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Sample records for affect peptide identification

  1. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  2. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  3. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  4. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, R. D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/ Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of charged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same composition but different sequence.

  5. Peptide Orientation Affects Selectivity in Ion-Exchange Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, Andrew J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Kangas, Lars J.; Smith, Richard D.; Mechtler, Karl; Mitulovic, Goran; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J.

    2010-06-15

    Here we demonstrate that separation of proteolytic peptides, having the same net charge and one basic residue, is affected by their specific orientation toward the stationary phase in ion-exchange chromatography. In electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) with an anion-exchange material, the C-terminus of the peptides is, on average, oriented toward the stationary phase. In cation exchange, the average peptide orientation is the opposite. Data with synthetic peptides, serving as orientation probes, indicate that in tryptic/Lys-C peptides the C-terminal carboxyl group appears to be in a zwitterionic bond with the side chain of the C-terminal Lys/Arg residue. In effect, the side chain is then less basic than the N-terminus, accounting for the specific orientation of tryptic and Lys-C peptides. Analyses of larger sets of peptides, generated from lysates by either Lys-N, Lys-C, or trypsin, reveal that specific peptide orientation affects the ability of harged side chains, such as phosphate residues, to influence retention. Phosphorylated residues that are remote in the sequence from the binding site affect retention less than those that are closer. When a peptide contains multiple charged sites, then orientation is observed to be less rigid and retention tends to be governed by the peptide’s net charge rather than its sequence. These general observations could be of value in confirming a peptide’s identification and, in particular, phosphosite assignments in proteomics analyses. More generally, orientation accounts for the ability of chromatography to separate peptides of the same compositionbut different sequence.

  6. Methods for peptide identification by spectral comparison

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Bell, Alexander W; Bergeron, John JM; Yanofsky, Corey M; Carrillo, Brian; Beaudrie, Christian EH; Kearney, Robert E

    2007-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry followed by database search is currently the predominant technology for peptide sequencing in shotgun proteomics experiments. Most methods compare experimentally observed spectra to the theoretical spectra predicted from the sequences in protein databases. There is a growing interest, however, in comparing unknown experimental spectra to a library of previously identified spectra. This approach has the advantage of taking into account instrument-dependent factors and peptide-specific differences in fragmentation probabilities. It is also computationally more efficient for high-throughput proteomics studies. Results This paper investigates computational issues related to this spectral comparison approach. Different methods have been empirically evaluated over several large sets of spectra. First, we illustrate that the peak intensities follow a Poisson distribution. This implies that applying a square root transform will optimally stabilize the peak intensity variance. Our results show that the square root did indeed outperform other transforms, resulting in improved accuracy of spectral matching. Second, different measures of spectral similarity were compared, and the results illustrated that the correlation coefficient was most robust. Finally, we examine how to assemble multiple spectra associated with the same peptide to generate a synthetic reference spectrum. Ensemble averaging is shown to provide the best combination of accuracy and efficiency. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that when combined, these methods can boost the sensitivity and specificity of spectral comparison. Therefore they are capable of enhancing and complementing existing tools for consistent and accurate peptide identification. PMID:17227583

  7. Bilingualism affects audiovisual phoneme identification.

    PubMed

    Burfin, Sabine; Pascalis, Olivier; Ruiz Tada, Elisa; Costa, Albert; Savariaux, Christophe; Kandel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We all go through a process of perceptual narrowing for phoneme identification. As we become experts in the languages we hear in our environment we lose the ability to identify phonemes that do not exist in our native phonological inventory. This research examined how linguistic experience-i.e., the exposure to a double phonological code during childhood-affects the visual processes involved in non-native phoneme identification in audiovisual speech perception. We conducted a phoneme identification experiment with bilingual and monolingual adult participants. It was an ABX task involving a Bengali dental-retroflex contrast that does not exist in any of the participants' languages. The phonemes were presented in audiovisual (AV) and audio-only (A) conditions. The results revealed that in the audio-only condition monolinguals and bilinguals had difficulties in discriminating the retroflex non-native phoneme. They were phonologically "deaf" and assimilated it to the dental phoneme that exists in their native languages. In the audiovisual presentation instead, both groups could overcome the phonological deafness for the retroflex non-native phoneme and identify both Bengali phonemes. However, monolinguals were more accurate and responded quicker than bilinguals. This suggests that bilinguals do not use the same processes as monolinguals to decode visual speech.

  8. Bilingualism affects audiovisual phoneme identification

    PubMed Central

    Burfin, Sabine; Pascalis, Olivier; Ruiz Tada, Elisa; Costa, Albert; Savariaux, Christophe; Kandel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    We all go through a process of perceptual narrowing for phoneme identification. As we become experts in the languages we hear in our environment we lose the ability to identify phonemes that do not exist in our native phonological inventory. This research examined how linguistic experience—i.e., the exposure to a double phonological code during childhood—affects the visual processes involved in non-native phoneme identification in audiovisual speech perception. We conducted a phoneme identification experiment with bilingual and monolingual adult participants. It was an ABX task involving a Bengali dental-retroflex contrast that does not exist in any of the participants' languages. The phonemes were presented in audiovisual (AV) and audio-only (A) conditions. The results revealed that in the audio-only condition monolinguals and bilinguals had difficulties in discriminating the retroflex non-native phoneme. They were phonologically “deaf” and assimilated it to the dental phoneme that exists in their native languages. In the audiovisual presentation instead, both groups could overcome the phonological deafness for the retroflex non-native phoneme and identify both Bengali phonemes. However, monolinguals were more accurate and responded quicker than bilinguals. This suggests that bilinguals do not use the same processes as monolinguals to decode visual speech. PMID:25374551

  9. Byonic: Advanced Peptide and Protein Identification Software

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Kil, Yong J.; Becker, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Byonic™ is the name of a software package for peptide and protein identification by tandem mass spectrometry. This software, which has only recently become commercially available, facilitates a much wider range of search possibilities than previous search software such as SEQUEST and Mascot. Byonic allows the user to define an essentially unlimited number of variable modification types. Byonic also allows the user to set a separate limit on the number of occurrences of each modification type, so that a search may consider only one or two chance modifications such as oxidations and deamidations per peptide, yet allow three or four biological modifications such as phosphorylations, which tend to cluster together. Hence Byonic can search for 10s or even 100s of modification types simultaneously without a prohibitively large combinatorial explosion. Byonic’s Wildcard Search™ allows the user to search for unanticipated or even unknown modifications alongside known modifications. Finally, Byonic’s Glycopeptide Search allows the user to identify glycopeptides without prior knowledge of glycan masses or glycosylation sites. PMID:23255153

  10. Verification of automated peptide identifications from proteomic tandem mass spectra

    PubMed Central

    Tabb, David L; Friedman, David B; Ham, Amy-Joan L

    2010-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics yields tandem mass spectra of peptides that can be identified by database search algorithms. When only a few observed peptides suggest the presence of a protein, establishing the accuracy of the peptide identifications is necessary for accepting or rejecting the protein identification. In this protocol, we describe the properties of peptide identifications that can differentiate legitimately identified peptides from spurious ones. The chemistry of fragmentation, as embodied in the ‘mobile proton’ and ‘pathways in competition’ models, informs the process of confirming or rejecting each spectral match. Examples of ion-trap and tandem time-of-flight (TOF/TOF) mass spectra illustrate these principles of fragmentation. PMID:17406459

  11. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  12. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  13. IDSieve: Protein Identification Using Peptide pI Filtering of MS/MS Data for Improved Confidence in Identifications

    PubMed Central

    West, K.D.; Zhang, X.; Bundy, J.L.; Stephenson, J.L.; Cargile, B.J.; Bunger, M.K.; Garge, N.R.

    2011-01-01

    The main challenge of tandem mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis is to correctly match the tandem mass spectra produced to the correct peptides. However, the large number of protein sequences in a database increases the chances of a false positive identification for any given peptide match. Here we present an automated algorithm called IDSieve that utilizes target-decoy database search strategy in combination with pI filtering to allow greater confidence for peptide identifications. IDSieve considers the SEQUEST parameters Xcorr and äCn to assign statistical confidence (false discovery rates) to the peptide matches. The distribution of predicted pI values for peptide spectrum matches (PSMs) is considered separately for each immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing fraction, and matches with pI values within 1.5 times inter-quartile range (within pI range) are analyzed independently of matches outside the pI ranges. We tested the performance of IDSieve and Peptide/Protein Prophet on the SEQUEST outputs from 60 immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing fractions derived from mouse intestinal epithelial cell protein extracts. Our results demonstrated that IDSieve produced 1355 more peptide spectrum matches (or 330 more peptides) than Peptide Prophet using comparable false positive rate cutoffs. Therefore, combining pI filtering with the appropriate statistical significance measurements allows for a higher number of protein identifications without adversely affecting the false positive rate. We further tested the performance of pI filtering using ID Sieve when samples were prefractionated using either pH range 3.5–4.5 or 3–10, and either 24cm or 7cm IPG strips.

  14. Chemical agents and peptides affect hair growth.

    PubMed

    Uno, H; Kurata, S

    1993-07-01

    During the past decade we have examined both the therapeutic and the prophylactic effects of several agents on the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia. Minoxidil and diazoxide, potent hypotensive agents acting as peripheral vasodilators, are known to have a hypertrichotic side effect. Topical use of both agents induced significant hair regrowth in the bald scalps of macaques. The application of a steroid 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor (4MA) in non-bald preadolescent macaques has prevented baldness, whereas controls developed it during 2 years of treatment. The effects of hair growth were determined by 1) phototrichogram, 2) folliculogram (micro-morphometric analysis), and 3) the rate of DNA synthesis in the follicular cells. These effects were essentially a stimulation of the follicular cell proliferation, resulting in an enlargement of the anagen follicles from vellus to terminal type (therapy) or a maintenance of the prebald terminal follicles (prevention). A copper binding peptide (PC1031) had the effect of follicular enlargement on the back skin of fuzzy rats, covering the vellus follicles; the effect was similar to that of topical minoxidil. Analyzing the quantitative sequences of follicular size and cyclic phases, we speculate on the effect of agents on follicular growth. We also discuss the triggering mechanism of androgen in the follicular epithelial-mesenchymal (dermal papilla) interaction.

  15. Identification of antimicrobial peptides by using eigenvectors.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Antibacterial peptides are subject to broad research due to their potential application and the benefit they can provide for a wide range of diseases. In this work, a mathematical-computational method, called the Polarity Vector Method, is introduced that has a high discriminative level (>70%) to identify peptides associated with Gram (-) bacteria, Gram (+) bacteria, cancer cells, fungi, insects, mammalian cells, parasites, and viruses, taken from the Antimicrobial Peptides Database. This supervised method uses only eigenvectors from the incident polar matrix of the group studied. It was verified with a comparative study with another extensively verified method developed previously by our team, the Polarity Index Method. The number of positive hits of both methods was up to 98% in all the tests conducted.

  16. Nontargeted identification of peptides and disinfection byproducts in water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Xu, Ying; Li, Feng; Jmaiff, Lindsay; Hrudey, Steve E; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-04-01

    A broad range of organic compounds are known to exist in drinking water sources and serve as precursors of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Epidemiological findings of an association of increased risk of bladder cancer with the consumption of chlorinated water has resulted in health concerns about DBPs. Peptides are thought to be an important category of DBP precursors in water. However, little is known about the actual presence of peptides and their DBPs in drinking water because of their high sample complexity and low concentrations. To address this challenge and identify peptides and non-chlorinated/chlorinated peptide DBPs from large sets of organic compounds in water, we developed a novel high throughput analysis strategy, which integrated multiple solid phase extraction (SPE), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation, and non-target identification using precursor ion exclusion (PIE) high resolution mass spectrometry (MS). After MS analysis, structures of candidate compounds, particularly peptides, were obtained by searching against the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB). Using this strategy, we successfully detected 625 peptides (out of 17,205 putative compounds) and 617 peptides (out of 13,297) respectively in source and finished water samples. The source and finished water samples had 501 peptides and amino acids in common. The remaining 116 peptides and amino acids were unique to the finished water. From a subset of 30 putative compounds for which standards were available, 25 were confirmed using HPLC-MS analysis. By analyzing the peptides identified in source and finished water, we successfully confirmed three disinfection reaction pathways that convert peptides into toxic DBPs.

  17. In silico identification of novel hevein-like peptide precursors.

    PubMed

    Porto, William F; Souza, Valéria A; Nolasco, Diego O; Franco, Octávio L

    2012-11-01

    Lectins are proteins with ability to bind reversibly and non-enzymatically to a specific carbohydrate. They are involved in numerous biological processes and show enormous biotechnological potential. Among plant lectins, the hevein domain is extremely common, being observed in several kinds of lectins. Moreover, this domain is also observed in an important class of antimicrobial peptides named hevein-like peptides. Due to higher cysteine residues conservation, hevein-like peptides could be mined among the sequence databases. By using the pattern CX(4,5)CC[GS]X(2)GXCGX[GST]X(2,3)[FWY]C[GS]X[AGS] novel hevein-like peptide precursors were found from three different plants: Oryza sativa, Vitis vinifera and Selaginella moellendorffii. In addition, an hevein-like peptide precursor from the phytopathogenic fungus Phaeosphaeria nodorum was also identified. The molecular models indicate that they have the same scaffold as others, composed of an antiparallel β-sheet and short helices. Nonetheless, the fungal hevein-like peptide probably has a different disulfide bond pattern. Despite this difference, the complexes between peptide and N,N,N-triacetylglucosamine are stable, according to molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first report of an hevein-like peptide from an organism outside the plant kingdom. The exact role of an hevein-like peptide in the fungal biology must be clarified, while in plants they are clearly involved in plant defense. In summary, data here reported clear shows that an in silico strategy could lead to the identification of novel hevein-like peptides that could be used as biotechnological tools in the fields of health and agribusiness.

  18. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  19. Support Vector Machine Classification of Probability Models and Peptide Features for Improved Peptide Identification from Shotgun Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Oehmen, Chris S.; Cannon, William R.

    2007-12-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing field offering a new perspective to biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a popular experimental approach because it allows global protein characterization of a sample in a high-throughput manner. The identification of a protein is based on the spectral signature of fragments of the constituent proteins, i.e., peptides. This peptide identification is typically performed with a computational database search algorithm; however, these database search algorithms return a large number of false positive identifications. We present a new scoring algorithm that uses a SVM to integrate database scoring metrics with peptide physiochemical properties, resulting in an improved ability to separate true from false peptide identification from MS. The Peptide Identification Classifier SVM (PICS) score using only five variables is significantly more accurate than the single best database metric, quantified as the area under a Receive Operating Characteristic curve of ~0.94 versus ~0.90.

  20. Building and Searching Tandem Mass Spectral Libraries for Peptide Identification*

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Spectral library searching is an emerging approach in peptide identifications from tandem mass spectra, a critical step in proteomic data analysis. Conceptually, the premise of this approach is that the tandem MS fragmentation pattern of a peptide under some fixed conditions is a reproducible fingerprint of that peptide, such that unknown spectra acquired under the same conditions can be identified by spectral matching. In actual practice, a spectral library is first meticulously compiled from a large collection of previously observed and identified tandem MS spectra, usually obtained from shotgun proteomics experiments of complex mixtures. Then, a query spectrum is then identified by spectral matching using recently developed spectral search engines. This review discusses the basic principles of the two pillars of this approach: spectral library construction, and spectral library searching. An overview of the software tools available for these two tasks, as well as a high-level description of the underlying algorithms, will be given. Finally, several new methods that utilize spectral libraries for peptide identification in ways other than straightforward spectral matching will also be described. PMID:21900153

  1. Amyloid Beta Peptides Differentially Affect Hippocampal Theta Rhythms In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Lerma, Armando I.; Ordaz, Benito; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Soluble amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) is responsible for the early cognitive dysfunction observed in Alzheimer's disease. Both cholinergically and glutamatergically induced hippocampal theta rhythms are related to learning and memory, spatial navigation, and spatial memory. However, these two types of theta rhythms are not identical; they are associated with different behaviors and can be differentially modulated by diverse experimental conditions. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to investigate whether or not application of soluble Aβ alters the two types of theta frequency oscillatory network activity generated in rat hippocampal slices by application of the cholinergic and glutamatergic agonists carbachol or DHPG, respectively. Due to previous evidence that oscillatory activity can be differentially affected by different Aβ peptides, we also compared Aβ25−35 and Aβ1−42 for their effects on theta rhythms in vitro at similar concentrations (0.5 to 1.0 μM). We found that Aβ25−35 reduces, with less potency than Aβ1−42, carbachol-induced population theta oscillatory activity. In contrast, DHPG-induced oscillatory activity was not affected by a high concentration of Aβ25−35 but was reduced by Aβ1−42. Our results support the idea that different amyloid peptides might alter specific cellular mechanisms related to the generation of specific neuronal network activities, instead of exerting a generalized inhibitory effect on neuronal network function. PMID:23878547

  2. Neutron encoded labeling for peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher M; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-05-21

    Metabolic labeling of cells using heavy amino acids is most commonly used for relative quantitation; however, partner mass shifts also detail the number of heavy amino acids contained within the precursor species. Here, we use a recently developed metabolic labeling technique, NeuCode (neutron encoding) stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), which produces precursor partners spaced ~40 mDa apart to enable amino acid counting. We implement large scale counting of amino acids through a program, "Amino Acid Counter", which determines the most likely combination of amino acids within a precursor based on NeuCode SILAC partner spacing and filters candidate peptide sequences during a database search using this information. Counting the number of lysine residues for precursors selected for MS/MS decreases the median number of candidate sequences from 44 to 14 as compared to an accurate mass search alone (20 ppm). Furthermore, the ability to co-isolate and fragment NeuCode SILAC partners enables counting of lysines in product ions, and when the information is used, the median number of candidates is reduced to 7. We then demonstrate counting leucine in addition to lysine results in a 6-fold decrease in search space, 43 to 7, when compared to an accurate mass search. We use this scheme to analyze a nanoLC-MS/MS experiment and demonstrate that accurate mass plus lysine and leucine counting reduces the number of candidate sequences to one for ~20% of all precursors selected, demonstrating an ability to identify precursors without MS/MS analysis.

  3. Neutron Encoded Labeling for Peptide Identification

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher M.; Merrill, Anna E.; Bailey, Derek J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of cells using heavy amino acids is most commonly used for relative quantitation; however, partner mass shifts also detail the number of heavy amino acids contained within the precursor species. Here, we use a recently developed metabolic labeling technique, NeuCode (neutron encoding) stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), which produces precursor partners spaced ~40 mDa apart to enable amino acid counting. We implement large scale counting of amino acids through a program, “Amino Acid Counter”, which determines the most likely combination of amino acids within a precursor based on NeuCode SILAC partner spacing and filters candidate peptide sequences during a database search using this information. Counting the number of lysine residues for precursors selected for MS/MS decreases the median number of candidate sequences from 44 to 14 as compared to an accurate mass search alone (20 ppm). Furthermore, the ability to co-isolate and fragment NeuCode SILAC partners enables counting of lysines in product ions, and when the information is used, the median number of candidates is reduced to 7. We then demonstrate counting leucine in addition to lysine results in a 6-fold decrease in search space, 43 to 7, when compared to an accurate mass search. We use this scheme to analyze a nanoLC-MS/MS experiment and demonstrate that accurate mass plus lysine and leucine counting reduces the number of candidate sequences to one for ~20% of all precursors selected, demonstrating an ability to identify precursors without MS/MS analysis. PMID:23638792

  4. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.

  5. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; ...

    2013-03-07

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of chargedmore » peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.« less

  6. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel C.; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-01-01

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification. PMID:23499924

  7. Identification of bitter peptides in whey protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaowei; Jiang, Deshou; Peterson, Devin G

    2014-06-25

    Bitterness of whey protein hydrolysates (WPH) can negatively affect product quality and limit utilization in food and pharmaceutical applications. Four main bitter peptides were identified in a commercial WPH by means of sensory-guided fractionation techniques that included ultrafiltration and offline two-dimensional reverse phase chromatography. LC-TOF-MS/MS analysis revealed the amino acid sequences of the bitter peptides were YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN that originated from α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, serum albumin, and β-casein, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis reported the concentrations of YGLF, IPAVF, LLF, and YPFPGPIPN to be 0.66, 0.58, 1.33, and 2.64 g/kg powder, respectively. Taste recombination analysis of an aqueous model consisting of all four peptides was reported to explain 88% of the bitterness intensity of the 10% WPH solution.

  8. PIPI: PTM-Invariant Peptide Identification Using Coding Method.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fengchao; Li, Ning; Yu, Weichuan

    2016-12-02

    In computational proteomics, the identification of peptides with an unlimited number of post-translational modification (PTM) types is a challenging task. The computational cost associated with database search increases exponentially with respect to the number of modified amino acids and linearly with respect to the number of potential PTM types at each amino acid. The problem becomes intractable very quickly if we want to enumerate all possible PTM patterns. To address this issue, one group of methods named restricted tools (including Mascot, Comet, and MS-GF+) only allow a small number of PTM types in database search process. Alternatively, the other group of methods named unrestricted tools (including MS-Alignment, ProteinProspector, and MODa) avoids enumerating PTM patterns with an alignment-based approach to localizing and characterizing modified amino acids. However, because of the large search space and PTM localization issue, the sensitivity of these unrestricted tools is low. This paper proposes a novel method named PIPI to achieve PTM-invariant peptide identification. PIPI belongs to the category of unrestricted tools. It first codes peptide sequences into Boolean vectors and codes experimental spectra into real-valued vectors. For each coded spectrum, it then searches the coded sequence database to find the top scored peptide sequences as candidates. After that, PIPI uses dynamic programming to localize and characterize modified amino acids in each candidate. We used simulation experiments and real data experiments to evaluate the performance in comparison with restricted tools (i.e., Mascot, Comet, and MS-GF+) and unrestricted tools (i.e., Mascot with error tolerant search, MS-Alignment, ProteinProspector, and MODa). Comparison with restricted tools shows that PIPI has a close sensitivity and running speed. Comparison with unrestricted tools shows that PIPI has the highest sensitivity except for Mascot with error tolerant search and Protein

  9. How does a hydrocarbon staple affect peptide hydrophobicity?

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L; Verma, Chandra

    2015-04-15

    Water is essential for the proper folding of proteins and the assembly of protein-protein/ligand complexes. How water regulates complex formation depends on the chemical and topological details of the interface. The dynamics of water in the interdomain region between an E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2) and three different peptides derived from the tumor suppressor protein p53 are studied using molecular dynamics. The peptides show bimodal distributions of interdomain water densities across a range of distances. The addition of a hydrocarbon chain to rigidify the peptides (in a process known as stapling) results in an increase in average hydrophobicity of the peptide-protein interface. Additionally, the hydrophobic staple shields a network of water molecules, kinetically stabilizing a water chain hydrogen-bonded between the peptide and MDM2. These properties could result in a decrease in the energy barrier associated with dehydrating the peptide-protein interface, thereby regulating the kinetics of peptide binding.

  10. Improving the identification rate of endogenous peptides using electron transfer dissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Eisuke; Menschaert, Gerben; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Luyten, Walter; Gevaert, Kris; Baggerman, Geert; Schoofs, Liliane

    2013-12-06

    Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) combined with bioinformatics tools have enabled fast and systematic protein identification based on peptide-to-spectrum matches. However, it remains challenging to obtain accurate identification of endogenous peptides, such as neuropeptides, peptide hormones, peptide pheromones, venom peptides, and antimicrobial peptides. Since these peptides are processed at sites that are difficult to predict reliably, the search of their MS/MS spectra in sequence databases needs to be done without any protease setting. In addition, many endogenous peptides carry various post-translational modifications, making it essential to take these into account in the database search. These characteristics of endogenous peptides result in a huge search space, frequently leading to poor confidence of the peptide characterizations in peptidomics studies. We have developed a new MS/MS spectrum search tool for highly accurate and confident identification of endogenous peptides by combining two different fragmentation methods. Our approach takes advantage of the combination of two independent fragmentation methods (collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation). Their peptide spectral matching is carried out separately in both methods, and the final score is built as a combination of the two separate scores. We demonstrate that this approach is very effective in discriminating correct peptide identifications from false hits. We applied this approach to a spectral data set of neuropeptides extracted from mouse pituitary tumor cells. Compared to conventional MS-based identification, i.e., using a single fragmentation method, our approach significantly increased the peptide identification rate. It proved also highly effective for scanning spectra against a very large search space, enabling more accurate genome-wide searches and searches including multiple potential post-translational modifications.

  11. Application of Peptide LC Retention Time Information in a Discriminant Function for Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, Eric F.; Kangas, Lars J.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Mottaz, Heather M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Shen, Yufeng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-07-09

    We describe the application of a peptide retention time reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) prediction model previously reported (Petritis et al. Anal. Chem. 99, 2002, 11049) for improved peptide identification. The model uses peptide sequence information to generate a theoretical (predicted) elution time that can be compared with the observed elution time. Using data from a set of known proteins, the retention time parameter was incorporated into a discriminant function for use with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data analyzed with the peptide/protein identification program SEQUEST. For singly charged ions, the number of identifications increased by 12% when the elution time metric is included compared to when mass spectral data is the sole source of information in the context of a Drosophila melanogaster database. A 3-4% improvement was obtained for doubly and triply charged ions for the same biological system. Application to the larger Rattus norvegicus (rat) and human proteome databases resulted in an 8-9% overall increase in the number of identifications, when both the discriminant function and elution time are used. The effect of adding “runner-up” hits (peptide matches that are not the highest scoring for a spectra) from SEQUEST is also explored, and we find that the number of confident identifications is further increased when these hits are also considered. Finally, application of the discriminant functions derived in this work with ~2.2 million spectra from 330 LC-MS/MS analyses of peptides from human plasma protein resulted in a 19% increase in confident peptide identifications (9551 vs 8049) using elution time information. Further improvements from the use of elution time information can be expected as both the experimental control of elution time reproducibility and the predictive capability are improved.

  12. Identification and Characterization of a Synthetic Osteogenic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, David E.; Hadjiargyrou, Michael; Udin, Sardar MZ; Trasolini, Nicholas A.; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic bone disorder and its management represents a tremendous public health encumbrance. While several classes of therapeutics have been approved to treat this disease, all are associated with significant adverse effects. An algorithm was developed and utilized to discover potential bioactive peptides, which led to the identification of an osteogenic peptide that mapped to the C-terminal region of the calcitonin receptor and has been named Calcitonin Receptor Fragment Peptide (CRFP). In vitro treatment of human MSCs with CRFP resulted in dose specific effects on both proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. Similarly, in vitro treatment of rat RCJ cells led to dose and species specific effects on proliferation. A rat ovariectomy (OVX) model was used to assess the potential efficacy of CRFP in treating osteoporosis. MicroCT analysis of distal femoral samples showed that OVX rats treated with CRFP were significantly protected from losses of 55% in trabecular bone volume fraction, 42% in connectivity density, and 18% in trabecular thickness in comparison to vehicle treated controls. MicroCT analyses of vertebrae revealed CRFP to significantly prevent a 25% reduction in bone volume fraction. MicroCT evaluation of femoral and vertebral cortical bone found a significant reduction of 2% in vertebral bone mineral density. In summary, our in vitro studies indicate that CRFP is both bioactive and osteogenic and our in vivo studies indicate that CRFP is skeletally bioactive. These promising data indicate that further in vitro and in vivo evaluation of CRFP as a new treatment for osteoporosis is warranted. PMID:26319675

  13. A survey of computational methods and error rate estimation procedures for peptide and protein identification in shotgun proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript provides a comprehensive review of the peptide and protein identification process using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data generated in shotgun proteomic experiments. The commonly used methods for assigning peptide sequences to MS/MS spectra are critically discussed and compared, from basic strategies to advanced multi-stage approaches. A particular attention is paid to the problem of false-positive identifications. Existing statistical approaches for assessing the significance of peptide to spectrum matches are surveyed, ranging from single-spectrum approaches such as expectation values to global error rate estimation procedures such as false discovery rates and posterior probabilities. The importance of using auxiliary discriminant information (mass accuracy, peptide separation coordinates, digestion properties, and etc.) is discussed, and advanced computational approaches for joint modeling of multiple sources of information are presented. This review also includes a detailed analysis of the issues affecting the interpretation of data at the protein level, including the amplification of error rates when going from peptide to protein level, and the ambiguities in inferring the identifies of sample proteins in the presence of shared peptides. Commonly used methods for computing protein-level confidence scores are discussed in detail. The review concludes with a discussion of several outstanding computational issues. PMID:20816881

  14. Identification of the agr Peptide of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zetzmann, Marion; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Waidmann, Mark S.; Blombach, Bastian; Riedel, Christian U.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is an important food-borne human pathogen that is able to strive under a wide range of environmental conditions. Its accessory gene regulator (agr) system was shown to impact on biofilm formation and virulence and has been proposed as one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in adaptation to these changing environments. The Lm agr operon is homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus system, which includes an agrD-encoded autoinducing peptide that stimulates expression of the agr genes via the AgrCA two-component system and is required for regulation of target genes. The aim of the present study was to identify the native autoinducing peptide (AIP) of Lm using a luciferase reporter system in wildtype and agrD deficient strains, rational design of synthetic peptides and mass spectrometry. Upon deletion of agrD, luciferase reporter activity driven by the PII promoter of the agr operon was completely abolished and this defect was restored by co-cultivation of the agrD-negative reporter strain with a producer strain. Based on the sequence and structures of known AIPs of other organisms, a set of potential Lm AIPs was designed and tested for PII-activation. This led to the identification of a cyclic pentapeptide that was able to induce PII-driven luciferase reporter activity and restore defective invasion of the agrD deletion mutant into Caco-2 cells. Analysis of supernatants of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing AgrBD identified a peptide identical in mass and charge to the cyclic pentapeptide. The Lm agr system is specific for this pentapeptide since the AIP of Lactobacillus plantarum, which also is a pentapeptide yet with different amino acid sequence, did not induce PII activity. In summary, the presented results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that the agrD gene of Lm encodes a secreted AIP responsible for autoregulation of the agr system of Lm. Additionally, the structure of the native Lm AIP was identified. PMID

  15. Support Vector Machines for Improved Peptide Identification from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Database Search

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2009-05-06

    Accurate identification of peptides is a current challenge in mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomics. The standard approach uses a search routine to compare tandem mass spectra to a database of peptides associated with the target organism. These database search routines yield multiple metrics associated with the quality of the mapping of the experimental spectrum to the theoretical spectrum of a peptide. The structure of these results make separating correct from false identifications difficult and has created a false identification problem. Statistical confidence scores are an approach to battle this false positive problem that has led to significant improvements in peptide identification. We have shown that machine learning, specifically support vector machine (SVM), is an effective approach to separating true peptide identifications from false ones. The SVM-based peptide statistical scoring method transforms a peptide into a vector representation based on database search metrics to train and validate the SVM. In practice, following the database search routine, a peptides is denoted in its vector representation and the SVM generates a single statistical score that is then used to classify presence or absence in the sample

  16. Large-scale identification of endogenous secretory peptides using electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    Mass spectrometry-based unbiased analysis of the full complement of secretory peptides is expected to facilitate the identification of unknown biologically active peptides. However, tandem MS sequencing of endogenous peptides in their native form has proven difficult because they show size heterogeneity and contain multiple internal basic residues, the characteristics not found in peptide fragments produced by in vitro digestion. Endogenous peptides remain largely unexplored by electron transfer dissociation (ETD), despite its widespread use in bottom-up proteomics. We used ETD, in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), to identify endogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of a human endocrine cell line. For mass accuracy, both MS and tandem MS were analyzed on an Orbitrap. CID and ETD, performed in different LC-MS runs, resulted in the identification of 795 and 569 unique peptides (ranging from 1000 to 15000 Da), respectively, with an overlap of 397. Peptides larger than 3000 Da accounted for 54% in CID and 46% in ETD identifications. Although numerically outperformed by CID, ETD provided more extensive fragmentation, leading to the identification of peptides that are not reached by CID. This advantage was demonstrated in identifying a new antimicrobial peptide from neurosecretory protein VGF (non-acronymic), VGF[554-577]-NH2, or in differentiating nearly isobaric peptides (mass difference less than 2 ppm) that arise from alternatively spliced exons of the gastrin-releasing peptide gene. CID and ETD complemented each other to add to our knowledge of the proteolytic processing sites of proteins implicated in the regulated secretory pathway. An advantage of the use of both fragmentation methods was also noted in localization of phosphorylation sites. These findings point to the utility of ETD mass spectrometry in the global study of endogenous peptides, or peptidomics.

  17. Large-scale Identification of Endogenous Secretory Peptides Using Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based unbiased analysis of the full complement of secretory peptides is expected to facilitate the identification of unknown biologically active peptides. However, tandem MS sequencing of endogenous peptides in their native form has proven difficult because they show size heterogeneity and contain multiple internal basic residues, the characteristics not found in peptide fragments produced by in vitro digestion. Endogenous peptides remain largely unexplored by electron transfer dissociation (ETD), despite its widespread use in bottom-up proteomics. We used ETD, in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), to identify endogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of a human endocrine cell line. For mass accuracy, both MS and tandem MS were analyzed on an Orbitrap. CID and ETD, performed in different LC-MS runs, resulted in the identification of 795 and 569 unique peptides (ranging from 1000 to 15000 Da), respectively, with an overlap of 397. Peptides larger than 3000 Da accounted for 54% in CID and 46% in ETD identifications. Although numerically outperformed by CID, ETD provided more extensive fragmentation, leading to the identification of peptides that are not reached by CID. This advantage was demonstrated in identifying a new antimicrobial peptide from neurosecretory protein VGF (non-acronymic), VGF[554–577]-NH2, or in differentiating nearly isobaric peptides (mass difference less than 2 ppm) that arise from alternatively spliced exons of the gastrin-releasing peptide gene. CID and ETD complemented each other to add to our knowledge of the proteolytic processing sites of proteins implicated in the regulated secretory pathway. An advantage of the use of both fragmentation methods was also noted in localization of phosphorylation sites. These findings point to the utility of ETD mass spectrometry in the global study of endogenous peptides, or peptidomics. PMID:23250050

  18. Improved peptide identification for proteomic analysis based on comprehensive characterization of electron transfer dissociation spectra.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Xiang; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Song, Chun-Qing; Chi, Hao; Yang, Bing; Xiu, Li-Yun; Tao, Li; Jing, Zhi-Yi; Liu, Chao; Wang, Le-Heng; Fu, Yan; He, Si-Min

    2010-12-03

    In recent years, electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has enjoyed widespread applications from sequencing of peptides with or without post-translational modifications to top-down analysis of intact proteins. However, peptide identification rates from ETD spectra compare poorly with those from collision induced dissociation (CID) spectra, especially for doubly charged precursors. This is in part due to an insufficient understanding of the characteristics of ETD and consequently a failure of database search engines to make use of the rich information contained in the ETD spectra. In this study, we statistically characterized ETD fragmentation patterns from a collection of 461 440 spectra and subsequently implemented our findings into pFind, a database search engine developed earlier for CID data. From ETD spectra of doubly charged precursors, pFind 2.1 identified 63-122% more unique peptides than Mascot 2.2 under the same 1% false discovery rate. For higher charged peptides as well as phosphopeptides, pFind 2.1 also consistently obtained more identifications. Of the features built into pFind 2.1, the following two greatly enhanced its performance: (1) refined automatic detection and removal of high-intensity peaks belonging to the precursor, charge-reduced precursor, or related neutral loss species, whose presence often set spectral matching askew; (2) a thorough consideration of hydrogen-rearranged fragment ions such as z + H and c - H for peptide precursors of different charge states. Our study has revealed that different charge states of precursors result in different hydrogen rearrangement patterns. For a fragment ion, its propensity of gaining or losing a hydrogen depends on (1) the ion type (c or z) and (2) the size of the fragment relative to the precursor, and both dependencies are affected by (3) the charge state of the precursor. In addition, we discovered ETD characteristics that are unique for certain types of amino acids (AAs), such as a prominent

  19. Identification of peptide-specific TCR genes by in vitro peptide stimulation and CDR3 length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hongwei; Lin, Yanmei; Wang, Teng; Ou, Yusheng; Shen, Han; Tao, Changli; Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wang, Hui; Huang, Shulin

    2015-07-10

    Identification of TCR genes specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) is necessary for TCR gene modification of T cells, which is applied in anti-tumor adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). The usual identification methods are based on isolating single peptide-responding T cells and cloning the TCR gene by in vitro expansion or by single-cell RT-PCR. However, the long and exacting in vitro culture period and demanding operational requirements restrict the application of these methods. Immunoscope is an effective tool that profiles a repertoire of TCRs and identifies significantly expanded clones through CDR3 length analysis. In this study, a survivin-derived mutant peptide optimized for HLA-A2 binding was selected to load DCs and activate T cells. The monoclonal expansion of TCRA and TCRB genes was separately identified by Immunoscope analysis and following sequence identification, the properly paired TCR genes were transferred into T cells. Peptide recognition and cytotoxicity assays indicated that TCR-modified PBMCs could respond to both the mutant and wild type peptides and lyse target cells. These results show that combining Immunoscope with in vitro peptide stimulation provides an alternative and superior method for identifying specific TCR genes, which represents a significant advance for the application of TCR gene-modified T cells.

  20. Object color affects identification and repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Uttl, Bob; Graf, Peter; Santacruz, Pilar

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the influence of color on the identification of both non-studied and studied objects. Participants studied black and white and color photos of common objects and memory was assessed with an identification test. Consistent with our meta-analysis of prior research, we found that objects were easier to identify from color than from black and white photos. We also found substantial priming in all conditions, and study-to-test changes in an object's color reduced the magnitude of priming. Color-specific priming effects were large for color-complex objects, but minimal for color-simple objects. The pattern and magnitude of priming effects was not influenced either by the extent to which an object always appears in the same color (i.e., whether a color is symptomatic of an object) or by the object's origin (natural versus fabricated). We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical accounts of object perception and repetition priming.

  1. Combinatorial peptide library-based identification of peptide ligands for tumor-reactive cytolytic T lymphocytes of unknown specificity.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Godoy, Verena; Ayyoub, Maha; Dutoit, Valerie; Servis, Catherine; Schink, Amy; Rimoldi, Donata; Romero, Pedro; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Simon, Richard; Zhao, Yindong; Houghten, Richard A; Pinilla, Clemencia; Valmori, Danila

    2002-08-01

    A novel approach for the identification of tumor antigen-derived sequences recognized by CD8(+) cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) consists in using synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries. Here we have screened a library composed of 3.1 x 10(11) nonapeptides arranged in a positional scanning format, in a cytotoxicity assay, to search the antigen recognized by melanoma-reactive CTL of unknown specificity. The results of this analysis enabled the identification of several optimal peptide ligands, as most of the individual nonapeptides deduced from the primary screening were efficiently recognized by the CTL. The results of the library screening were also analyzed with a mathematical approach based on a model of independent and additive contribution of individual amino acids to antigen recognition. This biometrical data analysis enabled the retrieval, in public databases, of the native antigenic peptide SSX-2(41-49), whose sequence is highly homologous to the ones deduced from the library screening, among the ones with the highest stimulatory score. These results underline the high predictive value of positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide library analysis and encourage its use for the identification of CTL ligands.

  2. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  3. Maximizing Peptide Identification Events in Proteomic Workflows Using Data-Dependent Acquisition (DDA)*

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Nicholas W.; Goulding, Scott P.; Shulman, Nicholas J.; Gadok, Avinash K.; Szumlinski, Karen K.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Wu, Christine C.

    2014-01-01

    Current analytical strategies for collecting proteomic data using data-dependent acquisition (DDA) are limited by the low analytical reproducibility of the method. Proteomic discovery efforts that exploit the benefits of DDA, such as providing peptide sequence information, but that enable improved analytical reproducibility, represent an ideal scenario for maximizing measureable peptide identifications in “shotgun”-type proteomic studies. Therefore, we propose an analytical workflow combining DDA with retention time aligned extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) areas obtained from high mass accuracy MS1 data acquired in parallel. We applied this workflow to the analyses of sample matrixes prepared from mouse blood plasma and brain tissues and observed increases in peptide detection of up to 30.5% due to the comparison of peptide MS1 XIC areas following retention time alignment of co-identified peptides. Furthermore, we show that the approach is quantitative using peptide standards diluted into a complex matrix. These data revealed that peptide MS1 XIC areas provide linear response of over three orders of magnitude down to low femtomole (fmol) levels. These findings argue that augmenting “shotgun” proteomic workflows with retention time alignment of peptide identifications and comparative analyses of corresponding peptide MS1 XIC areas improve the analytical performance of global proteomic discovery methods using DDA. PMID:23820513

  4. Identification of a novel skin penetration enhancement peptide by phage display peptide library screening.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu; Tummala, Hemachand

    2012-05-07

    Skin is an important site for local or systemic application of drugs. However, a majority of drugs have poor permeability through the skin's topmost layer, stratum corneum (SC). The aim of this study was to identify safe and smaller peptides that could enhance the skin penetration of drug molecules. By screening phage display peptide library, we have identified a T2 peptide (LVGVFH), which enhanced the penetration of bacteriophages (~800 nm long bacterial viruses) across porcine and mouse skin. Pretreating the skin with synthetic T2 peptide at pH 4.5 resulted in significant penetration enhancement of hydrophilic drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) across skin. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to enhance the skin penetration. Pretreating the skin with T2 peptide enhanced the partitioning of small molecules with different lipophilicities (5-FU, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and rhodamine 123 hydrochloride) into skin. Fluorescence studies showed that T2 peptide enhanced the diffusion of these molecules into intercellular lipids of SC and thus enhanced the penetration into the skin. Histidine at the c-terminus of T2 peptide was identified to be critical for the skin penetration enhancement. T2 peptide interacted with skin lipids to cause skin penetration enhancement. The study identified a novel, safe, and noninvasive peptide to improve the skin penetration of drugs without chemical conjugation.

  5. Chemically synthesized peptide libraries as a new source of BBB shuttles. Use of mass spectrometry for peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Guixer, B; Arroyo, X; Belda, I; Sabidó, E; Teixidó, M; Giralt, E

    2016-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a biological barrier that protects the brain from neurotoxic agents and regulates the influx and efflux of molecules required for its correct function. This stringent regulation hampers the passage of brain parenchyma-targeting drugs across the BBB. BBB shuttles have been proposed as a way to overcome this hurdle because these peptides can not only cross the BBB but also carry molecules which would otherwise be unable to cross the barrier unaided. Here we developed a new high-throughput screening methodology to identify new peptide BBB shuttles in a broadly unexplored chemical space. By introducing d-amino acids, this approach screens only protease-resistant peptides. This methodology combines combinatorial chemistry for peptide library synthesis, in vitro models mimicking the BBB for library evaluation and state-of-the-art mass spectrometry techniques to identify those peptides able to cross the in vitro assays. BBB shuttle synthesis was performed by the mix-and-split technique to generate a library based on the following: Ac-d-Arg-XXXXX-NH2 , where X were: d-Ala (a), d-Arg (r), d-Ile (i), d-Glu (e), d-Ser (s), d-Trp (w) or d-Pro (p). The assays used comprised the in vitro cell-based BBB assay (mimicking both active and passive transport) and the PAMPA (mimicking only passive diffusion). The identification of candidates was determined using a two-step mass spectrometry approach combining LTQ-Orbitrap and Q-trap mass spectrometers. Identified sequences were postulated to cross the BBB models. We hypothesized that some sequences cross the BBB through passive diffusion mechanisms and others through other mechanisms, including paracellular flux and active transport. These results provide a new set of BBB shuttle peptide families. Furthermore, the methodology described is proposed as a consistent approach to search for protease-resistant therapeutic peptides. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Correlation of Multiple Peptide Mass Spectra for Phosphoprotein Identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When collision induced dissociation is used to fragment phosphorylated peptides during tandem mass spectrometry (MS2), an ion exhibiting the neutral loss of phosphoric acid can be the major product. The neutral loss ion can then be fragmented during MS3 for additional resolution of the peptide sequ...

  7. Identification of peptides that bind to irradiated pancreatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Canhui; Liu, Xiang Y.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Lawrence, Theodore S. . E-mail: tsl@med.umich.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Peptides targeting tumor vascular cells or tumor cells themselves have the potential to be used as vectors for delivering either DNA in gene therapy or antitumor agents in chemotherapy. We wished to determine if peptides identified by phage display could be used to target irradiated pancreatic cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Irradiated Capan-2 cells were incubated with 5 x 10{sup 12} plaque-forming units of a phage display library. Internalized phage were recovered and absorbed against unirradiated cells. After five such cycles of enrichment, the recovered phage were subjected to DNA sequencing analysis and synthetic peptides made. The binding of both phage and synthetic peptides was evaluated by fluorescence staining and flow cytometry in vitro and in vivo. Results: We identified one 12-mer peptide (PA1) that binds to irradiated Capan-2 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells but not to unirradiated cells. The binding of peptide was significant after 48 h incubation with cells. In vivo experiments with Capan-2 xenografts in nude mice demonstrated that these small peptides are able to penetrate tumor tissue after intravenous injections and bind specifically to irradiated tumor cells. Conclusion: These data suggest that peptides can be identified that target tumors with radiation-induced cell markers and may be clinically useful.

  8. A novel algorithm for validating peptide identification from a shotgun proteomics search engine.

    PubMed

    Jian, Ling; Niu, Xinnan; Xia, Zhonghang; Samir, Parimal; Sumanasekera, Chiranthani; Mu, Zheng; Jennings, Jennifer L; Hoek, Kristen L; Allos, Tara; Howard, Leigh M; Edwards, Kathryn M; Weil, P Anthony; Link, Andrew J

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has revolutionized the proteomics analysis of complexes, cells, and tissues. In a typical proteomic analysis, the tandem mass spectra from a LC-MS/MS experiment are assigned to a peptide by a search engine that compares the experimental MS/MS peptide data to theoretical peptide sequences in a protein database. The peptide spectra matches are then used to infer a list of identified proteins in the original sample. However, the search engines often fail to distinguish between correct and incorrect peptides assignments. In this study, we designed and implemented a novel algorithm called De-Noise to reduce the number of incorrect peptide matches and maximize the number of correct peptides at a fixed false discovery rate using a minimal number of scoring outputs from the SEQUEST search engine. The novel algorithm uses a three-step process: data cleaning, data refining through a SVM-based decision function, and a final data refining step based on proteolytic peptide patterns. Using proteomics data generated on different types of mass spectrometers, we optimized the De-Noise algorithm on the basis of the resolution and mass accuracy of the mass spectrometer employed in the LC-MS/MS experiment. Our results demonstrate De-Noise improves peptide identification compared to other methods used to process the peptide sequence matches assigned by SEQUEST. Because De-Noise uses a limited number of scoring attributes, it can be easily implemented with other search engines.

  9. A Novel Algorithm for Validating Peptide Identification from a Shotgun Proteomics Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Ling; Niu, Xinnan; Xia, Zhonghang; Samir, Parimal; Sumanasekera, Chiranthani; Zheng, Mu; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Hoek, Kristen L.; Allos, Tara; Howard., Leigh M.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Weil, P. Anthony; Link, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry has revolutionized the proteomics analysis of complexes, cells, and tissues. In a typical proteomic analysis, the tandem mass spectra from a LC/MS/MS experiment are assigned to a peptide by a search engine that compares the experimental MS/MS peptide data to theoretical peptide sequences in a protein database. The peptide spectra matches are then used to infer a list of identified proteins in the original sample. However, the search engines often fail to distinguish between correct and incorrect peptides assignments. In this study, we designed and implemented a novel algorithm called De-Noise to reduce the number of incorrect peptide matches and maximize the number of correct peptides at a fixed false discovery rate using a minimal number of scoring outputs from the SEQUEST search engine. The novel algorithm uses a three step process: data cleaning, data refining through a SVM-based decision function, and a final data refining step based on proteolytic peptide patterns. Using proteomics data generated on different types of mass spectrometers, we optimized the De-Noise algorithm based on the resolution and mass accuracy of the mass spectrometer employed in the LC/MS/MS experiment. Our results demonstrate De-Noise improves peptide identification compared to other methods used to process the peptide sequence matches assigned by SEQUEST. Because De-Noise uses a limited number of scoring attributes, it can be easily implemented with other search engines. PMID:23402659

  10. Multi-species Identification of Polymorphic Peptide Variants via Propagation in Spectral Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Bandeira, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Peptide and protein identification remains challenging in organisms with poorly annotated or rapidly evolving genomes, as are commonly encountered in environmental or biofuels research. Such limitations render tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) database search algorithms ineffective as they lack corresponding sequences required for peptide-spectrum matching. We address this challenge with the spectral networks approach to (1) match spectra of orthologous peptides across multiple related species and then (2) propagate peptide annotations from identified to unidentified spectra. We here present algorithms to assess the statistical significance of spectral alignments (Align-GF), reduce the impurity in spectral networks, and accurately estimate the error rate in propagated identifications. Analyzing three related Cyanothece species, a model organism for biohydrogen production, spectral networks identified peptides from highly divergent sequences from networks with dozens of variant peptides, including thousands of peptides in species lacking a sequenced genome. Our analysis further detected the presence of many novel putative peptides even in genomically characterized species, thus suggesting the possibility of gaps in our understanding of their proteomic and genomic expression. A web-based pipeline for spectral networks analysis is available at http://proteomics.ucsd.edu/software. PMID:27609420

  11. Identification of gliadin-binding peptides by phage display

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coeliac disease (CD) is a common and complex disorder of the small intestine caused by intolerance to wheat gluten and related edible cereals like barley and rye. Peptides originating from incomplete gliadin digestion activate the lamina propria infiltrating T cells to release proinflammatory cytokines, which in turn cause profound tissue remodelling of the small intestinal wall. There is no cure for CD except refraining from consuming gluten-containing products. Results Phage from a random oligomer display library were enriched by repeated pannings against immobilised gliadin proteins. Phage from the final panning round were plated, individual plaques picked, incubated with host bacteria, amplified to a population size of 1011 to 1012 and purified. DNA was isolated from 1000 purified phage populations and the region covering the 36 bp oligonucleotide insert from which the displayed peptides were translated, was sequenced. Altogether more than 150 different peptide-encoding sequences were identified, many of which were repeatedly isolated under various experimental conditions. Amplified phage populations, each expressing a single peptide, were tested first in pools and then one by one for their ability to inhibit binding of human anti-gliadin antibodies in ELISA assays. These experiments showed that several of the different peptide-expressing phage tested inhibited the interaction between gliadin and anti-gliadin antibodies. Finally, four different peptide-encoding sequences were selected for further analysis, and the corresponding 12-mer peptides were synthesised in vitro. By ELISA assays it was demonstrated that several of the peptides inhibited the interaction between gliadin molecules and serum anti-gliadin antibodies. Moreover, ELISA competition experiments as well as dot-blot and western blot revealed that the different peptides interacted with different molecular sites of gliadin. Conclusions We believe that several of the isolated and

  12. Improved Identification and Relative Quantification of Sites of Peptide and Protein Oxidation for Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Li, Zixuan; Xie, Boer; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2013-11-01

    Protein oxidation is typically associated with oxidative stress and aging and affects protein function in normal and pathological processes. Additionally, deliberate oxidative labeling is used to probe protein structure and protein-ligand interactions in hydroxyl radical protein footprinting (HRPF). Oxidation often occurs at multiple sites, leading to mixtures of oxidation isomers that differ only by the site of modification. We utilized sets of synthetic, isomeric "oxidized" peptides to test and compare the ability of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID), as well as nano-ultra high performance liquid chromatography (nanoUPLC) separation, to quantitate oxidation isomers with one oxidation at multiple adjacent sites in mixtures of peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry by ETD generates fragment ion ratios that accurately report on relative oxidative modification extent on specific sites, regardless of the charge state of the precursor ion. Conversely, CID was found to generate quantitative MS/MS product ions only at the higher precursor charge state. Oxidized isomers having multiple sites of oxidation in each of two peptide sequences in HRPF product of protein Robo-1 Ig1-2, a protein involved in nervous system axon guidance, were also identified and the oxidation extent at each residue was quantified by ETD without prior liquid chromatography (LC) separation. ETD has proven to be a reliable technique for simultaneous identification and relative quantification of a variety of functionally different oxidation isomers, and is a valuable tool for the study of oxidative stress, as well as for improving spatial resolution for HRPF studies.

  13. Identification of peptides in functional Scamorza ovine milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Albenzio, M; Santillo, A; Marino, R; Della Malva, A; Caroprese, M; Sevi, A

    2015-12-01

    Ovine bulk milk was used to produce Scamorza cheese with probiotics: either a mix of Bifidobacterium longum and Bifidobacterium lactis or Lactobacillus acidophilus as the probiotic strains. Peptides obtained from reverse phase-HPLC water-soluble extract of Scamorza cheeses were analyzed using a quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Identified fragments were derived from casein hydrolysis or probiotic bacterial enzymes; some of the fragments showed encrypted peptide sequences that shared structural homology with previously described bioactive peptides in ovine milk and dairy products. Bifidobacterium longum and B. lactis showed greater proteolytic potential both in terms of level of pH 4.6 water-soluble nitrogen extract and ability to generate peptides with potential biofunctionality. Fragments deriving from microbial enzymes may be regarded as tracing fragments useful for monitoring probiotic activity in functional Scamorza cheese.

  14. Identification of bioactive peptide from Oreochromis niloticus skin gelatin.

    PubMed

    Choonpicharn, Sadabpong; Tateing, Suriya; Jaturasitha, Sanchai; Rakariyatham, Nuansri; Suree, Nuttee; Niamsup, Hataichanoke

    2016-02-01

    Fish skin, one type of wastes generated from Nile tilapia processing, is still a good source of collagen and gelatin. Bioactive peptides can be obtained from Nile tilapia skin gelatin by trypsin digestion. Trypsin hydrolysate was subsequently purified by gel filtration chromatography. Trypsin A fraction showed the greatest reducing power (5.138 ± 1.060 μM trolox/mg peptide) among all hydrolysate fractions, while trypsin B fraction from gel filtration column was found to exhibit the best radical scavenging and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities 8.16 ± 2.18 μg trolox/mg peptide and 59.32 ± 9.97 % inhibition, respectively. The most active fraction was subjected to MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS. After annotation by Mascot sequence matching software (Matrix Science) with Ludwig NR Database, two peptide sequences were identified; GPEGPAGAR (MW 810.87 Da) and GETGPAGPAGAAGPAGPR (MW 1490.61 Da). The docking analysis suggested that the shape of the shorter peptide may be slightly more proper, to fit into the binding cleft of the ACE. However, the binding affinities calculated from the docking showed no significant difference between the two peptides. In good agreement with the in silico data, results from the in vitro ACE inhibitory activity with synthetic peptides also showed no significant difference. Both peptides are thus interesting novel candidates suitable for further development as ACE inhibitory and antioxidant agents from the natural source.

  15. Coumarin tags for analysis of peptides by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS. 2. Alexa Fluor 350 tag for increased peptide and protein Identification by LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Pashkova, Anna; Chen, Hsuan-Shen; Rejtar, Tomas; Zang, Xin; Giese, Roger; Andreev, Victor; Moskovets, Eugene; Karger, Barry L

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this study was the development of N-terminal tags to improve peptide identification using high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. Part 1 of the study was focused on the influence of derivatization on the intensities of MALDI-TOF MS signals of peptides. In part 2, various derivatization approaches for the improvement of peptide fragmentation efficiency in MALDI-TOF/TOF MS are explored. We demonstrate that permanent cation tags, while significantly improving signal intensity in the MS mode, lead to severe suppression of MS/MS fragmentation, making these tags unsuitable for high-throughput MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis. In the present work, it was found that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350, a coumarin tag containing a sulfo group, along with guanidation of epsilon-amino groups of Lys, could enhance unimolecular fragmentation of peptides with the formation of a high-intensity y-ion series, while the peptide intensities in the MS mode were not severely affected. LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of tryptic peptides from the SCX fractions of an E. coli lysate revealed improved peptide scores, a doubling of the total number of peptides, and a 30% increase in the number of proteins identified, as a result of labeling. Furthermore, by combining the data from native and labeled samples, confidence in correct identification was increased, as many proteins were identified by different peptides in the native and labeled data sets. Additionally, derivatization was found not to impair chromatographic behavior of peptides. All these factors suggest that labeling with Alexa Fluor 350 is a promising approach to the high-throughput LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analysis of proteomic samples.

  16. Identification of candidate antimicrobial peptides derived from abalone hemocyanin.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jun; Coates, Christopher J; Zhu, Hongtao; Zhu, Ping; Wu, Zujian; Xie, Lianhui

    2015-03-01

    Hemocyanins present in invertebrate hemolymph are multifunctional proteins, responsible for oxygen transport and contributing to innate immunity through phenoloxidase-like activity. In arthropods, hemocyanin has been identified as a source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides during infection. Conversely, no hemocyanin-derived antimicrobial peptides have been reported for molluscs. The present study describes a putative antimicrobial region, termed haliotisin, located within the linking sequence between the α-helical domain and β-sheet domain of abalone (Haliotis tuberculata) hemocyanin functional unit E. A series of synthetic peptides based on overlapping fragments of the haliotisin region were tested for their bactericidal potential. Incubating Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in the presence of certain haliotisin peptides, notably peptides 3-4-5 (DTFDYKKFGYRYDSLELEGRSISRIDELIQQRQEKDRTFAGFLLKGFGTSAS) led to reductions in microbial growth. Furthermore, transmission electron micrographs of haliotisin-treated bacteria revealed damages to the microbial cell wall. Data discussed here provides the first evidence to suggest that molluscan hemocyanin may act as a source of anti-infective peptides.

  17. Combinatorial Approach for Large-scale Identification of Linked Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Anania, Veronica G.; Knott, Jeff; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Bourne, Philip E.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    The combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry has recently been shown to constitute a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions and elucidating the structure of large protein complexes. However, computational methods for interpreting the complex MS/MS spectra from linked peptides are still in their infancy, making the high-throughput application of this approach largely impractical. Because of the lack of large annotated datasets, most current approaches do not capture the specific fragmentation patterns of linked peptides and therefore are not optimal for the identification of cross-linked peptides. Here we propose a generic approach to address this problem and demonstrate it using disulfide-bridged peptide libraries to (i) efficiently generate large mass spectral reference data for linked peptides at a low cost and (ii) automatically train an algorithm that can efficiently and accurately identify linked peptides from MS/MS spectra. We show that using this approach we were able to identify thousands of MS/MS spectra from disulfide-bridged peptides through comparison with proteome-scale sequence databases and significantly improve the sensitivity of cross-linked peptide identification. This allowed us to identify 60% more direct pairwise interactions between the protein subunits in the 20S proteasome complex than existing tools on cross-linking studies of the proteasome complexes. The basic framework of this approach and the MS/MS reference dataset generated should be valuable resources for the future development of new tools for the identification of linked peptides. PMID:24493012

  18. Probabilistic consensus scoring improves tandem mass spectrometry peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Nahnsen, Sven; Bertsch, Andreas; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Nordheim, Alfred; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2011-08-05

    Database search is a standard technique for identifying peptides from their tandem mass spectra. To increase the number of correctly identified peptides, we suggest a probabilistic framework that allows the combination of scores from different search engines into a joint consensus score. Central to the approach is a novel method to estimate scores for peptides not found by an individual search engine. This approach allows the estimation of p-values for each candidate peptide and their combination across all search engines. The consensus approach works better than any single search engine across all different instrument types considered in this study. Improvements vary strongly from platform to platform and from search engine to search engine. Compared to the industry standard MASCOT, our approach can identify up to 60% more peptides. The software for consensus predictions is implemented in C++ as part of OpenMS, a software framework for mass spectrometry. The source code is available in the current development version of OpenMS and can easily be used as a command line application or via a graphical pipeline designer TOPPAS.

  19. How Prior Knowledge Affects Word Identification and Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priebe, Sarah J.; Keenan, Janice M.; Miller, Amanda C.

    2012-01-01

    While prior knowledge of a passage topic is known to facilitate comprehension, little is known about how it affects word identification. We examined oral reading errors in good and poor readers when reading a passage where they either had prior knowledge of the passage topic or did not. Children who had prior knowledge of the topic were matched on…

  20. MSblender: a probabilistic approach for integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taejoon; Choi, Hyungwon; Vogel, Christine; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics using mass spectrometry is a powerful method for protein identification but suffers limited sensitivity in complex samples. Integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines is a promising strategy to increase the number of peptide identifications and reduce the volume of unassigned tandem mass spectra. Existing methods pool statistical significance scores such as p-values or posterior probabilities of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from multiple search engines after high scoring peptides have been assigned to spectra, but these methods lack reliable control of identification error rates as data are integrated from different search engines. We developed a statistically coherent method for integrative analysis, termed MSblender. MSblender converts raw search scores from search engines into a probability score for all possible PSMs and properly accounts for the correlation between search scores. The method reliably estimates false discovery rates and identifies more PSMs than any single search engine at the same false discovery rate. Increased identifications increment spectral counts for all detected proteins and allow quantification of proteins that would not have been quantified by individual search engines. We also demonstrate that enhanced quantification contributes to improve sensitivity in differential expression analyses. PMID:21488652

  1. MSblender: A probabilistic approach for integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taejoon; Choi, Hyungwon; Vogel, Christine; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Marcotte, Edward M

    2011-07-01

    Shotgun proteomics using mass spectrometry is a powerful method for protein identification but suffers limited sensitivity in complex samples. Integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines is a promising strategy to increase the number of peptide identifications and reduce the volume of unassigned tandem mass spectra. Existing methods pool statistical significance scores such as p-values or posterior probabilities of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from multiple search engines after high scoring peptides have been assigned to spectra, but these methods lack reliable control of identification error rates as data are integrated from different search engines. We developed a statistically coherent method for integrative analysis, termed MSblender. MSblender converts raw search scores from search engines into a probability score for every possible PSM and properly accounts for the correlation between search scores. The method reliably estimates false discovery rates and identifies more PSMs than any single search engine at the same false discovery rate. Increased identifications increment spectral counts for most proteins and allow quantification of proteins that would not have been quantified by individual search engines. We also demonstrate that enhanced quantification contributes to improve sensitivity in differential expression analyses.

  2. Peptide-based identification of functional motifs and their binding partners.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Martin N; Huang, Ming Bo; Ali, Syed; Johnson, Kateena; Roth, William; Powell, Michael; Bond, Vincent

    2013-06-30

    Specific short peptides derived from motifs found in full-length proteins, in our case HIV-1 Nef, not only retain their biological function, but can also competitively inhibit the function of the full-length protein. A set of 20 Nef scanning peptides, 20 amino acids in length with each overlapping 10 amino acids of its neighbor, were used to identify motifs in Nef responsible for its induction of apoptosis. Peptides containing these apoptotic motifs induced apoptosis at levels comparable to the full-length Nef protein. A second peptide, derived from the Secretion Modification Region (SMR) of Nef, retained the ability to interact with cellular proteins involved in Nef's secretion in exosomes (exNef). This SMRwt peptide was used as the "bait" protein in co-immunoprecipitation experiments to isolate cellular proteins that bind specifically to Nef's SMR motif. Protein transfection and antibody inhibition was used to physically disrupt the interaction between Nef and mortalin, one of the isolated SMR-binding proteins, and the effect was measured with a fluorescent-based exNef secretion assay. The SMRwt peptide's ability to outcompete full-length Nef for cellular proteins that bind the SMR motif, make it the first inhibitor of exNef secretion. Thus, by employing the techniques described here, which utilize the unique properties of specific short peptides derived from motifs found in full-length proteins, one may accelerate the identification of functional motifs in proteins and the development of peptide-based inhibitors of pathogenic functions.

  3. Peptidomic identification and biological validation of neuroendocrine regulatory peptide-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hideki; Sasaki, Kazuki; Satomi, Yoshinori; Shimbara, Takuya; Kageyama, Haruaki; Mondal, Muhtashan S; Toshinai, Koji; Date, Yukari; González, Luis J; Shioda, Seiji; Takao, Toshifumi; Nakazato, Masamitsu; Minamino, Naoto

    2007-09-07

    Recent advances in peptidomics have enabled the identification of previously uncharacterized peptides. However, sequence information alone does not allow us to identify candidates for bioactive peptides. To increase an opportunity to discover bioactive peptides, we have focused on C-terminal amidation, a post-translational modification shared by many bioactive peptides. We analyzed peptides secreted from human medullary thyroid carcinoma TT cells that produce amidated peptides, and we identified two novel amidated peptides, designated neuroendocrine regulatory peptide (NERP)-1 and NERP-2. NERPs are derived from distinct regions of the neurosecretory protein that was originally identified as a product of a nerve growth factor-responsive gene in PC12 cells. Mass spectrometric analysis of the immunoprecipitate using specific antibodies as well as reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with radioimmunoassay analysis of brain extract demonstrated the endogenous presence of NERP-1 and NERP-2 in the rat. NERPs are abundant in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the rat hypothalamus and colocalized frequently with vasopressin but rarely with oxytocin. NERPs dose-dependently suppressed vasopressin release induced by intracerebroventricular injection of hypertonic NaCl or angiotensin II in vivo. NERPs also suppressed basal and angiotensin II-induced vasopressin secretion from hypothalamic explants in vitro. Bioactivity of NERPs required C-terminal amidation. Anti-NERP IgGs canceled plasma vasopressin reduction in response to water loading, indicating that NERPs could be potent endogenous suppressors of vasopressin release. These findings suggest that NERPs are novel modulators in body fluid homeostasis.

  4. Identification and rational design of novel antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Jose F; Muñoz, Alberto; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Misra, Santosh; López-García, Belén

    2008-01-01

    Peptides and small proteins exhibiting antimicrobial activity have been isolated from many organisms ranging from insects to humans, including plants. Their role in defense is established, and their use in agriculture was already being proposed shortly after their discovery. However, some natural peptides have undesirable properties that complicate their application. Advances in peptide synthesis and high-throughput activity screening have made possible the de novo and rational design of novel peptides with improved properties. This review summarizes findings in the identification and design of short antimicrobial peptides with activity against plant pathogens, and will discuss alternatives for their heterologous production suited to plant disease control. Recent studies suggest that peptide antimicrobial action is not due solely to microbe permeation as previously described, but that more subtle factors might account for the specificity and absence of toxicity of some peptides. The elucidation of the mode of action and interaction with microbes will assist the improvement of peptide design with a view to targeting specific problems in agriculture and providing new tools for plant protection.

  5. Identification and Analysis of Multivalent Proteolytically Resistant Peptides from Gluten: Implications for Celiac Sprue

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lu; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Molberg, Øyvind; Gray, Gary M.; Sollid, Ludvig M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-01-01

    Dietary gluten proteins from wheat, rye and barley are the primary triggers for the immuno-pathogenesis of Celiac Sprue, a widespread immune disease of the small intestine. Recent molecular and structural analyses of representative gluten proteins, most notably α- and γ-gliadin proteins from wheat, have improved our understanding of these pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, based on the properties of a 33-mer peptide, generated from α-gliadin under physiological conditions, a link between digestive resistance and inflammatory character of gluten has been proposed. Here we report three lines of investigation in support of this hypothesis. First, biochemical and immunological analysis of deletion mutants of α-2 gliadin confirmed that the DQ2 restricted T cell response to the α-2 gliadin are directed towards the epitopes clustered within the 33-mer. Second, proteolytic analysis of a representative γ-gliadin led to the identification of another multivalent 26-mer peptide that was also resistant to further gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush border degradation, and was a good substrate of human transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Analogous to the 33-mer, the synthetic 26-mer peptide displayed markedly enhanced T cell antigenicity compared to monovalent control peptides. Finally, in silico analysis of the gluten proteome led to the identification of at least 60 putative peptides that share the common characteristics of the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides. Together, these results highlight the pivotal role of physiologically generated, proteolytically stable, TG2-reactive, multivalent peptides in the immune response to dietary gluten in Celiac Sprue patients. Prolyl endopeptidase treatment was shown to abolish the antigenicity of both the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides, and was also predicted to have comparable effects on other proline-rich putatively immunotoxic peptides identified from other polypeptides within the gluten proteome. PMID:16212427

  6. Identification and analysis of multivalent proteolytically resistant peptides from gluten: implications for celiac sprue.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lu; Qiao, Shuo-Wang; Arentz-Hansen, Helene; Molberg, Øyvind; Gray, Gary M; Sollid, Ludvig M; Khosla, Chaitan

    2005-01-01

    Dietary gluten proteins from wheat, rye, and barley are the primary triggers for the immuno-pathogenesis of Celiac Sprue, a widespread immune disease of the small intestine. Recent molecular and structural analyses of representative gluten proteins, most notably alpha- and gamma-gliadin proteins from wheat, have improved our understanding of these pathogenic mechanisms. In particular, based on the properties of a 33-mer peptide, generated from alpha-gliadin under physiological conditions, a link between digestive resistance and inflammatory character of gluten has been proposed. Here, we report three lines of investigation in support of this hypothesis. First, biochemical and immunological analysis of deletion mutants of alpha-2 gliadin confirmed that the DQ2 restricted T cell response to the alpha-2 gliadin are directed toward the epitopes clustered within the 33-mer. Second, proteolytic analysis of a representative gamma-gliadin led to the identification of another multivalent 26-mer peptide that was also resistant to further gastric, pancreatic and intestinal brush border degradation, and was a good substrate of human transglutaminase 2 (TG2). Analogous to the 33-mer, the synthetic 26-mer peptide displayed markedly enhanced T cell antigenicity compared to monovalent control peptides. Finally, in silico analysis of the gluten proteome led to the identification of at least 60 putative peptides that share the common characteristics of the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides. Together, these results highlight the pivotal role of physiologically generated, proteolytically stable, TG2-reactive, multivalent peptides in the immune response to dietary gluten in Celiac Sprue patients. Prolyl endopeptidase treatment was shown to abolish the antigenicity of both the 33-mer and the 26-mer peptides, and was also predicted to have comparable effects on other proline-rich putatively immunotoxic peptides identified from other polypeptides within the gluten proteome.

  7. Charge State Coalescence During Electrospray Ionization Improves Peptide Identification by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jesse G.; A. Komives, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    We report the effects of supercharging reagents dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and m-nitrobenzyl alcohol ( m-NBA) applied to untargeted peptide identification, with special emphasis on non-tryptic peptides. Peptides generated from a mixture of five standard proteins digested with trypsin, elastase, or pepsin were separated with nanoflow liquid chromatography using mobile phases modified with either 5 % DMSO or 0.1 % m-NBA. Eluting peptides were ionized by online electrospray and sequenced by both CID and ETD using data-dependent MS/MS. Statistically significant improvements in peptide identifications were observed with DMSO co-solvent. In order to understand this observation, we assessed the effects of supercharging reagents on the chromatographic separation and the electrospray quality. The increase in identifications was not due to supercharging, which was greater for the 0.1 % m-NBA co-solvent and not observed for the 5.0 % DMSO co-solvent. The improved MS/MS efficiency using the DMSO modified mobile phase appeared to result from charge state coalescence.

  8. Ubiquitin Ligase Substrate Identification through Quantitative Proteomics at Both the Protein and Peptide Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kimberly A.; Hammerle, Lisa P.; Andrews, Paul S.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Mustelin, Tomas; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Black, Roy A.; Doedens, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a key regulatory process essential to life at a cellular level; significant efforts have been made to identify ubiquitinated proteins through proteomics studies, but the level of success has not reached that of heavily studied post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. HRD1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, has been implicated in rheumatoid arthritis, but no disease-relevant substrates have been identified. To identify these substrates, we have taken both peptide and protein level approaches to enrich for ubiquitinated proteins in the presence and absence of HRD1. At the protein level, a two-step strategy was taken using cells expressing His6-tagged ubiquitin, enriching proteins first based on their ubiquitination and second based on the His tag with protein identification by LC-MS/MS. Application of this method resulted in identification and quantification of more than 400 ubiquitinated proteins, a fraction of which were found to be sensitive to HRD1 and were therefore deemed candidate substrates. In a second approach, ubiquitinated peptides were enriched after tryptic digestion by peptide immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for the diglycine-labeled internal lysine residue indicative of protein ubiquitination, with peptides and ubiquitination sites identified by LC-MS/MS. Peptide immunoprecipitation resulted in identification of over 1800 ubiquitinated peptides on over 900 proteins in each study, with several proteins emerging as sensitive to HRD1 levels. Notably, significant overlap exists between the HRD1 substrates identified by the protein-based and the peptide-based strategies, with clear cross-validation apparent both qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating the effectiveness of both strategies and furthering our understanding of HRD1 biology. PMID:21987572

  9. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001). These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa Peptides Responsible for Allergic Sensitization and Characterization of Functional Interactions between Cyanobacterial Toxins and Immunogenic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Geh, Esmond N.; Ghosh, Debajyoti; McKell, Melanie; de la Cruz, Armah A.; Stelma, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    . Identification of Microcystis aeruginosa peptides responsible for allergic sensitization and characterization of functional interactions between cyanobacterial toxins and immunogenic peptides. Environ Health Perspect 123:1159–1166; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409065 PMID:25902363

  11. Multi-species Identification of Polymorphic Peptide Variants via Propagation in Spectral Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Seungjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Bandeira, Nuno

    2016-09-08

    The spectral networks approach enables the detection of pairs of spectra from related peptides and thus allows for the propagation of annotations from identified peptides to unidentified spectra. Beyond allowing for unbiased discovery of unexpected post-translational modifications, spectral networks are also applicable to multi-species comparative proteomics or metaproteomics to identify numerous orthologous versions of a protein. We present algorithmic and statistical advances in spectral networks that have made it possible to rigorously assess the statistical significance of spectral pairs and accurately estimate the error rate of identifications via propagation. In the analysis of three related Cyanothece species, a model organism for biohydrogen production, spectral networks identified peptides with highly divergent sequences with up to dozens of variants per peptide, including many novel peptides in species that lack a sequenced genome. Furthermore, spectral networks strongly suggested the presence of novel peptides even in genomically characterized species (i.e. missing from databases) in that a significant portion of unidentified multi-species networks included at least two polymorphic peptide variants.

  12. A statistical model-building perspective to identification of MS/MS spectra with PeptideProphet.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kelvin; Vitek, Olga; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2012-01-01

    PeptideProphet is a post-processing algorithm designed to evaluate the confidence in identifications of MS/MS spectra returned by a database search. In this manuscript we describe the "what and how" of PeptideProphet in a manner aimed at statisticians and life scientists who would like to gain a more in-depth understanding of the underlying statistical modeling. The theory and rationale behind the mixture-modeling approach taken by PeptideProphet is discussed from a statistical model-building perspective followed by a description of how a model can be used to express confidence in the identification of individual peptides or sets of peptides. We also demonstrate how to evaluate the quality of model fit and select an appropriate model from several available alternatives. We illustrate the use of PeptideProphet in association with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free suite of software used for protein identification.

  13. Overcoming Species Boundaries in Peptide Identification with Bayesian Information Criterion-driven Error-tolerant Peptide Search (BICEPS)*

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Bernhard Y.; Xu, Buote; Kirchner, Marc; Zickmann, Franziska; Winter, Dominic; Korten, Simone; Brattig, Norbert W.; Tzur, Amit; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Steen, Hanno

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the reliable identification of peptides and proteins is only feasible when thoroughly annotated sequence databases are available. Although sequencing capacities continue to grow, many organisms remain without reliable, fully annotated reference genomes required for proteomic analyses. Standard database search algorithms fail to identify peptides that are not exactly contained in a protein database. De novo searches are generally hindered by their restricted reliability, and current error-tolerant search strategies are limited by global, heuristic tradeoffs between database and spectral information. We propose a Bayesian information criterion-driven error-tolerant peptide search (BICEPS) and offer an open source implementation based on this statistical criterion to automatically balance the information of each single spectrum and the database, while limiting the run time. We show that BICEPS performs as well as current database search algorithms when such algorithms are applied to sequenced organisms, whereas BICEPS only uses a remotely related organism database. For instance, we use a chicken instead of a human database corresponding to an evolutionary distance of more than 300 million years (International Chicken Genome Sequencing Consortium (2004) Sequence and comparative analysis of the chicken genome provide unique perspectives on vertebrate evolution. Nature 432, 695–716). We demonstrate the successful application to cross-species proteomics with a 33% increase in the number of identified proteins for a filarial nematode sample of Litomosoides sigmodontis. PMID:22493179

  14. Identification of a signal peptide for oryzacystatin-I.

    PubMed

    Womack, J S; Randall, J; Kemp, J D

    2000-04-01

    A previously unidentified extension of an open reading frame from the genomic DNA of Japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) encoding oryzacystatin-I (OC-I; access. M29259, protein ID AAA33912.1) has been identified as a 5' gene segment coding for the OC-I signal peptide. The signal peptide appears to direct a pre-protein (SPOC-I; Accession No. AF164378) to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is processed into the mature form of OC-I. The start codon of SPOC-I begins 114 bp upstream from that previously published for OC-I. A putative proteolytic site. which may yield a mature OC-I approximately 12 residues larger than previously described, has been identified within SPOC-I between Ala-26 and Glu-27. The signal peptide sequence was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using genomic DNA from O. sativa seedlings and ligated to the 5' end of the truncated OC-I gene at the endogenous SalI site. Partially purified protein extracts from Escherichia coli expressing SPOC-I reacted with polyclonal antibodies raised against OC-I and revealed a protein of the expected molecular weight (15,355 Da). In-vitro translation of SPOC-I in the presence of microsomal membranes yielded a processed product approximately 2.7 kDa smaller than the pre-protein. Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi plants independently transformed with the SPOC-I gene processed SPOC-I and accumulated the mature form of OC-I (approximately 12.6 kDa), which co-migrated with natural, mature OC-I extracted from rice seed when separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  15. Estimating Probabilities of Peptide Database Identifications to LC-FTICR-MS Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Kevin K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Daly, Don S.

    2006-02-24

    One of the grand challenges in the post-genomic era is proteomics, the characterization of the proteins expressed in a cell under specific conditions. A promising technology for high-throughput proteomics is mass spectrometry, specifically liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR-MS). The accuracy and certainty of the determinations of peptide identities and abundances provided by LC-FTICR-MS are an important and necessary component of systems biology research. Methods: After a tryptically digested protein mixture is analyzed by LC-FTICR-MS, the observed masses and normalized elution times of the detected features are statistically matched to the theoretical masses and elution times of known peptides listed in a large database. The probability of matching is estimated for each peptide in the reference database using statistical classification methods assuming bivariate Gaussian probability distributions on the uncertainties in the masses and the normalized elution times. A database of 69,220 features from 32 LC-FTICR-MS analyses of a tryptically digested bovine serum albumin (BSA) sample was matched to a database populated with 97% false positive peptides. The percentage of high confidence identifications was found to be consistent with other database search procedures. BSA database peptides were identified with high confidence on average in 14.1 of the 32 analyses. False positives were identified on average in just 2.7 analyses. Using a priori probabilities that contrast peptides from expected and unexpected proteins was shown to perform better in identifying target peptides than using equally likely a priori probabilities. This is because a large percentage of the target peptides were similar to unexpected peptides which were included to be false positives. The use of triplicate analyses with a ''2 out of 3'' reporting rule was shown to have excellent rejection of false positives.

  16. Identification of the core regulators of the HLA I-peptide binding process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hang; Xing, Zhihao; Liu, Chenglin; Wang, ShaoPeng; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong; Kong, Xiangyin

    2017-01-01

    During the display of peptide/human leukocyte antigen (HLA) -I complex for further immune recognition, the cleaved and transported antigenic peptides have to bind to HLA-I protein and the binding affinity between peptide epitopes and HLA proteins directly influences the immune recognition ability in human beings. Key factors affecting the binding affinity during the generation, selection and presentation processes of HLA-I complex have not yet been fully discovered. In this study, a new method describing the HLA class I-peptide interactions was proposed. Three hundred and forty features of HLA I proteins and peptide sequences were utilized for analysis by four candidate algorithms, screening the optimal classifier. Features derived from the optimal classifier were further selected and systematically analyzed, revealing the core regulators. The results validated the hypothesis that features of HLA I proteins and related peptides simultaneously affect the binding process, though with discrepant redundancy. Besides, the high relative ratio (16/20) of the amino acid composition features suggests the unique role of sequence signatures for the binding processes. Integrating biological, evolutionary and chemical features of both HLA I molecules and peptides, this study may provide a new perspective of the underlying mechanisms of HLA I-mediated immune reactions. PMID:28211542

  17. Target Promiscuity and Heterogeneous Effects of Tarantula Venom Peptides Affecting Na+ and K+ Ion Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Redaelli, Elisa; Cassulini, Rita Restano; Silva, Deyanira Fuentes; Clement, Herlinda; Schiavon, Emanuele; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Odell, George; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Alagón, Alejandro; de la Vega, Ricardo C. Rodríguez; Possani, Lourival D.; Wanke, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Venom-derived peptide modulators of ion channel gating are regarded as essential tools for understanding the molecular motions that occur during the opening and closing of ion channels. In this study, we present the characterization of five spider toxins on 12 human voltage-gated ion channels, following observations about the target promiscuity of some spider toxins and the ongoing revision of their “canonical” gating-modifying mode of action. The peptides were purified de novo from the venom of Grammostola rosea tarantulas, and their sequences were confirmed by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis. Their effects on seven tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, the three human ether-à-go-go (hERG)-related K+ channels, and two human Shaker-related K+ channels were extensively characterized by electrophysiological techniques. All the peptides inhibited ion conduction through all the Na+ channels tested, although with distinctive patterns. The peptides also affected the three pharmaceutically relevant hERG isoforms differently. At higher concentrations, all peptides also modified the gating of the Na+ channels by shifting the activation to more positive potentials, whereas more complex effects were recorded on hERG channels. No effects were evident on the two Shaker-related K+ channels at concentrations well above the IC50 value for the affected channels. Given the sequence diversity of the tested peptides, we propose that tarantula toxins should be considered both as multimode and target-promiscuous ion channel modulators; both features should not be ignored when extracting mechanistic interpretations about ion channel gating. Our observations could also aid in future structure-function studies and might help the development of novel ion channel-specific drugs. PMID:19955179

  18. Dereplication, sequencing and identification of peptidic natural products: from genome mining to peptidogenomics to spectral networks.

    PubMed

    Mohimani, Hosein; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    Covering: 2000 to 2015. While recent breakthroughs in the discovery of peptide antibiotics and other Peptidic Natural Products (PNPs) raise a challenge for developing new algorithms for their analyses, the computational technologies for high-throughput PNP discovery are still lacking. We discuss the computational bottlenecks in analyzing PNPs and review recent advances in genome mining, peptidogenomics, and spectral networks that are now enabling the discovery of new PNPs via mass spectrometry. We further describe the connections between these advances and the new generation of software tools for PNP dereplication, de novo sequencing, and identification.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Identification of Peptides Associated with Cephalic Ganglia Regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea*

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Ta-Hsuan; Romanova, Elena V.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Yang, Ning; Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Collins, James J.; Lee, Ji Eun; Kelleher, Neil L.; Newmark, Phillip A.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves a mosaic of molecules that vary spatially and temporally. Insights into the chemical signaling underlying this process can be achieved with a multiplex and untargeted chemical imaging method such as mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), which can enable de novo studies of nervous system regeneration. A combination of MSI and multivariate statistics was used to differentiate peptide dynamics in the freshwater planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea at different time points during cephalic ganglia regeneration. A protocol was developed to make S. mediterranea tissues amenable for MSI. MS ion images of planarian tissue sections allow changes in peptides and unknown compounds to be followed as a function of cephalic ganglia regeneration. In conjunction with fluorescence imaging, our results suggest that even though the cephalic ganglia structure is visible after 6 days of regeneration, the original chemical composition of these regenerated structures is regained only after 12 days. Differences were observed in many peptides, such as those derived from secreted peptide 4 and EYE53-1. Peptidomic analysis further identified multiple peptides from various known prohormones, histone proteins, and DNA- and RNA-binding proteins as being associated with the regeneration process. Mass spectrometry data also facilitated the identification of a new prohormone, which we have named secreted peptide prohormone 20 (SPP-20), and is up-regulated during regeneration in planarians. PMID:26884331

  20. A peptide-retrieval strategy enables significant improvement of quantitative performance without compromising confidence of identification.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Shen, Shichen; Sheng, Quanhu; Shyr, Yu; Qu, Jun

    2017-01-30

    Reliable quantification of low-abundance proteins in complex proteomes is challenging largely owing to the limited number of spectra/peptides identified. In this study we developed a straightforward method to improve the quantitative accuracy and precision of proteins by strategically retrieving the less confident peptides that were previously filtered out using the standard target-decoy search strategy. The filtered-out MS/MS spectra matched to confidently-identified proteins were recovered, and the peptide-spectrum-match FDR were re-calculated and controlled at a confident level of FDR≤1%, while protein FDR maintained at ~1%. We evaluated the performance of this strategy in both spectral count- and ion current-based methods. >60% increase of total quantified spectra/peptides was respectively achieved for analyzing a spike-in sample set and a public dataset from CPTAC. Incorporating the peptide retrieval strategy significantly improved the quantitative accuracy and precision, especially for low-abundance proteins (e.g. one-hit proteins). Moreover, the capacity of confidently discovering significantly-altered proteins was also enhanced substantially, as demonstrated with two spike-in datasets. In summary, improved quantitative performance was achieved by this peptide recovery strategy without compromising confidence of protein identification, which can be readily implemented in a broad range of quantitative proteomics techniques including label-free or labeling approaches.

  1. Mass Spectrometry Imaging and Identification of Peptides Associated with Cephalic Ganglia Regeneration in Schmidtea mediterranea.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ta-Hsuan; Romanova, Elena V; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H; Yang, Ning; Zimmerman, Tyler A; Collins, James J; Lee, Ji Eun; Kelleher, Neil L; Newmark, Phillip A; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2016-04-08

    Tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves a mosaic of molecules that vary spatially and temporally. Insights into the chemical signaling underlying this process can be achieved with a multiplex and untargeted chemical imaging method such as mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), which can enablede novostudies of nervous system regeneration. A combination of MSI and multivariate statistics was used to differentiate peptide dynamics in the freshwater planarian flatwormSchmidtea mediterraneaat different time points during cephalic ganglia regeneration. A protocol was developed to makeS. mediterraneatissues amenable for MSI. MS ion images of planarian tissue sections allow changes in peptides and unknown compounds to be followed as a function of cephalic ganglia regeneration. In conjunction with fluorescence imaging, our results suggest that even though the cephalic ganglia structure is visible after 6 days of regeneration, the original chemical composition of these regenerated structures is regained only after 12 days. Differences were observed in many peptides, such as those derived from secreted peptide 4 and EYE53-1. Peptidomic analysis further identified multiple peptides from various known prohormones, histone proteins, and DNA- and RNA-binding proteins as being associated with the regeneration process. Mass spectrometry data also facilitated the identification of a new prohormone, which we have named secreted peptide prohormone 20 (SPP-20), and is up-regulated during regeneration in planarians.

  2. Protein identification: the origins of peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Henzel, William J; Watanabe, Colin; Stults, John T

    2003-09-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) grew from a need for a faster, more efficient method to identify frequently observed proteins in electrophoresis gels. We describe the genesis of the idea in 1989, and show the first demonstration with fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. Despite its promise, the method was seldom used until 1992, with the coming of significantly more sensitive commercial instrumentation based on MALDI-TOF-MS. We recount the evolution of the method and its dependence on a number of technical breakthroughs, both in mass spectrometry and in other areas. We show how it laid the foundation for high-throughput, high-sensitivity methods of protein analysis, now known as proteomics. We conclude with recommendations for further improvements, and speculation of the role of PMF in the future.

  3. How Prior Knowledge Affects Word Identification and Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Sarah J.; Keenan, Janice M.; Miller, Amanda C.

    2011-01-01

    While prior knowledge of a passage topic is known to facilitate comprehension, little is known about how it affects word identification. We examined oral reading errors in good and poor readers when reading a passage where they either had prior knowledge of the passage topic or did not. Children who had prior knowledge of the topic were matched on decoding skill to children who did not know the topic so that the groups differed only on knowledge of the passage topic. Prior knowledge of the passage topic was found to significantly increase fluency and reduce reading errors, especially errors based on graphic information, in poor readers. Two possible mechanisms of how prior knowledge might operate to facilitate word identification were evaluated using the pattern of error types, as was the relationship of errors to comprehension. Implications of knowledge effects for assessment and educational policy are discussed. PMID:21799586

  4. A chirality change in XPC- and Sfi1-derived peptides affects their affinity for centrin.

    PubMed

    Grecu, Dora; Irudayaraj, Victor Paul Raj; Martinez-Sanz, Juan; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Assairi, Liliane

    2016-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein centrin binds to a hydrophobic motif (W(1)xxL(4)xxxL(8)) included in the sequence of several cellular targets: XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein), Sfi1 (suppressor of fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance protein1), and Sac3 [the central component of the transcription and mRNA export (TREX-2) complex]. However, centrin binding occurs in a reversed orientation (L(8)xxxL(4)xxW(1)) for Sfi1 and Sac3 compared with XPC. Because D-peptides have been investigated for future therapeutic use, we analyzed their centrin-binding properties. Their affinity for centrin was measured using isothermal titration calorimetry. The chirality change in the target-derived peptides affected their ability to bind centrin in a specific manner depending on the sequence orientation of the centrin-binding motif. In contrast to L-XPC-P10, D-XPC-P10 bound C-HsCen1 in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and to a lesser extent. D-XPC-P10 exhibited a reduced affinity for C-HsCen1 (Ka=0.064 × 10(6) M(-1)) by a factor of 2000 compared with L-XPC-P10 (Ka=132 × 10(6) M(-1)). D-peptides have a lower affinity than L-peptides for centrin, and the strength of this affinity depends on the sequence orientation of the target-derived peptides. The residual affinity observed for D-XPC suggests that the use of d-peptides represents a promising strategy for inhibiting centrin binding to its targets.

  5. Identification of Drosophila Mutants Affecting Defense to an Entomopathogenic Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hsiao-Ling; Wang, Jonathan B.; Brown, Markus A.; Euerle, Christopher; St. Leger, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Fungi cause the majority of insect disease. However, to date attempts to model host–fungal interactions with Drosophila have focused on opportunistic human pathogens. Here, we performed a screen of 2,613 mutant Drosophila lines to identify host genes affecting susceptibility to the natural insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae (Ma549). Overall, 241 (9.22%) mutant lines had altered resistance to Ma549. Life spans ranged from 3.0 to 6.2 days, with females being more susceptible than males in all lines. Speed of kill correlated with within-host growth and onset of sporulation, but total spore production is decoupled from host genotypes. Results showed that mutations affected the ability of Drosophila to restrain rather than tolerate infections and suggested trade-offs between antifungal and antibacterial genes affecting cuticle and gut structural barriers. Approximately, 13% of mutations where in genes previously associated with host pathogen interactions. These encoded fast-acting immune responses including coagulation, phagocytosis, encapsulation and melanization but not the slow-response induction of anti-fungal peptides. The non-immune genes impact a wide variety of biological functions, including behavioral traits. Many have human orthologs already implicated in human disorders; while others were mutations in protein and non-protein coding genes for which disease resistance was the first biological annotation. PMID:26202798

  6. The identification of a series of novel, soluble non-peptidic neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lunniss, Gillian E; Barnes, Ashley A; Barton, Nick; Biagetti, Matteo; Bianchi, Federica; Blowers, Stephen M; Caberlotto, Laura L; Emmons, Amanda; Holmes, Ian P; Montanari, Dino; Norris, Roz; Puckey, Gemma V; Walters, Dewi J; Watson, Steve P; Willis, John

    2010-12-15

    The identification and subsequent optimisation of a selective non-peptidic NPY Y2 antagonist series is described. This led to the development of amine 2, a selective, soluble NPY Y2 receptor antagonist with enhanced CNS exposure.

  7. Aspartate-bond isomerization affects the major conformations of synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Szendrei, G I; Fabian, H; Mantsch, H H; Lovas, S; Nyéki, O; Schön, I; Otvos, L

    1994-12-15

    The aspartic acid bond changes to an beta-aspartate bond frequently as a side-reaction during peptide synthesis and often as a post-translational modification of proteins. The formation of beta-asparate bonds is reported to play a major role not only in protein metabolism, activation and deactivation, but also in pathological processes such as deposition of the neuritic plaques of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, we reported how conformational changes following the aspartic-acid-bond isomerization may help the selective aggregation and retention of the amyloid beta peptide in affected brains (Fabian et al., 1994). In the current study we used circular dichroism, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular modeling to characterize the general effect of the beta-aspartate-bond formation on the conformation of five sets of synthetic model peptides. Each of the non-modified, parent peptides has one of the major secondary structures as the dominant spectroscopically determined conformation: a type I beta turn, a type II beta turn, short segments of alpha or 3(10) helices, or extended beta strands. We found that both types of turn structures are stabilized by the aspartic acid-bond isomerization. The isomerization at a terminal position did not affect the helix propensity, but placing it in mid-chain broke both the helix and the beta-pleated sheet with the formation of reverse turns. The alteration of the geometry of the lowest energy reverse turn was also supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The tendency of the aspartic acid-bond isomerization to stabilize turns is very similar to the effect of incorporating sugars into synthetic peptides and suggests a common feature of these post-translational modifications in defining the secondary structure of protein fragments.

  8. Data-independent-acquisition mass spectrometry for identification of targeted-peptide site-specific modifications.

    PubMed

    Porter, Caleb J; Bereman, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel strategy based on data-independent acquisition coupled to targeted data extraction for the detection and identification of site-specific modifications of targeted peptides in a completely unbiased manner. This method requires prior knowledge of the site of the modification along the peptide backbone from the protein of interest, but not the mass of the modification. The procedure, named multiplex adduct peptide profiling (MAPP), consists of three steps: 1) A fragment-ion tag is extracted from the data, consisting of the b-type and y-type ion series from the N and C-terminus, respectively, up to the amino-acid position that is believed to be modified; 2) MS1 features are matched to the fragment-ion tag in retention-time space, using the isolation window as a pre-filter to enable calculation of the mass of the modification; and 3) modified fragment ions are overlaid with the unmodified fragment ions to verify the mass calculated in step 2. We discuss the development, applications, and limitations of this new method for detection of unknown peptide modifications. We present an application of the method in profiling adducted peptides derived from abundant proteins in biological fluids with the ultimate objective of detecting biomarkers of exposure to reactive species.

  9. BAGEL3: automated identification of genes encoding bacteriocins and (non-)bactericidal posttranslationally modified peptides

    PubMed Central

    van Heel, Auke J.; de Jong, Anne; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes encoding bacteriocins and ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) can be a challenging task. Especially those peptides that do not have strong homology to previously identified peptides can easily be overlooked. Extensive use of BAGEL2 and user feedback has led us to develop BAGEL3. BAGEL3 features genome mining of prokaryotes, which is largely independent of open reading frame (ORF) predictions and has been extended to cover more (novel) classes of posttranslationally modified peptides. BAGEL3 uses an identification approach that combines direct mining for the gene and indirect mining via context genes. Especially for heavily modified peptides like lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, glycocins and others, this genetic context harbors valuable information that is used for mining purposes. The bacteriocin and context protein databases have been updated and it is now easy for users to submit novel bacteriocins or RiPPs. The output has been simplified to allow user-friendly analysis of the results, in particular for large (meta-genomic) datasets. The genetic context of identified candidate genes is fully annotated. As input, BAGEL3 uses FASTA DNA sequences or folders containing multiple FASTA formatted files. BAGEL3 is freely accessible at http://bagel.molgenrug.nl. PMID:23677608

  10. Identification of small peptides arising from hydrolysis of meat proteins in dry fermented sausages.

    PubMed

    López, Constanza M; Bru, Elena; Vignolo, Graciela M; Fadda, Silvina G

    2015-06-01

    In this study, proteolysis and low molecular weight (LMW) peptides (<3kDa) from commercial Argentinean fermented sausages were characterized by applying a peptidomic approach. Protein profiles and peptides obtained by Tricine-SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC-MS, respectively, allowed distinguishing two different types of fermented sausages, although no specific biomarkers relating to commercial brands or quality were recognized. From electrophoresis, α-actin, myoglobin, creatine kinase M-type and L-lactate dehydrogenase were degraded at different intensities. In addition, a partial characterization of fermented sausage peptidome through the identification of 36 peptides, in the range of 1000-2100 Da, arising from sarcoplasmic (28) and myofibrillar (8) proteins was achieved. These peptides had been originated from α-actin, myoglobin, and creatine kinase M-type, but also from the hydrolysis of other proteins not previously reported. Although muscle enzymes exerted a major role on peptidogenesis, microbial contribution cannot be excluded as it was postulated herein. This work represents a first peptidomic approach for fermented sausages, thereby providing a baseline to define key peptides acting as potential biomarkers.

  11. BAGEL3: Automated identification of genes encoding bacteriocins and (non-)bactericidal posttranslationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    van Heel, Auke J; de Jong, Anne; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2013-07-01

    Identifying genes encoding bacteriocins and ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) can be a challenging task. Especially those peptides that do not have strong homology to previously identified peptides can easily be overlooked. Extensive use of BAGEL2 and user feedback has led us to develop BAGEL3. BAGEL3 features genome mining of prokaryotes, which is largely independent of open reading frame (ORF) predictions and has been extended to cover more (novel) classes of posttranslationally modified peptides. BAGEL3 uses an identification approach that combines direct mining for the gene and indirect mining via context genes. Especially for heavily modified peptides like lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, glycocins and others, this genetic context harbors valuable information that is used for mining purposes. The bacteriocin and context protein databases have been updated and it is now easy for users to submit novel bacteriocins or RiPPs. The output has been simplified to allow user-friendly analysis of the results, in particular for large (meta-genomic) datasets. The genetic context of identified candidate genes is fully annotated. As input, BAGEL3 uses FASTA DNA sequences or folders containing multiple FASTA formatted files. BAGEL3 is freely accessible at http://bagel.molgenrug.nl.

  12. Purification and Molecular Identification of an Antifungal Peptide from the Hemolymph of Musca domestica (housefly)

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ping; Wu, Jianwei; Guo, Guo

    2009-01-01

    Antibacterial and antifungal peptides found in houseflies (Musca domestica) in large number are indispensable components of its immune defense mechanism. In this study the anterior tip of the larvae of housefly was cut off with a pair of fine scissors and hemolymph was collected and exuded in an ice-cold test tube. From the hemolymph an antifungal substance was isolated by solid-phase extraction combined with reverse phase-high performance liquid chromotography (RP-HPLC) and named as Musca domestica antifungal peptide-1 (MAF-1). Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed its molecular weight was 17 kDa. UV absorption spectra revealed that this antifungal substance possessed the characteristics of protein peptides. Analysis by fingerprint-identification and tandem mass spectrometry suggested MAF-1 was an unknown protein. Edman degradation identified the sequence of 30 amino acids of its N-terminal which matched no peptide in the MASCOT search database, indicating MAF-1 was a novel insect antifungal peptide. Mass spectrometry showed the precise molecular weight of MAF-1 was 17203.384 Da. Its isoelectric point was acidic. PMID:19728925

  13. Expression analysis and identification of antimicrobial peptide transcripts from six North American frog species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Laura S.; Fellers, Gary M.; Marranca, Jamie Marie; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Frogs secrete antimicrobial peptides onto their skin. We describe an assay to preserve and analyze antimicrobial peptide transcripts from field-collected skin secretions that will complement existing methods for peptide analysis. We collected skin secretions from 4 North American species in the field in California and 2 species in the laboratory. Most frogs appeared healthy after release; however, Rana boylii in the Sierra Nevada foothills, but not the Coast Range, showed signs of morbidity and 2 died after handling. The amount of total RNA extracted from skin secretions was higher in R. boylii and R. sierrae compared to R. draytonii, and much higher compared to Pseudacris regilla. Interspecies variation in amount of RNA extracted was not explained by size, but for P. regilla it depended upon collection site and date. RNA extracted from skin secretions from frogs handled with bare hands had poor quality compared to frogs handled with gloves or plastic bags. Thirty-four putative antimicrobial peptide precursor transcripts were identified. This study demonstrates that RNA extracted from skin secretions collected in the field is of high quality suitable for use in sequencing or quantitative PCR (qPCR). However, some species do not secrete profusely, resulting in very little extracted RNA. The ability to measure transcript abundance of antimicrobial peptides in field-collected skin secretions complements proteomic analyses and may provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms that could affect peptide abundance.

  14. A Graph-Centric Approach for Metagenome-Guided Peptide and Protein Identification in Metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haixu; Li, Sujun; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-12-01

    Metaproteomic studies adopt the common bottom-up proteomics approach to investigate the protein composition and the dynamics of protein expression in microbial communities. When matched metagenomic and/or metatranscriptomic data of the microbial communities are available, metaproteomic data analyses often employ a metagenome-guided approach, in which complete or fragmental protein-coding genes are first directly predicted from metagenomic (and/or metatranscriptomic) sequences or from their assemblies, and the resulting protein sequences are then used as the reference database for peptide/protein identification from MS/MS spectra. This approach is often limited because protein coding genes predicted from metagenomes are incomplete and fragmental. In this paper, we present a graph-centric approach to improving metagenome-guided peptide and protein identification in metaproteomics. Our method exploits the de Bruijn graph structure reported by metagenome assembly algorithms to generate a comprehensive database of protein sequences encoded in the community. We tested our method using several public metaproteomic datasets with matched metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing data acquired from complex microbial communities in a biological wastewater treatment plant. The results showed that many more peptides and proteins can be identified when assembly graphs were utilized, improving the characterization of the proteins expressed in the microbial communities. The additional proteins we identified contribute to the characterization of important pathways such as those involved in degradation of chemical hazards. Our tools are released as open-source software on github at https://github.com/COL-IU/Graph2Pro.

  15. A Graph-Centric Approach for Metagenome-Guided Peptide and Protein Identification in Metaproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haixu; Li, Sujun; Ye, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Metaproteomic studies adopt the common bottom-up proteomics approach to investigate the protein composition and the dynamics of protein expression in microbial communities. When matched metagenomic and/or metatranscriptomic data of the microbial communities are available, metaproteomic data analyses often employ a metagenome-guided approach, in which complete or fragmental protein-coding genes are first directly predicted from metagenomic (and/or metatranscriptomic) sequences or from their assemblies, and the resulting protein sequences are then used as the reference database for peptide/protein identification from MS/MS spectra. This approach is often limited because protein coding genes predicted from metagenomes are incomplete and fragmental. In this paper, we present a graph-centric approach to improving metagenome-guided peptide and protein identification in metaproteomics. Our method exploits the de Bruijn graph structure reported by metagenome assembly algorithms to generate a comprehensive database of protein sequences encoded in the community. We tested our method using several public metaproteomic datasets with matched metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing data acquired from complex microbial communities in a biological wastewater treatment plant. The results showed that many more peptides and proteins can be identified when assembly graphs were utilized, improving the characterization of the proteins expressed in the microbial communities. The additional proteins we identified contribute to the characterization of important pathways such as those involved in degradation of chemical hazards. Our tools are released as open-source software on github at https://github.com/COL-IU/Graph2Pro. PMID:27918579

  16. Identification of distinct antibody epitopes and mimotopes from a peptide array of 5520 randomly generated sequences.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Ulrich; Ivascu, Claudia; Schlief, Marén; Landgraf, Christiane; Gericke, Seike; Zahn, Grit; Herzel, Hanspeter; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Schneider-Mergener, Jens

    2002-09-01

    We used a relatively small library of 5520 randomly generated single 15-mer peptides prepared by SPOT synthesis as an array of 28.5x19.0 cm to identify epitopes for three distinct monoclonal antibodies, namely anti-p24 (human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1) monoclonal anibody (mab) CB4-1, anti-interleukin-10 (IL-10) mab CB/RS/13, and anti-transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha) mab Tab2. Initially identified peptide ligands mostly had very low affinities for the antibodies with dissociation constants around 10(-4) M. Subsequent identification of residues critical for the antibody interactions involved complete L-amino acid substitutional analyses. Several substitutions resulted in analogs with dissociation constants in the low micromolar and high nanomolar range. Specifically binding peptides with key residue patterns matching the wild-type epitopes were identified for all three antibodies. In addition, for antibody CB4-1 mimotopes that showed no homology to the known epitope were selected. Our results suggest that a very limited library diversity, although far from covering the entire sequence repertoire, can suffice to rapidly and economically select peptidic antibody epitopes and mimotopes.

  17. Identification of distinct physiochemical properties of toxic prefibrillar species formed by A{beta} peptide variants

    SciTech Connect

    Goeransson, Anna-Lena; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Kagedal, Katarina; Brorsson, Ann-Christin

    2012-04-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of toxic prefibrillar A{beta} species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorescence measurements using a combined set of fluorophores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology studies using transmission electron microscopy. -- Abstract: The formation of amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) aggregates at an early stage during the self-assembly process is an important factor in the development of Alzheimer's disease. The toxic effect is believed to be exerted by prefibrillar species of A{beta}. It is therefore important to identify which prefibrillar species are toxic and characterize their distinct properties. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro aggregation behavior of A{beta}-derived peptides possessing different levels of neurotoxic activity, using fluorescence spectroscopy in combination with transmission electron microscopy. The toxicity of various A{beta} aggregates was assessed by using cultures of human neuroblastoma cells. Through combined use of the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-napthalenesulfonate (ANS) and the novel luminescent probe pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid (p-FTAA), we were able to identify those A{beta} peptide-derived prefibrillar species which exhibited cellular toxicity. In particular, species, which formed early during the aggregation process and showed strong p-FTAA and ANS fluorescence, were the species that possessed toxic activities. Moreover, by manipulating the aggregation conditions, it was possible to change the capacity of the A{beta} peptide to form nontoxic versus toxic species.

  18. Identification of a Peptide Produced by Bifidobacterium longum CECT 7210 with Antirotaviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chenoll, Empar; Casinos, Beatriz; Bataller, Esther; Buesa, Javier; Ramón, Daniel; Genovés, Salvador; Fábrega, Joan; Rivero Urgell, Montserrat; Moreno Muñoz, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus is one of the main causes of acute diarrhea and enteritis in infants. Currently, studies are underway to assess the use of probiotics to improve rotavirus vaccine protection. A previous work demonstrated that the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 is able to hinder rotavirus replication both in vitro and in vivo. The present study takes a systematic approach in order to identify the molecule directly involved in rotavirus inhibition. Supernatant protease digestions revealed both the proteinaceous nature of the active substance and the fact that the molecule responsible for inhibiting rotavirus replication is released to the supernatant. Following purification by cationic exchange chromatography, active fractions were obtained and the functional compound was identified as an 11-amino acid peptide (MHQPHQPLPPT, named 11-mer peptide) with a molecular mass of 1.282 KDa. The functionality of 11-mer was verified using the synthesized peptide in Wa, Ito, and VA70 rotavirus infections of both HT-29 and MA-104 cell lines. Finally, protease activity was detected in B. longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 supernatant, which releases 11-mer peptide. A preliminary identification of the protease is also included in the study. PMID:27199974

  19. Building and searching tandem mass (MS/MS) spectral libraries for peptide identification in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lam, Henry; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2011-08-01

    Spectral library searching is an emerging approach in peptide identifications from tandem mass spectra, a critical step in proteomic data analysis. In spectral library searching, a spectral library is first meticulously compiled from a large collection of previously observed peptide MS/MS spectra that are conclusively assigned to their corresponding amino acid sequence. An unknown spectrum is then identified by comparing it to all the candidates in the spectral library for the most similar match. This review discusses the basic principles of spectral library building and searching, describes its advantages and limitations, and provides a primer for researchers interested in adopting this new approach in their data analysis. It will also discuss the future outlook on the evolution and utility of spectral libraries in the field of proteomics.

  20. Molecular identification and characterization of peptide: N-glycanase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Xin Fengxue; Wang Shengjun; Song Lei; Liang Quanfeng; Qi Qingsheng

    2008-04-18

    Peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is an enzyme responsible for deglycosylation of misfolded glycoproteins in so-called endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) system. In this study, we reported the molecular identification and characterization of SpPNGase (Schizosaccharomyces pombe PNGase). Enzymatic analysis revealed that SpPNGase deglycosylated the misfolded glycoproteins and distinguished native and denatured high-mannose glycoproteins in vitro. The deglycosylation activity was lost with the addition of chelating agent EDTA and was not restored by re-addition of metal ions. By construction of deletion mutant, we confirmed that N-terminal {alpha}-helix of SpPNGase was responsible for the protein-protein interaction. Combining the results from ternary structure prediction and dendrogram analysis, we suggested that the N-terminal {alpha}-helices of PNGase are derived from evolutionary motif/peptide fusion.

  1. Identification of Crosslinked Peptides after Click-based Enrichment Using Sequential CID and ETD Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Du, Xiuxia; Tolić, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking combined with mass spectrometry can be a powerful approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions and for providing constraints on protein structures. However, enrichment of crosslinked peptides is crucial to reduce sample complexity before mass spectrometric analysis. In addition compact crosslinkers are often preferred to provide short spacer lengths, surface accessibility to the protein complexes, and must have reasonable solubility under condition where the native complex structure is stable. In this study, we present a novel compact crosslinker that contains two distinct features: 1) an alkyne tag and 2) a small molecule detection tag (NO2-) to maintain reasonable solubility in water. The alkyne tag enables enrichment of the crosslinked peptide after proteolytic cleavage after coupling of an affinity tag using alkyne-azido click chemistry. Neutral loss of the small NO2- moiety provides a secondary means of detecting crosslinked peptides in MS/MS analyses, providing additional confidence in peptide identifications. We show the labeling efficiency of this crosslinker, which we termed CLIP (Click-enabled Linker for Interacting Proteins) using ubiquitin. The enrichment capability of CLIP is demonstrated for crosslinked ubiquitin in highly complex E. coli cell lysates. Sequential CID-MS/MS and ETD-MS/MS of inter-crosslinked peptides (two peptides connected with a crosslinker) are also demonstrated for improved automated identification of crosslinked peptides. PMID:19496583

  2. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis

    PubMed Central

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; Moro, Gianluca De; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling. PMID:26201648

  3. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Family of Cysteine-Rich Peptides (MgCRP-I) from Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Gerdol, Marco; Puillandre, Nicolas; De Moro, Gianluca; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Lucafò, Marianna; Benincasa, Monica; Zlatev, Ventislav; Manfrin, Chiara; Torboli, Valentina; Giulianini, Piero Giulio; Sava, Gianni; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2015-07-21

    We report the identification of a novel gene family (named MgCRP-I) encoding short secreted cysteine-rich peptides in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. These peptides display a highly conserved pre-pro region and a hypervariable mature peptide comprising six invariant cysteine residues arranged in three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Although their cysteine pattern is similar to cysteines-rich neurotoxic peptides of distantly related protostomes such as cone snails and arachnids, the different organization of the disulfide bridges observed in synthetic peptides and phylogenetic analyses revealed MgCRP-I as a novel protein family. Genome- and transcriptome-wide searches for orthologous sequences in other bivalve species indicated the unique presence of this gene family in Mytilus spp. Like many antimicrobial peptides and neurotoxins, MgCRP-I peptides are produced as pre-propeptides, usually have a net positive charge and likely derive from similar evolutionary mechanisms, that is, gene duplication and positive selection within the mature peptide region; however, synthetic MgCRP-I peptides did not display significant toxicity in cultured mammalian cells, insecticidal, antimicrobial, or antifungal activities. The functional role of MgCRP-I peptides in mussel physiology still remains puzzling.

  4. Evaluating de novo sequencing in proteomics: already an accurate alternative to database-driven peptide identification?

    PubMed

    Muth, Thilo; Renard, Bernhard Y

    2017-03-21

    While peptide identifications in mass spectrometry (MS)-based shotgun proteomics are mostly obtained using database search methods, high-resolution spectrum data from modern MS instruments nowadays offer the prospect of improving the performance of computational de novo peptide sequencing. The major benefit of de novo sequencing is that it does not require a reference database to deduce full-length or partial tag-based peptide sequences directly from experimental tandem mass spectrometry spectra. Although various algorithms have been developed for automated de novo sequencing, the prediction accuracy of proposed solutions has been rarely evaluated in independent benchmarking studies. The main objective of this work is to provide a detailed evaluation on the performance of de novo sequencing algorithms on high-resolution data. For this purpose, we processed four experimental data sets acquired from different instrument types from collision-induced dissociation and higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation mode using the software packages Novor, PEAKS and PepNovo. Moreover, the accuracy of these algorithms is also tested on ground truth data based on simulated spectra generated from peak intensity prediction software. We found that Novor shows the overall best performance compared with PEAKS and PepNovo with respect to the accuracy of correct full peptide, tag-based and single-residue predictions. In addition, the same tool outpaced the commercial competitor PEAKS in terms of running time speedup by factors of around 12-17. Despite around 35% prediction accuracy for complete peptide sequences on HCD data sets, taken as a whole, the evaluated algorithms perform moderately on experimental data but show a significantly better performance on simulated data (up to 84% accuracy). Further, we describe the most frequently occurring de novo sequencing errors and evaluate the influence of missing fragment ion peaks and spectral noise on the accuracy. Finally

  5. Combinatorial peptide libraries as an alternative approach to the identification of ligands for tumor-reactive cytolytic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, C; Rubio-Godoy, V; Dutoit, V; Guillaume, P; Simon, R; Zhao, Y; Houghten, R A; Cerottini, J C; Romero, P; Valmori, D

    2001-07-01

    The recent identification of molecularly defined human tumor antigens recognized by autologous CTLs has opened new opportunities for the development of antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Despite extensive work, however, the number of CTL-defined tumor antigens that are suitable targets for generic vaccination of cancer patients is still limited, mostly because of the painstaking and lengthy nature of the procedures currently used for their identification. A novel approach is based on the combined use of combinatorial peptide libraries in positional scanning format (positional scanning synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries, PS-SCLs) and tumor-reactive CTL clones. To validate this approach, we herein analyzed in detail the recognition of PS-SCLs by Melan-A-specific CTL clones. Our results indicate that, at least for some clones, most of the amino acids composing the native antigenic peptide can be identified through the use of PS-SCLs. Interestingly, this analysis also allowed the identification of peptide analogues with increased antigenic activity as well as agonist peptides containing multiple amino-acid substitutions. In addition, biometrical analysis of the data generated by PS-SCL screening allowed the identification of the native ligand in a public database. Overall, these data demonstrate the successful use of PS-SCLs for the identification and optimization of tumor-associated CTL epitopes.

  6. The attack of the phytopathogens and the trumpet solo: Identification of a novel plant antifungal peptide with distinct fold and disulfide bond pattern.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Porto, William F; Dey, Prabuddha; Maiti, Mrinal K; Ghosh, Ananta K; Franco, Octavio L

    2013-10-01

    Phytopathogens cause economic losses in agribusiness. Plant-derived compounds have been proposed to overcome this problem, including the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This paper reports the identification of Ps-AFP1, a novel AMP isolated from the Pisum sativum radicle. Ps-AFP1 was purified and evaluated against phytopathogenic fungi, showing clear effectiveness. In silico analyses were performed, suggesting an unusual fold and disulfide bond pattern. A novel fold and a novel AMP class were here proposed, the αβ-trumpet fold and αβ-trumpet peptides, respectively. The name αβ-trumpet was created due to the peptide's fold, which resembles the musical instrument. The Ps-AFP1 mechanism of action was also proposed. Microscopic analyses revealed that Ps-AFP1 could affect the fungus during the hyphal elongation from spore germination. Furthermore, confocal microscopy performed with Ps-AFP1 labeled with FITC shows that the peptide was localized at high concentration along the fungal cell surface. Due to low cellular disruption rates, it seems that the main target is the fungal cell wall. The binding thermogram and isothermal titration, molecular dynamics and docking analyses were also performed, showing that Ps-AFP1 could bind to chitin producing a stable complex. Data here reported provided novel structural-functional insights into the αβ-trumpet peptide fold.

  7. Milk peptides increase iron dialyzability in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Argyri, Konstantina; Tako, Elad; Miller, Dennis D; Glahn, Raymond P; Komaitis, Michael; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2009-02-25

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether these fractions (a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells and (b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Two milk peptide fractions that solubilize iron were isolated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration of a milk digest. These peptide fractions did not affect relative gene expression of DMT-1 when incubated with Caco-2 cells for 2 or 48 h. Dialyzability was measured after in vitro simulated gastric and pancreatic digestion. Both peptide fractions enhanced the dialyzability of iron from ferric chloride added to PIPES buffer, but had no effect on dialyzability from milk or a vegetable or fruit meal after in vitro simulated gastric and pancreatic digestion. However, dialyzability from milk was enhanced by the addition of a more concentrated lyophilized peptide fraction.

  8. Identification of Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships, Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-17

    Universal Phylogenetic Tree of Bacteria Based on SSU rRNA Sequences Aquificae Termotogae Planctomycetes Actinobacteria Firmicutes Cyanobacteria...Identification of Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins Jacek P...Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived from Cellular Proteins 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  9. Employees’ Organizational Identification and Affective Organizational Commitment: An Integrative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover. PMID:25875086

  10. Employees' organizational identification and affective organizational commitment: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Stinglhamber, Florence; Marique, Géraldine; Caesens, Gaëtane; Desmette, Donatienne; Hansez, Isabelle; Hanin, Dorothée; Bertrand, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have empirically supported the distinction between organizational identification (OI) and affective commitment (AC), there is still disagreement regarding how they are related. Precisely, little attention has been given to the direction of causality between these two constructs and as to why they have common antecedents and outcomes. This research was designed to fill these gaps. Using a cross-lagged panel design with two measurement times, Study 1 examined the directionality of the relationship between OI and AC, and showed that OI is positively related to temporal change in AC, confirming the antecedence of OI on AC. Using a cross-sectional design, Study 2 investigated the mediating role of OI in the relationship between three work experiences (i.e., perceived organizational support, leader-member exchange, and job autonomy) and AC, and found that OI partially mediates the influence of work experiences on AC. Finally, Study 3 examined longitudinally how OI and AC combine in the prediction of actual turnover, and showed that AC totally mediates the relationship between OI and turnover. Overall, these findings suggest that favorable work experiences operate via OI to increase employees' AC that, in turn, decreases employee turnover.

  11. Spectrum-based method to generate good decoy libraries for spectral library searching in peptide identifications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chia-Ying; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2013-05-03

    As spectral library searching has received increasing attention for peptide identification, constructing good decoy spectra from the target spectra is the key to correctly estimating the false discovery rate in searching against the concatenated target-decoy spectral library. Several methods have been proposed to construct decoy spectral libraries. Most of them construct decoy peptide sequences and then generate theoretical spectra accordingly. In this paper, we propose a method, called precursor-swap, which directly constructs decoy spectral libraries directly at the "spectrum level" without generating decoy peptide sequences by swapping the precursors of two spectra selected according to a very simple rule. Our spectrum-based method does not require additional efforts to deal with ion types (e.g., a, b or c ions), fragment mechanism (e.g., CID, or ETD), or unannotated peaks, but preserves many spectral properties. The precursor-swap method is evaluated on different spectral libraries and the results of obtained decoy ratios show that it is comparable to other methods. Notably, it is efficient in time and memory usage for constructing decoy libraries. A software tool called Precursor-Swap-Decoy-Generation (PSDG) is publicly available for download at http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PSDG/.

  12. Identification and characterization of antimicrobial peptides from skin of Amolops ricketti (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ran, Ran; Yu, Haining; Yu, Zhijun; Hu, Yuhong; Zheng, Hongyuan; Wang, Duo; Yang, Fan; Liu, Renjie; Liu, Jingze

    2012-01-01

    As one of large amphibian group, there are a total of 45 species of Amolops in the world. However, the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) existing in this genus has not been extensively studied. In this study, cDNAs encoding five novel AMP precursors were cloned by screening the skin-derived cDNA library of Amolops ricketti, a frog species that exists in southern and western parts of China. Protein sequence analysis led to the identification of five deduced peptides, three belonging to the brevinin-1 family and two belonging to the brevinin-2 family of amphibian AMPs. Thus, they were named as brevinin-1RTa (FLPLLAGVVANFLPQIICKIARKC), brevinin-1RTb (FLGSLLGLVGKVVPTLFCKISKKC), brevinin-1RTc (FLGSLLGLVGKIVPTLICKISKKC), brevinin-2RTa (GLMSTLKDFGKTAAKEIAQSLLSTASCKLAKTC), and brevinin-2RTb (GILDTLKEFGKTAAKGIAQSLLSTASCKLAKTC), respectively. The purification of brevinin-1RTa, brevinin-1RTb, and brevinin-2RTb was carried out by RP-HPLC, and confirmed by the LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach. All of the peptides displayed different antimicrobial potency against a variety of microorganisms. In addition, brevinin-2RTa and brevinin-2RTb were found to have relatively low hemolytic activity (>400μg/ml) against mammalian red blood cells in vitro, which could potentially be as candidates for developing novel anti-infection agents.

  13. Yeasts identification in microfluidic devices using peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH).

    PubMed

    Ferreira, André M; Cruz-Moreira, Daniela; Cerqueira, Laura; Miranda, João M; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2017-03-01

    Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) is a highly specific molecular method widely used for microbial identification. Nonetheless, and due to the detection limit of this technique, a time-consuming pre-enrichment step is typically required before identification. In here we have developed a lab-on-a-chip device to concentrate cell suspensions and speed up the identification process in yeasts. The PNA-FISH protocol was optimized to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common yeast that is very relevant for several types of food industries. Then, several coin-sized microfluidic devices with different geometries were developed. Using Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), we modeled the hydrodynamics inside the microchannels and selected the most promising options. SU-8 structures were fabricated based on the selected designs and used to produce polydimethylsiloxane-based microchips by soft lithography. As a result, an integrated approach combining microfluidics and PNA-FISH for the rapid identification of S. cerevisiae was achieved. To improve fluid flow inside microchannels and the PNA-FISH labeling, oxygen plasma treatment was applied to the microfluidic devices and a new methodology to introduce the cell suspension and solutions into the microchannels was devised. A strong PNA-FISH signal was observed in cells trapped inside the microchannels, proving that the proposed methodology works as intended. The microfluidic designs and PNA-FISH procedure described in here should be easily adaptable for detection of other microorganisms of similar size.

  14. Cu(2+) affects amyloid-β (1-42) aggregation by increasing peptide-peptide binding forces.

    PubMed

    Hane, Francis; Tran, Gary; Attwood, Simon J; Leonenko, Zoya

    2013-01-01

    The link between metals, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its implicated protein, amyloid-β (Aβ), is complex and highly studied. AD is believed to occur as a result of the misfolding and aggregation of Aβ. The dyshomeostasis of metal ions and their propensity to interact with Aβ has also been implicated in AD. In this work, we use single molecule atomic force spectroscopy to measure the rupture force required to dissociate two Aβ (1-42) peptides in the presence of copper ions, Cu(2+). In addition, we use atomic force microscopy to resolve the aggregation of Aβ formed. Previous research has shown that metal ions decrease the lag time associated with Aβ aggregation. We show that with the addition of copper ions the unbinding force increases notably. This suggests that the reduction of lag time associated with Aβ aggregation occurs on a single molecule level as a result of an increase in binding forces during the very initial interactions between two Aβ peptides. We attribute these results to copper ions acting as a bridge between the two peptide molecules, increasing the stability of the peptide-peptide complex.

  15. Processed Meat Protein and Heat-Stable Peptide Marker Identification Using Microwave-Assisted Tryptic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Montowska, Magdalena; Pospiech, Edward

    2016-12-01

    New approaches to rapid examination of proteins and peptides in complex food matrices are of great interest to the community of food scientists. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of microwave irradiation on the acceleration of enzymatic cleavage and enzymatic digestion of denatured proteins in cooked meat of five species (cattle, horse, pig, chicken and turkey) and processed meat products (coarsely minced, smoked, cooked and semi-dried sausages). Severe protein aggregation occurred not only in heated meat under harsh treatment at 190 °C but also in processed meat products. All the protein aggregates were thoroughly hydrolyzed after 1 h of trypsin treatment with short exposure times of 40 and 20 s to microwave irradiation at 138 and 303 W. There were much more missed cleavage sites observed in all microwave-assisted digestions. Despite the incompleteness of microwave-assisted digestion, six unique peptide markers were detected, which allowed unambiguous identification of processed meat derived from the examined species. Although the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion can serve as a tool for rapid and high-throughput protein identification, great caution and pre-evaluation of individual samples is recommended in protein quantitation.

  16. Processed Meat Protein and Heat-Stable Peptide Marker Identification Using Microwave-Assisted Tryptic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Pospiech, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Summary New approaches to rapid examination of proteins and peptides in complex food matrices are of great interest to the community of food scientists. The aim of the study is to examine the influence of microwave irradiation on the acceleration of enzymatic cleavage and enzymatic digestion of denatured proteins in cooked meat of five species (cattle, horse, pig, chicken and turkey) and processed meat products (coarsely minced, smoked, cooked and semi-dried sausages). Severe protein aggregation occurred not only in heated meat under harsh treatment at 190 °C but also in processed meat products. All the protein aggregates were thoroughly hydrolyzed after 1 h of trypsin treatment with short exposure times of 40 and 20 s to microwave irradiation at 138 and 303 W. There were much more missed cleavage sites observed in all microwave-assisted digestions. Despite the incompleteness of microwave-assisted digestion, six unique peptide markers were detected, which allowed unambiguous identification of processed meat derived from the examined species. Although the microwave-assisted tryptic digestion can serve as a tool for rapid and high-throughput protein identification, great caution and pre-evaluation of individual samples is recommended in protein quantitation. PMID:28115907

  17. Identification of HLA-DR–bound peptides presented by human bronchoalveolar lavage cells in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Wahlström, Jan; Dengjel, Jörn; Persson, Bengt; Duyar, Hüseyin; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanoviδc, Stefan; Eklund, Anders; Weissert, Robert; Grunewald, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, most commonly affecting the lungs. Activated CD4+ T cells accumulate in the lungs of individuals with sarcoidosis and are considered to be of central importance for inflammation. We have previously shown that Scandinavian sarcoidosis patients expressing the HLA-DR allele DRB1*0301 are characterized by large accumulations in the lungs of CD4+ T cells expressing the TCR AV2S3 gene segment. This association afforded us a unique opportunity to identify a sarcoidosis-specific antigen recognized by AV2S3+ T cells. To identify candidates for the postulated sarcoidosis-specific antigen, lung cells from 16 HLA-DRB1*0301pos patients were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. HLA-DR molecules were affinity purified and bound peptides acid eluted. Subsequently, peptides were separated by reversed-phase HPLC and analyzed by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. We identified 78 amino acid sequences from self proteins presented in the lungs of sarcoidosis patients, some of which were well-known autoantigens such as vimentin and ATP synthase. For the first time, to our knowledge, we have identified HLA-bound peptides presented in vivo during an inflammatory condition. This approach can be extended to characterize HLA-bound peptides in various autoimmune settings. PMID:17975675

  18. Identification of a peptide sequence involved in homophilic binding in the neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule NCAM is capable of mediating cell- cell adhesion via homophilic interactions. In this study, three strategies have been combined to identify regions of NCAM that participate directly in NCAM-NCAM binding: analysis of domain deletion mutations, mapping of epitopes of monoclonal antibodies, and use of synthetic peptides to inhibit NCAM activity. Studies on L cells transfected with NCAM mutant cDNAs using cell aggregation and NCAM- covasphere binding assays indicate that the third immunoglobulin-like domain is involved in homophilic binding. The epitopes of four monoclonal antibodies that have been previously shown to affect cell- cell adhesion mediated by NCAM were also mapped to domain 3. Overlapping hexapeptides were synthesized on plastic pins and assayed for binding with these monoclonal antibodies. One of them (PP) reacted specifically with the sequence KYSFNY. Synthetic oligopeptides containing the PP epitope were potent and specific inhibitors of NCAM binding activity. A substratum containing immobilized peptide conjugates also exhibited adhesiveness for neural retinal cells. Cell attachment was specifically inhibited by peptides that contained the PP- epitope and by anti-NCAM univalent antibodies. The shortest active peptide has the sequence KYSFNYDGSE, suggesting that this site is directly involved in NCAM homophilic interaction. PMID:1380002

  19. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C K

    2015-09-23

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology.

  20. A peptide identification-free, genome sequence-independent shotgun proteomics workflow for strain-level bacterial differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhang, Min; Lam, Henry; Lau, Stanley C. K.

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics is an emerging tool for bacterial identification and differentiation. However, the identification of the mass spectra of peptides to genome-derived peptide sequences remains a key issue that limits the use of shotgun proteomics to bacteria with genome sequences available. In this proof-of-concept study, we report a novel bacterial fingerprinting method that enjoys the resolving power and accuracy of mass spectrometry without the burden of peptide identification (i.e. genome sequence-independent). This method uses a similarity-clustering algorithm to search for mass spectra that are derived from the same peptide and merge them into a unique consensus spectrum as the basis to generate proteomic fingerprints of bacterial isolates. In comparison to a traditional peptide identification-based shotgun proteomics workflow and a PCR-based DNA fingerprinting method targeting the repetitive extragenic palindromes elements in bacterial genomes, the novel method generated fingerprints that were richer in information and more discriminative in differentiating E. coli isolates by their animal sources. The novel method is readily deployable to any cultivable bacteria, and may be used for several fields of study such as environmental microbiology, applied microbiology, and clinical microbiology. PMID:26395646

  1. Maximizing the sensitivity and reliability of peptide identification in large-scale proteomic experiments by harnessing multiple search engines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen; Taylor, J Alex; Davis, Michael T; Bonilla, Leo E; Lee, Kimberly A; Auger, Paul L; Farnsworth, Chris C; Welcher, Andrew A; Patterson, Scott D

    2010-03-01

    Despite recent advances in qualitative proteomics, the automatic identification of peptides with optimal sensitivity and accuracy remains a difficult goal. To address this deficiency, a novel algorithm, Multiple Search Engines, Normalization and Consensus is described. The method employs six search engines and a re-scoring engine to search MS/MS spectra against protein and decoy sequences. After the peptide hits from each engine are normalized to error rates estimated from the decoy hits, peptide assignments are then deduced using a minimum consensus model. These assignments are produced in a series of progressively relaxed false-discovery rates, thus enabling a comprehensive interpretation of the data set. Additionally, the estimated false-discovery rate was found to have good concordance with the observed false-positive rate calculated from known identities. Benchmarking against standard proteins data sets (ISBv1, sPRG2006) and their published analysis, demonstrated that the Multiple Search Engines, Normalization and Consensus algorithm consistently achieved significantly higher sensitivity in peptide identifications, which led to increased or more robust protein identifications in all data sets compared with prior methods. The sensitivity and the false-positive rate of peptide identification exhibit an inverse-proportional and linear relationship with the number of participating search engines.

  2. Allatotropin-related peptide in cockroaches: identification via mass spectrometric analysis of single identified neurons.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Susanne; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Predel, Reinhard

    2009-03-01

    The first insect allatotropin-related peptide (ATRP) was isolated from head extracts of the adult sphinx moth Manduca sexta [Kataoka H, Toschi A, Li JP, Carney RL, Schooley DA, Kramer SJ. Identification of an allatotropin from adult Manduca sexta. Science 1989;243:1481-3.]. Meanwhile ATRPs are known from different holometabolous insects but only a single ATRP could be identified from hemimetabolous insects [Paemen L, Tips A, Schoofs L, Proost P, Van Damme J, De Loof A. Lom-AG-myotropin: a novel myotropic peptide from the male accessory glands of Locusta migratoria. Peptides 1991;12:7-10.]. This means that the extensive analysis of neuropeptides from Leucophaea maderae and Periplaneta americana, which led to the discovery of many novel insect neuropeptides, did not result in the detection of any ATRP. In this study, we used another approach to find a cockroach ATRP by first identifying Manse-AT immunoreactive neurons in the terminal ganglion that can be stained by retrograde labeling and are suitable for dissection and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The peptidomic analysis of these putative ATRP neurons paved the way for the identification of the first cockroach ATRP. MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry revealed a sequence identity with Locmi-AG-MT-1 which classifies this ATRP as a highly conserved neuropeptide. A mass spectrometric screening of the nervous system allowed the detection of ATRP-ion signals in different parts of the CNS of P. americana as well as L. maderae. The data obtained in this study will be incorporated in a map of peptidergic neurons from the CNS of the American cockroach, P. americana.

  3. Identification of MHC class II restricted T-cell-mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila T; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune; Larsen, Mette V; Dziegiel, Morten H; Lewinsohn, David M; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide-based vaccines. In the present work, bioinformatics technology was employed to predict binding motifs of 9mer peptides derived from M. tuberculosis for the 12 HLA-I supertypes. Subsequently, the predicted peptides were synthesized and assayed for binding to HLA-I molecules in a biochemically based system. The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA-I molecules of K(D) ≤ 500 nM were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T-cell responses. As judged from blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan-HLA class II and anti-HLA-DR antibodies. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell depletion before the 10 days of expansion, resulted in total loss of reactivity in the ELISPOT culture for most peptide specificities. FACS analyses with intracellular interferon-γ staining of T cells expanded in the presence of M. tuberculosis peptides confirmed that the responsive cells were indeed CD4(+). In conclusion, T-cell immunity against HLA-I binding 9mer M. tuberculosis-derived peptides might in many cases turn out to be mediated by CD4(+) T cells and restricted by HLA-II molecules. The use of 9mer peptides recognized by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells might be of importance for the development of future M. tuberculosis peptide-based vaccines.

  4. Identification and cardiotropic actions of sulfakinin peptides in the American lobster Homarus americanus.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Patsy S; Stevens, Jake S; Rus, Szymon; Brennan, Henry R; Goiney, Christopher C; Smith, Christine M; Li, Lingjun; Towle, David W; Christie, Andrew E

    2007-07-01

    In arthropods, a group of peptides possessing a -Y((SO3H))GHM/LRFamide carboxy-terminal motif have been collectively termed the sulfakinins. Sulfakinin isoforms have been identified from numerous insect species. In contrast, members of this peptide family have thus far been isolated from just two crustaceans, the penaeid shrimp Penaeus monodon and Litopenaeus vannamei. Here, we report the identification of a cDNA encoding prepro-sulfakinin from the American lobster Homarus americanus. Two sulfakinin-like sequences were identified within the open-reading frame of the cDNA. Based on modifications predicted by peptide modeling programs, and on homology to the known isoforms of sulfakinin, particularly those from shrimp, the mature H. americanus sulfakinins were hypothesized to be pEFDEY((SO3H))GHMRFamide (Hoa-SK I) and GGGEY((SO3H))DDY((SO3H))GHLRFamide (Hoa-SK II). Hoa-SK I is identical to one of the previously identified shrimp sulfakinins, while Hoa-SK II is a novel isoform. Exogenous application of either synthetic Hoa-SK I or Hoa-SK II to the isolated lobster heart increased both the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous heart contractions. In preparations in which spontaneous contractions were irregular, both peptides increased the regularity of the heartbeat. Our study provides the first molecular characterization of a sulfakinin-encoding cDNA from a crustacean, as well as the first demonstration of bioactivity for native sulfakinins in this group of arthropods.

  5. Identification of lactoferrin peptides generated by digestion with human gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Furlund, C B; Ulleberg, E K; Devold, T G; Flengsrud, R; Jacobsen, M; Sekse, C; Holm, H; Vegarud, G E

    2013-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a protein present in milk and other body fluids that plays important biological roles. As part of a diet, LF must survive gastrointestinal conditions or create bioactive fragments to exert its effects. The degradation of LF and formation of bioactive peptides is highly dependent on individual variation in intraluminal composition. The present study was designed to compare the degradation and peptide formation of bovine LF (bLF) following in vitro digestion under different simulated intraluminal conditions. Human gastrointestinal (GI) juices were used in a 2-step model digestion to mimic degradation in the stomach and duodenum. To account for variation in the buffering capacity of different lactoferrin-containing foods, gastric pH was adjusted either slowly or rapidly to 2.5 or 4.0. The results were compared with in vivo digestion of bLF performed in 2 volunteers. High concentration of GI juices and fast pH reduction to 2.5 resulted in complete degradation in the gastric step. More LF resisted gastric digestion when pH was slowly reduced to 2.5 or 4.0. Several peptides were identified; however, few matched with previously reported peptides from studies using nonhuman enzymes. Surprisingly, no bovine lactoferricin, f(17-41), was identified during in vitro or in vivo digestion under the intraluminal conditions used. The diversity of enzymes in human GI juices seems to affect the hydrolysis of bLF, generating different peptide fragments compared with those obtained when using only one or a few proteases of animal origin. Multiple sequence analysis of the identified peptides indicated a motif consisting of proline and neighboring hydrophobic residues that could restrict proteolytic processing. Further structure analysis showed that almost all proteolytic cutting sites were located on the surface and mainly on the nonglycosylated half of lactoferrin. Digestion of bLF by human enzymes may generate different peptides from those found when lactoferrin is

  6. Prostate stem cell antigen: Identification of immunogenic peptides and assessment of reactive CD8+ T cells in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Andrea; Schmitz, Marc; Stevanovic, Stefan; Weigle, Bernd; Hölig, Kristina; Füssel, Monika; Füssel, Susanne; Meye, Axel; Wirth, Manfred P; Rieber, Ernst Peter

    2002-12-01

    Identification of TAAs recognized by CD8(+) CTLs paved the way for new concepts in cancer therapy. In view of the heterogeneity of tumors and their diverse escape mechanisms, CTL-based cancer therapy largely depends on an appropriate number of TAAs. In prostate cancer, the number of antigens defined as suitable targets of CTLs remains rather limited. PSCA is widely distributed in prostate cancer. In this report, we define immunogenic peptides of PSCA which are recognized by circulating CD8(+) T cells from prostate cancer patients and able to activate CTLs in vitro. Screening the amino acid sequence of PSCA for peptides containing a binding motif for HLA-A*0201 resulted in 8 candidate peptides. Specificity and affinity of peptide binding were verified in a competition assay. Frequencies of CD8(+) T lymphocytes reactive against selected epitopes were determined in the blood of prostate cancer patients using the ELISPOT assay. Increased frequencies were revealed for CD8(+) T cells recognizing the peptides ALQPGTALL and AILALLPAL. CTLs from prostate cancer patients were raised against these 2 peptides in vitro when presented by autologous DCs. They specifically recognized peptide-pulsed T2 target cells and prostate cancer cells that were HLA-A*0201- and PSCA-positive, indicating that these peptides were naturally generated by tumor cells. These data suggest that PSCA is a promising target for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  7. Further identification of bioactive peptides in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus: two contractile and three inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Ikeda, T; Muneoka, Y; Kubota, I; Minakata, H; Nomoto, K; Nose, T; Miki, W

    1993-09-01

    1. Two contractile and three inhibitory peptides were newly isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscles (ABRMs) of the bivalve mollusc Mytilus edulis by using the muscle as the bioassay system. 2. The structures of the two contractile peptides were GPFGTHIKamide (GPFG-8) and GPFGLNKHGamide (GPFG-9). The contractile response of the ABRM to the first-time application of GPFG-8 or GPFG-9 was of considerable size. The threshold concentrations of the peptides were around 10(-9) M. However, the contractile response to the second-time application was far smaller than that to the first-time application in both cases. Namely, the muscle showed tachyphylaxis to the peptides. 3. Two of the three inhibitory peptides were members of the Mytilus-inhibitory-peptide (MIP) family. Their structures were RAPLFIamide (MIP6) and RSPMFVamide (MIP7). The peptides, as well as the other MIPs previously identified, showed a potent inhibitory effect on phasic contraction of the ABRM in response to repetitive electrical stimulation. The remaining one was an MIP-related peptide (MIP-RP) having the sequence of MRYFVamide. The MIP-RP was less potent than the two MIPs in inhibiting the contraction of the ABRM.

  8. Accelerating the scoring module of mass spectrometry-based peptide identification using GPUs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tandem mass spectrometry-based database searching is currently the main method for protein identification in shotgun proteomics. The explosive growth of protein and peptide databases, which is a result of genome translations, enzymatic digestions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs), is making computational efficiency in database searching a serious challenge. Profile analysis shows that most search engines spend 50%-90% of their total time on the scoring module, and that the spectrum dot product (SDP) based scoring module is the most widely used. As a general purpose and high performance parallel hardware, graphics processing units (GPUs) are promising platforms for speeding up database searches in the protein identification process. Results We designed and implemented a parallel SDP-based scoring module on GPUs that exploits the efficient use of GPU registers, constant memory and shared memory. Compared with the CPU-based version, we achieved a 30 to 60 times speedup using a single GPU. We also implemented our algorithm on a GPU cluster and achieved an approximately favorable speedup. Conclusions Our GPU-based SDP algorithm can significantly improve the speed of the scoring module in mass spectrometry-based protein identification. The algorithm can be easily implemented in many database search engines such as X!Tandem, SEQUEST, and pFind. A software tool implementing this algorithm is available at http://www.comp.hkbu.edu.hk/~youli/ProteinByGPU.html PMID:24773593

  9. Identification of a Bacteria Using Phylogenetic Relationships Revealed by MS/MS Sequencing of Tryptic Peptides Derived From Cellular Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    phylogenetic relationships between bacterial species as a part of a hierarchical decision tree process. 1. INTRODUCTION The detection and...1 IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING PHYLOGENETIC RELATIONSHIPS REVEALED BY MS/MS SEQUENCING OF TRYPTIC PEPTIDES DERIVED FROM CELLULAR PROTEINS...based on analysis of an electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS data for the fast classification of analyzed bacteria, using phylogenetic relationships

  10. Identification and characterization of latency-associated peptide-expressing γδ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Rafael M.; da Cunha, Andre P.; Kuhn, Chantal; Rubino, Stephen; M'Hamdi, Hanane; Gabriely, Galina; Vandeventer, Tyler; Liu, Shirong; Cialic, Ron; Pinheiro-Rosa, Natalia; Oliveira, Rafael P.; Gaublomme, Jellert T.; Obholzer, Nikolaus; Kozubek, James; Pochet, Nathalie; Faria, Ana M. C.; Weiner, Howard L.

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are a subset of lymphocytes specialized in protecting the host against pathogens and tumours. Here we describe a subset of regulatory γδ T cells that express the latency-associated peptide (LAP), a membrane-bound TGF-β1. Thymic CD27+IFN-γ+CCR9+α4β7+TCRγδ+ cells migrate to the periphery, particularly to Peyer's patches and small intestine lamina propria, where they upregulate LAP, downregulate IFN-γ via ATF-3 expression and acquire a regulatory phenotype. TCRγδ+LAP+ cells express antigen presentation molecules and function as antigen presenting cells that induce CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, although TCRγδ+LAP+ cells do not themselves express Foxp3. Identification of TCRγδ+LAP+ regulatory cells provides an avenue for understanding immune regulation and biologic processes linked to intestinal function and disease. PMID:26644347

  11. Mass spectrometric identification, sequence evolution, and intraspecific variability of dimeric peptides encoded by cockroach akh genes.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Sebastian; Predel, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    Neuropeptides are structurally the most diverse group of messenger molecules of the nervous system. Regarding neuropeptide identification, distribution, function, and evolution, insects are among the best studied invertebrates. Indeed, more than 100 neuropeptides are known from single species. Most of these peptides can easily be identified by direct tissue or cell profiling using MALDI-TOF MS. In these experiments, protein hormones with extensive post-translational modifications such as inter- and intramolecular disulfides are usually missed. It is evident that an exclusion of these bioactive molecules hinders the utilization of direct profiling methods in comprehensive peptidomic analyses. In the current study, we focus on the detection and structural elucidation of homo- and heterodimeric adipokinetic hormone precursor-related peptides (APRPs) of cockroaches. The physiological relevance of these molecules with highly conserved sequences in insects is still uncertain. Sequence similarities with vertebrate growth hormone-releasing factors have been reported, but remarkably, few data regarding APRP processing exist and these data are restricted to locusts. Here, we elucidated sequences of carbamidomethylated APRP monomers of different cockroaches by means of MALDI-TOF MS(2), and we were able to identify a surprisingly large number of APRP sequences, resulting either from intraspecific amino acid substitutions within the APRP sequences or C-terminal truncated APRPs.

  12. Identification of Core Segment of Amyloidal Peptide Mediated by Chaperone Molecules by using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yue; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen

    2015-10-05

    We illustrate in this work that pristine assemblies of amyloidal peptides can be obtained by perturbations of reduced scanning bias, and show a broad distribution in peptide length. In contrast, the chaperone-mediated peptide co-assembly presents ordered lamellar structures with a homogeneous distribution in length, which could be attributed to the core segment of the peptide. The efforts are beneficial for gaining insight into the aggregation propensity of peptides and inter-peptide interactions.

  13. Factors affecting the identification of individual mountain bongo antelope

    PubMed Central

    Bindemann, Markus; Roberts, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of individuals forms the basis of many endangered species monitoring protocols. This process typically relies on manual recognition techniques. This study aimed to calculate a measure of the error rates inherent within the manual technique and also sought to identify visual traits that aid identification, using the critically endangered mountain bongo, Tragelaphus eurycerus isaaci, as a model system. Identification accuracy was assessed with a matching task that required same/different decisions to side-by-side pairings of individual bongos. Error rates were lowest when only the flanks of bongos were shown, suggesting that the inclusion of other visual traits confounded accuracy. Accuracy was also higher for photographs of captive animals than camera-trap images, and in observers experienced in working with mountain bongos, than those unfamiliar with the sub-species. These results suggest that the removal of non-essential morphological traits from photographs of bongos, the use of high-quality images, and relevant expertise all help increase identification accuracy. Finally, given the rise in automated identification and the use of citizen science, something our results would suggest is applicable within the context of the mountain bongo, this study provides a framework for assessing their accuracy in individual as well as species identification. PMID:26587336

  14. Neuropeptides in Heteroptera: Identification of allatotropin-related peptide and tachykinin-related peptides using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, the peptidomic analysis of neuropeptides from the retrocerebral complex and abdominal perisympathetic organs of polyphagous stinkbugs (Pentatomidae) revealed the group-specific sequences of pyrokinins, CAPA peptides (CAPA-periviscerokinins/PVKs and CAPA-pyrokinin), myosuppressin, corazonin...

  15. Identification of high-affinity VEGFR3-binding peptides through a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Li, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) interaction with its receptor, VEGFR-3/Flt-4, regulates lymphangiogenesis. VEGFR-3/Flt-4 expression in cancer cells has been correlated with clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, and lymphatic invasion. The objective of this study is to identify a VEGFR-3/Flt-4-interacting peptide that could be used to inhibit VEGFR-3 for ovarian cancer therapy. Methods The extracellular fragment of recombinant human VEGFR-3/Flt-4 (rhVEGFR-3/Flt-4) fused with coat protein pIII was screened against a phage-displayed random peptide library. Using affinity enrichment and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening, positive clones of phages were amplified. Three phage clones were selected after four rounds of biopanning, and the specific binding of the peptides to rhVEGFR-3 was detected by ELISA and compared with that of VEGF-D. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses of ovarian cancer tissue sections was undertaken to demonstrate the specificity of the peptides. Results After four rounds of biopanning, ELISA confirmed the specificity of the enriched bound phage clones for rhVEGFR-3. Sequencing and translation identified three different peptides. Non-competitive ELISA revealed that peptides I, II, and III had binding affinities for VEGFR-3 with Kaff (affinity constant) of 16.4±8.6 µg/mL (n=3), 9.2±2.1 µg/mL (n=3), and 174.8±31.1 µg/mL (n=3), respectively. In ovarian carcinoma tissue sections, peptide III (WHWLPNLRHYAS), which had the greatest binding affinity, also co-localized with VEGFR-3 in endothelial cells lining lymphatic vessels; its labeling of ovarian tumors in vivo was also confirmed. Conclusion These finding showed that peptide III has high specificity and activity and, therefore, may represent a potential therapeutic approach to target VEGF-VEGFR-3 signaling for the treatment or diagnosis of ovarian cancer. PMID:26197772

  16. STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification Filtering of MS/MS Database Search Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Sandoval, John D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Kiebel, Gary R.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-03-01

    For bottom-up proteomics there are a wide variety of database searching algorithms in use for matching peptide sequences to tandem MS spectra. Likewise, there are numerous strategies being employed to produce a confident list of peptide identifications from the different search algorithm outputs. Here we introduce a grid search approach for determining optimal database filtering criteria in shotgun proteomics data analyses that is easily adaptable to any search. Systematic Trial and Error Parameter Selection - referred to as STEPS - utilizes user-defined parameter ranges to test a wide array of parameter combinations to arrive at an optimal "parameter set" for data filtering, thus maximizing confident identifications. The benefits of this approach in terms of numbers of true positive identifications are demonstrated using datasets derived from immunoaffinity-depleted blood serum and a bacterial cell lysate, two common proteomics sample types.

  17. Aging Affects Identification of Vocal Emotions in Semantically Neutral Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Kate; Pichora-Fuller, M. Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors determined the accuracy of younger and older adults in identifying vocal emotions using the Toronto Emotional Speech Set (TESS; Dupuis & Pichora-Fuller, 2010a) and investigated the possible contributions of auditory acuity and suprathreshold processing to emotion identification accuracy. Method: In 2 experiments, younger…

  18. On the Environmental Factors Affecting the Structural and Cytotoxic Properties of IAPP Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients are characterized by reduced β-cells mass and diffuse extracellular amyloidosis. Amyloid deposition involves the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a neuropancreatic hormone cosecreted with insulin by β-cells. IAPP is physiologically involved in glucose homeostasis, but it may turn toxic to β-cells owing to its tendency to misfold giving rise to oligomers and fibrils. The process by which the unfolded IAPP starts to self-assemble and the overall factors promoting this conversion are poorly understood. Other open questions are related to the nature of the IAPP toxic species and how exactly β-cells die. Over the last decades, there has been growing consensus about the notion that early molecular assemblies, notably small hIAPP oligomers, are the culprit of β-cells decline. Numerous environmental factors might affect the conformational, aggregation, and cytotoxic properties of IAPP. Herein we review recent progress in the field, focusing on the influences that membranes, pH, and metal ions may have on the conformational conversion and cytotoxicity of full-length IAPP as well as peptide fragments thereof. Current theories proposed for the mechanisms of toxicity will be also summarized together with an outline of the underlying molecular links between IAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ) misfolding. PMID:26582441

  19. On the Environmental Factors Affecting the Structural and Cytotoxic Properties of IAPP Peptides.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Pappalardo, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic islets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients are characterized by reduced β-cells mass and diffuse extracellular amyloidosis. Amyloid deposition involves the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), a neuropancreatic hormone cosecreted with insulin by β-cells. IAPP is physiologically involved in glucose homeostasis, but it may turn toxic to β-cells owing to its tendency to misfold giving rise to oligomers and fibrils. The process by which the unfolded IAPP starts to self-assemble and the overall factors promoting this conversion are poorly understood. Other open questions are related to the nature of the IAPP toxic species and how exactly β-cells die. Over the last decades, there has been growing consensus about the notion that early molecular assemblies, notably small hIAPP oligomers, are the culprit of β-cells decline. Numerous environmental factors might affect the conformational, aggregation, and cytotoxic properties of IAPP. Herein we review recent progress in the field, focusing on the influences that membranes, pH, and metal ions may have on the conformational conversion and cytotoxicity of full-length IAPP as well as peptide fragments thereof. Current theories proposed for the mechanisms of toxicity will be also summarized together with an outline of the underlying molecular links between IAPP and amyloid beta (Aβ) misfolding.

  20. Identification of Action Units Related to Affective States in a Tutoring System for Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padrón-Rivera, Gustavo; Rebolledo-Mendez, Genaro; Parra, Pilar Pozos; Huerta-Pacheco, N. Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Affect is an important element of the learning process both in the classroom and with educational technology. This paper presents analyses in relation to the identification of Action Units (AUs) related to affective states and their impact on learning with a tutoring system. To assess affect, a tool was devised to identify AUs on pictures of human…

  1. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Zang, Linquan; Shi, Lei; Guo, Jiao; Pan, Qin; Wu, Wei; Pan, Xuediao; Wang, Junye

    2009-08-18

    In this study, a NCI-H1299 (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, NSCLC) and a normal lung cell line (Small Airway Epithelial Cells, SAEC) were used for the subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display-12 peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment for the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased about 875-fold (from 0.4x10(4) to 3.5x10(6)). A group of peptides being capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells were obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through a cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining, and immunofluorescence, a M13 phage isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide ZS-1 (sequence EHMALTYPFRPP) corresponded to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage were demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cell lines and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lungs tissue samples, other different cancer cells, or nontumor surrounding lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZS-1 may be a potential candidate of biomarker ligands used for targeted drug delivery in therapy of lung cancer.

  2. Low-pH Solid-Phase Amino Labeling of Complex Peptide Digests with TMTs Improves Peptide Identification Rates for Multiplexed Global Phosphopeptide Analysis.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Gitte; Prefot, Petra; Jung, Stephan; Selzer, Stefan; Mitra, Vikram; Britton, David; Kuhn, Karsten; Pike, Ian; Thompson, Andrew H

    2015-06-05

    We present a novel tandem mass tag solid-phase amino labeling (TMT-SPAL) protocol using reversible immobilization of peptides onto octadecyl-derivatized (C18) solid supports. This method can reduce the number of steps required in complex protocols, saving time and potentially reducing sample loss. In our global phosphopeptide profiling workflow (SysQuant), we can cut 24 h from the protocol while increasing peptide identifications (20%) and reducing side reactions. Solid-phase labeling with TMTs does require some modification to typical labeling conditions, particularly pH. It has been found that complete labeling equivalent to standard basic pH solution-phase labeling for small and large samples can be achieved on C18 resins under slightly acidic buffer conditions. Improved labeling behavior on C18 compared to that with standard basic pH solution-phase labeling is demonstrated. We analyzed our samples for histidine, serine, threonine, and tyrosine labeling to determine the degree of overlabeling and observed higher than expected levels (25% of all peptide spectral matches (PSMs)) of overlabeling at all of these amino acids (predominantly at tyrosine and serine) in our standard solution-phase labeling protocol. Overlabeling at all of these sites is greatly reduced (4-fold, to 7% of all PSMs) by the low-pH conditions used in the TMT-SPAL protocol. Overlabeling seems to represent a so-far overlooked mechanism causing reductions in peptide identification rates with NHS-activated TMT labeling compared to that with label-free methods. Our results also highlight the importance of searching data for overlabeling when labeling methods are used.

  3. Identification of the growth-hormone-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in a nutritional supplement.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Kohler, Maxie; Mester, Joachim; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Petrou, Michael; Thevis, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Black market products of a pharmaceutical nature and nutritional supplements have received substantial and increasing attention because of potential performance enhancement in elite and non-professional sports. In addition, improved general health is claimed for non-competing individuals. The risks and foreseeable dangers of the uncontrolled use of highly potent and non-approved pharmaceutical compounds in healthy individuals are of considerable concern. In the present case report, the emerging drug candidate GHRP-2 with verified growth-hormone-releasing properties was identified and quantified in tablets offered as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement. The impact of this orally active peptide on the hGH/IGF-axis has been established for several years and its illicit use in elite sports has been assumed. As a releasing factor for hGH, GHRP-2 belongs to the list of substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Unfortunately, to date there is no routinely performed assay for the determination of these peptides potentially occurring in biological fluids of competing athletes, but the present data will facilitate the implementation by providing principle analytical information on liquid chromatographic and mass spectrometric behaviour. Qualitative identification of the target analyte after extraction from the tablet matrix was performed by high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry after liquid chromatographic separation under consideration of the accurate masses and the ratios of the protonated molecules and their fragment ions derived from their collisionally induced dissociation. Quantitative results were obtained by means of liquid chromatography coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and linear regression using an external calibration curve (with GHRP-2 reference compound) adjusted via internal standard (Hexarelin). Hereby, the content of GHRP-2 was determined with approximately 50 µg per tablet.

  4. Origin and evolution of peptide-modifying dioxygenases and identification of the wybutosine hydroxylase/hydroperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Abhiman, Saraswathi; de Souza, Robson F.; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Unlike classical 2-oxoglutarate and iron-dependent dioxygenases, which include several nucleic acid modifiers, the structurally similar jumonji-related dioxygenase superfamily was only known to catalyze peptide modifications. Using comparative genomics methods, we predict that a family of jumonji-related enzymes catalyzes wybutosine hydroxylation/peroxidation at position 37 of eukaryotic tRNAPhe. Identification of this enzyme raised questions regarding the emergence of protein- and nucleic acid-modifying activities among jumonji-related domains. We addressed these with a natural classification of DSBH domains and reconstructed the precursor of the dioxygenases as a sugar-binding domain. This precursor gave rise to sugar epimerases and metal-binding sugar isomerases. The sugar isomerase active site was exapted for catalysis of oxygenation, with a radiation of these enzymes in bacteria, probably due to impetus from the primary oxygenation event in Earth’s history. 2-Oxoglutarate-dependent versions appear to have further expanded with rise of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We identify previously under-appreciated aspects of their active site and multiple independent innovations of 2-oxoacid-binding basic residues among these superfamilies. We show that double-stranded β-helix dioxygenases diversified extensively in biosynthesis and modification of halogenated siderophores, antibiotics, peptide secondary metabolites and glycine-rich collagen-like proteins in bacteria. Jumonji-related domains diversified into three distinct lineages in bacterial secondary metabolism systems and these were precursors of the three major clades of eukaryotic enzymes. The specificity of wybutosine hydroxylase/peroxidase probably relates to the structural similarity of the modified moiety to the ancestral amino acid substrate of this superfamily. PMID:20423905

  5. Antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences affect mitochondrial coupling, respiration and protein import.

    PubMed

    Hugosson, M; Andreu, D; Boman, H G; Glaser, E

    1994-08-01

    Cecropins A and P1, antibacterial peptides from insects and from pig and some related peptides released respiratory control, inhibited protein import and at higher concentrations also inhibited respiration. However, PR-39, an antibacterial peptide from pig intestine, was found to be almost inert towards mitochondria. The concentrations at which the three mitochondrial functions were effected varied for different peptides. Melittin, magainin and Cecropin-A-(1,13)-Melittin(1,13)-NH2, a hybrid between cecropin A and melittin, were most potent, while the two cecropins acted at higher concentrations. The biosynthesis of cecropin A is known and the intermediates are synthesized. We have used four peptides from this pathway to investigate their effects on coupling, respiration and protein import into mitochondria. Mature cecropin A followed by the preproprotein were most aggressive whereas the intermediates were less active or inert. The efficiency of different derivatives of cecropin A as uncouplers correlates well with their capacity to release membrane potential measured as fluorescence quenching of Rhodamine 123. Inhibition of respiration was found to be dependent on membrane potential and was most pronounced with mature cecropin A, less so with its three precursors. We also found that three peptides derived from mitochondrial presequences showed antibacterial activity. It is concluded that, there are similarities in the functions of antibacterial peptides and mitochondrial presequences, uncoupling activity in mitochondria cannot be correlated with the antibacterial activity (contrary to a previous suggestion), the processing of preprocecropin A may have evolved in such a way that there is a minimum of membrane damage from the intermediates in the pathway, and peptides produced for delivery outside of an animal have evolved to be more aggressive against mitochondria than peptides for delivery inside of the animal.

  6. Identification of lanthanum-specific peptides for future recycling of rare earth elements from compact fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Franziska L; Curtis, Susan B; Bachmann, Stefanie; Dunbar, W Scott; MacGillivray, Ross T A

    2017-05-01

    As components of electronic scrap, rare earth minerals are an interesting but little used source of raw materials that are highly important for the recycling industry. Currently, there exists no cost-efficient technology to separate rare earth minerals from an electronic scrap mixture. In this study, phage surface display has been used as a key method to develop peptides with high specificity for particular inorganic targets in electronic scrap. Lanthanum phosphate doped with cerium and terbium as part of the fluorescent phosphors of spent compact fluorescent lamps (CFL) was used as a target material of economic interest to test the suitability of the phage display method to the separation of rare earth minerals. One random pVIII phage library was screened for peptide sequences that bind specifically to the fluorescent phosphor LaPO4 :Ce(3+) ,Tb(3+) (LAP). The library contained at least 100 binding pVIII peptides per phage particle with a diversity of 1 × 10(9) different phage per library. After three rounds of enrichment, a phage clone containing the surface peptide loop RCQYPLCS was found to bind specifically to LAP. Specificity and affinity of the identified phage bound peptide was confirmed by using binding and competition assays, immunofluorescence assays, and zeta potential measurements. Binding and immunofluorescence assays identified the peptide's affinity for the fluorescent phosphor components CAT (CeMgAl11 O19 :Tb(3+) ) and BAM (BaMgAl10 O17 :Eu(2+) ). No affinity was found for other fluorescent phosphor components such as YOX (Y2 O3 :Eu(3+) ). The binding specificity of the RCQYPLCS peptide loop was improved 3-51-fold by using alanine scanning mutagenesis. The identification of peptides with high specificity and affinity for special components in the fluorescent phosphor in CFLs provides a potentially new strategic approach to rare earth recycling. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1016-1024. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Screening and identification of a peptide specifically targeted to NCI-H1299 cells from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiangan; Zang, Linquan; Lan, Daiyan; Liang, Weican

    2009-01-01

    Ligands that are capable of binding to tumor cell surface biomarkers specifically used in the early diagnosis of cancer and targeted drug delivery in cancer chemotherapy have been extensively investigated. Phage display technology has been demonstrated to be a powerful tool in this field. In this study, the non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H1299 and the normal lung small airway epithelial cell lines were used for subtractive screening in vitro with a phage display 12-peptide library. After three rounds of panning, there was an obvious enrichment in the phages specifically binding to the NCI-H1299 cells, and the output/input ratio of phages increased approximately 875-fold (from 0.4x104 to 3.5x106). A group of peptides capable of binding specifically to the NCI-H1299 cells was obtained, and the affinity of these peptides to bind to the targeted cells and tissues was studied. Through cell-based ELISA, immunocytochemical staining, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence, an M13 phage was isolated and identified from the above screenings, and a synthetic peptide, ZT-1 (sequence QQMHLMSYAPGP), corresponding to the sequence of the surface protein of the M13 phage, was demonstrated to be capable of binding to the tumor cell surfaces of NCI-H1299 and A549 cells and biopsy specimens, but not to normal lung tissue samples, other cancer cells, or non-tumor adjacent lung tissues. In conclusion, the peptide ZT-1 may be a potential candidate biomarker ligand that can be used for targeted drug delivery in lung cancer therapy.

  8. Improved identification of wheat gluten proteins through alkylation of cysteine residues and peptide-based mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rombouts, Ine; Lagrain, Bert; Brunnbauer, Markus; Delcour, Jan A.; Koehler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The concentration and composition of wheat gluten proteins and the presence, concentration and location of cysteine residues therein are important for wheat flour quality. However, it is difficult to identify gluten proteins, as they are an extremely polymorphic mixture of prolamins. We here present methods for cysteine labeling of wheat prolamins with 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and iodoacetamide (IDAM) which, as compared to label-free analysis, substantially improve identification of cysteine-containing peptides in enzymic prolamin digests by electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry. Both chymotrypsin and thermolysin yielded cysteine-containing peptides from different gluten proteins, but more proteins could be identified after chymotryptic digestion. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, we were the first to label prolamins with isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT), which are commonly used for quantitative proteomics. However, more peptides were detected after labeling gluten proteins with 4-VP and IDAM than with ICAT. PMID:23880742

  9. Identification and characterization of antimicrobial peptides from the skin of the endangered frog Odorrana ishikawae.

    PubMed

    Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi; Okimoto, Aiko; Soga, Miyuki; Okada, Genya; Sano, Naomi; Fujii, Tamotsu; Sugawara, Yoshiaki; Sumida, Masayuki

    2011-04-01

    The endangered anuran species, Odorrana ishikawae, is endemic to only two small Japanese Islands, Amami and Okinawa. To assess the innate immune system in this frog, we investigated antimicrobial peptides in the skin using artificially bred animals. Nine novel antimicrobial peptides containing the C-terminal cyclic heptapeptide domain were isolated on the basis of antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. The peptides were members of the esculentin-1 (two peptides), esculentin-2 (one peptide), palustrin-2 (one peptide), brevinin-2 (three peptides) and nigrocin-2 (two peptides) antimicrobial peptide families. They were named esculentin-1ISa, esculentin-1ISb, esculentin-2ISa, palustrin-2ISa, brevinin-2ISa, brevinin-2ISb, brevinin-2ISc, nigrocin-2ISa and nigrocin-2ISb. Peptide primary structures suggest a close relationship with the Asian odorous frogs, Odorrana grahami and Odorrana hosii. These antimicrobial peptides possessed a broad-spectrum of growth inhibition against five microorganisms (E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans). Nine different cDNAs encoding the precursor proteins were also cloned and showed that the precursor proteins exhibited a signal peptide, an N-terminal acidic spacer domain, a Lys-Arg processing site and an antimicrobial peptide at the C-terminus.

  10. Heparin affin regulatory peptide/pleiotrophin negatively affects diverse biological activities in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Parthymou, Anastasia; Lampropoulou, Evgenia; Mikelis, Constantinos; Drosou, Georgia; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2008-01-01

    Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) or pleiotrophin seems to be involved in the progression of several tumors of diverse origin. In this study, we tried to determine the role of HARP in rat C6 glioma cells by using an antisense strategy for inhibition of HARP expression. Decrease of the expression of endogenous HARP in C6 cells (AS-C6 cells) significantly increased proliferation, migration, and anchorage-independent growth of cells. Implantation of AS-C6 cells onto chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes resulted in a significant increase of tumor-induced angiogenesis compared with that induced by non-transfected or C6 cells transfected with the plasmid alone (PC-C6 cells). In the same line, conditioned medium from AS-C6 cells significantly increased endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in vitro compared with the effect of conditioned medium from C6 or PC-C6 cells. Interestingly, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced C6 cell proliferation and migration, and SU1496, a selective inhibitor of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), blocked increased glioma cell growth, migration, and angiogenicity observed in AS-C6 cell cultures. The above results seem to be due to a direct interaction between HARP and VEGF in the culture medium of C6 and PC-C6 cells, while AS-C6 cells secreted comparable amounts of VEGF that do not interact with HARP. Collectively, these data suggest that HARP negatively affects diverse biological activities in C6 glioma cells, mainly due to binding of HARP to VEGF, which may sequester secreted VEGF from signalling through VEGFR2.

  11. A robust linear regression based algorithm for automated evaluation of peptide identifications from shotgun proteomics by use of reversed-phase liquid chromatography retention time

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Yang, Lanhao; Freitas, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Background Rejection of false positive peptide matches in database searches of shotgun proteomic experimental data is highly desirable. Several methods have been developed to use the peptide retention time as to refine and improve peptide identifications from database search algorithms. This report describes the implementation of an automated approach to reduce false positives and validate peptide matches. Results A robust linear regression based algorithm was developed to automate the evaluation of peptide identifications obtained from shotgun proteomic experiments. The algorithm scores peptides based on their predicted and observed reversed-phase liquid chromatography retention times. The robust algorithm does not require internal or external peptide standards to train or calibrate the linear regression model used for peptide retention time prediction. The algorithm is generic and can be incorporated into any database search program to perform automated evaluation of the candidate peptide matches based on their retention times. It provides a statistical score for each peptide match based on its retention time. Conclusion Analysis of peptide matches where the retention time score was included resulted in a significant reduction of false positive matches with little effect on the number of true positives. Overall higher sensitivities and specificities were achieved for database searches carried out with MassMatrix, Mascot and X!Tandem after implementation of the retention time based score algorithm. PMID:18713471

  12. Capsaicin treatment differentially affects feeding suppression by bombesin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Ladenheim, Ellen E; Knipp, Susan

    2007-05-16

    Peripheral administration of bombesin (BN) and the related mammalian peptides, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and neuromedin B (NMB), suppress food intake in rats. To examine whether all BN-like peptides utilize the same neural pathways to reduce feeding, rats were treated on postnatal day 2 with the injection vehicle or capsaicin, a neurotoxin that damages a subset of visceral afferent fibers. When rats reached adulthood, we compared the ability of a dose range of systemically administered BN, GRP18-27 and NMB to reduce intake of a 0.5 kcal/ml glucose solution in a short-term feeding test. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin treatment abolished or attenuated the suppression of glucose intake produced by BN and NMB but had no effect on the ability of GRP to reduce feeding. These results suggest that different neural substrates underlie the anorexic effects of peripherally administered BN-like peptides.

  13. Affect as Information in Persuasion: A Model of Affect Identification and Discounting

    PubMed Central

    Albarracín, Dolores; Kumkale, G. Tarcan

    2016-01-01

    Three studies examined the implications of a model of affect as information in persuasion. According to this model, extraneous affect may have an influence when message recipients exert moderate amounts of thought, because they identify their affective reactions as potential criteria but fail to discount them as irrelevant. However, message recipients may not use affect as information when they deem affect irrelevant or when they do not identify their affective reactions at all. Consistent with this curvilinear prediction, recipients of a message that either favored or opposed comprehensive exams used affect as a basis for attitudes in situations that elicited moderate thought. Affect, however, had no influence on attitudes in conditions that elicited either large or small amounts of thought. PMID:12635909

  14. Signal peptide discrimination and cleavage site identification using SVM and NN.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, H B; Yusuf, S A; White, K

    2014-02-01

    About 15% of all proteins in a genome contain a signal peptide (SP) sequence, at the N-terminus, that targets the protein to intracellular secretory pathways. Once the protein is targeted correctly in the cell, the SP is cleaved, releasing the mature protein. Accurate prediction of the presence of these short amino-acid SP chains is crucial for modelling the topology of membrane proteins, since SP sequences can be confused with transmembrane domains due to similar composition of hydrophobic amino acids. This paper presents a cascaded Support Vector Machine (SVM)-Neural Network (NN) classification methodology for SP discrimination and cleavage site identification. The proposed method utilises a dual phase classification approach using SVM as a primary classifier to discriminate SP sequences from Non-SP. The methodology further employs NNs to predict the most suitable cleavage site candidates. In phase one, a SVM classification utilises hydrophobic propensities as a primary feature vector extraction using symmetric sliding window amino-acid sequence analysis for discrimination of SP and Non-SP. In phase two, a NN classification uses asymmetric sliding window sequence analysis for prediction of cleavage site identification. The proposed SVM-NN method was tested using Uni-Prot non-redundant datasets of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins with SP and Non-SP N-termini. Computer simulation results demonstrate an overall accuracy of 0.90 for SP and Non-SP discrimination based on Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) tests using SVM. For SP cleavage site prediction, the overall accuracy is 91.5% based on cross-validation tests using the novel SVM-NN model.

  15. The Fusion Protein Signal-Peptide-Coding Region of Canine Distemper Virus: A Useful Tool for Phylogenetic Reconstruction and Lineage Identification

    PubMed Central

    Sarute, Nicolás; Calderón, Marina Gallo; Pérez, Ruben; La Torre, José; Hernández, Martín; Francia, Lourdes; Panzera, Yanina

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV; Paramyxoviridae, Morbillivirus) is the etiologic agent of a multisystemic infectious disease affecting all terrestrial carnivore families with high incidence and mortality in domestic dogs. Sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (H) gene has been widely employed to characterize field strains, permitting the identification of nine CDV lineages worldwide. Recently, it has been established that the sequences of the fusion protein signal-peptide (Fsp) coding region are extremely variable, suggesting that analysis of its sequence might be useful for strain characterization studies. However, the divergence of Fsp sequences among worldwide strains and its phylogenetic resolution has not yet been evaluated. We constructed datasets containing the Fsp-coding region and H gene sequences of the same strains belonging to eight CDV lineages. Both datasets were used to evaluate their phylogenetic resolution. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that both datasets clustered the same strains into eight different branches, corresponding to CDV lineages. The inter-lineage amino acid divergence was fourfold greater for the Fsp peptide than for the H protein. The likelihood mapping revealed that both datasets display strong phylogenetic signals in the region of well-resolved topologies. These features indicate that Fsp-coding region sequence analysis is suitable for evolutionary studies as it allows for straightforward identification of CDV lineages. PMID:23675493

  16. Enhanced performance of pulsed Q collision induced dissociation-based peptide identification on a dual-pressure linear ion trap.

    PubMed

    Lössner, Christopher; Blackstock, Walter; Gunaratne, Jayantha

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed Q collision induced dissociation (PQD) was introduced for isobaric tag quantification on linear ion traps to circumvent the problem of the low-mass cut-off for collision induced dissociation (CID). Unfortunately, fragmentation efficiency is compromised and PQD has found limited use for identification as well as quantification. We demonstrate that PQD has a comparable peptide identification performance to CID on dual-pressure linear ion traps, opening the potential for wider use of isobaric tag quantification on this new generation of linear ion traps.

  17. Proglucagon-Derived Peptides Do Not Significantly Affect Acute Exocrine Pancreas in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Akalestou, Elina; Christakis, Ioannis; Solomou, Antonia M.; Minnion, James S.; Rutter, Guy A.; Bloom, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Reports have suggested a link between treatment with glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues and an increased risk of pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin, a dual agonist of both GLP-1 and glucagon receptors, is currently being investigated as a potential anti-obesity therapy, but little is known about its pancreatic safety. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effect of oxyntomodulin and other proglucagon-derived peptides on the rat exocrine pancreas. Methods GLP-1, oxyntomodulin, glucagon and exendin-4 were infused into anaesthetised rats to measure plasma amylase concentration changes. Additionally, the effect of each peptide on both amylase release and proliferation in rat pancreatic acinar (AR42J) and primary isolated ductal cells was determined. Results Plasma amylase did not increase post peptide infusion, compared to vehicle and cholecystokinin (CCK); however, oxyntomodulin inhibited plasma amylase when co-administered with CCK. None of the peptides caused a significant increase in proliferation rate or amylase secretion from acinar and ductal cells. Conclusions The investigated peptides do not have an acute effect on the exocrine pancreas with regard to proliferation and plasma amylase, when administered individually. Oxyntomodulin appears to be a potent inhibitor of amylase release, potentially making it a safer anti-obesity agent regarding pancreatitis, compared to GLP-1 agonists. PMID:26731187

  18. Successful identification of novel agents to control infectious diseases from screening mixture-based peptide combinatorial libraries in complex cell-based bioassays.

    PubMed

    Boggiano, César; Reixach, Natàlia; Pinilla, Clemencia; Blondelle, Sylvie E

    2003-01-01

    Mixture-based peptide synthetic combinatorial libraries (SCLs) represent a valuable source for the development of novel agents to control infectious diseases. Indeed, a number of studies have now proven the ability of identifying active peptides from libraries composed of thousands to millions of peptides in cell-based biosystems of varying complexity. Furthermore, progressing knowledge on the importance of endogenous peptides in various immune responses lead to a regain in importance for peptides as potential therapeutic agents. This article is aimed at providing recent studies in our laboratory for the development of antimicrobial or antiviral peptides derived from mixture-based SCLs using cell-based assays, as well as a short review of the importance of such peptides in the control of infectious diseases. Furthermore, the use of positional scanning (PS) SCL-based biometrical analyses for the identification of native optimal epitopes specific to HIV-1 proteins is also presented.

  19. Identification of food-derived bioactive peptides in blood and other biological samples.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kenji; Iwai, Koji; Aito-Inoue, Misako

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the presence of food-derived peptides in human blood after ingestion of enzymatic hydrolysates of food proteins, while most peptides in food are degraded into amino acids during digestion and absorption. To capture and clarify the food-derived peptides in blood, solid-phase extraction (SPE) using a mini-spin column packed with a strong cation exchanger was developed. This technique allows the use of a nonvolatile acid such as trichloroacetic acid, a strong protein denaturant, for the deproteinizing procedure. To improve resolution of hydrophilic peptide and increase specificity and sensitivity in the detection of peptide by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) after subfractionation by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), peptides are derivatized with phenyl isothiocyanate. The resultant phenyl thiocarbamyl (PTC)-peptides can be resolved with high resolution and sensitivity by RP-HPLC. By comparing chromatograms of PTC derivatives from blood before and after ingestion of a peptide sample, food-derived peptide can be detected. The isolated PTC-peptide can be applied to a peptide sequencer based on the Edman degradation reaction.

  20. Identification of novel peptide hormones in the human proteome by hidden Markov model screening.

    PubMed

    Mirabeau, Olivier; Perlas, Emerald; Severini, Cinzia; Audero, Enrica; Gascuel, Olivier; Possenti, Roberta; Birney, Ewan; Rosenthal, Nadia; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-03-01

    Peptide hormones are small, processed, and secreted peptides that signal via membrane receptors and play critical roles in normal and pathological physiology. The search for novel peptide hormones has been hampered by their small size, low or restricted expression, and lack of sequence similarity. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a bioinformatics search tool based on the hidden Markov model formalism that uses several peptide hormone sequence features to estimate the likelihood that a protein contains a processed and secreted peptide of this class. Application of this tool to an alignment of mammalian proteomes ranked 90% of known peptide hormones among the top 300 proteins. An analysis of the top scoring hypothetical and poorly annotated human proteins identified two novel candidate peptide hormones. Biochemical analysis of the two candidates, which we called spexin and augurin, showed that both were localized to secretory granules in a transfected pancreatic cell line and were recovered from the cell supernatant. Spexin was expressed in the submucosal layer of the mouse esophagus and stomach, and a predicted peptide from the spexin precursor induced muscle contraction in a rat stomach explant assay. Augurin was specifically expressed in mouse endocrine tissues, including pituitary and adrenal gland, choroid plexus, and the atrio-ventricular node of the heart. Our findings demonstrate the utility of a bioinformatics approach to identify novel biologically active peptides. Peptide hormones and their receptors are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and our results suggest that spexin and augurin are novel peptide hormones likely to be involved in physiological homeostasis.

  1. Identification of peptide motif that binds to the surface of zirconia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Yoshinari, Masao; Matsuzaka, Kenichi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Inoue, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A zirconia-binding peptide motif was identified using a peptide phage display system. Yttria stabilized zirconia beads and discs were used as the target. Quartz crystal microbalance was used to monitor the binding of phages to zirconia. Starting from a library of phages displaying random sequences of 12-mer peptides, we repeated cycles of biopanning against zirconia beads. After four cycles of biopanning, we isolated a phage clone Φ#17. DNA sequencing of the corresponding portion of Φ#17 unexpectedly revealed that it displayed a 58-mer peptide (amino acid sequence: WMPSDVDINDPQGGGSRPNLHQPKPAAEAASKKKSENRKVPFYSHSWY-SSMSEDKRGW). We found that Φ#17 had a 300-fold, significantly higher binding affinity for zirconia discs than phages displaying no peptide. In quartz crystal microbalance assay, a rapid increase in energy dissipation was observed from Φ#17 but not from the control phages, indicating that Φ#17 binds to the surface of zirconia via its displayed peptide. We successfully identified a peptide motif that binds zirconia.

  2. Identification of multiple antimicrobial peptides from the skin of fine-spined frog, Hylarana spinulosa (Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Hu, Yuhong; Xu, Shiqi; Hu, Yonghong; Meng, Hao; Guo, Chao; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Jingze; Yu, Zhijun; Wang, Hui

    2013-12-01

    In this study, peptidomics and genomics analyses were used to study antimicrobial peptides from the skin of Hylarana spinulosa. Twenty-nine different antimicrobial peptide precursors were characterized from the skin of H. spinulosa, which produce 23 mature antimicrobial peptides belonging to 12 different families. To confirm the actual presence and characteristics of these antimicrobial peptides in the skin tissue extractions from H. spinulosa, we used two distinct methods, one was peptide purification method that combined gel filtration chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and the other was peptidomics approach based on liquid chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In the peptidomics approach, incomplete tryptic digestion and gas-phase fractionation (GPF) analysis were used to increase peptidome coverage and reproducibility of peptide ion selection. Multiple species of microorganisms were chosen to test and analyze the antimicrobial activities and spectrum of these antimicrobial peptides.

  3. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting reproduction in pigs.

    PubMed

    Cassady, J P; Johnson, R K; Pomp, D; Rohrer, G A; Van Vleck, L D; Spiegel, E K; Gilson, K M

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this research was to identify chromosomal regions harboring QTL affecting reproduction in pigs. A three-generation resource population was developed by crossing low-indexing pigs from a randomly selected control line (C) with high-indexing pigs of a line selected for increased index of ovulation rate and embryonic survival (I). Differences between Lines I and C at Generation 10 were 6.7 ova and 3.3 fetuses at 50 d of gestation and 3.1 fully formed and 1.6 live pigs at birth. Phenotypic data were collected on F2 females, born in three replicates, for ovulation rate (n = 423), age at puberty (n = 295), litter size (n = 370), and number of nipples (n = 428). Litter-size data included number of fully formed, live, stillborn, and mummified pigs. Grandparent, F1, and F2 animals were genotyped for 151 microsatellite markers distributed across all 18 autosomes and the X chromosome. Genotypic data were available on 423 F2 females. Average spacing between markers was 19.3 Kosambi centimorgans. Calculations of logarithms of odds (LOD) scores were by least squares, and fixed effects for sire-dam combination and replicate were included in the models. Genome-wide significance level thresholds of 5% and 10% were calculated using a permutation approach. There was evidence (P < 0.05) for QTL affecting ovulation rate on SSC9, age at puberty on SSC7 and SSC8, number of nipples on SSC8 and SSC11, number of stillborn pigs on SSC5 and SSC13, and number of fully formed pigs on SSC11. There was evidence (P < 0.10) for additional QTL affecting age at puberty on SSC7, SSC8, and SSC12, number born live on SSC11, and number of nipples on SSC1, SSC6, and SSC7. Litter size is lowly heritable and sex-limited. Therefore, accuracy of selection for litter size may be enhanced by marker-assisted selection. Ovulation rate and age at puberty are laborious to measure, and thus marker-assisted selection may provide a practical and efficient method of selection.

  4. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions.

  5. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in-situ hybridization for identification of Vibrio spp. in aquatic products and environments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Li, Ke; Wu, Shan; Shuai, Jiangbing; Fang, Weihuan

    2015-08-03

    A peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) method was developed for specific detection of the Vibrio genus. In silico analysis by BLAST and ProbeCheck showed that the designed PNA probe targeting the 16S rRNAs was suitable for specific identification of Vibrio. Specificity and sensitivity of the probe Vib-16S-1 were experimentally verified by its reactivity against 18 strains of 9 Vibrio species and 14 non-Vibrio strains of 14 representative species. The PNA-FISH assay was able to identify 47 Vibrio positive samples from selectively enriched cultures of 510 samples of aquatic products and environments, comparable with the results obtained by biochemical identification and real-time PCR. We conclude that PNA-FISH can be an alternative method for rapid identification of Vibrio species in a broad spectrum of seafood or related samples.

  6. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Aaron J; Stuart, Ronald C; Attard, Courtney A; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A; Low, Malcolm J

    2014-04-15

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24-48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis.

  7. Temporal changes in nutritional state affect hypothalamic POMC peptide levels independently of leptin in adult male mice

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Aaron J.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Attard, Courtney A.; Otero-Corchon, Veronica; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons constitute a critical anorexigenic node in the central nervous system (CNS) for maintaining energy balance. These neurons directly affect energy expenditure and feeding behavior by releasing bioactive neuropeptides but are also subject to signals directly related to nutritional state such as the adipokine leptin. To further investigate the interaction of diet and leptin on hypothalamic POMC peptide levels, we exposed 8- to 10-wk-old male POMC-Discosoma red fluorescent protein (DsRed) transgenic reporter mice to either 24–48 h (acute) or 2 wk (chronic) food restriction, high-fat diet (HFD), or leptin treatment. Using semiquantitative immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassays, we discovered that acute fasting and chronic food restriction decreased the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and β-endorphin in the hypothalamus, together with decreased DsRed fluorescence, compared with control ad libitum-fed mice. Furthermore, acute but not chronic HFD or leptin administration selectively increased α-MSH levels in POMC fibers and increased DsRed fluorescence in POMC cell bodies. HFD and leptin treatments comparably increased circulating leptin levels at both time points, suggesting that transcription of Pomc and synthesis of POMC peptide products are not modified in direct relation to the concentration of plasma leptin. Our findings indicate that negative energy balance persistently downregulated POMC peptide levels, and this phenomenon may be partially explained by decreased leptin levels, since these changes were blocked in fasted mice treated with leptin. In contrast, sustained elevation of plasma leptin by HFD or hormone supplementation did not significantly alter POMC peptide levels, indicating that enhanced leptin signaling does not chronically increase Pomc transcription and peptide synthesis. PMID:24518677

  8. Identification of Synthetic and Natural Host Defense Peptides with Leishmanicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A. K.; Cen, S.; Hancock, R. E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are a major public health problem worldwide. Effective treatment of leishmaniasis is hampered by the high incidence of adverse effects to traditional drug therapy and the emergence of resistance to current therapeutics. A vaccine is currently not available. Host defense peptides have been investigated as novel therapeutic agents against a wide range of pathogens. Here we demonstrate that the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the three synthetic peptides E6, L-1018, and RI-1018 exhibit leishmanicidal activity against promastigotes and intramacrophage amastigotes of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania major. We also report that the Leishmania protease/virulence factor GP63 confers protection to Leishmania from the cytolytic properties of all l-form peptides (E6, L-1018, and LL-37) but not the d-form peptide RI-1018. The results suggest that RI-1018, E6, and LL-37 are promising peptides to develop further into components for antileishmanial therapy. PMID:26883699

  9. Identification of factors affecting birth rate in Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámková, Martina; Blašková, Veronika

    2013-10-01

    This article is concerned with identifying economic factors primarily that affect birth rates in Czech Republic. To find the relationship between the magnitudes, we used the multivariate regression analysis and for modeling, we used a time series of annual values (1994-2011) both economic indicators and indicators related to demographics. Due to potential problems with apparent dependence we first cleansed all series obtained from the Czech Statistical Office using first differences. It is clear from the final model that meets all assumptions that there is a positive correlation between birth rates and the financial situation of households. We described the financial situation of households by GDP per capita, gross wages and consumer price index. As expected a positive correlation was proved for GDP per capita and gross wages and negative dependence was proved for the consumer price index. In addition to these economic variables in the model there were used also demographic characteristics of the workforce and the number of employed people. It can be stated that if the Czech Republic wants to support an increase in the birth rate, it is necessary to consider the financial support for households with small children.

  10. The identification of affinity peptide ligands specific to the variable region of human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Miyata, Haruo; Komiyama, Masaru; Nogami, Masahiro; Ozawa, Kazumichi; Oshita, Chie; Kume, Akiko; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Sakura, Naoki; Mochizuki, Tohru; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Of all potential biological therapeutics, monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies are becoming the dominant focus of clinical research. In particular, smaller recombinant antibody fragments such as single-chain variable fragments (scFv) have become the subject of intense focus. However, an efficient affinity ligand for antibody fragment purification has not been developed. In the present study, we designed a consensus sequence for the human antibody heavy or light chain-variable regions (Fv) based on the antibody sequences available in the ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT), and synthesized these consensus sequences as template Fv antibodies. We then screened peptide ligands that specifically bind to the repertoire-derived human Fv consensus antibody using a 12-mer-peptide library expressed-phage display method. Subsequently, 1 peptide for the VH template and 8 peptides for the VK template were selected as the candidate ligands after 4 rounds of panning the phage display. Using peptide-bead-based immunoprecipitation, the code-4 and code-13 peptides showed recovery rates of the VH and VK templates that were 20-30% and 40-50%, respectively. Both peptides exhibited better recovery rates for trastuzumab scFv (approximately 40%). If it were possible to identify the best combination of VH and VK-binding peptides among the ligand peptides suitable for the human mAb Fv sequence, the result could be a promising purification tool that might greatly improve the cost efficiencies of the purification process.

  11. LC-MS/MS Identification of a Bromelain Peptide Biomarker from Ananas comosus Merr

    PubMed Central

    Secor, Eric R.; Szczepanek, Steven M.; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda; Natarajan, Prabitha; Rezaul, Karim; Han, David K.; Thrall, Roger S.; Silbart, Lawrence K.

    2012-01-01

    Bromelain (Br) is a cysteine peptidase (GenBank AEH26024.1) from pineapple, with over 40 years of clinical use. The constituents mediating its anti-inflammatory activity are not thoroughly characterized and no peptide biomarker exists. Our objective is to characterize Br raw material and identify peptides in the plasma of Br treated mice. After SDS-PAGE in-gel digestion, Br (VN#3507; Middletown, CT, USA) peptides were analyzed via LC/MS/MS using 95% protein probability, 95% peptide probability, and a minimum peptide number = 5. Br spiked mouse plasma (1 ug/ul) and plasma from i.p. treated mice (12 mg/kg) were assessed using SRM. In Br raw material, we identified seven proteins: four proteases, one jacalin-like lectin, and two protease inhibitors. In Br spiked mouse plasma, six proteins (ananain, bromelain inhibitor, cysteine proteinase AN11, FB1035 precursor, FBSB precursor, and jacalin-like lectin) were identified. Using LC/MS/MS, we identified the unique peptide, DYGAVNEVK, derived from FB1035, in the plasma of i.p. Br treated mice. The spectral count of this peptide peaked at 6 hrs and was undetectable by 24 hrs. In this study, a novel Br peptide was identified in the plasma of treated mice for the first time. This Br peptide could serve as a biomarker to standardize the therapeutic dose and maximize clinical utility. PMID:23082082

  12. LC-MS/MS Identification of a Bromelain Peptide Biomarker from Ananas comosus Merr.

    PubMed

    Secor, Eric R; Szczepanek, Steven M; Singh, Anurag; Guernsey, Linda; Natarajan, Prabitha; Rezaul, Karim; Han, David K; Thrall, Roger S; Silbart, Lawrence K

    2012-01-01

    Bromelain (Br) is a cysteine peptidase (GenBank AEH26024.1) from pineapple, with over 40 years of clinical use. The constituents mediating its anti-inflammatory activity are not thoroughly characterized and no peptide biomarker exists. Our objective is to characterize Br raw material and identify peptides in the plasma of Br treated mice. After SDS-PAGE in-gel digestion, Br (VN#3507; Middletown, CT, USA) peptides were analyzed via LC/MS/MS using 95% protein probability, 95% peptide probability, and a minimum peptide number = 5. Br spiked mouse plasma (1 ug/ul) and plasma from i.p. treated mice (12 mg/kg) were assessed using SRM. In Br raw material, we identified seven proteins: four proteases, one jacalin-like lectin, and two protease inhibitors. In Br spiked mouse plasma, six proteins (ananain, bromelain inhibitor, cysteine proteinase AN11, FB1035 precursor, FBSB precursor, and jacalin-like lectin) were identified. Using LC/MS/MS, we identified the unique peptide, DYGAVNEVK, derived from FB1035, in the plasma of i.p. Br treated mice. The spectral count of this peptide peaked at 6 hrs and was undetectable by 24 hrs. In this study, a novel Br peptide was identified in the plasma of treated mice for the first time. This Br peptide could serve as a biomarker to standardize the therapeutic dose and maximize clinical utility.

  13. Purification and identification of endogenous antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory peptides from donkey milk by multidimensional liquid chromatography and nanoHPLC-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    Donkey milk is a valuable product for the food industry due to its nutraceutical, nutritional, and functional properties. In this work, the endogenous peptides from donkey milk were investigated for their antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities, combining a two-dimensional peptide fractionation strategy with high-resolution mass spectrometry, bioinformatics analysis, and in vitro assays. After extraction, the endogenous peptides were fractionated twice, first by polymeric reversed phase and then by hydrophilic interaction chromatography. Fractions were screened for the investigated bioactivities and only the most active ones were finally analyzed by nanoRP-HPLC-MS/MS; this approach allowed to reduce the total number of possible bioactive sequences. Results were further mined by in silico analysis using PeptideRanker, BioPep, and PepBank, which provided a bioactivity score to the identified peptides and matched sequences to known bioactive peptides, in order to select candidates for chemical synthesis. Thus, five peptides were prepared and then compared to the natural occurring ones, checking their retention times and fragmentation patterns in donkey milk alone and in spiked donkey milk samples. Pure peptide standards were finally in vitro tested for the specific bioactivity. In this way, two novel endogenous antioxidant peptides, namely EWFTFLKEAGQGAKDMWR and GQGAKDMWR, and two ACE-inhibitory peptides, namely REWFTFLK and MPFLKSPIVPF, were successfully validated from donkey milk. Graphical Abstract Analytical workflow for purification and identification of bioactive peptides from donkey milk sample.

  14. Efficient identification of murine M2 macrophage peptide targeting ligands by phage display and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gary W.; Livesay, Brynn R.; Kacherovsky, Nataly A.; Cieslewicz, Maryelise; Lutz, Emi; Waalkes, Adam; Jensen, Michael C.; Salipante, Stephen J.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide ligands are used to increase the specificity of drug carriers to their target cells and to facilitate intracellular delivery. One method to identify such peptide ligands, phage display, enables high-throughput screening of peptide libraries for ligands binding to therapeutic targets of interest. However, conventional methods for identifying target binders in a library by Sanger sequencing are low-throughput, labor-intensive, and provide a limited perspective (< 0.01%) of the complete sequence space. Moreover, the small sample space can be dominated by non-specific, preferentially amplifying “parasitic sequences” and plastic-binding sequences, which may lead to the identification of false positives or exclude the identification of target-binding sequences. To overcome these challenges, we employed next-generation Illumina sequencing to couple high-throughput screening and high-throughput sequencing, enabling more comprehensive access to the phage display library sequence space. In this work, we define the hallmarks of binding sequences in next-generation sequencing data, and develop a method that identifies several target-binding phage clones for murine, alternatively-activated (M2) macrophages with a high (100%) success rate: sequences and binding motifs were reproducibly present across biological replicates; binding motifs were identified across multiple unique sequences; and an unselected, amplified library accurately filtered out parasitic sequences. In addition, we validate the Multiple Em for Motif Elicitation tool as an efficient and principled means of discovering binding sequences. PMID:26161996

  15. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A.; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits. PMID:27271639

  16. Identification of Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Enzymatic Hydrolysates of Razor Clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sadiq, Faizan A; Fu, Li; Zhu, Hui; Zhong, Minghua; Sohail, Muhammad

    2016-06-03

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of razor clam hydrolysates produced using five proteases, namely, pepsin, trypsin, alcalase, flavourzyme and proteases from Actinomucor elegans T3 was investigated. Flavourzyme hydrolysate showed the highest level of degree of hydrolysis (DH) (45.87%) followed by A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate (37.84%) and alcalase (30.55%). The A. elegans T3 proteases was observed to be more effective in generating small peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity. The 3 kDa membrane permeate of A. elegans T3 proteases hydrolysate showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.79 mg/mL. After chromatographic separation by Sephadex G-15 gel filtration and reverse phase-high performance liquid chromatography, the potent fraction was subjected to MALDI/TOF-TOF MS/MS for identification. A novel ACE-inhibitory peptide (VQY) was identified exhibiting an IC50 of 9.8 μM. The inhibitory kinetics investigation by Lineweaver-Burk plots demonstrated that the peptide acts as a competitive ACE inhibitor. The razor clam hydrolysate obtained by A. elegans T3 proteases could serve as a source of functional peptides with ACE-inhibitory activity for physiological benefits.

  17. DeMix Workflow for Efficient Identification of Cofragmented Peptides in High Resolution Data-dependent Tandem Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Pirmoradian, Mohammad; Chernobrovkin, Alexey; Zubarev, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Based on conventional data-dependent acquisition strategy of shotgun proteomics, we present a new workflow DeMix, which significantly increases the efficiency of peptide identification for in-depth shotgun analysis of complex proteomes. Capitalizing on the high resolution and mass accuracy of Orbitrap-based tandem mass spectrometry, we developed a simple deconvolution method of “cloning” chimeric tandem spectra for cofragmented peptides. Additional to a database search, a simple rescoring scheme utilizes mass accuracy and converts the unwanted cofragmenting events into a surprising advantage of multiplexing. With the combination of cloning and rescoring, we obtained on average nine peptide-spectrum matches per second on a Q-Exactive workbench, whereas the actual MS/MS acquisition rate was close to seven spectra per second. This efficiency boost to 1.24 identified peptides per MS/MS spectrum enabled analysis of over 5000 human proteins in single-dimensional LC-MS/MS shotgun experiments with an only two-hour gradient. These findings suggest a change in the dominant “one MS/MS spectrum - one peptide” paradigm for data acquisition and analysis in shotgun data-dependent proteomics. DeMix also demonstrated higher robustness than conventional approaches in terms of lower variation among the results of consecutive LC-MS/MS runs. PMID:25100859

  18. Identification of Mimotope Peptides Which Bind to the Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qiaoping; Pestka, James J.; Hespenheide, Brandon M.; Kuhn, Leslie A.; Linz, John E.; Hart, L. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 6F5 (mAb 6F5), which recognizes the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) (vomitoxin), was used to select for peptides that mimic the mycotoxin by employing a library of filamentous phages that have random 7-mer peptides on their surfaces. Two phage clones selected from the random peptide phage-displayed library coded for the amino acid sequences SWGPFPF and SWGPLPF. These clones were designated DONPEP.2 and DONPEP.12, respectively. The results of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) suggested that the two phage displayed peptides bound to mAb 6F5 specifically at the DON binding site. The amino acid sequence of DONPEP.2 plus a structurally flexible linker at the C terminus (SWGPFPFGGGSC) was synthesized and tested to determine its ability to bind to mAb 6F5. This synthetic peptide (designated peptide C430) and DON competed with each other for mAb 6F5 binding. When translationally fused with bacterial alkaline phosphatase, DONPEP.2 bound specifically to mAb 6F5, while the fusion protein retained alkaline phosphatase activity. The potential of using DONPEP.2 as an immunochemical reagent in a DON immunoassay was evaluated with a DON-spiked wheat extract. When peptide C430 was conjugated to bovine serum albumin, it elicited antibody specific to peptide C430 but not to DON in both mice and rabbits. In an in vitro translation system containing rabbit reticulocyte lysate, synthetic peptide C430 did not inhibit protein synthesis but did show antagonism toward DON-induced protein synthesis inhibition. These data suggest that the peptides selected in this study bind to mAb 6F5 and that peptide C430 binds to ribosomes at the same sites as DON. PMID:10427007

  19. Identification of novel peptide hormones in the human proteome by hidden Markov model screening

    PubMed Central

    Mirabeau, Olivier; Perlas, Emerald; Severini, Cinzia; Audero, Enrica; Gascuel, Olivier; Possenti, Roberta; Birney, Ewan; Rosenthal, Nadia; Gross, Cornelius

    2007-01-01

    Peptide hormones are small, processed, and secreted peptides that signal via membrane receptors and play critical roles in normal and pathological physiology. The search for novel peptide hormones has been hampered by their small size, low or restricted expression, and lack of sequence similarity. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a bioinformatics search tool based on the hidden Markov model formalism that uses several peptide hormone sequence features to estimate the likelihood that a protein contains a processed and secreted peptide of this class. Application of this tool to an alignment of mammalian proteomes ranked 90% of known peptide hormones among the top 300 proteins. An analysis of the top scoring hypothetical and poorly annotated human proteins identified two novel candidate peptide hormones. Biochemical analysis of the two candidates, which we called spexin and augurin, showed that both were localized to secretory granules in a transfected pancreatic cell line and were recovered from the cell supernatant. Spexin was expressed in the submucosal layer of the mouse esophagus and stomach, and a predicted peptide from the spexin precursor induced muscle contraction in a rat stomach explant assay. Augurin was specifically expressed in mouse endocrine tissues, including pituitary and adrenal gland, choroid plexus, and the atrio-ventricular node of the heart. Our findings demonstrate the utility of a bioinformatics approach to identify novel biologically active peptides. Peptide hormones and their receptors are important diagnostic and therapeutic targets, and our results suggest that spexin and augurin are novel peptide hormones likely to be involved in physiological homeostasis. PMID:17284679

  20. The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O’Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O’Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F.; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M.; Perlmutter, Aaron M.; Pierce, Michael N.; Pincus, Jonathan M.; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C.; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E.; Rubin, David S.; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R.; Sanchez, William C.; Sanjana, Veeraf M.; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M.; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N.; Silebi, Vanessa I.; Sizemore, James M.; Skolnik, Paul R.; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M.; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T.; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F. Lisa; Stone, Valerie E.; Stone, David R.; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A.; Tedaldi, Ellen M.; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A.; Trinh, Phuong D.; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J.; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M.; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H.; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J.; Warner, Daniel A.; Weber, Robert D.; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G.; Wout, Angelique van’t; Wright, David P.; Yang, Otto O.; Yurdin, David L.; Zabukovic, Brandon W.; Zachary, Kimon C.; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2011-01-01

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  1. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  2. Identification of peptides applicable as vaccines for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yamei; Terasaki, Yasunobu; Komatsu, Nobukazu; Noguchi, Masanori; Shichijo, Shigeki; Itoh, Kyogo

    2009-11-01

    One-fifth of the Japanese population is positive for HLA-A26, but few peptides are available as potential cancer vaccines for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients. The objective of this study was to identify peptide vaccine candidates for HLA-A26-positive cancer patients. The HLA-A*2601-crossbinding activity of 24 peptides currently under clinical trial as vaccines for HLA-A2, -A24, or HLA-A3 supertype-positive cancer patients was evaluated by stabilization assay. Three peptides with HLA-A2-binding activity could bind the HLA-A*2601 molecule. These three peptides induced HLA-A26-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A*2601-, -A*2602-, or -A*2603-positive prostate cancer patients against HLA-A*2601- and HLA-A*2603-positive cancer cells in CD8-dependent and peptide-specific manners. In addition, one peptide with HLA-A24-binding activity could bind to HLA-A*2601 and induced HLA-A26-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes from HLA-A*2601-, -A*2602-, or -A*2603-positive prostate cancer patients against HLA-A*2603-positive cancer cells. These results may provide novel information for the development of a peptide-based cancer vaccine for HLA-A26-positive patients.

  3. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  4. Comprehensive Identification of Glycated Peptides and Their Glycation Motifs in Plasma and Erythrocytes of Control and Diabetic Subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Monroe, Matthew E.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Meng, Da; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    Non-enzymatic glycation of proteins is implicated in diabetes mellitus and its related complications. In this report, we extend our previous development and refinement of proteomics-based methods for the analysis of non-enzymatically glycated proteins to comprehensively identify glycated proteins in normal and diabetic human plasma and erythrocytes. Using immunodepletion, enrichment, and fractionation strategies, we identified 7749 unique glycated peptides, corresponding to 3742 unique glycated proteins. Semi-quantitative comparisons revealed a number of proteins with glycation levels significantly increased in diabetes relative to control samples and that erythrocyte proteins are more extensively glycated than plasma proteins. A glycation motif analysis revealed amino acids that are favored more than others in the protein primary structures in the vicinity of the glycation sites in both sample types. The glycated peptides and corresponding proteins reported here provide a foundation for the potential identification of novel markers for diabetes, glycemia, or diabetic complications.

  5. MALDI versus ESI: The Impact of the Ion Source on Peptide Identification.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Wiebke Maria; Waidelich, Dietmar; Kerner, Alexander; Hanke, Sabrina; Berg, Regina; Trumpp, Andreas; Rösli, Christoph

    2017-02-15

    For mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses, electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) are the commonly used ionization techniques. To investigate the influence of the ion source on peptide detection in large-scale proteomics, an optimized GeLC/MS workflow was developed and applied either with ESI/MS or with MALDI/MS for the proteomic analysis of different human cell lines of pancreatic origin. Statistical analysis of the resulting data set with more than 72 000 peptides emphasized the complementary character of the two methods, as the percentage of peptides identified with both approaches was as low as 39%. Significant differences between the resulting peptide sets were observed with respect to amino acid composition, charge-related parameters, hydrophobicity, and modifications of the detected peptides and could be linked to factors governing the respective ion yields in ESI and MALDI.

  6. Identification of a peptide binding protein that plays a role in antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lakey, E.K.; Margoliash, E.; Pierce, S.K.

    1987-03-01

    The helper T-cell response to globular proteins appears, in general, to require intracellular processing of the antigen, such that a peptide fragment containing the T-cell antigenic determinant is released and transported to and held on the surface of an Ia-expressing, antigen-presenting cell. However, the molecular details underlying these phenomena are largely unknown. The means by which antigenic peptides are anchored on the antigen-presenting cell surface was investigated. A cell surface protein is identified that was isolated by it ability to bind to a 24-amino acid peptide fragment of pigeon cytochrome c, residues 81-104, containing the major antigenic determinant for B10.A mouse T cells. This peptide binding protein, purified from (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cells, appears as two discrete bands of approx. =72 and 74 kDa after NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE. The protein can be eluted from the peptide affinity column with equivalent concentrations of either the antigenic pigeon cytochrome c peptide or the corresponding nonantigenic peptide of mouse cytochrome c. However, it does not bind to the native cytochromes c, either of pigeon or mouse, and thus the protein appears to recognize some structure available only in the free peptides. This protein plays a role in antigen presentation. Its expression is not major histocompatibility complex-restricted in that the blocking activity of the antisera can be absorbed on spleen cells from mice of different haplotypes. This peptide binding protein can be isolated from a variety of cell types, including B cells, T cells, and fibroblasts. The anchoring of processed peptides on the cell surface by such a protein may play a role in antigen presentation.

  7. Identification of novel dipeptidyl peptidase-IV and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from meat proteins using in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Tomas; O'Connor, Paula; Hayes, Maria

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I, EC 3.4.15.1), renin (EC 3.4.23.15), and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5) play key roles in the control of hypertension and the development of type-2 diabetes and other diseases associated with metabolic syndrome. The aim of this work was to utilize known in silico methodologies, peptide databases and software including ProtParam (http://web.expasy.org/protparam/), Basic Local Alignment Tool (BLAST), ExPASy PeptideCutter (http://web.expasy.org/peptide_cutter/) and BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/pl/biopep) to assess the release of potentially bioactive DPP-IV, renin and ACE-I inhibitory peptides from bovine and porcine meat proteins including hemoglobin, collagen and serum albumin. These proteins were chosen as they are found commonly in meat by-products such as bone, blood and low-value meat cuts. In addition, the bioactivities of identified peptides were confirmed using chemical synthesis and in vitro bioassays. The concentration of peptide required to inhibit the activity of ACE-I and DPP-IV by 50% was determined for selected, active peptides. Novel ACE-I and DPP-IV inhibitory peptides were identified in this study using both in silico analysis and a literature search to streamline enzyme selection for peptide production. These novel peptides included the ACE-I inhibitory tri-peptide Ile-Ile-Tyr and the DPP-IV inhibitory tri-peptide Pro-Pro-Leu corresponding to sequences f (182-184) and f (326-328) of both porcine and bovine serum albumin which can be released following hydrolysis with the enzymes papain and pepsin, respectively. This work demonstrates that meat proteins are a suitable resource for the generation of bioactive peptides and further demonstrates the usefulness of in silico methodologies to streamline identification and generation of bioactive peptides.

  8. Development of an analytical strategy for the identification of potential bioactive peptides generated by in vitro tryptic digestion of fish muscle proteins.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Foglia, Patrizia; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Zenezini Chiozzi, Riccardo; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, food proteins and peptides are attracting great attention because of the emergence of a new field, that of food-derived bioactive peptides. This paper presents a comparison and evaluation of four different experiments for the identification of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fish peptides. This study is aimed at the development of a simple and fast method for the identification of peptides that could arise from fish meat if trypsin was the only digestive enzyme acting on fish meat proteins. In particular, we tested the use of ultrafiltration membranes with a molecular weight cutoff of 3,000 Da. Data analysis has shown that the experiment in which there is neither precipitation nor an ultrafiltration step performed better and allowed the identification of a larger number of peptides and potential antimicrobial peptides (AMPs); this workflow provided 473 and 398 total identified peptides and 44 and 18 AMPs for sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar extracts, respectively. This protocol is found to be faster and more straightforward than the other three tested workflows. The developed strategy could be also useful for other food matrices and could provide information about food quality and safety control.

  9. Identification of cross-linked peptides after click-based enrichment using sequential collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Du, Xiuxia; Tolić, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J; Mayer, M Uljana; Smith, Richard D; Adkins, Joshua N

    2009-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry can be a powerful approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions and for providing constraints on protein structures. However, enrichment of cross-linked peptides is crucial to reduce sample complexity before mass spectrometric analysis. In addition compact cross-linkers are often preferred to provide short spacer lengths, surface accessibility to the protein complexes, and must have reasonable solubility under conditions where the native complex structure is stable. In this study, we present a novel compact cross-linker that contains two distinct features: (1) an alkyne tag and (2) a small molecule detection tag (NO(2)) to maintain reasonable solubility in water. The alkyne tag enables enrichment of the cross-linked peptides after proteolytic cleavage and coupling of an affinity tag using alkyne-azido click chemistry. Neutral loss of the small NO(2) moiety provides a secondary means of detecting cross-linked peptides in MS/MS analyses, providing additional confidence in peptide identifications. We show the labeling efficiency of this cross-linker, which we termed CLIP (click-enabled linker for interacting proteins) using ubiquitin. The enrichment capability of CLIP is demonstrated for cross-linked ubiquitin in highly complex E. coli cell lysates. Sequential collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (CID-MS/MS) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-MS/MS of intercross-linked peptides (two peptides connected with a cross-linker) are also demonstrated for improved automated identification of cross-linked peptides.

  10. Estimating influence of cofragmentation on peptide quantification and identification in iTRAQ experiments by simulating multiplexed spectra.

    PubMed

    Li, Honglan; Hwang, Kyu-Baek; Mun, Dong-Gi; Kim, Hokeun; Lee, Hangyeore; Lee, Sang-Won; Paek, Eunok

    2014-07-03

    Isobaric tag-based quantification such as iTRAQ and TMT is a promising approach to mass spectrometry-based quantification in proteomics as it provides wide proteome coverage with greatly increased experimental throughput. However, it is known to suffer from inaccurate quantification and identification of a target peptide due to cofragmentation of multiple peptides, which likely leads to under-estimation of differentially expressed peptides (DEPs). A simple method of filtering out cofragmented spectra with less than 100% precursor isolation purity (PIP) would decrease the coverage of iTRAQ/TMT experiments. In order to estimate the impact of cofragmentation on quantification and identification of iTRAQ-labeled peptide samples, we generated multiplexed spectra with varying degrees of PIP by mixing the two MS/MS spectra of 100% PIP obtained in global proteome profiling experiments on gastric tumor-normal tissue pair proteomes labeled by 4-plex iTRAQ. Despite cofragmentation, the simulation experiments showed that more than 99% of multiplexed spectra with PIP greater than 80% were correctly identified by three different database search engines-MODa, MS-GF+, and Proteome Discoverer. Using the multiplexed spectra that have been correctly identified, we estimated the effect of cofragmentation on peptide quantification. In 74% of the multiplexed spectra, however, the cancer-to-normal expression ratio was compressed, and a fair number of spectra showed the "ratio inflation" phenomenon. On the basis of the estimated distribution of distortions on quantification, we were able to calculate cutoff values for DEP detection from cofragmented spectra, which were corrected according to a specific PIP and probability of type I (or type II) error. When we applied these corrected cutoff values to real cofragmented spectra with PIP larger than or equal to 70%, we were able to identify reliable DEPs by removing about 25% of DEPs, which are highly likely to be false positives. Our

  11. Factors Affecting the Identification of Research Problems in Educational Administration Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalçin, Mikail; Bektas, Fatih; Öztekin, Özge; Karadag, Engin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the factors that affect the identification of research problems in educational administration studies. The study was designed using the case study method. Criterion sampling was used to determine the work group; the criterion used to select the participants was that of having a study in the field of…

  12. Identification and Relative Quantification of Bioactive Peptides Sequentially Released during Simulated Gastrointestinal Digestion of Commercial Kefir.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yufang; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2017-03-08

    Health-promoting effects of kefir may be partially caused by bioactive peptides. To evaluate their formation or degradation during gastrointestinal digestion, we monitored changes of the peptide profile in a model of (1) oral, (2) gastric, and (3) small intestinal digestion of kefir. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy analyses revealed clearly different profiles between digests 2/3 and kefir/digest 1. Subsequent ultraperformance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry identified 92 peptides in total (25, 25, 43, and 30, partly overlapping in kefir and digests 1, 2, and 3, respectively), including 16 peptides with ascribed bioactivity. Relative quantification in scheduled multiple reaction monitoring mode showed that many bioactive peptides were released by simulated digestion. Most prominently, the concentration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor β-casein203-209 increased approximately 10 000-fold after combined oral, gastric, and intestinal digestion. Thus, physiological digestive processes may promote bioactive peptide formation from proteins and oligopeptides in kefir. Furthermore, bioactive peptides present in certain compartments of the gastrointestinal tract may exert local physiological effects.

  13. Identification of Dekkera bruxellensis (Brettanomyces) from Wine by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Using Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes

    PubMed Central

    Stender, Henrik; Kurtzman, Cletus; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Sørensen, Ditte; Broomer, Adam; Oliveira, Kenneth; Perry-O'Keefe, Heather; Sage, Andrew; Young, Barbara; Coull, James

    2001-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Brettanomyces is described. The test is based on fluorescein-labeled PNA probes targeting a species-specific sequence of the rRNA of Dekkera bruxellensis. The PNA probes were applied to smears of colonies, and results were interpreted by fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained from testing 127 different yeast strains, including 78 Brettanomyces isolates from wine, show that the spoilage organism Brettanomyces belongs to the species D. bruxellensis and that the new method is able to identify Brettanomyces (D. bruxellensis) with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. PMID:11157265

  14. Use of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Definitive, Rapid Identification of Five Common Candida Species▿

    PubMed Central

    Reller, Megan E.; Mallonee, Amanda B.; Kwiatkowski, Nicole P.; Merz, William G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a 2.5-h peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) assay with five Candida species-specific probes to identify Candida colonies and compared it to standard 2-h to 5-day phenotypic identification methods. Suspensions were made and slides were prepared and read for fluorescence per the manufacturer's instructions. Sensitivity was 99% (109/110), and specificity was 99% (129/130). PNA-FISH can rapidly identify those Candida species isolated most frequently. PMID:17804657

  15. MapReduce Implementation of a Hybrid Spectral Library-Database Search Method for Large-Scale Peptide Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyanaraman, Anantharaman; Cannon, William R.; Latt, Benjamin K.; Baxter, Douglas J.

    2011-11-01

    A MapReduce-based implementation called MR- MSPolygraph for parallelizing peptide identification from mass spectrometry data is presented. The underlying serial method, MSPolygraph, uses a novel hybrid approach to match an experimental spectrum against a combination of a protein sequence database and a spectral library. Our MapReduce implementation can run on any Hadoop cluster environment. Experimental results demonstrate that, relative to the serial version, MR-MSPolygraph reduces the time to solution from weeks to hours, for processing tens of thousands of experimental spectra. Speedup and other related performance studies are also reported on a 400-core Hadoop cluster using spectral datasets from environmental microbial communities as inputs.

  16. Identification, activity, and structural studies of peptides incorporating the phorbol ester-binding domain of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Wender, P A; Irie, K; Miller, B L

    1995-01-01

    The family of homologous enzymes known as protein kinase C (PKC) has been the object of intense interest because of its crucial role in cellular signal transduction. Although considerable information about the activation of PKC has been gained through structure-activity, molecular modeling, and synthetic studies of both natural and designed activators, information about the structure of PKC itself has been limited by its large size and requirement for phospholipid cofactors. Additionally, difficulties in the purification of truncated mutants of PKC have thus far prevented their analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) or x-ray crystallographic methods. We describe the identification, synthesis, ligand-binding analysis, cofactor requirements, and preliminary NMR evaluation of two subdomains (peptides B and C) of the regulatory domain of PKC-gamma. Peptides B and C bind [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate with good affinity (Kd = 6.4 microM and 414 nM, respectively) in the presence of phosphatidylserine. In comparison, the binding affinity of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate for PKC was found to be 2.6 nM. Like PKC itself, these peptides also recognize other PKC activators, including dioctanoylglycerol and teleocidin B-4, and exhibit an ability to differentiate phorbol ester from its C-4 epimer. NMR studies of PKC subdomains are also described, indicating that both peptides B and C are well behaved in solution and do not exhibit any concentration-dependent changes. Finally, these studies reveal that peptide B becomes conformationally ordered only in the presence of phospholipid, suggesting that the regulatory domain of PKC itself might be organized for activation only when associated with the lipid bilayer, where its activator (diacylglycerol) is encountered. PMID:7816824

  17. Identification of the major ACE-inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate from cuttlefish wastewater.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-03-10

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC₅₀ = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL⁻¹) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC₅₀ value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL⁻¹. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A-D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC₅₀ values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL⁻¹, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions.

  18. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Amado, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A–D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions. PMID:24619242

  19. Identification and in vitro reactivity of celiac immunoactive peptides in an apparent gluten-free beer.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; Moreno, Ma de Lourdes; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Lorite, Pedro; Torres, Ma Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Gluten content from barley, rye, wheat and in certain oat varieties, must be avoid in individuals with celiac disease. In most of the Western countries, the level of gluten content in food to be considered as gluten-free products is below 20 parts per million measured by ELISA based on specific anti-gluten peptide antibody. However, in beverages or food suffering complex hydrolytic processes as beers, the relative proportion of reactive peptides for celiac patients and the analytical techniques may differ, because of the diversity of the resulting peptide populations after fermentations. A beer below 20 parts per million of gluten but yet detectable levels of gluten peptides by anti-gliadin 33-mer antibodies (G12 and A1) was analyzed. We identified and characterized the relevant peptides for either antibody recognition or immunoactivity in celiac patients. The beer was fractionated by HPLC. The relative reactivity of the different HPLC fractions to the G12/A1 antibodies correlated to the reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 14 celiac individuals. Peptides from representative fractions classified according to the relative reactivity to G12/A1 antibodies were identified by mass spectrometry. The beer peptides containing sequences with similarity to those of previously described G12 and A1 epitopes were synthesized and confirmed significant reactivity for the antibodies. The most reactive peptides for G12/A1 also confirmed the highest immunogenicity by peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation and interferon γ production from celiac patients. We concluded that preparative HPLC combined with anti-gliadin 33-mer G12/A1 antibodies were very sensitive and specific methods to analyze the relevant immunogenic peptides in hydrolyzed gluten.

  20. Identification and In Vitro Reactivity of Celiac Immunoactive Peptides in an Apparent Gluten-Free Beer

    PubMed Central

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; Moreno, Mª de Lourdes; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Lorite, Pedro; Torres, Mª Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Gluten content from barley, rye, wheat and in certain oat varieties, must be avoid in individuals with celiac disease. In most of the Western countries, the level of gluten content in food to be considered as gluten-free products is below 20 parts per million measured by ELISA based on specific anti-gluten peptide antibody. However, in beverages or food suffering complex hydrolytic processes as beers, the relative proportion of reactive peptides for celiac patients and the analytical techniques may differ, because of the diversity of the resulting peptide populations after fermentations. A beer below 20 parts per million of gluten but yet detectable levels of gluten peptides by anti-gliadin 33-mer antibodies (G12 and A1) was analyzed. We identified and characterized the relevant peptides for either antibody recognition or immunoactivity in celiac patients. The beer was fractionated by HPLC. The relative reactivity of the different HPLC fractions to the G12/A1 antibodies correlated to the reactivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 14 celiac individuals. Peptides from representative fractions classified according to the relative reactivity to G12/A1 antibodies were identified by mass spectrometry. The beer peptides containing sequences with similarity to those of previously described G12 and A1 epitopes were synthesized and confirmed significant reactivity for the antibodies. The most reactive peptides for G12/A1 also confirmed the highest immunogenicity by peripheral blood mononuclear cell activation and interferon γ production from celiac patients. We concluded that preparative HPLC combined with anti-gliadin 33-mer G12/A1 antibodies were very sensitive and specific methods to analyze the relevant immunogenic peptides in hydrolyzed gluten. PMID:24963630

  1. Duplex DNA-Invading γ-Modified Peptide Nucleic Acids Enable Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Infections in Whole Blood

    PubMed Central

    Nölling, Jörk; Rapireddy, Srinivas; Amburg, Joel I.; Crawford, Elizabeth M.; Prakash, Ranjit A.; Rabson, Arthur R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bloodstream infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Early and targeted antimicrobial intervention is lifesaving, yet current diagnostic approaches fail to provide actionable information within a clinically viable time frame due to their reliance on blood culturing. Here, we present a novel pathogen identification (PID) platform that features the use of duplex DNA-invading γ-modified peptide nucleic acids (γPNAs) for the rapid identification of bacterial and fungal pathogens directly from blood, without culturing. The PID platform provides species-level information in under 2.5 hours while reaching single-CFU-per-milliliter sensitivity across the entire 21-pathogen panel. The clinical utility of the PID platform was demonstrated through assessment of 61 clinical specimens, which showed >95% sensitivity and >90% overall correlation to blood culture findings. This rapid γPNA-based platform promises to improve patient care by enabling the administration of a targeted first-line antimicrobial intervention. PMID:27094328

  2. Identification of cyclic peptides able to mimic the functional epitope of IgG1-Fc for human FcγRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonetto, Stephane; Spadola, Loredana; Buchanan, Andrew G.; Jermutus, Lutz; Lund, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of short, structured peptides able to mimic potently protein-protein interfaces remains a challenge in drug discovery. We report here the use of a naive cyclic peptide phage display library to identify peptide ligands able to recognize and mimic IgG1-Fc functions with FcγRI. Selection by competing off binders to FcγRI with IgG1 allowed the isolation of a family of peptides sharing the common consensus sequence TX2CXXθPXLLGCΦXE (θ represents a hydrophobic residue, Φ is usually an acidic residue, and X is any residue) and able to inhibit IgG1 binding to FcγRI. In soluble form, these peptides antagonize superoxide generation mediated by IgG1. In complexed form, they trigger phagocytosis and a superoxide burst. Unlike IgG, these peptides are strictly FcγRI-specific among the FcγRs. Molecular modeling studies suggest that these peptides can adopt 2 distinct and complementary conformers, each able to mimic the discontinuous interface contacts constituted by the Cγ2-A and -B chains of Fc for FcγRI. In addition, by covalent homodimerization, we engineered a synthetic bivalent 37-mer peptide that retains the ability to trigger effector functions. We demonstrate here that it is feasible to maintain IgG-Fc function within a small structured peptide. These peptides represent a new format for modulation of effector functions.—Bonetto, S., Spadola, L., Buchanan, A. G., Jermutus, L. Lund, J. Identification of cyclic peptides able to mimic the functional epitope of IgG1-Fc for human FcγRI. PMID:18957574

  3. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knüpfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Fändrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  4. Purification and identification of antioxidant peptides from walnut (Juglans regia L.) protein hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ning; Yang, Hongmei; Sun, Yi; Niu, Jun; Liu, Shuying

    2012-12-01

    Walnut proteins were hydrolyzed separately using three different proteases to obtain antioxidant peptides. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysates were measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Among hydrolysates, pepsin hydrolysate obtained by 3h exhibited the highest antioxidant activities, which could also quench the hydroxyl radical, chelate ferrous ion, exhibit reducing power and inhibit the lipid peroxidation. Then, 3-h pepsin hydrolysates were purified sequentially by ultrafiltration, gel filtration and RP-HPLC. The sequence of the peptide with the highest antioxidative activity was identified to be Ala-Asp-Ala-Phe (423.23 Da) using RP-HPLC-ESI-MS, which was identified for the first time from walnut protein hydrolysates. Last, the inhibition of the peptide on lipid peroxidation was similar with that of reduced glutathione (GSH). These results indicate that the protein hydrolysates and/or its isolated peptides may be effectively used as food additives.

  5. Identification of pro-opiomelanocortin and secretion of its peptide fragments in bovine adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Tennov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.D.; Kizim, E.A.; Ustinova, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation to show that biosynthesis of POMC, its proteolytic processing, an secretion of the peptide products of that processing take place in the bovine adrenals. Rabbit antisera against endorphins were obtained and used for radioimmunoassay of peptides. I 125-labeled peptides were obtained by the chloramine method and purified from free I 125 on Sephadex G-10 (0.7 x 5 cm, centrifugation for 10 min at 1500 g). To detect secretion of peptide fragments of POMC in the adrenals experiments were undertaken to determine the beta-endorphin content in perfusates obtained during retrograde perfusion of the bovine adrenals. It was found that immunoreactive compounds, indistinguishable in their immunochemical properties from beta-endorphin, are present in the perfusates, just as in the tissue extracts.

  6. Organizational identification and commitment: correlates of sense of belonging and affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Dávila, Ma Celeste; Jiménez García, Gemma

    2012-03-01

    The general purpose of this work is to analyze the overlap between organizational identification and commitment. Specifically, our study focuses on the analysis of the differences and similarities between sense of belonging (a dimension of organizational identification) and affective commitment (a dimension of organizational commitment). In order to do this, we analyzed their discriminant validity and raised their relationship with variables that previous research had showed like precedent and subsequent variables of them: value congruence, perceived support, organizational citizenship behavior, and intention to continue in the organization. A total of 292 people at one organization completed surveys measuring the variables previously described. The results showed that sense of belonging and affective commitment are different concepts and they have different relationships with relation to precedent and subsequent variables. Affective commitment seems to be more useful than sense of belonging to predict organizational citizenship behavior aimed at the organization and intention to continue. Some practical implications are described.

  7. Identification of laminin α5 short arm peptides active for endothelial cell attachment and tube formation.

    PubMed

    Kikkawa, Yamato; Sugawara, Yumika; Harashima, Nozomi; Fujii, Shogo; Ikari, Kazuki; Kumai, Jun; Katagiri, Fumihiko; Hozumi, Kentaro; Nomizu, Motoyoshi

    2017-02-21

    Laminin-511, a major component of endothelial basement membrane, consists of α5, β1, and γ1 chains. The short arm region of the α5 chain is a structural feature of endothelial laminins. In this study, we identified active sequences for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides. The short arm of the α5 chain contains three globular domains [laminin N-terminal globular domain, laminin 4 domain a, and laminin 4 domain b (LN, L4a, and L4b)] and three rod-like elements [laminin epidermal growth factor-like domain a, b, and c (LEa, LEb, and LEc)]. The cell attachment assay using recombinant proteins showed that RGD-independent cell attachment sites were localized in the α5LN-LEa domain. Further, we synthesized 70 peptides covering the amino acid sequences of the α5LN-LEa domain. Of the 70 peptides, A5-16 (mouse laminin α5 230-243: LENGEIVVSLVNGR) potently exhibited endothelial cell attachment activity. An active sequence analysis using N-terminally and C-terminally truncated A5-16 peptides showed that the nine-amino acid sequence IVVSLVNGR was critical for the endothelial cell attachment activity. Cell adhesion to the peptides was dependent on both cations and heparan sulfate. Further, the A5-16 peptide inhibited the capillary-like tube formation of HUVECs with the cells forming small clumps with short tubes. The eight-amino acid sequence EIVVSLVN in the A5-16 peptide was critical to inhibit HUVEC tube formation. This amino acid sequence could be useful for grafts and thus modulate endothelial cell behavior for vascular surgery. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease

    PubMed Central

    Falta, Michael T.; Mack, Douglas G.; Tinega, Alex N.; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4+ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4+ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLA-DP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4+ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD. PMID:23797096

  9. Identification and immunogenicity of an immunodominant mimotope of Avibacterium paragallinarum from a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongjun; Gao, Yaping; Gong, Yumei; Chen, Xiaoling; Liu, Chuan; Zhou, Xuemei; Blackall, P J; Zhang, Peijun; Yang, Hanchun

    2007-01-31

    Avibacterium paragallinarum is the causative agent of infectious coryza. The protective antigens of this important pathogen have not yet been clearly identified. In this paper, we applied phage display technique to screen the immunodominant mimotopes of a serovar A strain of A. paragallinarum by using a random 12-peptide library, and evaluated the immunogenicity in chickens of the selected mimotope. Polyclonal antibody directed against A. paragallinarum strain 0083 (serovar A) was used as the target antibody and phage clones binding to this target were screened from the 12-mer random peptide library. More than 50% of the phage clones selected in the third round carried the consensus peptide motif sequence A-DP(M)L. The phage clones containing the peptide motif reacted with the target antibody and this interaction could be blocked, in a dose-dependent manner, by A. paragallinarum. One of the peptide sequences, YGLLAVDPLFKP, was selected and the corresponding oligonucleotide sequence was synthesized and then inserted into the expression vector pFliTrx. The recombinant plasmid was transferred into an expression host Escherichia coli GI826 by electroporation, resulting in a recombinant E. coli expressing the peptide on the bacterial surface. Intramuscular injection of the epitope-expressing recombinant bacteria into chickens induced a specific serological response to serovar A. A. paragallinarum. The chickens given the recombinant E. coli showed significant protection against challenge with A. paragallinarum 0083. These results indicated a potential for the use of the mimotope in the development of molecular vaccines for infectious coryza.

  10. Identification of immunogenic MAGED4B peptides for vaccine development in oral cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kue Peng; Chun, Nicole Ai Leng; Gan, Chai Phei; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Rahman, Zainal Ariff Abdul; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Ponniah, Sathibalan; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    The ever-increasing number of tumor-associated antigens has provided a major stimulus for the development of therapeutic peptides vaccines. Tumor-associated peptides can induce high immune response rates and have been developed as vaccines for several types of solid tumors, and many are at various stages of clinical testing. MAGED4B, a melanoma antigen, is overexpressed in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and this expression promotes proliferation and cell migration. In this study, we have identified 9 short peptides derived from MAGED4B protein that are restricted in binding to the HLA subtypes common in the Asian population (HLA-A2, A11, and A24). The peptides had good binding affinity with the MHC-Class I molecules and stimulated ex-vivo IFN-gamma and Granzyme-B production in blood samples from OSCC patients, suggesting that they are immunogenic. Further, T cells stimulated with peptide-pulsed dendritic cells showed enhanced T-cell cytotoxic activity against MAGED4B-overexpressing OSCC cell lines. In summary, we have identified MAGED4B peptides that induce anti-tumor immune responses advocating that they could be further developed as vaccine candidates for the treatment of OSCC.

  11. Identification of ageing-associated naturally occurring peptides in human urine

    PubMed Central

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Bhat, Akshay; Klein, Julie; Jankowski, Vera; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Dakna, Mohammed; Koeck, Thomas; Schanstra, Joost P.; Zürbig, Petra; Rudolph, Karl L.; Schumacher, Björn; Pich, Andreas; Mischak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    To assess normal and pathological peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying ageing, urinary peptidomes of 1227 healthy and 10333 diseased individuals between 20 and 86 years of age were investigated. The diseases thereby comprised diabetes mellitus, renal and cardiovascular diseases. Using age as a continuous variable, 116 peptides were identified that significantly (p < 0.05; |ρ|≥0.2) correlated with age in the healthy cohort. The same approach was applied to the diseased cohort. Upon comparison of the peptide patterns of the two cohorts 112 common age-correlated peptides were identified. These 112 peptides predominantly originated from collagen, uromodulin and fibrinogen. While most fibrillar and basement membrane collagen fragments showed a decreased age-related excretion, uromodulin, beta-2-microglobulin and fibrinogen fragments showed an increase. Peptide-based in silico protease analysis was performed and 32 proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins, were predicted to be involved in ageing. Identified peptides, predicted proteases and patient information were combined in a systems biology pathway analysis to identify molecular pathways associated with normal and/or pathological ageing. While perturbations in collagen homeostasis, trafficking of toll-like receptors and endosomal pathways were commonly identified, degradation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins was uniquely identified in pathological ageing. PMID:26431327

  12. IDENTIFICATION OF BEST INDICATORS OF PEPTIDE-SPECTRUM MATCH USING A PERMUTATION RESAMPLING APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    AKHTAR, MALIK N.; SOUTHEY, BRUCE R.; ANDRÉN, PER E.; SWEEDLER, JONATHAN V.; RODRIGUEZ-ZAS, SANDRA L.

    2014-01-01

    Various indicators of observed-theoretical spectrum matches were compared and the resulting statistical significance was characterized using permutation resampling. Novel decoy databases built by resampling the terminal positions of peptide sequences were evaluated to identify the conditions for accurate computation of peptide match significance levels. The methodology was tested on real and manually curated tandem mass spectra from peptides across a wide range of sizes. Spectra match indicators from complementary database search programs were profiled and optimal indicators were identified. The combination of the optimal indicator and permuted decoy databases improved the calculation of the peptide match significance compared to the approaches currently implemented in the database search programs that rely on distributional assumptions. Permutation tests using p-values obtained from software-dependent matching scores and E-values outperformed permutation tests using all other indicators. The higher overlap in matches between the database search programs when using end permutation compared to existing approaches confirm the superiority of the end permutation method to identify peptides. The combination of effective match indicators and the end permutation method is recommended for accurate detection of peptides. PMID:25362838

  13. Identification of beryllium-dependent peptides recognized by CD4+ T cells in chronic beryllium disease.

    PubMed

    Falta, Michael T; Pinilla, Clemencia; Mack, Douglas G; Tinega, Alex N; Crawford, Frances; Giulianotti, Marc; Santos, Radleigh; Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xuewu; Maier, Lisa A; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-07-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous disorder characterized by an influx of beryllium (Be)-specific CD4⁺ T cells into the lung. The vast majority of these T cells recognize Be in an HLA-DP–restricted manner, and peptide is required for T cell recognition. However, the peptides that stimulate Be-specific T cells are unknown. Using positional scanning libraries and fibroblasts expressing HLA-DP2, the most prevalent HLA-DP molecule linked to disease, we identified mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that bind to MHCII and Be, forming a complex recognized by pathogenic CD4⁺ T cells in CBD. These peptides possess aspartic and glutamic acid residues at p4 and p7, respectively, that surround the putative Be-binding site and cooperate with HLA-DP2 in Be coordination. Endogenous plexin A peptides and proteins, which share the core motif and are expressed in lung, also stimulate these TCRs. Be-loaded HLA-DP2–mimotope and HLA-DP2–plexin A4 tetramers detected high frequencies of CD4⁺ T cells specific for these ligands in all HLADP2+ CBD patients tested. Thus, our findings identify the first ligand for a CD4⁺ T cell involved in metal-induced hypersensitivity and suggest a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of a common antigen specificity in CBD.

  14. Antilisterial peptides from Spanish dry-cured hams: Purification and identification.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Patricia; Mora, Leticia; Escudero, Elizabeth; Vignolo, Graciela; Aznar, Rosa; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-10-01

    The typical Spanish dry-cured ham has a particular sensory quality that makes it a distinctive food, highly appreciated for consumers worldwide. Its particular physicochemical properties, such as high salt content and reduced water activity contribute to their shelf-stability. However, post-processing actions carried out for the commercialization of these products such as slicing may increase the risk of development of pathogenic microorganisms as Listeria monocytogenes. During ripening, muscle proteins are hydrolyzed by muscle peptidases releasing peptides and free amino acids. Some of these peptides have been described to exert biological activities such as antioxidant and ACE-inhibition. In this study, a peptidomic strategy using mass spectrometry techniques has been used to identify and sequence those naturally generated peptides showing antilisterial activity. One hundred and five peptides have been identified in active fractions and some synthesized and their MIC calculated. Ten peptides were able to inhibit the growth of L. monocytogenes, being the pentapeptide RHGYM the most effective showing a MIC value of 6.25 mM. This study proves for the first time the potential antimicrobial action against L. monocytogenes of certain naturally generated peptides obtained from Spanish dry-cured ham.

  15. Identification of ageing-associated naturally occurring peptides in human urine.

    PubMed

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Bhat, Akshay; Klein, Julie; Jankowski, Vera; Mullen, William; Vlahou, Antonia; Dakna, Mohammed; Koeck, Thomas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Rudolph, Karl L; Schumacher, Björn; Pich, Andreas; Mischak, Harald

    2015-10-27

    To assess normal and pathological peptidomic changes that may lead to an improved understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying ageing, urinarypeptidomes of 1227 healthy and 10333 diseased individuals between 20 and 86 years of age were investigated. The diseases thereby comprised diabetes mellitus, renal and cardiovascular diseases. Using age as a continuous variable, 116 peptides were identified that significantly (p < 0.05; |ρ|≥0.2) correlated with age in the healthy cohort. The same approach was applied to the diseased cohort. Upon comparison of the peptide patterns of the two cohorts 112 common age-correlated peptides were identified. These 112 peptides predominantly originated from collagen, uromodulin and fibrinogen. While most fibrillar and basement membrane collagen fragments showed a decreased age-related excretion, uromodulin, beta-2-microglobulin and fibrinogen fragments showed an increase. Peptide-based in silico protease analysis was performed and 32 proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases and cathepsins, were predicted to be involved in ageing. Identified peptides, predicted proteases and patient information were combined in a systems biology pathway analysis to identify molecular pathways associated with normal and/or pathological ageing. While perturbations in collagen homeostasis, trafficking of toll-like receptors and endosomal pathways were commonly identified, degradation of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins was uniquely identified in pathological ageing.

  16. Identification and structural insights of three novel antimicrobial peptides isolated from green coconut water.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Dey, Satyahari; Mandal, Mahitosh; Sarkar, Siddik; Maria-Neto, Simone; Franco, Octavio L

    2009-04-01

    Infections caused by pathogenic bacteria could cause an expressive negative impact on human health. A significant enhance in resistance to commercial antibiotics has been observed in all kinds of pathogenic bacteria. In order to find novel approaches to control such common infections, a wide number of defense peptides with bactericidal properties have been characterized. In this report, three peptides lower than 3kDa were purified and identified from green coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) water by using reversed phase-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), showing molecular masses of 858Da, 1249Da and 950Da. First one, named Cn-AMP1, was extremely efficient against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, being MICs calculated for three peptides. All complete sequences were determined by MALDI-ToF analysis showing no identity in databanks. Moreover, peptide net charge and hydrophobicity of each peptide was in silico evaluated. Finally molecular modeling and dynamics were also applied generating peptides three-dimensional structures, indicating a better explanation to probable mechanisms of action. Cn-AMPs here reported show remarkable potential to contribute in the development of novel antibiotics from natural sources.

  17. Identification of peptide sequences that target to the brain using in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingwei; Zhang, Qizhi; Pang, Zhiqing; Wang, Yuchen; Liu, Qingfeng; Guo, Liangran; Jiang, Xinguo

    2012-06-01

    Phage display technology could provide a rapid means for the discovery of novel peptides. To find peptide ligands specific for the brain vascular receptors, we performed a modified phage display method. Phages were recovered from mice brain parenchyma after administrated with a random 7-mer peptide library intravenously. A longer circulation time was arranged according to the biodistributive brain/blood ratios of phage particles. Following sequential rounds of isolation, a number of phages were sequenced and a peptide sequence (CTSTSAPYC, denoted as PepC7) was identified. Clone 7-1, which encodes PepC7, exhibited translocation efficiency about 41-fold higher than the random library phage. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that Clone 7-1 had a significant superiority on transport efficiency into the brain compared with native M13 phage. Clone 7-1 was inhibited from homing to the brain in a dose-dependent fashion when cyclic peptides of the same sequence were present in a competition assay. Interestingly, the linear peptide (ATSTSAPYA, Pep7) and a scrambled control peptide PepSC7 (CSPATSYTC) did not compete with the phage at the same tested concentration (0.2-200 pg). Labeled by Cy5.5, PepC7 exhibited significant brain-targeting capability in in vivo optical imaging analysis. The cyclic conformation of PepC7 formed by disulfide bond, and the correct structure itself play a critical role in maintaining the selectivity and affinity for the brain. In conclusion, PepC7 is a promising brain-target motif never been reported before and it could be applied to targeted drug delivery into the brain.

  18. Identification of Novel Hexapeptides Bioactive against Phytopathogenic Fungi through Screening of a Synthetic Peptide Combinatorial Library

    PubMed Central

    López-García, Belén; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Marcos, Jose F.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to improve the antifungal activity against selected phytopathogenic fungi of the previously identified hexapeptide PAF19. We describe some properties of a set of novel synthetic hexapeptides whose d-amino acid sequences were obtained through screening of a synthetic peptide combinatorial library in a positional scanning format. As a result of the screening, 12 putative bioactive peptides were identified, synthesized, and assayed. The peptides PAF26 (Ac-rkkwfw-NH2), PAF32 (Ac-rkwhfw-NH2), and PAF34 (Ac-rkwlfw-NH2) showed stronger activity than PAF19 against isolates of Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium italicum, and Botrytis cinerea. PAF26 and PAF32, but not PAF34, were also active against Fusarium oxysporum. Penicillium expansum was less susceptible to all four PAF peptides, and only PAF34 showed weak activity against it. Assays were also conducted on nontarget organisms, and PAF26 and PAF32 showed much-reduced toxicity to Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating selectivity towards certain filamentous fungi. Thus, the data showed distinct activity profiles for peptides differentiated by just one or two residue substitutions. Our conclusion from this observation is that a specificity factor is involved in the activity of these short peptides. Furthermore, PAF26 and PAF32 displayed activities against P. digitatum, P. italicum, and B. cinerea similar to that of the hemolytic 26-amino acid melittin, but they did not show the high toxicity of melittin towards bacteria and yeasts. The four peptides acted additively, with no synergistic interactions among them, and PAF26 was shown to have improved activity over PAF19 in in vivo orange fruit decay experiments. PMID:11976121

  19. Proteolytic peptide patterns as indicators for fungal infections and nonfungal affections of human nails measured by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hollemeyer, Klaus; Jager, Sven; Altmeyer, Wolfgang; Heinzle, Elmar

    2005-03-15

    The discrimination of onychomycoses from endogenous diseases showing macroscopically similar symptoms is difficult. Long-lasting but ineffective antifungal therapies using systemic medicaments with often severe adverse reactions may be the consequence. We introduce a novel mass spectrometric method for the discrimination of fungal infections and nonfungal affections. Horn samples from patients infected by Trichophyton rubrum, from patients with psoriasis affecting nails, and from healthy persons were investigated. Onychomycoses are basically associated with proteolytic attacks of the virulent fungi-secreting proteases partly hydrolyzing the horn material. Endogenous diseases lack these proteolytic activities, conserving intact structural proteins. Tryptical digestion of horn material produced cleavage peptides detectable by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Mass spectra of horn material infected by T. rubrum were clearly different from those originating from healthy test persons and from patients with psoriasis. Two methods were successfully applied to quantify the differences between groups of samples. One is based on the Euclidean match factor, and the other is based on the identification of specific peptide peaks occurring exclusively within one group of persons. The Euclidean match factor distributions and the occurrence of specific peptide peaks allowed a clear differentiation of T. rubrum infections from psoriasis patients and healthy test persons. No differences were found between healthy test persons and psoriasis patients. The method is rapid and does not require any cultivation.

  20. Identification of Peptide Mimics of a Glycan Epitope on the Surface of Parasitic Nematode Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Joanna M.; Shaw, Richard J.; Sutherland, Ian A.; Pernthaner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Phage display was used to identify peptide mimics of an immunologically protective nematode glycan (CarLA) by screening a constrained C7C peptide library for ligands that bound to an anti-CarLA mAb (PAB1). Characterisation of these peptide mimotopes revealed functional similarities with an epitope that is defined by PAB1. Mimotope vaccinations of mice with three selected individual phage clones facilitated the induction of antibody responses that recognised the purified, native CarLA molecule which was obtained from Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Furthermore, these mimotopes are specifically recognised by antibodies in the saliva of animals that were immune to natural polygeneric nematode challenge. This shows that antibodies to the PAB1 epitope form part of the mucosal polyclonal anti-CarLA antibody response of nematode immune host animals. This demonstrates that the selected peptide mimotopes are of biological relevance. These peptides are the first to mimic the PAB1 epitope of CarLA, a defined larval glycan epitope which is conserved between many nematode species. PMID:27579674

  1. Accumulation and identification of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Zou, Yu; Yu, Nanjing; Gu, Zhenxin

    2011-04-27

    The incubation conditions of wheat germ for angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity (ACEI) elevation and peptide accumulation were investigated, and five ACE inhibitory peptides were obtained. The effect of individual factors such as incubation time, temperature, initial pH, and liquid to solid ratio on ACEI and peptide concentration of incubation medium was evaluated, respectively. The combinations of four factors were further optimized using a Box-Behnken design. Under the best incubation condition (pH 4.4 with a liquid to solid ratio 8.14 mL/g at temperature 47 °C, for 7 h), maximum ACEI (92.16%) and peptide concentration (88.12 mg/g) were obtained, which were 6.2- and 2.4-fold, respectively, as compared to the unincubated wheat germ. After they were purified, five ACE inhibitory peptides, VEV, W, NPPSV, QV, and AMY, were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The IC(50) were 115.20, 94.87, 40.56, 26.82, and 5.86 μM, respectively.

  2. Identification of novel antibacterial peptides isolated from a commercially available casein hydrolysate by autofocusing technique.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Hend A; Abdou, Adham M; Nakamura, Yasushi; Park, Eun Young; Mohamed, Hamdi A; Sato, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Autofocusing, as a simple and safe technique, was used to fractionate casein hydrolysate based on the amphoteric nature of its peptides. The antibacterial activity of casein hydrolysate and its autofocusing fractions (A1-10) was examined against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The basic fraction A9 exhibited the highest activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 150 μg/mL, whereas casein hydrolysate showed MIC values ranging from 2000 to 8000 μg/mL. The antibacterial peptides in A9 were purified by using a series of size exclusion and reversed phase chromatographies. Three peptides exhibited the most potent antibacterial activity with MIC values ranging from 12.5 to 100 μg/mL. These peptides were generated from α(s2)-casein, α(s1)-casein, and κ-casein and identified as K165 KISQRYQKFALPQYLKTVYQHQK188, I6KHQGLPQEV15, and T136EAVESTVATL146, respectively. Therefore, the results revealed that casein hydrolysate had potent antibacterial peptides that could be isolated by autofocusing technique.

  3. Purification and Identification of Antioxidant Peptides from Enzymatic Hydrolysate of Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Hu, Yuanliang; Xue, Mingxiong; Dun, Yaohao; Li, Shenao; Peng, Nan; Liang, Yunxiang; Zhao, Shumao

    2016-07-28

    The aim of this study was to isolate antioxidant peptides from an enzymatic hydrolysate of Spirulina platensis. A novel antioxidant peptide was obtained by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, with the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay used to measure the antioxidant activity, and the sequence was determined to be Pro-Asn-Asn (343.15 Da) by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. This peptide was synthesized to confirm its antioxidant properties, and it exhibited 81.44 ± 0.43% DPPH scavenging activity at 100 µg/ml, which was similar to that of glutathione (82.63 ± 0.56%). Furthermore, the superoxide anion and hydroxyl free-radical scavenging activities and the SOD activity of the peptide were 47.84 ± 0.49%, 54.01 ± 0.82%, and 12.55 ± 0.75%, respectively, at 10 mg/ml. These results indicate that S. platensis is a good source of antioxidant peptides, and that its hydrolysate may have important applications in the pharmaceutical and food industries.

  4. Identification of Peptide Inhibitors of Enveloped Viruses Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yongtao; Yu, Shui; Zou, Jian-Wei; Hu, Guixiang; Rahman, Noorsaadah A. B. D.; Othman, Rozana Binti; Tao, Xia; Huang, Meilan

    2015-01-01

    The peptides derived from envelope proteins have been shown to inhibit the protein-protein interactions in the virus membrane fusion process and thus have a great potential to be developed into effective antiviral therapies. There are three types of envelope proteins each exhibiting distinct structure folds. Although the exact fusion mechanism remains elusive, it was suggested that the three classes of viral fusion proteins share a similar mechanism of membrane fusion. The common mechanism of action makes it possible to correlate the properties of self-derived peptide inhibitors with their activities. Here we developed a support vector machine model using sequence-based statistical scores of self-derived peptide inhibitors as input features to correlate with their activities. The model displayed 92% prediction accuracy with the Matthew’s correlation coefficient of 0.84, obviously superior to those using physicochemical properties and amino acid decomposition as input. The predictive support vector machine model for self- derived peptides of envelope proteins would be useful in development of antiviral peptide inhibitors targeting the virus fusion process. PMID:26636321

  5. Identification of a Highly Conserved Epitope on Avian Influenza Virus Non-Structural Protein 1 Using a Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xuexia; Bao, Hongmei; Shi, Lin; Tao, Qimeng; Jiang, Yongping; Zeng, Xianying; Xu, Xiaolong; Tian, Guobin; Zheng, Shimin; Chen, Hualan

    2016-01-01

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional protein. It is present at high levels in infected cells and can be used for AIV detection and diagnosis. In this study, we generated monoclonal antibody (MAb) D7 against AIV NS1 protein by immunization of BALB/c mice with purified recombinant NS1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli. Isotype determination revealed that the MAb was IgG1/κ-type subclass. To identify the epitope of the MAb D7, the NS1 protein was truncated into a total of 225 15-mer peptides with 14 amino acid overlaps, which were spotted for a peptide microarray. The results revealed that the MAb D7 recognized the consensus DAPF motif. Furthermore, the AIV NS1 protein with the DAPF motif deletion was transiently expressed in 293T cells and failed to react with MAb D7. Subsequently, the DAPF motif was synthesized with an elongated GSGS linker at both the C- and N-termini. The MAb D7 reacted with the synthesized peptide both in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and dot-blot assays. From these results, we concluded that DAPF motif is the epitope of MAb D7. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a 4-mer epitope on the NS1 protein of AIV that can be recognized by MAb using a peptide microarray, which is able to simplify epitope identification, and that could serve as the basis for immune responses against avian influenza. PMID:26938453

  6. Identification with Stimuli Moderates Women's Affective and Testosterone Responses to Self-Chosen Erotica.

    PubMed

    Goldey, Katherine L; van Anders, Sari M

    2016-11-01

    Sexual thoughts are sufficient to increase testosterone (T) in women, yet erotic films are not. A key confound in past studies is autonomy in stimulus selection: women choose the content of their sexual thoughts but films have been selected by researchers. We hypothesized that self-chosen erotic films, compared to researcher-chosen erotic films, would (1) increase women's self-reported arousal, enjoyment, and identification with stimuli, and decrease negative affect; and (2) increase T. Participants (N = 116 women) were randomly assigned to a neutral documentary condition or one of three erotic film conditions: high choice (self-chosen erotica from participants' own sources), moderate choice (self-chosen erotica from films preselected by sexuality researchers), or no choice (researcher-chosen erotica). Participants provided saliva samples for T before and after viewing the film in the privacy of their homes. Compared to researcher-chosen erotica, self-chosen erotica increased self-reported arousal and enjoyment, but also unexpectedly disgust, guilt, and embarrassment. Self-chosen erotica only marginally increased identification with stimuli compared to researcher-chosen erotica. Overall, film condition did not affect T, but individual differences in identification moderated T responses: among women reporting lower levels of identification, the moderate choice condition decreased T compared to the no choice condition, but this difference was not observed among women with higher identification. These results highlight the importance of cognitive/emotional factors like identification for sexually modulated T. However, self-chosen erotica results in more ambivalent rather than unequivocally positive cognitive/emotional responses, perhaps because stigma associated with viewing erotica for women becomes more salient when choosing stimuli.

  7. Identification of a Novel Parallel β‐Strand Conformation within Molecular Monolayer of Amyloid Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lei; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Xiaofeng; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Li, Jingyuan; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The differentiation of protein properties and biological functions arises from the variation in the primary and secondary structure. Specifically, in abnormal assemblies of protein, such as amyloid peptide, the secondary structure is closely correlated with the stable ensemble and the cytotoxicity. In this work, the early Aβ33‐42 aggregates forming the molecular monolayer at hydrophobic interface are investigated. The molecular monolayer of amyloid peptide Aβ33‐42 consisting of novel parallel β‐strand‐like structure is further revealed by means of a quantitative nanomechanical spectroscopy technique with force controlled in pico‐Newton range, combining with molecular dynamic simulation. The identified parallel β‐strand‐like structure of molecular monolayer is distinct from the antiparallel β‐strand structure of Aβ33‐42 amyloid fibril. This finding enriches the molecular structures of amyloid peptide aggregation, which could be closely related to the pathogenesis of amyloid disease. PMID:27818898

  8. [MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric identification of novel intercellular space peptides].

    PubMed

    Il'ina, A P; Kulikova, O G; Mal'tsev, D I; Krasnov, M S; Rybakova, E Iu; Skripnikova, V S; Kuznetsova, E S; Buriak, A K; Iamskova, V P; Iamskov, I A

    2011-01-01

    We performed the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis of the peptides entering into the composition of not yet explored bioregulators derived from the extracellular matrix of the tissues of the various organs of the mammals, and also plants and fungi. The study included 15 different mammalian tissues, 13 species of plants, and 2 species of fungi. Exploring the bioregulators derived from eye tissues, we demonstrated that their composition includes peptide components with the same values of the molecular weight. The composition of the bioregulators derived from the tissues of various organs of mammals or different species of plants and fungi includes the peptides with different values of molecular weight. Obtained data indicate the growing evidence of the assumptions about the major function of the bioregulators of this group--their involvement in the regulation of tissue-organ homeostasis in the biological systems.

  9. Identification of SER-PRO-CYS Peptide in Blood Serum of Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Myronovkij, Severyn; Negrych, Nazar; Nehrych, Tetyana; Tkachenko, Volodymyr; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy; Stoika, Rostyslav; Kit, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of multiple sclerosis (MS) requires additional molecular markers. Recently, we used original TCA-precipitation/extraction approach in combination with MALDI TOF/TOF mass-spectrometry and identified earlier unknown 48 kDa form of the unconventional myosin IC isoform b (Myo1C) in blood serum of the MS patients. Further examination of TCA-extracted fraction of blood serum of these patients by means of thin-layer chromatography and HPLC gel-filtration allowed detecting 300-500 Da peptides. MALDI TOF/TOF massspectrometry of these peptides showed that they contain Ser-Pro-Cys amino acid sequence. We discussed potential mechanisms of a release of these peptides that were earlier unknown in blood serum of the MS patients.

  10. Identification of IgE binding to Api g 1-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Elvira; Aÿ, Bernhard; Boisguerin, Prisca; Dölle, Sabine; Worm, Margitta; Volkmer, Rudolf

    2010-11-02

    Celery is a frequent cause of food allergy in pollen-sensitized patients and can induce severe allergic reactions. Clinical symptoms cannot be predicted by skin prick tests (SPTs) or by determining allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). Our aim was to identify specific IgE binding peptides by using an array technique. For our study, the sera of 21 patients with positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) to celery, as well as the sera of 17 healthy patients were used. Additionally, all patients underwent skin tests along with determinations of specific IgE binding. The major allergen of celery Api g 1.0101 (Apium graveolens) was synthesized as an array of overlapping peptides and probed with the patients' sera. We developed an improved immunoassay protocol by investigating peptide lengths, peptide densities, incubation parameters, and readout systems, which could influence IgE binding. Sera of celery-allergic patients showed binding to three distinct regions of Api g 1.0101. The region including amino acids 100 to 126 of Api g 1.0101 is the most important region for IgE binding. This region caused a fivefold higher binding of IgE from the sera of celery-allergic patients compared to those of healthy individuals. In particular, one peptide (VLVPTADGGSIC) was recognized by all sera of celery-allergic patients. In contrast, no binding to this peptide was detected in sera of the healthy controls. Our improved assay strategy allows us to distinguish between celery-allergic and healthy individuals, but needs to be explored in a larger cohort of well-defined patients.

  11. Isolation and identification of a new thymic peptide from calf thymus.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xi-Ming; Duan, Ming-Xing; Deng, Bin; Liu, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Qiang-Zhe; Liu, Zheng; He, Hong-Xuan

    2004-08-01

    Various thymic peptides (including thymulin, thymic humoral factor, thymopoietin, etc.) play important roles in the process of T cell maturation and development. We isolated a new peptide from calf thymus and named it thymus activity factor II (TAF-II). A yield of 0.92 mg of TAF-II was purified from 500 g calf thymus. Analysis by LC/MSD-Trap showed the amino acid sequence of this hexapeptide to be Glu-Ala-Lys-Ser-Gln-Gly-OH with molecular weight 618.5 daltons. We have also begun to investigate the influence of TAF-II.

  12. A dispensable peptide from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase affects tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Zúñiga, Roberto; Salazar, Juan; Canales, Mauricio; Orellana, Omar

    2002-12-18

    The activation domain of class I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which contains the Rossmann fold and the signature sequences HIGH and KMSKS, is generally split into two halves by the connective peptides (CP1, CP2) whose amino acid sequences are idiosyncratic. CP1 has been shown to participate in the binding of tRNA as well as the editing of the reaction intermediate aminoacyl-AMP or the aminoacyl-tRNA. No function has been assigned to CP2. The amino acid sequence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans TrpRS was predicted from the genome sequence. Protein sequence alignments revealed that A. ferrooxidans TrpRS contains a 70 amino acids long CP2 that is not found in any other bacterial TrpRS. However, a CP2 in the same relative position was found in the predicted sequence of several archaeal TrpRSs. A. ferrooxidans TrpRS is functional in vivo in Escherichia coli. A deletion mutant of A. ferrooxidans trpS lacking the coding region of CP2 was constructed. The in vivo activity of the mutant TrpRS in E. coli, as well as the kinetic parameters of the in vitro activation of tryptophan by ATP, were not altered by the deletion. However, the K(m) value for tRNA was seven-fold higher upon deletion, reducing the efficiency of aminoacylation. Structural modeling suggests that CP2 binds to the inner corner of the L shape of tRNA.

  13. A method for identification of the peptides that bind to a clone of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in the serum of Graves' disease patients.

    PubMed

    Na, Chan Hyun; Lee, Mi Hwa; Cho, Bo Youn; Chae, Chi-Bom

    2003-04-01

    A method was developed for identification of the peptide sequences that bind to thyroid-stimulating antibody (TSAb) clones from phage-displayed peptide library. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified from the serum of a Graves' disease patient that stimulates the synthesis of cAMP in the cells that express TSH receptor (TSHR). The IgG that binds to TSHR was purified by an affinity column packed with the resin cross-linked with the extracellular domain of human TSHR. The receptor-binding IgG was then mixed with phages that display linear or cyclic peptides at the end of tail protein pIII. The bound phages were eluted with acidic glycine after extensive washing. From sequencing of the pIII gene of the bound phages, one can deduce the sequences of the peptides that bind to the receptor-binding IgG. Each peptide sequence was then tested for inhibition of the synthesis of cAMP from thyroid cells induced by the serum of a Graves' patient. In this way, one can obtain the peptides that bind to a clone of TSAb. We obtained a peptide sequence that inhibits the action of TSAb at an extremely low concentration (<10(-14) M). Such a peptide will be useful for various studies on TSAb.

  14. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions.

  15. Identification of peptide mimotopes of gp96 using single-chain antibody library.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Arulkumaran; Suriano, Robert; Goswami, Neha; Chaudhuri, Devyani; Ashok, Badithe T; Rajoria, Shilpi; George, Andrea L; Mittelman, Abraham; Tiwari, Raj K

    2011-03-01

    Heat shock proteins such as gp96 are immunogenic and are widely used as vaccines in immunotherapy of cancers. The present study focuses on the use of peptide mimotopes as immunotherapeutic vaccines for prostate cancer. To this end, we developed a 15-mer gp96 peptide mimotope specifically reactive to MAT-LyLu gp96-peptide complex using combinatorial single-chain antibody and peptide phage display library. The immunogenicity of the synthesized gp96 mimotope was analyzed initially in normal BALB/c mice in combination with various adjuvants such as complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), aluminum salts (ALUM), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and liposome, of which CFA served as a positive control. The antibody response was determined and found that the gp96 mimotope with ALUM showed a significant increase in antibody titer, followed by GM-CSF and liposomes. Further, the T cell (CD4(+) and CD8(+)) populations from splenocytes, as well as IgG isotypes, interleukin-4, and interleukin-5 of gp96 mimotope with ALUM-immunized animals, were analyzed. The results suggest that the gp96 mimotope may elicit a potent and effective antitumor antibody response. Further, the study identifies ALUM and GM-CSF as adjuvant options to drive an appropriate protective immune response as these adjuvants have prior use in humans.

  16. Identification of Cellular Binding Sites for a Novel Human Anti-Breast Cancer Peptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    the linear form of the peptide, AFPep, has been isolated and identified by mass spectroscopy as Hsp72 which together with Hsp9O and other components...AFPep and Hsp72 and the relevance to the anti-breast cancer activity of AFPep are currently being evaluated. In addition, an in vitro cell culture method

  17. Identification and analysis of insulin like peptides in nematode secretomes provide targets for parasite control

    PubMed Central

    Gahoi, Shachi; Gautam, Budhayash

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like (ins) peptides play an important role in development and metabolism across the metazoa. In nematodes, these are also required for dauer formation and longevity and are expressed in different types of neurons across various life stages which demonstrate their role in parasites and could become possible targets for parasite control. To date, many nematode genomes are publically available. However, a systematic screening of ins peptides across different nematode group has not been reported. In the present study, we systematically identified ins peptides in the secretomes of 73 nematodes with fully sequenced genomes covering five different groups viz. plant parasitic, animal parasitic, human parasitic, entomopathogenic and free living nematodes. From the total of 93,949 secretory proteins, 176 proteins were uniquely mapped to 40 identified C. elegans ins families. The obtained result showed that 74.15% of the identified ins proteins were represented in free living nematodes only and remaining 25.84% were combinedly identified in all other nematode groups. The ins-1, ins-17 and ins-18 were the only ins families which were detected in all the studied nematode groups. Out of 176 proteins, 96 of ins proteins were predicted as hydrophilic in nature and 39 proteins were found stable using ProtParam analysis. Our study provides insight into the distribution of ins peptides across different group of nematodes and this information could be useful for further experimental study. PMID:28356679

  18. Xilmass: A New Approach toward the Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Şule; Drepper, Friedel; Hulstaert, Niels; Černič, Maša; Gevaert, Kris; Economou, Anastassios; Warscheid, Bettina; Martens, Lennart; Vandermarliere, Elien

    2016-10-18

    Chemical cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry plays an important role in unravelling protein interactions, especially weak and transient ones. Moreover, cross-linking complements several structural determination approaches such as cryo-EM. Although several computational approaches are available for the annotation of spectra obtained from cross-linked peptides, there remains room for improvement. Here, we present Xilmass, a novel algorithm to identify cross-linked peptides that introduces two new concepts: (i) the cross-linked peptides are represented in the search database such that the cross-linking sites are explicitly encoded, and (ii) the scoring function derived from the Andromeda algorithm was adapted to score against a theoretical tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectrum that contains the peaks from all possible fragment ions of a cross-linked peptide pair. The performance of Xilmass was evaluated against the recently published Kojak and the popular pLink algorithms on a calmodulin-plectin complex data set, as well as three additional, published data sets. The results show that Xilmass typically had the highest number of identified distinct cross-linked sites and also the highest number of predicted cross-linked sites.

  19. Identification of salt-inducible peptide with putative kinase activity in halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mahmoud-Reza; Sokhansanj, Ashrafaddin; Yoosefi, Mitra; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Ali

    2007-09-01

    Strain XII, a moderately halophilic bacterium, expressed a peptide in response to saline media. This peptide was designated as salt-inducible factor (Sif-A). The purpose of this study is to describe Sif-A, which might be involved in the osmoresistance mechanism of strain XII. The complete sequence of sif-A was determined using PCR. sif-A codes for a polypeptide of 20.518 kDa. The polypeptide has a putative signal peptide of 27 amino acids (2.667 kDa) preceding the mature protein (17.869 kDa). Motif analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence indicated that there is a p-loop NTPase domain on the C-terminal of the peptide, which might correlate with its function. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene was analyzed phylogenetically to classify strain XII. This organism was found to have the closest association with Virgibacillus halodenitrificans, which was proven by its phenotypic characteristics.

  20. MALDI-based identification of stable hazelnut protein derived tryptic marker peptides.

    PubMed

    Cucu, T; De Meulenaer, B; Devreese, B

    2012-01-01

    Food allergy is an important health problem especially in industrialised countries. Tree nuts, among which are hazelnuts (Corylus avellana), are typically causing serious and life-threatening symptoms in sensitive subjects. Hazelnut is used as a food ingredient in pastry, confectionary products, ice cream and meat products, therefore undeclared hazelnut can be often present as a cross-contaminant representing a threat for allergic consumers. Mass spectrometric techniques are used for the detection of food allergens in processed foods, but limited information regarding stable tryptic peptide markers for hazelnut is available. The aim of this study was to detect stable peptide markers from modified hazelnut protein through the Maillard reaction and oxidation in a buffered solution. Peptides ³⁹⁵Gly-Arg⁴⁰³ from Cor a 11 and ²⁰⁹Gln-Arg²¹⁷, ³⁵¹Ile-Arg³⁶³, ⁴⁶⁴Ala-Arg⁴⁷⁸ and ⁴⁰¹Val-Arg⁴¹⁷ from Cor a 9 hazelnut allergens proved to be the most stable and could be detected and confirmed with high scores in most of the modified samples. The identified peptides can be further used as analytical targets for the development of more robust quantitative methods for hazelnut detection in processed foods.

  1. Identification of nose-to-brain homing peptide through phage display.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ping; Xu, Wen-Rui; Yang, Wen-Jun; Wen, Long-Ping

    2009-02-01

    Brain delivery of drug molecules through the nasal passage represents a viable approach for bypassing the blood-brain barrier (BBB) but remains a major challenge due to lack of efficient homing carriers. To screen for potential peptides with the ability to transport into the brain via the nasal passage, we applied a C7C phage peptide display library (Ph.D.-C7C) intra-nasally to anesthetized rats and recovered phage from the brain tissue 45 min after phage administration. After three rounds of panning, 10 positive phage clones were selected and sequenced. Clone7, which exhibited highest translocation efficiency, was chosen for further studies. After nasal administration, Clone7 entered the brain within 30 min and exhibited translocation efficiency about 50-fold higher than a random phage. A 11-amino acid synthetic peptide derived from the displayed sequence of Clone7 (ACTTPHAWLCG) efficiently inhibited the nasal-brain translocation of Clone7. Both phage recovery results and fluorescent microscopy images revealed the presence of many more Clone7 phage in the brain than in the liver, kidney and other internal organs after the nasal administration, suggesting that Clone7 bypassed the BBB and entered brain directly. Furthermore, both Clone7 and the ACTTPHAWLCG peptide were found to be heavily distributed along the olfactory nerve after the nasal administration, further suggesting a direct passage route into the brain via the olfactory region. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using the in vivo phage display approach for selecting peptides with the nose-to-brain homing capability and may have implications for the development of novel targeting carriers useful for brain delivery.

  2. Identification and characterization of a peptide affinity reagent for detection of noroviruses in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jennifer D; Ajami, Nadim J; Fryszczyn, Bartlomiej G; Estes, Mary K; Atmar, Robert L; Palzkill, Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the most common agent of nonbacterial epidemic gastroenteritis and is estimated to cause 21 million cases of the disease in the United States annually. The antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) currently available for NoV diagnosis detect only certain strains and are approved for use in the United States only in epidemics where NoV is suspected. There is a clear need for simpler, more rapid, and more reliable diagnostic tools for the detection of NoV. In this study, phage display technology was used to screen a library of phage displaying random 12-mer peptides for those that bind to Norwalk virus virus-like particles (NV VLPs). Three phage clones displaying unique peptides were identified, and both the peptide-displaying phages and the peptides were confirmed to bind specifically to NV VLPs. The peptide displayed on phage clone NV-N-R5-1 was determined to bind to the protruding domain of the VP1 capsid protein. This phage also bound to NV VLPs seeded into NoV-negative stool with a limit of detection of 1.56 ng NV VLP. This value was comparable to monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3912, which is currently used in commercially available assays. Furthermore, the NV-N-R5-1 phage exhibited high specificity by detecting NV only in previously characterized NV-positive stool samples in contrast to no detection in NV-negative stool samples. These data demonstrate that the further development of NV-N-R5-1 phage as a diagnostic reagent is possible and might offer several distinct advantages over antibodies, such as decreases in the time and cost of production and ease of isolating phage against other epidemic strains currently circulating as well as those that are emerging.

  3. Optimization of Search Engines and Postprocessing Approaches to Maximize Peptide and Protein Identification for High-Resolution Mass Data.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chengjian; Sheng, Quanhu; Li, Jun; Ma, Danjun; Shen, Xiaomeng; Wang, Xue; Shyr, Yu; Yi, Zhengping; Qu, Jun

    2015-11-06

    The two key steps for analyzing proteomic data generated by high-resolution MS are database searching and postprocessing. While the two steps are interrelated, studies on their combinatory effects and the optimization of these procedures have not been adequately conducted. Here, we investigated the performance of three popular search engines (SEQUEST, Mascot, and MS Amanda) in conjunction with five filtering approaches, including respective score-based filtering, a group-based approach, local false discovery rate (LFDR), PeptideProphet, and Percolator. A total of eight data sets from various proteomes (e.g., E. coli, yeast, and human) produced by various instruments with high-accuracy survey scan (MS1) and high- or low-accuracy fragment ion scan (MS2) (LTQ-Orbitrap, Orbitrap-Velos, Orbitrap-Elite, Q-Exactive, Orbitrap-Fusion, and Q-TOF) were analyzed. It was found combinations involving Percolator achieved markedly more peptide and protein identifications at the same FDR level than the other 12 combinations for all data sets. Among these, combinations of SEQUEST-Percolator and MS Amanda-Percolator provided slightly better performances for data sets with low-accuracy MS2 (ion trap or IT) and high accuracy MS2 (Orbitrap or TOF), respectively, than did other methods. For approaches without Percolator, SEQUEST-group performs the best for data sets with MS2 produced by collision-induced dissociation (CID) and IT analysis; Mascot-LFDR gives more identifications for data sets generated by higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) and analyzed in Orbitrap (HCD-OT) and in Orbitrap Fusion (HCD-IT); MS Amanda-Group excels for the Q-TOF data set and the Orbitrap Velos HCD-OT data set. Therefore, if Percolator was not used, a specific combination should be applied for each type of data set. Moreover, a higher percentage of multiple-peptide proteins and lower variation of protein spectral counts were observed when analyzing technical replicates using Percolator

  4. Identification and characterization of pyrokinin and CAPA peptides, and corresponding GPCRs from spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To date, some biological activities have been confirmed as different named peptides, however, most FXPRLamide peptides are still poorly understood although these peptides are found in all insects. So, the study of receptors for these peptides is particularly important. Receptors of FXPRLamide peptid...

  5. Enteric YaiW Is a Surface-Exposed Outer Membrane Lipoprotein That Affects Sensitivity to an Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Markus F. F.; Caro-Hernandez, Paola; Tan, Karen; Runti, Giulia; Wehmeier, Silvia; Scocchi, Marco; Doerrler, William T.; Ferguson, Gail P.

    2014-01-01

    yaiW is a previously uncharacterized gene found in enteric bacteria that is of particular interest because it is located adjacent to the sbmA gene, whose bacA ortholog is required for Sinorhizobium meliloti symbiosis and Brucella abortus pathogenesis. We show that yaiW is cotranscribed with sbmA in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and Typhimurium strains. We present evidence that the YaiW is a palmitate-modified surface exposed outer membrane lipoprotein. Since BacA function affects the very-long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) modification of S. meliloti and B. abortus lipid A, we tested whether SbmA function might affect either the fatty acid modification of the YaiW lipoprotein or the fatty acid modification of enteric lipid A but found that it did not. Interestingly, we did observe that E. coli SbmA suppresses deficiencies in the VLCFA modification of the lipopolysaccharide of an S. meliloti bacA mutant despite the absence of VLCFA in E. coli. Finally, we found that both YaiW and SbmA positively affect the uptake of proline-rich Bac7 peptides, suggesting a possible connection between their cellular functions. PMID:24214946

  6. Identification of bioactive peptides in hypoallergenic infant milk formulas by CE-TOF-MS assisted by semiempirical model of electromigration behavior.

    PubMed

    Català-Clariana, Sergio; Benavente, Fernando; Giménez, Estela; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2013-07-01

    Biologically active peptides derived from complex bovine milk protein hydrolysates are of particular interest in food science and nutrition because they have been shown to play different physiological roles, providing benefits in human health. In this study, we used CE-TOF-MS for separation and identification of bioactive peptides in three hypoallergenic infant milk formulas. An appropriate sample cleanup using a citrate buffer with DTT and urea followed by SPE with Sep-Pack® C18 and StrataX™ cartridges allowed the detection of a large number of low molecular mass bioactive peptides. This preliminary identification was solely based on the measured experimental monoisotopic molecular mass values (M(exp)). Later, we evaluated the classical semiempirical relationships between electrophoretic mobility and charge-to-mass ratio (m(e) vs. q/M(α), α = 1/2 for the classical polymer model) to describe their migration behavior. The assistance of migration prediction proved to be useful to improve reliability of the identification, avoiding misinterpretations and solving some identity conflicts. After revision, the identity of 24, 30, and 38 bioactive peptides was confirmed in each of the three infant milk formulas. A significant number of these peptides were reported as inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme, however, the presence of sequences with other biological activities such as antihypertensive, antithrombotic, hypocholesterolemic, immunomodulation, cytotoxicity, antioxidant, antimicrobial, antigenic, or opioid was also confirmed.

  7. Optimization of the Use of Consensus Methods for the Detection and Putative Identification of Peptides via Mass Spectrometry Using Protein Standard Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Tamanna; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James

    2009-01-01

    Correct identification of peptides and proteins in complex biological samples from proteomic mass-spectra is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. The sensitivity and specificity of identification algorithms depend on underlying scoring methods, some being more sensitive, and others more specific. For high-throughput, automated peptide identification, control over the algorithms’ performance in terms of trade-off between sensitivity and specificity is desirable. Combinations of algorithms, called ‘consensus methods’, have been shown to provide more accurate results than individual algorithms. However, due to the proliferation of algorithms and their varied internal settings, a systematic understanding of relative performance of individual and consensus methods are lacking. We performed an in-depth analysis of various approaches to consensus scoring using known protein mixtures, and evaluated the performance of 2310 settings generated from consensus of three different search algorithms: Mascot, Sequest, and X!Tandem. Our findings indicate that the union of Mascot, Sequest, and X!Tandem performed well (considering overall accuracy), and methods using 80–99.9% protein probability and/or minimum 2 peptides and/or 0–50% minimum peptide probability for protein identification performed better (on average) among all consensus methods tested in terms of overall accuracy. The results also suggest method selection strategies to provide direct control over sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19779596

  8. "Fahrenheit 9-11," Need for Closure and the Priming of Affective Ambivalence: An Assessment of Intra-Affective Structures by Party Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holbert, R. Lance; Hansen, Glenn J.

    2006-01-01

    This study extends priming research in political communication by focusing on an alternative political information source (i.e., Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9-11), affect rather than cognitions, and the existence of intra-affective ambivalence. In addition, two moderator variables are analyzed: political party identification and need for closure.…

  9. Identification, characterization and expression of a defensin-like antifungal peptide from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-Z; Shi, M; Ye, X-Q; Chen, M-Y; Chen, X-X

    2013-06-01

    Defensins are a class of small and diverse cysteine-rich proteins which have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. We identified and characterized a full-length cDNA encoding a putative defensin-like peptide from the whitefly Bemisia tabaci by RACE and quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR. The full-length cDNA, named Btdef, was 388 bp long and contained an open reading frame of 228 bp. The putative mature Btdef had 46 amino acids with a molecular weight of 5.06 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed significant homology with insect defensins from Heliothis virescens (76%) and Galleria mellonella (75%). The predicted mature form of Btdef was expressed as a recombinant peptide in Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial assays of the purified product indicated that Btdef was most active against fungi. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that Btdef mRNA was constitutively expressed in different tissues of B. tabaci, including fat body, midgut, ovaries and salivary gland, and was induced by fungal infection. Btdef mRNA expression was also significantly altered after feeding on different host plants, indicating that diet affects immune defences in B. tabaci. These results describe for the first time the basic properties of a defensin-like peptide from B. tabaci that probably plays an important role in the immune response against pathogens.

  10. DNA Subtraction of In Vivo Selected Phage Repertoires for Efficient Peptide Pathology Biomarker Identification in Neuroinflammation Multiple Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Sanchez, Karina; Vekris, Antonios; Petry, Klaus G.

    2016-01-01

    To streamline in vivo biomarker discovery, we developed a suppression subtractive DNA hybridization technique adapted for phage-displayed combinatorial libraries of 12 amino acid peptides (PhiSSH). Physical DNA subtraction is performed in a one-tube-all-reactions format by sequential addition of reagents, producing the enrichment of specific clones of one repertoire. High-complexity phage repertoires produced by in vivo selections in the multiple sclerosis rat model (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) and matched healthy control rats were used to evaluate the technique. The healthy repertoire served as a physical DNA subtractor from the EAE repertoire to produce the subtraction repertoire. Full next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the three repertoires was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the subtraction technique. More than 96% of the clones common to the EAE and healthy repertoires were absent from the subtraction repertoire, increasing the probability of randomly selecting various specific peptides for EAE pathology to about 70%. Histopathology experiments were performed to confirm the quality of the subtraction repertoire clones, producing distinct labeling of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) affected by inflammation among healthy nervous tissue or the preferential binding to IL1-challenged vs. resting human BBB model. Combining PhiSSH with NGS will be useful for controlled in vivo screening of small peptide combinatorial libraries to discover biomarkers of specific molecular alterations interspersed within healthy tissues. PMID:26917946

  11. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  12. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species.

  13. Identification of the first neuropeptides from the CNS of Hemiptera: CAPA peptides of the southern green stinkbug Nezara viridula (L.).

    PubMed

    Predel, Reinhard; Russell, William K; Neupert, Susanne; Russell, David H; Esquivel, Jesus F; Nachman, Ronald J

    2006-11-01

    A direct mass spectrometric investigation of nerve homologs of the abdominal perisympathetic organs was employed to reveal the first and complete sequences of CAPA peptides from a hemipteran species, the southern green stinkbug Nezara viridula. Side-chain fragmentations allowed the assignment of internal Leu/Ile; on-plate acetylation was used to distinguish between the mass-related Lys and Gln. The following sequences were obtained: DQLFPFPRV-NH(2) (CAPA-PVK-1), EQLIPFPRV-NH(2) (CAPA-PVK-2), and NGSAGNGGLWFGPRL/I-NH(2) (CAPA-PK). CAPA-PVKs are associated with the regulation of diuresis in insects, and identification of those native to a hemipteran will provide the experimental basis to better understand regulation of water balance in this family of insects.

  14. Identification and Quantitation of Newly Synthesized Proteins in Escherichia coli by Enrichment of Azidohomoalanine-labeled Peptides with Diagonal Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Gertjan; Sprenger, Richard R.; Back, JaapWillem; Dekker, Henk L.; Nessen, Merel A.; van Maarseveen, Jan H.; de Koning, Leo J.; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; de Jong, Luitzen; de Koster, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented to identify and quantify several hundreds of newly synthesized proteins in Escherichia coli upon pulse labeling cells with the methionine analogue azidohomoalanine (azhal). For the first 30 min after inoculation, a methionine-auxotrophic strain grows equally well on azhal as on methionine. Upon a pulse of 15 min and digestion of total protein, azhal-labeled peptides are isolated by a retention time shift between two reversed phase chromatographic runs. The retention time shift is induced by a reaction selective for the azido group in labeled peptides using tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Selectively modified peptides are identified by reversed phase liquid chromatography and on-line tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 527 proteins representative of all major Gene Ontology categories. Comparing the relative amounts of 344 proteins synthesized in 15 min upon a switch of growth temperature from 37 to 44 °C showed that nearly 20% increased or decreased more than 2-fold. Among the most up-regulated proteins many were chaperones and proteases in accordance with the cells response to unfolded proteins due to heat stress. Comparison of our data with results from previous microarray experiments revealed the importance of regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription of the most elevated proteins under heat shock conditions and enabled identification of several candidate genes whose expression may predominantly be regulated at the level of translation. This work demonstrates for the first time the use of a bioorthogonal amino acid for proteome-wide detection of changes in the amounts of proteins synthesized during a brief period upon variations in cellular growth conditions. Comparison of such data with relative mRNA levels enables assessment of the separate contributions of transcription and translation to the regulation of gene expression. PMID:19321432

  15. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    DOE PAGES

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; ...

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancymore » of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.« less

  16. Identification of a mammalian glutaminyl cyclase converting glutaminyl into pyroglutamyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, W H; Spiess, J

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from bovine pituitary were found to contain an activity catalyzing the conversion of glutaminyl peptides such as [Gln1]gonadotropin-releasing hormone, [Gln1, Gly4]thyrotropin-releasing hormone (H-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-OH), and H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH to the respective pyroglutamyl peptides. The TRH precursor fragment H-Lys-Arg-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-Lys-Arg-OH and the D-glutaminyl stereoisomer of H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH did not react under the same conditions. The conversion products were identified by Edman degradation, amino acid analysis, and reversed-phase HPLC. That this activity was exhibited by an enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, was concluded from the protein character of the activity (revealed by its abolition with trypsin and heat), the Michaelis-Menten relationship between substrate concentration and conversion rate, and the substrate specificity. It was determined that glutaminyl cyclase had a molecular weight of 43,000-50,000, a pH optimum at pH 8, and Km and Vmax values in the range of 60-130 microM and 390-690 pmol/microgram per hr, respectively. Glutaminyl cyclase was not observed to require ATP and could be inhibited with 1.0 M ammonium chloride, which increased the Km and decreased the Vmax value. The subcellular distribution of glutaminyl cyclase corresponded to the one of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase believed to catalyze C-terminal amidations during posttranslational precursor processing. It was also observed that the formation of pyroglutamyl from glutaminyl peptides occurred nonenzymatically; however, the enzymatic reaction carried out with crude extract was found to be approximately 70 times faster than the nonenzymatic reaction enhanced by phosphate. It is speculated that glutaminyl cyclase may participate in the posttranslational processing of hormonal precursors to pyroglutamyl peptides. PMID:3473473

  17. Identification and Characterization of Ovarian Carcinoma Peptide Epitopes Recognized by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    restricted response from two of six different donors. The peptide sensitized targets for lysis at 1 to 20 nM, indicating that these CTL had receptors ...Immunoediting. Annu Rev Immunol 2004;22(1):329-60. 2. Lollini PL, Cavallo F, Nanni P, Forni G . Vaccines for tumour prevention. Nature Reviews...number? Curr Opin Immunol 2005;17(3):320-5. 6. Parmiani G , Castelli C, Rivoltini L, et al. Immunotherapy of melanoma. Semin Cancer Biol 2003;13(6

  18. Identification of a Peptide from Mammal Albumins Responsible for Enhanced Pigment Production by Group B Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Fraile, Manuel; Sampedro, Antonio; Varela, Javier; Garcia-Peña, Marisa; Gimenez-Gallego, Guillermo

    1999-01-01

    The peptide from peptones responsible for enhanced pigment production by Streptococcus agalactiae in culture media has been isolated from a peptic digest of human albumin and has been identified as Ile-Ala-Arg-Arg-His-Pro-Tyr-Phe. The related heptapeptide lacking the N-terminal Ile also had pigment-enhancing activity. A sequence similarity search showed that these sequences are present only in mammal albumins. PMID:10225848

  19. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

  20. Identification of the structural determinants for anticancer activity of a ruthenium arene peptide conjugate.

    PubMed

    Meier, Samuel M; Novak, Maria; Kandioller, Wolfgang; Jakupec, Michael A; Arion, Vladimir B; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Keppler, Bernhard K; Hartinger, Christian G

    2013-07-08

    Organometallic Ru(arene)-peptide bioconjugates with potent in vitro anticancer activity are rare. We have prepared a conjugate of a Ru(arene) complex with the neuropeptide [Leu(5)]-enkephalin. [Chlorido(η(6)-p-cymene)(5-oxo-κO-2-{(4-[(N-tyrosinyl-glycinyl-glycinyl-phenylalanyl-leucinyl-NH2)propanamido]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)methyl}-4H-pyronato-κO)ruthenium(II)] (8) shows antiproliferative activity in human ovarian carcinoma cells with an IC50 value as low as 13 μM, whereas the peptide or the Ru moiety alone are hardly cytotoxic. The conjugation strategy for linking the Ru(cym) (cym=η(6)-p-cymene) moiety to the peptide involved N-terminal modification of an alkyne-[Leu(5)]-enkephalin with a 2-(azidomethyl)-5-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-one linker, using Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), and subsequent metallation with the Ru(cym) moiety. The ruthenium-bioconjugate was characterized by high resolution top-down electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with regard to peptide sequence, linker modification and metallation site. Notably, complete sequence coverage was obtained and the Ru(cym) moiety was confirmed to be coordinated to the pyronato linker. The ruthenium-bioconjugate was analyzed with respect to cytotoxicity-determining constituents, and through the bioconjugate models [{2-(azidomethyl)-5-oxo-κO-4H-pyronato-κO}chloride (η(6)-p-cymene)ruthenium(II)] (5) and [chlorido(η(6)-p-cymene){5-oxo-κO-2-([(4-(phenoxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl]methyl)-4H-pyronato-κO}ruthenium(II)] (6) the Ru(cym) fragment with a triazole-carrying pyronato ligand was identified as the minimal unit required to achieve in vitro anticancer activity.

  1. Identification and characterization of Aβ peptide interactors in Alzheimer’s disease by structural approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philibert, Keith D.; Marr, Robert A.; Norstrom, Eric M.; Glucksman, Marc J.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there are very limited pharmaceutical interventions for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) to alleviate the amyloid burden implicated in the pathophysiology of the disease. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized immunohistologically by the accumulation of senile plaques in the brain with afflicted patients progressively losing short-term memory and, ultimately, cognition. Although significant improvements in clinical diagnosis and care for AD patients have been made, effective treatments for this devastating disease remain elusive. A key component of the amyloid burden of AD comes from accumulation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide which comes from processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by enzymes termed secretases, leading to production of these toxic Aβ peptides of 40–42 amino acids. New therapeutic approaches for reducing Aβ are warranted after the most logical avenues of inhibiting secretase activity appear less than optimal in ameliorating the progression of AD.Novel therapeutics may be gleaned from proteomics biomarker initiatives to yield detailed molecular interactions of enzymes and their potential substrates. Explicating the APPome by deciphering protein complexes forming in cells is a complementary approach to unveil novel molecular interactions with the amyloidogenic peptide precursor to both understand the biology and develop potential upstream drug targets. Utilizing these strategies we have identified EC 3.4.24.15 (EP24.15), a zinc metalloprotease related to neprilysin (NEP), with the ability to catabolize Aβ 1–42 by examining first potential in silico docking and then verification by mass spectrometry. In addition, a hormone carrier protein, transthyreitin (TTR), was identified and with its abundance in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), found to clear Aβ by inhibiting formation of oligomeric forms of Aβ peptide. The confluence of complementary strategies may allow new therapeutic avenues as well as biomarkers for AD that will aid in

  2. BACE-1 inhibitors part 2: identification of hydroxy ethylamines (HEAs) with reduced peptidic character.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Brian; Demont, Emmanuel; Dingwall, Colin; Dunsdon, Rachel; Faller, Andrew; Hawkins, Julie; Hussain, Ishrut; MacPherson, David; Maile, Graham; Matico, Rosalie; Milner, Peter; Mosley, Julie; Naylor, Alan; O'Brien, Alistair; Redshaw, Sally; Riddell, David; Rowland, Paul; Soleil, Virginie; Smith, Kathrine J; Stanway, Steven; Stemp, Geoffrey; Sweitzer, Sharon; Theobald, Pam; Vesey, David; Walter, Daryl S; Ward, John; Wayne, Gareth

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the discovery of non-peptidic, potent, and selective hydroxy ethylamine (HEA) inhibitors of BACE-1 by replacement of the prime side of a lead di-amide 2. Inhibitors with nanosmolar potency and high selectivity were identified. Depending on the nature of the P(1)(') and P(2)(') substituents, two different binding modes were observed in X-ray co-crystal structures.

  3. Molecular identification of poisonous mushrooms using nuclear ITS region and peptide toxins: a retrospective study on fatal cases in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Parnmen, Sittiporn; Sikaphan, Sujitra; Leudang, Siriwan; Boonpratuang, Thitiya; Rangsiruji, Achariya; Naksuwankul, Khwanruan

    2016-02-01

    Cases of mushroom poisoning in Thailand have increased annually. During 2008 to 2014, the cases reported to the National Institute of Health included 57 deaths; at least 15 died after ingestion of amanitas, the most common lethal wild mushrooms inhabited. Hence, the aims of this study were to identify mushroom samples from nine clinically reported cases during the 7-year study period based on nuclear ITS sequence data and diagnose lethal peptide toxins using a reversed phase LC-MS method. Nucleotide similarity was identified using BLAST search of the NCBI database and the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD). Clade characterization was performed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches. Based on BLAST and BOLD reference databases our results yielded high nucleotide similarities of poisonous mushroom samples to A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. Detailed phylogenetic analyses showed that all mushroom samples fall into their current classification. Detection of the peptide toxins revealed the presence of amatoxins and phallotoxins in A. exitialis and A. fuliginea. In addition, toxic α-amanitin was identified in a new provisional species, Amanita sp.1, with the highest toxin quantity. Molecular identification confirmed that the mushrooms ingested by the patients were members of the lethal amanitas in the sections Amanita and Phalloideae. In Thailand, the presence of A. exitialis was reported here for the first time and all three poisonous mushroom species provided new and informative data for clinical studies.

  4. Sequential peptide affinity purification system for the systematic isolation and identification of protein complexes from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Butland, Gareth; Pogoutse, Oxana; Li, Joyce; Greenblatt, Jack F; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Biochemical purification of affinity-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry methods is increasingly seen as a cornerstone of systems biology, as it allows for the systematic genome-scale characterization of macromolecular protein complexes, representing demarcated sets of stably interacting protein partners. Accurate and sensitive identification of both the specific and shared polypeptide components of distinct complexes requires purification to near homogeneity. To this end, a sequential peptide affinity (SPA) purification system was developed to enable the rapid and efficient isolation of native Escherichia coli protein complexes (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). SPA purification makes use of a dual-affinity tag, consisting of three modified FLAG sequences (3X FLAG) and a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP), spaced by a cleavage site for tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). Using the lambda-phage Red homologous recombination system (PNAS 97:5978-5983, 2000), a DNA cassette, encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker flanked by gene-specific targeting sequences, is introduced into a selected locus in the E. coli chromosome so as to create a C-terminal fusion with the protein of interest. This procedure aims for near-endogenous levels of tagged protein production in the recombinant bacteria to avoid spurious, non-specific protein associations (J Proteome Res 3:463-468, 2004). In this chapter, we describe a detailed, optimized protocol for the tagging, purification, and subsequent mass spectrometry-based identification of the subunits of even low-abundance bacterial protein complexes isolated as part of an ongoing large-scale proteomic study in E. coli (Nature 433:531-537, 2005).

  5. Identification of a Passiflora alata Curtis dimeric peptide showing identity with 2S albumins.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Suzana M; Almeida, Renato G; Pereira, Camila A A; Moreira, João S; Pinto, Michelle F S; Oliveira, Antonio C; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Santos, Marcelo O; Dias, Simoni C; Franco, Octávio L

    2011-05-01

    Antifungal proteins and peptides, essential compounds for plant defense, have been isolated from several tissues of various plants. These proteins could be used as a natural alternative to control phytopathogenic fungi. In this report a heterodimeric antifungal protein named Pa-AFP1, showing higher identity with the 2S albumin family, was purified by using 70-100% ammonium sulfate saturation and further purification steps such as anionic exchange Q-Sepharose chromatography associated with HPLC reversed-phase C4 chromatography. Analysis by Tricine-SDS-PAGE revealed two peptidic molecular masses of approximately 4500 Da and 7000 Da, in the presence of β-mercaptoethanol, while by removing the reducing agent a single protein with molecular mass of about 11,500 Da was obtained. Moreover, dimer mass was confirmed by MALDI-TOF analyses (11,569.76 Da). The antifungal protein, named Pa-AFP1, efficiently inhibited the growth of filamentous fungi Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, and was added to a short list of 2S albumins with antimicrobial properties. Otherwise, this same peptide showed no activity toward bacteria and yeasts. In summary, this compound could be used in the future to develop biotechnological products for the control of phytopathogenic fungi.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed peptides in high-throughput proteomics data.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Michiel P; Jong, Victor L; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Heck, Albert J R; Andeweg, Arno C; Binai, Nadine A; van den Ham, Henk-Jan

    2017-03-23

    With the advent of high-throughput proteomics, the type and amount of data pose a significant challenge to statistical approaches used to validate current quantitative analysis. Whereas many studies focus on the analysis at the protein level, the analysis of peptide-level data provides insight into changes at the sub-protein level, including splice variants, isoforms and a range of post-translational modifications. Statistical evaluation of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry peptide-based label-free differential data is most commonly performed using a t-test or analysis of variance, often after the application of data imputation to reduce the number of missing values. In high-throughput proteomics, statistical analysis methods and imputation techniques are difficult to evaluate, given the lack of gold standard data sets. Here, we use experimental and resampled data to evaluate the performance of four statistical analysis methods and the added value of imputation, for different numbers of biological replicates. We find that three or four replicates are the minimum requirement for high-throughput data analysis and confident assignment of significant changes. Data imputation does increase sensitivity in some cases, but leads to a much higher actual false discovery rate. Additionally, we find that empirical Bayes method (limma) achieves the highest sensitivity, and we thus recommend its use for performing differential expression analysis at the peptide level.

  7. Identification of Mycobacterium avium genes associated with resistance to host antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Motamedi, Nima; Danelishvili, Lia

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the innate immune defence. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (M. avium) is an organism that establishes contact with the respiratory and gastrointestinal mucosa as a necessary step for infection. M. avium is resistant to high concentrations of polymyxin B, a surrogate for antimicrobial peptides. To determine gene-encoding proteins that are associated with this resistance, we screened a transposon library of M. avium strain 104 for susceptibility to polymyxin B. Ten susceptible mutants were identified and the inactivated genes sequenced. The great majority of the genes were related to cell wall synthesis and permeability. The mutants were then examined for their ability to enter macrophages and to survive macrophage killing. Three clones among the mutants had impaired uptake by macrophages compared with the WT strain, and all ten clones were attenuated in macrophages. The mutants were also shown to be susceptible to cathelicidin (LL-37), in contrast to the WT bacterium. All but one of the mutants were significantly attenuated in mice. In conclusion, this study indicated that the M. avium envelope is the primary defence against host antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24836414

  8. Identification of a Peptide-Pheromone that Enhances Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Host Cell Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol. PMID:25822753

  9. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families.

  10. Identification and molecular characterization of oat peptides implicated on coeliac immune response

    PubMed Central

    Comino, Isabel; Bernardo, David; Bancel, Emmanuelle; Moreno, María de Lourdes; Sánchez, Borja; Barro, Francisco; Šuligoj, Tanja; Ciclitira, Paul J.; Cebolla, Ángel; Knight, Stella C.; Branlard, Gérard; Sousa, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Background Oats provide important nutritional and pharmacological properties, although their safety in coeliac patients remains controversial. Previous studies have confirmed that the reactivity of the anti-33-mer monoclonal antibody with different oat varieties is proportional to the immune responses in terms of T-cell proliferation. Although the impact of these varieties on the adaptive response has been studied, the role of the dendritic cells (DC) is still poorly understood. The aim of this study is to characterize different oat fractions and to study their effect on DC from coeliac patients. Methods and results Protein fractions were isolated from oat grains and analyzed by SDS–PAGE. Several proteins were characterized in the prolamin fraction using immunological and proteomic tools, and by Nano-LC-MS/MS. These proteins, analogous to α- and γ-gliadin-like, showed reactive sequences to anti-33-mer antibody suggesting their immunogenic potential. That was further confirmed as some of the newly identified oat peptides had a differential stimulatory capacity on circulating DC from coeliac patients compared with healthy controls. Conclusions This is the first time, to our knowledge, where newly identified oat peptides have been shown to elicit a differential stimulatory capacity on circulating DC obtained from coeliac patients, potentially identifying immunogenic properties of these oat peptides. PMID:26853779

  11. Natriuretic peptides in cetaceans: identification, molecular characterization and changes in plasma concentration after landing.

    PubMed

    Naka, Tadaomi; Katsumata, Etsuko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Minamino, Naoto; Yoshioka, Motoi; Takei, Yoshio

    2007-06-01

    Dolphins are aquatic animals free from gravity, and this may have imposed significant changes in their cardiovascular status and its hormonal regulation compared with terrestrial animals. This study molecularly characterized two major cardiovascular hormones, atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) and measured their changes in dolphin plasma concentrations in relation to the cardiovascular status of the animal. We initially identified ANP and BNP in three species of dolphins (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens, Phocoenoides dalli and Tursiops truncatus). ANP precursors are highly conserved in most mammals, but dolphin BNP precursors were more variable. In molecular phylogenetic analyses, dolphin ANP and BNP precursors grouped with those of artiodactyls, particularly to the camel peptides. The chromatographic characterization of tissue and plasma molecular forms using specific radioimmunoassays showed that the predominant ANP and BNP in the atrium are prohormone and mature peptide, respectively, whereas mature ANP and BNP are circulating in the dolphin blood. A mass spectrometric analysis showed that atrial BNP consists of 26 amino acids, rather than the 32-amino-acid form detected in other mammals. Finally, changes in plasma ANP and BNP concentrations were examined in captive bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) after their pool was drained. Plasma ANP and BNP concentrations did not change after landing, unlike terrestrial mammals. Plasma angiotensin II and cortisol concentrations did not change either, showing minor stress after landing. Since landed dolphins show a different cardiovascular status on land than terrestrial mammals, plasma ANP and BNP concentrations seem to reflect the cardiovascular status characteristic of dolphins.

  12. Isolation and identification of antifungal peptides from Bacillus BH072, a novel bacterium isolated from honey.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-jiang; Han, Ye; Wang, Zhan-zhong; Fan, Jie; Xiao, Hua-zhi

    2013-11-07

    A bacterial strain BH072 isolated from a honey sample showed antifungal activity against mold. Based on morphological, biochemical, physiological tests, and analysis of 16S rDNA sequence, the strain was identified to be a new subspecies of Bacillus sp. It had a broad spectrum of antifungal activity against various mold, such as Aspergillus niger, Pythium, and Botrytis cinerea. Six pairs of antifungal genes primers were designed and synthesized, and ituA, hag, tasA genes were detected by PCR analysis. The remarkable antifungal activity could be associated with the co-production of these three peptides. One of them was purified by 30-40% ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography on D201 resin. The purified peptide was estimated to be 35.615 kDa and identified to be flagellin by micrOTOF-Q II. By using methanol extraction, another substance was isolated from fermentation liquor, and determined to be iturin with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method. The third possible peptide encoded by tasA was not isolated in this study. The culture liquor displayed antifungal activity in a wide pH range (5.0-9.0) and at 40-100°C. The result of the present work suggested that Bacillus BH072 might be a bio-control bacterium of research value.

  13. Identification of a Novel Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptide from Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huihui; Ke, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Yu, Jingyin; Dong, Caihua; Cheng, Mingxing; Huang, Junyan; Liu, Shengyi

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PR-AMPs) are a group of cationic host defense peptides that are characterized by a high content of proline residues. Up to now, they have been reported in some insects, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, but are not found in plants. In this study, we performed an in silico screening of antimicrobial peptides, which led to discovery of a Brassica napus gene encoding a novel PR-AMP. This gene encodes a 35-amino acid peptide with 13 proline residues, designated BnPRP1. BnPRP1 has 40.5% identity with a known proline-rich antimicrobial peptide SP-B from the pig. BnPRP1 was artificially synthetized and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET30a/His-EDDIE-GFP. Recombinant BnPRP1 was produced in Escherichia coli and has a predicted molecular mass of 3.8 kDa. Analysis of its activity demonstrated that BnPRP1 exhibited strong antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacterium, Gram-negative bacterium, yeast and also had strong antifungal activity against several pathogenic fungi, such as Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Mucor sp., Magnaporthe oryzae and Botrytis cinerea. Circular dichroism (CD) revealed the main secondary structure of BnPRP1 was the random coil. BnPRP1 gene expression detected by qRT-PCR is responsive to pathogen inoculation. At 48 hours after S. sclerotiorum inoculation, the expression of BnPRP1 increased significantly in the susceptible lines while slight decrease occurred in resistant lines. These suggested that BnPRP1 might play a role in the plant defense response against S. sclerotiorum. BnPRP1 isolated from B. napus was the first PR-AMP member that was characterized in plants, and its homology sequences were found in some other Brassicaceae plants by the genome sequences analysis. Compared with the known PR-AMPs, BnPRP1 has the different primary sequences and antimicrobial activity. Above all, this study gives a chance to cast a new light on further understanding about the AMPs' mechanism and application.

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide affects cardiac remodeling, function, heart failure, and survival in a mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Gladysheva, Inna P; Fan, Tai-Hwang M; Sullivan, Ryan; Houng, Aiilyan K; Reed, Guy L

    2014-03-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a frequent cause of heart failure and death. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a biomarker of dilated cardiomyopathy, but there is controversy whether ANP modulates the development of heart failure. Therefore, we examined whether ANP affects heart failure, cardiac remodeling, function, and survival in a well-characterized, transgenic model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy with normal ANP levels survived longer than mice with partial ANP (P<0.01) or full ANP deficiency (P<0.001). In dilated cardiomyopathy mice, ANP protected against the development of heart failure as indicated by reduced lung water, alveolar congestion, pleural effusions, etc. ANP improved systolic function and reduced cardiomegaly. Pathological cardiac remodeling was diminished in mice with normal ANP as indicated by decreased ventricular interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. Mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and normal ANP levels had better systolic function (P<0.001) than mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Dilated cardiomyopathy was associated with diminished cardiac transcripts for NP receptors A and B in mice with normal ANP and ANP deficiency, but transcripts for NP receptor C and C-type natriuretic peptide were selectively altered in mice with dilated cardiomyopathy and ANP deficiency. Taken together, these data indicate that ANP has potent effects in experimental dilated cardiomyopathy that reduce the development of heart failure, prevent pathological remodeling, preserve systolic function, and reduce mortality. Despite the apparent overlap in physiological function between the NPs, these data suggest that the role of ANP in dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure is not compensated physiologically by other NPs.

  15. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Peptide Nucleic Acid Probes for Rapid Identification of Candida albicans Directly from Blood Culture Bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rigby, Susan; Procop, Gary W.; Haase, Gerhard; Wilson, Deborah; Hall, Geraldine; Kurtzman, Cletus; Oliveira, Kenneth; Von Oy, Sabina; Hyldig-Nielsen, Jens J.; Coull, James; Stender, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method that uses peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from positive-blood-culture bottles in which yeast was observed by Gram staining (herein referred to as yeast-positive blood culture bottles) is described. The test (the C. albicans PNA FISH method) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe that targets C. albicans 26S rRNA. The PNA probe is added to smears made directly from the contents of the blood culture bottle and hybridized for 90 min at 55°C. Unhybridized PNA probe is removed by washing of the mixture (30 min), and the smears are examined by fluorescence microscopy. The specificity of the method was confirmed with 23 reference strains representing phylogenetically related yeast species and 148 clinical isolates covering the clinically most significant yeast species, including C. albicans (n = 72), C. dubliniensis (n = 58), C. glabrata (n = 5), C. krusei (n = 2), C. parapsilosis (n = 4), and C. tropicalis (n = 3). The performance of the C. albicans PNA FISH method as a diagnostic test was evaluated with 33 routine and 25 simulated yeast-positive blood culture bottles and showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. It is concluded that this 2.5-h method for the definitive identification of C. albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles provides important information for optimal antifungal therapy and patient management. PMID:12037084

  16. Peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wu, Shan; Li, Ke; Shuai, Jiangbing; Dong, Qiang; Fang, Weihuan

    2012-07-02

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method in conjunction with fluorescin-labeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes (PNA-FISH) for detection of Listeria species was developed. In silico analysis showed that three PNA probes Lis-16S-1, Lm-16S-2 and Liv-16S-5 were suitable for specific identification of Listeria genus, Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. These probes were experimentally verified by their reactivity against 19 strains of six Listeria species (excluding newly described species Listeria marthii and Listeria rocourtiae) and eight other bacterial species. The PNA-FISH method was optimized as 30 min of hybridization with 0.2% Triton X-100 in the solution and used to identify 85 Listeria strains from individual putative Listeria colonies on PALCAM agar plates streaked from selectively enriched cultures of 780 food or food-related samples. Of the 85 Listeria strains, thirty-seven were identified as L. monocytogenes with the probe Lm-16S-2 and two as L. ivanovii with the probe Liv-16S-5 which was in agreement with the results obtained by the API LISTERIA method. Thus, the PNA-FISH protocol has the potential for identification of pathogenic Listeria spp. from food or food-related samples.

  17. Supporting data for the MS identification of distinct transferrin glycopeptide glycoforms and citrullinated peptides associated with inflammation or autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rosal-Vela, A.; Barroso, A.; Giménez, E.; García-Rodríguez, S.; Longobardo, V.; Postigo, J.; Iglesias, M.; Lario, A.; Merino, J.; Merino, R.; Zubiaur, M.; Sanz-Nebot, V.; Sancho, J.

    2016-01-01

    This data article presents the results of all the statistical analyses applied to the relative intensities of the detected 2D-DiGE protein spots for each of the 3 performed DiGE experiments. The data reveals specific subsets of protein spots with significant differences between WT and CD38-deficient mice with either Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), or with chronic inflammation induced by CFA, or under steady-state conditions. This article also shows the MS data analyses that allowed the identification of the protein species which serve to discriminate the different experimental groups used in this study. Moreover, the article presents MS data on the citrullinated peptides linked to specific protein species that were generated in CIA+ or CFA-treated mice. Lastly, this data article provides MS data on the efficiency of the analyses of the transferrin (Tf) glycopeptide glycosylation pattern in spleen and serum from CIA+ mice and normal controls. The data supplied in this work is related to the research article entitled “identification of multiple transferrin species in spleen and serum from mice with collagen-induced arthritis which may reflect changes in transferrin glycosylation associated with disease activity: the role of CD38” [1]. All mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with identifiers PRIDE: PXD002644, PRIDE: PXD002643, PRIDE: PXD003183 and PRIDE: PXD003163. PMID:26909372

  18. Purification and Identification of Antioxidant Peptides from Protein Hydrolysate of Scalloped Hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Rong; Chi, Chang-Feng; Li, Li; Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to purify and identify peptides with antioxidant properties from protein hydrolysate of scalloped hammerhead (Sphyrna lewini) cartilage. Cartilaginous proteins of the scalloped hammerhead were extracted by guanidine hydrochloride, and three antioxidant peptides, named enzymolysis peptide of scalloped hammerhead cartilage A (SCPE-A), SCPE-B and SCPE-C, were subsequently isolated from the hydrolysate of the cartilaginous proteins using ultrafiltration and chromatography. The amino acid sequences of SCPE-A, SCPE-B and SCPE-C were identified as Gly-Pro-Glu (GPE), Gly-Ala-Arg-Gly-Pro-Gln (GARGPQ), and Gly-Phe-Thr-Gly-Pro-Pro-Gly-Phe-Asn-Gly (GFTGPPGFNG), with molecular weights of 301.30 Da, 584.64 Da and 950.03 Da, respectively. As per in vitro activity testing, SCPE-A, SCPE-B and SCPE-C exhibited strong scavenging activities on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH•) (half elimination ratio (EC50) 2.43, 2.66 and 1.99 mg/mL), hydroxyl radicals (HO•) (EC50 0.28, 0.21 and 0.15 mg/mL), 2,2′-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radicals (ABTS+•) (EC50 0.24, 0.18 and 0.29 mg/mL), and superoxide anion radicals (O2−•) (EC50 0.10, 0.14 and 0.11 mg/mL). In addition, SCPE-A showed inhibition activity similar to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in lipid peroxidation in a linoleic acid model system. The amino acid residues of Gly, Pro and Phe could positively influence the antioxidant activities of GPE, GARGPQ and GFTGPPGFNG. These results suggested that GPE, GARGPQ and GFTGPPGFNG might serve as potential antioxidants and be used as food additives and functional foods. PMID:28257057

  19. Cell growth and proteolytic activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus in milk as affected by supplementation with peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation examined the effects of supplementation of milk peptide fractions produced by enzymatic hydrolysis on the fermentation of reconstituted skim milk (RSM). Changes in pH, cell growth, proteolytic activity, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity were monitored during fermentation of RSM by pure cultures of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. The study showed that supplementation with peptide fractions of different molecular weights did not significantly affect the bacterial growth in RSM. All bacteria showed an increased proteolytic activity in RSM supplemented with large peptides (>10 kDa), and L. helveticus in general exhibited the highest proteolytic activity among the bacteria studied. The ACE-inhibitory activity was observed to be the maximum in RSM supplemented with larger peptides (>10 kDa) for all bacteria. The results suggest that proteolysis by bacteria leads to increased production of ACE-inhibitory peptides compared to the supplemented peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  20. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum by in silico and functional analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haohan; Lei, Miaomiao; Du, Xiaoyuan; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-12-18

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) microbes leads to urgent demands for novel antibiotics exploration. We demonstrated a cDNA from amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum, designated Bjamp1, encoded a protein with features typical of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which is not homologous to any AMPs currently discovered. It was found that Bjamp1 was expressed in distinct tissues, and its expression was remarkably up-regulated following challenge with LPS and LTA. Moreover, the synthesized putative mature AMP, mBjAMP1, underwent a coil-to-helix transition in the presence of TFE or SDS, agreeing well with the expectation that BjAMP1 was a potential AMP. Functional assays showed that mBjAMP1 inhibited the growth of all the bacteria tested, and induced membrane/cytoplasmic damage. ELISA indicated that mBjAMP1 was a pattern recognition molecule capable of identifying LPS and LTA. Importantly, mBjAMP1 disrupted the bacterial membranes by a membranolytic mechanism. Additionally, mBjAMP1 was non-cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Collectively, these data indicate that mBjAMP1 is a new AMP with a high bacterial membrane selectivity, rendering it a promising template for the design of novel peptide antibiotics against MDR microbes. It also shows for the first time that use of signal conserved sequence of AMPs is effective identifying potential AMPs across different animal classes.

  1. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum by in silico and functional analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haohan; Lei, Miaomiao; Du, Xiaoyuan; Cui, Pengfei; Zhang, Shicui

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) microbes leads to urgent demands for novel antibiotics exploration. We demonstrated a cDNA from amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum, designated Bjamp1, encoded a protein with features typical of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which is not homologous to any AMPs currently discovered. It was found that Bjamp1 was expressed in distinct tissues, and its expression was remarkably up-regulated following challenge with LPS and LTA. Moreover, the synthesized putative mature AMP, mBjAMP1, underwent a coil-to-helix transition in the presence of TFE or SDS, agreeing well with the expectation that BjAMP1 was a potential AMP. Functional assays showed that mBjAMP1 inhibited the growth of all the bacteria tested, and induced membrane/cytoplasmic damage. ELISA indicated that mBjAMP1 was a pattern recognition molecule capable of identifying LPS and LTA. Importantly, mBjAMP1 disrupted the bacterial membranes by a membranolytic mechanism. Additionally, mBjAMP1 was non-cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Collectively, these data indicate that mBjAMP1 is a new AMP with a high bacterial membrane selectivity, rendering it a promising template for the design of novel peptide antibiotics against MDR microbes. It also shows for the first time that use of signal conserved sequence of AMPs is effective identifying potential AMPs across different animal classes. PMID:26680226

  2. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-28

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility "tag". Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS.

  3. Identification and characterization of antimicrobial peptide, defensin, in the taiga tick, Ixodes persulcatus.

    PubMed

    Saito, Y; Konnai, S; Yamada, S; Imamura, S; Nishikado, H; Ito, T; Onuma, M; Ohashi, K

    2009-08-01

    Ixodes persulcatus is the primary vector for human tick-borne diseases in Japan. A cDNA library was constructed from whole body homogenates of fed nymphs of I. persulcatus. From this library, one cDNA encoding defensin-like antimicrobial peptide was identified. The amino-acid sequence showed high similarity to those of the defensins of other ticks and arthropods. I. persulcatus defensin mRNA transcripts were detected at all life cycle stages of fed ticks and found to be predominantly expressed in the midguts of adult female ticks, but not in the salivary glands, a finding corroborated by Western blotting analysis. To investigate the function of I. persulcatus defensin, we examined its antibacterial activity by evaluation of growth of several bacterial strains in the presence of the synthetic peptide. The defensin from I. persulcatus markedly inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium renale, but not Gram-negative bacteria except Escherichia coli O157. In conclusion, these results suggest that I. persulcatus defensin may be playing a significant role in the defence against microbes from bloodmeals.

  4. Gaining efficiency by parallel quantification and identification of iTRAQ-labeled peptides using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD on an LTQ Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Mischerikow, Nikolai; van Nierop, Pim; Li, Ka Wan; Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Smit, August B; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2010-10-01

    Isobaric stable isotope labeling of peptides using iTRAQ is an important method for MS based quantitative proteomics. Traditionally, quantitative analysis of iTRAQ labeled peptides has been confined to beam-type instruments because of the weak detection capabilities of ion traps for low mass ions. Recent technical advances in fragmentation techniques on linear ion traps and the hybrid linear ion trap-orbitrap allow circumventing this limitation. Namely, PQD and HCD facilitate iTRAQ analysis on these instrument types. Here we report a method for iTRAQ-based relative quantification on the ETD enabled LTQ Orbitrap XL, which is based on parallel peptide quantification and peptide identification. iTRAQ reporter ion generation is performed by HCD, while CID and ETD provide peptide identification data in parallel in the LTQ ion trap. This approach circumvents problems accompanying iTRAQ reporter ion generation with ETD and allows quantitative, decision tree-based CID/ETD experiments. Furthermore, the use of HCD solely for iTRAQ reporter ion read out significantly reduces the number of ions needed to obtain informative spectra, which significantly reduces the analysis time. Finally, we show that integration of this method, both with existing CID and ETD methods as well as with existing iTRAQ data analysis workflows, is simple to realize. By applying our approach to the analysis of the synapse proteome from human brain biopsies, we demonstrate that it outperforms a latest generation MALDI TOF/TOF instrument, with improvements in both peptide and protein identification and quantification. Conclusively, our work shows how HCD, CID and ETD can be beneficially combined to enable iTRAQ-based quantification on an ETD-enabled LTQ Orbitrap XL.

  5. Species Identification of Archaeological Skin Objects from Danish Bogs: Comparison between Mass Spectrometry-Based Peptide Sequencing and Microscopy-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC – AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029. PMID:25260035

  6. Species identification of archaeological skin objects from Danish bogs: comparison between mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing and microscopy-based methods.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Luise Ørsted; Schmidt, Anne Lisbeth; Mannering, Ulla; Sarret, Mathilde; Kelstrup, Christian D; Olsen, Jesper V; Cappellini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has an extraordinarily large and well-preserved collection of archaeological skin garments found in peat bogs, dated to approximately 920 BC - AD 775. These objects provide not only the possibility to study prehistoric skin costume and technologies, but also to investigate the animal species used for the production of skin garments. Until recently, species identification of archaeological skin was primarily performed by light and scanning electron microscopy or the analysis of ancient DNA. However, the efficacy of these methods can be limited due to the harsh, mostly acidic environment of peat bogs leading to morphological and molecular degradation within the samples. We compared species assignment results of twelve archaeological skin samples from Danish bogs using Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based peptide sequencing, against results obtained using light and scanning electron microscopy. While it was difficult to obtain reliable results using microscopy, MS enabled the identification of several species-diagnostic peptides, mostly from collagen and keratins, allowing confident species discrimination even among taxonomically close organisms, such as sheep and goat. Unlike previous MS-based methods, mostly relying on peptide fingerprinting, the shotgun sequencing approach we describe aims to identify the complete extracted ancient proteome, without preselected specific targets. As an example, we report the identification, in one of the samples, of two peptides uniquely assigned to bovine foetal haemoglobin, indicating the production of skin from a calf slaughtered within the first months of its life. We conclude that MS-based peptide sequencing is a reliable method for species identification of samples from bogs. The mass spectrometry proteomics data were deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD001029.

  7. Amyloid Beta Peptides Affect Pregnenolone and Pregnenolone Sulfate Levels in PC-12 and SH-SY5Y Cells Depending on Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Calan, Ozlem Gursoy; Akan, Pinar; Cataler, Aysenur; Dogan, Cumhur; Kocturk, Semra

    2016-07-01

    Increased amyloid beta (AB) peptide concentration is one of the initiating factors in the neurodegeneration process. It has been suggested that cholesterol induces the synthesis of AB peptide from amyloid precursor protein or facilitates the formation of amyloid plaque by lowering the aggregation threshold of the peptide. It is also shown that AB peptides may affect cholesterol metabolism and the synthesis of steroid hormones such as progesterone and estradiol. Pregnenolone (P) and pregnenolone sulfate (PS) are the major steroids produced from cholesterol in neural tissue. In toxicity conditions, the effect of AB peptides on P and PS levels has not yet been determined. Furthermore, it has not been clearly defined how changes in cellular P and PS levels affect neuronal cell survival. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of AB peptides on cellular changes in P and PS levels depending on the level of their main precursor, cholesterol. Cholesterol and toxic concentrations of AB fragments (AB 25-35, AB 1-40 and AB 1-42) were applied to PC-12 and SH-SY5Y cells. Changes in cellular cholesterol, P and PS levels were determined simultaneously in a dose-and time-dependent manner. The cell viability and cell death types were also evaluated. AB peptides affected both cell viability and P/PS levels. Steroid levels were altered depending on AB fragment type and the cholesterol content of the cells. Treatment with each of the AB fragments alone increased P levels by twofold. However, combined treatment with AB peptides and cholesterol increased P levels by approximately sixfold, while PS levels were increased only about 2.5 fold in both cell lines. P levels in the groups treated with AB 25-35 were higher than those in AB 1-40 and AB 1-42 groups. The cell viabilities were significantly low in the group treated by AB and cholesterol (9 mM). The effect of AB peptides on P levels might be a result of cellular self-defense. On the other hand, the rate of P increase

  8. Identification and characterization of anti-microbial peptides from rabbit vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Patgaonkar, Mandar; Aranha, Clara; Bhonde, Gauri; Reddy, K V R

    2011-02-15

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) serve as a first line of host defense and represent an important, though poorly understood components of the innate immune system. The present study was an attempt to identify and characterize the major molecules having anti-bacterial activities from the vaginal fluid of rabbit, Oryctologus cuniculus. AMPs from the rabbit vaginal fluid (RVF) were identified in the acid extracts of pooled RVF samples after RP-HPLC purification. The protein, RVFAMP was effective against gram negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) bacteria. The results of acid urea-PAGE-gel overlay assay (AU-PAGE-GOA) demonstrated clear zone of growth inhibition of E. coli corresponding to 6 and 15 kDa protein bands. LC-MS data of these proteins indicated that 15 kDa protein consists of lysozyme, lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), hemoglobin-α and β subunits (Hb-α/β), whereas 9 kDa protein band consists of transthyretin and calcyclin while uteroglobulin and neutrophil antibacterial peptide-5 (NAMP-5) are present in the 6 kDa protein band. Of the eight proteins, Hb-α derived protein was further characterized, as it showed the highest Probability Based Mowse Score (PBMS) of 288. A 25mer peptide, RVFHbαp was active against several clinical pathogens as demonstrated by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and radial diffusion assays (RDA). The interaction of RVFHbαP with bacterial liposome membrane was assessed by calcein dye leakage assay. RVFHbαP did not show cytotoxicity against human endocervical cells (End1/E6E7) or erythrocytes. RT-PCR and immunofluorescence results revealed the expression of RVFHbαP mRNA and protein in rabbit vaginal tissue. To the best our knowledge, this is the first report describing the detection of AMPs in RVFs. In conclusion, these studies indicated that vaginal epithelial cells (VEC) derived RVFHbαP may have therapeutic potential in the

  9. Application of MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and collision-induced dissociation for the identification of disulfide-bonded peptides.

    PubMed

    Janecki, Dariusz J; Nemeth, Jennifer F

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes a method for the fast identification and composition of disulfide-bonded peptides. A unique fragmentation signature of inter-disulfide-bonded peptides is detected using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry and high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). This fragmentation pattern identifies peptides with an interconnected disulfide bond and provides information regarding the composition of the peptides involved in the pairing. The distinctive signature produced using CID is a triplet of ions resulting from the cleavage of the disulfide bond to produce dehydroalanine, cysteine or thiocysteine product ions. This method is not applicable to intra-peptide disulfide bonds, as the cleavage mechanism is not the same and a triplet pattern is not observed. This method has been successfully applied to identifying disulfide-bonded peptides in a number of control digestions, as well as study samples where disulfide bond networks were postulated and/or unknown.

  10. In silico Identification of Potential Peptides or Allergen Shot Candidates Against Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aspergillus fumigatus is capable of causing invasive aspergillosis or acute bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and the current situation is alarming. There are no vaccine or allergen shots available for Aspergillus-induced allergies. Thus, a novel approach in designing of an effective vaccine or allergen shot candidate against A. fumigatus is needed. Using immunoinformatics approaches from the characterized A. fumigatus allergens, we have mapped epitopic regions to predict potential peptides that elicit both Aspergillus-specific T cells and B cell immune response. Experimentally derived immunodominant allergens were retrieved from www.allergen.org. A total of 23 allergenic proteins of A. fumigatus were retrieved. Out of 23 allergenic proteins, 13 of them showed high sequence similarity to both human and mouse counterparts and thus were eliminated from analysis due to possible cross-reactivity. Remaining allergens were subjected to T cell (major histocompatibility complex class I and II alleles) and B cell epitope prediction using immune epitope database analysis resource. Only five allergens have shown a common B and T cell epitopic region between human and mouse. They are Asp f1 {147–156 region (RVIYTYPNKV); Mitogillin}, Asp f2 {5–19 region (LRLAVLLPLAAPLVA); Hypothetical protein}, Asp f5 {305–322 region (LNNYRPSSSSLSFKY); Metalloprotease}, Asp f17 {98–106 region (AANAGGTVY); Hypothetical protein}, and Asp f34 {74–82 region (YIQDGSLYL); PhiA cell wall protein}. The epitopic region from these five allergenic proteins showed potential for development of single peptide- or multipeptide-based vaccine or allergen shots for experimental prioritization. PMID:27872794

  11. Identification of an Orthogonal Peptide Binding Motif for Biarsenical Multiuse Affinity Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Baowei; Cao, Haishi; Yan, Ping; Mayer, M. Uljana; Squier, Thomas C.

    2007-07-01

    Biarsenical multiuse affinity probes (MAPs) complexed with ethanedithiol (EDT) permit the selective cellular labeling of proteins engineered with tetracysteine motifs, but are limited by the availability of a single binding motif (i.e., CCPGCC or PG tag) that prevents the differential labeling of co-expressed proteins. To overcome this problem, we have used a high-throughput peptide screen to identify an alternate binding motif (i.e., CCKACC or KA tag), which has a similar brightness to the classical sequence upon MAP binding, but displays altered rates and affinities of association that permit the differential labeling of these peptide sequences by the red probe 4,5-bis(1,3,2-dithiarsolan-2-yl)-resorufin (ReAsH-EDT2) or its green cognate 4’,5’-bis(1,3,2-dithoarsolan-2-yl)fluorescein-(1,2-ethanedithiol)2 (FLAsH-EDT2). The utility of this labeling strategy was demonstrated following the expression of PG- and KA-tagged subunits of RNA polymerase expressed in E. coli. Specific labeling of two subunits of RNA polymerase in cellular lysates was achieved, whereby ReAsH-EDT2 is shown to selectively label the PG-tag on RNA polymerase alpha subunit prior to the labeling of the KA-tag sequence of the beta subunit of RNA polymerase with FlAsH-EDT2. These results demonstrate the ability to selectively label multiple individual proteins with orthogonal sequence tags in complex cellular lystates with spectroscopically distinct MAPs, and indicate the absolute specificity of ReAsH to target expressed proteins with essentially no nonspecific binding interactions.

  12. Identification and functional characterization of an uncharacterized antimicrobial peptide from a ciliate Paramecium caudatum.

    PubMed

    Cui, Pengfei; Dong, Yuan; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Yubo; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-07-01

    The global ever-growing concerns about multi-drug resistant (MDR) microbes leads to urgent demands for exploration of new antibiotics including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Here we demonstrated that a cDNA from Ciliata Paramecium caudatum, designated Pcamp1, coded for a protein with features characteristic of AMPs, which is not homologous to any AMPs currently known. Both the C-terminal 91 amino acid residues of PcAMP1, cPcAMP1, expressed in Escherichia coli and the C-terminal 26 amino acid residues (predicted mature AMP), cPcAMP1/26, synthesized, underwent a coil-to-helix transition in the presence of TFE, SDS or DPC. Functional assays revealed that cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were both able to kill Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus. ELISA showed that cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were able to bind to microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules LPS and LTA, which was further corroborated by the observations that cPcAMP1 could deposit onto the bacterial membranes. Importantly, both cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were able to induce bacterial membrane permeabilization and depolarization, and to increase intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, cPcAMP1 and cPcAMP1/26 were not cytotoxic to mammalian cells. Taken together, our results show that PcAMP1 is a potential AMP with a membrane selectivity towards bacterial cells, which renders it a promising template for the design of novel peptide antibiotics against MDR microbes. It also shows that use of signal conserved sequence of AMPs can be an effective tool to identify potential AMPs across different animal classes.

  13. Milk peptides increase iron solubility in water but do not affect DMT-1 expression in Caco-2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In vitro digestion of milk produces peptide fractions that enhance iron uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our objectives were to investigate whether these fractions a) exert their effect by increasing relative gene expression of DMT-1 in Caco-2 cells b) enhance iron dialyzability when added in meals. Peptid...

  14. Identification of novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer-associated antigen applicable to developing helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ohtake, Junya; Ohkuri, Takayuki; Togashi, Yuji; Kitamura, Hidemitsu; Okuno, Kiyotaka; Nishimura, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We identified novel helper epitope peptides of Survivin cancer antigen, which are presented to both HLA-DRB1*01:01 and DQB1*06:01. The helper epitope also contained three distinct Survivin-killer epitopes presented to HLA-A*02:01 and A*24:02. This 19 amino-acids epitope peptide (SU18) induced weak responses of Survivin-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells though it contained both helper and killer epitopes. To enhance the vaccine efficacy, we synthesized a long peptide by conjugating SU18 peptide and another DR53-restricted helper epitope peptide (SU22; 12 amino-acids) using glycine-linker. We designated this artificial 40 amino-acids long peptide containing two helper and three killer epitopes as Survivin-helper/killer-hybrid epitope long peptide (Survivin-H/K-HELP). Survivin-H/K-HELP allowed superior activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) Th1 cells and CD8(+) Tc1 cells compared with the mixture of its component peptides (SU18 and SU22) in the presence of OK-432-treated monocyte-derived DC (Mo-DC). Survivin-H/K-HELP-pulsed Mo-DC pretreated with OK-432 also exhibited sustained antigen-presentation capability of stimulating Survivin-specific Th1 cells compared with Mo-DC pulsed with a mixture of SU18 and SU22 short peptides. Moreover, we demonstrated that Survivin-H/K-HELP induced a complete response in a breast cancer patient with the induction of cellular and humoral immune responses. Thus, we believe that an artificially synthesized Survivin-H/K-HELP will become an innovative cancer vaccine.

  15. Identification of the Fusion Peptide-Containing Region in Betacoronavirus Spike Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiuyuan; Zheng, Wangliang; Shan, Yiwei; Mu, Zhixia; Dominguez, Samuel R.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fusion peptides (FP) play an essential role in fusion of viral envelope with cellular membranes. The location and properties of the FPs in the spike (S) glycoproteins of different coronaviruses (CoV) have not yet been determined. Through amino acid sequence analysis of S proteins of representative CoVs, we identified a common region as a possible FP (pFP) that shares the characteristics of FPs of class I viral fusion proteins, including high Ala/Gly content, intermediate hydrophobicity, and few charged residues. To test the hypothesis that this region contains the CoV FP, we systemically mutated every residue in the pFP of Middle East respiratory syndrome betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV) and found that 11 of the 22 residues in the pFP (from G953 to L964, except for A956) were essential for S protein-mediated cell-cell fusion and virus entry. The synthetic MERS-CoV pFP core peptide (955IAGVGWTAGL964) induced extensive fusion of liposome membranes, while mutant peptide failed to induce any lipid mixing. We also selectively mutated residues in pFPs of two other β-CoVs, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Although the amino acid sequences of these two pFPs differed significantly from that of MERS-CoV and each other, most of the pFP mutants of SARS-CoV and MHV also failed to mediate membrane fusion, suggesting that these pFPs are also the functional FPs. Thus, the FPs of 3 different lineages of β-CoVs are conserved in location within the S glycoproteins and in their functions, although their amino acid sequences have diverged significantly during CoV evolution. IMPORTANCE Within the class I viral fusion proteins of many enveloped viruses, the FP is the critical mediator of fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes leading to virus infection. FPs from within a virus family, like influenza viruses or human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV), tend to share high amino acid sequence identity. In this

  16. Use of collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry as a rapid technique for the identification of pharmacologically active peptides in pharmacopoeial testing.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Nap, Cees-Jan; Almeling, Stefan

    2011-07-15

    The applicability of collision induced dissociation mass spectrometry (CID-MS) for the pharmacopoeial identification of pharmacologically active peptides was examined. Two different classes of related peptides were selected, i.e. four synthetic gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues (gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin and leuprorelin) being either nona- or decapeptides, and human insulin and 2 insulin analogues (insulin lispro and insulin aspart). For all these substances the pharmacopoeial identification currently requires a combination of several partly rather laborious tests using sophisticated equipment. In contrast, CID-MS as a stand alone test can provide increased reassurance about the identity and is rapid and efficient. Moreover, the substance consumption for testing is significantly lower, which is a non-negligible factor for very expensive substances.

  17. Identification of Ly2 members as antimicrobial peptides from zebrafish Danio rerio

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuemin; Cao, Xuwen; Wang, Su; Zhang, Shicui

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) microbes caused by overuse of antibiotics leads to urgent demands for novel antibiotics exploration. Our recent data showed that Ly2.1–3 (a novel lymphocyte antigen 6 (Ly6) gene cluster) were proteins with cationic nature and rich in cysteine content, that are characteristic of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their expression were all significantly up-regulated after challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These strongly suggested that Ly2.1–3 are potential AMPs, but firm evidence are lacking. Here, we clearly showed that the recombinant proteins of Ly2.1–3 were capable of killing Gram-negative bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila and Escherichia coli, while they had little bactericidal activity against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis. We also showed that recombinant proteins Ly2.1–3 (rLy2.1–3) were able to bind to the Gram-negative bacteria A. hydrophila, E. coli and the microbial signature molecule LPS, but not to the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and B. subtilis as well as the microbial signature molecule LTA. Moreover, the Scatchard analysis revealed that rLy2.1–3 could specifically bind to LPS. Finally, we found that Ly2.1–3 were not cytotoxic to mammalian cells. All these together indicate that Ly2.1–3 can function as AMPs. PMID:27980020

  18. Ligand and Structure-Based Approaches for the Identification of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Zhu, Yasheng; Qiu, Shengzhi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a metalloprotease catalyzing the removal of a formyl group from newly synthesized proteins, which makes it an important antibacterial drug target. Given the importance of PDF inhibitors like actinonin in antibacterial drug discovery, several reported potent PDF inhibitors were used to develop pharmacophore models using the Galahad module of Sybyl 7.1 software. Generated pharmacophore models were composed of two donor atom centers, four acceptor atom centers and two hydrophobic groups. Model-1 was screened against the Zinc database and several compounds were retrieved as hits. Compounds with Qfit values of more than 60 were employed to perform a molecular docking study with the receptor Escherichia coli PDF, then compounds with docking score values of more than 6 were used to predict the in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity risk via OSIRIS property explorer. Two known PDF inhibitors were also used to perform a molecular docking study with E. coli PDF as reference molecules. The results of the molecular docking study were validated by reproducing the crystal structure of actinonin. Molecular docking and in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity prediction studies suggested that ZINC08740166 has a relatively high docking score of 7.44 and a drug score of 0.78. PMID:27428963

  19. Identification of GPR83 as the receptor for the neuroendocrine peptide PEN

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N.; Margolis, Elyssa B.; Gupta, Achla; Sierra, Salvador; Fakira, Amanda K.; Fujita, Wakako; Müller, Timo D.; Müller, Anne; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Kleinau, Gunnar; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    PEN is an abundant peptide in the brain that has been implicated in the regulation of feeding. We identified a receptor for PEN in mouse hypothalamus and Neuro2A cells. PEN bound to and activated GPR83, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptor (GPCR). Reduction of GPR83 expression in mouse brain and Neuro2A cells reduced PEN binding and signaling, consistent with GPR83 functioning as the major receptor for PEN. In some brain regions, GPR83 colocalized with GPR171, a GPCR that binds the neuropeptide bigLEN, another neuropeptide that is involved in feeding and is generated from the same precursor protein as is PEN. Coexpression of these two receptors in cell lines altered the signaling properties of each receptor, suggesting a functional interaction. Our data established PEN as a neuropeptide that binds GPR83 and suggested that these two ligand-receptor systems—PEN-GPR83 and bigLEN-GPR171—may be functionally coupled in the regulation of feeding. PMID:27117253

  20. Identification of novel serum peptide biomarkers for high-altitude adaptation: a comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Li, Wenhua; Liu, Siyuan; Yuan, Dongya; Guo, Yijiao; Jia, Cheng; Song, Tusheng; Huang, Chen

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify serum biomarkers for screening individuals who could adapt to high-altitude hypoxia at sea level. HHA (high-altitude hypoxia acclimated; n = 48) and HHI (high-altitude hypoxia illness; n = 48) groups were distinguished at high altitude, routine blood tests were performed for both groups at high altitude and at sea level. Serum biomarkers were identified by comparing serum peptidome profiling between HHI and HHA groups collected at sea level. Routine blood tests revealed the concentration of hemoglobin and red blood cells were significantly higher in HHI than in HHA at high altitude. Serum peptidome profiling showed that ten significantly differentially expressed peaks between HHA and HHI at sea level. Three potential serum peptide peaks (m/z values: 1061.91, 1088.33, 4057.63) were further sequence identified as regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 fragment (ITIH4 347–356), regions of the inter-α trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H1 fragment (ITIH1 205–214), and isoform 1 of fibrinogen α chain precursor (FGA 588–624). Expression of their full proteins was also tested by ELISA in HHA and HHI samples collected at sea level. Our study provided a novel approach for identifying potential biomarkers for screening people at sea level who can adapt to high altitudes.

  1. Development of Online pH Gradient-Eluted Strong Cation Exchange Nanoelectrospray-Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Proteomic Analysis Facilitating Basic and Histidine-Containing Peptides Identification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingjing; Gao, Jing; Yu, Chengli; He, Han; Yang, Yiming; Figeys, Daniel; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-05

    A novel one-dimensional online pH gradient-eluted strong cation exchange-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (SCX-nano-ESI-MS/MS) method was developed for protein identification and tested with a mixture of six standard proteins, total lysate of HuH7 and N2a cells, as well as membrane fraction of N2a cells. This method utilized an online nanoflow SCX column in a nano-LC system coupled with a nanoelectrospray high-resolution mass spectrometer. Protein digests were separated on a nanoflow SCX column with a pH gradient and directly introduced into a mass spectrometer through nanoelectrospray ionization. More than five thousand unique peptides were identified in each 90 min LC-MS/MS run using 500 nanogram of protein digest either from total cell lysate or from membrane fraction. The unique peptide overlap between online strong cation exchange nano-ESI-MS/MS (SCXLC-MS/MS) and reverse phase nano-ESI-MS/MS (RPLC-MS/MS) is only ≤30%, which indicated these two methods were complementary to each other. The correlation coefficient of retention time and theoretical isoelectric point (pI) of identified peptides in SCXLC-MS/MS was higher than 0.4, which showed that peptides elution in SCXLC-MS/MS was dependent on their charge states. Furthermore, SCXLC-MS/MS showed identification capability for a higher proportion of basic peptides compared to the RPLC-MS/MS method, especially for histidine-containing peptides. Our SCXLC-MS/MS method is an excellent alternative method to the RPLC-MS/MS method for analysis of standard proteins, total cell and membrane proteomes.

  2. Handbook for the identification, location and investigation of pollution sources affecting ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Oudijk, G.; Mujica, K.

    1989-01-01

    Due to environmental pollution associated with increased urbanization and industrial development in wellhead areas, many public and domestic supply wells are becoming polluted at an ever-increasing rate. To prevent continued pollution of underground drinking water supplies, investigations must be conducted to locate and identify the sources of pollution. To conduct such investigations requires a diverse knowledge of hydrogeology, chemistry, urban planning, industrial and commercial processes, environmental law, and many other disciplines. Groundwater pollution investigations can be subdivided into the following five phases: (1) the background investigation (historical land usage, aerial photographs, pollutant characteristics, local hydrogeology); (2) the field pollution survey (site inspections, initial waste characterization); (3) the site-specific groundwater pollution investigation (monitoring wells, groundwater sampling); (4) data analysis (groundwater elevation contour maps, statistical analysis); and (5) source identification. This process may be used by investigators in order to locate pollution sources affecting aquifers, potable wells, and/or well fields.

  3. Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide improves intraoperative identification and resection of small salivary gland cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the use of intraoperative fluorescence guidance by enzymatically cleavable ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptide (RACPPPLGC(Me)AG) containing Cy5 as a fluorescent donor and Cy7 as a fluorescent acceptor for salivary gland cancer surgery in a mouse model. Methods Surgical resection of small parotid gland cancers in mice was performed with fluorescence guidance or white light (WL) imaging alone. Tumor identification accuracy, operating time and tumor free survival were compared. Results RACPP guidance aided tumor detection (positive histology in 90% (27/30) vs. 48% (15/31) for WL, p<0.001). A ~25% ratiometric signal increase as the threshold to distinguish between tumor and adjacent tissue, yielded >90% detection sensitivity and specificity. Operating time was reduced by 54% (p<0.001), tumor free survival was increased with RACPP guidance (p=0.025). Conclusions RACPP provides real-time intraoperative guidance leading to improved survival. Ratiometric signal thresholds can be set according to desired detection accuracy levels for future RACPP applications. PMID:25521629

  4. Peptide labeling with photoactivatable trifunctional cadaverine derivative and identification of interacting partners by biotin transfer.

    PubMed

    App, Christine; Knop, Jana; Huff, Thomas; Seebahn, Angela; Becker, Cord-Michael; Iavarone, Federica; Castagnola, Massimo; Hannappel, Ewald

    2014-07-01

    A new photoactivatable trifunctional cross-linker, cBED (cadaverine-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate), was synthesized by chemical conversion of sulfo-SBED (sulfosuccinimidyl-2-[6-(biotinamido)-2-(p-azidobenzamido) hexanoamido]ethyl-1,3'-dithiopropionate) with cadaverine. This cross-linker was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis. cBED is based on sulfo-SBED that has a photoactivatable azido group, a cleavable disulfide bond for label transfer methods, and a biotin moiety for highly sensitive biotin/avidin detection. By ultraviolet (UV) light, the azido group is converted to a reactive nitrene, transforming transient bindings of interacting structures to covalent bonds. In contrast to the sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) moiety of sulfo-SBED, which attaches quite unspecifically to amino groups, cBED includes a cadaverine moiety that can be attached by transglutaminase more specifically to certain glutamine residues. For instance, thymosin β4 can be labeled with cBED using tissue transglutaminase. By high-resolution HPLC/ESI-MS (electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) and tandem MS (MS/MS) of the trypsin digest, it was established that glutamine residues at positions 23 and 36 were labeled, whereas Q39 showed no reactivity. The covalent binding of cBED to thymosin β4 did not influence its G-actin sequestering activity, and the complex could be used to identify new interaction partners. Therefore, cBED can be used to better understand the multifunctional role of thymosin β4 as well as of other proteins and peptides.

  5. Identification, sequence and expression of a crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) gene in the moth Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Loi, P K; Emmal, S A; Park, Y; Tublitz, N J

    2001-08-01

    The crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) gene was isolated from the tobacco hawkmoth Manduca sexta. The gene has an open reading frame of 125 amino acid residues containing a single, complete copy of CCAP. Analysis of the gene structure revealed three introns interrupting the coding region. A comparison of the M. sexta CCAP gene with the Drosophila melanogaster genome database reveals significant similarities in sequence and gene structure. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of the CCAP gene in the M. sexta central nervous system were determined in all major post-embryonic stages using in situ hybridization techniques. The CCAP gene is expressed in a total of 116 neurons in the post-embryonic M. sexta central nervous system. Nine pairs of cells are observed in the brain, 4.5 pairs in the subesophageal ganglion, three pairs in each thoracic ganglion (T1-T3), three pairs in the first abdominal ganglion (A1), five pairs each in the second to sixth abdominal ganglia (A2-A6) and 7.5 pairs in the terminal ganglion. The CCAP gene is expressed in every ganglion in each post-embryonic stage, except in the thoracic ganglia of first- and second-instar larvae. The number of cells expressing the CCAP gene varies during post-embryonic life, starting at 52 cells in the first instar and reaching a maximum of 116 shortly after pupation. One set of thoracic neurons expressing CCAP mRNA shows unusual variability in expression levels immediately prior to larval ecdysis. Using previously published CCAP immunocytochemical data, it was determined that 91 of 95 CCAP-immunopositive neurons in the M. sexta central nervous system also express the M. sexta CCAP gene, indicating that there is likely to be only a single CCAP gene in M. sexta.

  6. Rapid Generation of a Nanocrystal-Labeled Peptide Library for Specific Identification of the Bacterium Clostrium Botulinum

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, J B

    2004-11-11

    Several peptide libraries containing up to 2 million unique peptide ligands have been synthesized. The peptides are attached onto a 80 micron resin and the length of these peptide ligands ranges from 5 to 9 amino acid residues. Using a novel calorimetric assay, the libraries were screened for binding to the ganglioside-binding domain of Clostridium Tetanus Toxin, a structural similar analog of the Clostridium Botulinum toxin. Several binding peptide sequences were identified, in which the detailed binding kinetics are currently underway using the Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique.

  7. A legume specific protein database (LegProt) improves the number of identified peptides, confidence scores and overall protein identification success rates for legume proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhentian; Dai, Xinbin; Watson, Bonnie S; Zhao, Patrick X; Sumner, Lloyd W

    2011-07-01

    A legume specific protein database (LegProt) has been created containing sequences from seven legume species, i.e., Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, Medicago sativa, Medicago truncatula, Lupinusalbus, Phaseolus vulgaris, and Pisum sativum. The database consists of amino acid sequences translated from predicted gene models and 6-frame translations of tentative consensus (TC) sequences assembled from expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and singleton ESTs. This database was queried using mass spectral data for protein identification and identification success rates were compared to the NCBI nr database. Specifically, Mascot MS/MS ion searches of tandem nano-LC Q-TOFMS/MS mass spectral data showed that relative to the NCBI nr protein database, the LegProt database yielded a 54% increase in the average protein score (i.e., from NCBI nr 480 to LegProt 739) and a 50% increase in the average number of matched peptides (i.e., from NCBI nr 8 to LegProt 12). The overall identification success rate also increased from 88% (NCBI nr) to 93% (LegProt). Mascot peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) searches of the LegProt database using MALDI-TOFMS data yielded a significant increase in the identification success rate from 19% (NCBI nr) to 34% (LegProt) while the average scores and average number of matched peptides showed insignificant changes. The results demonstrate that the LegProt database significantly increases legume protein identification success rates and the confidence levels compared to the commonly used NCBI nr. These improvements are primarily due to the presence of a large number of legume specific TC sequences in the LegProt database that were not found in NCBI nr. The LegProt database is freely available for download (http://bioinfo.noble.org/manuscript-support/legumedb) and will serve as a valuable resource for legume proteomics.

  8. Factors and Trends Affecting the Identification of a Reliable Biomarker for Diesel Exhaust Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The monitoring of human exposures to diesel exhaust continues to be a vexing problem for specialists seeking information on the potential health effects of this ubiquitous combustion product. Exposure biomarkers have yielded a potential solution to this problem by providing a direct measure of an individual's contact with key components in the exhaust stream. Spurred by the advent of new, highly sensitive, analytical methods capable of detecting substances at very low levels, there have been numerous attempts at identifying a stable and specific biomarker. Despite these new techniques, there is currently no foolproof method for unambiguously separating diesel exhaust exposures from those arising from other combustion sources. Diesel exhaust is a highly complex mixture of solid, liquid, and gaseous components whose exact composition can be affected by many variables, including engine technology, fuel composition, operating conditions, and photochemical aging. These factors together with those related to exposure methodology, epidemiological necessity, and regulatory reform can have a decided impact on the success or failure of future research aimed at identifying a suitable biomarker of exposure. The objective of this review is to examine existing information on exposure biomarkers for diesel exhaust and to identify those factors and trends that have had an impact on the successful identification of metrics for both occupational and community settings. The information will provide interested parties with a template for more thoroughly understanding those factors affecting diesel exhaust emissions and for identifying those substances and research approaches holding the greatest promise for future success. PMID:25170242

  9. Identification and mapping of functional domains on human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 envelope proteins by using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Sagara, Y; Inoue, Y; Shiraki, H; Jinno, A; Hoshino, H; Maeda, Y

    1996-01-01

    To identify the regions that are important in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope function, we synthesized 23 kinds of peptides covering the envelope proteins and examined the inhibitory effect of each peptide on syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells. Of the 23 synthetic peptides, 2, corresponding to amino acids 197 to 216 on gp46 and 400 to 429 on gp21, inhibited syncytium formation induced by HTLV-1-bearing cells but did not affect syncytium formation induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1-producing cells. The peptide concentrations giving 50% inhibition of syncytium formation for gp46 197 to 216 and gp21 400 to 429 were 14.9 and 6.0 microM, respectively. A syncytium formation assay with overlapping synthetic peptides containing amino acids 175 to 236 and 391 to 448 of the envelope proteins showed that syncytium formation was inhibited by peptides that contained the amino acid sequences 197 to 205 (Asp-His-Ile-Leu-Glu-Pro-Ser-Ile-Pro) and 397 to 406 (Gln-Glu-Gln-Cys-Arg-Phe- Pro-Asn-Ile-Thr). These observations suggest that the two regions corresponding to amino acids 197 to 216 and 400 to 429 are involved] in HTLV-1 envelope function. PMID:8627675

  10. NOVEL CONTINUOUS PH/SALT GRADIENT AND PEPTIDE SCORE FOR STRONG CATION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY IN 2D-NANO-LC/MSMS PEPTIDE IDENTIFICATION FOR PROTEOMICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tryptic digests of human serum albumin (HSA) and human lung epithelial cell lysates were used as test samples in a novel proteomics study. Peptides were separated and analyzed using 2D-nano-LC/MSMS with strong cation exchange (SCX) and reverse phase (RP) chromatography and contin...

  11. Family identification: a beneficial process for young adults who grow up in homes affected by parental intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine M.; Muldoon, Orla T.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to parental intimate partner violence (parental IPV) is a complex trauma. Research within social psychology establishes that identification with social groups impacts positively on how we appraise, respond to and recover from traumatic events. IPV is also a highly stigmatized social phenomenon and social isolation is a major factor for families affected by IPV, yet strong identification with the family group may act as a beneficial psychological resource to young people who grew up in homes affected by IPV. The current study, an online survey of 355 students (Mage = 20, 70% female), investigated if a psychosocial process, specifically identification with the family, may influence the relationship between the predictor, exposure to parental IPV, and outcomes, global self-esteem and state anxiety. Mediation analysis suggests that identification with the family has a positive influence on the relationship between exposure to parental IPV and psychological outcomes; exposure to parental IPV results in reduced family identification, but when family identification is strong it results in both reduced anxiety and increased self-esteem for young people. The findings highlight the importance of having a strong sense of belonging to the extended family for young people who were exposed to parental IPV, thus has implications for prevention, intervention, and social policy. PMID:26379582

  12. Identification of protein complexes in Escherichia coli using sequential peptide affinity purification in combination with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Kagan, Olga; Guo, Hongbo; Greenblatt, Jack; Emili, Andrew

    2012-11-12

    Since most cellular processes are mediated by macromolecular assemblies, the systematic identification of protein-protein interactions (PPI) and the identification of the subunit composition of multi-protein complexes can provide insight into gene function and enhance understanding of biological systems(1, 2). Physical interactions can be mapped with high confidence vialarge-scale isolation and characterization of endogenous protein complexes under near-physiological conditions based on affinity purification of chromosomally-tagged proteins in combination with mass spectrometry (APMS). This approach has been successfully applied in evolutionarily diverse organisms, including yeast, flies, worms, mammalian cells, and bacteria(1-6). In particular, we have generated a carboxy-terminal Sequential Peptide Affinity (SPA) dual tagging system for affinity-purifying native protein complexes from cultured gram-negative Escherichia coli, using genetically-tractable host laboratory strains that are well-suited for genome-wide investigations of the fundamental biology and conserved processes of prokaryotes(1, 2, 7). Our SPA-tagging system is analogous to the tandem affinity purification method developed originally for yeast(8, 9), and consists of a calmodulin binding peptide (CBP) followed by the cleavage site for the highly specific tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease and three copies of the FLAG epitope (3X FLAG), allowing for two consecutive rounds of affinity enrichment. After cassette amplification, sequence-specific linear PCR products encoding the SPA-tag and a selectable marker are integrated and expressed in frame as carboxy-terminal fusions in a DY330 background that is induced to transiently express a highly efficient heterologous bacteriophage lambda recombination system(10). Subsequent dual-step purification using calmodulin and anti-FLAG affinity beads enables the highly selective and efficient recovery of even low abundance protein complexes from large

  13. Chagas Cardiomiopathy: The Potential of Diastolic Dysfunction and Brain Natriuretic Peptide in the Early Identification of Cardiac Damage

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alvarez, Ana; Sitges, Marta; Pinazo, María-Jesús; Regueiro-Cueva, Ander; Posada, Elizabeth; Poyatos, Silvia; Ortiz-Pérez, José Tomás; Heras, Magda; Azqueta, Manel; Gascon, Joaquim; Sanz, Ginés

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Chagas disease remains a major cause of mortality in several countries of Latin America and has become a potential public health problem in non-endemic countries as a result of migration flows. Cardiac involvement represents the main cause of mortality, but its diagnosis is still based on nonspecific criteria with poor sensitivity. Early identification of patients with cardiac involvement is desirable, since early treatment may improve prognosis. This study aimed to assess the role of diastolic dysfunction, abnormal myocardial strain and elevated brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in the early identification of cardiac involvement in Chagas disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-four patients divided into 3 groups—group 1 (undetermined form: positive serology without ECG or 2D-echocardiographic abnormalities; N = 32), group 2 (typical ECG abnormalities of Chagas disease but normal 2D-echocardiography; N = 14), and group 3 (regional wall motion abnormalities, left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic diameter >55 mm or LV ejection fraction <50% on echocardiography; N = 8)—and 44 control subjects were studied. Patients with significant non-cardiac diseases, other heart diseases and previous treatment with benznidazol were excluded. The median age was 37 (20–58) years; 40% were men. BNP levels, longitudinal and radial myocardial strain and LV diastolic dysfunction increased progressively from group 1 to 3 (p for trend <0.01). Abnormal BNP levels (>37 pg/ml) were noted in 0%, 13%, 29% and 63% in controls and groups 1 to 3, respectively. Half of patients in the undetermined form had impaired relaxation patterns, whereas half of patients with ECG abnormalities suggestive of Chagas cardiomyopathy had normal diastolic function. In group 1, BNP levels were statistically higher in patients with diastolic dysfunction as compared to those with normal diastolic function (27±26 vs. 11±8 pg/ml, p = 0.03). Conclusion/Significance In conclusion

  14. Four natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, VNP and CNP) coexist in the sturgeon: identification of BNP in fish lineage.

    PubMed

    Kawakoshi, A; Hyodo, S; Inoue, K; Kobayashi, Y; Takei, Y

    2004-04-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) family is composed of three members: atrial, brain/ventricular and C-type NPs (ANP, BNP/VNP and CNP respectively) in tetrapods and teleostean fish, but only CNP in elasmobranch fish. In order to trace the process of divergence of the NP family in early vertebrate evolution, we attempted to detect NPs in the primitive ray-finned fish, the sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Unexpectedly, we isolated four distinct NP cDNAs from the heart and brain of this chondrostean fish. The single NP from the brain was CNP, as judged from the lack of C-terminal 'tail' sequence extending from the intramolecular ring. Two of the three cardiac NPs were ANP and VNP, as judged by the presence of an amidation signal at its C-terminus (ANP) and a long and conserved C-terminal tail sequence (VNP) respectively. The third cardiac NP was most probably BNP because it possessed all the features characteristic of BNP including: (1) the presence of dibasic amino acids within the intramolecular ring; (2) the presence of AUUUA repeats in the 3'-untranslated region of its mRNA; (3) equivalent expression of its mRNA in the atrium and ventricle and appreciable expression in the brain. Based on the sturgeon BNP sequence, we further isolated BNP cDNA from the heart of tilapia and pufferfish for the first time in teleostean fish. Phylogenetic analysis of the precursors showed that newly identified NPs belong to each group of the four NPs. The current identification of both VNP and BNP in the sturgeon clearly showed that BNP and VNP are coded by distinct genes, and that the NP family consists of at least four members in the ray-finned fish. VNP has not been molecularly identified in mammals but its presence is suggested from physiological studies; heterologous fish VNP exhibited more potent vasorelaxant activity than homologous mammalian ANP in the isolated coronary artery of dogs.

  15. Identification of structural traits that increase the antimicrobial activity of a chimeric peptide of human β-defensins 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Spudy, Björn; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Waetzig, Georg H; Grötzinger, Joachim; Jung, Sascha

    2012-10-12

    Antimicrobial peptides participate in the first line of defence of many organisms against pathogens. In humans, the family of β-defensins plays a pivotal role in innate immunity. Two human β-defensins, β-defensin-2 and -3 (HBD2 and HBD3), show substantial sequence identity and structural similarity. However, HBD3 kills Staphylococcus (S.) aureus with a 4- to 8-fold higher efficiency compared to HBD2, whereas their activities against Escherichia (E.) coli are very similar. The generation of six HBD2/HBD3-chimeric molecules led to the identification of distinct molecular regions which mediate their divergent killing properties. One of the chimeras (chimera C3) killed both E. coli and S. aureus with an even higher efficacy compared to the wild-type molecules. Due to the broad spectrum of its antimicrobial activity against many human multidrug-resistant pathogens, this HBD2/HBD3-chimeric peptide represents a promising candidate for a new class of antibiotics. In order to investigate the structural basis of its exceptional antimicrobial activity, the peptide's tertiary structure was determined by NMR spectroscopy, which allowed its direct comparison to the published structures of HBD2 and HBD3 and the identification of the activity-increasing molecular features.

  16. A paired ions scoring algorithm based on Morpheus for simultaneous identification and quantification of proteome samples prepared by isobaric peptide termini labeling strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shen; Wu, Qi; Shan, Yichu; Sui, Zhigang; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-06-01

    The isobaric peptide termini labeling (IPTL) method is a promising strategy in quantitative proteomics for its high accuracy, while the increased complexity of MS2 spectra originated from the paired b, y ions has adverse effect on the identification and the coverage of quantification. Here, a paired ions scoring algorithm (PISA) based on Morpheus, a database searching algorithm specifically designed for high-resolution MS2 spectra, was proposed to address this issue. PISA was first tested on two 1:1 mixed IPTL datasets, and increases in peptide to spectrum matchings, distinct peptides and protein groups compared to Morpheus itself and MASCOT were shown. Furthermore, the quantification is simultaneously performed and 100% quantification coverage is achieved by PISA since each of the identified peptide to spectrum matchings has several pairs of fragment ions which could be used for quantification. Then the PISA was applied to the relative quantification of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines with high and low metastatic potentials prepared by an IPTL strategy.

  17. Design in topographical space of peptide and peptidomimetic ligands that affect behavior. A chemist's glimpse at the mind--body problem.

    PubMed

    Hruby, V J

    2001-05-01

    Efforts to determine the bioactive conformations of peptide ligands for membrane-bound proteins such as G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been particularly challenging due to the flexibility of the ligands and the lack of 3D structural information (X-ray, NMR, etc.) for integral membrane proteins. An approach to determining these conformations by conformational constraint of the backbone template (phi and psi angles) and by topographical constraint (chi(1), chi(2), etc. constraint) is outlined. Special attention is given to peptide neurotransmitter ligands that affect critical behaviors (feeding, sexual, addiction, pain, etc.). It is demonstrated that small changes in structure or a single torsional angle are sufficient to dramatically modify complex behaviors.

  18. Identification of Patients Affected by Mitral Valve Prolapse with Severe Regurgitation: A Multivariable Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Songia, Paola; Chiesa, Mattia; Alamanni, Francesco; Tremoli, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background. Mitral valve prolapse (MVP) is the most common cause of severe mitral regurgitation. Besides echocardiography, up to now there are no reliable biomarkers available for the identification of this pathology. We aim to generate a predictive model, based on circulating biomarkers, able to identify MVP patients with the highest accuracy. Methods. We analysed 43 patients who underwent mitral valve repair due to MVP and compared to 29 matched controls. We assessed the oxidative stress status measuring the oxidized and the reduced form of glutathione by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) plasma levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The combination of these biochemical variables was used to implement several logistic regression models. Results. Oxidative stress levels and OPG concentrations were significantly higher in patients compared to control subjects (0.116 ± 0.007 versus 0.053 ± 0.013 and 1748 ± 100.2 versus 1109 ± 45.3 pg/mL, respectively; p < 0.0001). The best regression model was able to correctly classify 62 samples out of 72 with accuracy in terms of area under the curve of 0.92. Conclusions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a strong association between OPG and oxidative stress status in patients affected by MVP with severe regurgitation. PMID:28261377

  19. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  20. Identification and analysis of the sap genes from Vibrio fischeri belonging to the ATP-binding cassette gene family required for peptide transport and resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Chen, H Y; Weng, S F; Lin, J W

    2000-03-24

    Partial nucleotide sequences of the sapD and sapF genes of the sap operon (GenBank Accession No. AF178651) from Vibrio fischeri ATCC 7744 have been determined, and the peptide transport system of ATP-binding proteins SapD and SapF encoded by the genes have been deduced. Alignment and comparison of the Sap proteins of V. fischeri, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, and Haemophilus influenzae Rd show that these proteins are homologous. The sap operon residing in the genome enables V. fischeri to transport peptides and resist antimicrobial peptides. Nucleotide sequence and functional analyses confirm that the specific regulatory-region-like sequence R&R* that resides inside the sapD gene and before the sapF gene functions in gene expression and regulation; also, it is regulated by the LuxR-AI complex of the V. fischeri lux regulon. The putative upstream activator binding sequences SigmaUASI, SigmaUASII, SigmaUASIII TGTCGACTTGGGCCTCGCTGTCCGTATGCACA (72nd to 103rd bp), TGTCCGTATGCACA (90th to 103rd bp), and TGTTCAAGTACCAGAAAGACA (111st to 133rd bp) in the R&R* sequence, which are similar to the two-component regulator binding sequence TGT-N(8-12)-ACA and the LuxR-AI binding sequence ACCTGTAGGATCGTACAGGT in the regulatory region of the V. fischeri lux regulon, might be the specific sequences recognized by the LuxR-AI complex for enhancement.

  1. Identification and Characterization of a Suite of Tumor Targeting Peptides for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Michael J.; Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Cupka, Dorothy; Byers, Lauren Averett; Wu, Lei; Rezaie, Shaghayegh; Liu, Ying-Horng; Pattisapu, Naveen; Issac, James; Oyama, Tsukasa; Diao, Lixia; Heymach, John V.; Xie, Xian-Jin; Minna, John D.; Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2014-03-01

    Tumor targeting ligands are emerging components in cancer therapies. Widespread use of targeted therapies and molecular imaging is dependent on increasing the number of high affinity, tumor-specific ligands. Towards this goal, we biopanned three phage-displayed peptide libraries on a series of well-defined human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, isolating 11 novel peptides. The peptides show distinct binding profiles across 40 NSCLC cell lines and do not bind normal bronchial epithelial cell lines. Binding of specific peptides correlates with onco-genotypes and activation of particular pathways, such as EGFR signaling, suggesting the peptides may serve as surrogate markers. Multimerization of the peptides results in cell binding affinities between 0.0071-40 nM. The peptides home to tumors in vivo and bind to patient tumor samples. This is the first comprehensive biopanning for isolation of high affinity peptidic ligands for a single cancer type and expands the diversity of NSCLC targeting ligands.

  2. Identification and characterization of a sex peptide receptor-like transcript from the western tarnished plant bug, Lygus hesperus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lygus hesperus females exhibit a post-mating behavioral switch that triggers increased egg laying and decreased sexual interest. In Drosophila melanogaster, post-mating changes in behavior are controlled by sex peptide (SP) and the sex peptide receptor (DmSPR). SPR is present in most insect genome...

  3. Identification and Characterization of a Small Inhibitory Peptide That Can Target DNA-PKcs Autophosphorylation and Increase Tumor Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xiaonan; Yang Chunying; Liu Hai; Wang Qi; Wu Shixiu; Li Xia; Xie Tian; Brinkman, Kathryn L.; Teh, Bin S.; Butler, E. Brian; Xu Bo; Zheng, Shu

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The DNA protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is one of the critical elements involved in the DNA damage repair process. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR); therefore, this approach has been explored to develop molecular targeted radiosensitizers. Here, we aimed to develop small inhibitory peptides that could specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation, a critical step for the enzymatic activation of the kinase in response to IR. Methods and Materials: We generated several small fusion peptides consisting of 2 functional domains, 1 an internalization domain and the other a DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation inhibitory domain. We characterized the internalization, toxicity, and radiosensitization activities of the fusion peptides. Furthermore, we studied the mechanisms of the inhibitory peptides on DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and DNA repair. Results: We found that among several peptides, the biotin-labeled peptide 3 (BTW3) peptide, which targets DNA-PKcs threonine 2647 autophosphorylation, can abrogate IR-induced DNA-PKcs activation and cause prolonged {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. We demonstrated that BTW3 exposure led to hypersensitivity to IR in DNA-PKcs-proficient cells but not in DNA-PKcs-deficient cells. Conclusions: The small inhibitory peptide BTW3 can specifically target DNA-PKcs autophosphorylation and enhance radiosensitivity; therefore, it can be further developed as a novel class of radiosensitizer.

  4. Identification and characterization of novel host defense peptides from the skin secretion of the fungoid frog, Hydrophylax bahuvistara (Anura: Ranidae).

    PubMed

    Vineeth Kumar, Thundi Parambil Vasanth Kumar; Asha, Radhamony; Shyla, Gopal; George, Sanil

    2017-01-10

    Two novel peptides (brevinin1 HYba1 and brevinin1 HYba2) were identified from the skin secretion of the frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara, endemic to Western Ghats, India, and their amino acid sequences were confirmed using cDNA cloning and LC/MS/MS. Antibacterial, hemolytic, and cytotoxic activities of brevinin1 peptides and their synthetic analogs (amidated C-terminus) were investigated and compared. All the peptides except the acidic forms showed antibacterial activity against all tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. They exhibited low hemolysis on human erythrocytes and showed potent cytotoxic activity against Hep 3B cancer cell line. Upon amidation, the peptides showed increased activity against the tested microbes without altering their hemolytic and cytotoxic properties. The study also emphasizes the need for screening endemic amphibian fauna of Western Ghats, as a potential source of host defense peptides with possible therapeutic applications in the future.

  5. Identification of Antihypertensive Peptides Derived from Low Molecular Weight Casein Hydrolysates Generated during Fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC 91563

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Go Eun; Chang, Oun Ki; Jo, Su-Mi; Han, Gi-Sung; Park, Beom-Young; Ham, Jun-Sang; Jeong, Seok-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was evaluated for the low-molecular-weight fraction (<3 kDa) obtained from milk fermentation by Bifidobacterium longum KACC91563. The ACE inhibitory activity in this fraction was 62.3%. The peptides generated from the <3 kDa fraction were identified by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization quantitative time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis. Of the 28 peptides identified, 11 and 16 were identified as β-casein (CN) and αs1-CN, respectively. One peptide was identified as κ-CN. Three peptides, YQEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, QEPVLGPVRGPFPIIV, and GPVRGPFPIIV, from β-CN corresponded to known antihypertensive peptides. We also found 15 peptides that were identified as potential antihypertensive peptides because they included a known antihypertensive peptide fragment. These peptides were as follows: RELEELNVPGEIVE (f1-14), YQEPVLGPVRGPFP (f193-206), EPVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f195-206), PVLGPVRGPFPIIV (f196-206), VLGPVRGPFPIIV (f197-206), and LGPVRGPFPIIV (f198-206) for β-CN; and APSFSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f176-199), SFSDIPNPIGSENSEKT- TMPLW (f178-199), FSDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f179-199), SDIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f180-199), DIPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f181-199), IPNPIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f182-199), PIGSENSEKTTMPLW (f185-199), IGSENSEKTTMPLW (f186-199), and SENSEKTTMPLW (f188-199) for αs1-CN. From these results, B. longum could be used as a starter culture in combination with other lactic acid bacteria in the dairy industry, and/or these peptides could be used in functional food manufacturing as additives for the development of a product with beneficial effects for human health. PMID:26877633

  6. Identification of a Conserved B-cell Epitope on Reticuloendotheliosis Virus Envelope Protein by Screening a Phage-displayed Random Peptide Library

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mei; Shi, Xingming; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Hu, Shunlei; Gao, Hongbo; Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yun-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Background The gp90 protein of avian reticuloendotheliosis-associated virus (REV-A) is an important envelope glycoprotein, which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. B-cell epitopes on the gp90 protein of REV have not been well studied and reported. Methods and Results This study describes the identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the gp90 protein by screening a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) A9E8 directed against the gp90. The mAb A9E8 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif SVQYHPL. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched 213SVQYHPL219 of the gp90. Further identification of the displayed B cell epitope was conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as GST fusion proteins and the Western blot results indicated that 213SVQYHPL219 was the minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope recognized by the mAb A9E8. Moreover, an eight amino acid peptide SVQYHPLA was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with the maximal binding activity to mAb A9E8. The REV-A-positive chicken serum reacted with the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot, revealing the importance of the eight amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding activity. Furthermore, we found that the epitope is a common motif shared among REV-A and other members of REV group. Conclusions and Significance We identified 213SVQYHPL219 as a gp90-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb A9E8. The results in this study may have potential applications in development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against REV-A and other viruses of the REV group. PMID:23185456

  7. Intraoperative MRI electrical noise and monitor ECG filters affect arrhythmia detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Melissa; Kirchen, Gwynne; Bonaventura, Bridget; Rosborough, Kelly; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Dzwonczyk, Roger

    2012-06-01

    Most electrical equipment in the modern operating room (OR) radiates electrical noise (EN) that can interfere with patient monitors. We have described the EN that an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) system emits and have shown that this high-energy EN diminishes the quality of the ECG waveform during iMRI scans in our neurosurgical OR. We have also shown that the ECG signal filters in our iMRI-compatible patient monitor reduce this interference but, in the process, disturb the true morphology of the displayed waveform. This simulation study evaluates how iMRI-generated EN affects the ability of the anesthetist to detect and identify ECG arrhythmias and whether the patient monitor's ECG signal filters can improve arrhythmia recognition. Using an ECG simulator, we generated Lead II and V5 ECG signal segments that contained either no arrhythmia or one of four common cardiac arrhythmias. We filtered the ECG segments with four filters available on our iMRI-compatible monitor (Veris MR, MEDRAD Inc., Indianola, PA USA). We then digitized the segments and mixed simulated iMRI EN into the resultant tracings. With institutional approval and written informed consent, board-certified anesthesiologists reviewed the tracings, determined if an arrhythmia was present and identified the arrhythmia. We conducted the study anonymously. We reported the data as percent correct arrhythmia detection and correct arrhythmia identification. Thirty-one anesthesiologists completed the study. Overall, the participants correctly detected 79.5% (95% CI: 77.2, 81.7%) of the arrhythmias and correctly identified 62.5% (95% CI: 59.8, 65.3%) of the arrhythmias, regardless of EN presence. Although the proportions among monitor noise filters studied were not significant, the manufacturer-designated MR5 Veris MR filter optimized arrhythmia detection and arrhythmia identification for our participants, regardless if EN was present in the ECG tracings. In the neurosurgical OR, the

  8. The peptide semax affects the expression of genes related to the immune and vascular systems in rat brain focal ischemia: genome-wide transcriptional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nootropic neuroprotective peptide Semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro) has proved efficient in the therapy of brain stroke; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its action remain obscure. Our genome-wide study was designed to investigate the response of the transcriptome of ischemized rat brain cortex tissues to the action of Semax in vivo. Results The gene-expression alteration caused by the action of the peptide Semax was compared with the gene expression of the “ischemia” group animals at 3 and 24 h after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). The peptide predominantly enhanced the expression of genes related to the immune system. Three hours after pMCAO, Semax influenced the expression of some genes that affect the activity of immune cells, and, 24 h after pMCAO, the action of Semax on the immune response increased considerably. The genes implicated in this response represented over 50% of the total number of genes that exhibited Semax-induced altered expression. Among the immune-response genes, the expression of which was modulated by Semax, genes that encode immunoglobulins and chemokines formed the most notable groups. In response to Semax administration, 24 genes related to the vascular system exhibited altered expression 3 h after pMCAO, whereas 12 genes were changed 24 h after pMCAO. These genes are associated with such processes as the development and migration of endothelial tissue, the migration of smooth muscle cells, hematopoiesis, and vasculogenesis. Conclusions Semax affects several biological processes involved in the function of various systems. The immune response is the process most markedly affected by the drug. Semax altered the expression of genes that modulate the amount and mobility of immune cells and enhanced the expression of genes that encode chemokines and immunoglobulins. In conditions of rat brain focal ischemia, Semax influenced the expression of genes that promote the formation and

  9. The pars intercerebralis affects digestive activities of the American cockroach, Periplaneta Americana, via crustacean cardioactive peptide and allatostatin-A.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takaaki; Sakai, Tsubasa; Satake, Honoo; Takeda, Makio

    2013-01-01

    Our previous report showed that the pars intercerebralis (PI)-ablated cockroach, Periplaneta americana (PIX), exhibited hypertrophy and a significant increase in α-amylase and protease activities in the midgut under constant darkness (DD). Bath-applied crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) and allatostatin (AST) stimulated α-amylase and protease activities in the dissected midgut cultured in medium. However, the functional relationship and regulatory mechanism between the brain, particularly the pars intercerebralis and the midgut digestive activity remain to be investigated. Here, we investigated the immunohistochemical reactivities (IHCr) against CCAP and AST in the midgut of cockroach subjected to the above operation (PIX-DD). Three types of IHCr cells were observed in both the muscle layer and the epithelium: (1) CCAP-ir only, (2) AST-ir only and (3) both reactivities are colocalized. The number of all three types increased intensively after PIX under DD compared with that of sham operated control that was kept under constant condition (CNT-DD), indicating that the PI suppresses the expression of CCAP and AST in the midgut epithelium. We also showed that co-administration of CCAP and AST to the midgut caused increases of 1.5-fold and 1.4-fold for α-amylase and protease activities, respectively, compared with application of either peptide above. On the other hand, CCAP-ir in the muscle layer was more strongly expressed but AST-ir was suppressed in PIX-DD. While these peptides showed opposite effects on spontaneous contraction, when epithelially released, these peptides both activated the digestive enzyme system. Overall, up-regulated AST-6 and down-regulated CCAP in the stomatogastric nerve in the muscle layer produce the same end result, that is, stimulation of digestive activity (hypertrophy) via both enzyme activation and the retarded peristalsis that leads to increased throughput time.

  10. Separation and identification of peptides from gel-isolated membrane proteins using a microfabricated device for combined capillary electrophoresis/nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Kelly, J F; Chernushevich, I; Harrison, D J; Thibault, P

    2000-02-01

    The coupling of microfabricated devices to nanoelectrospray mass spectrometers using both a triple quadrupole and a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (QqTOF MS) is presented for the analysis of trace-level membrane proteins. Short disposable nanoelectrospray emitters were directly coupled to the chip device via a low dead volume connection. The analytical performance of this integrated device in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility was evaluated for standard peptide mixtures. A concentration detection limit ranging from 3.2 to 43.5 nM for different peptides was achieved in selected ion monitoring, thus representing a 10-fold improvement in sensitivity compared to that of microelectrospray using the same chip/mass spectrometer. Replicate injections indicated that reproducibility of migration time was typically less than 3.1% RSD whereas RSD values of 6-13% were observed on peak areas. Although complete resolution of individual components is not typically achieved for complex digests, the present chip capillary electrophoresis (chip-CE) device enabled proper sample cleanup and partial separation of multicomponent samples prior to mass spectral identification. Analyses of protein digests were typically achieved in less than 1.5 min with peak widths of 1.8-2.5 s (half-height definition) as indicated from individual reconstructed ion electropherograms. The application of this chip-CE/QqTOF MS system is further demonstrated for the identification of membrane proteins which form a subset of the Haemophilus influenzae proteome. Bands first separated by 1D-gel electrophoresis were excised and digested, and extracted tryptic peptides were loaded on the chip without any further sample cleanup or on-line adsorption preconcentration. Accurate molecular mass determination (< 5 ppm) in peptide-mapping experiments was obtained by introducing an internal standard via a postseparation channel. The analytical potential of this integrated device for the identification of

  11. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers.

    PubMed

    Graham, Robert Leslie James; Graham, Ciaren; McClean, Stephen; Chen, Tianbao; O'Rourke, Martin; Hirst, David; Theakston, David; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-23

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom.

  12. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers

    SciTech Connect

    James Graham, Robert Leslie . E-mail: rl.graham@ulster.ac.uk; Graham, Ciaren; McClean, Stephen; Chen, Tianbao; O'Rourke, Martin; Hirst, David; Theakston, David; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-23

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom.

  13. Identification and Tumour-Binding Properties of a Peptide with High Affinity to the Disialoganglioside GD2

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jan; Reichel, Robin; Vogt, Sebastian; Müller, Stefan P.; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Brandau, Wolfgang; Eggert, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Neuroectodermal tumours are characterized by aberrant processing of disialogangliosides concomitant with high expression of GD2 or GD3 on cell surfaces. Antibodies targeting GD2 are already in clinical use for therapy of neuroblastoma, a solid tumour of early childhood. Here, we set out to identify peptides with high affinity to human disialoganglioside GD2. To this end, we performed a combined in vivo and in vitro screen using a recombinant phage displayed peptide library. We isolated a phage displaying the peptide sequence WHWRLPS that specifically binds to the human disialoganglioside GD2. Binding specificity was confirmed by mutational scanning and by comparative analyses using structurally related disialogangliosides. In vivo, significant enrichment of phage binding to xenografts of human neuroblastoma cells in mice was observed. Tumour-specific phage accumulation could be blocked by intravenous coinjection of the corresponding peptide. Comparative pharmacokinetic analyses revealed higher specific accumulation of 68Ga-labelled GD2-binding peptide compared to 111In-labelled peptide in xenografts of human neuroblastoma. In contrast to 124I-MIBG, which is currently evaluated as a neuroblastoma marker in PET/CT, 68Ga-labelled GD2-specific peptide spared the thyroid but was enriched in the kidneys, which could be partially blocked by infusion of amino acids.In summary, we here report on a novel tumour-homing peptide that specifically binds to the disialoganglioside GD2, accumulates in xenografts of neuroblastoma cells in mice and bears the potential for tumour detection using PET/CT. Thus, this peptide may serve as a new scaffold for diagnosing GD2-positive tumours of neuroectodermal origin. PMID:27716771

  14. Development of a peptide based latex agglutination assay for serotype identification of foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Dilpreet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Saxena, Hari M; Dwivedi, Padam N

    2013-02-01

    Out of 200 serum samples collected from cattle (142) and buffaloes (58) of various ages and sexand subjected to latex agglutination test (LAT) using serotype specific peptides (O, A, Asia 1) and also with peptide for non-structural protein 2B (NSP-2B), 114 (70%) samples were positive against FMDV type 'O', 102 (51%) against serotype 'A' and 104 (52%) against serotype 'Asia 1'. With NSP-2B peptide a total of 71 (35.5%) samples were positive. The results suggest that LAT could be used for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease virus as it is easy, cheap and effective test.

  15. Selection and identification of ligand peptides targeting a model of castrate-resistant osteogenic prostate cancer and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Mandelin, Jami; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Mathew, Paul; Navone, Nora M; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Logothetis, Christopher J; Rietz, Anna Cecilia; Dobroff, Andrey S; Proneth, Bettina; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-03-24

    We performed combinatorial peptide library screening in vivo on a novel human prostate cancer xenograft that is androgen-independent and induces a robust osteoblastic reaction in bonelike matrix and soft tissue. We found two peptides, PKRGFQD and SNTRVAP, which were enriched in the tumors, targeted the cell surface of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells in vitro, and homed to androgen receptor-null prostate cancer in vivo. Purification of tumor homogenates by affinity chromatography on these peptides and subsequent mass spectrometry revealed a receptor for the peptide PKRGFQD, α-2-macroglobulin, and for SNTRVAP, 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78). These results indicate that GRP78 and α-2-macroglobulin are highly active in osteoblastic, androgen-independent prostate cancer in vivo. These previously unidentified ligand-receptor systems should be considered for targeted drug development against human metastatic androgen-independent prostate cancer.

  16. Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Swaminathan, Sivakumar; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.

    2015-01-01

    Soybean is one of the most important crops grown across the globe. In the United States, approximately 15% of the soybean yield is suppressed due to various pathogen and pests attack. Sudden death syndrome (SDS) is an emerging fungal disease caused by Fusarium virguliforme. Although growing SDS resistant soybean cultivars has been the main method of controlling this disease, SDS resistance is partial and controlled by a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL). A proteinacious toxin, FvTox1, produced by the pathogen, causes foliar SDS. Earlier, we demonstrated that expression of an anti-FvTox1 single chain variable fragment antibody resulted in reduced foliar SDS development in transgenic soybean plants. Here, we investigated if synthetic FvTox1-interacting peptides, displayed on M13 phage particles, can be identified for enhancing foliar SDS resistance in soybean. We screened three phage-display peptide libraries and discovered four classes of M13 phage clones displaying FvTox1-interacting peptides. In vitro pull-down assays and in vivo interaction assays in yeast were conducted to confirm the interaction of FvTox1 with these four synthetic peptides and their fusion-combinations. One of these peptides was able to partially neutralize the toxic effect of FvTox1 in vitro. Possible application of the synthetic peptides in engineering SDS resistance soybean cultivars is discussed. PMID:26709700

  17. Identification of vulnerable sites in salts affected agricultural soils from South-Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Jose A.; Faz, Angel; Kalbitz, Karsten; Jansen, Boris; Silvia, Martinez-Martinez

    2010-05-01

    little adsorption to soil colloidal particles. However, other ions such as sulfate, calcium, magnesium, and sodium also displayed significant increases in concentration in July. This can be explained by the movements of soluble salt to the surface due to evaporation and capillary rise and subsequent precipitation of the salts during high temperatures and low rainfall. Rainfall or irrigation events enhance the leaching of salts to deeper soil horizons. The most affected area is located in the west of the study area, at the lowest altitude within the study area. Depressions favour accumulation of salts, due to both runoffs from higher areas during rainfall periods and poor quality irrigation water. It is recommended to use a better quality of water, at least before the summer, in order to reduce the amount of salts in the surface layer, likely to cause stress to crops growing on the soil in question. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of anions in the soil solution is very useful for predicting where higher increases in salinity will be produced. This will allow for identification of vulnerable areas and subsequent implementation of the necessary measures to decrease the risk for sensitive crops. Acknowledgements: to "Fundación Séneca" of "Comunidad Autónoma de Murcia" for its financial support.

  18. Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment Using Sequential Collision-Induced Dissociation and Electron Transfer Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Du, Xiuxia; Tolic, Nikola; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Mayer, M. Uljana; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2009-07-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometric analysis is emerging as a powerful technique for protein-protein interaction and protein structure elucidation studies.1 Cross-linkers covalently link two interacting proteins, often with chemistries specific to certain amino acid side chains. After enzymatic digestion of the proteins, the resulting cross-linked peptides can be subjected to analysis by LC-MS(/MS) to identify cross-linked species.2,3 For studying protein interactions using chemical cross-linking towards global discovery-based applications, the critical needs are the development of cross-linkers that are highly specific, amenable to LC-MS/MS, and resulting spectra are interpretable by bioinformatics tools to automatically assign cross-linked peptides with high confidence.4-10 As recently mentioned by Aebersold and co-workers, due to the low relative abundances of cross-linking products compared to their unmodified counterparts, enrichment of cross-linked species is also highly desirable to improve the likelihood of unambiguous identification of cross-linked peptides.6 Most of the currently available enrichable cross-linkers are bulky and are not amenable to studying protein-protein interactions in vivo. To discover protein-protein interactions with high confidence, there is a need for chemical cross-linkers that can effectively label protein complexes, utilize mass spectrometry based bottom-up proteomics analysis pipelines and also contains enrichment functionality.

  19. Moving Away from the Reference Genome: Evaluating a Peptide Sequencing Tagging Approach for Single Amino Acid Polymorphism Identifications in the Genus Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Paul E; Adams, Rachel M; Tuskan, Gerald A; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity across natural populations of the model organism, Populus, is extensive, containing a single nucleotide polymorphism roughly every 200 base pairs. When deviations from the reference genome occur in coding regions, they can impact protein sequences. Rather than relying on a static reference database to profile protein expression, we employed a peptide sequence tagging (PST) approach capable of decoding the plasticity of the Populus proteome. Using shotgun proteomics data from two genotypes of P. trichocarpa, a tag-based approach enabled the detection of 6,653 unexpected sequence variants. Through manual validation, our study investigated how the most abundant chemical modification (methionine oxidation) could masquerade as a sequence variant (AlaSer) when few site-determining ions existed. In fact, precise localization of an oxidation site for peptides with more than one potential placement was indeterminate for 70% of the MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate that additional fragment ions made available by high energy collisional dissociation enhances the robustness of the peptide sequence tagging approach (81% of oxidation events could be exclusively localized to a methionine). We are confident that augmenting fragmentation processes for a PST approach will further improve the identification of single amino acid polymorphism in Populus and potentially other species as well.

  20. ProPepper: a curated database for identification and analysis of peptide and immune-responsive epitope composition of cereal grain protein families.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Angéla; Haraszi, Réka; Maulis, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    ProPepper is a database that contains prolamin proteins identified from true grasses (Poaceae), their peptides obtained with single- and multi-enzyme in silico digestions as well as linear T- and B-cell-specific epitopes that are responsible for wheat-related food disorders. The integrated database and analysis platform contains datasets that are collected from multiple public databases (UniprotKB, IEDB, NCBI GenBank), manually curated and annotated, and interpreted in three main data tables: Protein-, Peptide- and Epitope list views that are cross-connected by unique identifications. Altogether 21 genera and 80 different species are represented. Currently, the database contains 2146 unique and complete protein sequences related to 2618 GenBank entries and 35 657 unique peptide sequences that are a result of 575 110 unique digestion events obtained by in silico digestion methods involving six proteolytic enzymes and their combinations. The interface allows advanced global and parametric search functions along with a download option, with direct connections to the relevant public databases. Database URL: https://propepper.net.

  1. Cleaning of raw peptide MS/MS spectra: improved protein identification following deconvolution of multiply charged peaks, isotope clusters, and removal of background noise.

    PubMed

    Mujezinovic, Nedim; Raidl, Günther; Hutchins, James R A; Peters, Jan-Michael; Mechtler, Karl; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2006-10-01

    The dominant ions in MS/MS spectra of peptides, which have been fragmented by low-energy CID, are often b-, y-ions and their derivatives resulting from the cleavage of the peptide bonds. However, MS/MS spectra typically contain many more peaks. These can result not only from isotope variants and multiply charged replicates of the peptide fragmentation products but also from unknown fragmentation pathways, sample-specific or systematic chemical contaminations or from noise generated by the electronic detection system. The presence of this background complicates spectrum interpretation. Besides dramatically prolonged computation time, it can lead to incorrect protein identification, especially in the case of de novo sequencing algorithms. Here, we present an algorithm for detection and transformation of multiply charged peaks into singly charged monoisotopic peaks, removal of heavy isotope replicates, and random noise. A quantitative criterion for the recognition of some noninterpretable spectra has been derived as a byproduct. The approach is based on numerical spectral analysis and signal detection methods. The algorithm has been implemented in a stand-alone computer program called MS Cleaner that can be obtained from the authors upon request.

  2. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from human hepatitis B virus core protein arginine-rich domain (ARD).

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng-Li; Su, Pei-Yi; Chang, Ya-Shu; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, You-Di; Yu, Hui-Ming; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chang, Kaichih; Shih, Chiaho

    2013-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc) contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD) at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV). In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I-IV (HBc147-183) has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E)-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II-IV (HBc153-176) and ARD I-III (HBc147-167) were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I-IV (HBc147-183) had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that HBc ARD

  3. Identification of a Novel Antimicrobial Peptide from Human Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Arginine-Rich Domain (ARD)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heng-Li; Su, Pei-Yi; Chang, Ya-Shu; Wu, Szu-Yao; Liao, You-Di; Yu, Hui-Ming; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chang, Kaichih; Shih, Chiaho

    2013-01-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc) contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD) at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV). In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I–IV (HBc147-183) has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E)-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II–IV (HBc153-176) and ARD I–III (HBc147-167) were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I–IV (HBc147-183) had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that

  4. Expression levels of antimicrobial peptide tachyplesin I in transgenic Ornithogalum lines affect the resistance to Pectobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Lipsky, Alexander; Joshi, Janak Raj; Carmi, Nir; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-11-20

    The genus Ornithogalum includes several ornamental species that suffer substantial losses from bacterial soft rot caused by Pectobacteria. The absence of effective control measures for use against soft rot bacteria led to the initiation of a project in which a small antimicrobial peptide from an Asian horseshoe crab, tachyplesin (tpnI), was introduced into two commercial cultivars: O. dubium and O. thyrsoides. Disease severity and bacterial colonization were examined in transgenic lines expressing this peptide. Disease resistance was evaluated in six lines of each species by measuring bacterial proliferation in the plant tissue. Three transgenic lines of each species were subjected to further analysis in which the expression level of the transgene was evaluated using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. The development of disease symptoms and bacterial colonization of the plant tissue were also examined using GFP-expressing strain of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliense Pcb3. Confocal-microscopy imaging revealed significantly reduced quantities of bacterial cells in the transgenic plant lines that had been challenged with the bacterium. The results clearly demonstrate that tpnI expression reduces bacterial proliferation, colonization and disease symptom (reduced by 95-100%) in the transgenic plant tissues. The quantity of tpnI transcripts, as measured by qRT-PCR, was negatively correlated with the protection afforded to the plants, as measured by the reduced severity of disease symptoms in the tissue.

  5. Identification of the heme-modified peptides from cumene hydroperoxide-inactivated cytochrome P450 3A4.

    PubMed

    He, K; Bornheim, L M; Falick, A M; Maltby, D; Yin, H; Correia, M A

    1998-12-15

    Cumene hydroperoxide-mediated (CuOOH-mediated) inactivation of cytochromes P450 (CYPs) results in destruction of their prosthetic heme to reactive fragments that irreversibly bind to the protein. We have attempted to characterize this process structurally, using purified, 14C-heme labeled, recombinant human liver P450 3A4 as the target of CuOOH-mediated inactivation, and a battery of protein characterization approaches [chemical (CNBr) and proteolytic (lysylendopeptidase-C) digestion, HPLC-peptide mapping, microEdman sequencing, and mass spectrometric analyses]. The heme-peptide adducts isolated after CNBr/lysylendopeptidase-C digestion of the CuOOH-inactivated P450 3A4 pertain to two distinct P450 3A4 active site domains. One of the peptides isolated corresponds to the proximal helix L/Cys-region peptide 429-450 domain and the others to the K-region (peptide 359-386 domain). Although the precise residue(s) targeted remain to be identified, we have narrowed down the region of attack to within a 17 amino acid peptide (429-445) stretch of the 55-amino acid proximal helix L/Cys domain. Furthermore, although the exact structures of the heme-modifying fragments and the nature of the adduction remain to be established conclusively, the incremental masses of approximately 302 and 314 Da detected by electrospray mass spectrometric analyses of the heme-modified peptides are consistent with a dipyrrolic heme fragment comprised of either pyrrole ring A-D or B-C, a known soluble product of peroxidative heme degradation, as a modifying species.

  6. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes through Integrated Study of Alzheimer’s Disease Affected Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in older adults that damages the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behaviour. The identification of differentially expressed genes and related pathways among affected brain regions can provide more information on the mechanisms of AD. In the past decade, several studies have reported many genes that are associated with AD. This wealth of information has become difficult to follow and interpret as most of the results are conflicting. In that case, it is worth doing an integrated study of multiple datasets that helps to increase the total number of samples and the statistical power in detecting biomarkers. In this study, we present an integrated analysis of five different brain region datasets and introduce new genes that warrant further investigation. Methods The aim of our study is to apply a novel combinatorial optimisation based meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes that are associated to AD across brain regions. In this study, microarray gene expression data from 161 samples (74 non-demented controls, 87 AD) from the Entorhinal Cortex (EC), Hippocampus (HIP), Middle temporal gyrus (MTG), Posterior cingulate cortex (PC), Superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and visual cortex (VCX) brain regions were integrated and analysed using our method. The results are then compared to two popular meta-analysis methods, RankProd and GeneMeta, and to what can be obtained by analysing the individual datasets. Results We find genes related with AD that are consistent with existing studies, and new candidate genes not previously related with AD. Our study confirms the up-regualtion of INFAR2 and PTMA along with the down regulation of GPHN, RAB2A, PSMD14 and FGF. Novel genes PSMB2, WNK1, RPL15, SEMA4C, RWDD2A and LARGE are found to be differentially expressed across all brain regions. Further investigation on these genes may provide new insights into the development of AD

  7. Identification and phenotypic characterization of Sphingomonas wittichii strain RW1 by peptide mass fingerprinting using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Halden, Rolf U; Colquhoun, David R; Wisniewski, Eric S

    2005-05-01

    Mass spectrometry is a potentially attractive means of monitoring the survival and efficacy of bioaugmentation agents, such as the dioxin-mineralizing bacterium Sphingomonas wittichii strain RW1. The biotransformation activity of RW1 phenotypes is determined primarily by the presence and concentration of the dioxin dioxygenase, an enzyme initiating the degradation of both dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofuran (DF). We explored the possibility of identifying and characterizing putative cultures of RW1 by peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) targeting this characteristic phenotypic biomarker. The proteome from cells of RW1--grown on various media in the presence and absence of DF--was partially purified, tryptically digested, and analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Mascot online database queries allowed statistically significant identification of RW1 in disrupted, digested cells (P < 0.01 to 0.05) and in digested whole-cell extracts (P < 0.00001 to 0.05) containing hundreds of proteins, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Up to 14 peptide ions of the alpha subunit of the dioxin dioxygenase (43% protein coverage) were detected in individual samples. A minimum of 10(7) DF-grown cells was required to identify dioxin degradation-enabled phenotypes. The technique hinges on the detection of multiple characteristic peptides of a biomarker that can reveal at once the identity and phenotypic properties of the microbial host expressing the protein. The results demonstrate the power of PMF of minimally processed microbial cultures as a sensitive and specific technique for the positive identification and phenotypic characterization of certain microorganisms used in biotechnology and bioremediation.

  8. Electron transfer dissociation of modified peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Dong, Jia; Vachet, Richard W

    2011-10-01

    Mass spectrometry is the method of choice for sequencing peptides and proteins and is the preferred choice for characterizing post-translational modifications (PTMs). The most commonly used dissociation method to characterize peptides (i.e. collision-induced dissociation (CID)), however, has some limitations when it comes to analyzing many PTMs. Because CID chemistry is influenced by amino acid side-chains, some modifications can alter or inhibit dissociation along the peptide backbone, thereby limiting sequence information and hindering identification of the modification site. Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has emerged as an alternate dissociation technique that, in most cases, overcomes these limitations of CID because it is less affected by side chain chemistry. Here, we review recent applications of ETD for characterizing peptide and protein PTMs with a particular emphasis on the advantages of ETD over CID, the ways in which ETD and CID have been used in a complementary manner, and how peptide modifications can still influence ETD dissociation pathways.

  9. Alternative mechanisms of action of cationic antimicrobial peptides on bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hale, John D F; Hancock, Robert E W

    2007-12-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are a novel type of antibiotic offering much potential in the treatment of microbial-related diseases. They offer many advantages for commercial development, including a broad spectrum of action and modest size. However, despite the identification or synthetic production of thousands of such peptides, the mode of action remains elusive, except for a few examples. While the dogma for the mechanism of action of antimicrobial peptides against bacteria is believed to be through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, some peptides clearly act differently and other intracellular target sites have been identified. This article presents an updated review of how cationic antimicrobial peptides are able to affect bacterial killing, with a focus on internal targets.

  10. Pipa carvalhoi skin secretion profiling: absence of peptides and identification of kynurenic acid as the major constitutive component.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Douglas Oscar Ceolin; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Jared, Carlos; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The presence of peptides has been identified in all African pipid genera; nevertheless, little is known about skin secretion of South American frog genus Pipa. Skin secretion from captive and wild Pipa carvalhoi were obtained in the presence or absence of norepinephrine stimulation. The <10 kDa fraction was analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, searching for peptides. Chromatographic profiles show the presence of a major component in this secretion, regardless of the stimulation method (norepinephrine or mechanical stimulation) and the origin of the animal (captivity or wild), as well as in the absence of any stimulus. The general mass distribution profile in P. carvalhoi skin secretion shows numerous components below 800 Da. Moreover, no peptide could be identified, regardless of the chromatographic approach. The major component was purified and identified as kynurenic acid, an L-tryptophan derivative. P. carvalhoi does not secrete peptides as toxins in its skin. In addition, we here report that kynurenic acid is the main component of P. carvalhoi skin secretion. Although no biological activity was associated with kynurenic acid, we propose that this molecule is a pheromone that signals the presence of a co-specific in the shady environment in which this animal lives. In this study we demonstrate the absence of peptidic toxins in the skin secretion of P. carvalhoi, a break of paradigm in the pipid family.

  11. Preparation and identification of HLA-A*1101 tetramer loading with human cytomegalovirus pp65 antigen peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengyao; Xu, Lihui; Zha, Qingbing; Chi, Xiaoyun; Jia, Qiantao; He, Xianhui

    2007-04-01

    MHC/peptide tetramer technology has been widely used to study antigen-specific T cells, especially for identifying virus-specific CD8+ T cells in humans. The tetramer molecule is composed of HLA heavy chain, beta2-microglobulin (beta2m), an antigenic peptide, and fluorescent-labeled streptavidin. To further investigate the HLA-A*1101-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), we established an approach to prepare HLA-A*1101 tetramer complexed with a peptide from HCMV. The cDNA encoding HLA-A*1101 heavy chain was cloned and the prokaryotic expression vector for the ectodomain of HLA-A*1101 fused with a BirA substrate peptide (HLA-A*1101-BSP) at its carboxyl terminus was constructed. The fusion protein was highly expressed as inclusion bodies under optimized conditions in Escherichia coli. Moreover, HLA-A*1101-BSP protein was refolded in the presence of beta2m and an HCMV peptide pp65(16-24) (GPISGHVLK, GPI). Soluble HLA-A*1101-GPI monomer was biotinylated and purified to a purity of 95%, which was subsequently combined with streptavidin to form tetramers at a yield of > 80%. The HLA-A*1101-GPI tetramers could bind to virus-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting soluble HLA-A*1101-GPI tetramers were biologically functional. This study provides the basis for further evaluation of HLA-A*1101-restricted CD8+ T cell responses against HCMV infection.

  12. PEP-SiteFinder: a tool for the blind identification of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Saladin, Adrien; Rey, Julien; Thévenet, Pierre; Zacharias, Martin; Moroy, Gautier; Tufféry, Pierre

    2014-07-01

    Peptide-protein interactions are important to many processes of life, particularly for signal transmission or regulatory mechanisms. When no information is known about the interaction between a protein and a peptide, it is of interest to propose candidate sites of interaction at the protein surface, to assist the design of biological experiments to probe the interaction, or to serve as a starting point for more focused in silico approaches. PEP-SiteFinder is a tool that will, given the structure of a protein and the sequence of a peptide, identify protein residues predicted to be at peptide-protein interface. PEP-SiteFinder relies on the 3D de novo generation of peptide conformations given its sequence. These conformations then undergo a fast blind rigid docking on the complete protein surface, and we have found, as the result of a benchmark over 41 complexes, that the best poses overlap to some extent the experimental patch of interaction for close to 90% complexes. In addition, PEP-SiteFinder also returns a propensity index we have found informative about the confidence of the prediction. The PEP-SiteFinder web server is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-SiteFinder.

  13. Identification of cyst nematode B-type CLE peptides and modulation of the vascular stem cell pathway for feeding cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoli; Wang, Jianying; Fukuda, Hiroo; Kondo, Yuki; Wang, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell pools in the SAM (shoot apical meristem), RAM (root apical meristem) and vascular procambium/cambium are regulated by CLE-receptor kinase-WOX signaling modules. Previous data showed that cyst nematode CLE-like effector proteins delivered into host cells through a stylet, act as ligand mimics of plant A-type CLE peptides and are pivotal for successful parasitism. Here we report the identification of a new class of CLE peptides from cyst nematodes with functional similarity to the B-type CLE peptide TDIF (tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor) encoded by the CLE41 and CLE44 genes in Arabidopsis. We further demonstrate that the TDIF-TDR (TDIF receptor)-WOX4 pathway, which promotes procambial meristem cell proliferation, is involved in beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii parasitism. We observed activation of the TDIF pathway in developing feeding sites, reduced nematode infection in cle41 and tdr-1 wox4-1 mutants, and compromised syncytium size in cle41, tdr-1, wox4-1 and tdr-1 wox4-1 mutants. By qRT-PCR and promoter:GUS analyses, we showed that the expression of WOX4 is decreased in a clv1-101 clv2-101 rpk2-5 mutant, suggesting that WOX4 is a potential downstream target of nematode CLEs. Exogenous treatment with both nematode A-type and B-type CLE peptides induced massive cell proliferation in wild type roots, suggesting that the two types of CLEs may regulate cell proliferation during feeding site formation. These findings highlight an important role of the procambial cell proliferation pathway in cyst nematode feeding site formation. PMID:28158306

  14. Comprehensive peptide marker identification for the detection of multiple nut allergens using a non-targeted LC-HRMS multi-method.

    PubMed

    Korte, Robin; Lepski, Silke; Brockmeyer, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Food allergies have emerged as a global problem over the last few decades; therefore, reliable and sensitive analytical methods to ensure food safety for allergic consumers are required. The application of mass spectrometry is of growing interest in this field and several procedures based on low resolution tandem mass spectrometry using single tryptic peptides as analytical targets have recently been described. However, a comprehensive survey of marker peptides for the development of multi-methods is still missing, as is a consensus guide to marker identification. In this study, we therefore report a consistent approach to the development of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) multi-screening methods for the detection of allergens in food matrices. Proteotypic peptides were identified by a shotgun proteomics approach and verified through a thorough investigation of specificity and sensitivity. On the basis of this procedure, we identified 44 suitable tryptic marker peptides from six allergenic nut species and developed the first analytical LC-MS method for the detection of trace nut contaminations in processed foods using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). The analysis of spiked matrix samples gave limits of detection (LODs) below 10 μg/g for several nuts; these LODs are comparable with routinely used methods such as ELISA and PCR. Notably, the HRMS approach can be used in an untargeted fashion to identify multiple allergens also retrospectively. In conclusion, we present here the so far largest consensus set of analytical markers from nut allergens and to the best of our knowledge the first multi-allergen method based on LC-HRMS.

  15. Identification of regions involved in the binding of alpha-bungarotoxin to the human alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Marinou, Martha; Tzartos, Socrates J

    2003-01-01

    The neuronal alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) binds the neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt). Fine mapping of the alpha-Bgt-binding site on the human alpha7 AChR was performed using synthetic peptides covering the entire extracellular domain of the human alpha7 subunit (residues 1-206). Screening of these peptides for (125)I-alpha-Bgt binding resulted in the identification of at least two toxin-binding sites, one at residues 186-197, which exhibited the best (125)I-alpha-Bgt binding, and one at residues 159-165, with weak toxin-binding capacity; these correspond, respectively, to loops C and IV of the agonist-binding site. Toxin binding to the alpha7(186-197) peptide was almost completely inhibited by unlabelled alpha-Bgt or d -tubocurarine. Alanine substitutions within the sequence 186-198 revealed a predominant contribution of aromatic and negatively charged residues to the binding site. This sequence is homologous to the alpha-Bgt binding site of the alpha1 subunit (residues 188-200 in Torpedo AChR). In competition experiments, the soluble peptides alpha7(186-197) and Torpedo alpha1(184-200) inhibited the binding of (125)I-alpha-Bgt to the immobilized alpha7(186-197) peptide, to native Torpedo AChR, and to the extracellular domain of the human alpha1 subunit. These results suggest that the toxin-binding sites of the neuronal alpha7 and muscle-type AChRs bind to identical or overlapping sites on the alpha-Bgt molecule. In support of this, when synthetic alpha-Bgt peptides were tested for binding to the recombinant extracellular domains of the human alpha7 and alpha1 subunits, and to native Torpedo and alpha7 AChR, the results indicated that alpha-Bgt interacts with both neuronal and muscle-type AChRs through its central loop II and C-terminal tail. PMID:12614199

  16. Orally administered glucagon-like peptide-1 affects glucose homeostasis following an oral glucose tolerance test in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Steinert, R E; Poller, B; Castelli, M C; Friedman, K; Huber, A R; Drewe, J; Beglinger, C

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts several effects on glucose homeostasis and reduces food intake. After its release from intestinal L cells, GLP-1 is subject to (i) rapid breakdown by dipeptidyl peptidase IV and (ii) high liver extraction. The highest concentrations of GLP-1 are found in the splanchnic blood rather than in the systemic circulation. An oral delivery system would mimic endogenous secretion. Here we investigated the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) effects of a single dose (2 mg) of oral GLP-1 administered prior to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 16 healthy males. GLP-1 was rapidly absorbed from the gut, leading to tenfold higher plasma concentrations compared with controls. The PD profile was consistent with reported pharmacology; GLP-1 significantly stimulated basal insulin release (P < 0.027), with marked effects on glucose levels. The postprandial glucose peak was delayed with GLP-1, suggesting an effect on gastric emptying.

  17. Hydrophobic Peptides Affect Binding of Calmodulin and Ca2+ as Explored by H/D Amide Exchange and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sperry, Justin B.; Huang, Richard Y-C.; Zhu, Mei M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous intracellular sensor protein, binds Ca2+ and interacts with various targets as part of signal transduction. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/DX) and a high resolution PLIMSTEX (Protein-Ligand Interactions by Mass Spectrometry, Titration, and H/D Exchange) protocol, we examined five different states of calmodulin: calcium-free, calcium-loaded, and three states of calcium-loaded in the presence of either melittin, mastoparan, or skeletal myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK). When CaM binds Ca2+, the extent of HDX decreased, consistent with the protein becoming stabilized upon binding. Furthermore, Ca2+-saturated calmodulin exhibits increased protection when bound to the peptides, forming high affinity complexes. The protocol reveals significant changes in EF hands 1, 3, and 4 with saturating levels of Ca2+. Titration of the protein using PLIMSTEX provides the binding affinity of Ca2+ to calmodulin within previously reported values. The affinities of calmodulin to Ca2+ increase by factors of 300 and 1000 in the presence of melittin and mastoparan, respectively. A modified PLIMSTEX protocol whereby the protein is digested to component peptides gives a region-specific titration. The titration data taken in this way show a decrease in the root mean square fit of the residuals, indicating a better fit of the data. The global H/D exchange results and those obtained in a region-specific way provide new insight into the Ca2+-binding properties of this well-studied protein. PMID:21765646

  18. Left or Right: How Does Amino Acid Chirality Affect the Handedness of Nanostructures Self-Assembled from Short Amphiphilic Peptides?

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Jiqian; Zhao, Yurong; Ma, Hongchao; Lu, Jian R; Xu, Hai

    2017-03-22

    Peptide and protein fibrils have attracted an enormous amount of interests due to their relevance to many neurodegenerative diseases and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Although twisted fibrils are regarded as the key intermediate structures of thick fibrils or bundles of fibrils, the factors determining their twisting tendency and their handedness development from the molecular to the supramolecular level are still poorly understood. In this study, we have designed three pairs of enantiomeric short amphiphilic peptides: (L)I3(L)K and (D)I3(D)K, (L)I3(D)K and (D)I3(L)K, and (La)I3(L)K and (Da)I3(D)K, and investigated the chirality of their self-assembled nanofibrils through the combined use of atomic force microscopy (AFM), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The results indicated that the twisted handedness of the supramolecular nanofibrils was dictated by the chirality of the hydrophilic Lys head at the C-terminal, while their characteristic CD signals were determined by the chirality of hydrophobic Ile residues. MD simulations delineated the handedness development from molecular chirality to supramolecular handedness by showing that the β-sheets formed by (L)I3(L)K, (La)I3(L)K, and (D)I3(L)K exhibited a propensity to twist in a left-handed direction, while the ones of (D)I3(D)K, (Da)I3(D)K, and (L)I3(D)K in a right-handed twisting orientation.

  19. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's A{beta} peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated A{beta}(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. {yields} A{beta}(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. {yields} NMR revealed that A{beta}(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of A{beta} peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of A{beta} and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of A{beta} peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of A{beta} fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of A{beta}(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  20. Identification of haptoglobin peptide as a novel serum biomarker for lung squamous cell carcinoma by serum proteome and peptidome profiling.

    PubMed

    Okano, Tetsuya; Seike, Masahiro; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Soeno, Chie; Ishii, Takeo; Kida, Kozui; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    To date, a number of potential biomarkers for lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) have been identified; however, sensitive biomarkers are currently lacking to detect early stage SCC due to low sensitivity and specificity. In the present study, we compared the 7 serum proteomic profiles of 11 SCC patients, 7 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 7 healthy smokers as controls to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with SCC and COPD. Two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass-spectrometric analysis (MS) using an affinity column revealed two candidate proteins, haptoglobin (HP) and apolipoprotein 4, as biomarkers of SCC, and α-1-antichymotrypsin as a marker of COPD. The iTRAQ technique was also used to identify SCC-specific peptides. HP protein expression was significantly higher in SCC patients than in COPD patients. Furthermore, two HP protein peptides showed significantly higher serum levels in SCC patients than in COPD patients. We established novel polyclonal antibodies for the two HP peptides and subsequently a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of these specific peptides in patient and control sera. The sensitivity of detection by ELISA of one HP peptide (HP216) was 70% of SCC patients, 40% of COPDs patients and 13% of healthy controls. We also measured CYFRA, a cytokeratin fragment clinically used as an SCC tumor marker, in all the 28 cases and found CYFRA was detected in only seven SCC cases. However, when the measurement of HP216 was combined with that of CYFRA, 100% (10 of 10 patients) of SCC cases were detected. Our proteomic profiling demonstrates that the SCC-specific HP peptide HP216 may potentially be used as a diagnostic biomarker for SCC.

  1. Identification of epitope mimics recognized by CTL reactive to the melanoma/melanocyte-derived peptide MART-1(27-35)

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CTL reactivity to the epitope MART-1(27-35), of the melanoma (self) antigen MART-1/melan A is frequently observed in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and may be readily elicited from the peripheral blood of melanoma patients that express HLA-A*0201. Available data suggest that these observations contrast with those made for other HLA-A*0201- presented melanoma self antigens regarding the regularity of observed CTL responses. Based on preliminary findings, we hypothesized that the CTL response to MART-1 might be augmented in part by T cell encounters with peptides derived from sources other than MART-1, which show sequence similarity to MART-1(27-35). To test this idea, a protein database search for potential MART-1 epitope mimics was done using criteria developed from analyses of effector recognition of singly- substituted peptide analogues of MART-1(27-35). Synthetic peptides were made for a portion of the sequences retrieved; 12/40 peptides tested were able to sensitize target cells for lysis by one or more anti-MART- 1 effectors. The peptides recognized correspond to sequences occurring in a variety of proteins of viral, bacterial, and human (self) origin. One peptide derives from glycoprotein C of the common pathogen HSV-1; cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding native glycoprotein C were lysed by anti-MART-1 effectors. Our results overall indicate that sequences conforming to the A2.1 binding motif and possessing features essential to recognition by anti-MART-1 CTL occur frequently in proteins. These findings further suggest that T cells might encounter a variety of such sequences in vivo, and that epitope mimicry may play a role in modulating the CTL response to MART-1(27-35). PMID:8760818

  2. Identification and distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptides in the brain of horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huiyang; Li, Linming; Ye, Haihui; Feng, Biyun; Li, Shaojing

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a crucial peptide for the regulation of reproduction. Using immunological techniques, we investigated the presence of GnRH in horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Octopus GnRH-like immunoreactivity, tunicate GnRH-like immunoreactivity, and lamprey GnRH-I-like immunoreactivity were detected in the neurons and fibers of the protocerebrum. However, no mammal GnRH-like immunoreactivity or lamprey GnRH-III-like immunoreactivity was observed. Our results suggest that a GnRH-like factor, an ancient peptide, existed in the brain of T. tridentatus and may be involved in the reproductive endocrine system.

  3. Detachable strong cation exchange monolith, integrated with capillary zone electrophoresis and coupled with pH gradient elution, produces improved sensitivity and numbers of peptide identifications during bottom-up analysis of complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbin; Yan, Xiaojing; Sun, Liangliang; Zhu, Guijie; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-04-21

    A detachable sulfonate-silica hybrid strong cation-exchange monolith was synthesized in a fused silica capillary, and used for solid phase extraction with online pH gradient elution during capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CZE-MS/MS) proteomic analysis. Tryptic digests were prepared in 50 mM formic acid and loaded onto the strong cation-exchange monolith. Fractions were eluted using a series of buffers with lower concentration but higher pH values than the 50 mM formic acid background electrolyte. This combination of elution and background electrolytes results in both sample stacking and formation of a dynamic pH junction and allows use of relatively large elution buffer volumes while maintaining reasonable peak efficiency and resolution. A series of five pH bumps were applied to elute E. coli tryptic peptides from the monolith, followed by analysis using CZE coupled to an LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer; 799 protein groups and 3381 peptides were identified from 50 ng of the digest in a 2.5 h analysis, which approaches the identification rate for this organism that was obtained with an Orbitrap Fusion. We attribute the improved numbers of peptide and protein identifications to the efficient fractionation by the online pH gradient elution, which decreased the complexity of the sample in each elution step and improved the signal intensity of low abundance peptides. We also performed a comparative analysis using a nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LCH system. Similar numbers of protein and peptide identifications were produced by the two methods. Protein identifications showed significant overlap between the two methods, whereas peptide identifications were complementary.

  4. Factors That Affect Age of Identification of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adelman, Chana R.; Kubiszyn, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with age of identification of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results of a one-way ANOVA indicated differences in age of diagnosis among the four regions in the United States, F(3, 650) = 7.618, p = 0.01. Tukey's post hoc comparisons of the groups indicated that the mean age of diagnosis in the Midwest (M =…

  5. Identification of two linear B-cell epitopes from West Nile virus NS1 by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is an important antigenic protein that elicits protective antibody responses in animals and can be used for the serological diagnosis of WNV infection. Although previous work has demonstrated the vital role of WNV NS1-specific antibody responses, the specific epitopes in the NS1 have not been identified. Results The present study describes the identification of two linear B-cell epitopes in WNV NS1 through screening a phage-displayed random 12-mer peptide library with two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 3C7 and 4D1 that directed against the NS1. The mAbs 3C7 and 4D1 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motifs LTATTEK and VVDGPETKEC, respectively. Exact sequences of both motifs were found in the NS1 (895LTATTEK901 and 925VVDGPETKEC934). Further identification of the displayed B cell epitopes were conducted using a set of truncated peptides expressed as MBP fusion proteins. The data indicated that 896TATTEK901 and925VVDGPETKEC934 are minimal determinants of the linear B cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. Antibodies present in the serum of WNV-positive horses recognized the minimal linear epitopes in Western blot analysis, indicating that the two peptides are antigenic in horses during infection. Furthermore, we found that the epitope recognized by 3C7 is conserved only among WNV strains, whereas the epitope recognized by 4D1 is a common motif shared among WNV and other members of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) serocomplex. Conclusions We identified TATTEK and VVDGPETKEC as NS1-specific linear B-cell epitopes recognized by the mAbs 3C7 and 4D1, respectively. The knowledge and reagents generated in this study may have potential applications in differential diagnosis and the development of epitope-based marker vaccines against WNV and other viruses of JEV serocomplex. PMID:21729328

  6. Identification of IL-23p19 as an endothelial proinflammatory peptide that promotes gp130-STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Espígol-Frigolé, Georgina; Planas-Rigol, Ester; Ohnuki, Hidetaka; Salvucci, Ombretta; Kwak, Hyeongil; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian; Cid, Maria C; Tosato, Giovanna

    2016-03-15

    Interleukin-23 (IL-23), a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the unique p19 peptide (IL-23p19) and a peptide called IL-12p40, which is shared with IL-12, is implicated in Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Endothelial cells produce the IL-23p19 peptide in the absence of the IL-12p40 chain and thus do not make heterodimeric IL-23. We found that intercellular IL-23p19 increased the cell surface abundances of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on endothelial cells, which enhanced the attachment of leukocytes and increased their transendothelial migration. Intracellular p19 associated with the cytokine receptor subunit gp130 and stimulated the gp130-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling. Proinflammatory factors promoted the generation of IL-23p19 in endothelial cells. The adventitial capillaries of inflamed temporal arteries in patients with giant-cell arteritis (GCA) had endothelial p19 protein associated with gp130, but did not contain the IL-12p40 chain. Because adventitial capillaries are essential for the entry of inflammatory cells into arterial walls, these data suggest that p19 may contribute to GCA disease and could represent a therapeutic target. Our results provide evidence that IL-23p19 is a previously unrecognized endothelial proinflammatory peptide that promotes leukocyte transendothelial migration, advancing our current understanding of the complexities of inflammatory responses.

  7. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins.

    PubMed

    Koehbach, Johannes; Gruber, Christian W; Becker, Christian; Kreil, David P; Jilek, Alexander

    2016-05-06

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods.

  8. Identification of citrullinated peptides in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis using LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Chen, Fang-Fang; Gao, Wen-Bo; Wang, Hai-Yong; Zhao, Ning-Wei; Xu, Min; Gao, De-Yu; Yu, Wei; Yan, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Jian-Ning; Li, Xiao-Jun

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the study is to investigate potential citrullinated autoantigens as targets of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) response in synovial fluids (SFs) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). SFs from six RA patients and six osteoarthritis (OA) patients as controls were collected. The citrullinated proteins in SFs were extracted by immunoprecipitation with rabbit anti-citrulline antibodies. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry was subsequently performed to discover a characteristic neutral loss to finally determine citrullinated autoantigens. A total of 182 citrullinated peptides and 200 citrullinated sites were identified in RA SFs, while 3 citrullinated peptides and 4 citrullinated sites were identified in OA SFs. The 182 citrullinated peptides from RA SFs and the 3 citrullinated peptides from OA SFs were derived from 83 and 3 autoantigens, respectively. Eighty-three autoantigens except protein-arginine deiminase type-2 (PADI2) and protein-arginine deiminase type-2 (PADI4) were over-citrullinated compared with controls, and the citrullinated sites of PADI2 and PADI4 were different in two groups. Interestingly, citrullinated histone H3.3 (H3F3A) was found in OA controls, but not in RA groups. The differential citrullinated proteins identified in RA SFs suggested potential autoantigens were targeted for ACPAs response and might contribute to the induction and perpetuation of complement activation and joint inflammation in RA.

  9. Identification of neutralizing linear epitopes from the VP1 capsid protein of Enterovirus 71 using synthetic peptides.

    PubMed

    Foo, Damian Guang Wei; Alonso, Sylvie; Phoon, Meng Chee; Ramachandran, N P; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong; Poh, Chit Laa

    2007-04-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main causative agent of Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and has been associated with severe neurological diseases resulting in high mortalities. Currently, there is no vaccine available and treatment is limited to palliative care. In this study, antisera were raised in mice against 95 overlapping synthetic peptides spanning the VP1 capsid protein of EV71. Two peptides, SP55 and SP70, containing amino acid 163-177 and 208-222 of VP1, respectively, are capable of eliciting neutralizing antibodies against EV71 in the in vitro microneutralization assay. SP70 was identified to be particularly potent in eliciting a neutralizing antibody titer comparable to that obtained with a whole virion-immune serum. Immunization of mice with either SP55 or SP70 triggered an EV71-specific IgG response as high as that obtained with the whole virion as immunogen. The IgG sub-typing revealed that the neutralizing antibodies elicited by both synthetic peptides are likely belonging to the IgG1 sub-type. Alignment with databases showed that the amino acid residues of SP70 are highly conserved amongst the VP1 sequences of EV71 strains from various sub-genogroups. Altogether, these data indicate that SP70 represents a promising candidate for an effective synthetic peptide-based vaccine against EV71.

  10. Identification of antihyperuricemic peptides in the proteolytic digest of shark cartilage water extract using in vivo activity-guided fractionation.

    PubMed

    Murota, Itsuki; Taguchi, Satoko; Sato, Nobuyuki; Park, Eun Young; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sato, Kenji

    2014-03-19

    A peptide that exerts antihyperuricemic activity after oral administration was identified from a microbial protease (alcalase) digest of the water extract of shark cartilage by in vivo activity-guided fractionation, using oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Water extract of shark cartilage was first fractionated by preparative ampholine-free isoelectric focusing, followed by preparative reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalse digests of the obtained fractions was evaluated using an animal model. Alcalase digests of the basic and hydrophobic fractions exerted antihyperuricemic activity. A total of 18 peptides were identified in the alcalase digest of the final active fraction. These peptides were chemically synthesized and evaluated for antihyperuricemic activity. Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr and Ser-Pro-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Pro-Tyr lowered the serum uric acid level via intravenous injection at 5 mg/kg of body weight. Furthermore, orally administered Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr showed antihyperuricemic activity. Therefore, these peptides are at least partially responsible for the antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalase digest of shark cartilage.

  11. Identification of whole pathogenic cells by monoclonal antibodies generated against a specific peptide from an immunogenic cell wall protein.

    PubMed

    Kaba, Hani E J; Maier, Natalia; Schliebe-Ohler, Nicole; Mayer, Yvonne; Müller, Peter P; van den Heuvel, Joop; Schuchhardt, Johannes; Hanack, Katja; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    We selected the immunogenic cell wall ß-(1,3)-glucosyltransferase Bgl2p from Candida albicans as a target protein for the production of antibodies. We identified a unique peptide sequence in the protein and generated monoclonal anti- C. albicans Bgl2p antibodies, which bound in particular to whole C. albicans cells.

  12. Identification and binding mechanism of phage displayed peptides with specific affinity to acid-alkali treated titanium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhua; Tan, Jing; Wu, Baohua; Wang, Jianxin; Qu, Shuxin; Weng, Jie; Feng, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Acid-alkali treatment is one of means widely used for preparing bioactive titanium surfaces. Peptides with specific affinity to titanium surface modified by acid-alkali two-steps treatment were obtained via phage display technology. Out of the eight new unique peptides, titanium-binding peptide 54 displayed by monoclonal M13 phage at its pIII coat protein (TBP54-M13 phage) was proved to have higher binding affinity to the substrate. The binding interaction occurred at the domain from phenylalanine at position 1 to arginine at position 6 in the sequences of TBP54 (FAETHRGFHFSF) mainly via the reaction of these residues with the Ti surface. Together the coordination and electrostatic interactions controlled the specific binding of the phage to the substrate. The binding affinity was dependent on the surface basic hydroxyl group content. In addition, the phage showed a different interaction way with the Ti surface without acid-alkali treatment along with an impaired affinity. This study could provide more understanding of the interaction mechanism between the selected peptide and its specific substrate, and develop a promising method for the biofunctionalization of titanium.

  13. Identification of a novel peptide ligand targeting visceral adipose tissue via transdermal route by in vivo phage display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hong Shin; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Eun-Bae; Cho, Chong Su; Kang, Sang Kee; Choi, Yun Jaie

    2011-11-01

    To find novel peptide ligands targeting visceral adipose tissue (visceral fat) via transdermal route, in vivo phage display screening was conducted by dermal administration of a phage-peptide library to rats and a peptide sequence, CGLHPAFQC (designated as TDA1), was identified as a targeting ligand to visceral adipose tissue through the consecutive transdermal biopannings. Adipocyte-specific affinity and transdermal activity of the TDA1 were validated in vitro and targeting ability of the dermally administered TDA1 to visceral adipose tissue was also confirmed in vivo. TDA1 was effectively translocated into systemic circulation after dermal administration and selectively targeted visceral adipose tissue without any preference to other organs tested. Fluorescent microscopic analysis revealed that the TDA1 could be specifically localized in the hair follicles of the skin, as well as in the visceral adipose tissue. Thus, we inferred that dermally administered TDA1 would first access systemic circulation via hair follicles as its transdermal route and then could target visceral fat effectively. The overall results suggest that the TDA1 peptide could be potentially applied as a homing moiety for delivery of anti-obesity therapeutics to visceral fat through the convenient transdermal pathway.

  14. Identification of an antifungal peptide from Trapa natans fruits with inhibitory effects on Candida tropicalis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2011-08-01

    Due to recent emergence of fungal pathogens resistant to current antifungal therapies, several studies have been focused on screening of plant peptides to find novel compounds having antifungal activities. Here, a novel antifungal plant peptide, with molecular mass of 1230 Da was purified from fruits of Trapa natans by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography using 300SB-C18 column and named as Tn-AFP1. Determination of complete amino acid sequences of this peptide by tandem mass spectrometry showed to contain following eleven amino acid residues: LMCTHPLDCSN. Purified Tn-AFP1 showed the inhibition of Candida tropicalis growth in vitro and disrupted the biofilm formation in a concentration dependent manner. It also showed downregulation of MDR1 and ERG11 gene expression in real time-PCR analysis. In silico molecular modeling predicted the structure of Tn-AFP1 as a single coil attached by a unique disulfide bond. Characterization of Tn-AFP1 could contribute in designing novel derivative(s) of this peptide for the development of more effective antimycotic compounds.

  15. MALDI TOF/TOF-Based Approach for the Identification of d- Amino Acids in Biologically Active Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Several biologically active peptides contain a d- amino acid in a well-defined position, which is position 2 in all peptide epimers isolated to date from vertebrates and also some from invertebrates. The detection of such D- residues by standard analytical techniques is challenging. In tandem mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, although fragment masses are the same for all stereoisomers, peak intensities are known to depend on chirality. Here, we observe that the effect of a d- amino acid in the second N-terminal position on the fragmentation pattern in matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) strongly depends on the peptide sequence. Stereosensitive fragmentation (SF) is correlated to a neighborhood effect, but the d- residue also exerts an overall effect influencing distant bonds. In a fingerprint analysis, multiple peaks can thus serve to identify the chirality of a sample in short time and potentially high throughput. Problematic variations between individual spots could be successfully suppressed by cospotting deuterated analogues of the epimers. By identifying the [d-Leu2] isomer of the predicted peptide GH-2 (gene derived bombininH) in skin secretions of the toad Bombina orientalis, we demonstrated the analytical power of SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF measurements. In conclusion, SF-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS combines high sensitivity, versatility, and the ability to complement other methods. PMID:26985971

  16. High-throughput fluorescence screening assay for the identification and comparison of antimicrobial peptides' activity on various yeast species.

    PubMed

    Kodedová, Marie; Sychrová, Hana

    2016-09-10

    New antifungal compounds that circumvent the resistance of the pathogen by directly damaging yeast cell surface structures are promising agents for the treatment of fungal infections, due to their different mechanism of action from current clinically used antifungal drugs. We present here a rapid and cost-effective fluorescence method suitable for identifying new potent drugs that directly target yeast cell surface structures, causing cell permeabilization and thus bypassing the multidrug resistance mechanisms of pathogens. The fluorescence assay enabled us to detect with high sensitivity damage to the Candida plasma membrane (its hyperpolarization and permeabilization) as a result of short-term exposure to the antifungal compounds. Results can be obtained in 1-2h with minimal effort and consumption of the tested compounds, also 96 samples can be analysed simultaneously. We used this method to study antimicrobial peptides isolated from the venom of bees and their synthetic analogs, compare the potency of the peptides and determine their minimal effective concentrations. The antimicrobial peptides were able to kill yeast cells at low concentrations within a 15-min treatment, the LL-III peptide exhibited a broad spectrum of antifungal activity on various Saccharomyces, pathogenic Candida and osmotolerant yeast species.

  17. The use of images CBERS 2 and CBERS 2b in identification of areas affected by desertification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Claudionor Ribeiro; Castro, Fabiana Silva Pires; Centeno, Jorge Antonio Silva

    2010-02-01

    The process of desertification, which extends from a long time ago, became a reality in Brazil. This phenomenon can be understood as land degradation, caused by factors including climatic changes and human activities. Besides being a threat to biodiversity, causes loss of soil productivity, threatening the lives of thousands of people living in affected regions. So, the identification of affected areas is essential to diagnose and prevent the problem. Satellite image has been a source of relatively low cost and widely used in this task. Therefore, is proposed in this study, a method to extract automatically areas heavily affected by desertification. The method is based on concepts of mathematical morphology, vegetation index and classification of digital images. Experiments are conducted separately, with images of CBERS 2 and 2B, and subsequently compared. The validation is done by crossing the results obtained with a reference image, created by a manual process.

  18. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-04-06

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation.

  19. Membrane Protein Crystallization in Lipidic Mesophases. Hosting lipid affects on the crystallization and structure of a transmembrane peptide

    PubMed Central

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Lyons, Joseph A.; Caffrey, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Gramicidin is an apolar pentadecapeptide antibiotic consisting of alternating D-and L-amino acids. It functions, in part, by creating pores in membranes of susceptible cells rendering them leaky to monovalent cations. The peptide should be able to traverse the host membrane either as a double stranded, intertwined double helix (DSDH) or as a head-to-head single stranded helix (HHSH). Current structure models are based on macromolecular X-ray crystallography (MX) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). However, the HHSH form has only been observed by NMR. The shape and size of the different gramicidin conformations differ. We speculated therefore that reconstituting it into a lipidic mesophase with bilayers of different microstructures would preferentially stabilize one form over the other. By using such mesophases for in meso crystallogenesis the expectation was that at least one would generate crystals of gramicidin in the HHSH form for structure determination by MX. This was tested using commercial and in-house synthesised lipids that support in meso crystallogenesis. Lipid acyl chain lengths were varied from 14 to 18 carbons to provide mesophases with a range of bilayer thicknesses. Unexpectedly, all lipids produced high quality, structure-grade crystals with gramicidin only in the DSDH conformation. PMID:22933857

  20. Identification and characterization of pyrokinin and CAPA peptides, and corresponding GPCRs from spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Ahn, Seung-Joon; Kim, A Young; Koh, Youngho

    2017-01-07

    The family of FXPRLamide peptides serves as a major insect hormone. It is characterized by a core active amino acid sequence conserved at the C-terminal ends, and provides various physiological roles across the Insecta. In this study we identified and characterized pyrokinin (PK) and CAPA cDNAs encoding two FXPRLamide peptides, pyrokinin and CAPA-DH (diapause hormone), and two corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii. Expressions of PK and CAPA mRNAs were differentially observed during all life stages except the embryo, and the detection of CAPA transcription was relatively strong compared with the PK gene in SWD. Both D. suzukii pyrokinin receptor (DrosuPKr) and CAPA-DH receptor (DrosuCAPA-DHr) were functionally expressed and confirmed through binding to PK and DH peptides. Differential expression of two GPCRs occurred during all life stages; a strong transcription of DrosuPKr was observed in the 3rd instar. DrosuCAPA-DHr was clearly expressed from the embryo to the larva, but not detected in the adult. Gene regulation during the life stages was not synchronized between ligand and receptor. For example, SWD CAPA mRNA has been up-regulated in the adult while CAPA-DHr was down-regulated. The difference could be from the CAPA mRNA translating multiple peptides including CAPA-DH and two CAPA-PVK (periviscerokinin) peptides to act on different receptors. Comparing the genes of SWD PK, CAPA, PKr and CAPA-DHr to four corresponding genes of D. melanogaster, SWD CAPA and the receptor are more similar to D. melanogaster than PK and the receptor. These data suggest that the CAPA gene could be evolutionally more conserved to have a common biological role in insects. In addition, the effect of Kozak sequences was investigated by the expression of the GPCRs with or without Kozak sequences in Sf9 insect cells. The Kozak sequenced PK receptor was significantly less active than the original (= no Kozak sequenced

  1. An extra peptide within the catalytic module of a β-agarase affects the agarose degradation pattern.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-Jun; Gu, Jing-Yan; Liu, Hui-Hui; Li, Fu-Chuan; Wu, Zhi-Hong; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2013-03-29

    Agarase hydrolyzes agarose into a series of oligosaccharides with repeating disaccharide units. The glycoside hydrolase (GH) module of agarase is known to be responsible for its catalytic activity. However, variations in the composition of the GH module and its effects on enzymatic functions have been minimally elucidated. The agaG4 gene, cloned from the genome of the agarolytic Flammeovirga strain MY04, encodes a 503-amino acid protein, AgaG4. Compared with elucidated agarases, AgaG4 contains an extra peptide (Asn(246)-Gly(302)) within its GH module. Heterologously expressed AgaG4 (recombinant AgaG4; rAgaG4) was determined to be an endo-type β-agarase. The protein degraded agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose at a final molar ratio of 1.5:1. Neoagarooctaose was the smallest substrate for rAgaG4, whereas neoagarotetraose was the minimal degradation product. Removing the extra fragment from the GH module led to the inability of the mutant (rAgaG4-T57) to degrade neoagarooctaose, and the final degradation products of agarose by the truncated protein were neoagarotetraose, neoagarohexaose, and neoagarooctaose at a final molar ratio of 2.7:2.8:1. The optimal temperature for agarose degradation also decreased to 40 °C for this mutant. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that tyrosine 276 within the extra fragment was a candidate active site residue for the enzymatic activity. Site-swapping experiments of Tyr(276) to 19 various other amino acids demonstrated that the characteristics of this residue were crucial for the AgaG4 degradation of agarose and the cleavage pattern of substrate.

  2. Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-03-04

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. Cross-linking is the process of covalently joining two proteins using cross-linking reagents. After proteolytic cleavage, the cross-linked peptides can be identified using tandem mass spectrometry. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linkering reagent and/or protein to aid both identification and quantitation. However, these approaches have various limitations. These limitations can be overcome with a label-free approach and application of associated data analysis algorithms described in this work.

  3. In silico analysis of nonribosomal peptide synthetases of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri: identification of putative siderophore and lipopeptide biosynthetic genes.

    PubMed

    Etchegaray, Augusto; Silva-Stenico, Maria E; Moon, David H; Tsai, Siu M

    2004-01-01

    The genomes of the plant pathogens Xanthomonas axonopodis (Xac) and Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc) were analysed with the aim of deducing their ability to produce nonribosomal peptides. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes were identified in two separate loci of Xac. While the genes of locus 1 are common to both strains, locus 2 was only found in Xac. Dissection and phylogenetic analysis of the condensation and thioesterase domains of the NRPSs of loci 1 and 2 of Xac revealed homology, respectively, with siderophore and lipopeptide synthetases. Further analysis of locus 1 revealed genes related to polyketide and polyamine biosynthesis that could be involved in the assembly of substrates for siderophore biosynthesis in both strains. In vitro production of siderophores by both Xac and Xcc was confirmed. Since bacterial siderophores and lipopeptides can be pathogenic and are typically produced nonribosomally, these results suggest that the identified genes could be involved in phytotoxin production.

  4. Mass spectrometric identification of a candidate biomarker peptide from the in vitro interaction of epichlorohydrin with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, N; Pocsfalvi, G; Ferranti, P; Basile, A; Sannolo, N; Acampora, A; Soleo, L; Palmieri, F; Caira, S; De Giulio, B; Malorni, A

    2001-01-01

    The reaction products of epichlorohydrin with human alpha- and beta- globins, obtained through in vitro incubation of these compounds and red blood cells, were determined by using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The alpha-globin was much more reactive than the beta-globin. At low incubation ratios, approximating the order of magnitude of epichlorohydrin concentration as found in workplaces, the only modified peptide still detectable was the 62-90 belonging to the alpha-chain and carrying an incremental mass of 92 u on either His72 or His89. Given that the two peptides co-eluted in a single chromatographic peak during RP-HPLC separation, they could be chosen as suitable biomarkers for quantification in the setting up of a new methodology for the biological monitoring of persons occupationally exposed, replacing currently known procedures.

  5. Identification, expression, and innate immune responses of two insulin-like peptide genes in the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Niu, Donghong; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Honggang; Wang, Ze; Xie, Shumei; Li, Jiale

    2016-04-01

    Insulin-like peptide (ILP) has emerged as a cell regulatory factor with multiple functions in vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we identified and characterized two ILP genes, ILP1 and ILP2, in the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta. Both ILPs have a signal peptide and a mature domain consisting of six strictly conserved cysteines. The tertiary structure is divided into three main α-helices with a C-domain loop that separates helix 1 from helix 2. Both of ILPs were found to be regulated according to tissue type and developmental stage. After challenge with Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Micrococcus lysodeikticus, the expression of two ILP genes was significantly up-regulated in the liver, hemocytes and mantle tissues, suggesting that the ILPs may play roles in the innate immunity in the razor clam Sinonovacula constricta.

  6. Identification of avocado (Persea americana) pulp proteins by nano-LC-MS/MS via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Avocado (Persea americana) proteins have been scarcely studied despite their importance, especially in food related allergies. The proteome of avocado pulp was explored in depth by extracting proteins with capture by combinatorial peptide ligand libraries at pH 7.4 and under conditions mimicking reverse-phase capture at pH 2.2. The total number of unique gene products identified amounts to 1012 proteins, of which 174 are in common with the control, untreated sample, 190 are present only in the control and 648 represent the new species detected via combinatorial peptide ligand libraries of all combined eluates and likely represent low-abundance proteins. Among the 1012 proteins, it was possible to identify the already known avocado allergen Pers a 1 and different proteins susceptible to be allergens such as a profilin, a polygalacturonase, a thaumatin-like protein, a glucanase, and an isoflavone reductase like protein.

  7. Identification of 2D-gel proteins : a comparison of MALDI/TOF peptide mass mapping to {mu} LC-ESI tandem mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Hays, L. G.; Eng, J.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Giometti, C. S.; Holden, J. F.; Adams, M. W. W.; Reich, C. I.; Olsen, G. J.; Yates, J. R.; Biosciences Division; The Scripps Research Inst.; Univ. of Georgia; Univ. of Illinois

    2003-09-01

    A comparative analysis of protein identification for a total of 162 protein spots separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis from two fully sequenced archaea, Methanococcus jannaschii and Pyrococcus furiosus, using MALDI-TOF peptide mass mapping (PMM) and mu LC-MS/MS is presented. 100% of the gel spots analyzed were successfully matched to the predicted proteins in the two corresponding open reading frame databases by mu LC-MS/MS while 97% of them were identified by MALDI-TOF PMM. The high success rate from the PMM resulted from sample desalting/concentrating with ZipTip(C18) and optimization of several PMM search parameters including a 25 ppm average mass tolerance and the application of two different protein molecular weight search windows. By using this strategy, low-molecular weight (<23 kDa) proteins could be identified unambiguously with less than 5 peptide matches. Nine percent of spots were identified as containing multiple proteins. By using mu LC-MS/MS, 50% of the spots analyzed were identified as containing multiple proteins. mu LC-MS/MS demonstrated better protein sequence coverage than MALDI-TOF PMM over the entire mass range of proteins identified. MALDI-TOF and PMM produced unique peptide molecular weight matches that were not identified by mu LC-MS/MS. By incorporating amino acid sequence modifications into database searches, combined sequence coverage obtained from these two complimentary ionization methods exceeded 50% for approximately 70% of the 162 spots analyzed. This improved sequence coverage in combination with enzymatic digestions of different specificity is proposed as a method for analysis of post-translational modification from 2D-gel separated proteins.

  8. Identification, expression and antibacterial activities of an antimicrobial peptide NK-lysin from a marine fish Larimichthys crocea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi-Jia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Min; Qiao, Ying; Hong, Wan-Shu; Su, Yong-Quan; Han, Kun-Huang; Ke, Qiao-Zhen; Zheng, Wei-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    As fundamental immunologic mechanism, the innate immunity system is more important than the specific immunity system in teleost fishes during pathogens infection. Antimicrobial peptides are integral parts of the innate immune system, and play significant roles against pathogens infection. NK-lysin, the compounds of the natural killer cells and cytotoxic T cells, are potent and effective antimicrobial peptides widely distributed in animals. In this study, we reported the sequence characteristics, expression profiles and antibacterial activities of a NK-lysin gene (Lc-NK-lysin) from a commercially important marine fish, the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea). The open reading frame of Lc-NK-lysin cDNA sequence was 447 bp in length, coding 148 amino acids. The genomic DNA of Lc-NK-lysin has the common features of NK-lysin family, consisting of five exons and four introns, and in its deduced mature peptide, there are six well-conserved cysteine residues and a Saposin B domain. Lc-NK-lysin was expressed in all tested tissues (skin, muscle, gill, brain, head kidney, heart, liver, spleen, stomach and intestine) with different expression patterns. In pathogens infection the expression profiles of Lc-NK-lysin varied significantly in gill, head kidney, spleen and liver, indicating its role in immune response. Two peptides (Lc-NK-lysin-1 and Lc-NK-lysin-2) divided from the core region of the Lc-NK-lysin mature polypeptide were chemically synthesized and their antibacterial activities were examined; the potential function on the inhibition of bacteria propagation was revealed. Our results suggested that Lc-NK-lysin is a typical member of the NK-lysin family and as an immune-related gene it involves in the immune response when pathogens invasion.

  9. Identification and Optimization of Short Helical Peptides with Novel Reactive Functionality as Catalysts for Acyl Transfer by Reactive Tagging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-21

    spectrograms, reactive tag synthesis and their physical data, library hits mass-spectrograms, CD spectra, NOE spectra, cartoon representations of peptide...with reactive tag RT2 to look for hits that additionally have competitive deacylation properties . In this mode, the tagging time was extended so that...In prin- ciple, beads displaying a fast k1 (acylation) and a competent deacylation (k3) should have good catalytic properties . This two step treatment

  10. Identification of a small peptide that inhibits PCSK9 protein binding to the low density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingnan; Eigenbrot, Charles; Zhou, Lijuan; Shia, Steven; Li, Wei; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Moran, Paul; Di Lello, Paola; Skelton, Nicholas J; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Peterson, Andrew; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2014-01-10

    PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9) is a negative regulator of the hepatic LDL receptor, and clinical studies with PCSK9-inhibiting antibodies have demonstrated strong LDL-c-lowering effects. Here we screened phage-displayed peptide libraries and identified the 13-amino acid linear peptide Pep2-8 as the smallest PCSK9 inhibitor with a clearly defined mechanism of inhibition that has been described. Pep2-8 bound to PCSK9 with a KD of 0.7 μm but did not bind to other proprotein convertases. It fully restored LDL receptor surface levels and LDL particle uptake in PCSK9-treated HepG2 cells. The crystal structure of Pep2-8 bound to C-terminally truncated PCSK9 at 1.85 Å resolution showed that the peptide adopted a strand-turn-helix conformation, which is remarkably similar to its solution structure determined by NMR. Consistent with the functional binding site identified by an Ala scan of PCSK9, the structural Pep2-8 contact region of about 400 Å(2) largely overlapped with that contacted by the EGF(A) domain of the LDL receptor, suggesting a competitive inhibition mechanism. Consistent with this, Pep2-8 inhibited LDL receptor and EGF(A) domain binding to PCSK9 with IC50 values of 0.8 and 0.4 μm, respectively. Remarkably, Pep2-8 mimicked secondary structural elements of the EGF(A) domain that interact with PCSK9, notably the β-strand and a discontinuous short α-helix, and it engaged in the same β-sheet hydrogen bonds as EGF(A) does. Although Pep2-8 itself may not be amenable to therapeutic applications, this study demonstrates the feasibility of developing peptidic inhibitors to functionally relevant sites on PCSK9.

  11. Identification of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Sequences Important for Induction of Lymphocyte Proliferation by Using Synthetic Peptide Fragments of the Toxin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    toxin . WPPD 6. AUTHOR(S) Marti Jett, Roger Neill, C. Welch, T. Boyle, E Ber ton D. Hoover, G. Lowell, R. Hunt, S. Chatterjee, P. Gemski. 7. PERFORMING...Lymphocyte Proliferation by Using Synthetic Peptide Fragments of the Toxin MARTI JETT.I* ROGER NEILL,’ CHRISTOPHER WELCH,’ THOMAS BOYLE,’ EDWARD BERNTON...Superantigens are characterized by the terotoxins (SEs). These toxins , represented by several sero- ability to serve as ligands simultaneously binding to major

  12. Identification and Quantification of a New Family of Peptide Endocannabinoids (Pepcans) Showing Negative Allosteric Modulation at CB1 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Mark; Chicca, Andrea; Tamborrini, Marco; Eisen, David; Lerner, Raissa; Lutz, Beat; Poetz, Oliver; Pluschke, Gerd; Gertsch, Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The α-hemoglobin-derived dodecapeptide RVD-hemopressin (RVDPVNFKLLSH) has been proposed to be an endogenous agonist for the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). To study this peptide, we have raised mAbs against its C-terminal part. Using an immunoaffinity mass spectrometry approach, a whole family of N-terminally extended peptides in addition to RVD-Hpα were identified in rodent brain extracts and human and mouse plasma. We designated these peptides Pepcan-12 (RVDPVNFKLLSH) to Pepcan-23 (SALSDLHAHKLRVDPVNFKLLSH), referring to peptide length. The most abundant Pepcans found in the brain were tested for CB1 receptor binding. In the classical radioligand displacement assay, Pepcan-12 was the most efficacious ligand but only partially displaced both [3H]CP55,940 and [3H]WIN55,212-2. The data were fitted with the allosteric ternary complex model, revealing a cooperativity factor value α < 1, thus indicating a negative allosteric modulation. Dissociation kinetic studies of [3H]CP55,940 in the absence and presence of Pepcan-12 confirmed these results by showing increased dissociation rate constants induced by Pepcan-12. A fluorescently labeled Pepcan-12 analog was synthesized to investigate the binding to CB1 receptors. Competition binding studies revealed Ki values of several Pepcans in the nanomolar range. Accordingly, using competitive ELISA, we found low nanomolar concentrations of Pepcans in human plasma and ∼100 pmol/g in mouse brain. Surprisingly, Pepcan-12 exhibited potent negative allosteric modulation of the orthosteric agonist-induced cAMP accumulation, [35S]GTPγS binding, and CB1 receptor internalization. Pepcans are the first endogenous allosteric modulators identified for CB1 receptors. Given their abundance in the brain, Pepcans could play an important physiological role in modulating endocannabinoid signaling. PMID:22952224

  13. Identification of an immunodominant peptide from citrullinated tenascin-C as a major target for autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schwenzer, Anja; Jiang, Xia; Mikuls, Ted R; Payne, Jeffrey B; Sayles, Harlan R; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Kessler, Benedikt M; Fischer, Roman; Venables, Patrick J; Lundberg, Karin; Midwood, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether citrullinated tenascin-C (cTNC), an extracellular matrix protein expressed at high levels in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is a target for the autoantibodies in RA. Methods Citrullinated sites were mapped by mass spectrometry in the fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) domain of tenascin-C treated with peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD) 2 and 4. Antibodies to cyclic peptides containing citrullinated sites were screened in sera from patients with RA by ELISA. Potential cross-reactivity with well-established anticitrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) epitopes was tested by inhibition assays. The autoantibody response to one immunodominant cTNC peptide was then analysed in 101 pre-RA sera (median 7 years before onset) and two large independent RA cohorts. Results Nine arginine residues within FBG were citrullinated by PAD2 and PAD4. Two immunodominant peptides cTNC1 (VFLRRKNG-cit-ENFYQNW) and cTNC5 (EHSIQFAEMKL-cit-PSNF-cit-NLEG-cit-cit-KR) were identified. Antibodies to both showed limited cross-reactivity with ACPA epitopes from α-enolase, vimentin and fibrinogen, and no reactivity with citrullinated fibrinogen peptides sharing sequence homology with FBG. cTNC5 antibodies were detected in 18% of pre-RA sera, and in 47% of 1985 Swedish patients with RA and 51% of 287 North American patients with RA. The specificity was 98% compared with 160 healthy controls and 330 patients with osteoarthritis. Conclusions There are multiple citrullination sites in the FBG domain of tenascin-C. Among these, one epitope is recognised by autoantibodies that are detected years before disease onset, and which may serve as a useful biomarker to identify ACPA-positive patients with high sensitivity and specificity in established disease. PMID:26659718

  14. Identification of a novel receptor for an invertebrate oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily peptide: molecular and functional evolution of the oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Kanda, Atsuhiro; Minakata, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Osamu; Satake, Honoo

    2004-08-15

    Annetocin is structurally related to an OT (oxytocin)/VP (vasopressin) family peptide, which has been isolated from the earthworm Eisenia foetida and has been shown to induce OT-like egg-laying behaviour. We now report the identification of an endogenous AnR (annetocin receptor). The deduced AnR precursor displays high sequence similarity with OT/VP receptors. Genomic analysis of the AnR gene revealed that the intron-inserted position is conserved between the AnR gene and the mammalian OT/VP receptor genes. These results indicate that AnR and mammalian OT/VP receptors share a common ancestor gene. Administration of annetocin to the AnR expressed in Xenopus oocytes induced a calcium-dependent signal transduction. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis and in situ hybridization showed that the AnR gene is expressed specifically in the nephridia located in the clitellum region, although the nephridia are distributed throughout the worm body. This result suggests that annetocin induces egg-laying behaviour through its action on the nephridia. This is the first description concerning the functional correlation between an invertebrate OT/VP-related peptide and egg-laying behaviour.

  15. Screening and identification of mimotopes of the major shrimp allergen tropomyosin using one-bead-one-compound peptide libraries

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Nicki YH; Wai, Christine YY; Ho, Marco HK; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S; Wang, Jin Jun; Shu, Shang An; Chu, Ka Hou; Leung, Patrick SC

    2017-01-01

    The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial peptide library is a powerful tool to identify ligand and receptor interactions. Here, we applied the OBOC library technology to identify mimotopes specific to the immunoglobulin E (IgE) epitopes of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin. OBOC peptide libraries with 8–12 amino acid residues were screened with serum samples from patients with shellfish allergy for IgE mimotopes of tropomyosin. Twenty-five mimotopes were identified from the screening and their binding reactivity to tropomyosin-specific IgE was confirmed by peptide ELISA. These mimotopes could be divided into seven clusters based on sequence homology, and epitope mapping by EpiSearch of the clustered mimotopes was performed to characterize and confirm the validity of mimotopes. Five out of six of the predicted epitopes were found to overlap with previously identified epitopes of tropomyosin. To further confirm the mimicry potential of mimotopes, BALB/c mice were immunized with mimotopes conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin and assayed for their capacity to induce tropomyosin-specific antibodies. BALB/c mice that received mimotope immunization were found to have an elevated level of tropomyosin-specific immunoglobulin G, but not mice that received an irrelevant mimotope. This study pioneers the successful application of the OBOC libraries using whole sera to screen and identify multiple shrimp allergen mimotopes and validates their mimicry potential using in vitro, in vivo, and in silico methods. PMID:26364917

  16. Identification of protein N-termini in Cyanophora paradoxa cyanelles: transit peptide composition and sequence determinants for precursor maturation

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Helm, Stefan; Steiner, Jürgen M.; Baginsky, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Glaucophyta, rhodophyta, and chloroplastida represent the three main evolutionary lineages that diverged from a common ancestor after primary endosymbiosis. Comparative analyses between members of these three lineages are a rich source of information on ancestral plastid features. We analyzed the composition and the cleavage site of cyanelle transit peptides from the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa by terminal amine labeling of substrates (TAILS), and compared their characteristics to those of representatives of the chloroplastida. Our data show that transit peptide architecture is similar between members of these two lineages. This entails a comparable modular structure, an overrepresentation of serine or alanine and similarities in the amino acid composition around the processing peptidase cleavage site. The most distinctive difference is the overrepresentation of phenylalanine in the N-terminal 1–10 amino acids of cyanelle transit peptides. A quantitative proteome analysis with periplasm-free cyanelles identified 42 out of 262 proteins without the N-terminal phenylalanine, suggesting that the requirement for phenylalanine in the N-terminal region is not absolute. Proteins in this set are on average of low abundance, suggesting that either alternative import pathways are operating specifically for low abundance proteins or that the gene model annotation is incorrect for proteins with fewer EST sequences. We discuss these two possibilities and provide examples for both interpretations. PMID:26257763

  17. Single active-site histidine in D-xylose isomerase from Streptomyces violaceoruber. Identification by chemical derivatization and peptide mapping.

    PubMed

    Vangrysperre, W; Ampe, C; Kersters-Hilderson, H; Tempst, P

    1989-10-01

    Group-specific chemical modifications of D-xylose isomerase from Streptomyces violaceruber indicated that complete loss of activity is fully correlated with the acylation of a single histidine. Active-site protection, by the ligand combination of xylitol plus Mg2+, completely blocked diethyl pyrocarbonate derivatization of this particular residue [Vangrysperre, Callens, Kersters-Hilderson & De Bruyne (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 153-160]. Differential peptide mapping between D-xylose isomerase, which has previously been treated with diethyl pyrocarbonate in the presence or absence of xylitol plus Mg2+, allowed specific isolation and sequencing of a peptide containing this active-site histidine. For this purpose we used two essentially new techniques: first, a highly reproducible peptide cleavage protocol for protease-resistant, carbethoxylated proteins with guanidinium hydrochloride as denaturing agent and subtilisin for proteolysis; and second, reverse-phase liquid chromatography with dual-wavelength detection at 214 and 238 nm, and calculation of absorbance ratios. It allowed us to locate the single active-site histidine at position 54 in the primary structure of Streptomyces violaceoruber D-xylose isomerase. The sequence around this residue is conserved in D-xylose isomerases from a diversity of micro-organisms, suggesting that this is a structurally and/or functionally essential part of the molecule.

  18. Identification of IgE-binding peptides in hen egg ovalbumin digested in vitro with human and simulated gastroduodenal fluids.

    PubMed

    Benedé, Sara; López-Expósito, Iván; López-Fandiño, Rosina; Molina, Elena

    2014-01-08

    The digestibility of the major egg allergen ovalbumin (OVA, Gal d 2) with human and simulated digestive fluids was assessed. Degradation of OVA was faster when treated with human fluids, particularly following duodenal digestion, leading to gastrointestinal digests with lower IgE binding. Gastric digestion with both systems yielded 52 identical cleavage sites and a similar peptide pattern with 47 peptides in common. Subsequent duodenal digestion showed that the human fluid released fewer and shorter peptides. Several high-frequency IgE-binding epitopes were detected among the fragments of molecular mass lower than 3 kDa identified in the digests: OVA (141-154) and OVA (164-176) in the gastrointestinal digests produced with human fluids; and OVA (125-134), OVA (159-172), OVA (141-154), OVA (188-198), OVA (326-336), and OVA (370-385) in the gastrointestinal digests produced with simulated fluids. The high binding frequency of the fragment OVA (370-385), which reacted with 80% of the sera from allergic patients used, was noteworthy.

  19. PEP-SiteFinder: a tool for the blind identification of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Saladin, Adrien; Rey, Julien; Thévenet, Pierre; Zacharias, Martin; Moroy, Gautier; Tufféry, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Peptide–protein interactions are important to many processes of life, particularly for signal transmission or regulatory mechanisms. When no information is known about the interaction between a protein and a peptide, it is of interest to propose candidate sites of interaction at the protein surface, to assist the design of biological experiments to probe the interaction, or to serve as a starting point for more focused in silico approaches. PEP-SiteFinder is a tool that will, given the structure of a protein and the sequence of a peptide, identify protein residues predicted to be at peptide–protein interface. PEP-SiteFinder relies on the 3D de novo generation of peptide conformations given its sequence. These conformations then undergo a fast blind rigid docking on the complete protein surface, and we have found, as the result of a benchmark over 41 complexes, that the best poses overlap to some extent the experimental patch of interaction for close to 90% complexes. In addition, PEP-SiteFinder also returns a propensity index we have found informative about the confidence of the prediction. The PEP-SiteFinder web server is available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/PEP-SiteFinder. PMID:24803671

  20. Identification and characterization of four novel peptide motifs that recognize distinct regions of the transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chung, Bo Mee; Chae, Ji Hyung; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chan Gil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-03-01

    Although ubiquitously expressed, the transcriptional factor CP2 also exhibits some tissue- or stage-specific activation toward certain genes such as globin in red blood cells and interleukin-4 in T helper cells. Because this specificity may be achieved by interaction with other proteins, we screened a peptide display library and identified four consensus motifs in numerous CP2-binding peptides: HXPR, PHL, ASR and PXHXH. Protein-database searching revealed that RE-1 silencing factor (REST), Yin-Yang1 (YY1) and five other proteins have one or two of these CP2-binding motifs. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that two HXPR motif-containing proteins REST and YY1 indeed were able to bind CP2. Importantly, this binding to CP2 was almost abolished when a double amino acid substitution was made on the HXPR sequence of REST and YY1 proteins. The suppressing effect of YY1 on CP2's transcriptional activity was lost by this point mutation on the HXPR sequence of YY1 and reduced by an HXPR-containing peptide, further supporting the interaction between CP2 and YY1 via the HXPR sequence. Mapping the sites on CP2 for interaction with the four distinct CP2-binding motifs revealed at least three different regions on CP2. This suggests that CP2 recognizes several distinct binding motifs by virtue of employing different regions, thus being able to interact with and regulate many cellular partners.

  1. Identification of neuronal loci involved with displays of affective aggression in NC900 mice.

    PubMed

    Nehrenberg, Derrick L; Sheikh, Atif; Ghashghaei, H Troy

    2013-07-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that is essential for survival. Of the various forms of aggression, impulsive violent displays without prior planning or deliberation are referred to as affective aggression. Affective aggression is thought to be caused by aberrant perceptions of, and consequent responses to, threat. Understanding the neuronal networks that regulate affective aggression is pivotal to development of novel approaches to treat chronic affective aggression. Here, we provide a detailed anatomical map of neuronal activity in the forebrain of two inbred lines of mice that were selected for low (NC100) and high (NC900) affective aggression. Attack behavior was induced in male NC900 mice by exposure to an unfamiliar male in a novel environment. Forebrain maps of c-Fos+ nuclei, which are surrogates for neuronal activity during behavior, were then generated and analyzed. NC100 males rarely exhibited affective aggression in response to the same stimulus, thus their forebrain c-Fos maps were utilized to identify unique patterns of neuronal activity in NC900s. Quantitative results indicated robust differences in the distribution patterns and densities of c-Fos+ nuclei in distinct thalamic, subthalamic, and amygdaloid nuclei, together with unique patterns of neuronal activity in the nucleus accumbens and the frontal cortices. Our findings implicate these areas as foci regulating differential behavioral responses to an unfamiliar male in NC900 mice when expressing affective aggression. Based on the highly conserved patterns of connections and organization of neuronal limbic structures from mice to humans, we speculate that neuronal activities in analogous networks may be disrupted in humans prone to maladaptive affective aggression.

  2. Technology assessment of future intercity passenger transporation systems. Volume 2: Identification of issues affecting intercity transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers on major issues and trends that affect the future of intercity transportation are presented. Specific areas covered include: political, social, technological, institutional, and economic mechanisms, the workings of which determine how future intercity transporation technologies will evolve and be put into service; the major issues of intercity transportation from the point of view of reform, including candidate transporation technologies; and technical analysis of trends affecting the evolution of intercity transportation technologies.

  3. Evaluation of Peptide Nucleic Acid-Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for Identification of Clinically Relevant Mycobacteria in Clinical Specimens and Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Lefmann, Michael; Schweickert, Birgitta; Buchholz, Petra; Göbel, Ulf B.; Ulrichs, Timo; Seiler, Peter; Theegarten, Dirk; Moter, Annette

    2006-01-01

    With fluorescently labeled PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes targeting 16S rRNA, we established a 3-h fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for specific visualization of members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, M. leprae, M. avium, and M. kansasii. Probe specificity was tested against a panel of 25 Mycobacterium spp. and 10 gram-positive organisms. After validation, probes were used to identify 52 mycobacterial culture isolates. Results were compared to conventional genotypic identification with amplification-based methods. All isolates (M. tuberculosis complex, n = 24; M. avium, n = 7; M. kansasii, n = 1) were correctly identified by FISH. In addition, the technique was used successfully for visualization of mycobacteria in biopsies from infected humans or animals. In conclusion, PNA-FISH is a fast and accurate tool for species-specific identification of culture-grown mycobacteria and for direct visualization of these organisms in tissue sections. It may be used successfully for both research and clinical microbiology. PMID:17021106

  4. Identification of proopiomelanocortin-related peptides in the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary in coelacanth: evolutional implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akiyoshi; Yasuda, Akikazu; Sullivan, Craig V; Kawauchi, Hiroshi

    2003-02-15

    The coelacanth fish, genus Latimeria, flourished during the Devonian Period and is considered among the closest living relatives of tetrapods. It may therefore provide important information on the evolution of fishes into tetrapods. However, little is known about the components of the endocrine system in this fish. Here we describe the structural characterization of pituitary hormones derived from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in Latimeria chalumnae. We identified alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), N-Des-acetyl-alpha-MSH, beta-MSH, N-terminal peptide containing gamma-MSH, corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide (CLIP), and N-acetyl-beta-endorpin (END) in an extract from the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, amino acid sequence analysis, and mass spectrometry. The occurrence of three different MSHs and one beta-END indicates that the structural organization of coelacanth POMC is the same as that of lungfish, tetrapods, and primitive ray-finned fish. The coelacanth alpha-MSH is identical to its mammalian counterpart. The coelacanth beta-MSH shows the highest sequence identity with the amphibian counterpart, and gamma-MSH and CLIP show the highest sequence identity with their amphibian and bird counterparts, whereas coelacanth beta-END is most similar to the sturgeon peptide. The coexistence of tetrapod-type and fish-type characteristics in the putative coelacanth POMC molecule reflects the phylogenetic position of this fish. When each hormonal segment was compared between coelacanth, lungfish, and tetrapod, MSH and CLIP of coelacanth were closer to their tetrapod counterparts than those of lungfish, whereas beta-MSH and beta-END of coelacanth are less closely related to their tetrapod counterparts than those of lungfish. gamma-MSH and CLIP may have evolved at a different rate from beta-MSH and beta-END in both the coelacanth and lungfish.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Strategies to Improve the Identification of Pt(II)-Modification Sites on Peptides and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huilin; Snelling, Jonathon R.; Barrow, Mark P.; Scrivens, James H.; Sadler, Peter J.; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2014-07-01

    To further explore the binding chemistry of cisplatin ( cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2) to peptides and also establish mass spectrometry (MS) strategies to quickly assign the platinum-binding sites, a series of peptides with potential cisplatin binding sites (Met(S), His(N), Cys(S), disulfide, carboxyl groups of Asp and Glu, and amine groups of Arg and Lys, were reacted with cisplatin, then analyzed by electron capture dissociation (ECD) in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS). Radical-mediated side-chain losses from the charge-reduced Pt-binding species (such as CH3S• or CH3SH from Met, SH• from Cys, CO2 from Glu or Asp, and NH2 • from amine groups) were found to be characteristic indicators for rapid and unambiguous localization of the Pt-binding sites to certain amino acid residues. The method was then successfully applied to interpret the top-down ECD spectrum of an inter-chain Pt-crosslinked insulin dimer, insulin + Pt(NH3)2 + insulin (>10 kDa). In addition, ion mobility MS shows that Pt binds to multiple sites in Substance P, generating multiple conformers, which can be partially localized by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). Platinum(II) (Pt(II)) was found to coordinate to amine groups of Arg and Lys, but not to disulfide bonds under the conditions used. The coordination of Pt to Arg or Lys appears to arise from the migration of Pt(II) from Met(S) as shown by monitoring the reaction products at different pH values by ECD. No direct binding of cisplatin to amine groups was observed at pH 3 ~ 10 unless Met residues were present in the sequence, but noncovalent interactions between cisplatin hydrolysis and amination [Pt(NH3)4]2+ products and these peptides were found regardless of pH.

  6. Identification of new peptide amides as selective cathepsin L inhibitors: the first step towards selective irreversible inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Torkar, Ana; Lenarčič, Brigita; Lah, Tamara; Dive, Vincent; Devel, Laurent

    2013-05-15

    A small library of peptide amides was designed to profile the cathepsin L active site. Within the cathepsin family of cysteine proteases, the first round of selection was on cathepsin L and cathepsin B, and then selected hits were further evaluated for binding to cathepsin K and cathepsin S. Five highly selective sequences with submicromolar affinities towards cathepsin L were identified. An acyloxymethyl ketone warhead was then attached to these sequences. Although these original irreversible inhibitors inactivate cathepsin L, it appears that the nature of the warhead drastically impact the selectivity profile of the resulting covalent inhibitors.

  7. The identification of novel cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase anchoring proteins using bioinformatic filters and peptide arrays

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, William A.; Hou, Tingjun; Taylor, Susan S.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to specific regions in the cell and place PKA in proximity to its phosphorylation targets. A computational model was created to identify AKAPs that bind to the docking/dimerization domain of the RII alpha isoform of the regulatory subunit of PKA. The model was used to search the entire human proteome, and the top candidates were tested for an interaction using peptide array experiments. Verified interactions include sphingosine kinase interacting protein and retinoic acid-induced protein 16. These interactions highlight new signaling pathways mediated by PKA. PMID:21115539

  8. Identification of a ghrelin-like peptide in two species of shark, Sphyrna lewini and Carcharhinus melanopterus.

    PubMed

    Kawakoshi, Akatsuki; Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Riley, Larry G; Hirano, Tetsuya; Grau, E Gordon; Miyazato, Mikiya; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji

    2007-05-01

    In this study, we identified a ghrelin-like peptide (ghrelin-LP) in two elasmobranchs. The peptide, isoforms and cDNA encoding its precursor were isolated from the stomach of two sharks, the hammerhead (HH) shark (Sphyrna lewini) and the black-tip reef (BTR) shark (Carcharhinus melanopterus). The ghrelin-LP isolated from each shark was found to be 25 amino acids in length and exhibit high sequence homology with each other; only three amino acids were different. As has been shown in tetrapod and teleost fish ghrelins, shark ghrelin-LPs possess two forms that are distinguished by having the third serine residue (Ser) acylated by either octanoic or decanoic acid. The N-terminal four residues (GVSF), known as the active core of ghrelin, are not identical to those of other species (GSSF). Nevertheless, shark ghrelin-LP elevated Ca(2+) levels in CHO cell line expressing the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Unlike teleosts ghrelin's, shark ghrelin-LPs are not amidated at the C-terminus. Messenger RNA of ghrelin-LP in the HH shark was predominantly expressed in the stomach as seen in other species, followed by the brain, intestine, gill, heart and liver. The nucleotide sequence of the ghrelin-LP gene in the HH shark was characterized to compare organization of the ghrelin gene with those in other species. The size of the HH ghrelin-LP gene was 8541 bp, two to ten times larger than that of other species studied to date. The HH ghrelin-LP gene is composed of five exons and four introns, which is the same as ghrelin genes in mammals, chicken and rainbow trout. In conclusion, the shark ghrelin-LPs identified in this study exhibit many characteristics for ghrelin in terms of peptide modifications, GHS-R activation, tissue distribution, and gene organization; however, it is necessary to further clarify their biological properties such as growth hormone-releasing or orexigenic activity before designating these peptides as ghrelin.

  9. Approach/Avoidance Orientations Affect Self-Construal and Identification with In-group

    PubMed Central

    Nussinson, Ravit; Häfner, Michael; Seibt, Beate; Strack, Fritz; Trope, Yaacov

    2011-01-01

    Approach and avoidance are two basic motivational orientations. Their activation influences cognitive and perceptive processes: Previous work suggests that an approach orientation instigates a focus on larger units as compared to avoidance. Study 1 confirms this assumption using a paradigm that more directly taps a person’s tendency to represent objects as belonging to small or large units than prior studies. It was further predicted that the self should also be represented as belonging to larger units, and hence be more interdependent under approach than under avoidance. Study 2 supports this prediction. As a consequence of this focus on belonging to larger units, it was finally predicted that approach results in a stronger identification with one’s in-group than avoidance. Studies 3 and 4 support that prediction. PMID:22844229

  10. De novo sequencing of tryptic peptides sulfonated by 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate for unambiguous protein identification using post-source decay matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping; Nie, Song; Mi, Wei; Wang, Xian-Chun; Liang, Song-Ping

    2004-01-01

    A simple method of solid-phase derivatization and sequencing of tryptic peptides has been developed for rapid and unambiguous identification of spots on two-dimensional gels using post-source decay (PSD) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. The proteolytic digests of proteins are chemically modified by 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate. The derivatization reaction introduces a negative sulfonic acid group at the N-terminus of a peptide, which can increase the efficiency of PSD fragmentation and enable the selective detection of only a single series of fragment ions (y-ions). This chemically assisted method avoids the limitation of high background normally observed in MALDI-PSD spectra, and makes the spectra easier to interpret and facilitates de novo sequencing of internal fragment. The modification reaction is conducted in C(18) microZipTips to decrease the background and to enhance the signal/noise. Derivatization procedures were optimized for MALDI-PSD to increase the structural information and to obtain a complete peptide sequence even in critical cases. The MALDI-PSD mass spectra of two model peptides and their sulfonated derivatives are compared. For some proteins unambiguous identification could be achieved by MALDI-PSD sequencing of derivatized peptides obtained from in-gel digests of phosphorylase B and proteins of hepatic satellite cells (HSC).

  11. Factors Affecting the Identification of Hispanic English Language Learners in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Gail I.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study revealed factors affecting the overrepresentation of Hispanic English language learners (ELLs) in special education. An analysis of the lived experiences of school professionals indicate multiple causes that determine students to be disabled often in violation of state and federal guidelines. Child study…

  12. Identification of an RNA aptamer binding hTERT-derived peptide and inhibiting telomerase activity in MCF7 cells.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Akhil; Bala, Jyoti; Santosh, Baby; Bhaskar, Ashima; Kumar, Suresh; Yadava, Pramod K

    2017-03-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase is an essential rate-limiting component of telomerase complex. hTERT protein in association with other proteins and the human telomerase RNA (hTR) shows telomerase activity, essential for maintaining genomic integrity in proliferating cells. hTERT binds hTR through a decapeptide located in the RID2 (RNA interactive domain 2) domain of N-terminal region. Since hTERT is essential for telomerase activity, inhibitors of hTERT are of great interest as potential anti-cancer agent. We have selected RNA aptamers against a synthetic peptide from the RID2 domain of hTERT by employing in vitro selection protocol (SELEX). The selected RNAs could bind the free peptide, as CD spectra suggested conformational change in aptamer upon RID2 binding. Extracts of cultured breast cancer cells (MCF7) expressing this aptamer showed lower telomerase activity as estimated by TRAP assay. hTERT-binding RNA aptamers hold promise as probable anti-cancer therapeutic agent.

  13. FLEXIQuant: A novel tool for the absolute quantification of proteins, and the simultaneous identification and quantification of potentially modified peptides

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sasha; Springer, Michael; Steen, Judith; Kirschner, Marc W.; Steen, Hanno

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of protein abundance and quantitative assessment of multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) within a single protein are increasingly called for to understand the control of protein activity, particularly in metazoan cells. General methods of wide applicability and precision/accuracy for quantitative estimation of protein post-translational regulation are lacking. Protein mass spectrometry has evolved from a high throughput qualitative technique to a potentially general quantitative tool but there are still serious limitations in dynamic range and coverage. To address some of these limitations we introduce a novel MS-based quantitative strategy, FLEXIQuant, (Full-Length Expressed Stable Isotope-labeled Proteins for Quantification), which can track changes in relative peptide abundances as a function of PTM, and determine absolute quantity of a protein from its lysate. We examined two subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, CDC27 and APC5, as a test of our ability to monitor quantitatively, the PTM status of several peptides over time. We find evidence of differential regulation at different sites, a phenomenon we believe will be very widespread. FLEXIQuant proved itself to be capable of serving as a general quantitative tool. PMID:19344176

  14. Identification and characterization of Cd-induced peptides in Egeria densa (water weed): Putative role in Cd detoxification.

    PubMed

    Malec, Przemysław; Maleva, Maria G; Prasad, M N V; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2009-11-27

    Egeria densa has ability to grow in heavy metal contaminated and polluted bodies of water. Shoots exposed to Cd at concentrations up to 300microM for 7 days showed a pronounced decrease in chlorophyll a and in total protein concentration. Thiol-containing compounds and low-molecular-weight polypeptides were detected in Cd-treated plant extracts by gel filtration chromatography. Two Cd-binding fractions, a thiol-enriched fraction and a non-thiol fraction with a lower molecular weight were identified in extracts by gel filtration. The main fraction of thiol-containing polypeptide, purified by gel filtration and anion-exchange chromatography had a molecular weight of approximately 10kDa. This peptide was characterized by a broad absorption band specific to mercaptide bonds and Cd-sensitive fluorescence emission of aromatic amino acid residues. Our results indicate that cadmium exposure of plants resulted in both a formation of thiol-enriched cadmium complexing peptides and a synthesis of low-molecular-weight metal chelators. The putative role of these compounds in Cd detoxification is discussed.

  15. Biosynthesis of amphi-enterobactin siderophores by Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116: identification of a bifunctional nonribosomal peptide synthetase condensation domain.

    PubMed

    Zane, Hannah K; Naka, Hiroaki; Rosconi, Federico; Sandy, Moriah; Haygood, Margo G; Butler, Alison

    2014-04-16

    The genome of Vibrio harveyi BAA-1116 contains a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster (aebA-F) resembling that for enterobactin, yet enterobactin is not produced. A gene predicted to encode a long-chain fatty acid CoA ligase (FACL), similar to enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of acyl peptides, resides 15 kb away from the putative enterobactin-like biosynthetic gene cluster (aebG). The proximity of this FACL gene to the enterobactin-like synthetase suggested that V. harveyi may produce amphiphilic enterobactin-like siderophores. Extraction of the bacterial cell pellet of V. harveyi led to the isolation and structure determination of a suite of eight amphi-enterobactin siderophores composed of the cyclic lactone of tris-2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-L-serine and acyl-L-serine. The FACL knockout mutant, ΔaebG V. harveyi, and the NRPS knockout mutant, ΔaebF V. harveyi, do not produce amphi-enterobactins. The amphi-enterobactin biosynthetic machinery was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and reconstituted in vitro, demonstrating the condensation domain of AebF has unique activity, catalyzing two distinct condensation reactions.

  16. Identification and grafting of a unique peptide-binding site in the Fab framework of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Joshua M.; Zer, Cindy; Avery, Kendra N.; Bzymek, Krzysztof P.; Horne, David A.; Williams, John C.

    2013-10-07

    Capitalizing on their extraordinary specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most reengineered classes of biological molecules. A major goal in many of these engineering efforts is to add new functionality to the parental mAb, including the addition of cytotoxins and imaging agents for medical applications. Herein, we present a unique peptide-binding site within the central cavity of the fragment antigen binding framework region of the chimeric, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor mAb cetuximab. We demonstrate through diffraction methods, biophysical studies, and sequence analysis that this peptide, a meditope, has moderate affinity for the Fab, is specific to cetuximab (i.e., does not bind to human IgGs), and has no significant effect on antigen binding. We further demonstrate by diffraction studies and biophysical methods that the meditope binding site can be grafted onto the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mAb trastuzumab, and that the antigen binding affinity of the grafted trastuzumab is indistinguishable from the parental mAb. Lastly, we demonstrate a bivalent meditope variant binds specifically and stably to antigen-bearing cells only in the presence of the meditope-enabled mAbs. Collectively, this finding and the subsequent characterization and engineering efforts indicate that this unique interface could serve as a noncovalent “linker” for any meditope-enabled mAb with applications in multiple mAb-based technologies including diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic delivery.

  17. Identification of a Potent and Broad-Spectrum Hepatitis C Virus Fusion Inhibitory Peptide from the E2 Stem Domain

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Xiaojing; Niu, Yuqiang; Cheng, Min; Liu, Xiuying; Feng, Yetong; Zheng, Fuxiang; Fan, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Jin, Qi; Zhong, Jin; Li, Yi-Ping; Yang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope proteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry. However, the fusion mechanisms of HCV remain largely unclear, hampering the development of efficient fusion inhibitors. Here, we developed two cell-based membrane fusion models that allow for screening a peptide library covering the full-length E1 and E2 amino acid sequences. A peptide from the E2 stem domain, named E27, was found to possess the ability to block E1E2-mediated cell-cell fusion and inhibit cell entry of HCV pseudoparticles and infection of cell culture-derived HCV at nanomolar concentrations. E27 demonstrated broad-spectrum inhibition of the major genotypes 1 to 6. A time-of-addition experiment revealed that E27 predominantly functions in the late steps during HCV entry, without influencing the expression and localization of HCV co-receptors. Moreover, we demonstrated that E27 interfered with hetero-dimerization of ectopically expressed E1E2 in cells, and mutational analysis suggested that E27 might target a conserved region in E1. Taken together, our findings provide a novel candidate as well as a strategy for developing potent and broad-spectrum HCV fusion inhibitors, which may complement the current direct-acting antiviral medications for chronic hepatitis C, and shed light on the mechanism of HCV membrane fusion. PMID:27121372

  18. Top-down identification of endogenous peptides up to 9 kDa in cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue by nanoelectrospray quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Möhring, Thomas; Kellmann, Markus; Jürgens, Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2005-02-01

    Recent work on protein and peptide biomarker patterns revealed the difficulties in identifying their molecular components, which is indispensable for validation of the biological context. Cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue are used as sources to discover new biomarkers, e.g. for neurodegenerative diseases. Many of these biomarker candidates are peptides with a molecular mass of <10 kDa. Their identification is favourably achieved with a 'top-down' approach, because this requires less purification and an enzymatic cleavage will often not yield enough specific fragments for successful database searches. Here, we describe an approach using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) as a highly efficient mass spectrometric purification and identification tool after off-line decomplexation of biological samples by liquid chromatography. After initial peptidomic screening with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) TOFMS, the elution behaviour in chromatography and the exact molecular mass were used to locate the same signals in nanoelectrospray measurements. Most of the peaks detected in MALDI-TOFMS could be retrieved in nanoelectrospray quadrupole TOFMS. Suitable collision energies for informative fragment spectra were investigated for different parent ions, charge states and molecular masses. After collision-induced dissociation, the resulting fragmentation data of multiply charged ions can become much more complicated than those derived from tryptic peptide digests. However, the mass accuracy and resolution of quadrupole TOF instruments results in high-quality data suitable for determining peptide sequences. The protein precursor, proteolytic processing and post-translational modifications were identified by automated database searches. This is demonstrated by the exemplary identifications of thymosin beta-4 (5.0 kDa) and NPY (4.3 kDa) from rat hypothalamic tissue and ubiquitin (8.6 kDa) from human cerebrospinal fluid. The high data quality

  19. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, Hilary L; Sullivan, Lucy C; Clements, Craig S; Ely, Lauren K; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-Å resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  20. Identification of nonviable genes affecting touch sensitivity in Caenorhabditis elegans using neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyin; Cuadros, Margarete Diaz; Chalfie, Martin

    2015-01-09

    Caenorhabditis elegans senses gentle touch along the body via six touch receptor neurons. Although genetic screens and microarray analyses have identified several genes needed for touch sensitivity, these methods miss pleiotropic genes that are essential for the viability, movement, or fertility of the animals. We used neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference to screen genes that cause lethality or paralysis when mutated, and we identified 61 such genes affecting touch sensitivity, including five positive controls. We confirmed 18 genes by using available alleles, and further studied one of them, tag-170, now renamed txdc-9. txdc-9 preferentially affects anterior touch response but is needed for tubulin acetylation and microtubule formation in both the anterior and posterior touch receptor neurons. Our results indicate that neuronally enhanced feeding RNA interference screens complement traditional mutageneses by identifying additional nonviable genes needed for specific neuronal functions.

  1. Identification and Characterization of Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone in As-Welded Grade 91 Weldment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2016-12-01

    A metallurgical method is proposed for locating the intercritical heat-affected zone in the as-welded Grade 91 steel. New austenitic grains, preferentially formed along the original prior austenite grain boundaries, are characterized to contain finer M23C6 carbides and higher strain levels than the original prior austenite grains. Kurdjumov-Sachs Group 1 variant pairs, with a low misorientation of 7 deg within a martensitic block, are identified as the dominant variants in the new PAGs.

  2. Novel Molecular Assay for Simultaneous Identification of Neglected Lungworms and Heartworms Affecting Cats

    PubMed Central

    Veronesi, Fabrizia; Frangipane di Regalbono, Antonio; Iorio, Raffaella; Traversa, Donato

    2015-01-01

    Feline lungworms and heartworms are stimulating the interest of the scientific community due to their clinical impact and apparent geographical expansion. Diagnosis of the infections caused by these nematodes is indeed challenging. This report describes a novel multiplex PCR able to identify simultaneously three species of lungworms (Aelurostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior) and heartworms (Angiostrongylus chabaudi) affecting felids. Epidemiological and clinical perspectives are discussed. PMID:26109447

  3. Flavour compounds in tomato fruits: identification of loci and potential pathways affecting volatile composition.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Sandrine; Cin, Valeriano Dal; Fei, Zhangjun; Li, Hua; Bliss, Peter; Taylor, Mark G; Klee, Harry J; Tieman, Denise M

    2009-01-01

    The unique flavour of a tomato fruit is the sum of a complex interaction among sugars, acids, and a large set of volatile compounds. While it is generally acknowledged that the flavour of commercially produced tomatoes is inferior, the biochemical and genetic complexity of the trait has made breeding for improved flavour extremely difficult. The volatiles, in particular, present a major challenge for flavour improvement, being generated from a diverse set of lipid, amino acid, and carotenoid precursors. Very few genes controlling their biosynthesis have been identified. New quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that affect the volatile emissions of red-ripe fruits are described here. A population of introgression lines derived from a cross between the cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum and its wild relative, S. habrochaites, was characterized over multiple seasons and locations. A total of 30 QTLs affecting the emission of one or more volatiles were mapped. The data from this mapping project, combined with previously collected data on an IL population derived from a cross between S. lycopersicum and S. pennellii populations, were used to construct a correlational database. A metabolite tree derived from these data provides new insights into the pathways for the synthesis of several of these volatiles. One QTL is a novel locus affecting fruit carotenoid content on chromosome 2. Volatile emissions from this and other lines indicate that the linear and cyclic apocarotenoid volatiles are probably derived from separate carotenoid pools.

  4. The membrane interaction of amphiphilic model peptides affects phosphatidylserine headgroup and acyl chain order and dynamics. Application of the phospholipid headgroup electrometer concept to phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    de Kroon, A.I.P.M.; Killian, J.A.; de Gier, J.; de Kruijff, B. )

    1991-01-29

    Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 2}H NMR) was used to study the interaction of amphiphilic model peptides with model membranes consisting of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine deuterated either at the {beta}-position of the serine moiety ((2-{sup 2}H)DOPS) or at the 11-position of the acyl chains ((11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS). The peptides are derived from the sequences H-Ala-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and H-Arg-Met-Leu-Trp-Ala-OH and contain a positive charge of +1 or +2 at the amino terminus or one positive charge at each end of the molecule. Upon titration of dispersions of DOPS with the peptides, the divalent peptides show a similar extent of binding to the DOPS bilyers, which is larger than that of the single charged peptide. Under these conditions the values of the quadrupolar splitting of both (2-{sup 2}H)DOPS and (11,11-{sup 2}H{sub 2})DOPS are decreased, indicating that the peptides reduce the order of both the DOPS headgroup and the acyl chains. The extent of the decrease depends on the amount of peptide bound and on the position of the charged moieties in the peptide molecule. Titrations of DOPS with poly(L-lysine){sub 100}, which were included for reasons of comparison, reveal increased {Delta}v{sub q} values. When the peptide-lipid titrations are carried out without applying a freeze-thaw procedure to achieve full equilibration, two-component {sup 2}H NMR spectra occur. The apparently limited accessibility of the lipid to the peptides under these circumstances is discussed in relation to the ability of the peptides to exhibit transbilayer movement. {sup 2}H spin-lattice relaxation time T1 measurements demonstrate a decrease of the rates of motion of both headgroup and acyl chains of DOPS in the presence of the peptides.

  5. The effects of shared peptides on protein quantitation in label-free proteomics by LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Daly, Don S.; Springer, David L.; Miller, John H.

    2008-01-02

    Assessment of differential protein abundance from the observed properties of detected peptides is an essential part of protein profiling based on shotgun proteomics. However, the abundance observed for degenerate peptides may be due to contributions from multiple proteins that are affected differently by a given treatment. Excluding degenerate peptides eliminates this ambiguity but may significantly decrease the number of proteins for which abundance estimates can be obtained. Peptide degeneracy within a family of biologically related proteins does not cause ambiguity if family members have a common response to treatment. Based on this concept, we have developed an approach for including degenerate peptides in the analysis of differential protein abundance in protein profiling. Data from a recent proteomics study of lung tissue from mice exposed to lipopolysaccharide, cigarette smoke, and a combination of these agents is used to illustrate our method. Starting from data where about half of the protein identifications involved degenerate peptides, 82% of the affected proteins were grouped into families, based on FASTA annotation, with closure on peptide degeneracy. In many cases, a common abundance relative to control was sufficient to explain ion-current peak areas for peptides, both unique and degenerate, that identified biologically-related proteins in a peptide-degeneracy closure group. Based on these results, we propose that peptide-degeneracy closure groups provide a way to include abundance data for degenerate-peptides in quantitative protein profiling by high throughput mass spectrometry.

  6. Decline of executive processes affects identification of emotional facial expression in aging.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Beatriz; Fusari, Anna; Fernández-Guinea, Sara; Frank, Ana; Molina, José Antonio; Ellgring, Heiner

    2011-02-01

    The current study examined the hypothesis that old people have a selective deficit in the identification of emotional facial expressions (EFEs) when the task conditions require the mechanism of the central executive. We have used a Dual Task (DT) paradigm to assess the role of visuo-spatial interference of working memory when processing emotional faces under two conditions: DT at encoding and DT at retrieval. Previous studies have revealed a loss of the ability to identify specific emotional facial expressions (EFEs) in old age. This has been consistently associated with a decline of the ability to coordinate the performance of two tasks concurrently. Working memory is usually tested using DT paradigms. Regarding to aging, there is evidence that with DT performance during encoding the costs are substantial. In contrast, the introduction of a secondary task after the primary task (i.e. at retrieval), had less detrimental effects on primary task performance in either younger or older adults. Our results demonstrate that aging is associated with higher DT costs when EFEs are identified concurrently with a visuo-spatial task. In contrast, there was not a significant age-related decline when the two tasks were presented sequentially. This suggests a deficit of the central executive rather than visuo-spatial memory deficits. The current data provide further support for the hypothesis that emotional processing is "top-down" controlled, and suggest that the deficits in emotional processing of old people depend, above all, on specific cognitive impairment.

  7. [Identification of new genes that affect [PSI^(+)] prion toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast].

    PubMed

    Matveenko, A G; Belousov, M V; Bondarev, S A; Moskalenko, S E; Zhouravleva, G A

    2016-01-01

    Translation termination is an important step in gene expression. Its correct processing is governed by eRF1 (Sup45) and eRF3 (Sup35) proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in the corresponding genes, as well as Sup35 aggregation in [PSI^(+)] cells that propagate the prion form of Sup35 lead to inaccurate stop codon recognition and, consequently, nonsense suppression. The presence of stronger prion variants results in the more efficient suppression of nonsense mutations. Previously, we proposed a synthetic lethality test that enables the identification of genes that may influence either translation termination factors or [PSI^(+)] manifestation. This is based on the fact that the combination of sup45 mutations with the strong [PSI^(+)] prion variant in diploids is lethal. In this work, a set of genes that were previously shown to enhance nonsense suppression was analyzed. It was found that ABF1, FKH2, and REB1 overexpression decreased the growth of strains in a prion-dependent manner and, thus, might influence [PSI^(+)] prion toxicity. It was also shown that the synthetic lethality of [PSI^(+)] and sup45 mutations increased with the overexpression of GLN3 and MOT3 that encode Q/N-rich transcription factors. An analysis of the effects of their expression on the transcription of the release factors genes revealed an increase in SUP35 transcription in both cases. Since SUP35 overexpression is known to be toxic in [PSI^(+)] strains, these genes apparently enhance [PSI^(+)] toxicity via the regulation of SUP35 transcription.

  8. Identification of a dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) serotype-specific B-cell epitope and detection of DEN-2-immunized animal serum samples using an epitope-based peptide antigen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Chung; Jung, Mei-Ying; Chiu, Chien-Yu; Chao, Ting-Ting; Lai, Szu-Chia; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Shaio, Men-Fang

    2003-10-01

    In this study, a serotype-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), D(2) 16-1 (Ab4), against dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2) was generated. The specificity of Ab4, which recognized DEN-2 non-structural protein 1, was determined by ELISA, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting analyses. The serotype-specific B-cell epitope of Ab4 was identified further from a random phage-displayed peptide library; selected phage clones reacted specifically with Ab4 and did not react with other mAbs. Immunopositive phage clones displayed a consensus motif, His-Arg/Lys-Leu/Ile, and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the phage-displayed peptide bound specifically to Ab4. The His and Arg residues in this epitope were found to be crucial for peptide binding to Ab4 and binding activity decreased dramatically when these residues were changed to Leu. The epitope-based synthetic peptide not only identified serum samples from DEN-2-immunized mice and rabbits by ELISA but also differentiated clearly between serum samples from DEN-2- and Japanese encephalitis virus-immunized mice. This mAb and its epitope-based peptide antigen will be useful for serologic diagnosis of DEN-2 infection. Furthermore, DEN-2 epitope identification makes it feasible to dissect antibody responses to DEN and to address the role of antibodies in the pathogenesis of primary and secondary DEN-2 infections.

  9. Dual reductive/oxidative electrochemistry/liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: Towards peptide and protein modification, separation and identification.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Frensemeier, Lisa M; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2017-01-06

    A new hyphenated technique based on on-line dual (oxidative and reductive) electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography and high resolution electrospray mass spectrometry is presented. Two liquid streams are combined, with one containing a disulfide, which is reduced to the respective thiol in an electrochemical cell based on a titanium working electrode. The other stream contains phenol, which is electrochemically activated to benzoquinone on a boron-doped diamond working electrode. Upon combination of the two streams, a Michael addition takes places, leading to the covalent coupling of thiol to quinone. In continuous flow, the reaction mixture is transferred into an injection valve and the products are separated by reversed phase liquid chromatography and detected by electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry. Proof of concept is demonstrated for low molecular mass disulfides and peptides, but further optimization will be required in future work to achieve efficient protein labelling.

  10. Identification and grafting of a unique peptide-binding site in the Fab framework of monoclonal antibodies

    DOE PAGES

    Donaldson, Joshua M.; Zer, Cindy; Avery, Kendra N.; ...

    2013-10-07

    Capitalizing on their extraordinary specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the most reengineered classes of biological molecules. A major goal in many of these engineering efforts is to add new functionality to the parental mAb, including the addition of cytotoxins and imaging agents for medical applications. Herein, we present a unique peptide-binding site within the central cavity of the fragment antigen binding framework region of the chimeric, anti-epidermal growth factor receptor mAb cetuximab. We demonstrate through diffraction methods, biophysical studies, and sequence analysis that this peptide, a meditope, has moderate affinity for the Fab, is specific to cetuximabmore » (i.e., does not bind to human IgGs), and has no significant effect on antigen binding. We further demonstrate by diffraction studies and biophysical methods that the meditope binding site can be grafted onto the anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 mAb trastuzumab, and that the antigen binding affinity of the grafted trastuzumab is indistinguishable from the parental mAb. Lastly, we demonstrate a bivalent meditope variant binds specifically and stably to antigen-bearing cells only in the presence of the meditope-enabled mAbs. Collectively, this finding and the subsequent characterization and engineering efforts indicate that this unique interface could serve as a noncovalent “linker” for any meditope-enabled mAb with applications in multiple mAb-based technologies including diagnostics, imaging, and therapeutic delivery.« less

  11. Antiplatelet Aggregation and Antithrombosis Efficiency of Peptides in the Snake Venom of Deinagkistrodon acutus: Isolation, Identification, and Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Xu, Zhenghong; Qian, Chaodong; Jiang, Fusheng; Ding, Xinghong; Ruan, Yeping; Ding, Zhishan; Fan, Yongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Two peptides of Pt-A (Glu-Asn-Trp 429 Da) and Pt-B (Glu-Gln-Trp 443 Da) were isolated from venom liquor of Deinagkistrodon acutus. Their antiplatelet aggregation effects were evaluated with platelet-rich human plasma in vitro; the respective IC50 of Pt-A and Pt-B was 66 μM and 203 μM. Both peptides exhibited protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis in mice. After ADP administration, the paralysis time of different concentration of Pt-A and Pt-B lasted as the following: 80 mg/kg Pt-B (152.8 ± 57.8 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-A (163.5 ± 59.8 s) < 20 mg/kg Pt-A (253.5 ± 74.5 s) < 4 mg/kg clopidogrel (a positive control, 254.5 ± 41.97 s) < 40 mg/kg Pt-B (400.8 ± 35.9 s) < 10 mg/kg Pt-A (422.8 ± 55.4 s), all of which were statistically shorter than the saline treatment (666 ± 28 s). Pulmonary tissue biopsy confirmed that Pt-A and Pt-B prevented the formation of thrombi in the lung. Unlike ADP injection alone, which caused significant reduction of peripheral platelet count, Pt-A treatment prevented the drop of peripheral platelet counts; interestingly, Pt-B could not, even though the same amount of Pt-B also showed protection effects on ADP-induced paralysis and thrombosis. More importantly, intravenous injection of Pt-A and Pt-B did not significantly increase the hemorrhage risks as clopidogrel.

  12. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  13. Characterization of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) gene in chickens: functional analysis, tissue distribution, and identification of its transcript variants.

    PubMed

    Huang, G; Li, J; Fu, H; Yan, Z; Bu, G; He, X; Wang, Y

    2012-07-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) receptor plays a critical role in mediating the biological actions of GLP1 in mammals and fish; however, the gene structure, expression, and functionality of GLP1 receptor (GLP1R) remain largely unknown in birds. In this study, the full-length cDNA of chicken GLP1R (cGLP1R) was first cloned from brain tissue by reverse transcription PCR. The putative cGLP1R is 459 amino acids in length and shares high amino acid sequence identity with that of human (79%), rat (80%), and Xenopus (75%). Using a pGL3-CRE luciferase reporter system, we found that cGLP1R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells could be potently activated by cGLP1 (EC(50), 0.11 nM) but not by other structurally related peptides, indicating that cGLP1R is a functional receptor specific to cGLP1. Interestingly, in addition to identification of the transcript encoding cGLP1R of 459 amino acids, eight transcript variants, which were generated by alternative mRNA splicing and predicted to encode either C-terminally or N-terminally truncated cGLP1Rs, were also identified from chicken brain or testis. In line with this finding, multiple cGLP1R transcripts were detected to be expressed in most chicken tissues examined, including pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, and various brain regions by reverse transcription PCR. Using the dual-luciferase reporter assay system, we further found that the 5'-flanking region of cGLP1R gene displays promoter activities in cultured HepG2 and HEK293 cells, suggesting that it may control cGLP1R gene transcription in chicken tissues, including nonpancreatic tissues. Taken together, the results from the present study establish a molecular basis to investigate the roles of GLP1 in chickens.

  14. Cyclotide Discovery in Gentianales Revisited—Identification and Characterization of Cyclic Cystine-Knot Peptides and Their Phylogenetic Distribution in Rubiaceae Plants

    PubMed Central

    Koehbach, Johannes; Attah, Alfred F.; Berger, Andreas; Hellinger, Roland; Kutchan, Toni M.; Carpenter, Eric J.; Rolf, Megan; Sonibare, Mubo A.; Moody, Jones O.; Ka-Shu Wong, Gane; Dessein, Steven; Greger, Harald; Gruber, Christian W.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotides are a unique class of ribosomally synthesized cysteine-rich miniproteins characterized by a head-to-tail cyclized backbone and three conserved disulfide-bonds in a knotted arrangement. Originally they were discovered in the coffee-family plant Oldenlandia affinis (Rubiaceae) and have since been identified in several species of the violet, cucurbit, pea, potato, and grass families. However, the identification of novel cyclotide-containing plant species still is a major challenge due to the lack of a rapid and accurate analytical workflow in particular for large sampling numbers. As a consequence, their phylogeny in the plant kingdom remains unclear. To gain further insight into the distribution and evolution of plant cyclotides, we analyzed ~300 species of >40 different families, with special emphasis on plants from the order Gentianales. For this purpose, we have developed a refined screening methodology combining chemical analysis of plant extracts and bioinformatic analysis of transcript databases. Using mass spectrometry and transcriptome-mining, we identified nine novel cyclotide-containing species and their related cyclotide precursor genes in the tribe Palicoureeae. The characterization of novel peptide sequences underlines the high variability and plasticity of the cyclotide framework, and a comparison of novel precursor proteins from Carapichea ipecacuanha illustrated their typical cyclotide gene architectures. Phylogenetic analysis of their distribution within the Psychotria alliance revealed cyclotides to be restricted to Palicourea, Margaritopsis, Notopleura, Carapichea, Chassalia, and Geophila. In line with previous reports, our findings confirm cyclotides to be one of the largest peptide families within the plant kingdom and suggest that their total number may exceed tens of thousands. PMID:23897543

  15. Identification of multiple peptides with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities from skin and its secretions of Hylarana taipehensis, Amolops lifanensis, and Amolops granulosus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chao; Hu, Yuhong; Li, Jing; Liu, Yuliang; Li, Sihan; Yan, Keqiang; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Jingze; Wang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Amphibian skin and its secretions contain many kinds of peptides with different bioactivities. In this study, a large number of peptides including antioxidant and antimicrobial peptides were identified from three East Asian frog species Hylarana taipehensis, Amolops lifanensis, and Amolops granulosus. The majority of these peptides were antimicrobial peptides, while eight antioxidant peptides were identified, which included two novel peptides taipehensin-1TP1 (TLIWEFYHQILDEYNKENKG) and taipehensin-2TP1 (CLMARPNYRCKIFKQC). These antioxidant peptides exhibited the ability to scavenge ABTS and/or DPPH free radicals. Moreover, six out of eight antioxidant peptides temporin-TP1, brevinin-1TP1, brevinin-1TP2, brevinin-1TP3, brevinin-1LF1, and palustrin-2GN1 also showed antimicrobial activity.

  16. Identification of candidate genes affecting Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa

    PubMed Central

    Marks, M. David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P.; Omburo, Stephanie N.; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R.; Weiblen, George D.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands. PMID:19581347

  17. Identification of candidate genes affecting Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol biosynthesis in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Marks, M David; Tian, Li; Wenger, Jonathan P; Omburo, Stephanie N; Soto-Fuentes, Wilfredo; He, Ji; Gang, David R; Weiblen, George D; Dixon, Richard A

    2009-01-01

    RNA isolated from the glands of a Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA)-producing strain of Cannabis sativa was used to generate a cDNA library containing over 100 000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). Sequencing of over 2000 clones from the library resulted in the identification of over 1000 unigenes. Candidate genes for almost every step in the biochemical pathways leading from primary metabolites to THCA were identified. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that many of the pathway genes are preferentially expressed in the glands. Hexanoyl-CoA, one of the metabolites required for THCA synthesis, could be made via either de novo fatty acids synthesis or via the breakdown of existing lipids. qPCR analysis supported the de novo pathway. Many of the ESTs encode transcription factors and two putative MYB genes were identified that were preferentially expressed in glands. Given the similarity of the Cannabis MYB genes to those in other species with known functions, these Cannabis MYBs may play roles in regulating gland development and THCA synthesis. Three candidates for the polyketide synthase (PKS) gene responsible for the first committed step in the pathway to THCA were characterized in more detail. One of these was identical to a previously reported chalcone synthase (CHS) and was found to have CHS activity. All three could use malonyl-CoA and hexanoyl-CoA as substrates, including the CHS, but reaction conditions were not identified that allowed for the production of olivetolic acid (the proposed product of the PKS activity needed for THCA synthesis). One of the PKS candidates was highly and specifically expressed in glands (relative to whole leaves) and, on the basis of these expression data, it is proposed to be the most likely PKS responsible for olivetolic acid synthesis in Cannabis glands.

  18. Identification of a Short Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Bovine Lactoferricin for Intracellular Delivery of DNA in Human A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to deliver cargos, including protein, DNA, RNA, and nanomaterials, in fully active forms into live cells. Most of the CPP sequences in use today are based on non-native proteins that may be immunogenic. Here we demonstrate that the L5a CPP (RRWQW) from bovine lactoferricin (LFcin), stably and noncovalently complexed with plasmid DNA and prepared at an optimal nitrogen/phosphate ratio of 12, is able to efficiently enter into human lung cancer A549 cells. The L5a CPP delivered a plasmid containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence that was subsequently expressed in cells, as revealed by real-time PCR and fluorescent microscopy at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Treatment with calcium chloride increased the level of gene expression, without affecting CPP-mediated transfection efficiency. Zeta-potential analysis revealed that positively electrostatic interactions of CPP/DNA complexes correlated with CPP-mediated transport. The L5a and L5a/DNA complexes were not cytotoxic. This biomimetic LFcin L5a represents one of the shortest effective CPPs and could be a promising lead peptide with less immunogenic for DNA delivery in gene therapy.

  19. Cardiac tamponade as an independent condition affecting the relationship between the plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Minai, Kosuke; Komukai, Kimiaki; Arase, Satoshi; Nagoshi, Tomohisa; Matsuo, Seiichiro; Ogawa, Kazuo; Kayama, Yosuke; Inada, Keiichi; Tanigawa, Shin-Ichi; Takemoto, Tomoyuki; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Date, Taro; Ogawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2013-07-01

    Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is finely regulated by the cardiac function and several extracardiac factors. Therefore, the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and the severity of heart failure sometimes seems inconsistent. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the plasma BNP levels in patients with cardiac tamponade and their changes after pericardial drainage. This study included 14 patients with cardiac tamponade who underwent pericardiocentesis. The cardiac tamponade was due to malignant diseases in 13 patients and uremia in 1 patient. The plasma BNP levels were measured before and 24-48 h after drainage. Although the patients reported severe symptoms of heart failure, their plasma BNP levels were only 71.2 ± 11.1 pg/ml before drainage. After appropriate drainage, the plasma BNP levels increased to 186.0 ± 22.5 pg/ml, which was significantly higher than that before drainage (P = 0.0002). In patients with cardiac tamponade, the plasma BNP levels were low, probably because of impaired ventricular stretching, and the levels significantly increased in response to the primary condition after drainage. This study demonstrates an additional condition that affects the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and cardiac function. If inconsistency is seen in the relationship between the plasma BNP levels and clinical signs of heart failure, the presence of cardiac tamponade should therefore be considered.

  20. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.