. Coping with Challenge and Hindrance Stressors in Teams: Behavioral, Cognitive, and Affective Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearsall, Matthew J.; Ellis, Aleksander P. J.; Stein, Jordan H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the challenge-hindrance framework to examine the discrete and combined effects of different environmental stressors on behavioral, cognitive, and affective outcomes at the team level. Results from 83 teams working on a command and control simulation indicated that the introduction of a challenge stressor…

  10. School Factors Explaining Achievement on Cognitive and Affective Outcomes: Establishing a Dynamic Model of Educational Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, Bert; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model of educational effectiveness defines school level factors associated with student outcomes. Emphasis is given to the two main aspects of policy, evaluation, and improvement in schools which affect quality of teaching and learning at both the level of teachers and students: a) teaching and b) school learning environment. Five…

  11. Need for Cognitive Closure Modulates How Perceptual Decisions Are Affected by Task Difficulty and Outcome Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Vanda; Tosoni, Annalisa; Brizi, Ambra; Salvato, Ilaria; Kruglanski, Arie W.; Galati, Gaspare; Mannetti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which Need for Cognitive Closure (NCC), an individual-level epistemic motivation, can explain inter-individual variability in the cognitive effort invested on a perceptual decision making task (the random motion task). High levels of NCC are manifested in a preference for clarity, order and structure and a desire for firm and stable knowledge. The study evaluated how NCC moderates the impact of two variables known to increase the amount of cognitive effort invested on a task, namely task ambiguity (i.e., the difficulty of the perceptual discrimination) and outcome relevance (i.e., the monetary gain associated with a correct discrimination). Based on previous work and current design, we assumed that reaction times (RTs) on our motion discrimination task represent a valid index of effort investment. Task ambiguity was associated with increased cognitive effort in participants with low or medium NCC but, interestingly, it did not affect the RTs of participants with high NCC. A different pattern of association was observed for outcome relevance; high outcome relevance increased cognitive effort in participants with moderate or high NCC, but did not affect the performance of low NCC participants. In summary, the performance of individuals with low NCC was affected by task difficulty but not by outcome relevance, whereas individuals with high NCC were influenced by outcome relevance but not by task difficulty; only participants with medium NCC were affected by both task difficulty and outcome relevance. These results suggest that perceptual decision making is influenced by the interaction between context and NCC. PMID:26716987

  12. Analysis of Outcomes of the NRS 2002 in Patients Hospitalized in Nephrology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Paulina; Chmielewski, Michał; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia; Dębska Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition is a common problem among hospitalized patients. In chronic kidney disease, it affects up to 50% of the population. Undernourishment has an adverse effect on prognosis and prolongs convalescence. The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of NRS (Nutrition Risk Screening) -2002 in the assessment of risk of malnutrition for patients hospitalized in nephrology wards. The aim was to develop clinical characteristics of malnourished patients and to assess the relationship between nutritional status and patient outcome. Methods: The analysis included 292 patients, consecutively admitted to nephrology wards. NRS-2002 was assessed in comparison to subjective global assessment. Associations with patient characteristics and outcome were evaluated. Results: Out of all the respondents, 119 patients (40%) suffered from malnutrition. The NRS-2002 showed a very strong relationship with Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) (p < 0.0001). Malnourished patients were older, were characterized by a significantly lower body mass index (BMI), and had a much longer hospitalization duration. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of malnutrition proved to be an independent predictor of the duration of hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition is highly prevalent among patients hospitalized in nephrology wards, and it affects the length of hospitalization. Identification of malnourished patients and patients at serious risk of malnutrition progression allows the implementation of appropriate nutritional intervention. PMID:28300757

  13. Outcome of Gastric Cancer Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Owing to increased life expectancy, the number of elderly patients with gastric cancer has increased. This study aimed to identify the outcomes of gastric cancer patients aged 80 years or older through comparison of their clinicopathological characteristics, surgical outcomes, and oncologic outcomes. Materials and Methods Between January 2006 and December 2013, the records of 478 patients who underwent surgery for gastric cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups: patients <80 years old (n=446) and patients ≥80 years old (n=32). Results There were no significant differences in sex, body mass index, length of hospital stay, duration of surgery, depth of invasion, nodal metastasis, histologic type, or tumor size between the two groups. However, significant differences were found for the American Society of Anesthesiologist score and the serum albumin level between the two groups. Postoperative morbidity, mortality, disease-free survival, and recurrence rate did not differ between curatively resected patients in the two groups. Conclusions In elderly patients with gastric cancer, active treatment including radical gastrectomy is necessary. PMID:28053812

  14. Outcomes of multiple myeloma patients receiving bortezomib, lenalidomide, and carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Berenson, Ariana; Vardanyan, Suzie; David, Michael; Wang, James; Harutyunyan, Nika Manik; Gottlieb, Jillian; Halleluyan, Ran; Spektor, Tanya M; Udd, Kyle A; Eshaghian, Shahrooz; Nassir, Youram; Eades, Benjamin; Swift, Regina; Berenson, James R

    2017-03-01

    New classes of drugs including the proteasome inhibitors (PI) bortezomib and, more recently, carfilzomib and the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide have shown improved outcomes for multiple myeloma (MM) patients during the past decade. However, most of the studies reporting outcomes for patients receiving these drugs have relied on older data sets derived from large institutions that included patients not receiving their treatment at those facilities and represented only those eligible for clinical trials or were from sites where treatment options were limited. We have analyzed data from 258 MM patients who have received treatment with at least one of three agents: bortezomib, carfilzomib, and lenalidomide in a single clinic specializing in MM with respect to their responses and other outcomes to treatment regimens including these agents. Response rates were similar between these three drugs when used for the first time and again during subsequent treatment regimens. As expected, the clinical benefit rates (CBRs) were better for patients receiving their first treatment when compared to their use in subsequent treatment regimens. The CBRs were similar during their 2nd, 3rd, and 4th treatments containing these agents. Many patients refractory to these agents showed responses to regimens containing these same drugs when used in different combinations. In addition, patients refractory to one PI often responded to the other PI. The results of this study demonstrate that novel agents can be used repeatedly in novel combinations with significant clinical benefit for patients with MM.

  15. Social Media and Patient Health Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To provide a review of the current excellent research published in the field of Consumer Health Informatics. Method We searched MEDLINE® and WEB OF SCIENCE® databases for papers published in 2013 in relation with Consumer Health Informatics. The authors identified 16 candidate best papers, which were then reviewed by four reviewers. Results Five out of the 16 candidate papers were selected as best papers. One paper presents the key features of a system to automate the collection of web-based social media content for subsequent semantic annotation. This paper emphasizes the importance of mining social media to collect novel data from which new findings in drug abuse research were uncovered. The second paper presents a practical method to predict how a community structure would impact the spreading of information within the community. The third paper presents a method for improving the quality of online health communities. The fourth presents a new social network to allow the monitoring of the evolution of individuals’ health status and diagnostic deficiencies, difficulties or barriers in rehabilitation. The last paper reports on teenage patients’ perception on privacy and social media. Conclusion Selected papers not only show the value of using social media in the medical field but how to use these media to detect emergent diseases or risks, inform patients, promote disease prevention, and follow patients’ opinion on healthcare resources. PMID:25123742

  16. Incorporating Patient-Reported Outcomes Into Health Care To Engage Patients And Enhance Care.

    PubMed

    Lavallee, Danielle C; Chenok, Kate E; Love, Rebecca M; Petersen, Carolyn; Holve, Erin; Segal, Courtney D; Franklin, Patricia D

    2016-04-01

    The provision of patient-centered care requires a health care environment that fosters engagement between patients and their health care team. One way to encourage patient-centered care is to incorporate patient-reported outcomes into clinical settings. Collecting these outcomes in routine care ensures that important information only the patient can provide is captured. This provides insights into patients' experiences of symptoms, quality of life, and functioning; values and preferences; and goals for health care. Previously embraced in the research realm, patient-reported outcomes have started to play a role in successful shared decision making, which can enhance the safe and effective delivery of health care. We examine the opportunities for using patient-reported outcomes to enhance care delivery and outcomes as health care information needs and technology platforms change. We highlight emerging practices in which patient-reported outcomes provide value to patients and clinicians and improve care delivery. Finally, we examine present and future challenges to maximizing the use of patient-reported outcomes in the clinic.

  17. Roundtable on public policy affecting patient safety.

    PubMed

    Crane, Robert M; Raymond, Brian

    2011-03-01

    On April 15, 2010, patient safety experts were assembled to discuss the adequacy of the public policy response to the Institute of Medicine report "To Err is Human" 10 years after its publication. The experts concluded that additional government actions should be considered. Actions that deserve consideration include the development of an educational campaign to improve public and provider understanding of the issue as a means to support change similar to successful public health campaigns, support the evolution of payment reform away from fee for service, create a clearer aim or goal for patient safety activities, support the development and use of better safety measures to judge status and improvement, and support for additional learning of what works particularly on implementation issues. Participants included: Moderator Robert Crane, senior advisor, Kaiser Permanente Participants Doug Bonacum, vice president, Safety Management, Kaiser Permanente Janet Corrigan, PhD, president and CEO, National Quality Forum Helen Darling, MA, president and CEO, National Business Group on Health Susan Edgman-Levitan, PA, executive director, John D. Stoeckle Center for Primary Care Innovation, Massachusetts General Hospital David M. Lawrence, MD, MPH, chairman and CEO (Retired), Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Inc Lucian Leape, MD, adjunct professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health Diane C. Pinakiewicz, president, National Patient Safety Foundation Robert M. Wachter, MD, professor and associate chairman, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco.

  18. Invited lectures related to patient-centered outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Hache, Manon; Kazim, Robert

    2012-10-01

    The third PANDA symposium on Anesthesia and Neurodevelopment in Children included a session on Patient Centered Outcomes Research. Three speakers were invited to discuss SmartTots, a private-public partnership between IARS and FDA, Wake Up Safe, a patient safety organization and lastly, NICHD/NIH funding for training in research. The session provided information related to ongoing efforts to improve outcome and safety of anesthesia care in children and introduced potential sources and mechanisms of federal and non-federal funding for research related to anesthetic neurotoxicity in the developing brain.

  19. Chronic urinary retention in men: how we define it, and how does it affect treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Negro, Carlo L A; Muir, Gordon H

    2012-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Chronic urinary retention (CUR) is a poorly defined entity, as the key element of definition, significant postvoid residual urine volume (PVR), has not a worldwide and moreover evidenced-based definition. There is no agreement on which is the threshold value to define a significant PVR and different society produced guidelines with different thresholds ranging from 300 mL to 1000 mL. Diagnosis is difficult, and management has not been defined yet. There is a lack of studies on the best management of these patients, as this group of patients has always been considered at high risk of failure. Only one study compares conservative with the surgical management but it is not a randomised controlled trail. This review offers a systematic appraisal of the most recent publications on CUR. It indicates the absence of a real worldwide agreed definition, as the two keys element of it are not satisfactorily defined yet: significant PVR, is suffering from a lack of evidenced-based definition, and percussable or palpable bladder is a very nebulous concept as it is not a criteria of certainty as different individual variables affect it. This has an important effect on management which is not structured. Most of the trials involving benign prostatic hyperplasia treatments (either medical or surgical) tend to exclude this group of patients, which is a clinically important group, comprising up to a quarter of men undergoing TURP in the UK. Urinary retention describes a bladder that does not empty completely or does not empty at all. Historically, urinary retention has been classified as either acute or chronic the latter is generally classified as high pressure or low pressure according to the bladder filling pressure on urodynamic. A MEDLINE® search for articles written in English and published before January 2010 was done using a list of terms related to urinary retention: 'urinary retention', 'chronic urinary retention

  20. Outcomes of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    McGrath-Cadell, Lucy; McKenzie, Pamela; Emmanuel, Sam; Muller, David W M; Graham, Robert M; Holloway, Cameron J

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an uncommon but serious condition presenting as an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) or cardiac arrest. The pathophysiology and outcomes are poorly understood. We investigated the characteristics and outcomes of patients presenting with SCAD. Methods In a retrospective study of a large cohort of patients with SCAD, data were collected regarding clinical presentation, patient characteristics, vascular screening, coronary artery involvement and clinical outcomes. Results 40 patients with SCAD (95% women, mean age 45±10 years) were included. At least 1 traditional cardiovascular risk factor was present in 40% of patients. Migraine was reported in 43% of patients. Events preceding SCAD included parturition (8%), physical stress (13%), emotional stress (10%) and vasoconstrictor substance-use (8%). 65% of patients had a non-ST elevation ACS (NSTEACS) at presentation, 30% had an ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and 13% had a cardiac arrest. The left anterior descending artery was most frequently involved (68% of patients), and 13% had involvement of multiple coronary territories. Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) was identified in 7 (37%) of 19 patients screened. 68% of patients were managed medically, 30% had percutaneous coronary intervention and 5% had coronary artery bypass grafting. Over a median 16-month follow-up period, 8% of patients had at least 1 recurrent SCAD event. There were no deaths. Conclusions Patients with SCAD in this study often had multiple coronary territories involved (13%) and extracardiac vascular abnormalities, suggesting a systemic vascular process, which may explain the high incidence of migraine. All patients with SCAD should be screened for FMD and followed closely due to the possibility of recurrence. PMID:27621835

  1. Chromosomal anomalies and sperm retrieval outcomes of patients with non-obstructive azoospermia: a case series.

    PubMed

    Takeda, T; Iwatsuki, S; Hamakawa, T; Mizuno, K; Kamiya, H; Umemoto, Y; Kubota, H; Kubota, Y; Sasaki, S; Yasui, T

    2017-02-24

    Some preoperative factors affecting the outcome of microdissection testicular sperm extraction (micro-TESE) have been previously evaluated. However, other than Klinefelter syndrome (KS), no other chromosomal anomalies have been discussed in the context of sperm retrieval outcomes. The objective of this study was to describe chromosomal anomalies and their relationship with sperm retrieval outcomes in patients with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Of the 197 NOA patients whose clinical records were retrospectively reviewed, 144 (73.1%) had normal 46,XY karyotype, 40 (20.3%) had KS (47,XXY), and 13 (6.6%) had other chromosomal anomalies (autosomal in seven cases and sex-chromosomal anomalies in six). Of the seven patients with autosomal anomalies, two had the reportedly normal variant 46,XY,inv(9)(p12;q13). Testicular volume and serum hormone levels (luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and total testosterone) of the patients with chromosomal anomalies other than KS were comparable to those of the patients with normal karyotype. The sperm retrieval rate of the patients with 46,XY karyotype, KS, or other chromosomal anomalies were 27.1%, 22.5%, and 15.4%, respectively, with no statistically significant difference. However, among the samples collected from the 13 patients with chromosomal anomalies other than KS, only those from the two patients with the normal variant 46,XY,inv(9)(p12;q13) contained spermatozoa. Among our series of NOA patients, the incidence of autosomal anomalies was higher than that generally noted among neonates, which suggests that not only sex-chromosomal anomalies but also autosomal anomalies may affect the development of NOA. Furthermore, our findings suggest that sperm retrieval outcome is more unfavorable in NOA patients with chromosomal anomalies than in NOA patients with 46,XY karyotype or KS, despite the use of micro-TESE.

  2. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Kimmel, Paul L; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A; Bruce, Marino A; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Lash, James P

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

  3. Student perceptions of their biology teacher's interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Wade Clay, Jr.

    The primary goals of this dissertation were to determine the relationships between interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes. The instrument used to collect student perceptions of teacher interpersonal teaching behaviors was the Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI). The instrument used to assess student affective learning outcomes was the Biology Student Affective Instrument (BSAI). The interpersonal teaching behavior data were collected using students as the observers. 111 students in an urban influenced, rural high school answered the QTI and BSAI in September 1997 and again in April 1998. At the same time students were pre and post tested using the Biology End of Course Examination (BECE). The QTI has been used primarily in European and Oceanic areas. The instrument was also primarily used in educational stratified environment. This was the first time the BSAI was used to assess student affective learning outcomes. The BECE is a Texas normed cognitive assessment test and it is used by Texas schools districts as the end of course examination in biology. The interpersonal teaching behaviors model was tested to ascertain if predictive power in the USA and in a non-stratified educational environment. Findings indicate that the QTI is an adequate predictor of student achievement in biology. The results were not congruent with the non-USA data and results, this indicates that the QTI is a society/culturally sensitive instrument and the instrument needs to be normed to a particular society/culture before it is used to affect teachers' and students' educational environments.

  4. Towards Better Test Utilization – Strategies to Improve Physician Ordering and Their Impact on Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is the single highest volume medical activity in healthcare and demand for laboratory testing is increasing disproportionately to medical activity. It has been estimated that $6.8 billion of medical care in the US involves unnecessary testing and procedures that do not improve patient care and may even harm the patient. Physicians face many challenges in accurately, efficiently and safely ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests. In order to improve patient outcomes, laboratory tests must be appropriately ordered, properly conducted, reported in a timely manner, correctly interpreted and affect a decision for future diagnosis and treatment of the patient. PMID:27683478

  5. Towards Better Test Utilization - Strategies to Improve Physician Ordering and Their Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Danielle B

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory medicine is the single highest volume medical activity in healthcare and demand for laboratory testing is increasing disproportionately to medical activity. It has been estimated that $6.8 billion of medical care in the US involves unnecessary testing and procedures that do not improve patient care and may even harm the patient. Physicians face many challenges in accurately, efficiently and safely ordering and interpreting diagnostic tests. In order to improve patient outcomes, laboratory tests must be appropriately ordered, properly conducted, reported in a timely manner, correctly interpreted and affect a decision for future diagnosis and treatment of the patient.

  6. Long-term outcome of epilepsy in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Cusmai, Raffaella; Laino, Daniela; Carotenuto, Marco; Esposito, Maria; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Margari, Lucia; Rizzo, Renata; Savasta, Salvatore; Grosso, Salvatore; Striano, Pasquale; Belcastro, Vincenzo; Franzoni, Emilio; Curatolo, Paolo; Giordano, Lucio; Freri, Elena; Matricardi, Sara; Pruna, Dario; Toldo, Irene; Tozzi, Elisabetta; Lobefalo, Lucio; Operto, Francesca; Altobelli, Emma; Chiarelli, Francesco; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a multisystemic genetic disorder that can be associated with epilepsy. There is insufficient information concerning the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of epilepsy and the long-term outcome of these patients. The aim of this study is to describe seizure types, electroencephalographic patterns and long-term seizure outcome in Prader-Willi syndrome patients suffering from epilepsy. We retrospectively studied 38 patients with Prader-Willi syndrome and seizures. Results of neuroimaging studies were obtained for 35 individuals. We subdivided these patients into two groups: group A, 24 patients, without brain lesions; and group B, 11 patients, with brain abnormalities. All patients were re-evaluated after a period of at least 10 years. Twenty-one patients (55.2 %) were affected by generalized epilepsy and 17 patients (44.8 %) presented focal epilepsy. The most common seizure type was generalized tonic-clonic seizure. The mean age at seizure onset was 4.5 years (ranged from 1 month to 14 years). In the follow-up period, seizure freedom was achieved in 32 patients (84.2 %). Seizure freedom was associated with electroencephalographic normalization, while the six children presenting drug-resistant epilepsy showed persistence of electroencephalographic abnormalities. Group B patients showed a higher prevalence of drug-resistant epilepsy. Patients with Prader-Willi syndrome were frequently affected by generalized seizures. Most of the patients had a favorable evolution, although, patients with brain abnormalities presented a worse outcome, suggesting that the presence of these lesions can influence the response to antiepileptic therapy.

  7. Nurse burnout and patient safety outcomes: nurse safety perception versus reporting behavior.

    PubMed

    Halbesleben, Jonathon R B; Wakefield, Bonnie J; Wakefield, Douglas S; Cooper, Lynn B

    2008-08-01

    This article examines the relationship between nurse burnout and patient safety indicators, including both safety perceptions and reporting behavior. Based on the Conservation of Resources model of stress and burnout, it is predicted that burnout will negatively affect both patient safety perceptions and perceived likelihood of reporting events. Nurses from a Veteran's Administration hospital completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory and safety outcomes subset of measures from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Culture measure. After controlling for work-related demographics, multiple regression analysis supported the prediction that burnout was associated with the perception of lower patient safety. Burnout was not associated with event-reporting behavior but was negatively associated with reporting of mistakes that did not lead to adverse events. The findings extend previous research on the relationship between burnout and patient outcomes and offer avenues for future research on how nurse motivation resources are invested in light of their stressful work environment.

  8. Screening for autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C patients has no effect on treatment initiation or outcome.

    PubMed

    Mauss, S; Berger, F; Schober, A; Moog, G; Heyne, R; John, C; Pape, S; Hueppe, D; Pfeiffer-Vornkahl, H; Alshuth, U

    2013-04-01

    Autoantibodies in hepatitis C virus-infected patients may indicate autoimmune hepatitis or other immune-mediated diseases. This may impact safety and efficacy of interferon-based therapy of chronic hepatitis C. We investigated the association between a positive test result for a variety of autoantibodies and the initiation and efficacy of therapy for chronic hepatitis C. We analysed an observational cohort of 24 306 patients for an association between autoantibodies and treatment outcome. 8241 patients were tested simultaneously for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), liver kidney microsomal antibodies (LKM), smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). Matched-pair analysis was performed matching one autoantibody-positive patient to three controls. Control patients had negative tests for all four antibodies. Analyses were performed for patients with a single positive autoantibody test and for patients with multiple positive autoantibody tests. A positive test result for ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA did not affect the physician's decision to initiate therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. In addition, a positive test for one or multiple autoantibodies did not adversely affect sustained virologic response. There was no difference in fibrosis stage or alanine transaminase at baseline or during therapy irrespective of antibody status. Thyroid dysfunction was more frequent in patients with positive LKM antibodies (P = 0.004). Initiation of therapy for chronic hepatitis C and outcome were not affected by the presence of ANA, LKM, SMA or AMA. Routine testing of these autoantibodies seems not warranted. Determination of autoantibodies should be guided by individualized clinical decisions.

  9. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  10. Association between Physical Pain and Alcohol Treatment Outcomes: The Mediating Role of Negative Affect

    PubMed Central

    Witkiewitz, Katie; McCallion, Elizabeth; Vowles, Kevin E.; Kirouac, Megan; Frohe, Tessa; Maisto, Stephen A.; Hodgson, Ray; Heather, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical pain and negative affect have been described as risk factors for alcohol use following alcohol treatment. The current study was a secondary analysis of two clinical trials for alcohol use disorder (AUD) to examine the associations between pain, negative affect and AUD treatment outcomes. Method Participants included 1383 individuals from the COMBINE Study (COMBINE Study Group, 2003; 31% female, 23% ethnic minorities, average age=44.4 (SD=10.2)), a multisite combination pharmacotherapy and behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United States, and 742 individuals from the United Kingdom Alcohol Treatment Trial (UKATT Research Team, 2001; 25.9% female, 4.4% ethnic minorities, average age=41.6 (SD=10.1)) a multisite behavioral intervention study for AUD in the United Kingdom. The Form-90 was used to collect alcohol use data, the Short Form Health Survey and Quality of Life measures were used to assess pain, and negative affect was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory (COMBINE) and the General Health Questionnaire (UKATT). Results Pain scores were significantly associated with drinking outcomes in both datasets. Greater pain scores were associated with greater negative affect and increases in pain were associated with increases in negative affect. Negative affect significantly mediated the association between pain and drinking outcomes and this effect was moderated by social behavior network therapy (SBNT) in the UKATT study, with SBNT attenuating the association between pain and drinking. Conclusion Findings suggest pain and negative affect are associated among individuals in AUD treatment and that negative affect mediated pain may be a risk factor for alcohol relapse. PMID:26098375

  11. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  12. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for Hand and Wrist Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dacombe, Peter Jonathan; Amirfeyz, Rouin; Davis, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools for assessing outcomes following injuries to the hand and wrist. Many commonly used PROMs have no evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. This systematic review examines the PROMs used in the assessment of hand and wrist trauma patients, and the evidence for reliability, validity, and responsiveness of each measure in this population. Methods: A systematic review of Pubmed, Medline, and CINAHL searching for randomized controlled trials of patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist was carried out to identify the PROMs. For each identified PROM, evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness was identified using a further systematic review of the Pubmed, Medline, CINAHL, and reverse citation trail audit procedure. Results: The PROM used most often was the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire; the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), Gartland and Werley score, Michigan Hand Outcomes score, Mayo Wrist Score, and Short Form 36 were also commonly used. Only the DASH and PRWE have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in patients with traumatic injuries to the hand and wrist; other measures either have incomplete evidence or evidence gathered in a nontraumatic population. Conclusions: The DASH and PRWE both have evidence of reliability, validity, and responsiveness in a hand and wrist trauma population. Other PROMs used to assess hand and wrist trauma patients do not. This should be considered when selecting a PROM for patients with traumatic hand and wrist pathology. PMID:27418884

  13. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT for representing Acuity...acute and intermediate phases of burn rehabilitation through the collection of daily treatment information for analysis. In particular, the ACT is...primarily interested in investigating the influence that time spent receiving rehabilitation treatments has on patient outcomes as a reflection of

  14. Does pediatric patient-centeredness affect family trust?

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; McGuinn, Laura; Bavin, Stefoni A; Gesell, Sabina B

    2010-01-01

    Despite its recognition as a key dimension of healthcare quality, it is often unclear what exactly patient-centeredness means. A generally accepted measurement model of patient-centeredness is still nonexistent, current operational definitions lack sufficient specificity to inform providers how it relates to outcomes, and the influence of patient-centeredness on pediatric patients and families has not been quantified. This study demonstrates that patient-centeredness is a measurable ability of pediatricians that increases family trust. As an ability, it is teachable. The study offers an evidence-based model for future research with specific implications for quality measurement and improvement in the outpatient pediatrician's office.

  15. Impact of Obesity on Heart and Lung Transplantation: Does Pre-Transplant Obesity Affect Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Bozso, S J; Nagendran, Je; Gill, R S; Freed, D H; Nagendran, Ja

    2017-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of obesity has led to a rise in the number of prospective obese heart and lung transplant recipients. The optimal management strategy of obese patients with end-stage heart and lung failure remains controversial. This review article discusses and provides a summary of the literature surrounding the impact of obesity on outcomes in heart and lung transplantation. Studies on transplant obesity demonstrate controversy in terms of morbidity and mortality outcomes and obesity pre-transplantation. However, the impact of obesity on outcomes seems to be more consistently demonstrated in lung rather than heart transplantation. The ultimate goal in heart and lung transplantation in the obese patient is to identify those at highest risk of complication that may warrant therapies to mitigate risk by addressing comorbid conditions.

  16. Factors affecting the outcome of distal realignment for patellofemoral disorders of the knee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Jen; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Han-Hsiang; Wu, Su-Ter

    2005-06-01

    This study correlated the risk factors with the clinical outcome of distal realignment for patellofemoral disorders in 48 patients with 53 knees with 25 to 96 months follow-up. The indications for surgery included pain and disability due to patellofemoral disorders with failure of at least 6 months of conservative treatments. The evaluations included pain scores, Lysholm functional scores and radiographs of the knee. The overall results were satisfactory in 47 knees (88.7%) and unsatisfactory in six knees (11.3%). There was no correlation of the clinical results with age, sex, body weight and body height, preoperative pain scores and Lysholm scores. However, the clinical outcome correlated with the severity of articular damage and the correction of patellar malalignment. Error in patient selection and inadequate surgical technique were attributable to poor outcomes.

  17. Therapeutic outcome of adjustable gastric banding in morbid obese patients.

    PubMed

    Hotter, A; Mangweth, B; Kemmler, G; Fiala, M; Kinzl, J; Biebl, W

    2003-09-01

    We examined 77 obese patients treated with bariatric surgery in order to analyse treatment success, and compare those with a good or a poor outcome. The subjects, who were recruited one year after undergoing adjustable gastric banding, were asked questions concerning their sociodemographic status, postoperative course, past and present weight status, eating behaviours and difficulties in changing eating habits. Furthermore, we also used two body image questionnaires, and considered the patients' evaluations of positive and negative changes, as well as their wishes for the future. There were no preoperative differences between the 71% of patients in the good outcome group and the 29% in the poor outcome group. With regard to the postoperative course, the poor outcome group had more problems in adapting to new eating behaviours, experienced significantly more post-surgical complications, and had a persistently negative body evaluation. Both groups were satisfied with their achieved weight loss achieved, and their improved self-esteem and mobility. Adjustable gastric banding seems to be successful in inducing weight loss and allowing a better quality of life. However, factors such as postoperative complications, the ability and willingness to adopt new eating attitudes, and an improved body image seem to be crucial for therapeutic outcome.

  18. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants

    PubMed Central

    Kishnani, Priya S.; Goldenberg, Paula C.; DeArmey, Stephanie L.; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S.; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were ≤6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc4. Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p < 0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein. PMID:19775921

  19. Cross-reactive immunologic material status affects treatment outcomes in Pompe disease infants.

    PubMed

    Kishnani, Priya S; Goldenberg, Paula C; DeArmey, Stephanie L; Heller, James; Benjamin, Danny; Young, Sarah; Bali, Deeksha; Smith, Sue Ann; Li, Jennifer S; Mandel, Hanna; Koeberl, Dwight; Rosenberg, Amy; Chen, Y-T

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease, which is usually fatal if onset occurs in infancy. Patients synthesize a non-functional form of GAA or are unable to form native enzyme. Enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) prolongs survival in infantile Pompe patients but may be less effective in cross-reactive immunologic material (CRIM)-negative patients. We retrospectively analyzed the influence of CRIM status on outcome in 21 CRIM-positive and 11 CRIM-negative infantile Pompe patients receiving rhGAA. Patients were from the clinical setting and from clinical trials of rhGAA, were 6 months of age, were not invasively ventilated, and were treated with IV rhGAA at a cumulative or total dose of 20 or 40 mg/kg/2 weeks. Outcome measures included survival, invasive ventilator-free survival, cardiac status, gross motor development, development of antibodies to rhGAA, and levels of urinary Glc(4). Following 52 weeks of treatment, 6/11 (54.5%) CRIM-negative and 1/21 (4.8%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated (p<0.0001). By age 27.1 months, all CRIM-negative patients and 4/21 (19.0%) CRIM-positive patients were deceased or invasively ventilated. Cardiac function and gross motor development improved significantly more in the CRIM-positive group. IgG antibodies to rhGAA developed earlier and serotiters were higher and more sustained in the CRIM-negative group. CRIM-negative status predicted reduced overall survival and invasive ventilator-free survival and poorer clinical outcomes in infants with Pompe disease treated with rhGAA. The effect of CRIM status on outcome appears to be mediated by antibody responses to the exogenous protein.

  20. Customer-driven outcomes: a patient and family perspective.

    PubMed

    Weston, Marla J; Weston, Richard R

    2006-01-01

    Experiencing the healthcare system during an acute surgical event highlighted factors that contributed to customer-driven outcomes. Communicating intentions of and rationale for interventions increased the patient and family's confidence, and engaged the whole mind-body connection into the healing process. Utilizing the family as a repository of patient information incorporated their perspective, knowledge, and wisdom into the delivery and evaluation of patient care. Lastly, fostering the relationship between the nurse and the patient and family strengthened the therapeutic process, thus providing a foundation for customizing care.

  1. Nurse staffing and patient outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Audrey; Powell-Cope, Gail; Palacios, Polly; Luther, Stephen L; Black, Terrie; Hillman, Troy; Christiansen, Beth; Nathenson, Paul; Gross, Jan Coleman

    2007-01-01

    In rehabilitation nursing, the patient classification systems or acuity models and nurse-staffing ratios are not supported by empirical evidence. Moreover there are no studies published characterizing nursing hours per patient day, proportion of RN staff and impact of agency nurses in inpatient rehabilitation settings. The purpose of this prospective observational study was to describe rehabilitation nurse staffing patterns, to validate the impact of rehabilitation nursing on patient outcomes, and to test whether existing patient measures on severity and outcomes in rehabilitation could be used as a proxy for burden of care to predict rehabilitation nurse staffing ceilings and daily nurse staffing requirements. A total of 54 rehabilitation facilities in the United States, stratified by geography, were randomly selected to participate in the study.

  2. Distal Radial Fractures in the Superelderly: Does Malunion Affect Functional Outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Clement, N. D.; Duckworth, A. D.; Court-Brown, C. M.; McQueen, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The management of unstable distal radial fractures in the superelderly (≥80 years old) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to compare the functional outcome of super-elderly patients with and without malunion after a distal radial fracture. Methods. We identified 51 superelderly patients living independently with displaced fractures from a prospective database of 4024 patients with distal radial fractures. Activities of daily living, presence of wrist pain, whether the wrist had returned to its normal level function, grip strength and ROM were recorded. The dorsal angulation was measured radiographically. Results. There were 17 (33.3%) patients defined to have a malunion. The outcomes of the independent patients with and without malunion were compared at a mean follow-up of 15 months. No difference was observed in activities of daily living (P = 0.28), wrist pain (P = 0.14), whether the wrist had returned to its normal level function (P = 0.25), grip strength (P = 0.31), or ROM (P = 0.41). An increasing degree of dorsal angulation correlated with diminished ROM (P = 0.038), but did not correlate with activities of daily living (P = 0.10). Conclusions. Malunion of the distal radius does not influence the functional outcome of independent superelderly patients. PMID:24967123

  3. Tracking patient-reported outcomes in spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Coats, John Mitchell; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Stein, Sherman C.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) quantify health status from the patient's point of view. While the number of published outcomes studies grows each year, so too has the number of instruments being reported, leading to confusion on which instruments are appropriate to use for various spinal conditions. Methods: A broad search was conducted to identify commonly used PROMs in patients undergoing spinal surgery. We searched PubMed for combinations of terms related to anatomic location and a measure of patient-reported outcome in the title or text. We supplemented the search using the “related articles” feature of PubMed and by manually searching the bibliographies of selected articles. Results: Major categories of PROMs in spine surgery include health-related quality-of-life, pain, and disease-specific disability, for which several different instrument options were identified and detailed. The minimal clinically important difference varies between instruments and differentiates statistical significance from clinical significance. In addition, the accurate estimation of costs has become a challenging but intrinsically linked variable to outcomes as increased attention is paid to the relative value of surgical interventions. Conclusion: While a number of PROMs are available for tracking outcomes in spine surgery, only a handful appear to be widely used. At least one instrument from each category should be measured pre- and post-operatively to quantify treatment effect. In addition, while the primary goal is to select the most appropriate instruments for the patient's condition, one should keep in mind sustainability of efforts with regard to patient and administrative burden. PMID:26605111

  4. Pathways to poor educational outcomes for HIV/AIDS-affected youth in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Mark; Boyes, Mark E; Cluver, Lucie D; Zhang, Yuning

    2014-01-01

    A recent systematic review of studies in the developing world has critically examined linkages from familial HIV/AIDS and associated factors such as poverty and child mental health to negative child educational outcomes. In line with several recommendations in the review, the current study modelled relationships between familial HIV/AIDS, poverty, child internalising problems, gender and four educational outcomes: non-enrolment at school, non-attendance, deficits in grade progression and concentration problems. Path analyses reveal no direct associations between familial HIV/AIDS and any of the educational outcomes. Instead, HIV/AIDS-orphanhood or caregiver HIV/AIDS-sickness impacted indirectly on educational outcomes via the poverty and internalising problems that they occasioned. This has implications for evidence-based policy inferences. For instance, by addressing such intervening variables generally, rather than by seeking to target families affected by HIV/AIDS, interventions could avoid exacerbating stigmatisation, while having a more direct and stronger impact on children's educational outcomes. This analytic approach also suggests that future research should seek to identify causal paths, and may include other intervening variables related to poverty (such as child housework and caring responsibilities) or to child mental health (such as stigma and abuse), that are linked to both familial HIV/AIDS and educational outcomes.

  5. Outcome of excisional surgeries for the patients with spinal metastases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haomiao; Cappuccio, Michele; Terzi, Silvia; Paderni, Stefania; Mirabile, Loris

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of the excisional surgeries (en bloc/debulking) in spinal metastatic treatment in 10 years. A total of 131 patients (134 lesions) with spinal metastases were studied. The postoperative survival time and the local recurrence rate were calculated statistically. The comparison of the two procedures on the survival time, local recurrence rate, and neurologic change were made. The median survival time of the en bloc surgery and the debulking surgery was 40.93 and 24.73 months, respectively, with no significant difference. The significant difference was shown in the local recurrence rate comparison, but not in neurological change comparison. 19.85% patients combined with surgical complications. The en bloc surgery can achieve a lower local recurrence rate than the debulking surgery, while was similar in survival outcome, neurological salvage, and incidence of complications. The risk of the excisional surgeries is high, however, good outcomes could be expected. PMID:19655177

  6. The Effect of Diabetes on the Perioperative Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Raymond; Wilkins, Simon; Staples, Margaret; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    There are approximately 1.3 million patients in Australia with diabetes. Conflicting reports exist in the literature as to the effect of diabetes on the outcomes of colorectal cancer patients. We hypothesized that patients with diabetes would have poorer perioperative outcomes, and that diabetes was an independent risk factor for both 30-day mortality and perioperative morbidity. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of diabetes on perioperative colorectal cancer surgery outcomes, as compared to a diabetes-free reference population, and to examine factors affecting perioperative risk. We conducted an analysis of a prospectively collected, clinician-led colorectal cancer database of patients from 2010–2015. Patients with diabetes were compared to patients without diabetes on a range of perioperative outcomes. Pearson χ-squared tests, Wilcoxon rank sum tests and t-tests were employed for univariate analyses. Confounding factors were controlled for by separate logistic and linear regression analyses. The Huber-White Sandwich Estimator was used to calculate robust standard errors. A total of 1725 patients were analysed over 1745 treatment episodes in the study period with 267 patients (268 episodes) with diabetes studied. Diabetes contributed to medical, surgical complications, and increased length of inpatient stay in univariate analyses. Multivariable analysis adjusted for variables independently associated with each outcome revealed that diabetes was an independent contributor to an increased risk of surgical complications, with no significant effect on medical complications, return to the operating room, 30-day mortality, or readmission within 30 days. In this study, where overall baseline morbidity and mortality levels are low, the effect of diabetes alone on perioperative surgical outcomes appears to be overstated with control of associated perioperative risk factors such as cardiac, renal and respiratory factors being more important. PMID:27907053

  7. Predialysis systolic BP variability and outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Tariq; Sozio, Stephen M; Bandeen-Roche, Karen J; Ephraim, Patti L; Luly, Jason R; St Peter, Wendy L; McDermott, Aidan; Scialla, Julia J; Crews, Deidra C; Tangri, Navdeep; Miskulin, Dana C; Michels, Wieneke M; Jaar, Bernard G; Herzog, Charles A; Zager, Philip G; Meyer, Klemens B; Wu, Albert W; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-04-01

    BP variability (BPV) is an important predictor of outcomes in the general population, but its association with clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients is not clear. We identified 11,291 patients starting dialysis in 2003-2008 and followed them through December 31, 2008 (median=22 months). Predialysis systolic BPV was assessed over monthly intervals. Outcomes included factors associated with BPV, mortality (all-cause and cardiovascular), and first cardiovascular event (cardiovascular death or hospitalization). Patients' mean age was 62 years, 55% of patients were men, and 58% of patients were white. Modifiable factors associated with higher BPV included obesity, higher calcium-phosphate product levels, and lower hemoglobin concentration; factors associated with lower BPV included greater fluid removal, achievement of prescribed dry weight during dialysis, higher hemoglobin concentration, and antihypertensive regimens without β-blockers or renin-angiotensin system blocking agents. In total, 3200 deaths occurred, including 1592 cardiovascular deaths. After adjustment for demographics, comorbidities, and clinical factors, higher predialysis BPV was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] per 1 SD increase in BPV, 1.13 to 1.22), cardiovascular mortality (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.24), and first cardiovascular event (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.07 to 1.15). Results were similar when BPV was categorized in tertiles and patients were stratified by baseline systolic BP. In summary, predialysis systolic BPV is an important, potentially modifiable risk factor for death and cardiovascular outcomes in incident hemodialysis patients. Studies of BP management in dialysis patients should focus on both absolute BP and BPV.

  8. Desperation and Other Affective States in Suicidal Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendin, Herbert; Maltsberger, John T.; Haas, Ann Pollinger; Szanto, Katalin; Rabinowicz, Heather

    2004-01-01

    Data collected from 26 therapists who were treating patients when they died by suicide were used to identify intense affective states in such patients preceding the suicide. Eleven therapists provided comparable data on 26 patients they had treated who were seriously depressed but not suicidal. Although the two groups had similar numbers diagnosed…

  9. Improving Rural Cancer Patients' Outcomes: A Group-Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Thomas E.; Elliott, Barbara A.; Regal, Ronald R.; Renier, Colleen M.; Haller, Irina V.; Crouse, Byron J.; Witrak, Martha T.; Jensen, Patricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Significant barriers exist in the delivery of state-of-the-art cancer care to rural populations. Rural providers' knowledge and practices, their rural health care delivery systems, and linkages to cancer specialists are not optimal; therefore, rural cancer patient outcomes are less than achievable. Purpose: To test the effects of a strategy…

  10. Communication and Outcomes of Visits Between Older Patients and Nurse Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dorothy Ann; Hayes, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective patient-clinician communication is at the heart of good health care and may be even more vital for older patients and their nurse practitioners (NPs). Objectives To examine contributions of older patients’ and NPs’ characteristics and the content and relationship components of their communication to patients’ proximal outcomes (satisfaction and intention to adhere) and longer-term outcomes (changes in presenting problems, physical health, and mental health), and contributions of proximal outcomes to longer-term outcomes. Methods Visits were videorecorded of a statewide sample of 31 NPs and 155 older patients. Patients’ and NPs’ communication during visits were measured using the Roter Interaction Analysis System for verbal activities, a check sheet for nonverbal activities, and an inventory of relationship dimension items. Proximal outcomes were measured with single items after visits. At 4 weeks, change in presenting problems was measured with a single item and physical and mental health changes were measured with the SF-12v2 Health Survey. Mixed models regression with backward deletion was conducted until only predictors with p ≤ .05 remained in the models. Results With the other variables in the models held constant, better outcomes were related to background characteristics of poorer baseline health, nonmanaged care settings, and more NP experience; to a content component of seeking and giving biomedical and psychosocial information; and to a relationship component of more positive talk and greater trust and receptivity and affection, depth, and similarity. Poorer outcomes were associated with higher rates of lifestyle discussion and NPs’ rapport building that patients may have perceived to be patronizing. Greater intention to adhere was associated with greater improvement in presenting problems. Discussion Older patient-NP communication was effective regarding seeking and giving biomedical and psychosocial information other

  11. Prognostic Factors of Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Spontaneous Thalamic Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Kyung-Jae; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Jung, Yong-Gu; Park, Jung-Yul; Park, Dong-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a well-known condition, but ICH restricted to the thalamus is less widely studied. We investigated the prognostic factors of thalamic ICHs. Material/Methods Seventy patients from January 2009 to November 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who demonstrated spontaneous ICH primarily affecting the thalamus on initial brain computed tomography (CT) were enrolled. Patients were categorized into 2 groups based on their Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores. Various presumptive prognostic factors were analyzed to investigate relationships between various clinical characteristics and outcomes. Results Of the enrolled patients, 39 showed a GOS of 4–5, and were categorized as the good outcome group, while another 31 patients showed a GOS of 1–3 and were categorized as the poor outcome group. Initial GCS score, calculated volume of hematoma, presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), coexisting complications, hydrocephalus, performance of external ventricular drainage, and modified Graeb’s scores of patients with IVH were significantly different between the 2 groups. In multivariate analysis, among the factors above, initial GCS score (P=0.002, Odds ratio [OR]=1.761, Confidence interval [CI]=1.223–2.536) and the existence of systemic complications (P=0.015, OR=0.059, CI=0.006–0.573) were independently associated with clinical outcomes. Calculated hematoma volume showed a borderline relationship with outcomes (P=0.079, OR=0.920, CI=0.839–1.010). Conclusions Initial GCS score and the existence of systemic complications were strong predictive factors for prognosis of thalamic ICH. Calculated hematoma volume also had predictive value for clinical outcomes. PMID:26343784

  12. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  13. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group: formation of patient-centered outcome measures in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Alice B; Levin, Adriane A; Armstrong, April W; Abernethy, April; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Bhushan, Reva; Garg, Amit; Merola, Joseph F; Maccarone, Mara; Christensen, Robin

    2015-02-01

    As quality standards are increasingly in demand throughout medicine, dermatology needs to establish outcome measures to quantify the effectiveness of treatments and providers. The International Dermatology Outcome Measures Group was established to address this need. Beginning with psoriasis, the group aims to create a tool considerate of patients and providers using the input of all relevant stakeholders in assessment of disease severity and response to treatment. Herein, we delineate the procedures through which consensus is being reached and the future directions of the project.

  14. Effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric history.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ilknur; Mutlu, Mehmet Firat; Biri, Aydan; Bulut, Berk; Erdem, Mehmet; Erdem, Ahmet

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of anticoagulant therapy on pregnancy outcomes in 204 patients with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes. Patients with poor obstetric history (pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth retardation, fetal death, placental abruption, recurrent pregnancy loss) and having hereditary thrombophilia were included in this study. Poor obstetric outcomes were observed more frequently in patients who had not taken anticogulant therapy compared with treated group. Live birth rate, gestational age at birth and Apgar scores were significantly higher in the treated group when compared with the untreated group. There were no significant differences in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery and admission rates to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) plus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) had higher gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, live birth rate and a lower abortion rates when compared with controls; in contrast, no significant difference was observed in terms of birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. There were no significant differences between control group and both LMWH only and ASA only groups in terms of gestational age at birth, Apgar scores, birthweight, mode of delivery, obstetric complications and admission rates to NICU. Only LMWH group had higher live birth rate as compared with control group. The use of only ASA did not seem to affect the perinatal complication rates and outcomes. In conclusion, anticoagulant therapy with both LMWH and ASA seems to provide better obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with thrombophilia and previous poor obstetric outcomes.

  15. Does Cognitive Impairment Affect Rehabilitation Outcome in Parkinson’s Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ferrazzoli, Davide; Ortelli, Paola; Maestri, Roberto; Bera, Rossana; Giladi, Nir; Ghilardi, Maria Felice; Pezzoli, Gianni; Frazzitta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background: The cognitive status is generally considered as a major determinant of rehabilitation outcome in Parkinson’s disease (PD). No studies about the effect of cognitive impairment on motor rehabilitation outcomes in PD have been performed before. Objective: This study is aimed to evaluate the impact of cognitive decline on rehabilitation outcomes in patients with PD. Methods: We retrospectively identified 485 patients with PD hospitalized for a 4-week Multidisciplinary Intensive Rehabilitation Treatment (MIRT) between January 2014 and September 2015. According to Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), patients were divided into: group 1—normal cognition (score 27–30), group 2—mild cognitive impairment (score 21–26), group 3—moderate or severe cognitive impairment (score ≤ 20). According to Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), subjects were divided into patients with normal (score ≥13.8) and pathological (score <13.8) executive functions. The outcome measures were: Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Parkinson’s Disease Disability Scale (PDDS), Six Minutes Walking Test (6MWT), Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Results: All scales had worse values with the increase of cognitive impairment and passing from normal to pathological executive functions. After rehabilitation, all the outcome measures improved in all groups (p < 0.0001). Between groups, the percentage of improvement was significantly different for total UPDRS (p = 0.0009, best improvement in normal MMSE group; p = 0.019, best improvement in normal FAB group), and BBS (p < 0.0001, all pairwise comparisons significant, best improvement in patients with worse MMSE score; p < 0.0001, best improvement in patients with pathological FAB). TUG (p = 0.006) and BBS (p < 0.0001) improved in patients with pathological FAB score, more than in those with normal FAB score. Conclusions: Patients gain benefit in the rehabilitative outcomes, regardless of cognition

  16. Gender differences in cardiac patients: a longitudinal investigation of exercise, autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression.

    PubMed

    Hunt-Shanks, Tiffany; Blanchard, Christopher; Reid, Robert D

    2009-05-01

    Female cardiac patients frequently experience greater anxiety and depression and engage in less exercise when compared with their male counterparts. This study considered whether exercise had similar effects on male and female cardiac patients' autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression, and whether exercise behavior explained the gender difference in their affective functioning (e.g. autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression). Eight hundred one participants completed the Hospital and Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) and the leisure score index (LSI) of the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire at baseline, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Female cardiac patients had greater autonomic anxiety, negative affect and depression and reduced exercise when compared with male cardiac patients at all time points. Although exercise was significantly related to affective outcomes at various time points for both men and women, gender did not moderate any of the exercise/affective relationships, and exercise did not mediate any of the gender/affective relationships. Further research is needed to clarify the complex relationships between gender, exercise, and the affective functioning of cardiac patients.

  17. Examining intrinsic versus extrinsic exercise goals: cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sebire, Simon J; Standage, Martyn; Vansteenkiste, Maarten

    2009-04-01

    Grounded in self-determination theory (SDT), this study had two purposes: (a) examine the associations between intrinsic (relative to extrinsic) exercise goal content and cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes; and (b) test the mediating role of psychological need satisfaction in the Exercise Goal Content --> Outcomes relationship. Using a sample of 410 adults, hierarchical regression analysis showed relative intrinsic goal content to positively predict physical self-worth, self-reported exercise behavior, psychological well-being, and psychological need satisfaction and negatively predict exercise anxiety. Except for exercise behavior, the predictive utility of relative intrinsic goal content on the dependent variables of interest remained significant after controlling for participants' relative self-determined exercise motivation. Structural equation modeling analyses showed psychological need satisfaction to partially mediate the effect of relative intrinsic goal content on the outcome variables. Our findings support further investigation of exercise goals commensurate with the goal content perspective advanced in SDT.

  18. The Association of Visual Impairment With Clinical Outcomes in Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yu Ah; Kim, Suk Young; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-05-01

    Visual impairment limits people's ability to perform daily tasks and affects their quality of life. We evaluated the impact of visual impairment on clinical outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients.HD patients were selected from the Clinical Research Center registry a prospective cohort study on dialysis patients in Korea. Visual impairment was defined as difficulty in daily life due to decreased visual acuity or blindness. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and the secondary outcomes were cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization.A total of 3250 patients were included. Seven hundred thirty (22.5%) of the enrolled patients had visual impairment. The median follow-up period was 30 months. The Kaplan-Meier curve and log-rank test showed that all-cause mortality rates (P < 0.001) as well as cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization rates (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with visual impairment than in patients without visual impairment. In the multivariable analysis, visual impairment had significant predictive power for all-cause mortality (Hazard ratio [HR], 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-2.61, P = 0.004) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.45 [1.00-1.90], P = 0.008) after adjusting for confounding variables. Of these 3250 patients, 634 patients from each group were matched by propensity scores. In the propensity score matched analysis, patients with visual impairment had independently significant associations with increased all-cause mortality (HR 1.69 [1.12-2.54], P = 0.01) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.48 [1.08-2.02], P = 0.01) compared with patients without visual impairment after adjustment for confounding variables.Our data demonstrated that visual impairment was an independent risk factor for clinical adverse outcomes in HD patients.

  19. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  20. Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence: strategies to improve patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Martei, Yehoda M; Matro, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    Identifying patients at high risk of breast cancer recurrence has important implications not only for enabling the ability to provide accurate information to patients but also the potential to improve patient outcomes. Patients at high recurrence risk can be offered appropriate treatment to improve the overall survival. However, the major challenge is identifying patients with early-stage breast cancer at lower risk who may be spared potentially toxic therapy. The successful integration of molecular assays into clinical practice may address the problem of overtreatment and improve overall patient outcomes. PMID:26504408

  1. Outcomes from the Patient Perspective Workshop at OMERACT 6.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, John; Heiberg, Turid; Hewlett, Sarah; Hughes, Rod; Kvien, Tore; Ahlmèn, Monica; Boers, Maarten; Minnock, Patricia; Saag, Kenneth; Shea, Beverley; Suarez Almazor, Maria; Taal, Erik

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the Patient Perspective Workshop at OMERACT 6 was to address the question of assessing the outcomes of intervention in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the perspective of those who experience the disease themselves. This was done by reviewing the current state of research in the area, identifying the requirements for the development of valid instruments, delineating a research agenda that can attain these requirements, and motivating participants to undertake the appropriate research. Through a series of meetings and discussion sessions a research agenda emerged that includes: exploring subjective experiences of RA identified by patients as important but not encompassed within the current "core set" of outcome measures (such as a sense of well being, fatigue, and disturbed sleep); clarifying terminology; and empowering patients to be more effective partners in outcomes research. These were supported by the OMERACT plenary session. Specific actions were required by both patient participants and organizers to ensure the nature of the conference, its focus and method of working were understood, and that the patient participants were sufficiently confident to make their contribution.

  2. Opportunities for Patient-centered Outcomes Research in Radiology.

    PubMed

    Zygmont, Matthew E; Lam, Diana L; Nowitzki, Kristina M; Burton, Kirsteen R; Lenchik, Leon; McArthur, Tatum A; Sekhar, Aarti K; Itri, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Recently created in 2010, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) supports patient-centered comparative effectiveness research with a focus on prioritizing high-impact studies and improving trial design methodology. The Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Alliance Task Force on patient-centered outcomes research in Radiology aims to review recently funded imaging-centric projects that adhere to the methodologies established by PCORI. We provide an overview of the successful application of PCORI standards to radiology topics, highlight how these methodologies differ from other forms of radiology research, and identify opportunities for new projects as well as potential barriers for involvement. Our hope is that review of specific case examples in radiology will clarify the use and value of PCORI methods mandated and supported nationally by the Affordable Care Act.

  3. Gestational outcomes in patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, G R; Rodrigues, B C; Lacerda, M I; Dos Santos, F C; de Jesus, N R; Klumb, E M; Levy, R A

    2017-04-01

    This study analyzed maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancies of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients followed in a reference unit. This retrospective cohort study included 26 pregnancies of patients seen between 2011 and 2015 included with history and/or active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus among 135 pregnancies. Three patients had active neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus at conception, but only one remained with neurological activity during gestation, characteristically related to the inadvertent suspension of medications. Twenty six percent of the newborns were small for gestational age and 40% of live births were premature, with no neonatal death or early complications of prematurity. Preeclampsia was diagnosed in nine pregnancies, with two cases of early severe form that resulted in intrauterine fetal death. Patients with neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus had more prematurity and preeclampsia compared to patients without neuropsychiatric disease. However, when concomitant lupus nephritis was excluded, the gestational results of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus patients were more favorable.

  4. Issues impacting therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Atin; Goindi, Shishu

    2014-01-01

    The quest for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients has evaded the healthcare professionals for long and often lack of child specific dosage forms and the associated events that follow with it have been considered to be major contributor towards suboptimal outcomes. Consequently, there have been sustained efforts over the years to address this issue with the enactment of legislations like Best Pharmaceutical for Children Act (BPCA), Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) and Pediatric Regulation by European Union (EU) to incentivise the participation of pharmaceutical industry towards development of child friendly dosage forms. Initiatives taken in past by organisations like World Health Organisation (WHO) and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) to spur the development of child friendly dosage forms has helped to address issues pertaining to management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and malaria in pediatric patients. Present efforts aimed at developing child friendly dosage forms include oro-dispersible platforms including thin films and mini-tablets. Despite these leaps and advancements in developing better dosage forms for children, lower therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients continue to remain an unresolved issue because of detrimental effects of additional factors such as parents understanding of label instructions and complexities involved in executing pediatric clinical studies thus requiring a concerted effort from pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers, parents and healthcare providers to work for better treatment outcomes in children.

  5. Optimizing Survival Outcomes For Adult Patients With Nontraumatic Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julianna

    2016-10-01

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed.

  6. A Comparison of Fibromyalgia Symptoms in Patients with Healthy versus Depressive, Low and Reactive Affect Balance Styles

    PubMed Central

    Toussaint, Loren L.; Vincent, Ann; McAllister, Samantha J; Oh, Terry H; Hassett, Afton L

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Affect balance reflects relative levels of negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA) and includes four styles: Healthy (low NA/high PA), Depressive (high NA/low PA), Reactive (high NA/high PA) and Low (low NA/low PA). These affect balance styles may have important associations with clinical outcomes in patients with fibromyalgia. Herein, we evaluated the severity of core fibromyalgia symptom domains as described by the Outcomes Research in Rheumatology-Fibromyalgia working group in the context of the four affect balance styles. Methods Data from735 patients with fibromyalgia who completed the Brief Pain Inventory, Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, Profile of Mood States, Medical Outcomes Sleep Scale, Multiple Ability Self-Report Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule were included in this analysis. Results The majority (51.8%) of patients in our sample had a Depressive affect balance style; compared to patients with a Healthy affect balance style, they scored significantly worse in all fibromyalgia symptom domains including pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, dyscognition, depression, anxiety, stiffness, and functional status (P = <.001 - .004). Overall, patients with a Healthy affect balance style had the lowest level of symptoms, while symptom levels of those with Reactive and Low affect balance styles were distributed in between those of the Depressive and Healthy groups. Conclusions and Implications The results of our cross-sectional study suggest that having a Healthy affect balance style is associated with better physical and psychological symptom profiles in fibromyalgia. Futures studies evaluating these associations longitudinally could provide rationale for evaluating the effect of psychological interventions on affect balance and clinical outcomes in fibromyalgia. PMID:25067981

  7. Improving outcomes for ESRD patients: shifting the quality paradigm.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    The availability of life-saving dialysis therapy has been one of the great successes of medicine in the past four decades. Over this time period, despite treatment of hundreds of thousands of patients, the overall quality of life for patients with ESRD has not substantially improved. A narrow focus by clinicians and regulators on basic indicators of care, like dialysis adequacy and anemia, has consumed time and resources but not resulted in significantly improved survival; also, frequent hospitalizations and dissatisfaction with the care experience continue to be seen. A new quality paradigm is needed to help guide clinicians, providers, and regulators to ensure that patients' lives are improved by the technically complex and costly therapy that they are receiving. This paradigm can be envisioned as a quality pyramid: the foundation is the basic indicators (outstanding performance on these indicators is necessary but not sufficient to drive the primary outcomes). Overall, these basics are being well managed currently, but there remains an excessive focus on them, largely because of publically reported data and regulatory requirements. With a strong foundation, it is now time to focus on the more complex intermediate clinical outcomes-fluid management, infection control, diabetes management, medication management, and end-of-life care among others. Successfully addressing these intermediate outcomes will drive improvements in the primary outcomes, better survival, fewer hospitalizations, better patient experience with the treatment, and ultimately, improved quality of life. By articulating this view of quality in the ESRD program (pushing up the quality pyramid), the discussion about quality is reframed, and also, clinicians can better target their facilities in the direction of regulatory oversight and requirements about quality. Clinicians owe it to their patients, as the ESRD program celebrates its 40th anniversary, to rekindle the aspirations of the creators of

  8. Outcomes of Elderly Patients after Predialysis Vascular Access Creation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Timmy; Thamer, Mae; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Allon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Uniform vascular access guidelines for elderly patients may be inappropriate because of the competing risk of death, high rate of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) maturation failure, and poor vascular access outcomes in this population. However, the outcomes in elderly patients with advanced CKD who receive permanent vascular access before dialysis initiation are unclear. We identified a large nationally representative cohort of 3418 elderly patients (aged ≥ 70 years) with CKD undergoing predialysis AVF or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation from 2004 to 2009, and assessed the frequencies of dialysis initiation, death before dialysis initiation, and dialysis-free survival for 2 years after vascular access creation. In all, 67% of patients with predialysis AVF and 71% of patients with predialysis AVG creation initiated dialysis within 2 years of access placement, but the overall risk of dialysis initiation was modified by patient age and race. Only one half of patients initiated dialysis with a functioning AVF or AVG; 46.8% of AVFs were created <90 days before dialysis initiation. Catheter dependence at dialysis initiation was more common in patients receiving predialysis AVF than in patients receiving AVG (46.0% versus 28.5%; P<0.001). In conclusion, most elderly patients with advanced CKD who received predialysis vascular access creation initiated dialysis within 2 years. As a consequence of late predialysis placement or maturation failure, almost one half of patients receiving AVFs initiated dialysis with a catheter. Insertion of an AVG closer to dialysis initiation may serve as a "catheter-sparing" approach and allow delay of permanent access placement in selected elderly patients with CKD.

  9. Outcomes of Elderly Patients after Predialysis Vascular Access Creation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Thamer, Mae; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Uniform vascular access guidelines for elderly patients may be inappropriate because of the competing risk of death, high rate of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) maturation failure, and poor vascular access outcomes in this population. However, the outcomes in elderly patients with advanced CKD who receive permanent vascular access before dialysis initiation are unclear. We identified a large nationally representative cohort of 3418 elderly patients (aged ≥70 years) with CKD undergoing predialysis AVF or arteriovenous graft (AVG) creation from 2004 to 2009, and assessed the frequencies of dialysis initiation, death before dialysis initiation, and dialysis-free survival for 2 years after vascular access creation. In all, 67% of patients with predialysis AVF and 71% of patients with predialysis AVG creation initiated dialysis within 2 years of access placement, but the overall risk of dialysis initiation was modified by patient age and race. Only one half of patients initiated dialysis with a functioning AVF or AVG; 46.8% of AVFs were created <90 days before dialysis initiation. Catheter dependence at dialysis initiation was more common in patients receiving predialysis AVF than in patients receiving AVG (46.0% versus 28.5%; P<0.001). In conclusion, most elderly patients with advanced CKD who received predialysis vascular access creation initiated dialysis within 2 years. As a consequence of late predialysis placement or maturation failure, almost one half of patients receiving AVFs initiated dialysis with a catheter. Insertion of an AVG closer to dialysis initiation may serve as a “catheter-sparing” approach and allow delay of permanent access placement in selected elderly patients with CKD. PMID:25855782

  10. Dementia and delirium, the outcomes in elderly hip fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosk, Christina A; Mus, Marnix; Vroemen, Jos PAM; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Vos, Dagmar I; Elmans, Leon HGJ; van der Laan, Lijckle

    2017-01-01

    Background Delirium in hip fractured patients is a frequent complication. Dementia is an important risk factor for delirium and is common in frail elderly. This study aimed to extend the previous knowledge on risk factors for delirium and the consequences. Special attention was given to patients with dementia and delirium. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study performed in the Amphia Hospital, Breda, the Netherlands. A full electronic patient file system (Hyperspace Version IU4: Epic, Inc., Verona, WI, USA) was used to assess data between January 2014 and September 2015. All patients presented were aged ≥70 years with a hip fracture, who underwent surgery with osteosynthesis or arthroplasty. Patients were excluded in case of a pathological or a periprosthetic hip fracture, multiple traumatic injuries, and high-energy trauma. Patient and surgical characteristics were documented. Postoperative outcomes were noted. Delirium was screened using Delirium Observation Screening Scale and dementia was assessed from medical notes. Results Of a total of 566 included patients, 75% were females. The median age was 84 years (interquartile range: 9). Delirium was observed in 35%. Significant risk factors for delirium were a high American Society of Anesthesiology score, delirium in medical history, functional dependency, preoperative institutionalization, low hemoglobin level, and high amount of blood transfusion. Delirium was correlated with a longer hospital stay (P=0.001), increased association with complications (P<0.001), institutionalization (P<0.001), and 6-month mortality (P<0.001). Patients with dementia (N=168) had a higher delirium rate (57.7%, P<0.001) but a shorter hospital stay (P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the 6-month mortality between delirious patients with (34.0%) and without dementia (26.3%). Conclusion Elderly patients with a hip fracture are vulnerable for delirium, especially when the patient has dementia. Patients who underwent

  11. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donald E.; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M.; Locke, David G.; Reband, Agnes M.; Pine, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts. We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation. A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume. Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing

  12. Risk-adjusted outcomes in Medicare inpatient nephrectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donald E; Pine, Michael; Nedza, Susan M; Locke, David G; Reband, Agnes M; Pine, Gregory

    2016-09-01

    Without risk-adjusted outcomes of surgical care across both the inpatient and postacute period of time, hospitals and surgeons cannot evaluate the effectiveness of current performance in nephrectomy and other operations, and will not have objective metrics to gauge improvements from care redesign efforts.We compared risk-adjusted hospital outcomes following elective total and partial nephrectomy to demonstrate differences that can be used to improve care. We used the Medicare Limited Dataset for 2010 to 2012 for total and partial nephrectomy for benign and malignant neoplasms to create prediction models for the adverse outcomes (AOs) of inpatient deaths, prolonged length-of-stay outliers, 90-day postdischarge deaths without readmission, and 90-day relevant readmissions. From the 4 prediction models, total predicted adverse outcomes were determined for each hospital in the dataset that met a minimum of 25 evaluable cases for the study period. Standard deviations (SDs) for each hospital were used to identify specific z-scores. Risk-adjusted adverse outcomes rates were computed to permit benchmarking each hospital's performance against the national standard. Differences between best and suboptimal performing hospitals defined the potential margin of preventable adverse outcomes for this operation.A total of 449 hospitals with 23,477 patients were evaluated. Overall AO rate was 20.8%; 17 hospitals had risk-adjusted AO rates that were 2 SDs poorer than predicted and 8 were 2 SDs better. The top performing decile of hospitals had a risk-adjusted AO rate of 10.2% while the lowest performing decile had 32.1%. With a minimum of 25 cases for each study hospital, no statistically valid improvement in outcomes was seen with increased case volume.Inpatient and 90-day postdischarge risk-adjusted adverse outcomes demonstrated marked variability among study hospitals and illustrate the opportunities for care improvement. This analytic design is applicable for comparing provider

  13. Different school placements following language unit attendance: which factors affect language outcome?

    PubMed

    Conti-Ramsden, Gina; Botting, Nicola; Knox, Emma; Simkin, Zoë

    2002-01-01

    The study compared the outcomes of two groups of children who were attending language unit provision at 7 years of age. Of 242 children in the original study, 62 (28%) transferred to mainstream school placements at age 8 years. These children were then closely matched to children still attending language unit provision at this age using measures of non-verbal IQ, expression and comprehension. These two groups of children were compared on outcome at 11 years in the areas of language skill, non-verbal IQ and social behaviour. Teacher/speech-language therapist opinions of placement were also examined as factors affecting outcome. Results show that children who moved to mainstream provision at 8 years were more likely to be attending mainstream at 11 years, although the majority received extra support. No further differences were evident in outcome according to placement type. However, there was a main effect of teacher/therapist opinion on outcome--children whose teachers were not entirely happy with the 8-year placement performed more poorly at 11 years on language measures. There were no differences on any other measures. The findings suggest that follow-on placements for children attending language units need to be more closely in line with teacher's opinions and that more flexibility needs to be evident in school placement policy in order that appropriate educational settings can be arranged.

  14. Management and Outcomes Among Chinese Hospitalized Patients With Established Cardiovascular Disease or Multiple Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingang; Yang, Yuejin; Gu, Hongqiu; Li, Wei; Hu, Dayi

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the management and outcomes among hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease (PAD), or with multiple (≥ 2) cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (multiple risk factors [MRFs]). We retrospectively studied 3732 hospitalized patients of either CV disease or ≥ 2 risk factors for atherothrombosis from October 2004 to January 2005. Outcomes included CV death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and hospitalization for atherothrombotic events. About one-third had disease involving ≥ 1 vascular bed. Medication was more intense in patients with CAD than in others. The lowest use of statins and antiplatelet treatment was in the PAD-only group. Patients with PAD experienced a higher CV mortality (5.1%) than the patients with CAD (3.73%) or stroke (4.1%), P < .001. Cardiovascular death ranged from 1.2% for patients with MRFs, 2.8% for patients with 1-bed disease, 4.7% for patients with 2-bed disease to 6.4% for patients with 3-bed disease (P for trend <.001). For hospitalized patients with established atherosclerotic arterial disease, a substantial increase in CV event rates occurs with increasing numbers of affected arterial beds. Patients with PAD were at an especially high risk.

  15. Outcomes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia after discontinuing ibrutinib.

    PubMed

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jain, Nitin; George, Binsah; James, Danelle; Kantarjian, Hagop; Burger, Jan; O'Brien, Susan

    2015-03-26

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RR-CLL). We describe the characteristics, causes of discontinuation, and outcomes in patients who discontinued treatment with ibrutinib. One hundred twenty-seven patients were enrolled in various clinical trials of ibrutinib, with or without rituximab, at our center. Thirty-three (26%) patients have discontinued ibrutinib to date. The majority of those patients had high-risk features: 94% with unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene rearrangement, 58% with del(17p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and 54% with a complex karyotype. Causes of discontinuation were disease transformation (7), progressive CLL (7), stem cell transplantation (3), adverse events (11), serious adverse events/deaths (3), and miscellaneous reasons (2). Twenty five patients (76%) died after discontinuing ibrutinib; the median overall survival was 3.1 months after discontinuation. Most patients with RR-CLL who discontinued ibrutinib early were difficult to treat and had poor outcomes.

  16. Outcomes of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia after discontinuing ibrutinib

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Jain, Nitin; George, Binsah; James, Danelle; Kantarjian, Hagop; Burger, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Ibrutinib is a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with relapsed refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (RR-CLL). We describe the characteristics, causes of discontinuation, and outcomes in patients who discontinued treatment with ibrutinib. One hundred twenty-seven patients were enrolled in various clinical trials of ibrutinib, with or without rituximab, at our center. Thirty-three (26%) patients have discontinued ibrutinib to date. The majority of those patients had high-risk features: 94% with unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene rearrangement, 58% with del(17p) by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and 54% with a complex karyotype. Causes of discontinuation were disease transformation (7), progressive CLL (7), stem cell transplantation (3), adverse events (11), serious adverse events/deaths (3), and miscellaneous reasons (2). Twenty five patients (76%) died after discontinuing ibrutinib; the median overall survival was 3.1 months after discontinuation. Most patients with RR-CLL who discontinued ibrutinib early were difficult to treat and had poor outcomes. PMID:25573991

  17. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs affect the outcome of arthroscopic Bankart repair?

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, J; Solheim, E; Liavaag, S; Baste, V; Havelin, L I

    2014-01-01

    To achieve pain control after arthroscopic shoulder surgery, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a complement to other analgesics. However, experimental studies have raised concerns that these drugs may have a detrimental effect on soft tissue-to-bone healing and, thus, have a negative effect on the outcome. We wanted to investigate if there are any differences in the clinical outcome after the arthroscopic Bankart procedure for patients who received NSAIDs prescription compared with those who did not. 477 patients with a primary arthroscopic Bankart procedure were identified in the Norwegian shoulder instability register and included in the study. 32.5% received prescription of NSAIDs post-operatively. 370 (78%) of the patients answered a follow-up questionnaire containing the Western Ontario Shoulder Instability index (WOSI). Mean follow-up was 21 months. WOSI at follow-up were 75% in the NSAID group and 74% in the control group. 12% of the patients in the NSAID group and 14% in the control group reported recurrence of instability. The reoperation rate was 5% in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Prescription of short-term post-operative NSAID treatment in the post-operative period did not influence on the functional outcome after arthroscopic Bankart procedures. PMID:24750379

  18. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Parker Jones, ‘Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P.; Seghier, Mohamed L.; Price, Cathy J.; Green, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find ‘good’ prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2–80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1–431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1–77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9–219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills

  19. Comparing language outcomes in monolingual and bilingual stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Hope, Thomas M H; Parker Jones, 'Ōiwi; Grogan, Alice; Crinion, Jenny; Rae, Johanna; Ruffle, Louise; Leff, Alex P; Seghier, Mohamed L; Price, Cathy J; Green, David W

    2015-04-01

    Post-stroke prognoses are usually inductive, generalizing trends learned from one group of patients, whose outcomes are known, to make predictions for new patients. Research into the recovery of language function is almost exclusively focused on monolingual stroke patients, but bilingualism is the norm in many parts of the world. If bilingual language recruits qualitatively different networks in the brain, prognostic models developed for monolinguals might not generalize well to bilingual stroke patients. Here, we sought to establish how applicable post-stroke prognostic models, trained with monolingual patient data, are to bilingual stroke patients who had been ordinarily resident in the UK for many years. We used an algorithm to extract binary lesion images for each stroke patient, and assessed their language with a standard tool. We used feature selection and cross-validation to find 'good' prognostic models for each of 22 different language skills, using monolingual data only (174 patients; 112 males and 62 females; age at stroke: mean = 53.0 years, standard deviation = 12.2 years, range = 17.2-80.1 years; time post-stroke: mean = 55.6 months, standard deviation = 62.6 months, range = 3.1-431.9 months), then made predictions for both monolinguals and bilinguals (33 patients; 18 males and 15 females; age at stroke: mean = 49.0 years, standard deviation = 13.2 years, range = 23.1-77.0 years; time post-stroke: mean = 49.2 months, standard deviation = 55.8 months, range = 3.9-219.9 months) separately, after training with monolingual data only. We measured group differences by comparing prediction error distributions, and used a Bayesian test to search for group differences in terms of lesion-deficit associations in the brain. Our models distinguish better outcomes from worse outcomes equally well within each group, but tended to be over-optimistic when predicting bilingual language outcomes: our bilingual patients tended to have poorer language skills than expected

  20. Quality of life among breast cancer patients with lymphedema: a systematic review of patient-reported outcome instruments and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cemal, Yeliz; Albornoz, Claudia; Klassen, Anne; Cano, Stefan; Sulimanoff, Isabel; Hernandez, Marisol; Massey, Marga; Cordeiro, Peter; Morrow, Monica; Mehrara, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Lymphedema following breast cancer surgery remains a common and feared treatment complication. Accurate information on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes among patients with lymphedema is critically needed to inform shared medical decision making and evidence-based practice in oncologic breast surgery. Our systematic review aimed to (1) identify studies describing HRQOL outcomes in breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) patients, (2) assess the quality of these studies, and (3) assess the quality and appropriateness of the patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments used. Methods Using the PRISMA statement, we performed a systematic review including studies describing HRQOL outcomes among BCRL patients. Studies were classified by levels of evidence and fulfillment of the Efficace criteria. PRO instruments were assessed using the COSMIN criteria. Results Thirty-nine studies met inclusion criteria, including 8 level I and 14 level II studies. Sixteen of 39 studies were compliant with the Efficace criteria. Seventeen HRQOL instruments were used, two specific to lymphedema patients. Exercise and complex decongestive therapy treatment interventions were associated with improved HRQOL. Conclusions High-quality data on HRQOL outcomes is required to inform surgical decisions for breast cancer management and survivors. Of the lymphedema-specific PRO instruments, the Upper Limb Lymphedema 27 (ULL-27) was found to have strong psychometric properties. Future studies should strive to use high-quality condition-specific PRO instruments, follow existing guidelines for HRQOL measurement and to consider economic burdens of BCRL. Implications for Cancer Survivors As lymphedema may develop many years after breast cancer surgery, the ULL-27 may offer greater content validity for use in survivorship research. PMID:23212603

  1. Age Related Incidence and Early Outcomes of Hip Fractures: A Prospective Cohort Study of 1177 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Associated with the increase in the aging population, there is an increase in the incidence of hip fractures worldwide. Outcome following such fractures is affected by age of the patient. This study aims to assess the incidence and early outcome of hip fractures, comparing between different age groups. Methods Data of hip fractures collected over a period of five years was analysed. Patients were divided into three groups, group A (patients under the age of 64), group B (patients between 65 and 84 years of age), and group C (patients over the age of 85). Results Of the 1177 patients included in the study, there were 90 patients in group A, 702 patients in group B and 385 patients in group C. There was a female preponderance across all age groups, and this increased as age advanced (p < 0.0001). A significantly larger number of older patients lived alone and needed aids to walk before the injury (p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the type of fracture across the three groups (p = 0.13). A higher proportion of the elderly with intracapsular fractures were treated by replacement arthroplasty. Older patients who had internal fixation of intracapsular fractures had a better walking ability at 4 months. The overall deterioration in mobility was greater in older patients (p < 0.0001). Mortality was higher in older patients. Conclusions Hip fractures are more common among females irrespective of age group. Older patients have a higher mortality and a greater deterioration of walking ability after such injuries. Internal fixation of intracapsular fractures have demonstrated satisfactory early outcome in the immediate period. This could be attributed to retention of native bone, better propioception and shorter operation time. PMID:21261942

  2. Factors Associated with Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Primary Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Kyung-Jae; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Park, Jung-Yul; Jung, Yong-Gu

    2017-01-01

    Background Primary intraventricular hemorrhage (PIVH) is an uncommon type of intracerebral hemorrhage. Owing to its rarity, the clinical and radiological factors affecting outcomes in patients with PIVH have not been widely studied. Material/Methods We retrospectively reviewed 112 patients (mean age 53 years) treated for PIVH at our institution from January 2004 to December 2014. Clinical and radiological parameters were analyzed 3 months after initial presentation to identify factors associated with clinical outcomes, as assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (favorable ≥4, unfavorable <4). Results Of the 99 patients who underwent angiography, causative vascular abnormalities were found in 46%, and included Moyamoya disease, arteriovenous malformation, and cerebral aneurysm. At 3 months after initial presentation, 64% and 36% of patients were in the favorable and unfavorable outcome groups, respectively. The mortality rate was 19%. However, most survivors had no or mild deficits. Age, initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II), modified Graeb score, and various radiological parameters reflecting ventricular dilatation were significantly different between the groups. Specifically, a GCS score of less than 13 (p=0.015), a SAPS II score of less than 33 (p=0.039), and a dilated fourth ventricle (p=0.043) were demonstrated to be independent predictors of an unfavorable clinical outcome. Conclusions In this study we reveal independent predictors of poor outcome in primary intraventricular hemorrhage patients, and show that nearly half of the patients in our study had predisposing vascular abnormalities. Routine angiography is recommended in the evaluation of PIVH to identify potentially treatable etiologies, which may enhance long-term prognosis. PMID:28325888

  3. Prognostic Factors for Visual Outcome in Traumatic Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan F.; Zhu, Yu; Wan, Ming G.; Du, Shan S.; Yue, Zhen Z.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the prognostic factors for visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients. Methods. The demographic features of traumatic cataract patients in Central China were studied. The factors that might influence the visual outcome were analyzed. The sensitivity and specificity of OTS (ocular trauma score) in predicting VA were calculated. Results. The study enrolled 480 cases. 65.5% of patients achieved VA at >20/60. The factors associated with the final VA were initial VA, injury type, wound location, the way of cataract removal, and IOL implantation. The sensitivities of OTS in predicting the VA at NLP (nonlight perception), LP/HM (light perception/hand motion), and ≥20/40 were 100%. The specificity of OTS to predict the final VA at 1/200-19/200 and 20/200-20/50 was 100%. Conclusion. The prognostic factors were initial VA, injury type, wound location, cataract removal procedure, and the way of IOL implantation. The OTS has good sensitivity and specificity in predicting visual outcome in traumatic cataract patients in long follow-up. PMID:27595014

  4. Pediatric hydrocephalus: Does the shunt device pressure selection affect the outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Arvind; Sharma, Anuj; Gupta, Charitesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of low- versus medium-pressure shunts in pediatric hydrocephalus in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Forty patients of pediatric hydrocephalus were randomized into two groups. The Chhabra differential pressure VP shunt (low or medium) was inserted in every patient. Postoperative follow-up was performed for symptomatic improvement and radiological evaluation (by sonography or computed tomography scan) for ventricle hemispheric ratio (VHR). Comparative analysis of pre- and postoperative VHR and need of redo surgery for shunt malformation were carried out to establish outcomes. Results: Nineteen patients had a low-pressure and 21 patients had a medium-pressure shunt inserted. The age of the patients ranged from 1 day to 10 years. The average preoperative VHR in group A was 55.37%, which reduced to 40% postoperatively (P = 0.00005); likewise, the pre- and postoperative VHR in group B were 61.57% and 42%, respectively, which was statistically significant (P = 0.0006). The complications of shunts and incidence of redo shunt surgery in both groups were not found to be statistically significant (P = 0.5614). Conclusions: The study found no significant difference in the outcome of patients with low- or medium-pressure shunt placement in pediatric hydrocephalus. PMID:22529548

  5. Quality of Life, Psychological Interventions and Treatment Outcome in Tuberculosis Patients: The Indian Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Psychological distress is being recognized in individuals affected with many diseases since it affects quality of life (QOF) and has gained importance in the clinical settings. Psychological interventions and their effect on the treatment outcome have yielded encouraging results in many diseased conditions. Tuberculosis (TB) ranks as a deadly disease resulting in millions of deaths worldwide. However, the effect of TB on the psychological status of patients and interventions to improve treatment outcome is neglected, especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Methods: Systematic review of research papers that published on the QOF in TB and the effect of psychological interventions on treatment outcome were conducted. Results: Tuberculosis patients experience high levels of stress and decreased QOF. In the Indian scenario, TB patients undergo immense psychological stress similar to what is reported in other locations. Psychological interventions renewed hope on life and adherence to medication and treatment outcomes. Such psychological interventions are not practiced in Indian clinical settings. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for both governmental and non-governmental organizations to devise strategies to include psychological interventions mandatory during TB treatments. In the absence of such interventions, the fight against TB in India will remain incomplete. PMID:27833578

  6. Management outcomes in pubic diastasis: our experience with 19 patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pubic diastasis, a result of high energy antero-posterior compression (APC) injury, has been managed based on the Young and Burguess classification system. The mode of fixation in APC II injury has, however, been a subject of controversy and some authors have proposed a need to address the issue of partial breach of the posterior pelvic ring elements in these injuries. Methods The study included a total of 19 patients with pubic diastasis managed by us from May 2006 to December 2007. There was a single patient with type I APC injury who treated conservatively. Type II APC injuries (13 patients) were treated surgically with symphyseal plating using single anterior/superior plates or double perpendicularly placed plates. Type III injuries (5 patients) in addition underwent posterior fixation using plates or percutaneous sacro-iliac screws. The outcome was assessed clinically (Majeed score) and radiologically. Results The mean follow-up was for 2.9 years (6 months to 4.5 years). Among the 13 patients with APC II injuries, the clinical scores were excellent in one (7.6%), good in 6 (46.15%), fair in 4 (30.76%) and poor in 2 (15.38%). Radiological scores were excellent in 2 (15.38%), good in 8 (61.53%), fair in 2 (15.38%) and poor in one patient (7.6%). Among the 5 patients with APC III injuries, there were 2 patients each with good (50%) and fair (50%) clinical scores while one patient was lost on long term follow up. The radiological outcomes were also similar in these. Complications included implant failure in 3 patients, postoperative infection in 2 patients, deep venous thrombosis in one patient and bladder herniation in one of the patients with implant failure. Conclusions There is no observed dissimilarity in outcomes between isolated anterior and combined symphyseal (perpendicular) plating techniques in APC II injuries. Single anterior symphyseal plating along with posterior stabilisation provides a stable fixation in type III APC injuries. Limited

  7. Do patient autonomy preferences matter? Linking patient-centered care to patient-physician relationships and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yin-Yang; Lin, Julia L

    2010-11-01

    As health care systems seek to provide patient-centered care as a cornerstone of quality, the link between patient-centeredness and patient outcomes is a concern. Past research reveals inconsistent findings regarding the impact of patient-centeredness on patient outcomes, and few studies have investigated the factors that moderate this relationship. Most studies have used self-rated outcomes on a cross-sectional basis, even though most patient care is inherently longitudinal. The current study extends past research by examining the theoretical and empirical relationships between patients' perceptions of autonomy support and autonomy preferences with regard to their health outcomes. We hypothesized that autonomy preferences moderate the positive relationships between perceived autonomy support and patient-physician relationships, and on self-rated and objective health outcomes such that the relationships are more positive when patient autonomy preferences are high. Data were collected 3 times over a one-year period from a sample of 614 patients with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. The results revealed strong support for the hypothesized relationships between perceived autonomy support and patient trust, satisfaction, and mental health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after adjusting for baseline scores; however, the direct link between autonomy support and patients' glycemic control was not significant. Specifically, patients with high decisional preference experienced a greater increase in subsequent trust and satisfaction than patients with low decisional preference. Further, patients with high information preference had a higher level of satisfaction over time than patients with low information preference. In addition, it was found that perceived autonomy support improved both physical and mental HRQoL but only if combined with high levels of information preference. This study provides evidence of a contingency perspective of the relationship between patient autonomy

  8. Resilient appliance-therapy treatment outcome in patients with TMD pain correlated to MRI-determined changes in condyle position.

    PubMed

    Limchaichana, Napat; Nilsson, Håkan; Petersson, Arne; Ekberg, EwaCarin

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research was to study if changes in condyle position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients could be a factor that is affected by resilient appliance therapy and if it influences the treatment outcome. The study investigated 48 patients randomly assigned to a treatment group (T group = 21 patients, using resilient appliance) or a control group (C group = 27 patients, using nonoccluding appliance). Changes in the condyle-fossa relationship (with and without the appliance) were determined in an MRI examination. Ten weeks after treatment, the treatment outcome was measured. The results showed that with the appliance, change in condyle position occurred in 76% of the T group and 22% of the C group (p < 0.001). Sixty-seven percent (67%) of the T group and 44% of the C group experienced a successful treatment outcome. Treatment outcome was not related to changes in condyle position in patients with TMD pain.

  9. A comparative study of pregnancy outcomes and menstrual irregularities in northern Indian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Deepanjali, S; Kumar, A; Dadhwal, V; Agarwal, S K; Pandey, R M; Chaturvedi, P K

    2010-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can affect the menstruation, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes of the affected subjects. There is very little data on this aspect of the disease in Indian patients. Our aim was to study the menstrual, fertility, and pregnancy outcomes in these patients in comparison with patients of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and also to study the effect of cyclophosphamide therapy on menstrual cycles in patients with SLE. Four hundred and twenty patients of SLE (210) and RA (210) were interviewed using a standard questionnaire and available medical records used. After disease-onset, the chances of adverse pregnancy outcomes were significantly more in patients with SLE compared to RA [OR = 5.17 (2.13-12.52); p ≤ 0.001]. Compared to the National average in India, the average number of living children is lesser in patients with RA (2.39 ± 1.39, p = 0.002), but more so in patients with SLE (1.44 ± 1.35, p = 0.001). A younger age at diagnosis and cyclophosphamide therapy was found to be independently associated with menstrual irregularities after disease-onset. We conclude that pregnancy outcome in patients with SLE in India is worse in comparison to patients with RA. Average family size of patients with SLE and RA is less when compared to National average in India. Patients with SLE are more prone for menstrual irregularities, especially those who receive cyclophosphamide treatment.

  10. Bad actions or bad outcomes? Differentiating affective contributions to the moral condemnation of harm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ryan M; Hannikainen, Ivar A; Cushman, Fiery A

    2014-06-01

    Moral condemnation of harmful behavior is influenced by both cognitive and affective processes. However, despite much recent research, the proximate source of affect remains unclear. One obvious contender is empathy; simulating the victim's pain could lead one to judge an action as wrong ("outcome aversion"). An alternative, less obvious source is one's own aversion to performing the action itself ("action aversion"). To dissociate these alternatives, we developed a scale that assessed individual aversions to (a) witnessing others experience painful outcomes (e.g., seeing someone fall down stairs); and (b) performing actions that are harmless yet aversive (e.g., stabbing a fellow actor with a fake stage knife). Across 4 experiments, we found that moral condemnation of both first-person and third-party harmful behavior in the context of moral dilemmas is better predicted by one's aversion to action properties than by an affective response to victim suffering. In a fifth experiment, we manipulated both action aversion and the degree of expected suffering across a number of actions and found that both factors make large, independent contributions to moral judgment. Together, these results suggest we may judge others' actions by imagining what it would feel like to perform the action rather than experience the consequences of the action. Accordingly, they provide a counterpoint to a dominant but largely untested assumption that empathy is the key affective response governing moral judgments of harm.

  11. Computed tomography perfusion and computed tomography angiography for prediction of clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients after thrombolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jia-wei; Yu, Xiang-rong; Zhou, Shu-yi; Wang, Jian-hong; Zhang, Jun; Geng, Dao-ying; Zhang, Tian-yu; Cheng, Xin; Ling, Yi-feng; Dong, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral blood perfusion and cerebrovascular lesions are important factors that can affect the therapeutic efficacy of thrombolysis. At present, the majority of studies focus on assessing the accuracy of lesion location using imaging methods before treatment, with less attention to predictions of outcomes after thrombolysis. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the efficacy of combined computed tomography (CT) perfusion and CT angiography in predicting clinical outcomes after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke patients. The study included 52 patients who received both CT perfusion and CT angiography. Patients were grouped based on the following criteria to compare clinical outcomes: (1) thrombolytic and non-thrombolytic patients, (2) thrombolytic patients with CT angiography showing the presence or absence of a vascular stenosis, (3) thrombolytic patients with CT perfusion showing the presence or absence of hemodynamic mismatch, and (4) different CT angiography and CT perfusion results. Short-term outcome was assessed by the 24-hour National Institution of Health Stroke Scale score change. Long-term outcome was assessed by the 3-month modified Rankin Scale score. Of 52 ischemic stroke patients, 29 were treated with thrombolysis and exhibited improved short-term outcomes compared with those without thrombolysis treatment (23 patients). Patients with both vascular stenosis and blood flow mismatch (13 patients) exhibited the best short-term outcome, while there was no correlation of long-term outcome with CT angiography or CT perfusion findings. These data suggest that combined CT perfusion and CT angiography are useful for predicting short-term outcome, but not long-term outcome, after thrombolysis. PMID:28250755

  12. Predictive Factors Affecting Long-Term Outcome of Unilateral Lateral Rectus Recession

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hee Kyung; Kim, Mi-Jin; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Background There are few long-term outcome reports of unilateral lateral rectus (LR) recession for exotropia including a large number of subjects. Previous reports on unilateral LR recession commonly show extremely low rates of initial overcorrection and large exodrifts after surgery suggesting that the surgical dose may be increased. However, little is known of the long-term outcome of a large unilateral LR recession for exotropia. Objectives To determine long-term outcomes and predictive factors of recurrence after a large unilateral LR recession in patients with exotropia. Data Extraction Retrospective analysis was performed on 92 patients aged 3 to 17 years who underwent 10 mm unilateral LR recession for exotropia of ≤ 25 prism diopters (Δ) with prism and alternate cover testing and were followed up for more than 2 years after surgery. Final success rates within 10Δ of exophoria/tropia and 5Δ of esophoria/tropia at distance in the primary position, improvement in stereopsis and the predictive factors for recurrence were evaluated. Results At 24 months after surgery, 54% of patients had ocular alignment meeting the defined criteria of success, 45% had recurrence and 1% had overcorrection. After a mean follow-up of 39 months, 36% showed success, 63% showed recurrence and 1% resulted in overcorrection. The average time of recurrence was 23.4±14.7 months (range, 1–60 months) and the rate of recurrence per person-year was 23% after unilateral LR recession. Predictive factors of recurrence were a larger preoperative near angle of deviation (>16Δ) and larger initial postoperative exodeviation (>5Δ) at distance. Conclusions Long-term outcome of unilateral LR recession for exotropia showed low success rates with high recurrence, thus should be reserved for patients with a small preoperative near angle of exodeviation. PMID:26418819

  13. Semaglutide and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marso, Steven P; Bain, Stephen C; Consoli, Agostino; Eliaschewitz, Freddy G; Jódar, Esteban; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lingvay, Ildiko; Rosenstock, Julio; Seufert, Jochen; Warren, Mark L; Woo, Vincent; Hansen, Oluf; Holst, Anders G; Pettersson, Jonas; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2016-11-10

    Background Regulatory guidance specifies the need to establish cardiovascular safety of new diabetes therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes in order to rule out excess cardiovascular risk. The cardiovascular effects of semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue with an extended half-life of approximately 1 week, in type 2 diabetes are unknown. Methods We randomly assigned 3297 patients with type 2 diabetes who were on a standard-care regimen to receive once-weekly semaglutide (0.5 mg or 1.0 mg) or placebo for 104 weeks. The primary composite outcome was the first occurrence of cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke. We hypothesized that semaglutide would be noninferior to placebo for the primary outcome. The noninferiority margin was 1.8 for the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio. Results At baseline, 2735 of the patients (83.0%) had established cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, or both. The primary outcome occurred in 108 of 1648 patients (6.6%) in the semaglutide group and in 146 of 1649 patients (8.9%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58 to 0.95; P<0.001 for noninferiority). Nonfatal myocardial infarction occurred in 2.9% of the patients receiving semaglutide and in 3.9% of those receiving placebo (hazard ratio, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.08; P=0.12); nonfatal stroke occurred in 1.6% and 2.7%, respectively (hazard ratio, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38 to 0.99; P=0.04). Rates of death from cardiovascular causes were similar in the two groups. Rates of new or worsening nephropathy were lower in the semaglutide group, but rates of retinopathy complications (vitreous hemorrhage, blindness, or conditions requiring treatment with an intravitreal agent or photocoagulation) were significantly higher (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.11 to 2.78; P=0.02). Fewer serious adverse events occurred in the semaglutide group, although more patients discontinued treatment

  14. Predicting neurosurgical outcomes in focal epilepsy patients using computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Nishant; Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Cash, Sydney S; Brandon Westover, M; Wang, Yujiang; Taylor, Peter N

    2017-02-01

    SEE EISSA AND SCHEVON DOI101093/AWW332 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Surgery can be a last resort for patients with intractable, medically refractory epilepsy. For many of these patients, however, there is substantial risk that the surgery will be ineffective. The prediction of who is likely to benefit from a surgical approach is crucial for being able to inform patients better, conduct principled prospective clinical trials, and ultimately tailor therapeutic approaches to these patients more effectively. Dynamical computational models, informed with patient data, can be used to make predictions and give mechanistic insight. In this study, we develop patient-specific dynamical network models of epileptogenic cortex. We infer the network connectivity matrix from non-seizure electrographic recordings of patients and use these connectivity matrices as the network structure in our model. The model simulates the dynamics of a bi-stable switch at every node in this network, meaning that every node starts in a background state, but has the ability to transit to a co-existing seizure state. Whether a transition happens in a node is partly determined by the stochastic nature of the input to the node, but also by the input the node receives from other connected nodes in the network. By conducting simulations with such a model, we can detect the average transition time for nodes in a given network, and therefore define nodes with a short transition time as highly epileptogenic. In a retrospective study, we found that in some patients the regions with high epileptogenicity in the model overlap with those identified clinically as the seizure onset zone. Moreover, it was found that the resection of these regions in the model reduces the overall likelihood of a seizure. Following removal of these regions in the model, we predicted surgical outcomes and compared these to actual patient outcomes. Our predictions were found to be 81.3% accurate on a dataset of 16

  15. Predicting neurosurgical outcomes in focal epilepsy patients using computational modelling

    PubMed Central

    Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Cash, Sydney S.; Brandon Westover, M.; Wang, Yujiang

    2017-01-01

    See Eissa and Schevon (doi:10.1093/aww332) for a scientific commentary on this article. Surgery can be a last resort for patients with intractable, medically refractory epilepsy. For many of these patients, however, there is substantial risk that the surgery will be ineffective. The prediction of who is likely to benefit from a surgical approach is crucial for being able to inform patients better, conduct principled prospective clinical trials, and ultimately tailor therapeutic approaches to these patients more effectively. Dynamical computational models, informed with patient data, can be used to make predictions and give mechanistic insight. In this study, we develop patient-specific dynamical network models of epileptogenic cortex. We infer the network connectivity matrix from non-seizure electrographic recordings of patients and use these connectivity matrices as the network structure in our model. The model simulates the dynamics of a bi-stable switch at every node in this network, meaning that every node starts in a background state, but has the ability to transit to a co-existing seizure state. Whether a transition happens in a node is partly determined by the stochastic nature of the input to the node, but also by the input the node receives from other connected nodes in the network. By conducting simulations with such a model, we can detect the average transition time for nodes in a given network, and therefore define nodes with a short transition time as highly epileptogenic. In a retrospective study, we found that in some patients the regions with high epileptogenicity in the model overlap with those identified clinically as the seizure onset zone. Moreover, it was found that the resection of these regions in the model reduces the overall likelihood of a seizure. Following removal of these regions in the model, we predicted surgical outcomes and compared these to actual patient outcomes. Our predictions were found to be 81.3% accurate on a dataset of 16

  16. [Clinical outcomes: the impact of patient-centered care].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Chii; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Chiang, Li-Chi

    2012-12-01

    An extensive body of literature advocating a "patient-centered" approach to medical care has emerged over the past three decades. This approach is now a mainstream trend in healthcare. Despite its popularity, there remains little consensus regarding the content or definition of patient-centered care. Various quantitative and qualitative research studies have extracted core meanings from "doctor-patient relationship" perspectives and investigated the relationships of these meanings with patient satisfaction, compliance with health promoting behavior, and health status. Mead and Bower's review of the conceptual and empirical literature represented the first attempt to develop a model of the doctor-patient relationship that considered the multiple aspects embraced by the "patient-centered" approach. However, any interpretation of the "patient-centered" concept that fails to consider the perspective of nursing is likely incomplete, as patient-centered care is the essence of nursing. This paper reviewed the concept of "patient-centered care", conducted a systematic review of randomized control trials to explore the effectiveness of patient-centered care, and integrated nursing-related studies that focused on patient-centered care. Our search covered articles published through the end of February 2011 in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, JBI, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Pubmed, ProQuest, PsycInfo, and CEPS, with 13 relevant articles identified. The majority of trials addressed by these studies demonstrated a positive "patient-centered care" effect on self-care knowledge and skills but a limited/insignificant effect on disease improvement. The reviewed studies used traditional definitions of "patient-centered care" that were inconsistent with the concepts defined by Mead and Bower. Heterogeneities exist between reviewed studies and the lack of related research in Taiwan. We thus integrated outcome indicators related to "patient-centered care". This study may be referenced by

  17. Perioperative problems in patients with brainstem tumors and their influence on patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Sachidanand J; Pandia, Mihir Prakash; Rath, Girija Prasad; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Dash, Hari Hara; Dube, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Patients with brainstem tumors have many associated systemic abnormalities and are prone to develop perioperative complications. We studied the problems associated with brainstem tumors and their influence on the postoperative neurological outcome. Material and Methods: Retrospective review of records of patients who underwent surgery for brainstem tumors over a period of 8 years was done. Preoperative variables, perioperative complications and neurological outcome as assessed by Glasgow Outcome Scale at the time of hospital discharge were noted. Association between perioperative factors and the unfavorable neurological outcome was evaluated. Results: Data of 70 patients were retrieved, 7 patients were excluded from the study because of incomplete data and data analysis was carried out for 63 patients. We found that lower cranial nerve palsies (32%) and hydrocephalus (43%) were common preoperatively. Various intraoperative problems encountered were hemodynamic instability (56%), major blood loss requiring blood transfusion (40%) and venous air embolism (11%), and postoperative problems were meningitis (51%), hypokalemia (38%), chest infection (21%), seizure (11%), deterioration of Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, 11%), hyponatremia (8%), hydrocephalus (6%), respiratory distress (3%) and operatives site hematoma (3%). Fifty-six (89%) patients had favorable outcome at hospital discharge whereas, 7 (11%) had an unfavorable outcome. There was no association between pre- and intra-operative factors and the neurological outcome. Deterioration of GCS, chest infection, and the need for reintubation and tracheostomy were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. Conclusion: Patients of brainstem tumors are at increased risk of perioperative complications. Some of the postoperative complications were associated with unfavorable neurological outcome. PMID:27275044

  18. Does Augmented Reality Affect High School Students' Learning Outcomes in Chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Jonathan Christopher

    Some teens may prefer using a self-directed, constructivist, and technologic approach to learning rather than traditional classroom instruction. If it can be demonstrated, educators may adjust their teaching methodology. The guiding research question for this study focused on how augmented reality affects high school students' learning outcomes in chemistry, as measured by a pretest and posttest methodology when ensuring that the individual outcomes were not the result of group collaboration. This study employed a quantitative, quasi-experimental study design that used a comparison and experimental group. Inferential statistical analysis was employed. The study was conducted at a high school in southwest Colorado. Eighty-nine respondents returned completed and signed consent forms, and 78 participants completed the study. Results demonstrated that augmented reality instruction caused posttest scores to significantly increase, as compared to pretest scores, but it was not as effective as traditional classroom instruction. Scores did improve under both types of instruction; therefore, more research is needed in this area. The present study was the first quantitative experiment controlling for individual learning to validate augmented reality using mobile handheld digital devices that affected individual students' learning outcomes without group collaboration. This topic was important to the field of education as it may help educators understand how students learn and it may also change the way students are taught.

  19. Postibrutinib outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Martin, Peter; Maddocks, Kami; Leonard, John P; Ruan, Jia; Goy, Andre; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Rule, Simon; Advani, Ranjana; Iberri, David; Phillips, Tycel; Spurgeon, Stephen; Kozin, Eliana; Noto, Katherine; Chen, Zhengming; Jurczak, Wojciech; Auer, Rebecca; Chmielowska, Ewa; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bloehdorn, Johannes; Portell, Craig; Williams, Michael E; Dreyling, Martin; Barr, Paul M; Chen-Kiang, Selina; DiLiberto, Maurizio; Furman, Richard R; Blum, Kristie A

    2016-03-24

    Despite unprecedented clinical activity in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), primary and acquired resistance to ibrutinib is common. The outcomes and ideal management of patients who experience ibrutinib failure are unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients with MCL who experienced disease progression while receiving ibrutinib across 15 international sites. Medical records were evaluated for clinical characteristics, pathological and radiological data, and therapies used pre- and postibrutinib. A total of 114 subjects met eligibility criteria. The median number of prior therapies was 3 (range, 0-10). The Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index (MIPI) scores at the start of ibrutinib were low, intermediate, and high in 46%, 31%, and 23% of patients, respectively. Of patients with available data prior to ibrutinib and postibrutinib, 34 of 47 and 11 of 12 had a Ki67 >30%. The median time on ibrutinib was 4.7 months (range 0.7-43.6). The median overall survival (OS) following cessation of ibrutinib was 2.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-4.9). Of the 104 patients with data available, 73 underwent subsequent treatment an average of 0.3 months after stopping ibrutinib with a median OS of 5.8 months (95% CI, 3.7-10.4). Multivariate Cox regression analysis of MIPI before postibrutinib treatment, and subsequent treatment with bendamustine, cytarabine, or lenalidomide failed to reveal any association with OS. Poor clinical outcomes were noted in the majority of patients with primary or secondary ibrutinib resistance. We could not identify treatments that clearly improved outcomes. Future trials should focus on understanding the mechanisms of ibrutinib resistance and on treatment after ibrutinib.

  20. DESIGN OF THE SPINE PATIENT OUTCOMES RESEARCH TRIAL (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Birkmeyer, Nancy J. O.; Weinstein, James N.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Skinner, Jonathan S.; Lurie, Jon D.; Deyo, Richard; Wennberg, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of Background Data The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) was designed to assess the relative efficacy and cost-effectiveness of surgical and non-surgical approaches to the treatment of common conditions associated with low back and leg pain. Objectives To describe the rationale and design of the SPORT project and discuss its strengths and limitations. Study Design Descriptive Methods First, we explain the rationale for embarking on SPORT, i.e. deficiencies in the existing scientific knowledge base for treatment of these conditions. Second, we describe the design of SPORT, including topics such as: specific aims; participating sites; study population; recruitment and enrollment; study interventions; follow-up; outcomes; statistical analysis; and study governance and organization. Finally, we discuss issues that complicate the performance of randomized trials in surgery as they relate to the design and conduct of SPORT. Results The SPORT project is being conducted at 11 clinical centers around the United States. It involves the simultaneous conduct of three multi-center, randomized, controlled clinical trials. The study includes patients with the three most common diagnoses for which spine surgery is performed: intervertebral disc herniation (IDH), spinal stenosis (SpS) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS), and compares the most commonly used standard surgical and non-surgical treatments for patients with these diagnoses. By the end of enrollment we anticipate a total of 500 IDH, 370 SpS, and 300 DS patients in the randomized trials. Patients who meet the eligibility criteria but decline to be randomized are invited to participate in an observational cohort study. Patients are being followed for a minimum of 24 months with visits scheduled at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Conclusions The results of this study will provide high-quality scientific evidence to aid clinical decision making and improve treatment outcomes for these common, costly

  1. Outcomes of Brugada Syndrome Patients with Coronary Artery Vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Kujime, Shingo; Sakurada, Harumizu; Saito, Naoki; Enomoto, Yoshinari; Ito, Naoshi; Nakamura, Keijiro; Fukamizu, Seiji; Tejima, Tamotsu; Yambe, Yuzuru; Nishizaki, Mitsuhiro; Noro, Mahito; Hiraoka, Masayasu; Sugi, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the outcomes of patients with concomitant Brugada syndrome and coronary artery vasospasm. Methods Patients diagnosed with Brugada syndrome with an implantable cardiac defibrillator were retrospectively investigated, and the coexistence of vasospasm was evaluated. The clinical features and outcomes were evaluated, especially in patients with coexistent vasospasm. A provocation test using acetylcholine was performed in patients confirmed to have no organic stenosis on percutaneous coronary angiography to confirm the presence of vasospasm. Implantable cardiac defibrillator shock status was checked every three months. Statistical comparisons of the groups with and without vasospasm were performed. A univariate analysis was also performed, and the odds ratio for the risk of implantable cardiac defibrillator shock was calculated. Patients Thirty-five patients with Brugada syndrome, of whom six had coexistent vasospasm. Results There were no significant differences in the laboratory data, echocardiogram findings, disease, or the history of taking any drugs between patients with and without vasospasm. There were significant differences in the clinical features of Brugada syndrome, i.e. cardiac events such as resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation or appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock. Four patients with vasospasm had cardiac events such as resuscitation from ventricular fibrillation and/or appropriate defibrillator shock; three of them had no cardiac events with calcium channel blocker therapy to prevent vasospasm. The coexistence of vasospasm was a potential risk factor for an appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator shock (odds ratio: 13.5, confidence interval: 1.572-115.940, p value: 0.035) on a univariate analysis. Conclusion Coronary artery vasospasm could be a risk factor for cardiac events in patients with Brugada syndrome. PMID:28090040

  2. Paternal investment and status-related child outcomes: timing of father's death affects offspring success.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Mary K; Scelza, Brooke A

    2012-09-01

    Recent work in human behavioural ecology has suggested that analyses focusing on early childhood may underestimate the importance of paternal investment to child outcomes since such investment may not become crucial until adolescence or beyond. This may be especially important in societies with a heritable component to status, as later investment by fathers may be more strongly related to a child's adult status than early forms of parental investment that affect child survival and child health. In such circumstances, the death or absence of a father may have profoundly negative effects on the adult outcomes of his children that cannot be easily compensated for by the investment of mothers or other relatives. This proposition is tested using a multigenerational dataset from Bangalore, India, containing information on paternal mortality as well as several child outcomes dependent on parental investment during adolescence and young adulthood. The paper examines the effects of paternal death, and the timing of paternal death, on a child's education, adult income, age at marriage and the amount spent on his or her marriage, along with similar characteristics of spouses. Results indicate that a father's death has a negative impact on child outcomes, and that, in contrast to some findings in the literature on father absence, the effects of paternal death are strongest for children who lose their father in late childhood or adolescence.

  3. Patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and health outcomes among COPD phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Ramey, Felicia C; Gupta, Shaloo; DiBonaventura, Marco daCosta

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent literature has suggested that emphysema and chronic bronchitis, traditionally considered to be entities overlapping within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), may be distinct disorders. Few studies have examined the differences in patient characteristics and health outcomes between these conditions. This study examined whether COPD phenotypes represent distinct patient populations, in a large nationally representative US sample. Methods: Data were obtained from the 2010 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS). NHWS respondents (n = 75,000) were categorized as a COPD phenotype based on their self-reported diagnosis of COPD only (n = 970), emphysema only (n = 399), or chronic bronchitis only (n = 2071). Phenotypes were compared on demographics, health characteristics, treatment patterns, health outcomes, work productivity, and resource use. Variables were compared using Chi-square and analysis of variance tests for categorical and continuous outcomes, respectively. Health outcomes were also examined using regression modeling, controlling for demographic and health characteristic covariates. Results: Patients with chronic bronchitis were significantly younger (51.38 years versus 63.24 years for COPD versus 63.30 years for emphysema, P < 0.05) and more likely to be employed (46.98% versus 23.81% for COPD versus 28.33% for emphysema, P < 0.05). Relative to the other phenotypes, patients with chronic bronchitis were also significantly more likely to be female, nonwhite, and to exercise currently (all P < 0.05), and were significantly less likely to be a current or former smoker (P < 0.05). Controlling for demographic and health characteristics, patients self-identified as having COPD only reported significantly worse physical quality of life (adjusted mean 36.69) and health utilities (adjusted mean 0.65) and significantly more absenteeism (adjusted mean 7.08%), presenteeism (adjusted mean 30.73%), overall work impairment (adjusted mean

  4. Do endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with emphysema?

    PubMed

    Barua, Anupama; Vaughan, Paul; Wotton, Robin; Naidu, Babu

    2012-12-01

    A best evidence topic in thoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether endobronchial valves improve outcomes in patients with severe emphysema. Eighty-seven papers were found using the reported search, of which seven represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial demonstrated that endobronchial valve increased forced expiratory volume in one second by 4.3% (95% confidence interval 1.4-7.2) and decreased by 2.5% in the control group (95% confidence interval -5.4 to 0.4) at a 6-month interval. This benefit is more marked in patients who do not have collateral ventilation into the area of lung being isolated as mapped by bronchoscopic physiological mapping (Chartis) or by computed tomography imaging documenting intact fissures. This evidence is reflected in the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial. Patients treated with endobronchial valve with high heterogeneity and complete fissures had greater improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second at 6- and 12-month intervals. We conclude that endobronchial valve placement improves lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in selected patients with emphysematous diseases.

  5. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  6. Collaborative practice and patient satisfaction: impact and selected outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koerner, B L; Cohen, J R

    1985-09-01

    The Collaborative Practice was a demonstration project sponsored by the Hartford Hospital Administration, and the Departments of Medicine and Nursing. A prospective evaluative study was established to measure the impact of collaborative practice on increased patient and family satisfaction with health care, as well as the impact on selected outcome variables. A specific 27-bed medical unit and a comparison unit with identical structural characteristics were chosen for study from March 31, 1982, to March 31, 1983. Results of the study indicate that significant differences in patients' perceptions of care existed between the Collaborative Practice Unit (CPU) and the comparison unit under a traditional team nursing system. More positive ratings from patients on the CPU were found for all selected dimensions: patient-provider interaction; quality of care; health education; knowledge of practitioners; and the environment. In order to assess the impact of collaborative practice on outcome variables, a retrospective audit of randomly selected patient records was done. No significant differences for selected variables were found except for the number of health teaching plans. More documented health teaching was recorded on the Team Nursing Unit.

  7. Maintaining primacy of the patient perspective in the development of patient-centered patient reported outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Garver, Amanda; Ljungberg, Inger H.; Schladen, Manon M.; Groah, Suzanne L.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe and demonstrate a new model of developing patient reported outcomes (PROs) that are patient-centered, and to test the hypothesis that following this model would result in a qualitatively different PRO than if the typical PRO development model were followed. The typical process of developing PROs begins with an initial list of signs or symptoms originating from clinicians or PRO developers; patient validation of this list ensures that the list (i.e., the new PRO) is interpretable by patients, but not that patient perspectives are central or even represented. The new model begins with elicitation from clinicians and patients independently and separately. These perspectives are formally analyzed qualitatively, and the results are iteratively integrated by researchers, supporting clinical relevance and patient centeredness. We describe the application of this new model to the development of a PRO for urinary signs and symptoms in individuals with neuropathic bladder, and test the hypothesis that the two processes generate qualitatively different instruments using a national validation sample of 300 respondents. Of its 29 items, the new instrument included 13 signs/symptoms derived from existing clinical practice guidelines, with 16 others derived from the patient/focus groups. The three most-endorsed items came from the patients, and the three least-endorsed items came from clinical guidelines. Thematic qualitative analysis of the elicitation process, as well as the results from our national sample, support the conclusion that the new model yields an instrument that is clinically interpretable, but more patient-centered, than the typical model would have done in this context. PMID:28257414

  8. [Personality changes of neurotic patients as outcome of the treatment].

    PubMed

    Jodzio, K

    1993-01-01

    The present article attempted to assess the importance of outcomes which appeared during the treatment of 30 neurotic patients. This study specially concentrates on measures of emotional empathy, self-confidence and introspection. There were two surveys in the clinical group: before and after the treatment was completed. Data were compared with a control group, also consisting of 30 persons (15 male and 15 female) matched for age and education. All patients attending group psychotherapy were also treated by pharmacotherapy. As it appeared from the analysis before treatment high empathy in patients was found, but this declined after therapy, however it was still significantly higher than in the control group. The first survey revealed also that patients demonstrated lower levels of self-confidence and introspection. After treatment there were no important differences between the groups. Relationships between the studied qualities were not statistically significant.

  9. Effect of Right Heart Systolic Function on Outcomes in Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis Undergoing Pericardiectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Xu, Rui-Yi; Liu, Jian-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Chen, Lian-Feng; Yang, Peng-Hua; Fang, Li-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the influence of right ventricular function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) undergoing surgery and to compare the outcomes of patients who received surgery with those managed medically. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of CP and healthy volunteers were recruited from January 2006 to November 2011. Patients with CP chose to either receive pericardiectomy or medical management. Echocardiographic measurements were performed to evaluate heart function, and survival was recorded. Results: A total of 58 patients with CP (36 received pericardiectomy, 22 managed medically), and 43 healthy volunteers were included. CP patients who received surgery had a higher survival rate than those managed medically (P = 0.003), and higher survival was also seen in the subgroup of CP patients with severely impaired right systolic function. Albumin level, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and tricuspid regurgitation velocity were associated with survival in CP patients who received surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative right heart function does not affect surgical outcomes. Patients with severely impaired preoperative right systolic function obtain a greater survival advantage with surgery than with medical treatment. PMID:26830985

  10. Impact of Perceived Stigma on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Taft, Tiffany H.; Keefer, Laurie; Leonhard, Christoph; Nealon-Woods, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Perceived stigma has been linked to disease outcome in several chronic illnesses. Stigmatization of illness often leads to increased psychological distress and poorer quality of life. While body stigma has been identified as a specific inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patient concern, no study to date has systematically investigated the presence of stigma in IBD or its effects on disease course and management. Methods Participants were recruited online and through the Illinois chapter of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America. A screening measure was used to identify an established IBD diagnosis. Patients completed the Perceived Stigma Scale in IBS, Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, General Self-Efficacy Scale, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Rating Form of IBD Patient Concerns. Results A total of 211 patients (156 CD, 55 UC) with a confirmed diagnosis for a minimum of 6 months completed the study. Eighty-four percent of participants reported perceived stigma. Hierarchical regression demonstrated that perceived stigma accounted for 10%–22% of the variance in health-related quality of life scores, 4%–16% for psychological distress, 5% for medication adherence, 19% for self-esteem, and 8% for self-efficacy. Effect sizes were small, but comparable with more traditionally evaluated patient variables. Conclusions The majority of IBD patients report some perceived stigmatization. These results suggest that perceived stigma is a significant predictor of poorer outcomes in patients with IBD when controlling for illness and demographic variables. Perceived stigma is a potentially important psychosocial factor in IBD patient care and warrants further investigation. PMID:19180581

  11. Spigelian hernias: repair and outcome for 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Larson, David W; Farley, David R

    2002-10-01

    Spigelian hernia is a rare partial abdominal wall defect. The frequent lack of physical findings along with vague associated abdominal complaints makes the diagnosis elusive. A retrospective review of Mayo Clinic patients was performed to find all patients who had undergone surgical repair of a Spigelian hernia from 1976 to 1997. Patients were scrutinized for presentation, work-up, therapy, and outcome. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term outcome. The study was set in a tertiary referral center. There were 76 patients in whom 81 Spigelian hernias were repaired. Symptoms most commonly included an intermittent mass (n = 29), pain (n = 20), pain with a mass (n = 22), and bowel obstruction (n = 5). Five patients were asymptomatic. Preoperative imaging was performed in 21 patients and correctly diagnosed the hernia in 15. Spigelian hernias were repaired by primary suture closure (n = 75), mesh (n = 5), and laparoscopic (n = 1) techniques. Eight patients (10%) required emergent operations. Thirteen hernias (17%) were found to be incarcerated at the time of the operation. Overall mean follow-up for the 76 patients was 8 years, with three hernia recurrences identified. Spigelian hernia is rare and requires a high index of suspicion given the lack of consistent symptoms and signs. An astute physician may couple a proper history and physical examination with preoperative imaging to secure the diagnosis. Mesh and laparoscopic repairs are viable alternatives to the durable results of standard primary closure. Given the high rate of incarceration/strangulation, the diagnosis of Spigelian hernia is an indication for surgical repair.

  12. Using skinfold calipers while teaching body fatness-related concepts: cognitive and affective outcomes.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, J R; Eklund, R C; Williams, A C

    2003-12-01

    Body composition testing has been advocated as part of fitness test batteries in an educational effort to promote health-related fitness, and to prevent public health problems like obesity. However, the measurement of the body composition of children and youth, especially involving the use of skinfold calipers, has raised concerns. In two experiments the cognitive and affective consequences of skinfold caliper use in a 7th grade (155 boys, 177 girls, total N = 332) health/physical education context were examined. Experiment 1 demonstrated that the students could be taught to accurately measure a partner and/or significantly learn body fatness-related concepts compared to controls. It was also shown that inexpensive plastic Fat Control calipers produced accurate measurements. Experiment 2 was designed to replicate the significant cognitive outcome effects, and also to test the hypothesis that psychological damage is a likely consequence of skinfold caliper use-and that hypothesis was refuted. Specifically, knowledge scores, and outcome scores on adapted affect scales (e.g., PANAS, MAACL), physical self-esteem scales (CY-PSPP) and on the Social Physique Anxiety Scale supported the premise that skinfold calipers can be used in an educational context to facilitate cognitive learning without causing adverse affective consequences.

  13. Nurse Practitioner Care Improves Renal Outcome in Patients with CKD

    PubMed Central

    van Zuilen, Arjan D.; van den Brand, Jan A.J.G.; Bots, Michiel L.; van Buren, Marjolijn; ten Dam, Marc A.G.J.; Kaasjager, Karin A.H.; Ligtenberg, Gerry; Sijpkens, Yvo W.J.; Sluiter, Henk E.; van de Ven, Peter J.G.; Vervoort, Gerald; Vleming, Louis-Jean; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Wetzels, Jack F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment goals for patients with CKD are often unrealized for many reasons, but support by nurse practitioners may improve risk factor levels in these patients. Here, we analyzed renal endpoints of the Multifactorial Approach and Superior Treatment Efficacy in Renal Patients with the Aid of Nurse Practitioners (MASTERPLAN) study after extended follow-up to determine whether strict implementation of current CKD guidelines through the aid of nurse practitioners improves renal outcome. In total, 788 patients with moderate to severe CKD were randomized to receive nurse practitioner support added to physician care (intervention group) or physician care alone (control group). Median follow-up was 5.7 years. Renal outcome was a secondary endpoint of the MASTERPLAN study. We used a composite renal endpoint of death, ESRD, and 50% increase in serum creatinine. Event rates were compared with adjustment for baseline serum creatinine concentration and changes in estimated GFR were determined. During the randomized phase, there were small but significant differences between the groups in BP, proteinuria, LDL cholesterol, and use of aspirin, statins, active vitamin D, and antihypertensive medications, in favor of the intervention group. The intervention reduced the incidence of the composite renal endpoint by 20% (hazard ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.66 to 0.98; P=0.03). In the intervention group, the decrease in estimated GFR was 0.45 ml/min per 1.73 m2 per year less than in the control group (P=0.01). In conclusion, additional support by nurse practitioners attenuated the decline of kidney function and improved renal outcome in patients with CKD. PMID:24158983

  14. Chloride alterations in hospitalized patients: Prevalence and outcome significance

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum Cl (sCl) alterations in hospitalized patients have not been comprehensively studied in recent years. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and outcome significance of (1) sCl alterations on hospital admission, and (2) sCl evolution within the first 48 hr of hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective study of all hospital admissions in the years 2011–2013 at Mayo Clinic Rochester, a 2000-bed tertiary medical center. Outcome measures included hospital mortality, length of hospital stay and discharge disposition. 76,719 unique admissions (≥18 years old) were studied. Based on hospital mortality, sCl in the range of 105–108 mmol/L was found to be optimal. sCl <100 (n = 13,611) and >108 (n = 11,395) mmol/L independently predicted a higher risk of hospital mortality, longer hospital stay and being discharged to a care facility. 13,089 patients (17.1%) had serum anion gap >12 mmol/L; their hospital mortality, when compared to 63,630 patients (82.9%) with anion gap ≤12 mmol/L, was worse. Notably, patients with elevated anion gap displayed a progressively worsening mortality with rising sCl. sCl elevation within 48 hr of admission was associated with a higher proportion of 0.9% saline administration and was an independent predictor for hospital mortality. Moreover, the magnitude of sCl rise was inversely correlated to the days of patient survival. In conclusion, serum Cl alterations on admission predict poor clinical outcomes. Post-admission sCl increase, due to Cl-rich fluid infusion, independently predicts hospital mortality. These results raise a critical question of whether iatrogenic cause of hyperchloremia should be avoided, a question to be addressed by future prospective studies. PMID:28328963

  15. Outcomes of acute kidney injury patients with and without cancer.

    PubMed

    Juwon, Lee; Jang, Gookhwan; Kim, Sunmin; Kim, Dajung; Lee, Jinwook; Park, Hyunjoon; Lee, Junyeob; Kim, Sangbin; Kim, Yunkyung; Kim, Soo Young; Yang, Joung Wook; Gwoo, Sangeon; Kim, Ye Na; Shin, Ho Sik; Jung, Yeonsoon; Rim, Hark

    2015-11-01

    Incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients with cancer is increasing, but there have been few studies on AKI in patients with cancer. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a South Korean tertiary care hospital. A total of 2211 consecutive patients (without cancer 61.5%; with cancer 38.5%) were included over a 140-month period. Predictors of all-cause death were examined using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model. The main contributing factors of AKI were sepsis (31.1%) and ischemia (52.7%). AKI was multifactorial in 78% of patients with cancer and in 71% of patients without cancer. Hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with cancer (42.8%) than in patients without cancer (22.5%) (p = 0.014). In multivariate analyses, diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer diagnosis were associated with hospital mortality. Cancer diagnosis was independently associated with mortality [odds ratio = 3.010 (95% confidence interval, 2.340-3.873), p = 0.001]. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that subjects with DM and cancer (n = 146) had lower survival rates than subjects with DM and without cancer (n = 687) (log rank test, p = 0.001). The presence of DM and cancer was independently associated with mortality in AKI patients both with and without cancer. Studies are warranted to determine whether proactive measures may limit AKI and improve outcomes.

  16. Using standardized patients to evaluate hospital-based intervention outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Guan, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    Background The standardized patient approach has proved to be an effective training tool for medical educators. This article explains the process of employing standardized patients in an HIV stigma reduction intervention in healthcare settings in China. Methods The study was conducted in 40 hospitals in two provinces of China. One year after the stigma reduction intervention, standardized patients made unannounced visits to participating hospitals, randomly approached service providers on duty and presented symptoms related to HIV and disclosed HIV-positive test results. After each visit, the standardized patients evaluated their providers’ attitudes and behaviours using a structured checklist. Standardized patients also took open-ended observation notes about their experience and the evaluation process. Results Seven standardized patients conducted a total of 217 assessments (108 from 20 hospitals in the intervention condition; 109 from 20 hospitals in the control condition). Based on a comparative analysis, the intervention hospitals received a better rating than the control hospitals in terms of general impression and universal precaution compliance as well as a lower score on stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours toward the standardized patients. Conclusion Standardized patients are a useful supplement to traditional self-report assessments, particularly for measuring intervention outcomes that are sensitive or prone to social desirability. PMID:24369433

  17. Can pegylated interferon improve the outcome of polycythemia vera patients?

    PubMed

    Crisà, Elena; Cerrano, Marco; Beggiato, Eloise; Benevolo, Giulia; Lanzarone, Giuseppe; Manzini, Paola Maria; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Riera, Ludovica; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2017-01-13

    Pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) was proven by phase II trials to be effective in polycythemia vera (PV); however, it is not clear whether it could improve patient outcome compared to hydroxyurea (HU). Here, we present an observational study on 65 PV patients aged 65 years or younger, who received either peg-IFN (30) or HU (35) according to the physician choice. Median follow-up was 75 months. The two cohorts were comparable for patient and disease characteristics. Eighty-seven percent of the patients treated with peg-INF responded, with a CR rate of 70% as compared to 100 and 49% with HU, respectively. Discontinuation rate was similar in the two groups (20% in peg-IFN vs 17% in HU). JAK2 allele burden was monitored in peg-INF arm only, and a reduction was observed in 88% of the patients. No thrombotic events were observed during peg-IFN treatment compared to three on HU. Disease progression to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia occurred to a patient only in peg-INF, compared to three in HU. Overall, three second malignancies were observed during the study, two in patients who received HU only, and one in a patient largely treated HU who received also peg-IFN for 3 months. Overall survival was significantly better for peg-IFN patients compared to HU, p = 0.027. Our study, albeit limited by small patient and event number and lack of randomization, confirms the efficacy of peg-INF in PV and shows a significant survival advantage for peg-INF-treated patients. Waiting for confirming data from the ongoing phase III trials, our study can support peg-INF as a first-line treatment option for PV, at least for younger patients.

  18. Short-term outcome of patients with preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Koual, Meriem; Abbou, Hind; Carbonnel, Marie; Picone, Olivier; Ayoubi, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia constitutes a cause of increased mortality in mothers and fetuses. Screening for promoting factors is essential for adequate prevention in the event of any subsequent pregnancy, and for the adequate follow-up of concerned patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short-term outcome of patients with preeclampsia and to identify possible new factors predisposing them to the disease. Methods One hundred fifty-five patients having experienced preeclampsia between 2005 and 2010 from the Gynecology and Obstetrics Department of the Foch Hospital (Suresnes, France) were included in the study. All patients had undergone close clinical and standard biological follow-up immediately postpartum and then 3 months later with a reference practitioner. In severe cases, further investigation was carried out by full etiological examination with an assessment of both autoimmune and thrombophilic status. Results Obesity and gestational diabetes were observed to be major risk factors for preeclampsia, which were found in 46% and 15% of the cases, respectively. The etiological assessment showed abnormalities in 11% of the patients. Impaired thrombophilia was found in 3% of the patients, impaired autoimmune status in 4%, a combination of both abnormalities in only 1% of the patients, and detection of renal abnormalities in 3% of the patients were observed. In the immediate postpartum period, 66% of patients had maintained elevated blood pressure levels, and 66% had proteinuria > 0.3 g/24 hours. At the 3-month postpartum assessment, persisting arterial hypertension was found in 16% of the patients, requiring continuation of antihypertensive therapy, and 22% of the patients had proteinuria over the accepted threshold (0.15 g/24 hours). Conclusion Patients with preeclampsia have increased cardiovascular risk, necessitating lifestyle measures and long-term follow-up. Etiological assessment must be carried out, systematically aiming at the detection

  19. Coronary Arteriovenous Fistulas in Adult Patients: Surgical Management and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Albeyoglu, Sebnem; Aldag, Mustafa; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Sargin, Murat; Oz, Tugba Kemaloglu; Kutlu, Hakan; Dagsali, Sabri

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical and anatomic characteristics of coronary arteriovenous fistulas in adult patients who underwent open cardiac surgery and to review surgical management and outcomes. Methods Twenty-one adult patients (12 female, 9 male; mean age: 56.1±7.9 years) who underwent surgical treatment for coronary arteriovenous fistulas were retrospectively included in this study. Coronary angiography, chest X-ray, electrocardiography and transthoracic echocardiography were preoperatively performed in all patients. Demographic and clinical data were also collected. Postoperative courses of all patients were monitored and postoperative complications were noted. Results A total of 25 coronary arteriovenous fistulas were detected in 21 patients; the fistulas originated mainly from left anterior descending artery (n=9, 42.8%). Four (19.4%) patients had bilateral fistulas originating from both left anterior descending and right coronary artery. The main drainage site of coronary arteriovenous fistulas was the pulmonary artery (n=18, 85.7%). Twelve (57.1%) patients had isolated coronary arteriovenous fistulas and 4 (19.4%), concomitant coronary artery disease. Twenty (95.3%) of all patients were symptomatic. Seventeen patients were operated on with and 4 without cardiopulmonary bypass. There was no mortality. Three patients had postoperative atrial fibrillation. One patient had pericardial effusion causing cardiac tamponade who underwent reoperation. Conclusion The decision of surgical management should be made on the size and the anatomical location of coronary arteriovenous fistulas and concomitant cardiac comorbidities. Surgical closure with ligation of coronary arteriovenous fistulas can be performed easily with on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting, even in asymptomatic patients to prevent fistula related complications with very low risk of mortality and morbidity.

  20. Procedural Predictors of Outcome in Patients Undergoing Endovascular Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Ansaar T. Jhadhav, Yahodeep; Domico, Jennifer; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To identify factors impacting outcome in patients undergoing interventions for acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing endovascular therapy for AIS secondary during a 30 month period. Outcome was based on modified Rankin score at 3- to 6-month follow-up. Recanalization was defined as Thrombolysis in myocardial infarction score 2 to 3. Collaterals were graded based on pial circulation from the anterior cerebral artery either from an ipsilateral injection in cases of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion or contralateral injection for internal carotid artery terminus (ICA) occlusion as follows: no collaterals (grade 0), some collaterals with retrograde opacification of the distal MCA territory (grade 1), and good collaterals with filling of the proximal MCA (M2) branches or retrograde opacification up to the occlusion site (grade 2). Occlusion site was divided into group 1 (ICA), group 2 (MCA with or without contiguous M2 involvement), and group 3 (isolated M2 or M3 branch occlusion). Results: A total of 89 patients were studied. Median age and National Institutes of health stroke scale (NIHSS) score was 71 and 15 years, respectively. Favorable outcome was seen in 49.4% of patients and mortality in 25.8% of patients. Younger age (P = 0.006), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.001), successful recanalization (P < 0.0001), collateral support (P = 0.0008), distal occlusion (P = 0.001), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.01) were associated with a favorable outcome. Factors affecting successful recanalization included younger age (P = 0.01), lower baseline NIHSS score (P = 0.05), collateral support (P = 0.01), and shorter procedure duration (P = 0.03). An ICA terminus occlusion (P < 0.0001), lack of collaterals (P = 0.0003), and unsuccessful recanalization (P = 0.005) were significantly associated with mortality. Conclusion: Angiographic findings and preprocedure variables can help

  1. Do Insurance Mandates Affect Racial Disparities in Outcomes for Children with Autism?

    PubMed

    Doshi, Pratik; Tilford, J Mick; Ounpraseuth, Songthip; Kuo, Dennis Z; Payakachat, Nalin

    2017-02-01

    Objective The study investigated whether state mandates for private insurers to provide services for children with autism influence racial disparities in outcomes. Methods The study used 2005/2006 and 2009/2010 waves of the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs. Children with a current diagnosis of autism were included in the sample. Children residing in 14 states and the District of Columbia that were not covered by the mandate in the 2005/2006 survey, but were covered in the 2009/2010 survey, served as the mandate group. Children residing in 32 states that were not covered by a mandate in either wave served as the comparison group. Outcome measures assessed included care quality, family economics, and child health. A difference-in-difference-in-differences (DDD) approach was used to assess the impact of the mandates on racial disparities in outcomes. Results Non-white children had less access to family-centered care compared to white children in both waves of data, but this difference was not apparent across mandate and comparison states as only the comparison states had significant differences. Parents of non-white children reported paying less in annual out-of-pocket expenses compared to parents of white children across waves and groups. DDD estimates did not provide evidence that the mandates had statistically significant effects on improving or worsening racial disparities for any outcome measure. Conclusions This study did not find evidence that state mandates on private insurers affected racial disparities in outcomes for children with autism.

  2. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  3. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery. PMID:26973406

  4. Outcomes of abdominal surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Delgado, Juan C; Ballus, Josep; Esteve, Francisco; Betancur-Zambrano, Nelson L; Corral-Velez, Vicente; Mañez, Rafael; Betbese, Antoni J; Roncal, Joan A; Javierre, Casimiro

    2016-03-07

    Patients suffering from liver cirrhosis (LC) frequently require non-hepatic abdominal surgery, even before liver transplantation. LC is an important risk factor itself for surgery, due to the higher than average associated morbidity and mortality. This high surgical risk occurs because of the pathophysiology of liver disease itself and to the presence of contributing factors, such as coagulopathy, poor nutritional status, adaptive immune dysfunction, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, and renal and pulmonary dysfunction, which all lead to poor outcomes. Careful evaluation of these factors and the degree of liver disease can help to reduce the development of complications both during and after abdominal surgery. In the emergency setting, with the presence of decompensated LC, alcoholic hepatitis, severe/advanced LC, and significant extrahepatic organ dysfunction conservative management is preferred. A multidisciplinary, individualized, and specialized approach can improve outcomes; preoperative optimization after risk stratification and careful management are mandatory before surgery. Laparoscopic techniques can also improve outcomes. We review the impact of LC on surgical outcome in non-hepatic abdominal surgeries required in this cirrhotic population before, during, and after surgery.

  5. Looking beyond historical patient outcomes to improve clinical models.

    PubMed

    Chia, Chih-Chun; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Scirica, Benjamin M; McMillan, Sean; Gurm, Hitinder S; Syed, Zeeshan

    2012-04-25

    Conventional algorithms for modeling clinical events focus on characterizing the differences between patients with varying outcomes in historical data sets used for the model derivation. For many clinical conditions with low prevalence and where small data sets are available, this approach to developing models is challenging due to the limited number of positive (that is, event) examples available for model training. Here, we investigate how the approach of developing clinical models might be improved across three distinct patient populations (patients with acute coronary syndrome enrolled in the DISPERSE2-TIMI33 and MERLIN-TIMI36 trials, patients undergoing inpatient surgery in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program registry, and patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium registry). For each of these cases, we supplement an incomplete characterization of patient outcomes in the derivation data set (uncensored view of the data) with an additional characterization of the extent to which patients differ from the statistical support of their clinical characteristics (censored view of the data). Our approach exploits the same training data within the derivation cohort in multiple ways to improve the accuracy of prediction. We position this approach within the context of traditional supervised (2-class) and unsupervised (1-class) learning methods and present a 1.5-class approach for clinical decision-making. We describe a 1.5-class support vector machine (SVM) classification algorithm that implements this approach, and report on its performance relative to logistic regression and 2-class SVM classification with cost-sensitive weighting and oversampling. The 1.5-class SVM algorithm improved prediction accuracy relative to other approaches and may have value in predicting clinical events both at the bedside and for risk-adjusted quality of care assessment.

  6. Trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders: frequency and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A; Keersmaekers, K

    1996-02-01

    Controversy exists on the aetiological importance and the effect of jaw macrotrauma (fractures excluded) on the occurrence of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of jaw injury in TMD patients and to compare the severity of the symptoms, the clinical characteristics and the treatment outcome in TMD patients with or without a history of trauma to the head and neck region directly linked to the onset of symptoms. The study sample included 400 consecutive TMD clinical patients. In 24.5% of patients the onset of the pain and dysfunction could be linked directly to the trauma, mainly whiplash accidents. No significant differences could be found between the two groups in daily recurrent headache, dizziness, neck pain, joint crepitation and pain in the joints. Maximal mouth opening was less than 20 mm in 14.3% of patients with a history of trauma and in 4.1% of those without such a history. According to the Helkimo dysfunction index (DI), more trauma than non-trauma TMD patients belonged to the severe dysfunction groups (DI 4 and 5) at first examination. The outcome of a conservative treatment procedure (counselling, occlusal splint, physiotherapy, occasionally occlusal therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs was not different between the two groups at the 1 year evaluation. The degree of maximal opening was similar: less than 20 mm in 3.7% and 2.2% in trauma and non-trauma patients respectively. Forty percent and 41% respectively were symptom free or had DI = 1. The results suggest that external trauma to the joint or to the jaw in general is an important initiating factor in the aetiology of TMD but also that the prognosis is favourable.

  7. CLINICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS IN YEMENI PATIENTS TREATED WITH EMPIRICAL ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Al-Aghbari; Al-Noami, Alezzy Yahya; Al-Ansi, Mohamed; Faiza, Ahmed Askar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Infective endocarditis is a common disease in Yemen. Although the incidence of rheumatic valvular disease and uncorrected congenital heart disease in adults is high in Yemen, there are few data regarding the pattern, characteristic features and outcome of infective endocarditis in Yemen. Objective: The aim was to study the characteristic, clinical features and diagnostic criteria of infective endocarditis in Yemeni patients and the outcome in patients treated with medical therapy. Patients and Method: Seventy-two consecutive patients admitted to Kuwait teaching hospital in Sana’a with suspected infective endocarditis between June 1, 2005 and June 1, 2007 were included in this study. A questionnaire including history, clinical findings, and result of requested investigations, treatment, complications and outcome was used. The diagnosis was based on Dukes criteria, which proposed two major or five minor criteria. In our study, we included raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as a minor criteria. The patients were classified as definite, possible and rejected cases. All patients received empirical antibiotic therapy. Results: The mean age was 28.56 ± 14.5 years. Men were 30 (42.2%) while women were 42 (57.7%). 59 (81.9%) of the patients had been admitted due to fever. Past history of rheumatic heart disease was positive in 38 (53.3%) of the patients. Mitral regurgitation was the commonest form of valvular affection 54 (82.1%) of patients followed by aortic regurgitation in 45 (63%). Anemia was present in 53 (74%) while raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate was high in all patients. Vegetations were detected by transthorasic echocardiography in 51 (70.83%) of the patients while blood culture was positive in only 7 (9.6%). After adding high ESR to the criteria, definite infective endocarditis were found in 34 (47.2%); possible in 38 (52.7%) and no rejected patients. Sixty-two (87.5%) of the patients improved and were discharged in good general

  8. Preoperative factors affecting the outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Behzad; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated preoperative variables contributing to adverse surgical outcome for repair of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms on data collected prospectively between October 1989 and March 2010. Putative risk factors including age, sex, smoking status, positive family history, modified Rankin Score prior to the surgery, size of the aneurysm, specific site (basilar caput and trunk, vertebral artery and posterior inferior cerebellar artery), midline location, presence of calcium, thrombus or irregularity in the aneurysm on preoperative imaging, associated arteriovenous malformation and preoperative coiling were investigated using regression analyses. In a total of 121 operations, surgical mortality and morbidity was 16.3%. For patients with aneurysms less than 9mm this rate was 3.2%. Among the investigated variables we found that size, calcification of the aneurysm and age were each predictors of surgical outcome of unruptured posterior circulation aneurysms.

  9. Revision surgery for recurrent and persistent carpal tunnel syndrome: Clinical results and factors affecting outcomes.

    PubMed

    Djerbi, I; César, M; Lenoir, H; Coulet, B; Lazerges, C; Chammas, M

    2015-12-01

    Thirty-eight hands in 36 patients with recurrent or persistent carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) were reviewed retrospectively after a mean of 51 months (range 12-86) to identify factors that may lead to poor outcomes after surgical management. Clinical assessment focused on pain and sensitivity recovery, measured with a VAS and Weber's two-point discrimination test, respectively. At the latest follow-up, we found 11 excellent, 15 good, nine fair and three poor results. The risk of fair or poor results was significantly higher in the presence of intraneural fibrosis, severe preoperative sensory deficit, neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve, workers compensation claims and number of previous surgeries. This last factor also significantly increased the risk of intraneural fibrosis. Despite disappointing outcomes, identification of these factors may improve our prognostic ability for revision surgery in cases of recurrent CTS.

  10. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  11. Does the etiology affect the outcome and satisfaction rates of penile prosthesis implantation surgery?

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Arslan, Burak; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Yonguc, Tarik; Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-11-01

    Our aim was to compare the outcomes and satisfaction rates of men undergoing penile prostheses implantation (PPI) secondary to radical prostatectomy (RP) and other causes of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED). A total of 142 patients, of whom 60 underwent PPI due to ED following RP (Group 1) and 82 underwent PPI due to ED with other vasculogenic causes (Group 2) were included in this study. The preoperative erectile status was evaluated with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The satisfaction of patients and partners were evaluated by a telephone interview using Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) questionnaire and Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction Partner Survey. Preoperative mean IIEF scores were significantly lower in Group 1 (17.5 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 5.1, p = 0.01). For Groups 1 and 2, the mean EDITS scores of the patients were 58 ± 10 and 71 ± 8, respectively, and that for the partners were 46 ± 8 and 65 ± 7, respectively. Group 1 had significantly lower scores both for the EDITS and the EDITS Partner Survey (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, respectively). Patients who had undergone RP and their partners were found to have lower satisfaction rates compared to patients with other causes of vasculogenic ED who had penile implant surgery. From this point of view, it is important to know the patient's expectations about the treatment outcomes and a preoperative psychological and sexual counseling should be managed for possible treatment alternatives after RP.

  12. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in patients with and without vestibular migraine.

    PubMed

    Vitkovic, Jessica; Winoto, Arimbi; Rance, Gary; Dowell, Richard; Paine, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation programs do appear to play a beneficial role in the treatment of dizziness in patients with vestibular migraine. Anecdotally, however, patients with vestibular migraine may report persistent significant symptoms at the end of a standard treatment period where other non-migrainous patients are accomplishing their treatment goals. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of vestibular rehabilitation in patients with vestibular migraine compared to patients with vestibular symptoms without migraine. Thirty-six patients (vestibular migraine = 20, vestibular impairment = 16) with significant daily vestibular symptoms received a nine week customized vestibular rehabilitation program. Each subject attended five therapy appointments occurring at initial, two, five, nine and six months. A range of subjective and physical performance outcome measures were taken at baseline, nine weeks and six months. The vestibular migraine group showed poorer subjective performance at the onset of therapy, which was not reflected in the difference in physical performance between the groups. Both groups benefitted equally from rehabilitation. The same degree of improvement was observed in the migraine group regardless of medication regime. This study has validated vestibular rehabilitation as an effective treatment in dizzy patients both with and without vestibular migraine where the use of medication did not preclude benefit from therapy. However, further research is required to clarify the role of specific vestibular suppressant medications and the scheduling of their use in relation to physical therapy.

  13. Hearing outcomes in patients with cleft lip/palate.

    PubMed

    Skuladottir, Hildur; Sivertsen, Ase; Assmus, Jorg; Remme, Asa Rommetveit; Dahlen, Marianne; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2015-03-01

    Objective : Children with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only have a high incidence of conductive hearing loss from otitis media with effusion. Studies demonstrating longitudinal results are lacking. This study was undertaken to investigate long-term longitudinal hearing outcomes of children with cleft lip and/or cleft palate and cleft palate only. Design : Retrospective chart review. Setting : Clinical charts of patients born with cleft lip and palate or cleft palate only in 1985 to 1994 who were referred to the cleft team in Bergen, Norway. Study findings include 15 years of follow-up. Participants : The study population consisted of 317 children of whom 159 had nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 158 had nonsyndromic cleft palate. Main Outcome Measures : Pure tone average calculated from pure tone audiometry at ages 4, 6, and 15 years. Results : The median pure tone average significantly improved with increasing age. For the cleft lip and palate group, the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 16 dB hearing level (HL), 13 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). In the cleft palate group the median pure tone average at ages 4, 6, and 15 years was 15 dB HL, 12 dB HL, and 9 dB HL, respectively (P ≤ .001). There was no significant difference in the hearing levels between the two groups. Patients who had surgical closure of the palate at age 18 months had a significantly better pure tone average outcome at age 15 compared with patients who had surgery at 12 months. Conclusions : Hearing improves significantly from childhood to adolescence in patients with cleft lip and palate and cleft palate only.

  14. Patient-reported outcome measures for asthma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Worth, Allison; Hammersley, Victoria; Knibb, Rebecca; Flokstra-de-Blok, Bertine; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Walker, Samantha; Dubois, Anthony E J; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are measures of the outcome of treatment(s) reported directly by the patient or carer. There is increasing international policy interest in using these to assess the impact of clinical care. Aims: To identify suitably validated PROMs for asthma and examine their potential for use in clinical settings. Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases from 1990 onwards to identify PROMs for asthma. These were critically appraised, then narratively synthesised. We also identified the generic PROMs commonly used alongside asthma-specific PROMs. Results: We identified 68 PROMs for asthma, 13 of which were selected through screening as being adequately developed to warrant full-quality appraisal: 8 for adults, 4 for children and 1 for a child’s caregiver. The PROMs found to be sufficiently well validated to offer promise for use in clinical settings were the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) and mini-AQLQ for adults, and Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire for children. Rhinasthma was considered promising in simultaneously assessing the impact of asthma and rhinitis in those with coexistent disease. We identified 28 generic PROMs commonly used in conjunction with asthma-specific instruments. Conclusions: We identified asthma PROMs that offer the greatest potential for use in clinical settings. Further work is needed to assess whether these are fit-for-purpose for use in clinical practice with individual patients. In particular, there is a need to ensure these are validated for use in clinical settings, acceptable to patients, caregivers and clinicians, and yield meaningful outcomes. PMID:24964767

  15. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  16. Aristotle score predicts outcome in patients requiring extracorporeal circulatory support following repair of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Derby, Christopher D; Kolcz, Jacek; Kerins, Paul J; Duncan, Daniel R; Quezada, Emilio; Pizarro, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has become the standard technique of mechanical support for the failing circulation following repair of congenital heart lesions. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of survival in patients requiring postcardiotomy ECMO. The Aristotle score, a method developed to evaluate quality of care based on complexity, was investigated as a potential predictor of outcome. Between 2003 and 2005, 37 patients required ECMO following corrective surgery for congenital heart disease. Records were reviewed retrospectively with emphasis on factors affecting survival to discharge. The comprehensive Aristotle complexity score was calculated for each patient. Overall, 28 patients (76%) survived to decannulation and 17 patients (46%) survived to discharge. There were 24 (65%) neonates and 10 patients (27%) with single ventricle physiology, with a hospital survival of 42% (10 of 24) and 50% (5 of 10), respectively. Univariate factors associated with survival included Aristotle score, duration of support, reexploration, multiple organ failure, and number of complications. Age, weight, and single-ventricle physiology were not significant. In a logistic regression model, an Aristotle score < 14 was identified as a predictor of survival (OR 0.12, CI 0.02-0.87). The Aristotle score is predictive of outcome in patients requiring postcardiotomy ECMO and may serve as a uniform criterion when comparing and evaluating quality of care and performance in this complex patient population.

  17. Predicted and experienced affective responses to the outcome of the 2008 U.S. presidential election.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, Michael B; Corser, Grant C; Gohm, Carol L; VonWaldner, Kristen L; Foreman, Elizabeth L

    2010-12-01

    People typically have intense feelings about politics. Therefore, it was no surprise that the campaign and eventual election of Barack Obama were highly anticipated and emotionally charged events, making it and the emotion experienced afterward a useful situation in which to replicate prior research showing that people typically overestimate the intensity and duration of their future affective states. Consequently, it was expected that Obama supporters and McCain supporters might overestimate the intensity of their affective responses to the outcome of the election. Data showed that while McCain supporters underestimated how happy they would be following the election, Obama supporters accurately predicted how happy they would be following the election. These data provide descriptive information on the accuracy of people's predicted reactions to the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The findings are discussed in the context of the broad literature and this specific and unique event.

  18. Affective States and State Tests: Investigating How Affect and Engagement during the School Year Predict End-of-Year Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Baker, Ryan S. J. D.; San Pedro, Maria O. C. Z.; Gowda, Sujith M.; Gowda, Supreeth M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the correspondence between student affect and behavioural engagement in a web-based tutoring platform throughout the school year and learning outcomes at the end of the year on a high-stakes mathematics exam in a manner that is both longitudinal and fine-grained. Affect and behaviour detectors are used to estimate…

  19. Qualitative Methods in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Vandermause, Roxanne; Barg, Frances K; Esmail, Laura; Edmundson, Lauren; Girard, Samantha; Perfetti, A Ross

    2016-09-14

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created to fund research guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, offers a new research venue. Many (41 of 50) first funded projects involved qualitative research methods. This study was completed to examine the current state of the science of qualitative methodologies used in PCORI-funded research. Principle investigators participated in phenomenological interviews to learn (a) how do researchers using qualitative methods experience seeking funding for, implementing and disseminating their work; and (b) how may qualitative methods advance the quality and relevance of evidence for patients? Results showed the experience of doing qualitative research in the current research climate as "Being a bona fide qualitative researcher: Staying true to research aims while negotiating challenges," with overlapping patterns: (a) researching the elemental, (b) expecting surprise, and (c) pushing boundaries. The nature of qualitative work today was explicitly described and is rendered in this article.

  20. Transplantation outcome in patients on PD and HD.

    PubMed

    Cancarini, Giovanni C; Sandrini, Silvio; Setti, Gisella; Bossini, Nicola; Cassamali, Silvia; Pertica, Nicoletta; Maiorca, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    In the past, peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been considered a second choice dialysis modality for many aspects and that negative attitude has been extended also to possible negative effects on renal transplantation. In the last years, many papers have faced the question whether PD could attain similar results in renal transplantation as hemodialysis and there is sufficient evidence to answer that question. On the short time after transplantation, patients coming PD have lower prevalence of delayed graft function than hemodialysis patients, but higher prevalence of renal vascular thrombosis, above all in children. Incidence of acute graft rejection is not different between the two dialysis modalities. The long-term outcome of renal transplantation is similar in patients coming from either PD or hemodialysis.

  1. Monitoring the Immune Competence of Cancer Patients to Predict Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Serena; Kohrt, Holbrook; Maecker, Holden T.

    2014-01-01

    A new era of cancer immunotherapy has brought not only successful cancer vaccines but also immunomodulators, such as those that target checkpoint blockade in order to induce endogenous host immune responses. However, the immune system of cancer patients can be compromised through multiple means, including immune suppression by the tumor and by prior therapies such as chemotherapy and radiation. Therefore, a comprehensive means of assessing patient immunocompetence would seem helpful for determining whether patients are ready to benefit from immunotherapy, and perhaps even which immunotherapy might be most appropriate for them. Unfortunately, there are no standardized tests for immune competence, nor is there agreement on what to measure and what will be predictive of outcome. In this review, we will discuss the technologies and assays that might be most useful for this purpose. We argue for a comprehensive approach that should maximize the chances of developing predictive biomarkers for eventual clinical use. PMID:24487923

  2. Treatment adherence, clinical outcomes, and economics of triple-drug therapy in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Panjabi, Sumeet; Lacey, Michael; Bancroft, Timothy; Cao, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Poor antihypertensive treatment adherence adversely affects blood pressure control. We analyzed US health plan data to assess the impact of fixed- versus loose-dose triple-combination therapy on adherence, clinical, and economic outcomes. Patients initiating triple therapy with an angiotensin receptor blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, or beta blocker plus amlodipine and hydrochlorothiazide comprised three cohorts. Within-cohort comparisons were made between fixed-dose combinations of two antihypertensives plus a second pill (two pills) or three separate pills. Outcomes included adherence, cardiovascular events, health care resource use, and costs for patients with ≥ 12 months follow-up. A total of 16,290 patients were matched. Patients receiving two pills were more likely to be adherent (P < .001) and less likely to discontinue treatment (P < .001) across all cohorts. Therapy with two versus three pills resulted in significantly lower adjusted risk of cardiovascular events (hazard ratio = 0.76, P = .005) in the beta blocker cohort only. Total adjusted health care costs were significantly lower for two- versus three-pill therapy in the beta blocker cohort only (cost ratio = 0.74 overall, P < .01; 0.71 hypertension-attributable, P < .01). In patients with hypertension requiring triple therapy, fixed-dose combinations that lower pill burden may improve adherence (seen across all cohorts) and clinical outcomes (seen in the beta blocker cohort) without increasing health care costs.

  3. Clinical Course and Results of Surgery for Chronic Subdural Hematomas in Patients on Drugs Affecting Hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Tomasz Andrzej; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Objective An apparent increase of use of drugs affecting hemostasis in our neurosurgical department since the 1990s has encouraged us to investigate whether these drugs influence the clinical course and results of surgery for chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH). Methods This retrospective analysis included 178 patients admitted for CSDH from 2007 to 2011 who were divided into two groups: on drugs affecting hemostasis (40; 22%) and no bleeding disorders (138; 78%). Medications in the first group included oral anticoagulants (33; 82.5%), antiplatelets (5; 12.5%) and low molecular weight heparins (2; 5%). Results The patients on drugs affecting hemostasis were older (74.3±7.4 vs. 68.4±14.8; p-value 0.01) and the group without bleeding disorders had more head trauma history (61% vs. 38%, p-value 0.01). The groups did not differ in bilateral hematoma rates (25% vs. 20%, p-value=NS). At diagnosis, mean hematoma thickness was lower in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (18.7±7.4 mm vs. 21.9±7.9 mm, p-value<0.01). Average stay of hospital was 1 day longer in patients on drugs affecting hemostasis (11.7±4.1 vs.10.9±5.3, p-value=NS) and was related to the necessity of bleeding disorder reversal. Mean neurological status at presentation was similar between the groups (p-value=NS) as was the likelihood of hematoma recurrence (p-value=NS). Glasgow Outcome Scale results were comparable. Conclusion Patients on drugs affecting hemostasis are less often aware of a head trauma history, possibly suggesting a higher CSDH risk after minor trauma in this group. In these patients, smaller hematomas are symptomatic, probably due to faster hematoma formation. Drugs affecting hemostasis do not affect treatment results. PMID:28264245

  4. Designing of Intelligent Multilingual Patient Reported Outcome System (IMPROS)

    PubMed Central

    Pourasghar, Faramarz; Partovi, Yeganeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: By self-reporting outcome procedure the patients themselves record disease symptoms outside medical centers and then report them to medical staff in specific periods of time. One of the self-reporting methods is the application of interactive voice response (IVR), in which some pre-designed questions in the form of voice tracks would be played and then the caller responses the questions by pressing phone’s keypad bottoms. Aim: The present research explains the main framework of such system designing according to IVR technology that is for the first time designed and administered in Iran. Methods: Interactive Voice Response system was composed by two main parts of hardware and software. Hardware section includes one or several digital phone lines, a modem card with voice playing capability and a PC. IVR software on the other hand, acts as an intelligent control center, records call information and controls incoming data. Results: One of the main features of the system is its capability to be administered in common PCs, utilizing simple and cheap modems, high speed to take responses and it’s appropriateness to low literate patients. The system is applicable for monitoring chronic diseases, cancer and also in psychological diseases and can be suitable for taking care of elders and Children who require long term cares. Other features include user-friendly, decrease in direct and indirect costs of disease treatment and enjoying from high level of security to access patients’ profiles. Conclusions: Intelligent multilingual patient reported outcome system (IMPROS) by controlling diseases gives the opportunity to patients to have more participation during treatment and it improves mutual interaction between patient and medical staff. Moreover it increases the quality of medical services, Additional to empowering patients and their followers. PMID:26635441

  5. Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with Cancer-Related Complications

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Viviane B. L.; Vassalo, Juliana; Silva, Ulysses V. A.; Caruso, Pedro; Torelly, André P.; Silva, Eliezer; Teles, José M. M.; Knibel, Marcos; Rezende, Ederlon; Netto, José J. S.; Piras, Claudio; Azevedo, Luciano C. P.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Spector, Nelson; Salluh, Jorge I. F.; Soares, Marcio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer patients are at risk for severe complications related to the underlying malignancy or its treatment and, therefore, usually require admission to intensive care units (ICU). Here, we evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in this subgroup of patients. Materials and Methods Secondary analysis of two prospective cohorts of cancer patients admitted to ICUs. We used multivariable logistic regression to identify variables associated with hospital mortality. Results Out of 2,028 patients, 456 (23%) had cancer-related complications. Compared to those without cancer-related complications, they more frequently had worse performance status (PS) (57% vs 36% with PS≥2), active malignancy (95% vs 58%), need for vasopressors (45% vs 34%), mechanical ventilation (70% vs 51%) and dialysis (12% vs 8%) (P<0.001 for all analyses). ICU (47% vs. 27%) and hospital (63% vs. 38%) mortality rates were also higher in patients with cancer-related complications (P<0.001). Chemo/radiation therapy-induced toxicity (6%), venous thromboembolism (5%), respiratory failure (4%), gastrointestinal involvement (3%) and vena cava syndrome (VCS) (2%) were the most frequent cancer-related complications. In multivariable analysis, the presence of cancer-related complications per se was not associated with mortality [odds ratio (OR) = 1.25 (95% confidence interval, 0.94–1.66), P = 0.131]. However, among the individual cancer-related complications, VCS [OR = 3.79 (1.11–12.92), P = 0.033], gastrointestinal involvement [OR = 3.05 (1.57–5.91), P = <0.001] and respiratory failure [OR = 1.96(1.04–3.71), P = 0.038] were independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions The prognostic impact of cancer-related complications was variable. Although some complications were associated with worse outcomes, the presence of an acute cancer-related complication per se should not guide decisions to admit a patient to ICU. PMID:27764143

  6. Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, ShienPei; Cates, Megan; Saunders, Gabrielle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire. Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid evaluation and again at their hearing aid follow-up visit. At follow-up, half received a clean HHI form (blind administration), whereas the remainder responded on their original form (informed administration) and could thus base their follow-up responses on those they gave at the hearing aid evaluation. Results The data show that for the population examined here, informed administration of the follow-up HHI did not yield a different outcome to blind administration of the follow-up HHI. This was not influenced by past hearing aid use, age of the participant, or the duration of time between baseline questionnaire completion and follow-up completion. Conclusion These data suggest that completion of follow-up questionnaires in either informed or blind format will have little impact on HHI responses, most likely because of the many other factors that combined to influence hearing aid outcome. PMID:21940983

  7. Mechanisms of Behavioral and Affective Treatment Outcomes in a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Boys

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeffrey D.; Loeber, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for effective treatment for behavioral problems continues to grow, yet evidence about the effective mechanisms underlying those interventions has lagged behind. The Stop Now and Plan (SNAP) program is a multicomponent intervention for boys between 6 and 11. This study tested putative treatment mechanisms using data from 252 boys in a randomized controlled trial of SNAP versus treatment as usual. SNAP includes a 3 month group treatment period followed by individualized intervention, which persisted through the 15 month study period. Measures were administered in four waves: at baseline and at 3, 9 and 15 months after baseline. A hierarchical linear modeling strategy was used. SNAP was associated with improved problem-solving skills, prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills, and reduced parental stress. Prosocial behavior, emotion regulation skills and reduced parental stress partially mediated improvements in child aggression. Improved emotion regulation skills partially mediated treatment-related child anxious-depressed outcomes. Improvements in parenting behaviors did not differ between treatment conditions. The results suggest that independent processes may drive affective and behavioral outcomes, with some specificity regarding the mechanisms related to differing treatment outcomes. PMID:25619927

  8. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  9. Beyond Our Walls: Impact of Patient and Provider Coordination across the Continuum on Outcomes for Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Dana Beth; Gittell, Jody Hoffer; Lusenhop, R William; Kautz, Cori M; Wright, John

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patients' experience with coordination of their postsurgical care across multiple settings and the effects on key outcomes. Data Sources Primary data collected over 18 months from 222 unilateral knee-replacement patients at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, MA. Study Design Patients were surveyed about the coordination of their postdischarge care during the 6-week period postdischarge when they received care from rehabilitation facilities and/or home care agencies and follow-up care from the surgeon. Data Collection Patients were surveyed before surgery and at 6 and 12 weeks postsurgery. Principal Findings Patient reports highlight problems with coordination across settings and between providers and themselves. These problems, measured at 6 weeks, were associated with greater joint pain, lower functioning, and lower patient satisfaction at 6 weeks after surgery. At 12 weeks after surgery, coordination problems were associated with greater joint pain, but were not associated with functional status. Conclusion Coordination across settings affects patients' clinical outcomes and satisfaction with their care. Although accountable for transfer to the next care setting, providers are neither accountable for nor supported to coordinate across the continuum. Addressing this system problem requires both introducing coordinating mechanisms and also supporting their use through changes in providers' incentives, resources, and time. PMID:17355579

  10. Affective forecasting in an orangutan: predicting the hedonic outcome of novel juice mixes.

    PubMed

    Sauciuc, Gabriela-Alina; Persson, Tomas; Bååth, Rasmus; Bobrowicz, Katarzyna; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-11-01

    Affective forecasting is an ability that allows the prediction of the hedonic outcome of never-before experienced situations, by mentally recombining elements of prior experiences into possible scenarios, and pre-experiencing what these might feel like. It has been hypothesised that this ability is uniquely human. For example, given prior experience with the ingredients, but in the absence of direct experience with the mixture, only humans are said to be able to predict that lemonade tastes better with sugar than without it. Non-human animals, on the other hand, are claimed to be confined to predicting-exclusively and inflexibly-the outcome of previously experienced situations. Relying on gustatory stimuli, we devised a non-verbal method for assessing affective forecasting and tested comparatively one Sumatran orangutan and ten human participants. Administered as binary choices, the test required the participants to mentally construct novel juice blends from familiar ingredients and to make hedonic predictions concerning the ensuing mixes. The orangutan's performance was within the range of that shown by the humans. Both species made consistent choices that reflected independently measured taste preferences for the stimuli. Statistical models fitted to the data confirmed the predictive accuracy of such a relationship. The orangutan, just like humans, thus seems to have been able to make hedonic predictions concerning never-before experienced events.

  11. Differential outcomes of type A dissection with malperfusion according to affected organ system

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Joshua C.; Magruder, J. Trent; Crawford, Todd C.; Sciortino, Christopher M.; Zehr, Kenton J.; Mandal, Kaushik; Conte, John V.; Cameron, Duke E.; Black, James H.

    2016-01-01

    type A dissection can be managed in many patients by aortic replacement alone with low overall mortality. Most cases of renal and cerebral malperfusion resolved following aortic surgery. Revascularization was frequently necessary in patients with extremity malperfusion. Patients presenting with intestinal ischemia had very poor outcomes. A patient-specific approach is recommended in such complex patients. PMID:27386407

  12. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure affects fertilization outcome in swine animal model.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, N; Tettamanti, E; Russo, V; Martelli, A; Turriani, M; Mattoli, M; Barboni, B

    2010-06-01

    Modern society continuously exposes the population to electromagnetic radiation, the effects of which on human health, in particular reproduction, are still unknown. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of acute (1h) exposure of boar spermatozoa to a 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early fertility outcome. The effect of intensities ranging from 0 to 2 mT on morpho-functional integrity of capacitated spermatozoa was examined in vitro. The oviducts containing or without spermatozoa were then exposed to the minimum in vivo, TD(50,) and maximum intensities determined in vitro, 4h before ovulation. The effects of ELF-EMF on spermatozoa in terms of early embryo development were evaluated after 12h and 6 days. It was found that in vitro ELF-EMF > 0.5 mT induced a progressive acrosome damage, thus compromising the ability of spermatozoa to undergo acrosomal reaction after zona pellucida stimulation and reducing the in vitro fertilization outcome. These effects became evident at 0.75 mT and reached the plateau at 1 mT. Under in vivo conditions, the ELF-EMF intensity of 1 mT was able to compromise sperm function, significantly reducing the fertilization rate. In addition, the exposure of oviducts to fields > or = 0.75 mT in the absence of spermatozoa was able to negatively affect early embryo development. In fact, it was found to cause a slowdown in the embryo cleavage. In conclusion, it was demonstrated how and at which intensities ELF-EMF negatively affect early fertility outcome in a highly predictive animal model.

  13. Patient-reported outcomes in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis research.

    PubMed

    Swigris, Jeffrey J; Fairclough, Diane

    2012-08-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) include questionnaires or surveys that ask patients for their perceptions about things like symptoms they are experiencing or quality of life. For incurable, morbid, life-shortening conditions like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), PROs are particularly germane: They elucidate for clinicians and researchers what it is like for patients to live with such a disease, and they may detect important treatment effects not captured by other metrics (eg, pulmonary physiology). However, a relative paucity of research on PROs in IPF has left significant knowledge gaps in this area and contributed to the timidity investigators have about using PROs as prominent outcomes in IPF drug trials. Additional research on existing instruments is needed to establish or bolster their basic psychometric properties in IPF. When PROs are used as end points in therapeutic trials, analyzing PRO response data can be challenging, but these challenges can be overcome with a transparent, thoughtful, and sophisticated statistical approach. In this article, we discuss some of the basics of PRO assessment, existing knowledge gaps in IPF-related PRO research, and the potential usefulness of using PROs in IPF trials and conclude by offering specific recommendations for an approach to analyzing repeated-measures PRO data from IPF trials.

  14. Fracture liaison services: improving outcomes for patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Samuel; Khan, Tanvir; Ong, Terence; Sahota, Opinder

    2017-01-01

    Fragility fractures are sentinels of osteoporosis, and as such all patients with low-trauma fractures should be considered for further investigation for osteoporosis and, if confirmed, started on osteoporosis medication. Fracture liaison services (FLSs) with varying models of care are in place to take responsibility for this investigative and treatment process. This review aims to describe outcomes for patients with osteoporotic fragility fractures as part of FLSs. The most intensive service that includes identification, assessment and treatment of patients appears to deliver the best outcomes. This FLS model is associated with reduction in re-fracture risk (hazard ratio [HR] 0.18–0.67 over 2–4 years), reduced mortality (HR 0.65 over 2 years), increased assessment of bone mineral density (relative risk [RR] 2–3), increased treatment initiation (RR 1.5–4.25) and adherence to treatment (65%–88% at 1 year) and is cost-effective. In response to this evidence, key organizations and stakeholders have published guidance and framework to ensure that best practice in FLSs is delivered. PMID:28138228

  15. Characteristics and Outcomes of Elderly Patients Refused to ICU

    PubMed Central

    Pintado, María-Consuelo; Villa, Patricia; González-García, Natalia; Luján, Jimena; Molina, Rocío; Trascasa, María; López-Ramos, Esther; Martínez, Cristina; Cambronero, José-Andrés; de Pablo, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    Background. There are few data regarding the process of deciding which elderly patients are refused to ICU admission, their characteristics, and outcome. Methods. Prospective longitudinal observational cohort study. We included all consecutive patients older than 75 years, who were evaluated for admission to but were refused to treatment in ICU, during 18 months, with 12-month followup. We collected demographic data, ICU admission/refusal reasons, previous functional and cognitive status, comorbidity, severity of illness, and hospital and 12-month mortality. Results. 338 elderly patients were evaluated for ICU admission and 88 were refused to ICU (26%). Patients refused because they were “too ill to benefit” had more comorbidity and worse functional and mental situation than those admitted to ICU; there were no differences in illness severity. Hospital mortality rate of the whole study cohort was 36.3%, higher in patients “too ill to benefit” (55.6% versus 35.8%, P < 0.01), which also have higher 1-year mortality (73.7% versus 42.5%, P < 0.01). High comorbidity, low functional status, unavailable ICU beds, and age were associated with refusal decision on multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Prior functional status and comorbidity, not only the age or severity of illness, can help us more to make the right decision of admitting or refusing to ICU patients older than 75 years. PMID:24453879

  16. Improving Clinical Outcomes for Patients With Class III Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Melissa; Bires, Angela Macci; Waterstram-Rich, Kristen; Cline, Thomas W

    Heart failure (HF) is a serious medical problem in the United States and is placing a financial strain on the health care system. It is the leading cause of mortality and as the overall incidence continues to increase, so does the economic impact on the health care system. Innovative treatment options, in the form of disease management programs and implantable cardiac devices, such as the CorVue capable implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) pacemaker, offer the promise of an enhanced quality of life and reduced mortality. Even with these advances, HF continues to be a challenge. Studies reviewing HF management programs have shown promising results. However, more studies are needed to determine which combination of HF management interventions has the greatest financial impact and yields the best patient outcomes. The objective of the research study was to compare 30-day readmission rates of patients implanted with the CorVue capable ICD pacemaker with patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) with no implanted device. The aim of the research focused on the usefulness of intrathoracic impedance monitoring alerts in guiding empirical treatment of patients with CHF to prevent HF readmissions. Methodology included a retrospective medical chart review, comparing 30-day readmission events among patients with class III CHF who received home health intervention with similar patients implanted with the CorVue ICD.

  17. Provider and Patient Directed Financial Incentives to Improve Care and Outcomes for Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lorincz, Ilona S.; Lawson, Brittany C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Incentive programs directed at both providers and patients have become increasingly widespread. Pay-for-performance (P4P) where providers receive financial incentives to carry out specific care or improve clinical outcomes has been widely implemented. The existing literature indicates they probably spur initial gains which then level off or partially revert if incentives are withdrawn. The literature also indicates that process measures are easier to influence through P4P programs but that intermediate outcomes such as glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol control are harder to influence, and the long term impact of P4P programs on health is largely unknown. Programs directed at patients show greater promise as a means to influence patient behavior and intermediate outcomes such as weight loss; however, the evidence for long term effects are lacking. In combination, both patient and provider incentives are potentially powerful tools but whether they are cost-effective has yet to be determined. PMID:23225214

  18. Gender differences and tuberculosis in the Syrian Arab Republic: patients' attitudes, compliance and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bashour, H; Mamaree, F

    2003-07-01

    In a prospective study of gender and TB outcomes, 552 newly diagnosed smear-positive patients throughout the Syrian Arab Republic were interviewed at recruitment (from January 2002 to July 2002) and followed until the end of treatment. Delay in diagnosis was significantly longer among males. Significant differences between males and females were noted in relation to the place they usually use to seek care. Gender did not seem to affect knowledge and attitudes of TB patients. Although the women reported more barriers to seeking care, compliance with treatment tended to be higher and the treatment success rate was significantly higher among females than males. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex was a significant predictor of a negative treatment outcome, after controlling for other significant sociodemographic and health care related variables.

  19. Scoring Systems for Outcome Prediction of Patients with Perforation Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Litake, Manjusha Madhusudhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peritonitis continues to be one of the major infectious problems confronting a surgeon. Mannheim Peritonitis Index (MPI), Physiological and Operative Severity Score for en Umeration of Mortality (POSSUM) and Morbidity and sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute have been devised for risk assessment and for prediction of postoperative outcome. Aim The aim of this study was to find the accuracy of these scores in predicting outcome in terms of mortality in patients undergoing exploratory laprotomy for perforation peritonitis. Materials and Methods The prospective study was carried out in 100 diagnosed cases of perforation at our centre in a single unit over a period of 21 months from December 2012 to August 2014. Study was conducted on all cases of peritonitis albeit primary, tertiary, iatrogenic and those with age less than 12 years were excluded from the study. All the relevant data were collected and three scores were computed from one set of data from the patient. The main outcome measure was survival of the patient. The Receiver Operator Characteristics (ROC) curves were obtained for the three scores. Area Under the Curves (AUC) was calculated. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated at a cut off point obtained from the ROC curves. Results POSSUM had an AUC of 0.99, sepsis score had an AUC of 0.98 and MPI had an AUC of 0.95. The cut off point score of 51 for POSSUM had an accuracy of 93.8 and positive predictive value of 70.5, the score of 29 for MPI had an accuracy of 82.8 and positive predictive value of 46 and the score of 22 for sepsis score had an accuracy of 95.9 and positive predictive value of 86.67. Conclusion POSSUM score was found to be superior in prediction of mortality as compared to sepsis score of Stoner and Elebute and MPI. POSSUM and MPI over predicted mortality in some cases. None of these scores are strictly preoperative. PMID:27134924

  20. Graft and Patient Survival Outcomes of a Third Kidney Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Redfield, Robert R.; Gupta, Meera; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Wood, Alexander; Abt, Peter L.; Levine, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The waiting time for deceased donor renal transplantation in the United States continues to grow. Retransplant candidates make up a small but growing percentage of the overall transplant waiting list and raise questions about the stewardship of scarce resources. The utility of renal transplantation among individuals with two prior renal transplants is not described in the literature and we thus sought to determine the survival benefit associated with a third kidney transplant (3KT). Methods Multivariable Cox regression models were created to determine characteristics associated with 3KT outcomes and the survival benefit of 3KT among recipients wait listed and transplanted within the United States between 1995 and 2009. Results 4,334 patients were waitlisted for a 3KT and 2,492 patients received a 3KT. In a multivariate analysis, 3KT demonstrated an overall patient survival benefit compared to the wait list (HR-0.379, CI=0.302-0.475 p<0.001) for those awaiting their first, second or third kidney transplants, although an inferior graft outcome compared to first kidney transplants. The time to survival benefit did not accrue until 8-months after transplant. Additionally we found that the duration of second graft survival was predictive of third graft survival, such that second graft survival beyond 5 years is associated with superior 3KT graft survival. Second graft loss in 30 days or less was not associated with inferior 3KT graft survival. Conclusion 3KT achieves a survival benefit over remaining on the wait list, although is associated with inferior graft outcomes compared to first kidney transplants. Graft survival of the second transplant beyond 5 years is associated with superior 3KT graft survival. PMID:25121473

  1. Social Influences on Clinical Outcomes of Patients With Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lutgendorf, Susan K.; De Geest, Koen; Bender, David; Ahmed, Amina; Goodheart, Michael J.; Dahmoush, Laila; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Penedo, Frank J.; Lucci, Joseph A.; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Thaker, Premal H.; Mendez, Luis; Lubaroff, David M.; Slavich, George M.; Cole, Steven W.; Sood, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Previous research has demonstrated relationships of social support with disease-related biomarkers in patients with ovarian cancer. However, the clinical relevance of these findings to patient outcomes has not been established. This prospective study examined how social support relates to long-term survival among consecutive patients with ovarian cancer. We focused on two types of social support: social attachment, a type of emotional social support reflecting connections with others, and instrumental social support reflecting the availability of tangible assistance. Patients and Methods Patients were prospectively recruited during a presurgical clinic visit and completed surveys before surgery. One hundred sixty-eight patients with histologically confirmed epithelial ovarian cancer were observed from the date of surgery until death or December 2010. Clinical information was obtained from medical records. Results In a Cox regression model, adjusting for disease stage, grade, histology, residual disease, and age, greater social attachment was associated with a lower likelihood of death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.87; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.98; P = .018). The median survival time for patients with low social attachment categorized on a median split of 15 was 3.35 years (95% CI, 2.56 to 4.15 years). In contrast, by study completion, 59% of patients with high social attachment were still alive after 4.70 years. No significant association was found between instrumental social support and survival, even after adjustment for covariates. Conclusion Social attachment is associated with a survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. Clinical implications include the importance of screening for deficits in the social environment and consideration of support activities during adjuvant treatment. PMID:22802321

  2. Peripheral Venous Access Ports: Outcomes Analysis in 109 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bodner, Leonard J.; Nosher, John L.; Patel, Kaushik M.; Siegel, Randall L.; Biswal, Rajiv; Gribbin, Christopher E.; Tokarz, Robert

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a retrospective outcomes analysis of central venous catheters with peripheral venous access ports, with comparison to published data.Methods: One hundred and twelve central venous catheters with peripherally placed access ports were placed under sonographic guidance in 109 patients over a 4-year period. Ports were placed for the administration of chemotherapy, hyperalimentation, long-term antibiotic therapy, gamma-globulin therapy, and frequent blood sampling. A vein in the upper arm was accessed in each case and the catheter was passed to the superior vena cava or right atrium. Povidone iodine skin preparation was used in the first 65 port insertions. A combination of Iodophor solution and povidone iodine solution was used in the last 47 port insertions. Forty patients received low-dose (1 mg) warfarin sodium beginning the day after port insertion. Three patients received higher doses of warfarin sodium for preexistent venous thrombosis. Catheter performance and complications were assessed and compared with published data.Results: Access into the basilic or brachial veins was obtained in all cases. Ports remained functional for a total of 28,936 patient days. The port functioned in 50% of patients until completion of therapy, or the patient's expiration. Ports were removed prior to completion of therapy in 18% of patients. Eleven patients (9.9% of ports placed) suffered an infectious complication (0.38 per thousand catheter-days)-in nine, at the port implantation site, in two along the catheter. In all 11 instances the port was removed. Port pocket infection in the early postoperative period occurred in three patients (4.7%) receiving a Betadine prep vs two patients (4.2%) receiving a standard O.R. prep. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.9). Venous thrombosis occurred in three patients (6.8%) receiving warfarin sodium and in two patients (3%) not receiving warfarin sodium. This difference was not statistically significant

  3. Does Radial Styloid Abnormality in de Quervain’s Disease Affect the Outcome of Management?

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Hosam; Ali, Atif

    2010-01-01

    Radiological changes have been described in de Quervain’s disease of the wrist. The author analyzed the clinical data of 114 patients who reported to the orthopedic clinic of a Regional Referral Hospital for a period of 4 years [2003 to 2007]. Radiographs of the wrist were available for 39 cases, of which 14 [35.89%] were found abnormal. Two patients with abnormal radiographs [14.28%] required surgery where as 7 out of 25 [28%] with normal radiographs were managed surgically. Radial styloid abnormality was not found statistically significant [p < 0.05], and the outcome of management was irrespective of the changes in the radial styloid. PMID:22131918

  4. Outcomes in Patients With Early-Stage Hypopharyngeal Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Ryo-ichi; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Ito, Yoshinori; Asai, Masao; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Sumi, Minako; Itami, Jun

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in patients with early-stage hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) who were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between February 1988 and February 2007, 77 patients with Stage I or Stage II HPC underwent definitive RT in the Division of Radiation Oncology at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Eleven of the patients received local irradiation, and the other 66 patients received elective bilateral neck irradiation and booster irradiation to the primary lesion. The median follow-up period for all the patients was 33 months from the start of RT, ranging from 3 to 229 months. Results: The rates of overall survival, HPC-specific survival, HPC recurrence-free survival, and local control with laryngeal voice preservation for the 77 patients at 5 years were 47%, 74%, 57%, and 70%, respectively. The survival rates were not affected by the patient characteristics or treatment factors, but the RT field was significantly correlated with local control in a multivariate analysis. Seven of the patients had Grade 3 or greater complications, but these complications occurred after salvage surgery in 6 of the patients. Of the 77 patients, 83% had synchronous or metachronous malignancies, but these malignancies did not influence the survival of the patients if the malignancies were detected at an early stage. Conclusion: RT is an appropriate treatment method for early-stage HPC. However, because synchronous or metachronous malignancies occur at a relatively high frequency, careful follow-up and the early detection of such malignancies are critical.

  5. Outcomes of Late Implantation in Usher Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ana Cristina H.; Echegoyen, Agustina; Goffi-Gomez, Maria Valéria Schmidt; Tsuji, Robinson Koji; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Usher syndrome (US) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and progressive visual impairment. Some deaf Usher syndrome patients learn to communicate using sign language. During adolescence, as they start losing vision, they are usually referred to cochlear implantation as a salvage for their new condition. Is a late implantation beneficial to these children? Objective The objective of this study is to describe the outcomes of US patients who received cochlear implants at a later age. Methods This is a retrospective study of ten patients diagnosed with US1. We collected pure-tone thresholds and speech perception tests from pre and one-year post implant. Results Average age at implantation was 18.9 years (5–49). Aided average thresholds were 103 dB HL and 35 dB HL pre and one-year post implant, respectively. Speech perception was only possible to be measured in four patients preoperatively, who scored 13.3; 26.67; 46% vowels and 56% 4-choice. All patients except one had some kind of communication. Two were bilingual. After one year of using the device, seven patients were able to perform the speech tests (from four-choice to close set sentences) and three patients abandoned the use of the implant. Conclusion We observed that detection of sounds can be achieved with late implantation, but speech recognition is only possible in patients with previous hearing stimulation, since it depends on the development of hearing skills and the maturation of the auditory pathways. PMID:28382120

  6. Radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid diseases: effects, side effects, and factors affecting therapeutic outcome.

    PubMed

    Bonnema, Steen Joop; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2012-12-01

    Radioiodine ((131)I) therapy of benign thyroid diseases was introduced 70 yr ago, and the patients treated since then are probably numbered in the millions. Fifty to 90% of hyperthyroid patients are cured within 1 yr after (131)I therapy. With longer follow-up, permanent hypothyroidism seems inevitable in Graves' disease, whereas this risk is much lower when treating toxic nodular goiter. The side effect causing most concern is the potential induction of ophthalmopathy in predisposed individuals. The response to (131)I therapy is to some extent related to the radiation dose. However, calculation of an exact thyroid dose is error-prone due to imprecise measurement of the (131)I biokinetics, and the importance of internal dosimetric factors, such as the thyroid follicle size, is probably underestimated. Besides these obstacles, several potential confounders interfere with the efficacy of (131)I therapy, and they may even interact mutually and counteract each other. Numerous studies have evaluated the effect of (131)I therapy, but results have been conflicting due to differences in design, sample size, patient selection, and dose calculation. It seems clear that no single factor reliably predicts the outcome from (131)I therapy. The individual radiosensitivity, still poorly defined and impossible to quantify, may be a major determinant of the outcome from (131)I therapy. Above all, the impact of (131)I therapy relies on the iodine-concentrating ability of the thyroid gland. The thyroid (131)I uptake (or retention) can be stimulated in several ways, including dietary iodine restriction and use of lithium. In particular, recombinant human thyrotropin has gained interest because this compound significantly amplifies the effect of (131)I therapy in patients with nontoxic nodular goiter.

  7. Speech Outcomes after Tonsillectomy in Patients with Known Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, L. M.; MacArthur, C. J.; Beaulieu, K. B.; Brockman, J. H.; Milczuk, H. A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Controversy exists over whether tonsillectomy will affect speech in patients with known velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), particularly in those with cleft palate. Methods. All patients seen at the OHSU Doernbecher Children's Hospital VPI clinic between 1997 and 2010 with VPI who underwent tonsillectomy were reviewed. Speech parameters were assessed before and after tonsillectomy. Wilcoxon rank-sum testing was used to evaluate for significance. Results. A total of 46 patients with VPI underwent tonsillectomy during this period. Twenty-three had pre- and postoperative speech evaluation sufficient for analysis. The majority (87%) had a history of cleft palate. Indications for tonsillectomy included obstructive sleep apnea in 11 (48%) and staged tonsillectomy prior to pharyngoplasty in 10 (43%). There was no significant difference between pre- and postoperative speech intelligibility or velopharyngeal competency in this population. Conclusion. In this study, tonsillectomy in patients with VPI did not significantly alter speech intelligibility or velopharyngeal competence. PMID:22164175

  8. Effect of Perioperative Management on Outcome of Patients after Craniosynostosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar Hormozi, Abdoljalil; Mahdavi, Nastaran; Foroozanfar, Mohammad Mehdi; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohajerani, Razavi; Eghbali, Ahmad; Mafi, Amir Ali; Hashemzadeh, Haleh; Mahdavi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Craniosynostosis results from premature closure of one or more cranial sutures, leading to deformed calvaria and craniofacial skeleton at birth. Postoperative complications and outcome in intensive care unit (ICU) is related to surgical method and perioperative management. This study determined the perioperative risk factors, which affect outcome of patients after craniosynostosis surgery. METHODS In a retrospective study, 178 patients with craniosynostosis who underwent primary cranial reconstruction were included. Postoperative complications following neurosurgical procedures including fever in ICU, level of consciousness, re-intubation, and blood, urine, and other cultures were also performed and their association with the main outcomes (length of ICU stay) were analyzed. RESULTS Factors independently associated with a longer pediatric ICU stay were fever (OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.25-4.32; p=0.001), perioperative bleeding (OR=2.25, 95% CI=1.65-3.65; p=0.01), age (having surgery after the first 5 years) (OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.33-3.54, p=0.016) and infection (OR=2.17, 95% CI=1.83-7.46; p=0.002). Mean blood loss during surgery was significantly higher in patients whose duration of ICU was longer than 4 days compare to less than 4 day (p=0.026). Amount of bleeding significantly was correlated to duration of surgery (r=0.70, p=0.001) and patient’s age (r=0.23, p=0.44). CONCLUSION perioperative management particularly blood loss could deteriorate patients outcome and length of stay in ICU and hospital. Infections in ICU could deteriorate outcomes. PMID:28289613

  9. Aortic valve regurgitation in a patient affected by KBG syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nicolini, Francesco; Beghi, Cesare; Gherli, Tiziano

    2009-01-01

    The KBG syndrome is a very rare condition characterized by developmental delay, short stature, distinct facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors and skeletal abnormalities. Associated congenital heart defects have been described in 9% of patients. Herein is described a case of aortic root dilatation with significant regurgitation in a young patient affected by KBG syndrome. Surgical inspection showed a dilated aortic annulus, slightly dilated aortic sinuses, a tricuspid valvb with slightly thickened cuspal margins and central regurgitation. Histological examination showed a fibrous hyaline involution of the valvular leaflets. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of KBG syndrome affected by aortic root dilatation with severe regurgitation. Morphology of the aortic valve leaflets was relatively normal, but the annulus was dilated in the absence of any history of rheumatic fever, hypertension, connective tissue or rheumatic systemic diseases. The unusual findings in this young patient raised questions regarding the as-yet unexplained etiopathogenesis of the KBG syndrome.

  10. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  11. Learning science in a cooperative setting: Academic achievement and affective outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarowitz, Reuven; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel; Baird, J. Hugh

    A learning unit in earth science was taught to high school students, using a jigsaw-group mastery learning approach. The sample consisted of 73 students in the experimental group and 47 students who learned the topic in an individualized mastery learning approach. The study lasted 5 weeks. Pretests and posttests on academic achievement and affective outcomes were administered. Data were treated with an analysis of covariance. The results show that students of the experimental group achieved significantly higher on academic outcomes, both normative and objective scores. On the creative essay test, the differences in number of ideas and total essay score were not significant between the groups, although the mean scores for number of words were higher for the individualized mastery learning group. On the affective domain, jigsaw-group mastery learning students scored significantly higher on self-esteem, number of friends, and involvement in the classroom. No differences were found in cohesiveness, cooperation, competition, and attitudes toward the subject learned. The results are discussed through the evaluation and comparison of the two methods of instruction used in this study.The cooperative learning movement began in junior high schools as part of the desegregation process, aiming at facilitating positive ethnic relations and increasing academic achievement and social skills among diverse students (Aronson, Stephan, Sikes, Blaney, & Snapp, 1978; Sharan & Hertz-Lazarowitz, 1980; Slavin, 1980). However, elementary teachers quickly recognized the potential of cooperative methods, and such methods were adopted freely in elementary schools before becoming widespread on the junior and senior high level. It has only been during the past few years that application of cooperative learning has been studied extensively with these older students.Cooperative learning methods generally involve heterogeneous groups working together on tasks that are deliberately structured to

  12. Influence of Transfusions on Perioperative and Long-Term Outcome in Patients Following Hepatic Resection for Colorectal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kooby, David A.; Stockman, Jennifer; Ben-Porat, Leah; Gonen, Mithat; Jarnagin, William R.; Dematteo, Ronald P.; Tuorto, Scott; Wuest, David; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Fong, Yuman

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine if transfusion affected perioperative and long-term outcome in patients undergoing liver resection for metastatic colorectal cancer. Summary Background Data Blood transfusion produces host immunosuppression and has been postulated to result in adverse outcome for patients undergoing surgical resection of malignancies. Methods Blood transfusion records and clinical outcomes for 1,351 patients undergoing liver resection at a tertiary cancer referral center were analyzed. Results Blood transfusion was associated with adverse outcome after liver resection. The greatest effect was in the perioperative course, where transfusion was an independent predictor of operative mortality, complications, major complications, and length of hospital stay. This effect was dose-related. Patients receiving one or two units or more than two units had an operative mortality of 2.5% and 11.1%, respectively, compared to 1.2% for patients not requiring transfusions. Transfusion was also associated with adverse long-term survival by univariate analysis, but this factor was not significant on multivariate analysis. Even patients receiving only one or two units had a more adverse outcome. Conclusions Perioperative blood transfusion is a risk factor for poor outcome after liver resection. Blood conservation methods should be used to avoid transfusion, especially in patents currently requiring limited amounts of transfused blood products. PMID:12796583

  13. Trends and outcomes of infective endocarditis in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nirmanmoh; Agrawal, Sahil; Garg, Aakash; Mohananey, Divyanshu; Sharma, Abhishek; Agarwal, Manyoo; Garg, Lohit; Agrawal, Nikhil; Singh, Amitoj; Nanda, Sudip; Shirani, Jamshid

    2017-03-16

    Dialysis patients are at high risk for infective endocarditis (IE); however, no large contemporary data exist on this issue. We examined outcomes of 44 816 patients with IE on dialysis and 202 547 patients with IE not on dialysis from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 thorough 2011. Dialysis patients were younger (59 ± 15 years vs 62 ± 18 years) and more likely to be female (47% vs 40%) and African-American (47% vs 40%; all P < 0.001). Hospitalizations for IE in the dialysis group increased from 175 to 222 per 10 000 patients (P trend  = 0.04). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common microorganism isolated in both dialysis (61%) and nondialysis (45%) groups. IE due to S aureus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.79, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.73-1.84), non-aureus staphylococcus (aOR: 1.72, 95% CI: 1.64-1.80), and fungi (aOR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.12-1.78) were more likely in the dialysis group, whereas infection due to gram-negative bacteria (aOR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.81-0.89), streptococci (aOR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.36-0.39), and enterococci (aOR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.74-0.82) were less likely (all P < 0.001). Dialysis patients had higher in-hospital mortality (aOR: 2.13, 95% CI: 2.04-2.21), lower likelihood of valve-replacement surgery (aOR: 0.82, 95% CI: 0.76-0.86), and higher incidence of stroke (aOR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03-1.12; all P < 0.001). We demonstrate rising incidence of IE-related hospitalizations in dialysis patients, highlight significant differences in baseline comorbidities and microbiology of IE compared with the general population, and validate the association of long-term dialysis with worse in-hospital outcomes.

  14. Autoregulation monitoring and outcome prediction in neurocritical care patients: Does one index fit all?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bernhard; Reinhard, Matthias; Lezaic, Vesna; McLeod, Damian D; Weinhold, Marco; Mattes, Heinz; Klingelhöfer, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Indexes PRx and Mx have been formerly introduced to assess cerebral autoregulation and have been shown to be associated with 3-month clinical outcome. In a mixed cohort of neurocritical care patients, we retrospectively investigated the impact of selected clinical characteristics on this association. Forty-one patients (18-77 years) with severe traumatic (TBI, N = 20) and non-traumatic (N = 21) brain injuries were studied. Cerebral blood flow velocity, arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure were repeatedly recorded during 1-h periods. Calculated PRx and Mx were correlated with 3-month clinical outcome score of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) in different subgroups with specific clinical characteristics. Both PRx and Mx correlated significantly with outcome (PRx: r = 0.38, p < 0.05; AUC = 0.64, n.s./Mx: r = 0.48, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.80, p < 0.005) in the overall group, and in patients with hemicraniectomy (N = 17; PRx: r = 0.73, p < 0.001; AUC = 0.89, p < 0.01/Mx: r = 0.69, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.87, p < 0.05). Mx, not PRx, correlated significantly with mRS in patients with heart failure (N = 17; r = 0.69, p < 0.005; AUC = 0.92, p < 0.005), and in non-traumatic patients (r = 0.49, p < 0.05; AUC = 0.79, p < 0.05). PRx, not Mx, correlated significantly with mRS in TBI patients (r = 0.63, p < 0.01; AUC = 0.89, p < 0.01). Both indexes did not correlate with mRS in diabetes patients (N = 15), PRx failed in hypocapnic patients (N = 26). Both PRx and Mx were significantly associated with 3-month clinical outcome, even in patients with hemicraniectomy. PRx was more appropriate for TBI patients, while Mx was better suited for non-traumatic patients and patients with heart failure. Prognostic values of indexes were affected by diabetes (both Mx and PRx) and hypocapnia (PRx only).

  15. The Association of Visual Impairment With Clinical Outcomes in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu Ah; Kim, Suk Young; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Young Ok; Jin, Dong Chan; Song, Ho Chul; Choi, Euy Jin; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon-Su; Kang, Shin-Wook; Kim, Nam-Ho; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Visual impairment limits people's ability to perform daily tasks and affects their quality of life. We evaluated the impact of visual impairment on clinical outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients. HD patients were selected from the Clinical Research Center registry a prospective cohort study on dialysis patients in Korea. Visual impairment was defined as difficulty in daily life due to decreased visual acuity or blindness. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and the secondary outcomes were cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization. A total of 3250 patients were included. Seven hundred thirty (22.5%) of the enrolled patients had visual impairment. The median follow-up period was 30 months. The Kaplan–Meier curve and log-rank test showed that all-cause mortality rates (P < 0.001) as well as cardiovascular and infection-related hospitalization rates (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients with visual impairment than in patients without visual impairment. In the multivariable analysis, visual impairment had significant predictive power for all-cause mortality (Hazard ratio [HR], 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–2.61, P = 0.004) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.45 [1.00–1.90], P = 0.008) after adjusting for confounding variables. Of these 3250 patients, 634 patients from each group were matched by propensity scores. In the propensity score matched analysis, patients with visual impairment had independently significant associations with increased all-cause mortality (HR 1.69 [1.12–2.54], P = 0.01) and cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.48 [1.08–2.02], P = 0.01) compared with patients without visual impairment after adjustment for confounding variables. Our data demonstrated that visual impairment was an independent risk factor for clinical adverse outcomes in HD patients. PMID:27175661

  16. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P.; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery. PMID:28299184

  17. Patient reported outcome measures of quality of end-of-life care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Tara; Cornally, Nicola; Molloy, William

    2017-02-01

    End-of-life (EoL) care(1) is increasingly used as a generic term in preference to palliative care or terminal care, particularly with reference to individuals with chronic disease, who are resident in community and long-term care (LTC) settings. This review evaluates studies based on patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) of quality of EoL care across all health-care settings. From 1041 citations, 12 studies were extracted by searches conducted in EBSCO, Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane, Open Grey and Google Scholar databases. At present, the evidence base for EoL care is founded on cancer care. This review highlights the paucity of studies that evaluate quality of EoL care for patients with chronic disease outside the established cancer-acute care paradigm, particularly in LTC. This review highlights the absence of any PROMs for the estimated 60% of patients in LTC with cognitive impairment. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical to understanding how EoL care services and practices affect patients' health and EoL experience. PROMs describe the quality of care from the patient's perspective and add balance to existing clinical or proxy-derived knowledge on the quality of care and services provided.

  18. Revisiting blood transfusion and predictors of outcome in cardiac surgery patients: a concise perspective.

    PubMed

    Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Slawski, Diana; Bhandary, Sujatha P; Saranteas, Theodosios; Kaminiotis, Eva; Papadimos, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    In the United States, cardiac surgery-related blood transfusion rates reached new highs in 2010, with 34% of patients receiving blood products. Patients undergoing both complex (coronary artery bypass grafting [CABG] plus valve repair or replacement) and non-complex (isolated CABG) cardiac surgeries are likely to have comorbidities such as anemia. Furthermore, the majority of patients undergoing isolated CABG have a history of myocardial infarction. These characteristics may increase the risk of complications and blood transfusion requirement. It becomes difficult to demonstrate the association between transfusions and mortality because of the fact that most patients undergoing cardiac surgery are also critically ill. Transfusion rates remain high despite the advances in perioperative blood conservation, such as the intraoperative use of cell saver in cardiac surgery. Some recent prospective studies have suggested that the use of blood products, even in low-risk patients, may adversely affect clinical outcomes. In light of this information, we reviewed the literature to assess the clinical outcomes in terms of 30-day and 1-year morbidity and mortality in transfused patients who underwent uncomplicated CABG surgery.

  19. Rationale for Using Social Media to Collect Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients with Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Kt; Harris, Merissa; Khavari, Nasim; Khosla, Chaitan

    2014-02-01

    Patients with celiac disease (CD) are increasingly interconnected through social media, exchanging patient experiences and health-tracking information between individuals through various web-based platforms. Social media represents potentially unique communication interface between gastroenterologists and active social media users - especially young adults and adolescents with celiac disease-regarding adherence to the strict gluten-free diet, gastrointestinal symptoms, and meaningful discussion about disease management. Yet, various social media platforms may be underutilized for research purposes to collect patient-reported outcomes data. In this commentary, we summarize the scientific rationale and potential for future growth of social media in patient-reported outcomes research, focusing on college freshmen with celiac disease as a case study and provide overview of the methodological approach. Finally, we discuss how social media may impact patient care in the future through increasing mobile technology use.

  20. Bystanders affect the outcome of mother–infant interactions in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Stuart; Gerald, Melissa S.; Suggs, Dianne N.

    2009-01-01

    Animal communication involves the transfer of information between a sender and one or more receivers. However, such interactions do not happen in a social vacuum; third parties are typically present, who can potentially eavesdrop upon or intervene in the interaction. The importance of such bystanders in shaping the outcome of communicative interactions has been widely studied in humans, but has only recently received attention in other animal species. Here, we studied bouts of infant crying among rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in order to investigate how the presence of bystanders may affect the outcome of this signalling interaction between infants and mothers. It was hypothesized that, as crying is acoustically aversive, bystanders may be aggressive to the mother or the infant in order to bring the crying bout to a close. Consequently, it was predicted that mothers should acquiesce more often to crying if in the presence of potentially aggressive animals. In line with this prediction, it was found that mothers gave infants access to the nipple significantly more often when crying occurred in the presence of animals that posed a high risk of aggression towards them. Both mothers and infants tended to receive more aggression from bystanders during crying bouts than outside of this time, although such aggression was extremely rare and was received by less than half of the mothers and infants in the study. Mothers were also found to be significantly more aggressive to their infants while the latter were crying than outside of crying bouts. These results provide new insight into the complex dynamics of mother–offspring conflict, and indicate that bystanders may play an important role in shaping the outcome of signalling interactions between infants and their mothers. PMID:19324744

  1. Teammates and social influence affect weight loss outcomes in a team-based weight loss competition.

    PubMed

    Leahey, Tricia M; Kumar, Rajiv; Weinberg, Brad M; Wing, Rena R

    2012-07-01

    Team-based internet interventions are increasing in popularity as a way of promoting weight loss in large numbers of individuals. Given that social networks influence health behavior change, this study investigated the effects of teammates and social influence on individual weight loss during a team-based weight loss competition. Shape Up Rhode Island (SURI) 2009 was a 12-week online program open to adult residents of Rhode Island. Participants joined with a team and competed with other teams on weight loss and/or physical activity. Overweight/obese (OW/OB) individuals (N = 3,330; 76% female; age = 46.1 ± 10.8; BMI = 31.2 ± 5.3 kg/m(2)), representing 987 teams, completed the weight loss program. Multilevel modeling was used to examine whether weight loss clustered among teammates and whether percentage of teammates in the weight loss division and reported teammate influence on weight loss were associated with individual weight outcomes. OW/OB completers reported losing 4.2 ± 3.4% of initial body weight. Weight loss was similar among teammates (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.10, P < 0.001). Moreover, having a greater percentage of teammates in the weight loss division and reporting higher social influence for weight loss were associated with greater percent weight loss (P's ≤ 0.002). Similarly, achieving a clinically significant (5%) weight loss tended to cluster within teams (ICC = 0.09; P < 0.001) and having more teammates in the weight loss division and higher social influence for weight loss were associated with increased likelihood of achieving a 5% weight loss (odds ratio (OR) = 1.06; OR = 1.20, respectively). These results suggest that teammates affect weight loss outcomes during a team-based intervention. Harnessing and maximizing teammate influence for weight loss may enhance weight outcomes in large-scale team-based programs.

  2. Through what mechanisms do protected areas affect environmental and social outcomes?

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Paul J; Hanauer, Merlin M

    2015-11-05

    To develop effective protected area policies, scholars and practitioners must better understand the mechanisms through which protected areas affect social and environmental outcomes. With strong evidence about mechanisms, the key elements of success can be strengthened, and the key elements of failure can be eliminated or repaired. Unfortunately, empirical evidence about these mechanisms is limited, and little guidance for quantifying them exists. This essay assesses what mechanisms have been hypothesized, what empirical evidence exists for their relative contributions and what advances have been made in the past decade for estimating mechanism causal effects from non-experimental data. The essay concludes with a proposed agenda for building an evidence base about protected area mechanisms.

  3. Through what mechanisms do protected areas affect environmental and social outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Paul J.; Hanauer, Merlin M.

    2015-01-01

    To develop effective protected area policies, scholars and practitioners must better understand the mechanisms through which protected areas affect social and environmental outcomes. With strong evidence about mechanisms, the key elements of success can be strengthened, and the key elements of failure can be eliminated or repaired. Unfortunately, empirical evidence about these mechanisms is limited, and little guidance for quantifying them exists. This essay assesses what mechanisms have been hypothesized, what empirical evidence exists for their relative contributions and what advances have been made in the past decade for estimating mechanism causal effects from non-experimental data. The essay concludes with a proposed agenda for building an evidence base about protected area mechanisms. PMID:26460122

  4. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Maseda, Ana; Balo, Aránzazu; Lorenzo–López, Laura; Lodeiro–Fernández, Leire; Rodríguez–Villamil, José Luis; Millán–Calenti, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting. Patients and methods Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0%) were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities) and affective status (depressive symptoms). Results Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients) had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting. Conclusion Our findings revealed a similar global cognitive decline rate between patients receiving day care services and those residing in a nursing home at the 1-year follow-up, and slightly different trajectories in other outcomes such as naming function and

  5. Parenting Cognition and Affective Outcomes Following Parent Management Training: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Colalillo, Sara; Johnston, Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    Parent management training (PMT) is considered the gold standard in the treatment of child behavior problems. The secondary effects of these interventions, particularly on parent well-being, are infrequently studied, despite evidence that parents of children with behavior problems often experience personal difficulties. This narrative review examined the affective and parenting cognition outcomes of PMT for mothers and fathers of children ages 2-13 years, across 48 controlled treatment studies. Substantial support was found for reductions in parenting stress, and increases in perceived parenting competence following PMT. Evidence indicated fewer improvements in domains more distal from parenting, including parent depressive symptoms and marital relationship dysfunction. A number of studies suggested parent gender as a moderator of parent outcomes of PMT; however, the underrepresentation of fathers in existing research limits conclusions in this regard. Avenues for future research are highlighted to address current gaps in the literature, and to further our understanding of the ways in which both children and parents may benefit from PMT.

  6. Risk factors and outcomes of high peritonitis rate in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuanshi; Xie, Xishao; Xiang, Shilong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). A high peritonitis rate (HPR) affects continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients’ technique survival and mortality. Predictors and outcomes of HPR, rather than the first peritonitis episode, were rarely studied in the Chinese population. In this study, we examined the risk factors associated with HPR and its effects on clinical outcomes in CAPD patients. This is a single center, retrospective, observational cohort study. A total of 294 patients who developing at least 1 episode of peritonitis were followed up from March 1st, 2002, to July 31, 2014, in our PD center. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with HPR, and the Cox proportional hazard model was conducted to assess the effects of HPR on clinical outcomes. During the study period of 2917.5 patient-years, 489 episodes of peritonitis were recorded, and the total peritonitis rate was 0.168 episodes per patient-year. The multivariate analysis showed that factors associated with HPR include a quick occurrence of peritonitis after CAPD initiation (shorter than 12 months), and a low serum albumin level at the start of CAPD. In the Cox proportional hazard model, HPR was a significant predictor of technique failure. There were no differences between HPR and low peritonitis rate (LPR) group for all-cause mortality. However, when the peritonitis rate was considered as a continuous variable, a positive correlation was observed between the peritonitis rate and mortality. We found the quick peritonitis occurrence after CAPD and the low serum albumin level before CAPD were strongly associated with an HPR. Also, our results verified that HPR was positively correlated with technique failure. More importantly, the increase in the peritonitis rate suggested a higher risk of all-cause mortality. These results may help to identify and target patients who are at higher risk of HPR at the start

  7. Factors affecting the incidence and outcome of Trueperella pyogenes mastitis in cows

    PubMed Central

    ISHIYAMA, Dai; MIZOMOTO, Tomoko; UEDA, Chise; TAKAGI, Nobuyuki; SHIMIZU, Noriko; MATSUURA, Yu; MAKUUCHI, Yuto; WATANABE, Aiko; SHINOZUKA, Yasunori; KAWAI, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The main factors affecting the outcome of Trueperella pyogenes (T. pyogenes) mastitis were examined through a survey of diagnostic data and interviews relating to the occurrence of T. pyogenes mastitis in 83 quarters from 82 Holstein cows between August 2012 and April 2014. Ultimately, one cow was sold during the examination, and 82 quarters from 81 cows were used for analysis on prognosis. T. pyogenes mastitis occurred year round in both lactating and dry cows. The incidence of T. pyogenes mastitis did not significantly differ by month or show seasonality in either lactating or dry cows. Therefore, the occurrence of T. pyogenes mastitis also differed from that of summer mastitis. The 1-month survival rate of infected cows was 64.6% (53/82), and the recovery rate of quarters with T. pyogenes mastitis was 14.6% (12/82). Bivariate logistic regression analysis was performed with survival and culling of infected cows as objective variables and with recovery and non-recovery of quarters with T. pyogenes mastitis as objective variables. The severe cases were significantly culled (odds ratio, 16.30) compared to mild cases, and the status of quarters didn’t recover (odds ratio, 6.50). The results suggest that mild to moderate symptom severity at the time of onset are the main factors affecting outcomes in cows and recovery of quarters infected with T. pyogenes mastitis. Further, high level of NAGase activity also suggested the potential use as an indicator of culling of cows with T. pyogenes mastitis. PMID:28163273

  8. Improving the outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse: a review of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, Stacy; Conner, Emma; Miller, Melodi; Messina, Nena

    2015-01-01

    Substance abuse is a major public health concern that impacts not just the user but also the user’s family. The effect that parental substance abuse has on children has been given substantial attention over the years. Findings from the literature suggest that children of substance-abusing parents have a high risk of developing physical and mental health and behavioral problems. A number of intervention programs have been developed for parents who have a substance abuse problem. There have also been a number of interventions that have been developed for children who have at least one parent with a substance abuse problem. However, it remains unclear how we can best mitigate the negative effects that parental substance abuse has on children due to the scarcity of evaluations that utilize rigorous methodologies such as experimental designs. The purpose of this study is to review randomized controlled trials of intervention programs targeting parents with substance abuse problems and/or children with at least one parent with a substance abuse problem in order to identify programs that show some promise in improving the behavioral and mental health outcomes of children affected by parental substance abuse. Four randomized controlled trials that met our eligibility criteria were identified using major literature search engines. The findings from this review suggest that interventions that focus on improving parenting practices and family functioning may be effective in reducing problems in children affected by parental substance abuse. However, further research utilizing rigorous methodologies are needed in order to identify other successful interventions that can improve the outcomes of these children long after the intervention has ended. PMID:25670915

  9. Factors influencing polymerase chain reaction outcomes in patients with clinically suspected ocular tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay can be a useful method for definitive diagnosis in paucibacillary infections such as ocular tuberculosis (TB). In this study, we have evaluated factors affecting PCR outcomes in patients with clinically suspected ocular TB. Patients with clinically suspected ocular TB were investigated by PCR of aqueous or vitreous samples. Three control groups were also tested: group 1 included culture-proven non-tuberculous endophthalmitis, group 2 culture-negative non-tuberculous endophthalmitis, and group 3 patients undergoing surgery for uncomplicated cataract. PCR targeted one or more of following targets: IS6110, MPB64, and protein b genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Multiple regression analysis (5% level of significance) was done to evaluate the associations between positive PCR outcome and laterality of disease, tuberculin skin test (TST)/interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA), chest radiography, and type of sample (aqueous or vitreous). The main outcome measures were positive PCR by one or more gene targets, and factors influencing positive PCR outcomes. Results All 114 samples were tested for MPB64, 110 for protein b, and 88 for IS6110. MPB64 was positive in 70.2% (n = 80) of tested samples, protein b in 40.0% (n = 44), and IS6110 in only 9.1% (n = 8). DNA sequencing of amplicons from four randomly chosen PCR reactions showed homology for M. tuberculosis complex. Of the 80 PCR-positive patients, 71 completed a full course of antitubercular therapy, of which 65 patients (91.5%) had complete resolution of inflammation at final follow-up. Among controls, 12.5% (3 out of 24) in group 1 and 18.7% (6 out of 32) in group 2 also tested positive by PCR. No PCR-positive outcome was observed in control group 3 (n = 25). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant association of positive PCR outcome with bilateral presentation, but not with a positive TST/IGRA, chest radiography, or type of sample

  10. Prevalence of HIV infection among burn patients: is there a relationship with patients' outcomes?

    PubMed

    Salehi, Seyed Hamid; As'adi, Kamran; Tabatabaeenezhad, Seyedeh Azam; Naderan, Mohammad; Shoar, Saeed

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among acute burn patients and its impacts on patient's outcomes in an Iranian burn care hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary burn care hospital in Iran, retrospectively reviewing the data records of all patients admitted between February 2011 and February 2012. The HIV status of all the patients was assessed in relation to clinical outcomes and the patient's prognosis. A total of 969 patients were included in this study. Five patients (0·5%) were HIV positive, and all of them were male. Mean burn area was significantly larger in HIV-positive patients than the healthy group (P < 0·05). HIV-positive patients had a longer period of hospitalisation than HIV-negative patients (23·2 ± 16·3 versus 13·1 ± 14·6, P = 0·008). Nonetheless, the average number of procedures and the mortality rate did not significantly differ between the study groups (P > 0·05). Comparison of age, sex and burn extent between HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative cases also revealed similar results. Prevalence of HIV infection among our burn population was 0·5%; thus, HIV status may be related with more extensive injuries and longer hospital stays.

  11. Laparoscopic Hiatal Hernia Repair in 221 Patients: Outcomes and Experience

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Hiatal hernia is a common condition often associated with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The objectives of this study were to examine the efficacy and safety of laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair (LHHR) with biologic mesh to reduce and/or alleviate GERD symptoms and associated hiatal hernia recurrence. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed consecutive LHHR procedures with biologic mesh performed by a single surgeon from July 2009 to October 2014. The primary efficacy outcome measures were relief from GERD symptoms, as measured according to the GERD–health-related quality-of-life (GERD-HRQL) scale and hiatal hernia recurrence. A secondary outcome measure was overall safety of the procedure. Results: A total of 221 patients underwent LHHR with biologic mesh during the study period, and pre- and postoperative GERD-HRQL studies were available for 172 of them. At baseline (preoperative), the mean GERD-HRQL score for all procedures was 18.5 ± 14.4. At follow-up (mean, 14.5 ± 11.0 months [range, 2.0–56.0]), the score showed a statistically significant decline to a mean of 4.4 ± 7.5 (P < .0001). To date, 8 patients (3.6%, 8/221) have had a documented anatomic hiatal hernia recurrence. However, a secondary hiatal hernia repair reoperation was necessary in only 1 patient. Most complications were minor (dysphagia, nausea and vomiting). However, there was 1 death caused by a hemorrhage that occurred 1 week after surgery. Conclusions: Laparoscopic hiatal hernia repair using biologic mesh, both with and without a simultaneous bariatric or antireflux procedure, is an efficacious and safe therapeutic option for management of hiatal hernia, prevention of recurrence, and relief of symptomatic GERD. PMID:26884676

  12. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS)

    PubMed Central

    Cella, David; Yount, Susan; Rothrock, Nan; Gershon, Richard; Cook, Karon; Reeve, Bryce; Ader, Deborah; Fries, James F.; Bruce, Bonnie; Rose, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Roadmap initiative (www.nihpromis.org) is a 5-year cooperative group program of research designed to develop, validate, and standardize item banks to measure patient-reported outcomes (PROs) relevant across common medical conditions. In this article, we will summarize the organization and scientific activity of the PROMIS network during its first 2 years. Design The network consists of 6 primary research sites (PRSs), a statistical coordinating center (SCC), and NIH research scientists. Governed by a steering committee, the network is organized into functional subcommittees and working groups. In the first year, we created an item library and activated 3 interacting protocols: Domain Mapping, Archival Data Analysis, and Qualitative Item Review (QIR). In the second year, we developed and initiated testing of item banks covering 5 broad domains of self-reported health. Results The domain mapping process is built on the World Health Organization (WHO) framework of physical, mental, and social health. From this framework, pain, fatigue, emotional distress, physical functioning, social role participation, and global health perceptions were selected for the first wave of testing. Item response theory (IRT)-based analysis of 11 large datasets supplemented and informed item-level qualitative review of nearly 7000 items from available PRO measures in the item library. Items were selected for rewriting or creation with further detailed review before the first round of testing in the general population and target patient populations. Conclusions The NIH PROMIS network derived a consensus-based framework for self-reported health, systematically reviewed available instruments and datasets that address the initial PROMIS domains. Qualitative item research led to the first wave of network testing which began in the second year. PMID:17443116

  13. Demographic characteristics and outcome of burn patients requiring skin grafts: a tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Shlash, Saud Othman Al; Madani, Jamal Omran Al; Deib, Jamal Ismail El; Alsubhi, Fatemah Suliman; Saifi, Sara Saud Al; Helmi, Ayman Mohammed Adel; Al-Mutairi, Sultan Khalaf; Khurram, Javed Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Split thickness skin graft (STSG) and full thickness skin graft (FTSG) are the integral part of burn wound management. However the impact of these graft types on the outcome still remain a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics and outcome of graft surgery of the patients undergone STSG and FTSG at Plastic Surgery Department of Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This retrospective study included 85 burn patients who received STSG (56 cases) and FTSG (29 cases) at PSMMC during 2010-2015. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, etiology of burn, and area of burn) and outcome (graft loss, graft contraction, skin pigmentation, altered sensation, infection rate and duration of hospital stay) were recorded among the patients who received STSG or FTSG. Out of 85 patients 50 patients were male and 35 female with a ratio of 1.42:1. The patients under the age of 10 years comprised the largest burn group with 28 cases (32.9%) out of total 85 patients. The number of patients above the age of 30 years was relatively smaller. Flame (49.3%) and scald (27%) burns constituted the majority of burn cases. The incidence of contraction among STSG (12.5%) and in FTSG (17.2%) cases was similar. Altered sensation was observed in 7.05% of STSG patients and 13.7% of FTSG cases. Loss of graft was observed in 16% of STSG and 20.6% of FTSG patients. The pigmentation was quite similar in STSG (21.4%) and FTSG (24. 1%). The hospitalization time in FTSG (28 days) patients was also comparable with STSG (26.9 days) group. This study showed that majority of the skin graft cases at PSMMC were male under the age of 30 years mostly affected by flame or scald burns. The outcome following STSG and FTSG surgery was comparable with no significant advantage of one over the other. It may be deduced that both STSG and FTSG have relative merits and demerits and either of these grafting procedure may be

  14. Epidemiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis patients affected by oral bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This literature review aims to evaluate the epidemiologic profile of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that developed a bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis that affect the jaws (BRONJ), including demographic aspects, as well as clinical and therapeutic issues. A search of PUBMED/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases from January 2003 to September 2011 was conducted with the objective of identifying publications that contained case reports regarding oral BRONJ in RA patients. Patients with RA who develop oral BRONJ are usually women above 60 years taking steroids and long-term alendronate. Most of them have osteoporosis, and lesions, triggered by dental procedures, are usually detected at stage II in the mandible. Although there is no accepted treatment protocol, these patients seem to have better outcomes with conservative approaches that include antibiotic therapy, chlorhexidine, and drug discontinuation. PMID:22376948

  15. Incorporating Meaningful Gamification in a Blended Learning Research Methods Class: Examining Student Learning, Engagement, and Affective Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Meng; Hew, Khe Foon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how the use of meaningful gamification affects student learning, engagement, and affective outcomes in a short, 3-day blended learning research methods class using a combination of experimental and qualitative research methods. Twenty-two postgraduates were randomly split into two groups taught by the same…

  16. Patient Characteristics and Outcomes by GN Subtype in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Montez-Rath, Maria E.; Lafayette, Richard A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Outcomes-based research rarely focuses on patients with ESRD caused by GN. The hypotheses were that the GN subtype would clinically discriminate patient groups and independently associate with survival after ESRD therapy initiation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Data were extracted from the US Renal Data System for adult patients with incident (1996–2011) ESRD attributed to six GN subtypes: FSGS, IgA nephropathy (IgAN), membranous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomeruonephritis, lupus nephritis (LN), and vasculitis. ESRD attributed to diabetes and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease served as non-GN comparators. Unadjusted and adjusted mortality hazard ratios (aHRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox regression (reference, IgAN). Models sequentially adjusted for sociodemographic (model 2), comorbidity/laboratory (model 3), and ESRD treatment modality (model 4) variables. Results Among 84,301 patients with ESRD attributed to GN, the median age ranged from 39 (LN) to 66 (vasculitis) years, male sex ranged from 18% (LN) to 68% (IgAN), and black race ranged from 7% (IgAN) to 49% (LN). Patients with IgAN had the fewest comorbidities and lowest use of hemodialysis (70.1%). After a median follow-up of 2.5 (interquartile range, 1.0–4.9) years, crude mortality was lowest in IgAN (3.7 deaths/100 person years). Compared to IgAN, adjusted mortality was highest in LN (model 4 aHR=1.75; 95% CI, 1.68 to 1.83) and in diabetes (aHR=1.73; 95% CI, 1.67 to 1.79), and was also higher in all other GN subtypes (membranous nephropathy: aHR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.17 to 1.29; FSGS: aHR=1.37; 95% CI, 1.32 to 1.42; membranoproliferative GN: aHR=1.38; 95% CI, 1.31 to 1.45; vasculitis: aHR=1.51; 95% CI, 1.45 to 1.58) and in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (aHR=1.22; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.27). Conclusions This study exposes substantial heterogeneity across GN subtypes at ESRD therapy initiation and

  17. Patient satisfaction with anaesthesia - Part 1: satisfaction as part of outcome - and what satisfies patients.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, T; Saal, D; Nübling, M

    2013-11-01

    Patients' involvement in all decision processes is becoming increasingly important in modern healthcare. Patient satisfaction is a sensitive measure of a well-functioning health service system. The objective of this review is to discuss patient satisfaction as part of outcome quality, to define the somewhat abstract term 'satisfaction', and to discuss the role of surrogate markers within the field of satisfaction with anaesthesia care. We critically discuss what is relevant to satisfy patients with anaesthesia care, and we provide guidance on improving satisfaction.

  18. Clinical characteristics affecting motor recovery and ambulation in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Yetisgin, Alparslan

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] To describe the clinical characteristics affecting motor recovery and ambulation in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Demographic and clinical characteristics of 53 stroke patients (31 M, 22 F), such as age, gender, etiology, hemiplegic side, Brunnstrom stage, functional ambulation scale scores, history of rehabilitation, and presence of shoulder pain and complex regional pain syndrome were evaluated. [Results] The etiology was ischemic in 79.2% of patients and hemorrhagic in 20.8%. Brunnstrom hand and upper extremity values in females were lower than in males. Complex regional pain syndrome was observed at a level of 18.9% in all patients (more common in females). Brunnstrom hand stage was lower in complex regional pain syndrome patients than in those without the syndrome. Shoulder pain was present in 44.4% of patients. Brunnstrom lower extremity values and functional ambulation scale scores were higher in rehabilitated than in non-rehabilitated cases. [Conclusion] Brunnstrom stages of hand and upper extremity were lower and complex regional pain syndrome was more common in female stroke patients. Shoulder pain and lower Brunnstrom hand stages were related to the presence of complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:28265142

  19. Pregnancy outcome of five patients with renal amyloidosis regarding familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Turgal, Mert; Selcuk, Ilker; Ozyuncu, Ozgur

    2014-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease affecting mainly patients of the Mediterranean basin and its major complication is the development of renal AA amyloidosis. On the other hand pregnancy with amyloidosis is not common; nevertheless, amyloidosis will complicate pregnancies also with the underlying disease and may cause terrible perinatal morbidities and mortalities. We report here the cases of five pregnant women and their pregnancy outcomes, who have been diagnosed with FMF complicated by renal amyloidosis. In the five cases, we observed that increased pregnancy complication such as small for gestational age, intrauterine growth restriction, preeclampsia and preterm birth.

  20. Diabetic retinopathy: variations in patient therapeutic outcomes and pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Aniruddha; Soliman, Mohamed K; Sepah, Yasir J; Do, Diana V; Nguyen, Quan Dong

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes and its microvascular complications in patients poses a significant challenge and constitutes a major health problem. When it comes to manifestations in the eye, each case of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is unique, in terms of the phenotype, genotype, and, more importantly, the therapeutic response. It is therefore important to identify factors that distinguish one patient from another. Personalized therapy in DR is a new trend aimed at achieving maximum therapeutic response in patients by identifying genotypic and phenotypic factors that may result in less than optimal response to conventional therapy, and consequently, lead to poorer outcome. With advances in the identification of these genetic markers, such as gene polymorphisms and human leucocyte antigen associations, as well as development of drugs that can target their effects, the future of personalized medicine in DR is promising. In this comprehensive review, data from various studies have been analyzed to present what has been achieved in the field of pharmacogenomics thus far. An insight into future research is also provided. PMID:25548526

  1. Factors that affect the flow of patients through triage

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Melinda; Brown, Ruth; Wears, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Objective To use observational methods to objectively evaluate the organisation of triage and what issues may affect the effectiveness of the process. Design A two‐phase study comprising observation of 16 h of triage in a London hospital emergency department and interviews with the triage staff to build a qualitative task analysis and study protocol for phase 2; observation and timing in triage for 1870 min including 257 patients and for 16 different members of the triage staff. Results No significant difference was found between grades of staff for the average triage time or the fraction of time absent from triage. In all, 67% of the time spent absent from triage was due to escorting patients into the department. The average time a patient waited in the reception before triage was 13 min 34 s; the average length of time to triage for a patient was 4 min 17 s. A significant increase in triage time was found when patients were triaged to a specialty, expected by a specialty, or were actively “seen and treated” in triage. Protocols to prioritise patients with potentially serious conditions to the front of the queue had a significantly positive effect on their waiting time. Supplementary tasks and distractions had varying effects on the timely assessment and triage of patients. Conclusions The human factors method is applicable to the triage process and can identify key factors that affect the throughput at triage. Referring a patient to a specialty at triage affects significantly the triage workload; hence, alternative methods or management should be suggested. The decision to offer active treatment at triage increases the time taken, and should be based on clinical criteria and the workload determined by staffing levels. The proportion of time absent from triage could be markedly improved by support from porters or other non‐qualified staff, as well as by proceduralised handovers from triage to the main clinical area. Triage productivity could be

  2. Needs of Hemodialysis Patients and Factors Affecting Them

    PubMed Central

    Xhulia, Dhima; Gerta, Jaku; Dajana, Zefaj; Koutelekos, Ioannis; Vasilopoulou, Chrysoula; Skopelitou, Margitsa; Polikandrioti, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Of this study was to explore the needs of hemodialysis patients and the factors that affect them. Material & Methods: The sample of the study included 141 patients undergoing hemodialysis. Data collection was performed by the method of interview using a specially designed questionnaire which served the purposes of the study. The needs were grouped into six categories. Patients were asked to answer how important was for them each of the statements in the questionnaire. Furthermore, there were collected socio-demographic characteristics, information on health status and relations with the physicians and nurses, as well as data on the incidence of the disease in their social life. Results: The results of this study showed that patients evaluated as fairly important all six categories of their needs, with similar results in both sexes. Age was found to be statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support and guidance’, ’the need to be informed’ and ’the need to meet the emotional and physical needs’, (p=0.023, p=0.012, p=0.028 respectively). Education level was found to be statistically significantly associated with all patients’ needs with the exception of ’the need to trust the medical and nursing staff’, (p=<0.05). Place of residence was statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support and guidance’, (p=0.029). Furthermore, difficulties in relations with family members was found to be statistically significantly associated with ’the need for support, the need for communication and individualization of care’, (p=0.014, p=0.040, p=0.041). After multivariate analysis, however, it was shown that the only independent factor affecting ’the need for support and guidance’, ’the need for individualized care’ and ’the need to meet the emotional and physical needs’, was if the patients reported themselves as anxious or not (p=0,024, p=0,012 and p=0,004, respectively). In particular, patients who

  3. Approaches to Predicting Outcomes in Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Saly, Danielle; Yang, Alina; Triebwasser, Corey; Oh, Janice; Sun, Qisi; Testani, Jeffrey; Parikh, Chirag R.; Bia, Joshua; Biswas, Aditya; Stetson, Chess; Chaisanguanthum, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Despite recognition that Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) leads to substantial increases in morbidity, mortality, and length of stay, accurate prognostication of these clinical events remains difficult. It remains unclear which approaches to variable selection and model building are most robust. We used data from a randomized trial of AKI alerting to develop time-updated prognostic models using stepwise regression compared to more advanced variable selection techniques. We randomly split data into training and validation cohorts. Outcomes of interest were death within 7 days, dialysis within 7 days, and length of stay. Data elements eligible for model-building included lab values, medications and dosages, procedures, and demographics. We assessed model discrimination using the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve and r-squared values. 2241 individuals were available for analysis. Both modeling techniques created viable models with very good discrimination ability, with AUCs exceeding 0.85 for dialysis and 0.8 for death prediction. Model performance was similar across model building strategies, though the strategy employing more advanced variable selection was more parsimonious. Very good to excellent prediction of outcome events is feasible in patients with AKI. More advanced techniques may lead to more parsimonious models, which may facilitate adoption in other settings. PMID:28122032

  4. Treatment Outcomes of Patients With Tardive Dyskinesia and Chronic Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Caroff, Stanley N.; Davis, Vicki G.; Miller, Del D.; Davis, Sonia M.; Rosenheck, Robert A.; McEvoy, Joseph P.; Campbell, E. Cabrina; Saltz, Bruce L.; Riggio, Silvana; Chakos, Miranda H.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Stroup, T. Scott; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We compared the response to antipsychotic treatment between patients with and without tardive dyskinesia (TD) and examined the course of TD. Method This analysis compared 200 patients with DSM-IV–defined schizophrenia and TD and 997 patients without TD, all of whom were randomly assigned to receive one of 4 second-generation antipsychotics. The primary clinical outcome measure was time to all-cause treatment discontinuation, and the primary measure for evaluating the course of TD was change from baseline in Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) score. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to compare treatment discontinuation between groups. Changes in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and neurocognitive scores were compared using mixed models and analysis of variance. Treatment differences between drugs in AIMS scores and all-cause discontinuation were examined for those with TD at baseline. Percentages of patients meeting criteria for TD postbase-line or showing changes in AIMS scores were evaluated with χ2 tests. Data were collected from January 2001 to December 2004. Results Time to treatment discontinuation for any cause was not significantly different between the TD and non-TD groups (χ21 =0.11, P = .743). Changes in PANSS scores were not significantly different (F1,974 = 0.82, P = .366), but patients with TD showed less improvement in neurocognitive scores (F1,359=6.53, P =.011). Among patients with TD, there were no significant differences between drugs in the decline in AIMS scores (F3,151 = 0.32, P = .811); 55% met criteria for TD at 2 consecutive visits postbaseline, 76% met criteria for TD at some or all postbaseline visits, 24% did not meet criteria for TD at any subsequent visit, 32% showed a ≥ 50% decrease in AIMS score, and 7% showed a ≥ 50% increase in AIMS score. Conclusions Schizophrenia patients with and without TD were similar in time to discontinuation of

  5. Depressive symptomatology differentiates subgroups of patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Goel, Namni; Terman, Michael; Terman, Jiuan Su

    2002-01-01

    Patients with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may vary in symptoms of their depressed winter mood state, as we showed previously for nondepressed (manic, hypomanic, hyperthymic, euthymic) springtime states [Goel et al., 1999]. Identification of such differences during depression may be useful in predicting differences in treatment efficacy or analyzing the pathogenesis of the disorder. In a cross-sectional analysis, we determined whether 165 patients with Bipolar Disorder (I, II) or Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), both with seasonal pattern, showed different symptom profiles while depressed. Assessment was by the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-Seasonal Affective Disorder Version (SIGH-SAD), which includes a set of items for atypical symptoms. We identified subgroup differences in SAD based on categories specified for nonseasonal depression, using multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant analysis. Patients with Bipolar Disorder (I and II) were more depressed (had higher SIGH-SAD scores) and showed more psychomotor agitation and social withdrawal than those with MDD. Bipolar I patients had more psychomotor retardation, late insomnia, and social withdrawal than bipolar II patients. Men showed more obsessions/compulsions and suicidality than women, while women showed more weight gain and early insomnia. Whites showed more guilt and fatigability than blacks, while blacks showed more hypochondriasis and social withdrawal. Darker-eyed patients were significantly more depressed and fatigued than blue-eyed patients. Single and divorced or separated patients showed more hypochondriasis and diurnal variation than married patients. Employed patients showed more atypical symptoms than unemployed patients, although most of the subgroup distinctions lay on the Hamilton Scale. These results comprise a set of biological and sociocultural factors-including race, gender, and marital and employment status-which contribute to depressive

  6. Obesity in the Kaiser Permanente Patient Population and Positive Outcomes of Online Weight-Management Programs

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Keith H; Histon, Trina M; Remmers, Carol

    2007-01-01

    We review what is known about the effects of obesity in the Kaiser Permanente (KP) population and discuss outcomes for two nationally available effective online programs, HealthMedia Balance® (Balance) and 10,000 Steps®. Obese KP patients often have health problems related to overweight and report difficulties with self-care, yet with the proper support, they can avail themselves of effective treatment to manage both obesity and associated conditions that affect quality of life. Clinicians should be aware of potential problems with functional status and self-care in their obese patients, provide brief assessment and advice, and refer obese patients to effective national and regional weight-management programs. PMID:21461090

  7. Sarcopenia, physical rehabilitation and functional outcomes of patients in a subacute geriatric care unit.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Dolores; Marco, Ester; Miralles, Ramon; Fayos, Mónica; Mojal, Sergio; Alvarado, Martha; Vázquez-Ibar, Olga; Escalada, Ferran; Muniesa, Josep M

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass and strength, which in the elderly can result in disability and affect functional outcomes after hospitalization. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes and mortality during hospitalization and at three months post-discharge, according to the presence of sarcopenia. Prospective study of 99 patients (38.4% men, aged 84.6) admitted in a subacute geriatric care unit who underwent a rehabilitation intervention. Main outcomes were mortality and functional improvement at discharge and at three-month follow-up. Sarcopenia was assessed by handgrip strength (hydraulic dynamometer) and by body composition bioimpedance. Forty-six (46.5%) patients met diagnostic criteria of sarcopenia. Patients with sarcopenia had a worse prior functional status than those without the condition (Barthel Index: 64.2±22.8 vs 73.3±21.8; p=0.04) but both groups had similar functional decline at admission (Barthel Index: 24±15.1 vs 28.5±15.2; p=0.1) and achieved similar functional improvement at discharge (20.4±18.3 vs 27.4±21; p=0.08). Barthel Index at discharge remained comparatively worse in patients with sarcopenia (44.2±26.6 vs 55.9±26.7; p=0.03). After completing a 3-month at-home rehabilitation program, no changes in functional capacity were observed in patients with sarcopenia; their peers improved their Barthel Index scores (45.5±24.8 vs 61.6±26.6; p=0.007). Mortality rates at 3-month follow-up did not differ between groups. In conclusion, patients with sarcopenia had a worse functional status, similar functional improvement during hospitalization and a lack of recovery after returning home. Further studies are needed to establish long-terms effects on mortality.

  8. Periapical healing outcome following single visit endodontic treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Moksha; Babshet, Medha

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of apical periodontitis in diabetes mellitus patients is high. The altered immunity in diabetes affects the healing process of periapical tissue. Single visit endodontic treatment has shown to increase the periapical healing rate with better patient compliance. Hence the present study aims at evaluating the clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic treatment, in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with periapical disease. Material and Methods Eighty patients with periapical disease were divided into 2 groups of 40 each: Group I, Control subjects and Group II, Type 2 diabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were assessed preoperatively and at follow up intervals in diabetics. Pre-operative assessment of periapical status was done using CPDR (Clinical periapical diagnosis of root), QLDR (Qualitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) and QTDR (Quantitative radiographic diagnosis of tooth) criteria. Postoperative healing was evaluated following single-visit endodontic treatment by Strindberg criteria. Results Group 2 subjects had chronic and exacerbating lesions with significantly larger lesions (p=0.029). 100 % clinical healing outcome in diabetic group was seen in two months. Group 2 showed 85% success in one year on radiographic evaluation. Poor controlled diabetics showed failure compared to fair and good controlled. Conclusions Type 2 diabetics had chronic and larger sized lesions when compared to control subjects. The periapical lesions in patients with poor diabetic control showed failure. The clinical and radiographic healing outcome of single visit endodontic therapy was delayed in diabetic patients. Key words:Apical periodontitis, diabetes mellitus type 2, endodontics, periapical lesion, strindberg criteria. PMID:27957260

  9. Clinical Outcomes of Lung Transplantation in Patients with Telomerase Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tokman, Sofya; Singer, Jonathan P.; Devine, Megan S.; Westall, Glen P.; Aubert, John-David; Tamm, Michael; Snell, Gregory I.; Lee, Joyce S.; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Golden, Jeffrey A.; Leard, Lorriana E.; Garcia, Christine K.; Hays, Steven R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Successful lung transplantation (LT) for patients with pulmonary fibrosis from telomerase mutations is limited by systemic complications of telomerase dysfunction including myelosuppression, cirrhosis, and malignancy. We describe clinical outcomes among 14 LT recipients with telomerase mutations. Methods Subjects underwent LT between February 2005 and April 2014 at 5 LT centers. We abstracted data from medical records, focusing on outcomes reflecting post-LT treatment effects likely to be complicated by telomerase mutations. Results The median age of subjects was 60.5 years (IQR 52.0–62.0), 64.3% were male, and the mean post-LT observation time was 3.2 years (SD ±2.9). Eleven subjects had a mutation in telomerase reverse transcriptase, 2 in telomerase RNA component, and 1 had an uncharacterized mutation. Ten subjects were leukopenic post-LT; leukopenia prompted cessation of mycophenolate mofetil in 5 and treatment with filgrastim in 4. Six subjects had recurrent lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), 7 had acute cellular rejection (ACR) (A1), and 4 developed chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Ten LT recipients developed chronic renal insufficiency and 8 experienced acute, reversible renal failure. Three developed cancer, none had cirrhosis. Thirteen subjects were alive at data censorship. Conclusions The clinical course for LT recipients with telomerase mutations is complicated by renal disease, leukopenia prompting a change in the immunosuppressive regimen, and recurrent LTRI. In contrast, cirrhosis was absent, ACR was mild, and development of CLAD was comparable to other LT populations. While posing challenges, lung transplantation may be feasible for patients with pulmonary fibrosis due to telomerase mutations. PMID:26169663

  10. Comparison of bacteriological conversion and treatment outcomes among MDR-TB patients with and without diabetes in Mexico: Preliminary data.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Torrico, M; Caminero Luna, J; Migliori, G B; D'Ambrosio, L; Carrillo-Alduenda, J L; Villareal-Velarde, H; Torres-Cruz, A; Flores-Ergara, H; Martínez-Mendoza, D; García-Sancho, C; Centis, R; Salazar-Lezama, M Á; Pérez-Padilla, R

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a well-known risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). However, it is not known to what extent DM affects the outcome in patients with multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) treated with second-line anti-TB drugs. The objective of this study was to compare the microbiological evolution (sputum smear and culture conversion) and final outcomes of MDR/XDR-TB patients with and without DM, managed at the national TB reference centre in Mexico City.

  11. A retrospective observational analysis to identify patient and treatment-related predictors of outcomes in a community mental health programme

    PubMed Central

    Green, Stuart A; Honeybourne, Emmi; Chalkley, Sylvia R; Price, Geraint; Bell, Derek; Green, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to identify patient and treatment factors that affect clinical outcomes of community psychological therapy through the development of a predictive model using historic data from 2 services in London. In addition, the study aims to assess the completeness of data collection, explore how treatment outcomes are discriminated using current criteria for classifying recovery, and assess the feasibility and need for undertaking a future larger population analysis. Design Observational, retrospective discriminant analysis. Setting 2 London community mental health services that provide psychological therapies for common mental disorders including anxiety and depression. Participants A total of 7388 patients attended the services between February 2009 and May 2012, of which 4393 (59%) completed therapy, or there was an agreement to end therapy, and were included in the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Different combinations of the clinical outcome scores for anxiety Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 and depression Patient Health Questionnaire-9 were used to construct different treatment outcomes. Results The predictive models were able to assign a positive or negative clinical outcome to each patient based on 5 independent pre-treatment variables, with an accuracy of 69.4% and 79.3%, respectively: initial severity of anxiety and depression, ethnicity, deprivation and gender. The number of sessions attended/missed were also important factors identified in recovery. Conclusions Predicting whether patients are likely to have a positive outcome following treatment at entry might allow suitable modification of scheduled treatment, possibly resulting in improvements in outcomes. The model also highlights factors not only associated with poorer outcomes but inextricably linked to prevalence of common mental disorders, emphasising the importance of social determinants not only in poor health but also poor recovery. PMID:25995234

  12. Comparable Low-Level Mosaicism in Affected and Non Affected Tissue of a Complex CDH Patient

    PubMed Central

    Veenma, Danielle; Beurskens, Niels; Douben, Hannie; Eussen, Bert; Noomen, Petra; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Grijseels, Els; Lequin, Maarten; de Krijger, Ronald; Tibboel, Dick; de Klein, Annelies; Van Opstal, Dian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present the detailed clinical and cytogenetic analysis of a prenatally detected complex Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) patient with a mosaic unbalanced translocation (5;12). High-resolution whole genome SNP array confirmed a low-level mosaicism (20%) in uncultured cells, underlining the value of array technology for identification studies. Subsequently, targeted Fluorescence In-Situ Hybridization in postmortem collected tissues demonstrated a similar low-level mosaicism, independently of the affected status of the tissue. Thus, a higher incidence of the genetic aberration in affected organs as lung and diaphragm cannot explain the severe phenotype of this complex CDH patient. Comparison with other described chromosome 5p and 12p anomalies indicated that half of the features presented in our patient (including the diaphragm defect) could be attributed to both chromosomal areas. In contrast, a few features such as the palpebral downslant, the broad nasal bridge, the micrognathia, microcephaly, abnormal dermatoglyphics and IUGR better fitted the 5p associated syndromes only. This study underlines the fact that low-level mosaicism can be associated with severe birth defects including CDH. The contribution of mosaicism to human diseases and specifically to congenital anomalies and spontaneous abortions becomes more and more accepted, although its phenotypic consequences are poorly described phenomena leading to counseling issues. Therefore, thorough follow–up of mosaic aberrations such as presented here is indicated in order to provide genetic counselors a more evidence based prediction of fetal prognosis in the future. PMID:21203572

  13. Methadone maintenance in general practice: patients, workload, and outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P.; Watson, R.; Ralston, G. E.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess recruitment to and work-load associated with methadone maintenance clinics in general practice; to investigate the characteristics of patients and outcomes associated with treatment. DESIGN--Study of case notes. SETTING--Methadone maintenance clinics run jointly by general practitioners and drug counsellors in two practices in Glasgow. PARTICIPANTS--46 injecting drug users receiving methadone maintenance during an 18 month period, 31 of whom were recruited to clinic based methadone maintenance treatment and 15 of whom were already receiving methadone maintenance treatment from the general practitioners. Mean (SD) age of patients entering treatment was 29.6 (5.5) years; 29 were male. They had been injecting opiates for a mean 9.9 (5.1) years, and most had a concurrent history of benzodiazepine misuse. Average reported daily intake of heroin was approximately 0.75 g. Participants in treatment had high levels of preexisting morbidity, and most stated that they committed crime daily. RESULTS--2232 patient weeks of treatment were studied. Mean duration of treatment during the study period was 50.7 (21.1) weeks and retention in treatment at 26 weeks was 83%. No evidence of illicit opiate use was obtained at an average of 78% of patients' consultations where methadone had been prescribed in the previous week; for opiate injection the corresponding figure was 86%. CONCLUSIONS--Providing methadone maintenance in general practice is feasible. Although costs are considerable, the reduction in drug use, especially of intravenous opiates, is encouraging. Attending clinics also allows this population, in which morbidity is considerable, to receive other health care. PMID:8086989

  14. Iron administration and clinical outcomes in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Harold I; Santanna, Jill; Guo, Wensheng; Furst, Howard; Franklin, Eunice; Joffe, Marshall; Marcus, Sue; Faich, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of parenteral iron administration on the survival and rate of hospitalization of US hemodialysis patients, a nonconcurrent cohort study of 10,169 hemodialysis patients in the United States in 1994 was conducted. The main outcome measures were patient survival and rate of hospitalization. After adjusting for 23 demographic and comorbidity characteristics among 5833 patients included in multivariable analysis, bills for 10 vials showed a statistically significant elevated rate of death (adjusted RR = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.24; P = 0.05). Bills for 10 vials showed statistically significant elevated risk (adjusted RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.25; P = 0.03). Prescribing iron in quantities of 10 vials (1000 mg) of iron dextran over a period of 6 mo.

  15. Feasibility of Frequent Patient-Reported Outcome Surveillance in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, William A.; Deal, Allison M.; Abernethy, Amy; Basch, Ethan; Battaglini, Claudio; Kim, Yoon Hie; Whitley, Julia; Shatten, Charlotte; Serody, Jon; Shea, Thomas; Reeve, Bryce B.

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PROs), including symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL), provide a patient-centered description of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT)-related toxicity. These data characterize the patient experience after HCT and may have prognostic usefulness for long-term outcomes after HCT. We conducted a study of 32 patients after HCT (10 autologous HCT recipients, 11 full-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients, and 11 reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic HCT recipients) to determine the feasibility of weekly electronic PRO collection from HCT until day (D) + 100. We used questions from the PRO version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events to capture symptoms, and the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System Global Health scale to measure physical and mental HRQOL. The vast majority (94%) of patients used the electronic PRO system, with only 6% opting for paper-and-pencil only. The median weekly percentage of participants who completed the surveys was 100% in all cohorts through hospital discharge, and remained 100% for the autologous HCT and reduced-intensity allogeneic HCT cohorts through D+100. Patients were satisfied with the electronic system, giving high marks for readability, comfort, and questionnaire length. Symptom severity varied by absolute level and type of symptom across the 3 cohorts, with the full-intensity allogeneic HCT cohort exhibiting the greatest median overall symptom severity, peaking at D+7. Median physical health HRQOL scores decreased with time in the 3 cohorts, and HRQOL was generally correlated with overall symptom severity. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of frequent electronic PROs in the early post-HCT period. Future studies in larger populations to explore predictive models using frequent PRO data for outcomes, including long-term HRQOL and survival, are warranted. PMID:23253558

  16. Validating English- and Spanish-language patient-reported outcome measures in underserved patients with rheumatic disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatic diseases are among the most common and debilitating health problems in the United States. These diseases are chronic, can result in severe decrements of physical and psychosocial functioning and affect patients' overall quality of life. A consensus regarding the best patient outcomes to be measured in randomized, controlled trials and prospective natural history studies is essential to provide best estimates of efficacy and safety of interventions across diverse patient populations. Methods Face-to-face English- and Spanish-language cognitive interviews were conducted among urban Hispanic and African American patients with rheumatic disease to develop a questionnaire booklet. Six measures validating patient-reported outcomes were included: the Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale, the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index, the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale, the Short Acculturation Scale, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the Inventory of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practices. A sample of patients (n = 15) attending the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases Community Health Center participated in the initial interviews. Revised measures were further tested for reliability in a separate sample of patients (n = 109) upon enrollment at the health center. Results Cognitive interviews provided feedback for questionnaire modifications and methods to enhance content validity and data quality, including discarding redundant questions, providing visual aids and concrete examples when appropriate and increasing the use of racially and ethnically concordant interviewers. The cognitive interviews further elucidated that some contextual assumptions and language usage in the original questionnaires may not have taken each respondent's environmental and sociocultural context into consideration. Internal reliability for previously tested measures remained high (Cronbach's α = 0

  17. Efficient phagocytosis and laccase activity affect the outcome of HIV-associated cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabiiti, Wilber; Robertson, Emma; Beale, Mathew A.; Johnston, Simon A.; Brouwer, Annemarie E.; Loyse, Angela; Jarvis, Joseph N.; Gilbert, Andrew S.; Fisher, Matthew C.; Harrison, Thomas S.; May, Robin C.; Bicanic, Tihana

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is a leading cause of HIV-associated mortality globally. High fungal burden in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at diagnosis and poor fungal clearance during treatment are recognized adverse prognostic markers; however, the underlying pathogenic factors that drive these clinical manifestations are incompletely understood. We profiled a large set of clinical isolates for established cryptococcal virulence traits to evaluate the contribution of C. neoformans phenotypic diversity to clinical presentation and outcome in human cryptococcosis. Methods. Sixty-five C. neoformans isolates from clinical trial patients with matched clinical data were assayed in vitro to determine murine macrophage uptake, intracellular proliferation rate (IPR), capsule induction, and laccase activity. Analysis of the correlation between prognostic clinical and host immune parameters and fungal phenotypes was performed using Spearman’s r, while the fungal-dependent impact on long-term survival was determined by Cox regression analysis. Results. High levels of fungal uptake by macrophages in vitro, but not the IPR, were associated with CSF fungal burden (r = 0.38, P = 0.002) and long-term patient survival (hazard ratio [HR] 2.6, 95% CI 1.2–5.5, P = 0.012). High-uptake strains were hypocapsular (r = –0.28, P = 0.05) and exhibited enhanced laccase activity (r = 0.36, P = 0.003). Fungal isolates with greater laccase activity exhibited heightened survival ex vivo in purified CSF (r = 0.49, P < 0.0001) and resistance to clearance following patient antifungal treatment (r = 0.39, P = 0.003). Conclusion. These findings underscore the contribution of cryptococcal-phagocyte interactions and laccase-dependent melanin pathways to human clinical presentation and outcome. Furthermore, characterization of fungal-specific pathways that drive clinical manifestation provide potential targets for the development of therapeutics and the management of CM. Funding. This work

  18. Recovery and outcomes after the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients and their family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Herridge, Margaret S; Moss, Marc; Hough, Catherine L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Rice, Todd W; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Azoulay, Elie

    2016-05-01

    Outcomes after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are similar to those of other survivors of critical illness and largely affect the nerve, muscle, and central nervous system but also include a constellation of varied physical devastations ranging from contractures and frozen joints to tooth loss and cosmesis. Compromised quality of life is related to a spectrum of impairment of physical, social, emotional, and neurocognitive function and to a much lesser extent discrete pulmonary disability. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is ubiquitous and includes contributions from both critical illness polyneuropathy and myopathy, and recovery from these lesions may be incomplete at 5 years after ICU discharge. Cognitive impairment in ARDS survivors ranges from 70 to 100 % at hospital discharge, 46 to 80 % at 1 year, and 20 % at 5 years, and mood disorders including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are also sustained and prevalent. Robust multidisciplinary and longitudinal interventions that improve these outcomes are still uncertain and data in our literature are conflicting. Studies are needed in family members of ARDS survivors to better understand long-term outcomes of the post-ICU family syndrome and to evaluate how it affects patient recovery.

  19. Blood levels of methemoglobin in patients with aluminum phosphide poisoning and its correlation with patient's outcome.

    PubMed

    Mostafazadeh, Babak; Pajoumand, Abdolkarim; Farzaneh, Esmaeil; Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Rasouli, Mohammad Reza

    2011-03-01

    Although methemoglobinemia following aluminum phosphide (AlP) intoxication has been reported, probable effect of blood level of methemoglobin (Met-Hb) on outcome of AlP-poisoned patients has not yet been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate blood levels of methemoglobin in patients with AP intoxication and its correlation with patient's outcome. This prospective study was carried out at the Loghman-Hakim poison hospital from April 2009 to August 2009. All patients aged >12 years who had ingested AlP and were admitted at the hospital were enrolled in the study. Using the co-oximetry, blood Met-Hb level was measured at the time of admission and 24 h later if the patient survived. Forty-eight patients with AlP intoxication including 24 males were evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 25.5±9.5 years. There was significant association between blood level of Met-Hb at the time of admission and mortality (2.4%±7.1% in survivors versus 15.2%±13.5% in non-survivors, P<0.001). The same association was found at the 2nd day of admission (2.9%±8.2% in survivors versus 26.5%±9.9% in non-survivors, P=0.02). The present study found an association between blood level of Met-Hb and mortality in patients with AlP intoxication. Effect of administration of vitamin C and methylene blue on outcome of patients with AlP intoxication should be investigated in future studies.

  20. A steroid-induced bilateral avascular necrosis of the femoral head in an underage patient affected by multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Carulli, Christian; Nistri, Lorenzo; Bracco, Laura; Giannini, Marta; Amato, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis are often treated by pulsed intravenous corticosteroids to manage acute relapses with positive outcomes. The intravenous administration is frequently associated to avascular necrosis of several bones, particularly the femur. The present report regards a case of an underage MS patient with a bilateral ANFH secondary to pulsed administrations of steroids, managed by a conservative approach on a hip, and by a novel surgical technique on the contralateral side. PMID:26811707

  1. Deliberative Engagement Methods for Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    PubMed

    Morain, Stephanie R; Whicher, Danielle M; Kass, Nancy E; Faden, Ruth R

    2017-04-03

    There is growing emphasis on eliciting and incorporating stakeholder perspectives into health research and public policy development. The deliberative engagement session (DES) method provides one approach to elicit informed preferences from patients and other stakeholders on policy issues. DES involves day-long interaction with participants, including short plenary presentations followed by small group discussion. While interest in DES methods is expanding, practical guidance for researchers on this method remains limited. In this paper, we describe the DES method and its contemporary relevance for health policy research, illustrate how to conduct a DES using an example of a recent patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) study with which we were involved, and discuss strengths and challenges of using this approach. DES methods generate rich data, reduce the risk of eliciting uniformed preferences or non-attitudes, and increase the likelihood of eliciting informed, reflective preferences. However, they are resource-intensive, and thus generally require trading away a larger, more representative sample. Despite these limitations, the DES method, when carefully designed, is well-suited for engaging stakeholders in research on complex health policy issues.

  2. Patient reported outcomes in the assessment of premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Althof, Stanley E

    2016-08-01

    The term 'Patient Reported Outcome', abbreviated as PRO, was introduced by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) which proposed guidance on the development and validation of PROs. Previously PROs were known as self-report diaries, event-logs, self-administered questionnaires, and clinician administered rating scales. PROs seek to capture the subjective perceptions of patients and/or partner's related to their specific symptoms, degree of bother, efficacy of a medication or psychotherapy intervention, and quality of life issues related to a specific condition. This article reviews the essential psychometric and regulatory agency requirements in the development of PROs. The constructs of reliability, various forms of validity, sensitivity, and specificity as well as concerns with translating a PRO into a different language are reviewed. Three PROs, the Premature Ejaculation Profile (PEP), the Index of Premature Ejaculation (IPE) and the Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT) all used in the assessment of premature ejaculation (PE) are discussed. These questionnaires meet or exceed all the psychometric requirements and have been employed in clinical trials and observational studies of men with PE. The article concludes on discussing some of the limitations of PRO use and recommendations for the future.

  3. Assessing patient reported outcome measures: A practical guide for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Hutchings, Hayley A; Williams, John G

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal illnesses cause physical, emotional and social impact on patients. Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used in clinical decision-making, clinical research and approval of new therapies. In the last decade, there has been a rapid increase in the number of PROMs in gastroenterology and, therefore, the choice between which of these PROMs to use can be difficult. Not all PROM instruments currently used in research and clinical practice in gastroenterology have gone through a rigorous development methodology. New drugs and therapies will not have access to the market if the PROMs used in their clinical trials are not validated according to the guidelines of the international agencies. Therefore, it is important to know the required properties of PROMs when choosing or evaluating a drug or a clinical intervention. This paper reviews the current literature on how to assess the validity and reliability of PROMs. It summarises the required properties into a practical guide for gastroenterologists to use in assessing an instrument for use in clinical practice or research. PMID:25452841

  4. Patient-reported outcome measures: an on-line system empowering patient choice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J; Arshad, F; Nnamoko, N; Whiteman, A; Ring, J; Roy, B

    2014-01-01

    An innovative web-based system was developed to allow patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) to be easily administered. Stakeholders guided the design and implementation. The software gives patients access to their current and previous scores. This pilot study focused on patients undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression, evaluated using the Oxford shoulder score (OSS). Patients showing good improvement in their OSS were offered the choice to return for routine follow-up clinic appointments, or continue rehabilitation, reassured by their improved score. Thirty-six of 117 patients were eligible. Thirty of these (83%) were opted to avoid further clinics. PROMs 2.0 can be used for any medical intervention with a validated PROM. Evolution and refinement is ongoing. Funding has been granted for 12 primary and secondary healthcare trusts to implement PROMs 2.0. Further work is needed to assess economic impact, patient views and satisfaction with the process. PMID:24013090

  5. Predicting postoperative visual outcomes in cataract patients with maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Macky, Tamer A; Mohamed, Abdel Moniem Hasaballah; Emarah, Ahmed M; Osman, Amr Abdellatif; Gado, Ahmed S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of the potential acuity meter (PAM) in predicting postcataract surgery visual acuity outcome in patients with healed inactive maculopathies. Study Design: Prospective interventional clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Patients scheduled for phacoemulsification had preoperative and 1 month postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), PAM test, fluorescein angiography, and macular optical coherence tomography. Patients were grouped to following preoperative BCVA: PRE1: 0.29 and better, PRE2: 0.25–0.13, and PRE3: 0.1 or worse; age: G1 <60, G2 = 60–70, and G3 >70 years. PAM accuracy was divided into: Grade 1: Postoperative BCVA ≤1 or less line error of the PAM score, Grade 2: Between 1 and 2 lines error, and Grade 3: ≥3 lines or more error. Results: This study enrolled 57 patients with a mean age of 71.05 ± 6.78 years where 34 were females. There were 21 (36.84%) patients with diabetic maculopathy and 36 (63.16%) with age-related macular degeneration. The mean preoperative BCVA was 0.198 ± 0.12 (0.1–0.5). The mean PAM score was 0.442 ± 0.24 (0.1–1.3). The mean postoperative BCVA was 0.4352 ± 0.19 (0.17–1.00). The PAM score was in Grade 1, 2, and 3 in 46 (80.7%), 54 (94.7%), and 56 (98.2), respectively. There was a highly significant correlation between the PAM score and the postoperative BCVA (P < 0.001, Chi-square test). There was no correlation between the PAM test accuracy and age, gender, diagnosis, and preoperative BCVA (P = 0.661, 0.667, 0. 0.991, 0.833, Chi-square test; respectively). Conclusion: The PAM is an accurate method of predicting postoperative visual acuity for eyes with nuclear cataracts Grade I and II and inactive maculopathies. PMID:26655002

  6. Implant outcomes poorer in patients with history of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Keenan, James R

    2017-03-01

    Data sourcesMedline and Embase databases and bibliographies of all included articles and relevant review articles were screened for possible inclusion.Study selectionLongitudinal studies were included reporting on implant survival, success, incidence of peri-implantitis, bone loss and periodontal status and on partially dentate patients with a history of treatment for periodontitis. There were no language restrictions for the included studies.Data extraction and synthesisAuthors independently and in duplicate assessed the studies for eligibility and data extraction. Disagreements were resolved by discussion and consensus. The methodological quality assessment of the included studies was done using an adapted Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Confounding factors such as smoking, systemic disease influencing osseointegration, chemotherapy and radiation were assessed and adjusted in the analysis. Data were organised into tables and grouped in accordance with the study design.ResultsTwenty-four studies reported in 27 publications were included. Implant survival and success rate were higher in periodontally healthy patients.Twelve prospective cohort studies, five case series with a control group, four retrospective cohort studies and three studies with a sub group comparison were included.Bone loss and peri-implantitis were increased in patients with a history of treated periodontitis. More complications were reported in patients presenting with more severe forms of periodontitis. High heterogeneity among the studies in terms of study design, population, therapy, unit of analysis, inconsistent definitions of baseline and outcomes, inadequate reporting and confounding factors meant a meta-analysis could not be performed.Most of the studies showed better implant survival rates for the non-periodontitis group ranging from 91.67% to 100% compared to the treated periodontitis group 79.22% to 100% over a 1.2 to 16 year follow-up.ConclusionsImplants placed in patients treated for

  7. Inherited Variants in Wnt Pathway Genes Influence Outcomes of Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jiun-Hung; Lin, Victor C.; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Yin, Hsin-Ling; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Lu, Te-Ling; Huang, Shu-Pin; Bao, Bo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Wnt signaling has been associated with many types of cancer. However, the association of inherited Wnt pathway variants with clinical outcomes in prostate cancer patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has not been determined. Here, we comprehensively studied the contribution of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Wnt pathway genes to the clinical outcomes of 465 advanced prostate cancer patients treated with ADT. Two SNPs, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) rs2707765 and rs497844, were significantly (p ≤ 0.009 and q ≤ 0.043) associated with both prostate cancer progression and all-cause mortality, even after multivariate analyses and multiple testing correction. Patients with a greater number of favorable alleles had a longer time to disease progression and better overall survival during ADT (p for trend ≤ 0.003). Additional, cDNA array and in silico analyses of prostate cancer tissue suggested that rs2707765 affects APC expression, which in turn is correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. This study identifies the influence of inherited variants in the Wnt pathway on the efficacy of ADT and highlights a preclinical rationale for using APC as a prognostic marker in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27898031

  8. Modeling strategy to identify patients with primary immunodeficiency utilizing risk management and outcome measurement.

    PubMed

    Modell, Vicki; Quinn, Jessica; Ginsberg, Grant; Gladue, Ron; Orange, Jordan; Modell, Fred

    2017-02-21

    This study seeks to generate analytic insights into risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. The Jeffrey Modell Centers Network database, Jeffrey Modell Foundation's 10 Warning Signs, the 4 Stages of Testing Algorithm, physician-reported clinical outcomes, programs of physician education and public awareness, the SPIRIT® Analyzer, and newborn screening, taken together, generates P values of less than 0.05%. This indicates that the data results do not occur by chance, and that there is a better than 95% probability that the data are valid. The objectives are to improve patients' quality of life, while generating significant reduction of costs. The advances of the world's experts aligned with these JMF programs can generate analytic insights as to risk management and probability of an identifiable primary immunodeficiency defect. This strategy reduces the uncertainties related to primary immunodeficiency risks, as we can screen, test, identify, and treat undiagnosed patients. We can also address regional differences and prevalence, age, gender, treatment modalities, and sites of care, as well as economic benefits. These tools support high net benefits, substantial financial savings, and significant reduction of costs. All stakeholders, including patients, clinicians, pharmaceutical companies, third party payers, and government healthcare agencies, must address the earliest possible precise diagnosis, appropriate intervention and treatment, as well as stringent control of healthcare costs through risk assessment and outcome measurement. An affected patient is entitled to nothing less, and stakeholders are responsible to utilize tools currently available. Implementation offers a significant challenge to the entire primary immunodeficiency community.

  9. Rotator Cuff Repair in Patients over 75 Years of Age: Clinical Outcome and Repair Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Gwan; Cho, Nam Su; Song, Jong Hoon; Baek, Jong Hun; Jeong, Ho Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have shown significant functional improvement after rotator cuff (RC) repair in elderly patients. However, few studies have reported the healing potential of RC tears in elderly patients. Methods Twenty-five patients aged ≥ 75 years who underwent RC repair were enrolled. The mean age at the time of surgery was 78.3 years (range, 75 to 88 years) while the mean follow-up was 36.3 months (range, 18 to 114 months). We evaluated clinical and structural outcomes after RC repair in the retear and healed groups. Results Of 25 patients, 16 (64%) had healed RC lesions and 9 (36%) had retorn cuff lesions. The retear rate increased significantly with increasing initial tear size (small to medium, 13%; large, 60%; massive, 80%; p = 0.024) but not with increasing age (p = 0.072). The mean visual analog scale (VAS), University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), and Constant scores significantly improved from 5.2, 15.8, and 49.3 preoperatively to 1.4, 31.1, and 71.9 in the healed group and from 6.0, 14.4, and 39.5 preoperatively to 2.4, 28.3, and 63.6 in the retear group at the final follow-up (p < 0.05, respectively). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 groups at the final follow-up. Retear was significantly correlated with initial tear size (p = 0.001; odds ratio [OR], 2.771; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.394 to 5.509 for large to massive tears) (p = 0.001; OR, 0.183; 95% CI, 0.048 to 0.692 for small to medium tears). Conclusions There were significant improvements in clinical outcomes after RC repair in patients ≥ 75 years. Structural integrity after cuff repair did not affect the final clinical outcome. Even in elderly patients aged ≥ 75 years, healing of repaired RC can be expected in cases of small to medium tears. Although the retear rate was relatively high for large to massive tears, clinical outcomes still showed significant improvement. PMID:27904725

  10. Clinical Outcomes of 174 Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients With Radiation-Induced Temporal Lobe Necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Tai-Chung; Wong, Frank C.S.; Leung, To-Wai; Ng, S.H.; Tung, Stewart Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively study the clinical outcomes of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients with radiation-induced temporal lobe necrosis (TLN) treated with steroids, surgery, or observation only. Methods and Patients: We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 consecutive patients diagnosed with TLN between 1990 and 2008. Before 1998, symptomatic patients were treated with oral steroids, while asymptomatic patients were treated conservatively. After 1998, most symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with a large volume of necrosis were treated by intravenously pulsed-steroid therapy with a standardized protocol. We examined factors affecting grade 4 complication-free survival and overall survival. Outcomes of the three treatment groups, those receiving conservative treatment, those receiving oral steroid, and those receiving intravenous pulse steroid, were compared. Results: The mean follow-up time was 115 months. Rates of grade 4 complication-free survival at 2 years and at 5 years after diagnosis of TLN were 72.2% and 54.1%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 57.5% and 35.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that being symptomatic at diagnosis (relative risk [RR], 4.5; p = 0.0001), re-irradiation of the nasopharynx (NP) (RR, 1.56; p = 0.008), salvage brachytherapy to the NP (RR, 1.75; p = 0.012), and a short latency period before the diagnosis of TLN (RR, 0.96, p < 0.0001) were independent prognosticators of poor grade 4 complication-free survival. Patients with all four factors had a 100% risk of developing grade 4 complications within 5 years; whereas if no factor was present, the risk was 12.5%. Intravenous pulse steroid therapy was associated with a higher clinical response rate compared with conventional steroid therapy (p < 0.0001); however, it did not affect complication-free survival in multivariate analysis. Conclusions: TLN patients with good prognosticators could be observed without active treatment. Although

  11. Usefulness of Serum Triiodothyronine (T3) to Predict Outcomes in Patients Hospitalized With Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Rothberger, Gary D; Gadhvi, Sonya; Michelakis, Nickolaos; Kumar, Amit; Calixte, Rose; Shapiro, Lawrence E

    2017-02-15

    Thyroid hormone plays an important role in cardiac function. Low levels of serum triiodothyronine (T3) due to nonthyroidal illness syndrome may have adverse effects in heart failure (HF). This study was designed to assess the ability of T3 to predict in-hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF. In total, 137 patients without thyroid disease or treatment with drugs which affect TH levels, who were hospitalized with acute HF were prospectively enrolled and studied. TH levels were tested upon hospital admission, and outcomes were compared between patients with low (<2.3 pg/ml) and normal (≥2.3 pg/ml) free T3 levels as well as between those with low (<0.6 ng/ml) and normal (≥0.6 ng/ml) total T3 levels. Low free T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and higher rates of intensive care unit admission (31.8% vs 16.9%, p = 0.047), with a trend toward increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.0% vs 1.4%, p = 0.056). Low total T3 correlated with an increased length of stay in the hospital (median 11 vs 7 days, p <0.001) and increased need for invasive mechanical ventilation (9.8% vs 1.3%, p = 0.045). In conclusion, low T3 predicts worse hospital outcomes in patients with acute HF and can be useful in the risk stratification of these patients.

  12. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  13. Sexual outcome of patients undergoing thulium laser enucleation of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Carmignani, Luca; Bozzini, Giorgio; Macchi, Alberto; Maruccia, Serena; Picozzi, Stefano; Casellato, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect the quality of sexual function and ejaculation. The effect of new surgical procedures, which are currently available to treat BPH, on erection and ejaculation, has been poorly studied. This study aimed to assess the effect of thulium laser enucleation of the prostate (ThuLEP) on sexual function and retrograde ejaculation in patients with LUTS secondary to BPH. We performed a prospective study in 110 consecutive patients who had undergone ThuLEP to analyze changes in sexual function and urinary symptoms. To evaluate changes in erection and ejaculation, and the effect of urinary symptoms on the quality of life (QoL), five validated questionnaires were used: the ICIQ-MLUTSsex, MSHQ-EjD, International Index of Erectile Function 5, International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) questionnaire, and QoL index of the intraclass correlation coefficients. Patients also underwent IPSS and flowmetry to assess the outcome of flow. Patients were evaluated before surgery and 3-6 months after ThuLEP, whereas those with previous abdominal surgery were excluded. The patients' mean age was 67.83 years. Postoperative urinary symptoms improved after surgery. No significant differences in erectile function before and after surgery were observed. As compared with other techniques described in the literature, the percentage of patients with conserved ejaculation increased by 52.7% after ThuLEP. ThuLEP positively affects urinary symptoms and their effect on the QoL of patients as assessed by questionnaire scores. While endoscopic management of BPH (e.g. transurethral resection of the prostate) causes retrograde ejaculation in most patients, those who undergo ThuLEP have conserved ejaculation and erectile function.

  14. Written and computerized care plans. Organizational processes and effect on patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M; Buckwalter, Kathleen; Maas, Meridean

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how use of a standardized nomenclature for nursing diagnosis and intervention statements on the computerized nursing care plan in a long-term care (LTC) facility would affect patient outcomes, as well as organizational processes and outcomes. An experimental design was used to compare the effects of two methods of documentation: Computer care plan and paper care plan. Twenty participants (10 in each group) were randomly assigned to either group. No statistically significant differences were found by group for demographic data. Repeated measures ANOVA was computed for each of the study variables with type of care plan, written or computerized, as the independent variable. There were no statistically significant differences between participants, group (care plan), within subjects (across time), or interaction (group and time) effects for the dependent variables: Level of care, activities of daily living, perception of pain, cognitive abilities, number of medications, number of bowel medications, number of constipation episodes, weight, percent of meals eaten, and incidence of alteration in skin integrity. There were significantly more nursing interventions and activities on the computerized care plan, although this care plan took longer to develop at each of the three time periods. Results from this study suggest that use of a computerized plan of care increases the number of documented nursing activities and interventions, but further research is warranted to determine if this potential advantage can be translated into improved patient and organizational outcomes in the long-term care setting.

  15. Variable gene dispersal conditions and spatial deforestation patterns can interact to affect tropical tree conservation outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with 'Near' distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  16. Variable Gene Dispersal Conditions and Spatial Deforestation Patterns Can Interact to Affect Tropical Tree Conservation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kashimshetty, Yamini; Pelikan, Stephan; Rogstad, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Tropical lowland rain forest (TLRF) biodiversity is under threat from anthropogenic factors including deforestation which creates forest fragments of different sizes that can further undergo various internal patterns of logging. Such interventions can modify previous equilibrium abundance and spatial distribution patterns of offspring recruitment and/or pollen dispersal. Little is known about how these aspects of deforestation and fragmentation might synergistically affect TLRF tree recovery demographics and population genetics in newly formed forest fragments. To investigate these TLRF anthropogenic disturbance processes we used the computer program NEWGARDEN (NG), which models spatially-explicit, individual-based plant populations, to simulate 10% deforestation in six different spatial logging patterns for the plant functional type of a long-lived TLRF canopy tree species. Further, each logging pattern was analyzed under nine varying patterns of offspring versus pollen dispersal distances that could have arisen post-fragmentation. Results indicated that gene dispersal condition (especially via offspring) had a greater effect on population growth and genetic diversity retention (explaining 98.5% and 88.8% of the variance respectively) than spatial logging pattern (0.2% and 4.7% respectively), with ‘Near’ distance dispersal maximizing population growth and genetic diversity relative to distant dispersal. Within logged regions of the fragment, deforestation patterns closer to fragment borders more often exhibited lower population recovery rates and founding genetic diversity retention relative to more centrally located logging. These results suggest newly isolated fragments have populations that are more sensitive to the way in which their offspring and pollen dispersers are affected than the spatial pattern in which subsequent logging occurs, and that large variation in the recovery rates of different TLRF tree species attributable to altered gene dispersal

  17. Involvement of endocrine system in a patient affected by glycogen storage disease 1b: speculation on the role of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Melis, Daniela; Della Casa, Roberto; Balivo, Francesca; Minopoli, Giorgia; Rossi, Alessandro; Salerno, Mariacarolina; Andria, Generoso; Parenti, Giancarlo

    2014-03-19

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is an inherited metabolic defect of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis due to mutations of the SLC37A4 gene and to defective transport of glucose-6-phosphate. The clinical presentation of GSD1b is characterized by hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, fasting hypoglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Patients affected by GSD1b also show neutropenia and/or neutrophil dysfunction that cause increased susceptibility to recurrent bacterial infections. GSD1b patients are also at risk for inflammatory bowel disease. Occasional reports suggesting an increased risk of autoimmune disorders in GSD1b patients, have been published. These complications affect the clinical outcome of the patients. Here we describe the occurrence of autoimmune endocrine disorders including thyroiditis and growth hormone deficiency, in a patient affected by GSD1b. This case further supports the association between GSD1b and autoimmune diseases.

  18. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients.

  19. Collaboration Between Surgeons and Medical Oncologists and Outcomes for Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Veenstra, Christine M.; Pollack, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Collaboration between specialists is essential for achieving high-value care in patients with complex cancer needs. We explore how collaboration between oncologists and surgeons affects mortality and cost for patients requiring multispecialty cancer care. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with stage III colon cancer from SEER-Medicare diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Patients were assigned to a primary treating surgeon and oncologist. Collaboration between surgeon and oncologist was measured as the number of patients shared between them; this has been shown to reflect advice seeking and referral relationships between physicians. Outcomes included hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazards for colon cancer–specific mortality, and cost of care at 12 months. Results: A total of 9,329 patients received care from 3,623 different surgeons and 2,319 medical oncologists, representing 6,827 unique surgeon–medical oncologist pairs. As the number of patients shared between specialists increased from to one to five (25th to 75th percentile), patients experienced an approximately 20% improved survival benefit from all-cause and colon cancer–specific mortalities. Specifically, for each additional patient shared between oncologist and surgeon, all-cause mortality improved by 5% (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.92 to 0.97), and colon cancer–specific mortality improved by 5% (subhazard ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.97). There was no association with cost. Conclusion: Specialist collaboration is associated with lower mortality without increased cost among patients with stage III colon cancer. Facilitating formal and informal collaboration between specialists may be an important strategy for improving the care of patients with complex cancers. PMID:25873063

  20. Long-term clinical outcomes of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and concomitant coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Spartera, Marco; Godino, Cosmo; Baldissera, Elena; Campochiaro, Corrado; La Spina, Ketty; Aiello, Patrizia; Salerno, Anna; Cera, Michela; Magni, Valeria; Jabbour, Richard J; Dagna, Lorenzo; Tresoldi, Moreno; Cappelletti, Alberto; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Margonato, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with high morbidity and mortality predominately due to increased cardiovascular risk. Few reports are available regarding the management of coronary artery disease (CAD) in RA patients and the long-term clinical outcomes after coronary revascularization. Methods and results: All consecutive patients with RA were identified by retrospective review at a rheumatology tertiary center in Milan, Italy between 2001 and 2013. RA patients affected by significant CAD (RA-CAD+) were prospectively followed for major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) after percutaneous coronary revascularization (RA-PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting (RA-CABG) or medical therapy (RA-MT). Among 936 patients with RA, the presence of clinically significant CAD was found in 5.6% (53 patients, RA-CAD+). Of these, 32 patients (60%) underwent PCI (RA-PCI), 10 patients (19%) underwent CABG (RA-CABG) and 11 patients (21%) treated with MT (RA-MT). After a mean follow-up of 9±7 years, the rate of MACCE was 56% in RA-PCI patients, 50% in RA-CABG and 27% in RA-MT patients (P=0.184). The high MACCE rate was mainly driven by repeat coronary revascularization (47%) in the RA-PCI group and high rate of strokes (30%) in RA-CABG patients. Conclusion: In patients with rheumatoid arthritis and concomitant coronary artery disease (RA-CAD+), we observed at long-term follow-up a high MACCE rate, predominantly in those who underwent coronary revascularization PMID:28337386

  1. Does administering albumin to postoperative gastroschisis patients improve outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina A; Silva, Luanna M; Leal, Antonio José G; de Moraes, Augusto César F; Tannuri, Uenis

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Newborns who undergo surgery for gastroschisis correction may present with oliguria, anasarca, prolonged postoperative ileus, and infection. New postoperative therapeutic procedures were tested with the objective of improving postoperative outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred thirty-six newborns participated in one of two phases. Newborns in the first phase received infusions of large volumes of crystalloid solution and integral enteral formula, and newborns in the second phase received crystalloid solutions in smaller volumes, with albumin solution infusion when necessary and the late introduction of a semi-elemental diet. The studied variables were serum sodium and albumin levels, the need for albumin solution expansion, the occurrence of anasarca, the length of time on parenteral nutrition, the length of time before initiating an enteral diet and reaching a full enteral diet, orotracheal intubation time, length of hospitalization, and survival rates. RESULTS: Serum sodium levels were higher in newborns in the second phase. There was a correlation between low serum sodium levels and orotracheal intubation time; additionally, low serum albumin levels correlated with the length of time before the initiation of an oral diet and the time until a full enteral diet was reached. However, the discharge weights of newborns in the second phase were higher than in the first phase. The other studied variables, including survival rates (83.4% and 92.0%, respectively), were similar for both phases. CONCLUSIONS: The administration of an albumin solution to newborns in the early postoperative period following gastroschisis repair increased their low serum sodium levels but did not improve the final outcome. The introduction of a semi-elemental diet promoted an increase in body weight at the time of discharge. PMID:22358234

  2. Impact of Polypharmacy on the Rehabilitation Outcome of Japanese Stroke Patients in the Convalescent Rehabilitation Ward

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Riku; Okazoe, Susumu; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background. A risk factor associated with stroke onset is chronic kidney disease (CKD). To prevent stroke reoccurrence, it is necessary to strictly manage blood pressure, lipids, and plasma glucose. Therefore, some cases are forced to polypharmacy, elderly patients in particular. Polypharmacy often leads to adverse drug reactions and has the potential to negatively affect the rehabilitation of stroke patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of polypharmacy using a functional independence measure (FIM). Methods. A total of 144 stroke patients with CKD were included in the present analysis. We divided stroke patients into those taking six or more drugs (polypharmacy group) and those taking less than six drugs (nonpolypharmacy group) upon admission. Patient background features, laboratory data, and FIM scores were compared. Results. FIM-Motor (FIM-M) efficiency, age, and diabetes mellitus were positively associated with polypharmacy. FIM-M efficiency in the polypharmacy group was significantly lower than in the nonpolypharmacy group. Conclusion. Polypharmacy interferes with the effect of rehabilitation in stroke patients with CKD. Pharmacists and doctors should make efforts to optimize medications to be able to respond to the outcome of each patient. PMID:28042484

  3. Deletion of PLCB1 gene in schizophrenia-affected patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Cardinale, Giuseppina; Polonia, Patrizia

    2012-04-01

    A prevalence of 1% in the general population and approximately 50% concordance rate in monozygotic twins was reported for schizophrenia, suggesting that genetic predisposition affecting neurodevelopmental processes might combine with environmental risk factors. A multitude of pathways seems to be involved in the aetiology and/or pathogenesis of schizophrenia, including dopaminergic, serotoninergic, muscarinic and glutamatergic signalling. The phosphoinositide signal transduction system and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes seem to represent a point of convergence in these networking pathways during the development of selected brain regions. The existence of a susceptibility locus on the short arm of chromosome 20 moved us to analyse PLCB1, the gene codifying for PI-PLC β1 enzyme, which maps on 20p12. By using interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization methodology, we found deletions of PLCB1 in orbito-frontal cortex samples of schizophrenia-affected patients.

  4. Deletion of PLCB1 gene in schizophrenia-affected patients

    PubMed Central

    Vasco, Vincenza Rita Lo; Cardinale, Giuseppina; Polonia, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A prevalence of 1% in the general population and approximately 50% concordance rate in monozygotic twins was reported for schizophrenia, suggesting that genetic predisposition affecting neurodevelopmental processes might combine with environmental risk factors. A multitude of pathways seems to be involved in the aetiology and/or pathogenesis of schizophrenia, including dopaminergic, serotoninergic, muscarinic and glutamatergic signalling. The phosphoinositide signal transduction system and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes seem to represent a point of convergence in these networking pathways during the development of selected brain regions. The existence of a susceptibility locus on the short arm of chromosome 20 moved us to analyse PLCB1, the gene codifying for PI-PLC β1 enzyme, which maps on 20p12. By using interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization methodology, we found deletions of PLCB1 in orbito-frontal cortex samples of schizophrenia-affected patients. PMID:22507702

  5. Perceptions of Intragroup Rejection and Coping Strategies: Malleable Factors Affecting Hispanic Adolescents’ Emotional and Academic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Michael T.; Crano, William D.; Unger, Jennifer B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding psychosocial factors that affect the academic achievement of Hispanic adolescents remains a nationwide priority in the United States. Extending previous studies of the stressful effects of perceived discrimination, this year-long longitudinal study examined the correlates of perceived ethnic in-group rejection, coping strategies and fatalistic beliefs, on depressive symptoms, grades, and college aspirations of 2,214 Hispanic adolescents (54 % female) in Southern California. Based on the transactional model of stress and coping and on self-perception theory, structural equation models revealed that high perceived intragroup rejection (10th grade) and low levels of active coping (11th grade) were associated with depressive symptoms in 11th grade. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the link between intragroup rejection and both academic outcomes. Avoidant coping strategies (e.g., watching TV) also predicted depressive symptoms and were positively related to fatalism. In addition, fatalism was negatively related to grades and aspiration to attend college. The findings suggest the need to help adolescents find adequate outlets for communication and to create awareness about the potential effects of intragroup rejection. PMID:24234042

  6. Selecting networks of nature reserves: methods do affect the long-term outcome

    PubMed Central

    Virolainen, K. M.; Virola, T.; Suhonen, J.; Kuitunen, M.; Lammi, A.; ki, P. Siikam

    1999-01-01

    Data on vascular plants of boreal lakes in Finland were used to compare the efficiency of reserve selection methods in representing four aspects of biodiversity over a 63 year period. These aspects included species richness, phylogenetic diversity, restricted range diversity and threatened species. Our results show that the efficiency of reserve selection methods depends on the selection criteria used and on the aspect of biodiversity under consideration. Heuristic methods and optimizing algorithms were nearly equally efficient in selecting lake networks over a small geographical range. In addition, a scoring procedure was observed to be efficient in maintaining different aspects of biodiversity over time. However, the random selection of lakes seems to be the most inefficient option for a reserve network. In general, reserve selection methods seem to favour lakes that maximize one aspect of diversity at the time of selection, but the network may not be the best option for maintaining the maximum diversity over time. The reserve selection methods do affect the long-term outcome but it is impossible to recommend one method over the others unequivocally.

  7. Patient-based Outcomes and Quality of Life after Salvageable Wartime Extremity Vascular Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    From the Peripheral Vascular Surgery Society Patient -based outcomes and quality of life after salvageable wartime extremity vascular injury Daniel J...Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey administered after patient contact and consent. Demographic, injury, and management variables...study reports the first long-term patient -centered outcomes data after wartime EVI. At 5 years after injury, quality-of-life measures are reduced

  8. Effects of nursing care and staff skill mix on patient outcomes within acute care nursing units.

    PubMed

    Hart, Patricia; Davis, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study that evaluates the relationships between staffing indicators and patient outcomes at the hospital unit level. Nursing administrators should not only evaluate the impact staffing decisions have on patient outcomes at the hospital level but also examine these relationships at the unit level. The findings from this study have implications for nursing practice in the areas of staff orientation, education, and patient outcome monitoring.

  9. Speech Outcome in Oral Cancer Patients – Pre- and Post-operative Evaluation: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Saravanan, Gomathi; Ranganathan, Venkatesan; Gandhi, Anitha; Jaya, V

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The tongue plays a major role in articulation. Speech outcome depends on the site of lesion, extent of resection, and flexibility of the remaining structures. The aim of this study is to evaluate the speech outcome measures such as sounds that are misarticulated and speech intelligibility and its connection to tumor site before and after surgery. Methodology: Totally, 24 (12 pre- and 12 post-operative patients) patients who had buccal and tongue cancer underwent speech intelligibility rating and articulation screening. Result: The results show that the speech outcome is worse in postoperative patients when compared to preoperative patients. The articulation errors produced by tongue cancer patients were more than the errors produced in buccal cancer patients. The type of reconstruction also affects the speech outcome. Conclusion: The perceptual analysis of oral cancer patients showed specific articulation issues and reduced intelligibility of speech in regards to site of lesion and type of reconstruction surgery. To reduce the speech errors, effective rehabilitation is recommended. A comprehensive speech evaluation and analysis of error patterns would help us in planning the rehabilitative measures of speech which is the most important factor in re-establishing interpersonal communication and well-being of the individual. PMID:27803574

  10. Superior outcomes in HIV-positive kidney transplant patients compared with HCV-infected or HIV/HCV-coinfected recipients.

    PubMed

    Sawinski, Deirdre; Forde, Kimberly A; Eddinger, Kevin; Troxel, Andrea B; Blumberg, Emily; Tebas, Pablo; Abt, Peter L; Bloom, Roy D

    2015-08-01

    The prerequisite for an 'undetectable' HIV viral load has restricted access to transplantation for HIV-infected kidney recipients. However, HCV-infected recipients, owing to the historic limitations of HCV therapy in patients with renal disease, are commonly viremic at transplant and have universal access. To compare the effect of HIV, HCV, and HIV/HCV coinfection on kidney transplant patient and allograft outcomes, we performed a retrospective study of kidney recipients transplanted from January 1996 through December 2013. In multivariable analysis, patient (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.66-1.24) and allograft survival (0.60, 40-0.88) in 492 HIV patients did not differ significantly from the 117,791 patient-uninfected reference group. This was superior to outcomes in both the 5605 patient HCV group for death (1.44, 1.33-1.56) and graft loss (1.43, 1.31-1.56), as well as the 147 patient HIV/HCV coinfected group for death (2.26, 1.45-3.52) and graft loss (2.59, 1.60-4.19). HIV infection did not adversely affect recipient or allograft survival and was associated with superior outcomes compared with both HCV infection and HIV/HCV coinfection in this population. Thus, pretransplant viral eradication and/or immediate posttransplant eradication should be studied as potential strategies to improve posttransplant outcomes in HCV-infected kidney recipients.

  11. Patient Expectations and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Jennifer; McGlinn, Evan P.; Sears, Erika Davis; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent events in healthcare reform have brought national attention to integrating patient experiences and expectations into quality metrics. Few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effect of patient expectations on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) following surgery. The purpose of this study is to systematically review the available literature describing the relationship between patient expectations and postoperative PROs. Methods We performed a search of the literature published prior to November 1, 2012. Articles were included in the review if 1) primary data were presented 2) patient expectations regarding a surgical procedure were measured 3) PROs were measured, and 4) the relationship between patient expectations and PROs was specifically examined. PROs were categorized into five subgroups: satisfaction, quality of life (QOL), disability, mood disorder, and pain. We examined each study to determine the relationship between patient expectations and PROs as well as study quality. Results From the initial literature search yielding 1,708 studies, 60 articles were included. Fulfillment of expectations was associated with improved PROs among 24 studies. Positive expectations were correlated with improved PROs for 28 (47%) studies, and poorer PROs for 9 (15%) studies. Eighteen studies reported that fulfillment of expectations was correlated with improved patient satisfaction, and 10 studies identified that positive expectations were correlated with improved postoperative QOL. Finally, patients with positive preoperative expectations reported less pain (8 studies) and disability (15 studies) compared with patients with negative preoperative expectations. Conclusions Patient expectations are inconsistently correlated with PROs following surgery, and there is no accepted method to capture perioperative expectations. Future efforts to rigorously measure expectations and explore their influence on postoperative outcomes can inform clinicians and policy

  12. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions.

  13. Endocrinological disorders affecting neurosurgical patients: An intensivists perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Haldar, Rudrashish

    2014-01-01

    Management of critically ill neurosurgical patients is often complicated by the presence or development of endocrinological ailments which complicate the clinical scenario and adversely affect the prognosis of these patients. The anatomical proximity to the vital centers regulating the endocrinological physiology and alteration in the neurotransmitter release causes disturbances in the hormonal homeostasis. This paves the way for development of diverse disorders where single or multiple hormones may be involved which can have deleterious effect on the different organ system. Understanding and awareness of these disorders is important for the treating intensivist to recognize these changes early in their course, so that appropriate and timely therapeutic measures can be initiated along with the treatment of the primary malady. PMID:25364671

  14. Myofunctional therapy in patients with orofacial dysfunctions affecting speech.

    PubMed

    Bigenzahn, W; Fischman, L; Mayrhofer-Krammel, U

    1992-01-01

    Tongue thrusting, deviate swallowing, mouth breathing, orofacial muscle imbalance, deviate mandibular movement and malocclusion are the most important orofacial dysfunctions underlying disorders of articulation. Their development is linked to early bottle feeding and sucking habits. The phoniatrician is charged with the early detection of orofacial dysfunctions affecting speech. Early correction of habits and retraining by speech therapy are important preventive measures. Case histories, phoniatric and myofunctional diagnoses and dental/orthodontic findings were compiled for a total of 103 patients aged 3-30 years (11 +/- 4 years). Forty-five patients have completed a regimen of myofunctional therapy. For these patients highly significant improvements in lip strength, lip closure, breathing and tongue placement as well as in the swallowing pattern and orofacial muscle balance have been observed. Concomitantly, two thirds of the patients (66%) attained normal articulation. Speech defects were resistant to therapy in only 2 cases. In dental/orthodontic practice myofunctional therapy is used for retraining abnormal positions and functions of the orofacial muscles so as to create a normal occlusal relationship. The results of this study show that myofunctional therapy is highly instrumental also in phoniatrics as a special form of treatment for disorders of articulation.

  15. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways.

    PubMed

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-11-29

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene-environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4(+) T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell-related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome.

  16. Epipolymorphisms associated with the clinical outcome of autoimmune arthritis affect CD4+ T cell activation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Roberto; Rossetti, Maura; Whitaker, John W.; Wang, Wei; Lovell, Daniel J.; Albani, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial diseases, including autoimmune juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), result from a complex interplay between genetics and environment. Epigenetic mechanisms are believed to integrate such gene–environment interactions, fine-tuning gene expression, and possibly contributing to immune system dysregulation. Although anti-TNF therapy has strongly increased JIA remission rates, it is not curative and up to 80% of patients flare upon treatment withdrawal. Thus, a crucial unmet medical and scientific need is to understand the immunological mechanisms associated with remission or flare to inform clinical decisions. Here, we explored the CD4+ T-cell DNA methylome of 68 poly-articular and extended oligo-articular JIA patients, before and after anti-TNF therapy withdrawal, to identify features associated with maintenance of inactive disease. Individual CpG sites were clustered in coherent modules without a priori knowledge of their function through network analysis. The methylation level of several CpG modules, specifically those enriched in CpG sites belonging to genes that mediate T-cell activation, uniquely correlated with clinical activity. Differences in DNA methylation were already detectable at the time of therapy discontinuation, suggesting epigenetic predisposition. RNA profiling also detected differences in T-cell activation markers (including HLA-DR) but, overall, its sensitivity was lower than epigenetic profiling. Changes to the T-cell activation signature at the protein level were detectable by flow cytometry, confirming the biological relevance of the observed alterations in methylation. Our work proposes epigenetic discrimination between clinical activity states, and reveals T-cell–related biological functions tied to, and possibly predicting or causing, clinical outcome. PMID:27849614

  17. The effect of demographics and patient location on the outcome of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El-Haddad, Haitham; Jang, Hyejeong; Chen, Wei; Haider, Samran; Soubani, Ayman O.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Outcome of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in relation to age, gender, race, pre-Intensive Care Unit (ICU) location, and type of ICU. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study of patients enrolled in the ARDS network randomized controlled trials. RESULTS: A total of 2914 patients were included in these trials. Outcomes were adjusted to baseline covariates including APACHE III score, vasopressor use, cause of lung injury, lung injury score, diabetes, cancer status, body mass index, and study ID. Older patients had significantly higher mortality at both 28- and 60-day (odds ratio [OR] 2.59 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.12–3.18] P < 0.001 and 2.79, 95% CI: 2.29–3.39, P < 0.001, respectively); less ICU and ventilator free days (relative risk [RR] 0.92, 95% CI: 0.87–0.96, P < 0.001 and 0.92, 95% CI: 0.88–0.96, P < 0.001, respectively). For preadmission location, the 28- and 60-day mortality were lower if the patient was admitted from the operating room (OR)/recovery room (OR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44–0.95, P = 0.026; and OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.46–0.95, P = 0.025, respectively) or emergency department (OR = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.61–0.99, P = 0.039; and OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56–0.89, P = 0.004, respectively), but no statistical differences in ICU and ventilator free days between different preadmission locations. Races other than white and black had a statistically higher mortality (28- and 60-day mortality: OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.09–1.98, P = 0.011; and OR 1.53, 95% CI: 1.15–2.04, P = 0.004, respectively). Between whites and blacks, females and males there were no statistically significant differences in all outcomes. CONCLUSION: Older patients and races other than blacks and whites have higher mortality associated with ARDS. Mortality is affected by patients preadmission location. There are no differences in outcome in relation to the type of ICU, gender, or between blacks and whites. PMID:28197217

  18. Does varicocelectomy affect DNA fragmentation in infertile patients?

    PubMed Central

    Telli, Onur; Sarici, Hasmet; Kabar, Mucahit; Ozgur, Berat Cem; Resorlu, Berkan; Bozkurt, Selen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of varicocelectomy on DNA fragmentation index and semen parameters in infertile patients before and after surgical repair of varicocele. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 72 men with at least 1-year history of infertility, varicocele and oligospermia were examined. Varicocele sperm samples were classified as normal or pathological according to the 2010 World Health Organization guidelines. The acridine orange test was used to assess the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: DFI decreased significantly after varicocelectomy from 34.5% to 28.2% (P = 0.024). In addition all sperm parameters such as mean sperm count, sperm concentration, progressive motility and sperm morphology significantly increased from 19.5 × 106 to 30.7 × 106, 5.4 × 106/ml to 14.3 × 106/ml, and 19.9% to 31.2% (P < 0.001) and 2.6% to 3.1% (P = 0.017). The study was limited by the loss to follow-up of some patients and unrecorded pregnancy outcome due to short follow-up. Conclusion: Varicocele causes DNA-damage in spermatozoa. We suggest that varicocelectomy improves sperm parameters and decreases DFI. PMID:25878412

  19. Improving outcomes in hypertensive patients: focus on adherence and persistence with antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2009-07-01

    Although effective control of blood pressure (BP) reduces the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension, BP control rates among treated patients in actual clinical practice are less than optimal. Although the costs of medicines and medical care (which are difficult to estimate both in clinical trials and general clinical practice) are important, medication-taking behavior--adherence and persistence with antihypertensive regimens--influences BP control rates. Many factors affect adherence and persistence with medications, including efficacy and tolerability of drugs prescribed, such that rates vary greatly among antihypertensive classes. In general, medications with fewer adverse effects (in registration trials or large outcomes studies) are associated with increased adherence and lower discontinuation rates. More widespread use of such agents, particularly those available in generic formulations or in low-cost formularies, may lead to better long-term BP control and fewer cardiovascular events.

  20. The quality and economic impact of disruptive behaviors on clinical outcomes of patient care.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2011-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors have been shown to have a negative impact on work relationships, team collaboration, communication efficiency, and process flow, all of which can adversely affect patient safety and quality of care. Despite the growing recognition of the damage that can be done, there are still pockets of resistance to taking action to address the issue head-on. Given the new call to action from the Joint Commission accreditation standard and the growing public accountability for patient safety, organizations need to recognize the full impact of disruptive behaviors and implement appropriate policies, procedures, and educational programs to raise levels of awareness regarding the seriousness of the issue, hold individuals accountable for their behavior, and provide training and support not only to reduce the incidence and consequences of disruptive events but also to improve efficiency of communication and team collaboration in an effort to improve outcomes of care.

  1. Do Physical Symptoms Predict the Outcome of Surgical Fusion in Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with discogenic low back pain (DLBP). Overview of Literature Specific diagnosis of DLBP remains difficult. Worsening of pain on flexion is a reported symptom of DLBP. This study sought to determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with DLBP. Methods We investigated 127 patients with low back pain (LBP) and no dominant radicular pain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to select patients with disc degeneration at only one level. If pain was provoked during discography, we performed fusion surgery (87 patients). Visual analogue scale score and responses to a questionnaire regarding symptoms including worsening of pain on flexion or extension were assessed. Symptom sites before surgery were categorized into LBP alone, or LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain. We followed 77 patients (average 3.0 years) and compared symptoms before surgery with surgical outcome. Results Sixty-three patients with a good outcome showed postsurgical pain relief (≥60% pain relief) and 14 patients with a poor outcome did not (<60% pain relief). In patients with good outcomes, worsening of LBP was evident in 65% of cases on flexion and in 35% on extension. However, these findings were not significantly different from those in patients with poor outcomes. The percentage of patients with LBP alone was significantly lower and the percentage of patients with LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain was significantly higher in the group with good surgical outcome compared with patients in the group with poor surgical outcome (p<0.05). Conclusions Worsening of pain on extension may be a symptom of DLBP. Surgical outcomes were superior in patients with both LBP and either referred inguinal or leg pain compared with those having LBP alone. PMID:27340531

  2. Treatment outcome in patients with TMD--a survey of 123 patients referred to specialist care.

    PubMed

    Polso, Hanna-Leena; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune M

    2010-07-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are a group of functional disorders of the masticatory system. Signs and symptoms of TMD are very common in different age groups in both genders. Treatment need varies greatly, ranging from 5 to 27% of the population. The treatment of TMD patients is generally initiated using reversible conservative methods and if necessary, irreversible and surgical methods are used. Altogether 123 patients (93 females, 30 males, mean age 39 years, range 12 to 72 years) were referred to the Oral and Maxillofacial Department of Oulu University Hospital between the years 2005 and 2008. The treatment outcome was evaluated using the anamnestic and clinical dysfunction indices of Helkimo, before and after treatment. The results of the study showed that the outcome of the conservative treatment methods of TMD and of surgical treatment, if needed, was beneficial, with a subjectively and clinically statistically significant decrease in signs and symptoms.

  3. Impact of Radiotherapy on Fertility, Pregnancy, and Neonatal Outcomes in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wo, Jennifer Y.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation has many potential long-term effects on cancer survivors. Female cancer patients may experience decreased fertility depending on the site irradiated. Oncologists should be aware of these consequences and discuss options for fertility preservation before initiating therapy. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive review of the existing literature was conducted. Studies reporting the outcomes for female patients treated with cranio-spinal, abdominal, or pelvic radiation reporting fertility, pregnancy, or neonatal-related outcomes were reviewed. Results: Cranio-spinal irradiation elicited significant hormonal changes in women that affected their ability to become pregnant later in life. Women treated with abdomino-pelvic radiation have an increased rate of uterine dysfunction leading to miscarriage, preterm labor, low birth weight, and placental abnormalities. Early menopause results from low-dose ovarian radiation. Ovarian transposition may decrease the rates of ovarian dysfunction. Conclusions: There is a dose-dependent relationship between ovarian radiation therapy (RT) and premature menopause. Patients treated with RT must be aware of the impact of treatment on fertility and explore appropriate options.

  4. Does Timing of Colon Procedures Affect Outcomes in D-IBS Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Sherrill, Beth; Hamm, Lynne A.; Mangel, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy is usually performed prior to enrollment into clinical trials of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Two main reasons are to rule out alternative diagnoses and to ensure that colitis is not present. However, the possible impact of a recent versus remote colon procedure on symptoms in IBS trials has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of colon procedures on symptoms in IBS trials. Methods Post hoc analyses were conducted using placebo patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS in a phase 2 trial. Pain, frequency, consistency, and urgency were analyzed using repeated measures models during the first 7 days of treatment and over the entire 12-week treatment period. Results Fifty-two placebo patients were grouped by whether they had a colon exam performed between screening and randomization (Group 1) or had a normal colon procedure during the 3 years prior to screening for this trial (Group 2). Average screening symptom scores were comparable between the two groups. Evaluation of various symptoms showed that there were no consistent significant differences between the two groups in pain, frequency, consistency, or urgency. Conclusions After the required 3-day post-procedure recovery period, there was no evidence that colonoscopy timing affected subsequent IBS symptoms. PMID:27956995

  5. Long-term outcomes of infrainguinal bypass surgery for patients with diabetes mellitus and tissue loss

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heekyung; Cho, Jayun; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Kim, Jihye

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and tissue loss who have undergone infrainguinal bypass surgery (IBS). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 91 patients with DM and tissue loss who underwent IBS between July 2003 and December 2013. We determined the rates of overall survival (OS), amputation-free survival (AFS), limb salvage (LS), and graft patency (GP). In addition, we evaluated data to identify risk factors that affected long-term outcomes. Results The mean age of patients was 66 ± 8 years, and 78 patients (85.7%) were men. The locations of tissue loss were toe on 76 limbs (71.6%), heel on 6 limbs (5.7%) and others on 24 limbs (22.6%). Single lesions were found in 81 limbs (76.4%). According to categorization by distal anastomosis artery, there were 57 popliteal (53.8%) and 49 infrapopliteal bypasses (46.2%). Among infrapopliteal bypasses, 5 cases (10.2%) were sequential bypasses. The OS at 1, 3, and 5 years was 90.5%, 70.9%, and 44.2%, respectively. At 1, 3, and 5 years, the LS was 92.1%, 88.9%, 88.9%, respectively; and AFS was 84.4%, 67.6%, 45.7%, respectively. At 1, 3, and 5 years, the GP was 84.8%, 74.5%, and 69.8%, respectively. Renal failure was a negative predictor for OS, and female gender was a negative predictor for GP. Conclusion IBS for patients with DM and tissue loss led to acceptable OS, AFS, LS, and GP. Active revascularization for patients with DM and tissue loss can reduce the risk of major amputation. PMID:25553323

  6. Fighting while Parasitized: Can Nematode Infections Affect the Outcome of Staged Combat in Beetles?

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, David; Willoughby, Anna; Davis, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal parasites may be felt most strongly when hosts engage in intense, energy-demanding behaviors. One such behavior is fighting with conspecifics, which is common among territorial animals, including many beetle species. We examined the effects of parasites on the fighting ability of a saproxylic beetle, the horned passalus (Odontotaenius disjunctus, Family: Passalidae), which is host to a non-lethal nematode, Chondronema passali. We pitted pairs of randomly-chosen (but equally-weighted) beetles against each other in a small arena and determined the winner and aggression level of fights. Then we examined beetles for the presence, and severity of nematode infections. There was a non-significant tendency (p = 0.065) for the frequency of wins, losses and draws to differ between beetles with and without C. passali; non-parasitized individuals (n = 104) won 47% of their fights while those with the parasite (n = 88) won 34%, a 13% difference in wins. The number of nematodes in a beetle affected the outcome of fights between infected and uninfected individuals in an unexpected fashion: fighting ability was lowest in beetles with the lowest (p = 0.033), not highest (p = 0.266), nematode burdens. Within-fight aggression was highest when both beetles were uninfected and lowest when both were infected (p = 0.034). Collectively, these results suggest the nematode parasite, C. passali, is associated with a modest reduction in fighting ability in horned passalus beetles, consistent with the idea that parasitized beetles have lower energy available for fighting. This study adds to a small but growing body of evidence showing how parasites negatively influence fighting behavior in animals. PMID:25830367

  7. The effect of playing a science center-based mobile game: Affective outcomes and gender differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood-Blaine, Dana

    Situated in a hands-on science center, The Great STEM Caper was a collaborative mobile game built on the ARIS platform that was designed to engage 5th-9th grade players in NGSS science and engineering practices while they interacted with various exhibits. Same gender partners sharing one iPad would search for QR codes placed at specific exhibits; scanning a code within the game would launch a challenge for that exhibit. The primary hypothesis was that in- game victories would be equivalent to "mastery experiences" as described by Bandura (1997) and would result in increased science self-efficacy. Gender differences in gameplay behaviors and perceptions were also studied. The study included two groups, one that played the game during their visit and one that explored the science center in the traditional way. The Motivation to Learn Science Questionnaire was administered to participants in both groups both before and after their visit to the science center. Participants wore head-mounted GoPro cameras to record their interactions within the physical and social environment. No differences in affective outcomes were found between the game and comparison groups or between boys and girls in the game group. The MLSQ was unable to measure any significant change in science self-efficacy, interest and enjoyment of science, or overall motivation to learn science in either group. However, girls outperformed boys on every measure of game achievement. Lazzaro's (2004) four types of fun were found to be a good fit for describing the gender differences in game perceptions and behaviors. Girls tended to enjoy hard fun and collaborative people fun while boys enjoyed easy fun and competitive people fun. While boys associated game achievement with enjoyment and victory, girls perceived their game achievement as difficult, rather than enjoyable or victorious.

  8. WT1 overexpression affecting clinical outcome in non-hodgkin lymphomas and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ujj, Zsófia; Buglyó, Gergely; Udvardy, Miklós; Vargha, György; Biró, Sándor; Rejtő, László

    2014-07-01

    The Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene has a complex role as a transcriptional regulator, acting as tumor suppressor or oncogene in different malignancies. The prognostic role of its overexpression has been well-studied in leukemias, especially acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but not in lymphomas. For the first time to our knowledge, we present a study demonstrating the correlation of WT1 expression and survival in various non-Hodgkin lymphomas. We also studied the prognostic implications of WT1 overexpression in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In our sample of 53 patients--25 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 8 with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), 9 with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), 2 with Burkitt's lymphoma, 2 with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and 7 with B-cell ALL--, we measured WT1 mRNA from blood samples by quantitative RT-PCR, and divided the patients into subgroups based on the level of expression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were drawn and compared using the logrank test. In the sample of DLBCL patients, the difference in overall and disease-free survival between WT1-positive and negative subgroups was significant (p = 0.0475 and p = 0.0004, respectively), and in a few observed cases, a sudden increase in WT1 expression signified a relapse soon followed by death. Disease-free survival curves in MCL and ALL were similarly suggestive of a potential role played by WT1. In PTCL, though WT1-positivity was detected in 4 out of 9 cases, it did not seem to affect survival. The few cases of MALT and Burkitt's lymphoma all proved to be WT1-negative.

  9. Life after prostate cancer diagnosis: protocol for a UK-wide patient-reported outcomes s